Science.gov

Sample records for activity test mat

  1. Applicability of the Monocyte Activation Test (MAT) for hyperimmune sera in the routine of the quality control laboratory: Comparison with the Rabbit Pyrogen Test (RPT).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cristiane Caldeira; Presgrave, Octavio Augusto França; Hartung, Thomas; de Moraes, Aurea Maria Lage; Delgado, Isabella Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Pyrogen tests are safety assays performed during the routine quality control of injectable products required by regulatory agencies. Currently, there are three available testing possibilities: 1) the Rabbit Pyrogen Test (RPT); 2) the Bacterial Endotoxin Test (BET); and 3) test systems using human whole-blood or monocytes, termed Monocyte Activation Test (MAT). Although BET is often considered as a replacement for the animal test, it is unable to detect pyrogens other than endotoxin. MAT is based on the human fever reaction and thus, most closely reflects the human response. The aim of this study was to conduct a parallel comparison of the RPT and MAT for hyperimmune sera (HS) batches analyzed during the routine of a quality control laboratory. MAT was performed in the same 43 batches of HS previously tested using RPT. The results showed that MAT presented 100% sensitivity and approximately 85% specificity as compared to RPT, i.e., no false-negative results were obtained. Few suspicious samples, which were negative in the RPT after retesting, provided divergent positive results suggesting a lower limit of detection of MAT. MAT is thus able to detect contaminants in biological products such as HS batches. PMID:26688320

  2. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections. PMID:24920895

  3. The role of simulation in the development and flight test of the HiMAT vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. B.; Schilling, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Real time simulations have been essential in the flight test program of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle at NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility. The HiMAT project makes extensive use of simulations in design, development, and qualification for flight, pilot training, and flight planning. Four distinct simulations, each with varying amounts of hardware in the loop, were developed for the HiMAT project. The use of simulations in detecting anomalous behavior of the flight software and hardware at the various stages of development, verification, and validation has been the key to flight qualification of the HiMAT vehicle.

  4. Hypersaline cyanobacterial mats as indicators of elevated tropical hurricane activity and associated climate change.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Steppe, Timothy F; Buchan, Kenneth C; Potts, Malcolm

    2003-03-01

    The Atlantic hurricanes of 1999 caused widespread environmental damage throughout the Caribbean and US mid-Atlantic coastal regions. However, these storms also proved beneficial to certain microbial habitats; specifically, cyanobacteria-dominated mats. Modern mats represent the oldest known biological communities on earth, stromatolites. Contemporary mats are dominant biological communities in the hypersaline Bahamian lakes along the Atlantic hurricane track. We examined the impacts of varying levels of hypersalinity on 2 processes controlling mat growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, in Salt Pond, San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Hypersalinity (> 5 times seawater salinity) proved highly inhibitory to these processes. Freshwater input from Hurricane Floyd and other large storms alleviated this salt-inhibition. A predicted 10 to 40 year increase in Atlantic hurricane activity accompanied by more frequent "freshening" events will enhance mat productivity, CO2 sequestration and nutrient cycling. Cyanobacterial mats are sensitive short- and long-term indicators of climatic and ecological changes impacting these and other waterstressed environments.

  5. Silver ions/ovalbumin films layer-by-layer self-assembled polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous mats and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Rukun; Yan, Jinjiao; Xu, Shasha; Wang, Yuntao; Ye, Ting; Chang, Jing; Deng, Hongbing; Li, Bin

    2013-08-01

    The CN groups of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) can strongly adsorb silver ions. The possibility of using this attraction as a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly driving force was investigated. Firstly, the surface of the PAN nanofibrous mats was modified by silver ions to make sure it was positively charged. Then oppositely charged ovalbumin (OVA) and silver ions in aqueous media were alternatively deposited onto the surface of the obtained composite mats by layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. The morphology of the LBL films coating mats was observed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The deposition of silver ions and OVA was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). The thermal degradation properties were investigated by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Besides these, the cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of the prepared mats were studied via flow cytometry (FCM) and inhibition zone test, respectively. The results showed that the composite mats after LBL self-assembly processing exhibited improved thermal stability, slightly decreased cytotoxicity, and excellent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coil and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23563300

  6. A Psychometric Analysis of the Mat-Sea-Cal Oral Proficiency Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Vincent

    The Mat-Sea-Cal Oral Proficiency Tests are a series of comparable grammatical structure tests. They have been developed in six languages: English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, Ilokano and Tagalog. Their purpose is to identify linguistic skills and deficiencies of primary school children grades K through 4. This research reported on the…

  7. Community Analysis of Dynamic Microbial Mat Communities from Actively Erupting Seamounts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R.; Tebo, B.; Moyer, C. L.

    2009-12-01

    The actively erupting deep-sea volcanoes NW Rota-1 and W Mata have multiple diffuse low-temperature (Tmax= 20-30 degrees) vent sites which harbor dense populations of microbial mat communities driven by chemoautotrophy. These microbial mats were often composed of white filamentous bacteria growing in close proximity to focused hydrothermal flow. Eight microbial mats were sampled from discrete hydrothermal vents on NW Rota-1 and W Mata volcanoes in 2009. The microbial mat communities were analyzed with quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) community fingerprinting. All of the sampled microbial mats were dominated by the class Epsilonproteobacteria. The microbial mat at Iceberg Vent contained 13.5% Archaea, while all other microbial mats contained less than 1% Archaea. Bacterial community fingerprints from NW Rota-1 and W Mata formed distinct clusters that were well separated from clusters formed by hydrothermal communities from Axial and Eifuku Seamounts that were also dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria. Iceberg vent communities from NW Rota-1 have transitioned from being dominated by Caminibacter phylotypes to Sulfuimonas group phylotypes since 2004. These data suggest that microbial communities found on actively erupting volcanoes are geographically distinct and provide a natural laboratory to study microbial colonization and community succession at hydrothermal systems.

  8. Is the microagglutination test (MAT) good for predicting the infecting serogroup for leptospirosis in Brazil?

    PubMed

    Blanco, Roberta Morozetti; dos Santos, Luis Fernando; Galloway, Renee Lynn; Romero, Eliete Caló

    2016-02-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection caused by pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira spp. Knowledge of the prevalent serovars and their maintenance hosts is essential to understand the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of serology by the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) to predict the serogroups compared with results of identification of leptospires in São Paulo, Brazil. MAT correctly assigned the serogroup of the infecting isolate in 49/52 cases (94.23%). The serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae was the predominant serogroup (88.46%). This study showed the usefulness of the MAT to correctly identify the infecting serogroup with a good overall agreement between the serologically-identified infecting serogroup and by identification of the isolate and can be used in epidemiological surveys in São Paulo. However, it should be complemented by the identification of Leptospira isolates. PMID:26851592

  9. The Process of Customization of the "Metropolitan Achievement Test" (MAT-6) in Mathematics for New York City Public School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taleporos, Betsy; And Others

    In the spring of 1986, New York City began using the Metropolitan Achievement Test-6 (MAT-6) series to assess achievement in mathematics as part of a continuing end-of-year testing program. During the first two years of the program, appropriate levels of the shelf version of MAT-6 (Forms L and M) were administered to second through eighth graders.…

  10. Nitrogenase activity and nifH expression in a marine intertidal microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Steppe, T F; Paerl, H W

    2005-02-01

    N(2) fixation, diazotrophic community composition, and organisms actively expressing genes for N(2) fixation were examined over at 3-year period (1997-1999) for intertidal microbial mats on a sand flat located in the Rachel Carson National Estuarine Research Reserve (RCNERR) (Beaufort, NC, USA). Specifically, diel variations of N(2) fixation in the mats from the RCNERR were examined. Three distinct diel patterns of nitrogenase activity (NA) were observed. NA responses to short-term inhibitions of photosynthesis corresponded to one of the three patterns. High rates of NA were observed during peak O(2) production periods for diel experiments during summer months. Different types of NA diel variations correspond to different stages of mat development. Chloramphenicol treatments indicated that the mechanism of protein synthesis supporting NA changed throughout the day. Analysis of mat DNA and RNA gave further evidence suggesting that in addition to cyanobacteria, other functional groups were responsible for the NA observed in the RCNERR mats. The role of microbial diversity in the N(2) fixation dynamics of these mats is discussed.

  11. Multiarray on a test strip (MATS): rapid multiplex immunodetection of priority potato pathogens.

    PubMed

    Safenkova, Irina V; Pankratova, Galina K; Zaitsev, Ilya A; Varitsev, Yuri A; Vengerov, Yuri Y; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2016-09-01

    Multiarray on a test strip (MATS) was developed for the detection of eight important potato pathogens. The proposed assay combines the rapidity of immunochromatography with the high throughput of array techniques. The test zone of the immunochromatographic strip comprises ordered rows of spots containing antibodies specific for different potato pathogens. The assay benefits from the simplicity of immunochromatography; colored immune complexes form at the corresponding spots within the test zone. The presence and intensity of the coloration are used for identification of the target pathogens. The MATS was applied to the simultaneous detection of eight priority potato pathogens, characterized by the following limits of detection: 1 ng/mL for potato virus X and the ordinary type of potato virus Y, 10 ng/mL for potato virus M, 20 ng/mL for potato leaf roll virus, 40 ng/mL for necrotic-type potato virus Y, 100 ng/mL for potato virus S, 300 ng/mL for potato virus A, and 10(4) cells/mL for Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. Analysis time was 15 min. The observed sensitivity of the MATS was comparable to the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The developed technique was tested on potato leaf extracts, and its efficiency for on-site control of the pathogens was confirmed in 100 % by commercial LFIA test strips. Graphical abstract Location of binding zones in the developed multiarray on a test strip (MATS) for simultaneous detection of eight pathogens. PMID:27007732

  12. A Thermal Physiological Comparison of Two HazMat Protective Ensembles With and Without Active Convective Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca; Carbo, Jorge; Luna, Bernadette; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1998-01-01

    Wearing impermeable garments for hazardous materials clean up can often present a health and safety problem for the wearer. Even short duration clean up activities can produce heat stress injuries in hazardous materials workers. It was hypothesized that an internal cooling system might increase worker productivity and decrease likelihood of heat stress injuries in typical HazMat operations. Two HazMat protective ensembles were compared during treadmill exercise. The different ensembles were created using two different suits: a Trelleborg VPS suit representative of current HazMat suits and a prototype suit developed by NASA engineers. The two life support systems used were a current technology Interspiro Spirolite breathing apparatus and a liquid air breathing system that also provided convective cooling. Twelve local members of a HazMat team served as test subjects. They were fully instrumented to allow a complete physiological comparison of their thermal responses to the different ensembles. Results showed that cooling from the liquid air system significantly decreased thermal stress. The results of the subjective evaluations of new design features in the prototype suit were also highly favorable. Incorporation of these new design features could lead to significant operational advantages in the future.

  13. The impact of long-term hydrocarbon exposure on the structure, activity, and biogeochemical functioning of microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Aubé, Johanne; Senin, Pavel; Pringault, Olivier; Bonin, Patricia; Deflandre, Bruno; Bouchez, Olivier; Bru, Noëlle; Biritxinaga-Etchart, Edurne; Klopp, Christophe; Guyoneaud, Rémy; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol

    2016-10-15

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are metabolically structured systems driven by solar light. They are ubiquitous and can grow in hydrocarbon-polluted sites. Our aim is to determine the impact of chronic hydrocarbon contamination on the structure, activity, and functioning of a microbial mat. We compared it to an uncontaminated mat harboring similar geochemical characteristics. The mats were sampled in spring and fall for 2years. Seasonal variations were observed for the reference mat: sulfur cycle-related bacteria dominated spring samples, while Cyanobacteria dominated in autumn. The contaminated mat showed minor seasonal variation; a progressive increase of Cyanobacteria was noticed, indicating a perturbation of the classical seasonal behavior. Hydrocarbon content was the main factor explaining the differences in the microbial community structure; however, hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria were among rare or transient Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in the contaminated mat. We suggest that in long-term contaminated systems, hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria cannot be considered a sentinel of contamination. PMID:27449831

  14. The impact of long-term hydrocarbon exposure on the structure, activity, and biogeochemical functioning of microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Aubé, Johanne; Senin, Pavel; Pringault, Olivier; Bonin, Patricia; Deflandre, Bruno; Bouchez, Olivier; Bru, Noëlle; Biritxinaga-Etchart, Edurne; Klopp, Christophe; Guyoneaud, Rémy; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol

    2016-10-15

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are metabolically structured systems driven by solar light. They are ubiquitous and can grow in hydrocarbon-polluted sites. Our aim is to determine the impact of chronic hydrocarbon contamination on the structure, activity, and functioning of a microbial mat. We compared it to an uncontaminated mat harboring similar geochemical characteristics. The mats were sampled in spring and fall for 2years. Seasonal variations were observed for the reference mat: sulfur cycle-related bacteria dominated spring samples, while Cyanobacteria dominated in autumn. The contaminated mat showed minor seasonal variation; a progressive increase of Cyanobacteria was noticed, indicating a perturbation of the classical seasonal behavior. Hydrocarbon content was the main factor explaining the differences in the microbial community structure; however, hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria were among rare or transient Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in the contaminated mat. We suggest that in long-term contaminated systems, hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria cannot be considered a sentinel of contamination.

  15. Flight control systems development and flight test experience with the HiMAT research vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Earls, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    Two highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted vehicles were flown a total of 26 flights. These subscale vehicles were of advanced aerodynamic configuration with advanced technology concepts such as composite and metallic structures, digital integrated propulsion control, and ground (primary) and airborne (backup) relaxed static stability, digital fly-by-wire control systems. Extensive systems development, checkout, and flight qualification were required to conduct the flight test program. The design maneuver goal was to achieve a sustained 8-g turn at Mach 0.9 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. This goal was achieved, along with the acquisition of high-quality flight data at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers. Control systems were modified in a variety of ways using the flight-determined aerodynamic characteristics. The HiMAT program was successfully completed with approximately 11 hours of total flight time.

  16. Microelectrode studies of interstitial water chemistry and photosynthetic activity in a hot spring microbial mat

    SciTech Connect

    Revsbech, N.P.; Ward, D.M.

    1984-08-01

    Microelectrodes were used to measure oxygen, pH, and oxygenic photosynthetic activity in a hot spring microbial mat (Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park), where the cyanobacterium Synechoccus lividus and the filamentous bacteria Chloroflexus aurantiacus are the only known phototrophs. The data showed very high biological activities in the topmost layers of the microbial mat, resulting in extreme values for oxygen and pH. At a 1-mm depth at a 55 C site, oxygen and pH reached 900 micro M and 9.4, respectively, just after solar noon, whereas anoxic conditions with pH of 7.2 were measured before sunrise. Although diurnal changes between these extremes occurred over hours during a diurnal cycle microbial activity was great enough to give the same response in 1 to 2 mm after artificial shading. Oxygenic photosynthesis was confined to a 0.5- to 1.1-mm layer at sites with temperatures at or above about 50 C, with maximum activities in the 55 to 60 C region. The data suggest that S. lividus is the dominant primary producer of the mat. 30 references, 5 figures.

  17. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Ha, Phuc T; Renslow, Ryan S; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N; Lindemann, Stephen R; Fredrickson, James K; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  18. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Ha, Phuc T; Renslow, Ryan S; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N; Lindemann, Stephen R; Fredrickson, James K; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  19. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  20. Testing the utility of matK and ITS DNA regions for discrimination of Allium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Allium L. has been mainly based on the nucleotide sequences of ITS region. In 2009 matK and rbcL were accepted as a two-locus DNA barcode to classify plant species by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) Plant Working Group. MatK region has been ...

  1. Efficacy of serum samples stored on filter paper for the detection of antibody to Leptospira spp. by microagglutination test (MAT).

    PubMed

    Blanco, R M; Romero, E C

    2012-12-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microagglutination test (MAT) results in serum samples dried on filter paper and stored at different temperatures during 1day, 7days, 30days and 1year to determine the stability of sera antibody against leptospires. Serum samples collected onto filter paper for the detection of leptospires antibody was compared with MAT in a study of 300 serum samples from patients with suspected leptospirosis. Among 300 fresh serum samples analyzed by MAT 156 (52%) were positive and 144 (48%) negative. All the negative fresh serum samples were negative when dried on filter paper (specificity 100%). The sensitivity of MAT performed on dried serum samples was 100%. Storage on filter paper at room temperature and at 4°C for 1 and 7days did not affect the MAT titers. For up to 7days, 98.72% of dried serum samples had titers identical to those of the corresponding serum samples, and 1.18% of dried serum samples showed 1 dilution of difference. After a storage period of one month a prozone phenomenon was observed. After a storage period of one year all serum samples were negative. Serum samples collected onto filter paper are a convenient source of antibodies for serological diagnosis and epidemiological surveys. PMID:22960422

  2. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-03

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. In conclusion, these data suggested

  3. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    DOE PAGES

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-03

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system]more » and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. In conclusion, these data suggested that

  4. Identification of a novel cyanobacterial group as active diazotrophs in a coastal microbial mat using NanoSIMS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Bebout, Brad M; Hoehler, Tori M; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Spormann, Alfred M; Weber, Peter K; Singer, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    N2 fixation is a key process in photosynthetic microbial mats to support the nitrogen demands associated with primary production. Despite its importance, groups that actively fix N2 and contribute to the input of organic N in these ecosystems still remain largely unclear. To investigate the active diazotrophic community in microbial mats from the Elkhorn Slough estuary, Monterey Bay, CA, USA, we conducted an extensive combined approach, including biogeochemical, molecular and high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses. Detailed analysis of dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) transcript clone libraries from mat samples that fixed N2 at night indicated that cyanobacterial nifH transcripts were abundant and formed a novel monophyletic lineage. Independent NanoSIMS analysis of 15N2-incubated samples revealed significant incorporation of 15N into small, non-heterocystous cyanobacterial filaments. Mat-derived enrichment cultures yielded a unicyanobacterial culture with similar filaments (named Elkhorn Slough Filamentous Cyanobacterium-1 (ESFC-1)) that contained nifH gene sequences grouping with the novel cyanobacterial lineage identified in the transcript clone libraries, displaying up to 100% amino-acid sequence identity. The 16S rRNA gene sequence recovered from this enrichment allowed for the identification of related sequences from Elkhorn Slough mats and revealed great sequence diversity in this cluster. Furthermore, by combining 15N2 tracer experiments, fluorescence in situ hybridization and NanoSIMS, in situ N2 fixation activity by the novel ESFC-1 group was demonstrated, suggesting that this group may be the most active cyanobacterial diazotroph in the Elkhorn Slough mat. Pyrotag sequences affiliated with ESFC-1 were recovered from mat samples throughout 2009, demonstrating the prevalence of this group. This work illustrates that combining standard and single-cell analyses can link phylogeny and function to identify previously unknown key

  5. Electrospun magnetic nanofibre mats - A new bondable biomaterial using remotely activated magnetic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Leung, Victor; Yuqin Wan, Lynn; Dutz, Silvio; Ko, Frank K.; Häfeli, Urs O.

    2015-04-01

    A solvothermal process was adopted to produce hydrophilic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles which were subsequently emulsified with a chloroform/methanol (70/30 v/v) solution of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and then electrospun into a 0.2 mm thick PCL mat. The magnetic heating of the mats at a field amplitude of 25 kA/m and frequency of 400 kHz exhibited promising efficiency for magnetic hyperthermia, with a specific absorption rate of about 40 W/g for the magnetic mat. The produced heat was used to melt the magnetic mat onto the surrounding non-magnetic polymer mat from within, without destroying the nanostructure of the non-magnetic polymer more than 0.5 mm away. Magnetic nanofibre mats might thus be useful for internal heat sealing applications, and potentially also for thermotherapy.

  6. Testing the Reliability and Sensitivity of Foraminiferal Transfer Functions Based on the Modern Analog Technique (MAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lac, D.; Cullen, J. L.; Martin, A.

    2004-05-01

    Quantitative estimates of past sea-surface temperatures (SST's) based on surface sediment calibration data sets of planktic foraminifers and modern SST's have been widely used in the interpretation and modeling of past climates. One widely used approach, The Modern Analog Techniques (MAT) relies on comparing a downcore sample to the Brown University modern Global Data Base of 1265 seabed samples and choosing either the10 or 5 most similar modern samples using the squared-chord distance similarity metric. The SST's above the best modern analogs are then averaged to produce the downcore SST estimate. We have chosen a set of 8 modern sea-bed samples from the Global Data Base with a wide range of foraminiferal compositions; 3 from the Pacific, 3 from the Atlantic, and 2 from the Indian Ocean and have generated duplicate foraminiferal census counts from sets of 5-6 random splits from each of our 8 samples so that we can: 1. compare the degree of similarity between duplicate samples so that we can evaluate the differences in dissimilarity values that can be attributed to counting error and begin to better understand the sensitivity of the chosen dissimilarity measures to ecologically produced differences in foraminiferal composition, 2. evaluate differences in how the duplicate samples choose analogs from the Global Data Base, and 3. test the sensitivity of the MAT's ability to accurately and precisely predict SST's using analogs from the Global Data Base for each set of duplicate samples. Comparison of the dissimilarity coefficients within each set of duplicate samples produces maximum dissimilarity values that range from 0.03 to 0.14. Both mean and maximum dissimilarities are greatest in sample sets from the low latitudes. The 5 best analogs chosen from the Global Data Base for samples within each set of duplicates generate average dissimilarities that range from 0.01 to 0.04. However, between a total of 8 and 12 different modern analogs were needed to find the 5 best

  7. Wound-dressing materials with antibacterial activity from electrospun polyurethane-dextran nanofiber mats containing ciprofloxacin HCl.

    PubMed

    Unnithan, Afeesh R; Barakat, Nasser A M; Pichiah, P B Tirupathi; Gnanasekaran, Gopalsamy; Nirmala, R; Cha, Youn-Soo; Jung, Che-Hun; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Kim, Hak Yong

    2012-11-01

    Dextran is a versatile biomacromolecule for preparing electrospun nanofibrous membranes by blending with either water-soluble bioactive agents or hydrophobic biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications. In this study, an antibacterial electrospun scaffold was prepared by electrospinning of a solution composed of dextran, polyurethane (PU) and ciprofloxacin HCl (CipHCl) drug. The obtained nanofiber mats have good morphology. The mats were characterized by various analytical techniques. The interaction parameters between fibroblasts and the PU-dextran and PU-dextran-drug scaffolds such as viability, proliferation, and attachment were investigated. The results indicated that the cells interacted favorably with the scaffolds especially the drug-containing one. Moreover, the composite mat showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Overall, our results conclude that the introduced scaffold might be an ideal biomaterial for wound dressing applications.

  8. Temporal study of acetaminophen (APAP) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) effects on subcellular hepatic SAMe levels and methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) expression and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Hogsett, Amy; Williams, Tierra; Valentovic, Monica

    2010-08-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of drug induced liver failure in the United States. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) is protective for APAP hepatic toxicity. SAMe is critical for glutathione synthesis and transmethylation of nucleic acids, proteins and phospholipids which would facilitate recovery from APAP toxicity. SAMe is synthesized in cells through the action of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). This study tested the hypothesis that total hepatic and subcellular SAMe levels are decreased by APAP toxicity. Studies further examined MAT expression and activity in response to APAP toxicity. Male C57BL/6 mice (16-22 g) were treated with vehicle (Veh; water 15 ml/kg ip injections), 250 mg/kg APAP (15 ml/kg, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg) or SAMe administered 1 h after APAP injection (SAMe and SAMe + APAP). Hepatic tissue was collected 2, 4, and 6 h after APAP administration. Levels of SAMe and its metabolite S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) were determined by HPLC analysis. MAT expression was examined by Western blot. MAT activity was determined by fluorescence assay. Total liver SAMe levels were depressed at 4 h by APAP overdose, but not at 2 or 6 h. APAP depressed mitochondrial SAMe levels at 4 and 6 h relative to the Veh group. In the nucleus, levels of SAMe were depressed below detectable limits 4 h following APAP administration. SAMe administration following APAP (SAMe + APAP) prevented APAP associated decline in mitochondrial and nuclear SAMe levels. In conclusion, the maintenance of SAMe may provide benefit in preventing damage associated with APAP toxicity.

  9. Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activities in Cyanobacterial Mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas; Ramsing, Niels B.; Habicht, Kirsten; Fukui, Manabu; Küver, Jan; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Cohen, Yehuda

    1998-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 106 and 107 cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml−1 and showed sulfate reduction rates between 1,000 and 2,200 nmol ml−1 day−1, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 104 to 106 cells ml−1. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO2 from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO2 demand of the mat. PMID:9687455

  10. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, A.; Ramsing, N.B.; Habicht, K.; Kuever, J.; Joergensen, B.B.; Fukui, Manabu; Cohen, Y.

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 7} cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} cells ml{sup {minus}1}. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO{sub 2} from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO{sub 2} demand of the mat.

  11. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of solar lake (Sinai, Egypt).

    PubMed

    Teske, A; Ramsing, N B; Habicht, K; Fukui, M; Küver, J; Jørgensen, B B; Cohen, Y

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10(6) and 10(7) cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml-1 and showed sulfate reduction rates between 1,000 and 2, 200 nmol ml-1 day-1, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10(4) to 10(6) cells ml-1. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO2 from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO2 demand of the mat. PMID:9687455

  12. Electrospun chitosan-based nanofiber mats loaded with Garcinia mangostana extracts.

    PubMed

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Sukma, Monrudee; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2013-08-16

    The aim of this study was to prepare electrospun chitosan-based nanofiber mats and to incorporate the fruit hull of Garcinia mangostana (GM) extracts into the mats. Chitosan-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid/polyvinyl alcohol (CS-EDTA/PVA) was selected as the polymers. The GM extracts with 1, 2 and 3 wt% α-mangostin were incorporated into the CS-EDTA/PVA solution and electrospun to obtain nanofibers. The morphology and diameters of the mats were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical and swelling properties were investigated. The amount of GM extracts was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The antioxidative activity, antibacterial activity, extract release and stability of the mats were evaluated. In vivo wound healing tests were also performed in Wistar rats. The results indicated that the diameters of the fibers were on the nanoscale and that no crystals of the extract were observed in the mats at any concentration. The mats provided suitable tensile strength and swelling properties. All of the mats exhibited antioxidant and antibacterial activity. During the wound healing test, the mats accelerated the rate of healing when compared to the control (gauze-covered). The mats maintained 90% of their content of α-mangostin for 3 months. In conclusion, the chitosan-based nanofiber mats loaded with GM extracts were successfully prepared using the electrospinning method. These nanofiber mats loaded with GM extracts may provide a good alternative for accelerating wound healing.

  13. Electrospun chitosan-based nanofiber mats loaded with Garcinia mangostana extracts.

    PubMed

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Sukma, Monrudee; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2013-08-16

    The aim of this study was to prepare electrospun chitosan-based nanofiber mats and to incorporate the fruit hull of Garcinia mangostana (GM) extracts into the mats. Chitosan-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid/polyvinyl alcohol (CS-EDTA/PVA) was selected as the polymers. The GM extracts with 1, 2 and 3 wt% α-mangostin were incorporated into the CS-EDTA/PVA solution and electrospun to obtain nanofibers. The morphology and diameters of the mats were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical and swelling properties were investigated. The amount of GM extracts was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The antioxidative activity, antibacterial activity, extract release and stability of the mats were evaluated. In vivo wound healing tests were also performed in Wistar rats. The results indicated that the diameters of the fibers were on the nanoscale and that no crystals of the extract were observed in the mats at any concentration. The mats provided suitable tensile strength and swelling properties. All of the mats exhibited antioxidant and antibacterial activity. During the wound healing test, the mats accelerated the rate of healing when compared to the control (gauze-covered). The mats maintained 90% of their content of α-mangostin for 3 months. In conclusion, the chitosan-based nanofiber mats loaded with GM extracts were successfully prepared using the electrospinning method. These nanofiber mats loaded with GM extracts may provide a good alternative for accelerating wound healing. PMID:23680732

  14. Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Chung

    1993-10-01

    According to the EPA-recommended closure cap design a waste site can either be covered with a single layer cap made of 36 inches of compacted soil (clay) or with a multilayer cap consisting of an upper vegetative layer underlain by a drainage layer over a low permeability layer. The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four-foot loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected. Currently, detailed soil test data and cavity configuration data are not available to validate the mathematical model. Since the configuration of the cavities created in the testing process is irregular and unpredictable, two extreme configurations are considered in this mathematical model, viz., the circular cavity and the infinitely long trench in the sand underneath the cap. This approach will provide bounds for the testing results.

  15. Gelatin blending and sonication of chitosan nanofiber mats produce synergistic effects on hemostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Jong-Il; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To improve the hemostatic function of chitosan nanofiber mats, we studied the synergetic effects of gelatin blending and porosity control. Gelatin-blended-chitosan (Chi-Gel) nanofiber mats were evaluated with respect to surface morphology, mechanical properties and wettability, and functionally tested in a blood clotting study. The blood clotting efficiency of Chi-Gel nanofiber mats using rabbit whole blood in vitro was superior to that of chitosan nanofibers. Moreover, Chi-Gel nanofiber mats with enlarged porosity, produced by ultra-sonication, showed improved blood clotting efficiency, cell viability and cell infiltration compared with non-sonicated Chi-Gel nanofiber mats. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy revealed a richer density of platelets on sonicated nanofiber mats than on non-sonicated nanofiber mats after 3 min of blood clotting. The proliferation of human dermal fibroblast cells on sonicated Chi-Gel nanofiber mats using the DNA assay was higher than that on non-sonicated chitosan nanofiber mats after 7 days of culture. Confocal z-stack images showed that sonicated Chi-Gel nanofiber mats with high porosity supported active cell migration and infiltration into the 3-dimensional nanofiber mats. These results suggest that hydrophilic gelatin blending and sonication of chitosan nanofiber mats yields synergistic effects that not only improve hemostatic function but also promote wound repair.

  16. Flexible N-doped TiO2/C ultrafine fiber mat and its photocatalytic activity under simulated sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Yingde; Lei, Yongpeng; Wang, Bing; Han, Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Flexible N-doped TiO2/C ultrafine fiber (NTCf) mat has been produced via electrospinning and subsequent heat treatment, analyzed by a combination of characterizations. The nitrogen content can be modulated by the addition of urea. The composite fiber with mean diameter of around 500 nm exhibits outstanding mechanical flexibility. The TiO2 in the fiber obtained at 700 °C is anatase with a mass ratio of 23 wt%. In the photodegradation experiment under simulated sunlight, the as-prepared flexible mat demonstrates remarkable efficiency in the degradation of methylene blue (MB) due to the well-proportioned distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles and the improvement of charge transfer process. The nitrogen species in TiO2 lattice and the nitrogen functional groups on the surface of the fiber play crucial impacts on the photocatalytic activity.

  17. Wright Brothers Lectureship in Aeronautics: Experience with HiMAT remotely piloted research vehicle - An alternate flight test approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deets, D. A.; Brown, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) program explored the various and complex interactions of advanced technologies, such as aeroelastic tailoring, close-coupled canard, and relaxed static stability. A 0.44-subscale remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) of a hypothetical fighter airplane was designed and flight-tested to determine the effects of these interactions and to define the design techniques appropriate for advanced fighter technologies. Flexibility and high maneuverability were provided by flight control laws implemented in ground-based computers and telemetered to the vehicle control system during flight tests. The high quality of the flight-measured data and their close correlation with the analytical design modeling proved that the RPRV is a viable and cost-effective tool for developing aerodynamic, structure, and control law requirements for highly maneuverable fighter airplanes of the future.

  18. Phylogenetic diversity and activity of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria from a hypersaline oil-polluted microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Zein, Burhanuddin; Al-Thukair, Assad; de Beer, Dirk

    2007-06-01

    The diversity and function of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria (AHB) in cyanobacterial mats have been largely overlooked. We used culture-dependent and molecular techniques to explore the species diversity, degradative capacities and functional guilds of AHB in the photic layer (2mm) of an oil-polluted microbial mat from Saudi Arabia. Enrichment isolation was carried out at different salinities (5% and 12%) and temperatures (28 and 45 degrees C) and on various substrates (acetate, glycolate, Spirulina extract and crude oils). Counts of most probable number showed a numerical abundance of AHB in the range of 1.15-8.13x10(6) cellsg(-1) and suggested the presence of halotolerant and thermotolerant populations. Most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the obtained clones and isolates were phylogenetically affiliated to the groups Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Alphaproteobacteria. Groups like Deltaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcus-Thermus were only detected by cloning. The strains isolated on acetate and glycolate belonged to the genera Marinobacter, Halomonas, Roseobacter and Rhodobacter whereas the strains enriched on crude oil belonged to Marinobacter and Alcanivorax. Members of the Bacteriodetes group were only enriched on Spirulina extract indicating their specialization in the degradation of cyanobacterial dead cells. The substrate spectra of representative strains showed the ability of all AHB to metabolize cyanobacterial photosynthetic and fermentation products. However, the unique in situ conditions of the mat apparently favored the enrichment of versatile strains that grew on both the cyanobacterial exudates and the hydrocarbons. We conclude that AHB in cyanobacterial mats represent a diverse community that plays an important role in carbon-cycling within microbial mats. PMID:17056222

  19. Leptospirosis in Kuala Lumpur and the comparative evaluation of two rapid commercial diagnostic kits against the MAT test for the detection of antibodies to leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, W Y; Soo, E H; Gopalakrishnan, V; Devi, S

    2000-08-01

    The aim of the study was to look into the epidemiology of serodiagnosed cases of leptospirosis at the University Hospital and compare two commercial ELISA Assays to the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). Demographic data for all serodiagnosed cases for the years 1991-1997 were collected. From this data, 104 sera (n = 104) were selected as samples for comparative evaluation of the commercial ELISAs (INDX Dip-S-Ticks and PanBio ELISA) to the MAT test. Thirty two (n = 32) negative control sera were selected from serodiagnosed cases of other differential diagnosis of leptospira infection. The MAT test is a standard test that detects agglutination antibodies to leptospira biflexa, while the INDX Dip-S-Ticks is an ELISA dot test assaying for total anti-leptospira antibodies. The PanBio ELISA is a colorometric assay in test well strips to detect anti-leptospira IgM. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of tests were calculated at a MAT cut-off value of 1:320. Demographic data showed that leptospirosis peaks during March-May and Aug-Nov coinciding with the inter-monsoon period with more men being infected than women and more adults than children. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of test for the INDX Dip-S-Ticks were 83.3%, 93.8% and 87.5% while the values for the PanBio ELISA were 54.2%, 96.9% and 71.3%. The suboptimal PanBio result could be related to the blocking effect of high IgG titres or could be related to the diagnostic MAT cut-off values used in this study. The data hence reflects a pattern of transmission that is related to "wet" occupational risk factors. The commercial assays evaluated, are easier to perform but interpretation of results should be based on level of endemicity. The INDX Dip-S-Ticks allows this flexibility and is a practical alternative to the MAT test.

  20. Leptospirosis in Kuala Lumpur and the comparative evaluation of two rapid commercial diagnostic kits against the MAT test for the detection of antibodies to leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, W Y; Soo, E H; Gopalakrishnan, V; Devi, S

    2000-08-01

    The aim of the study was to look into the epidemiology of serodiagnosed cases of leptospirosis at the University Hospital and compare two commercial ELISA Assays to the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). Demographic data for all serodiagnosed cases for the years 1991-1997 were collected. From this data, 104 sera (n = 104) were selected as samples for comparative evaluation of the commercial ELISAs (INDX Dip-S-Ticks and PanBio ELISA) to the MAT test. Thirty two (n = 32) negative control sera were selected from serodiagnosed cases of other differential diagnosis of leptospira infection. The MAT test is a standard test that detects agglutination antibodies to leptospira biflexa, while the INDX Dip-S-Ticks is an ELISA dot test assaying for total anti-leptospira antibodies. The PanBio ELISA is a colorometric assay in test well strips to detect anti-leptospira IgM. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of tests were calculated at a MAT cut-off value of 1:320. Demographic data showed that leptospirosis peaks during March-May and Aug-Nov coinciding with the inter-monsoon period with more men being infected than women and more adults than children. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of test for the INDX Dip-S-Ticks were 83.3%, 93.8% and 87.5% while the values for the PanBio ELISA were 54.2%, 96.9% and 71.3%. The suboptimal PanBio result could be related to the blocking effect of high IgG titres or could be related to the diagnostic MAT cut-off values used in this study. The data hence reflects a pattern of transmission that is related to "wet" occupational risk factors. The commercial assays evaluated, are easier to perform but interpretation of results should be based on level of endemicity. The INDX Dip-S-Ticks allows this flexibility and is a practical alternative to the MAT test. PMID:11256343

  1. Molecular evidence that phylogenetically diverged ciliates are active in microbial mats of deep-sea cold-seep sediment.

    PubMed

    Takishita, Kiyotaka; Kakizoe, Natsuki; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    Cold seeps are areas of the seafloor where hydrogen sulfide- and methane-rich fluid seepage occurs, often sustaining chemosynthetic ecosystems. It is well known that both archaea and bacteria oxidize sulfides and methane to produce chemical energy and that several endemic animals use this energy to thrive in cold seeps. On the other hand, there is little knowledge regarding diversity and ecology of microbial eukaryotes in this ecosystem. In this study we isolated environmental RNA and DNA from microbial mats of cold-seep sediment in Sagami Bay, Japan, and retrieved eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal RNA sequences with polymerase chain reaction methods followed by clone library construction. Most RNA-derived clones obtained were from ciliates, although DNA-derived clones were mainly from the fungus Cryptococcus curvatus, suggesting that ciliates are active in the environment. The ciliate sequences were phylogenetically diverse, and represented eight known class lineages as well as undesignated lineages. Because most ciliates are bacterivorous, it is highly likely that the ciliates for which sequences were recovered play a role in the food web of this ecosystem as grazers of microbial mats. In addition, given that the environment studied is under highly reduced (anoxic) conditions, based on the prokaryotic community structure deduced from T-RFLP profiles, the ciliates detected may be obligatory or facultative anaerobes.

  2. Biogeochemistry of Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenizi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines the rates of processes that shape Earth's environment, define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred, and create biosignatures in sediments and atmospheres. In cyanobacterial mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides energy, organic substrates and oxygen to the ecosystem. Incident light changes with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition, and counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide shape the chemical microenvironment. A combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Microliters produce hydrogen, small organic acids, nitrogen and sulfur species. Such compounds fuel a flow of energy and electrons in these ecosystems and thus shape interactions between groups of microorganisms. Coordinated observations of population distribution, abundance, and activity for an entire community are making fundamental questions in ecology accessible. These questions address those factors that sustain the remarkable diversity of microorganisms that are now being revealed by molecular techniques. These questions also target the processes that shape the various kinds of biosignatures that we will seek, both in ancient rocks from Earth and Mars, and in atmospheres of distant planets beyond our Solar System.

  3. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  4. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  5. Manganese Influences Carbonate Precipitation in a Laminated Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krusor, M.; Grim, S. L.; Wilmeth, D.; Johnson, H.; Berelson, W.; Stevenson, B. S.; Stamps, B. W.; Corsetti, F. A.; Spear, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Investigating mineralization within modern microbial mats informs our interpretation of ancient microbialites and the mineralization process. Microbial mats in Little Hot Creek (LHC), California contain 4 distinct layers with different microbiota. Each layer of the mat is supersaturated with regard to calcium carbonate (CaCO3), which increases with depth. Total organic carbon decreases with depth through the mat. We used 13C-labeled bicarbonate incubations of each mat layer to calculate growth rates of organic carbon and CaCO3 within the mat. Incubations were also amended with Mn or Mg to test their effect on rates of CaCO3 and organic carbon formation. The Mn-amended top layer increased CaCO3 precipitation and organic carbon growth. Mn increased organic carbon production in the lowest layer to a lesser extent, but not growth of CaCO3. Mn addition had no effect on growth rates in the two intervening layers. Mg amendment stimulated only organic carbon formation in the top layer, with little to no effect on the lower layers or overall CaCO3 formation. We attribute the elevated CaCO3 precipitation noted after Mn addition to increased oxygenic photosynthetic activity. Oxygenic photosynthesis requires Mn as an enzyme cofactor and promotes carbonate precipitation. We propose that the phototrophic community was responsible for most of the CaCO3 precipitation in the upper layer. Phototrophs gradually moved upwards for optimal access to sunlight, and as the mat grew, "tenant" microorganisms inhabited the lower carbonate layers while the "builders" remained on top. The relatively constant percentages of inorganic carbon below the top layer combined with observed minimal CaCO3 precipitation under laboratory conditions suggest that additional research into potential metabolisms that impact carbonate formation would be informative. These results improve our understanding of the linkages between microbial metabolisms, carbonate precipitation in microbial mats, and the potential

  6. Interactions of purified transcription factors: binding of yeast MAT alpha 1 and PRTF to cell type-specific, upstream activating sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S; Ammerer, G; Richmond, T J

    1988-01-01

    Pheromone receptor transcription factor (PRTF) and MAT alpha 1 are protein transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of the alpha-specific genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have expressed MAT alpha 1 as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified it from inclusion bodies in milligram quantities. The MAT alpha 1 protein was obtained after specific cleavage of the fusion protein. Quantitative band shift electrophoresis was used to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants that describe the multicomponent binding equilibrium between the PRTF and MAT alpha 1 proteins, and alpha-specific STE3 upstream activating sequence (UAS) DNA. The dissociation constant for the complex of PRTF and the a-specific UAS of STE2 was also measured and found to be 5.9 X 10(-11) M, only three times less than that for the PRTF-STE3 UAS complex. Analyses of these complexes by DNase I footprinting demonstrate that the PRTF binding site is confined to the palindromic P-box sequence in the case of the STE3 UAS, but extends symmetrically from this central region to cover 28 bp for the STE2 UAS. When MAT alpha 1 is bound to the PRTF-STE3 complex, the region of DNA protected is enlarged to that seen for the PRTF-STE2 complex. Our results using these two purified factors in vitro suggest that PRTF has nearly the same affinity for a- and alpha-specific UAS elements and that transcriptional activation requires a particular conformational state for the PRTF-DNA complex which occurs in the PRTF-STE2 and MAT alpha 1-PRTF-STE3 complexes, but not in the PRTF-STE3 complex. Images PMID:2854061

  7. Archean Microbial Mat Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Michael M.; Thornton, Daniel C. O.; Pope, Michael C.; Olszewski, Thomas D.; Gong, Jian

    2011-05-01

    Much of the Archean record of microbial communities consists of fossil mats and stromatolites. Critical physical emergent properties governing the evolution of large-scale (centimeters to meters) topographic relief on the mat landscape are (a) mat surface roughness relative to the laminar sublayer and (b) cohesion. These properties can be estimated for fossil samples under many circumstances. A preliminary analysis of Archean mat cohesion suggests that mats growing in shallow marine environments from throughout this time had cohesions similar to those of modern shallow marine mats. There may have been a significant increase in mat strength at the end of the Archean.

  8. Effects of mat characteristics on plantar pressure patterns and perceived mat properties during landing in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; Perez-Turpin, Jose Antonio; Cortell-Tormo, Juan Manuel; van den Tillaar, Roland

    2010-11-01

    Shock absorption and stability during landings is provided by both, gymnast ability and mat properties. The aims of this study were to determine the influence of different mat constructions on their energy absorption and stability capabilities, and to analyse how these properties affect gymnast's plantar pressures as well as subjective mat perception during landing. Six mats were tested using a standard mechanical drop test. In addition, plantar pressures and subjective perception during landing were obtained from 15 expert gymnasts. The different mats influenced plantar pressures and gymnasts' subjective perception during landing of gymnasts. Significant correlations between plantar pressures at the medial metatarsal and lateral metatarsal zones of the gymnasts' feet with the different shock absorption characteristics of the mats were found. However, subjective perception tests were not able to discriminate mat functionality between the six mats as no significant correlations between the mechanical mat properties with the subjective perception of these properties were found. This study demonstrated that plantar pressures are a useful tool for discriminating different landing mats. Using similar approaches, ideally including kinematics as well, could help us in our understanding about the influences of different mats upon gymnast-mat interaction. PMID:21309299

  9. Evidence for preferential repair of 3-carbethoxypsoralen plus UVA induced DNA lesions in the active MAT alpha locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the UvrABC assay.

    PubMed

    Méniel, V; Brouwer, J; Averbeck, D

    1993-09-01

    The occurrence of preferential repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the active MAT alpha locus compared with the inactive HML alpha locus was confirmed after 254 nm UV irradiation. Experiments carried out using the UvrABC excinuclease assay with the monofunctional furocoumarin 3-carbethoxypsoralen (3-CPs) plus UVA radiation which induce mainly monoadducts in DNA demonstrated preferential repair of the active MAT alpha locus compared with the inactive HML alpha locus in a SIR+ strain. However, as after 254 nm UV irradiation, no difference in the rate of removal of 3-CPs plus UVA induced lesions was observed between the two loci in the sir-3 mutant in which both loci are active. Thus, it appears that 3-CPs plus UVA induced monoadducts as well as pyrimidine dimers are subject to preferential repair.

  10. Mat2exo

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-11

    MAT2EXO is a program which translates mesh data from Matlab mat-file format to Exodus II format. This tool is the inverse of the commonly used tool exo2mat which translates Exodus II data to the Matlab mat-file format. These tools provide a means for preprocessing an Exodus II model file or postprocessing an Exodus II results file using Matlab

  11. Two-dimensional mapping of photopigment distribution and activity of Chloroflexus-like bacteria in a hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Bachar, Ami; Polerecky, Lubos; Fischer, Jan P; Vamvakopoulos, Kyriakos; de Beer, Dirk; Jonkers, Henk M

    2008-09-01

    Pigment analysis in an intact hypersaline microbial mat by hyperspectral imaging revealed very patchy and spatially uncorrelated distributions of photopigments Chl a and BChl a/c, which are characteristic photopigments for oxygenic (diatoms and cyanobacteria) and anoxygenic phototrophs (Chloroflexaceae). This finding is in contrast to the expectation that these biomarker pigments should be spatially correlated, as oxygenic phototrophs are thought to supply the Chloroflexaceae members with organic substrates for growth. We suggest that the heterogeneous occurrence is possibly due to sulfide, whose production by sulfate-reducing bacteria may be spatially heterogeneous in the partially oxic photic zone of the mat. We furthermore mapped the near-infra-red-light controlled respiration of Chloroflexaceae under light and dark conditions and found that Chloroflexaceae are responsible for a major part of oxygen consumption at the lower part of the oxic zone in the mat. The presence of Chloroflexaceae was further confirmed by FISH probe and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. We assume that species related to the genera Oscillochloris and 'Candidatus Chlorothrix', in contrast to those related to Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus, depend less on excreted photosynthates but more on the presence of free sulfide, which may explain their presence in deeper parts of the mat. PMID:18616583

  12. Nanofibrous mats layer-by-layer assembled by HTCC/layered silicate composites with in vitro antitumor activity against SMMC-7721 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Xinqin; Zhang, Qi; Jin, Huan'guang; Shi, Xiaowen; Luo, Wenjing; Deng, Hongbing

    2014-03-01

    Organic rectorite (OREC) was used to prepare the intercalated nanocomposites with N-(2-hydroxyl) propyl-3-trimethyl ammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC), and then the immobilization of the positively charged HTCC-OREC nanocomposites and the negatively charged sodium alginate (ALG) on cellulose nanofibrous mats was performed through layer-by-layer (LBL) technique. Fiber diameter distribution results from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) images showed that the average fiber diameter of (HTCC-OREC/ALG)(n) films coating obviously increased from 433 to 608 nm. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results further confirmed the interaction between HTCC and OREC and their successful immobilization on cellulose template. MTT assay indicated that the prepared nanofibrous mats exhibited strong inhibitory activity against human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (SMMC-7721) but a little cytotoxic effect on human Chang liver (CCL-13) cells. Furthermore, the experimental results from FE-SEM and Inverted Fluorescence Microscope of SMMC-7721 cells cultured on LBL structured nanofibrous mats demonstrated the significant antitumor activity of prepared samples. The developed approach to immobilize nanocomposites onto polymer nanofibers with controllable thickness may also be utilized to tumor therapy. PMID:24730244

  13. Molecular ecology of microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Henk; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Stal, Lucas J

    2014-11-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep and fluctuating physicochemical microgradients, that are the result of the ever changing environmental conditions and of the microorganisms' own activities, give rise to a plethora of potential niches resulting in the formation of one of the most diverse microbial ecosystems known to date. For several decades, microbial mats have been studied extensively and more recently molecular biological techniques have been introduced that allowed assessing and investigating the diversity and functioning of these systems. These investigations also involved metagenomics analyses using high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing. Here, we summarize some of the latest developments in metagenomic analysis of three representative phototrophic microbial mat types (coastal, hot spring, and hypersaline). We also present a comparison of the available metagenomic data sets from mats emphasizing the major differences between them as well as elucidating the overlap in overall community composition. PMID:25109247

  14. Molecular ecology of microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Henk; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Stal, Lucas J

    2014-11-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep and fluctuating physicochemical microgradients, that are the result of the ever changing environmental conditions and of the microorganisms' own activities, give rise to a plethora of potential niches resulting in the formation of one of the most diverse microbial ecosystems known to date. For several decades, microbial mats have been studied extensively and more recently molecular biological techniques have been introduced that allowed assessing and investigating the diversity and functioning of these systems. These investigations also involved metagenomics analyses using high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing. Here, we summarize some of the latest developments in metagenomic analysis of three representative phototrophic microbial mat types (coastal, hot spring, and hypersaline). We also present a comparison of the available metagenomic data sets from mats emphasizing the major differences between them as well as elucidating the overlap in overall community composition.

  15. Electrospun chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol nanofibre mats for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-04-01

    Chitosan (CS) aqueous salt blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibre mats was prepared by electrospinning. CS was dissolved with hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in distilled water without the use of toxic or hazardous solvents. The CS aqueous salts were blended with PVA at different weight ratios, and the effect of the solution ratios was investigated. The morphologies and mechanical and swelling properties of the generated fibres were analysed. Indirect cytotoxicity studies indicated that the CS/PVA nanofibre mats were non-toxic to normal human fibroblast cells. The CS-HOBt/PVA and CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats demonstrated satisfactory antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and an in vivo wound healing test showed that the CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats performed better than gauze in decreasing acute wound size during the first week after tissue damage. In conclusion, the biodegradable, biocompatible and antibacterial CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats have potential for use as wound dressing materials.

  16. The Extracellular Matrix in Photosynthetic Mats: A Cyanobacterial Gingerbread House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, R.; Stannard, W.; Bebout, B.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Mayali, X.; Weber, P. K.; Lipton, M. S.; Lee, J.; Everroad, R. C.; Thelen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Hypersaline laminated cyanobacterial mats are excellent model systems for investigating photoautotrophic contributions to biogeochemical cycling on a millimeter scale. These self-sustaining ecosystems are characterized by steep physiochemical gradients that fluctuate dramatically on hour timescales, providing a dynamic environment to study microbial response. However, elucidating the distribution of energy from light absorption into biomass requires a complete understanding of the various constituents of the mat. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and DNA are a major component of these mats and may function in the redistribution of nutrients and metabolites within the community. To test this notion, we established a model mat-building culture for comparison with the phylogenetically diverse natural mat communities. In these two systems we determined how proteins and glycans in the matrix changed as a function of light and tracked nutrient flow from the matrix. Using mass spectrometry metaproteomics analysis, we found homologous proteins in both field and culture extracellular matrix that point to cyanobacterial turnover of amino acids, inorganic nutrients, carbohydrates and nucleic acids from the EPS. Other abundant functions identified included oxidative stress response from both the cyanobacteria and heterotrophs and cyanobacterial structural proteins that may play a role in mat cohesion. Several degradative enzymes also varied in abundance in the EPS in response to light availability, suggesting active secretion. To further test cyanobacterial EPS turnover, we generated isotopically-labeled EPS and used NanoSIMS to trace uptake of this labeled EPS. Our findings suggest Cyanobacteria may facilitate nutrient transfer to other groups, as well as uptake of their own products through degradation of EPS components. This work provides evidence for the essential roles of EPS for storage, structural

  17. [The effects of 16-weeks pilates mat program on anthropometric variables and body composition in active adult women after a short detraining period].

    PubMed

    Vaquero-Cristóbal, Raquel; Alacid, Fernando; Esparza-Ros, Francisco; Muyor, José M; López-Miñarro, Pedro Ángel

    2015-04-01

    Introducción: Estudios previos han analizado los efectos de la práctica de Pilates mat sobre las variables antropométricas y la composición corporal en poblaciones sedentarias. No existen estudios sobre los beneficios del Pilates en estas varibles tras un corto periodo de desentrenamiento. Objetivo: Determinar el efecto un programa de 16 semanas de Pilates mat sobre las variables antropométricas, la composición coporal y el somatotipo, en mujeres adultas con experiencia previa tras 3 semanas de desentrenamiento. Metodología: A veintiuna mujeres se les realizó una valoración antropométrica completa siguiendo las indicaciones de la ISAK antes y después de un programa de Pilates mat de 16 semanas (2 días a la semana, una hora por día). Todas las mujeres tenían una experiencia previa en la práctica de Pilates mat de entre 1 y 3 años y venían de un proceso de desentrenamiento de 3 semanas (vacaciones de Navidad). Resultados y discusión: Las mujeres mostraron una reducción significativa del peso corporal, el IMC, los pliegues cutáneos individuales del miembro superior (bíceps y tríceps) y el tronco (subescapular, cresta iliaca, supraespinal y abdominal), el sumatorio de 6 y 8 pliegues, la endomorfia y la masa grasa; y un aumento significativo de la masa muscular. El somatotipo medio se clasificó en meso-endomorfo para el pre- (4,91, 4,01, 1,47) y el post-test (4,68, 4,16, 1,69). Ocho mujeres cambiaron su clasificación del somatotipo tras el programa de intervención. Conclusiones: La práctica de Pilates mat durante 16 semanas provocó cambios asociados a una mejora del estado de salud en las variables antropométricas, sobre todo en los pliegues cutáneos que disminuyeron significativamente, la composición corporal (masa grasa y muscular, que disminuyeron y aumentaron, respectivamente) y el somatotipo (una reducción significativa del componente endomórfico) en mujeres con experiencia previa en la práctica de Pilates después de tres semanas

  18. In-situ Curing Strain Monitoring of a Flat Plate Residual Stress Specimen Using a Chopped Stand Mat Glass/Epoxy Composite as Test Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Skordos, A.; James, S.; Correia, R. G.; Jensen, M.

    2015-12-01

    The curing stresses in a newly proposed bi-axial residual stress testing configuration are studied using a chopped strand mat glass/epoxy specimen. In-situ monitoring of the curing is conducted using dielectric and fibre Bragg grating sensors. It is confirmed that a bi-axial residual stress state can be introduced in the specimens during curing and a quantification of its magnitude is presented. An alternative decomposition method used for converting the dielectric signal into a material state variable is proposed and good agreement with models found in the literature is obtained. From the cure cycles chosen it is suggested that any stress build up in the un-vitrified state is relaxed immediately and only stress build up in the vitrified state contributes to the residual stress state in the specimen.

  19. Direct piezoelectric responses of soft composite fiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, M.; Morvan, J.; Diorio, N.; Buyuktanir, E.; Harden, J.; West, J. L.; Jákli, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recently soft fiber mats electrospun from solutions of Barium Titanate (BT) ferroelectric ceramics particles and polylactic acid (PLA) were found to have large (d33 ˜ 1 nm/V) converse piezoelectric signals offering a myriad of applications ranging from active implants to smart textiles. Here, we report direct piezoelectric measurements (electric signals due to mechanical stress) of the BT/PLA composite fiber mats at several BT concentrations. A homemade testing apparatus provided AC stresses in the 50 Hz-1.5 kHz-frequency range. The piezoelectric constant d33 ˜ 0.5 nC/N and the compression modulus Y ˜ 104-105 Pa found are in agreement with the prior converse piezoelectric and compressibility measurements. Importantly, the direct piezoelectric signal is large enough to power a small LCD by simple finger tapping of a 0.15 mm thick 2-cm2 area mat. We propose using these mats in active Braille cells and in liquid crystal writing tablets.

  20. Astronaut Thomas Mattingly performs EVA during Apollo 16 transearth coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 16 transearth coast. mattingly is assisted by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Mattingly inspected the SIM bay of the Service Module, and retrieved film from the Mapping and Panoramic cameras. Mattingly is wearing the helmet of Astronaut John W. Young, commander. The helmet's lunar extravehicular visor assembly helped protect Mattingly's eyes frmo the bright sun. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera.

  1. Ecophysiological Changes in Microbial Mats Incubated in a Greenhouse Collaboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; DesMarais, David J.; GarciaPichel, Ferran; Hogan, Mary; Jahnke, Linda; Keller, Richard M.; Miller, Scott R.

    2001-01-01

    Microbial mats are modern examples of the earliest microbial communities known. Among the best studied are microbial mats growing in hypersaline ponds managed for the production of salt by Exportadora de Sal, S.A. de C.V., Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. In May, 2001, we collected mats from Ponds 4 and 5 in this system and returned them to Ames Research Center, where they have been maintained for a period of over nine months. We report here on both the ecophysiological changes occurring in the mats over that period of time as well as the facility in which they were incubated. Mats (approximately 1 sq. meter total area) were incubated in a greenhouse facility modified to provide the mats with natural levels of visible and ultraviolet radiation as well as constantly flowing, temperature-controlled water. Two replicated treatments were maintained, a 'high salinity' treatment (about 120 ppt) and a 'low salinity' treatment (about 90 ppt). Rates of net biological activity (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, trace gas production) in the mats were relatively constant over the several months, and were similar to rates of activity measured in the field. However, over the course of the incubation, mats in both treatments changed in physical appearance. The most obvious change was that mats in the higher salinity treatments developed a higher proportion of carotenoid pigments (relative to chlorophyll), resulting in a noticeably orange color in the high salinity mats. This trend is also seen in the natural salinity gradient present at the field site. Changes in the community composition of the mats, as assayed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), as well as biomarker compounds produced in the mats were also monitored. The degree to which the mats kept in the greenhouse changed from the originally collected mats, as well as differences between high and low salinity mats will be discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended

  2. ProMat

    SciTech Connect

    2008-06-12

    ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code

  3. The effects of mats on back and leg fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Stuart-Buttle, C; Marras, W S

    1994-02-01

    Prolonged standing is common in many industrial workplaces. It is also quite common for workers to complain of discomfort in the back and legs as a result of prolonged standing. Mats are often provided for the worker to relieve this fatigue. However, there is no quantitative evidence that these mats relieve leg and back fatigue. Five subjects were asked to stand on a concrete surface and two mat surfaces for prolonged periods of time. Spectral electromyographic analyses indicated that mats reduced localized muscle fatigue in the erector spinae muscle only. Furthermore, this fatigue reduction occurred only with the more compressible of the two mats tested. These results imply that localized muscular fatigue in the leg may not be relieved with 'anti-fatigue' mats, and some of these mats only benefit the back. PMID:15676945

  4. TESTING TESTS ON ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI MICROVARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    De Diego, Jose A.

    2010-03-15

    Literature on optical and infrared microvariability in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reflects a diversity of statistical tests and strategies to detect tiny variations in the light curves of these sources. Comparison between the results obtained using different methodologies is difficult, and the pros and cons of each statistical method are often badly understood or even ignored. Even worse, improperly tested methodologies are becoming more and more common, and biased results may be misleading with regard to the origin of the AGN microvariability. This paper intends to point future research on AGN microvariability toward the use of powerful and well-tested statistical methodologies, providing a reference for choosing the best strategy to obtain unbiased results. Light curves monitoring has been simulated for quasars and for reference and comparison stars. Changes for the quasar light curves include both Gaussian fluctuations and linear variations. Simulated light curves have been analyzed using {chi}{sup 2} tests, F tests for variances, one-way analyses of variance and C-statistics. Statistical Type I and Type II errors, which indicate the robustness and the power of the tests, have been obtained in each case. One-way analyses of variance and {chi}{sup 2} prove to be powerful and robust estimators for microvariations, while the C-statistic is not a reliable methodology and its use should be avoided.

  5. Closing the design loop on HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Robinson, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    The design methodology used in the HiMAT program and the wind tunnel development activities are discussed. Selected results from the flight test program are presented and the strengths and weaknesses of testing advanced technology vehicles using the RPV concept is examined. The role of simulation on the development of digital flight control systems and in RPV's in particular is emphasized.

  6. Cyanobacterial mats: Microanalysis of community metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.; Bermudes, D.; Fischer, U.; Haddad, R.; Prufert, L.; Scheulderman-Suylen, T.; Shaw, T.

    1985-01-01

    The microbial communities in two sites were studied using several approaches: (1) light microscopy; (2) the measurement of microprofiles of oxygen and sulfide at the surface of the microbial mat; (3) the study of diurnal variation of oxygen and sulfides; (4) in situ measurement of photosynthesis and sulfate reduction and study of the coupling of these two processes; (5) measurement of glutathione in the upper layers of the microbial mat as a possible oxygen quencher; (6) measurement of reduced iron as a possible intermediate electron donor along the established redoxcline in the mats; (7) measurement of dissolved phosphate as an indicator of processes of break down of organic matter in these systems; and (8) measurement of carbon dioxide in the interstitial water and its delta C-13 in an attempt to understand the flow of CO2 through the systems. Microbial processes of primary production and initial degradation at the most active zone of the microbial mat were analyzed.

  7. A Recombinationally Repressed Region between Mat2 and Mat3 Loci Shares Homology to Centromeric Repeats and Regulates Directionality of Mating-Type Switching in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, SIS.; Klar, AJS.

    1997-01-01

    Cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe switch mating type by replacing genetic information at the transcriptionally active mat1 locus with sequences copied from one of two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P or mat3-M. By a process referred to as directionality of switching, cells predominantly switch to the opposite mat1 allele; the mat1-P allele preferentially recombines with mat3, while mat1-M selects the mat2. In contrast to efficient recombination at mat1, recombination within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval is undetectable. We defined the role of sequences between mat2 and mat3, designated the K-region, in directionality as well as recombinational suppression. Cloning and sequencing analysis revealed that a part of the K-region is homologous to repeat sequences present at centromeres, which also display transcriptional and recombinational suppression. Replacement of 7.5 kb of the K-region with the ura4(+) gene affected directionality in a variegated manner. Analysis of the swi6-mod locus, which was previously shown to affect directionality, in KΔ::ura4(+) strains suggested the existence of at least two overlapping directionality mechanisms. Our work furthers the model that directionality is regulated by cell-type-specific organization of the heterochromatin-like structure in the mating-type region and provides evidence that the K-region contributes to silencing of the mat2-mat3 interval. PMID:9258669

  8. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the modified agglutination test (MAT) and an indirect ELISA for the detection of serum antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii in sheep through Bayesian approaches.

    PubMed

    Mainar-Jaime, R C; Barberán, M

    2007-09-01

    The diagnostic accuracies of the modified agglutination test (MAT) and indirect ELISA test for the detection of serum antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii in sheep were evaluated through Bayesian approaches on two populations of sheep created from three different groups of animals (T. gondii-aborted ewes, colostrums-deprived newborn lambs, and ewe-lambs and adult ewes with unknown T. gondii infection status). Tests showed a high degree of agreement (kappa statistic = 0.93; 95% confidence interval = 0.87, 0.98) and a significant specificity (Sp) correlation (gamma(Sp) = 0.26; 95% credibility interval = 0.017, 0.61). When prior information was used for all unknown parameters the posterior medians for the sensitivity (Se) and Sp of the MAT and ELISA were, respectively, 92.6% (95% credibility interval = 85.2, 96.9), 95.5% (89.9, 98.7), 90.5% (83.4, 95.6), and 97.8% (94.2, 99.5). These estimates remained similar when uninformative priors were included. The Se estimates of the MAT and ELISA were higher than those obtained on pigs in other study using the same approach (Se = 80.6% and Sp = 89.5% for the MAT, and Se = 71.5% and Sp = 85.5% for the ELISA [Georgiadis, M.P., Wesley, O.J., Gardner, I.A., Singh, R., 2003. Correlation-adjusted estimation of sensitivity and specificity of two diagnostic tests. Appl. Stat. 52, 63-78]. This finding supported the believe that test performances may vary when applied on different animal species. Thus, if these tests are planned to be used on animal species other than sheep or pigs, their diagnostic accuracy should be re-assessed to prevent biased inferences from their results.

  9. Micro-hybrid electric vehicle application of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries in absorbent glass mat technology: Testing a partial-state-of-charge operation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Hockgeiger, E.

    The BMW Group has launched two micro-hybrid functions in high volume models in order to contribute to reduction of fuel consumption in modern passenger cars. Both the brake energy regeneration (BER) and the auto-start-stop function (ASSF) are based on the conventional 14 V vehicle electrical system and current series components with only little modifications. An intelligent control algorithm of the alternator enables recuperative charging in braking and coasting phases, known as BER. By switching off the internal combustion engine at a vehicle standstill the idling fuel consumption is effectively reduced by ASSF. By reason of economy and package a lead-acid battery is used as electrochemical energy storage device. The BMW Group assembles valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology in the micro-hybrid electrical power system since special challenges arise for the batteries. By field data analysis a lower average state-of-charge (SOC) due to partial state-of-charge (PSOC) operation and a higher cycling rate due to BER and ASSF are confirmed in this article. Similar to a design of experiment (DOE) like method we present a long-term lab investigation. Two types of 90 Ah VRLA AGM batteries are operated with a test bench profile that simulates the micro-hybrid vehicle electrical system under varying conditions. The main attention of this lab testing is focused on capacity loss and charge acceptance over cycle life. These effects are put into context with periodically refresh charging the batteries in order to prevent accelerated battery aging due to hard sulfation. We demonstrate the positive effect of refresh chargings concerning preservation of battery charge acceptance. Furthermore, we observe moderate capacity loss over 90 full cycles both at 25 °C and at 3 °C battery temperature.

  10. Bioremediation of oil by marine microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yehuda

    2002-12-01

    Cyanobacterial mats developing in oil-contaminated sabkhas along the African coasts of the Gulf of Suez and in the pristine Solar Lake, Sinai, were collected for laboratory studies. Samples of both mats showed efficient degradation of crude oil in the light, followed by development of an intense bloom of Phormidium spp. and Oscillatoria spp. Isolated cyanobacterial strains, however, did not degrade crude oil in axenic cultures. Strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria and aerobic heterotrophs were capable of degrading model compounds of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Results indicate that degradation of oil was done primarily by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. The oxygenic photosynthesis of oil-insensitive cyanobacteria supplied the molecular oxygen for the efficient aerobic metabolism of organisms, such as Marinobacter sp. The diurnal shifts in environmental conditions at the mat surface, from highly oxic conditions in the light to anaerobic sulfide-rich habitat in the dark, may allow the combined aerobic and anaerobic degradation of crude oil at the mat surface. Hence, coastal cyanobacterial mats may be used for the degradation of coastline oil spills. Oxygen microelectrodes detected a significant inhibition of photosynthetic activity subsequent to oil addition. This prevailed for a few hours and then rapidly recovered. In addition, shifts in bacterial community structure following exposure to oil were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fractions of 16S rRNA from eubacteria, cyanobacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Since the mats used for the present study were obtained from oil-contaminated environments, they were believed to be preequilibrated for petroleum remediation. The mesocosm system at Eilat provided a unique opportunity to study petroleum degradation by mats formed under different salinities (up to 21%). These mats, dominated by cyanobacteria, can serve as close analogues to the sabkhas contaminated during the

  11. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  12. Active SWIR laboratory testing methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Curtis M.; White, Steve; Rich, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Active Short Wave InfraRed (SWIR) imaging presents unique challenges to laboratory testing. It is always important to have laboratory testing that will directly relate to field performance. This paper will present the modeling and corresponding laboratory testing that was developed for these types of systems. The paper will present the modeling that was used to derive the lab metric used for verification testing of the system and provide details into the design of the lab equipment that was necessary to ensure accurate lab testing. The Noise Limited Resolution (NLR) test, first developed for low light imaging systems in the 1960s, serves as the basic lab metric for the evaluation of the active SWIR system. This test serves well for a quick test (go-no go) and is used to evaluate this system during production testing. The test derivation will be described and shown how it relates to the modeling results. The test equipment developed by Santa Barbara InfraRed (SBIR) for this application allows for accurate uniform radiance levels from an integrating sphere for both 1.06um and 1.57um imaging applications. The source has the ability to directly mimic any laser system and can provide pulsed laser source radiation from 20 nanoseconds to 500 nanoseconds resulting in levels from 0.4 to 85 nJ/cm2/sr, peak radiance levels. The light source can be triggered to replicate a laser return at any range from 100m to 100,000m. Additionally, the source provides the ability to output Mid Wave IR (MWIR) illumination through the use of a small extended area IR source in the integrating sphere. This is useful for boresighting the active SWIR sensor with other sensors such as Forward Looking IR (FLIR).

  13. Quantitative PCR analysis of functional genes in iron-rich microbial mats at an active hydrothermal vent system (Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i).

    PubMed

    Jesser, Kelsey J; Fullerton, Heather; Hager, Kevin W; Moyer, Craig L

    2015-05-01

    The chemolithotrophic Zetaproteobacteria represent a novel class of Proteobacteria which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and are the dominant bacterial population in iron-rich microbial mats. Zetaproteobacteria were first discovered at Lō'ihi Seamount, located 35 km southeast off the big island of Hawai'i, which is characterized by low-temperature diffuse hydrothermal venting. Novel nondegenerate quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for genes associated with microbial nitrogen fixation, denitrification, arsenic detoxification, Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB), and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles were developed using selected microbial mat community-derived metagenomes. Nitrogen fixation genes were not detected, but all other functional genes were present. This suggests that arsenic detoxification and denitrification processes are likely cooccurring in addition to two modes of carbon fixation. Two groups of microbial mat community types were identified by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and were further described based on qPCR data for zetaproteobacterial abundance and carbon fixation mode preference. qPCR variance was associated with mat morphology but not with temperature or sample site. Geochemistry data were significantly associated with sample site and mat morphology. Together, these qPCR assays constitute a functional gene signature for iron microbial mat communities across a broad array of temperatures, mat types, chemistries, and sampling sites at Lō'ihi Seamount.

  14. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Functional Genes in Iron-Rich Microbial Mats at an Active Hydrothermal Vent System (Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i)

    PubMed Central

    Jesser, Kelsey J.; Fullerton, Heather; Hager, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    The chemolithotrophic Zetaproteobacteria represent a novel class of Proteobacteria which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and are the dominant bacterial population in iron-rich microbial mats. Zetaproteobacteria were first discovered at Lō'ihi Seamount, located 35 km southeast off the big island of Hawai'i, which is characterized by low-temperature diffuse hydrothermal venting. Novel nondegenerate quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for genes associated with microbial nitrogen fixation, denitrification, arsenic detoxification, Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB), and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles were developed using selected microbial mat community-derived metagenomes. Nitrogen fixation genes were not detected, but all other functional genes were present. This suggests that arsenic detoxification and denitrification processes are likely cooccurring in addition to two modes of carbon fixation. Two groups of microbial mat community types were identified by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and were further described based on qPCR data for zetaproteobacterial abundance and carbon fixation mode preference. qPCR variance was associated with mat morphology but not with temperature or sample site. Geochemistry data were significantly associated with sample site and mat morphology. Together, these qPCR assays constitute a functional gene signature for iron microbial mat communities across a broad array of temperatures, mat types, chemistries, and sampling sites at Lō'ihi Seamount. PMID:25681182

  15. Fast releasing oral electrospun PVP/CD nanofiber mats of taste-masked meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Akkaramongkolporn, Prasert; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-06-20

    Fast release and taste masking of meloxicam (MX)-loaded polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/cyclodextrin (CD) nanofiber mats were developed using an electrospinning process. CDs were blended to improve the stability of the mats. The morphology and diameter of the mats were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM); physical and mechanical properties were also studied. The MX content, disintegration time, MX release and cytotoxicity of the mats were investigated. In vivo studies were also performed in healthy human volunteers. The results indicated that the mats were successfully prepared with fiber in the nanometer range. MX was well incorporated into the mats, with an amorphous form. The mats showed suitable tensile strength. CDs improved the physical stability by their cage-like supramolecular structure to protect from humidity and moisture, and create bead free nanofiber mats. The nanofiber mats with CDs were physically stable without any hygroscopicity and fusion. A fast disintegration and release of MX was achieved. Moreover, this mat released MX faster than the MX powder and commercial tablets. The cytotoxicity test revealed that mats were safe for a 5-min incubation. The disintegration studies indicated that in vivo disintegration agreed with the in vitro studies; the mat rapidly disintegrated in the mouth. The less bitter of MX was occurred in the mats that incorporated CD, menthol and aspartame. In addition, this mat was physical stable for 6 months. The results suggest that these mats may be a good candidate for fast dissolving drug delivery systems of bitter drugs to increase the palatability of dosage forms.

  16. Highly sensitive pyrogen detection on medical devices by the monocyte activation test.

    PubMed

    Stang, Katharina; Fennrich, Stefan; Krajewski, Stefanie; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Burgener, Iwan Anton; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Post, Marcell

    2014-04-01

    Pyrogens are components of microorganisms, like bacteria, viruses or fungi, which can induce a complex inflammatory response in the human body. Pyrogen contamination on medical devices prior operation is still critical and associated with severe complications for the patients. The aim of our study was to develop a reliable test, which allows detection of pyrogen contamination on the surface of medical devices. After in vitro pyrogen contamination of different medical devices and incubation in a rotation model, the human whole blood monocyte activation test (MAT), which is based on an IL-1β-specific ELISA, was employed. Our results show that when combining a modified MAT protocol and a dynamic incubation system, even smallest amounts of pyrogens can be directly detected on the surface of medical devices. Therefore, screening of medical devices prior clinical application using our novel assay, has the potential to significantly reduce complications associated with pyrogen-contaminated medical devices.

  17. Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers

    DOEpatents

    Langton, Christine A.; Narasimhan, Rajendran; Karraker, David G.

    2001-01-01

    A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

  18. Biosilica-loaded poly(ϵ-caprolactone) nanofibers mats provide a morphogenetically active surface scaffold for the growth and mineralization of the osteoclast-related SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Tolba, Emad; Schröder, Heinz C; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Link, Thorben; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-10-01

    Bioprinting/3D cell printing procedures for the preparation of scaffolds/implants have the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. Besides biocompatibility and biodegradability, the hardness of the scaffold material is of critical importance to allow sufficient mechanical protection and, to the same extent, allow migration, cell-cell, and cell-substrate contact formation of the matrix-embedded cells. In the present study, we present a strategy to encase a bioprinted, cell-containing, and soft scaffold with an electrospun mat. The electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers mats, containing tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), were subsequently incubated with silicatein. Silicatein synthesizes polymeric biosilica by polycondensation of ortho-silicate that is formed from prehydrolyzed TEOS. Biosilica provides a morphogenetically active matrix for the growth and mineralization of osteoblast-related SaOS-2 cells in vitro. Analysis of the microstructure of the 300-700 nm thick PCL/TEOS nanofibers, incubated with silicatein and prehydrolyzed TEOS, displayed biosilica deposits on the mats formed by the nanofibers. We conclude and propose that electrospun PCL nanofibers mats, coated with biosilica, may represent a morphogenetically active and protective cover for bioprinted cell/tissue-like units with a suitable mechanical stability, even if the cells are embedded in a softer matrix.

  19. Swi6, a Gene Required for Mating-Type Switching, Prohibits Meiotic Recombination in the Mat2-Mat3 ``cold Spot'' of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klar, AJS.; Bonaduce, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mitotic interconversion of the mating-type locus (mat1) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is initiated by a double-strand break at mat1. The mat2 and mat3 loci act as nonrandom donors of genetic information for mat1 switching such that switches occur primarily (or only) to the opposite mat1 allele. Location of the mat1 ``hot spot'' for transposition should be contrasted with the ``cold spot'' of meiotic recombination located within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval. That is, meiotic interchromosomal recombination in mat2, mat3 and the intervening 15-kilobase region does not occur at all. swi2 and swi6 switching-deficient mutants possess the normal level of double-strand break at mat1, yet they fail to switch efficiently. By testing for meiotic recombination in the cold spot, we found the usual lack of recombination in a swi2 mutant but a significant level of recombination in a swi6 mutant. Therefore, the swi6 gene function is required to keep the donor loci inert for interchromosomal recombination. This finding, combined with the additional result that switching primarily occurs intrachromosomally, suggests that the donor loci are made accessible for switching by folding them onto mat1, thus causing the cold spot of recombination. PMID:1783290

  20. Investigation of VEGGIE Root Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbiah, Arun M.

    2013-01-01

    VEGGIE is a plant growth facility that utilizes the phenomenon of capillary action as its primary watering system. A cloth made of Meta Aramid fiber, known as Nomex is used to wick water up from a reservoir to the bottom of the plants roots. This root mat system is intended to be low maintenance with no moving parts and requires minimal crew interface time. Unfortunately, the water wicking rates are inconsistent throughout the plant life cycle, thus causing plants to die. Over-wicking of water occurs toward the beginning of the cycle, while under-wicking occurs toward the middle. This inconsistency of wicking has become a major issue, drastically inhibiting plant growth. The primary objective is to determine the root cause of the inconsistent wicking through experimental testing. Suspect causes for the capillary water column to break include: a vacuum effect due to a negative pressure gradient in the water reservoir, contamination of material due to minerals in water and back wash from plant fertilizer, induced air bubbles while using syringe refill method, and material limitations of Nomex's ability to absorb and retain water. Experimental testing will be conducted to systematically determine the cause of under and over-wicking. Pressure gages will be used to determine pressure drop during the course of the plant life cycle and during the water refill process. A debubbler device will be connected to a root mat in order to equalize pressure inside the reservoir. Moisture and evaporation tests will simultaneously be implemented to observe moisture content and wicking rates over the course of a plant cycle. Water retention tests will be performed using strips of Nomex to determine materials wicking rates, porosity, and absorptivity. Through these experimental tests, we will have a better understanding of material properties of Nomex, as well as determine the root cause of water column breakage. With consistent test results, a forward plan can be achieved to resolve

  1. MAT - MULTI-ATTRIBUTE TASK BATTERY FOR HUMAN OPERATOR WORKLOAD AND STRATEGIC BEHAVIOR RESEARCH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    MAT, a Multi-Attribute Task battery, gives the researcher the capability of performing multi-task workload and performance experiments. The battery provides a benchmark set of tasks for use in a wide range of laboratory studies of operator performance and workload. MAT incorporates tasks analogous to activities that aircraft crew members perform in flight, while providing a high degree of experiment control, performance data on each subtask, and freedom to use non-pilot test subjects. The MAT battery primary display is composed of four separate task windows which are as follows: a monitoring task window which includes gauges and warning lights, a tracking task window for the demands of manual control, a communication task window to simulate air traffic control communications, and a resource management task window which permits maintaining target levels on a fuel management task. In addition, a scheduling task window gives the researcher information about future task demands. The battery also provides the option of manual or automated control of tasks. The task generates performance data for each subtask. The task battery may be paused and onscreen workload rating scales presented to the subject. The MAT battery was designed to use a serially linked second computer to generate the voice messages for the Communications task. The MATREMX program and support files, which are included in the MAT package, were designed to work with the Heath Voice Card (Model HV-2000, available through the Heath Company, Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022); however, the MATREMX program and support files may easily be modified to work with other voice synthesizer or digitizer cards. The MAT battery task computer may also be used independent of the voice computer if no computer synthesized voice messages are desired or if some other method of presenting auditory messages is devised. MAT is written in QuickBasic and assembly language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The

  2. A Facile Approach for the Mass Production of Submicro/Micro Poly (Lactic Acid) Fibrous Mats and Their Cytotoxicity Test towards Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite many of the studies being conducted, the electrospinning of poly (lactic acid) (PLA), dissolved in its common solvents, is difficult to be continuously processed for mass production. This is due to the polymer solution droplet drying. Besides, the poor stretching capability of the polymer solution limits the production of small diameter fibers. To address these issues, we have examined the two following objectives: first, using an appropriate solvent system for the mass production of fibrous mats with fine-tunable fiber diameters; second, nontoxicity of the mats towards Neural Stem Cell (NSC). To this aim, TFA (trifluoroacetic acid) was used as a cosolvent, in a mixture with DCM (dichloromethane), and the solution viscosity, surface tension, electrical conductivity, and the continuity of the electrospinning process were compared with the solutions prepared with common single solvents. The binary solvent facilitated PLA electrospinning, resulting in a long lasting, stable electrospinning condition, due to the low surface tension and high conductivity of the binary-solvent system. The fiber diameter was tailored from nano to micro by varying effective parameters and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image-processing software. Laminin-coated electrospun mats supported NSC expansion and spreading, as examined using AlamarBlue assay and fluorescent microscopy, respectively.

  3. A Facile Approach for the Mass Production of Submicro/Micro Poly (Lactic Acid) Fibrous Mats and Their Cytotoxicity Test towards Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite many of the studies being conducted, the electrospinning of poly (lactic acid) (PLA), dissolved in its common solvents, is difficult to be continuously processed for mass production. This is due to the polymer solution droplet drying. Besides, the poor stretching capability of the polymer solution limits the production of small diameter fibers. To address these issues, we have examined the two following objectives: first, using an appropriate solvent system for the mass production of fibrous mats with fine-tunable fiber diameters; second, nontoxicity of the mats towards Neural Stem Cell (NSC). To this aim, TFA (trifluoroacetic acid) was used as a cosolvent, in a mixture with DCM (dichloromethane), and the solution viscosity, surface tension, electrical conductivity, and the continuity of the electrospinning process were compared with the solutions prepared with common single solvents. The binary solvent facilitated PLA electrospinning, resulting in a long lasting, stable electrospinning condition, due to the low surface tension and high conductivity of the binary-solvent system. The fiber diameter was tailored from nano to micro by varying effective parameters and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image-processing software. Laminin-coated electrospun mats supported NSC expansion and spreading, as examined using AlamarBlue assay and fluorescent microscopy, respectively. PMID:27699177

  4. Superhydrophobic PVDF and PVDF-HFP nanofibrous mats with antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, M.; Manolova, N.; Markova, N.; Rashkov, I.

    2016-02-01

    Superhydrophobic nanofibrous materials of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) were prepared by one-pot electrospinning technique. The mats were decorated with ZnO nanoparticles with silanized surface and a model drug - 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinol (5Cl8HQ). The obtained hybrid nanofibrous materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), contact angle measurements, mechanical and microbiological tests. The results showed that the incorporation of ZnO nanoparticles into PVDF and PVDF-HFP nanofibers increased the hydrophobicity (contact angle 152°), improved the thermal stability and imparted to the nanofibrous materials anti-adhesive and antimicrobial properties. The mats containing the model drug possessed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggested that the obtained hybrid mats could find potential biomedical applications requiring antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties.

  5. Active Matrix OLED Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, George

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits

  6. Versatility of electrospinning in the fabrication of fibrous mat and mesh nanostructures of bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) and their magnetic and photocatalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Bharathkumar, S; Sakar, M; K, Rohith Vinod; Balakumar, S

    2015-07-21

    This study demonstrates the fabrication of electrospun bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3/BFO) fiber mat and fibrous mesh nanostructures consisting of aligned and random fibers respectively. The formation of these one dimensional (1D) nanostructures was mediated by the drum and plate collectors in the electrospinning process that yielded aligned and random nanofibers of BFO respectively. The single phase and rhombohedral crystal structure of the fabricated 1D BFO nanostructures are confirmed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies indicated that the fabricated fibers are stoichiometric BFO with native oxidation states +3. The surface texture and morphology are analyzed using the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The average size of fibers in mat and mesh nanostructures is found to be 200 nm and 150 nm respectively. The band gap energy of BFO mat and mesh deduced from their UV diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-DRS) was found to be 2.44 eV and 2.39 eV, respectively, which evidenced the improved visible light receptivity of BFO mesh compared to that of the mat. Magnetization studies using a super conducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer revealed the weak ferromagnetic properties of BFO mesh and mat nanostructures that could emerge due to the dimension induced suppression of cycloidal spin structures. The photocatalytic degradation properties of the fibrous mesh are found to be enhanced compared to that of the mat. This could be attributed to the reduced band gap energy and an improved semiconductor band-bending phenomenon in the mesh that favoured the transportation of excited charge carriers to the photocatalyst-dye interfaces and the production of more number of reactive species that lead to the effective degradation of the dye molecules.

  7. Stromatolites, Metals, Statistics and Microbial Mats: A Complex Interplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Initially thought to be relatively 'simple' ecosystems for study, microbial mats have long been considered ideal for any number of research questions. Microbial mats can be found in any number of environments, both natural and manmade, and are typically dependent upon the physiochemical environment for their structure, maintenance and longevity. Ultimately, these and other parameters govern community whereby a microbial mat provides overall ecosystem services to their environment. On the edge of a hotspring in Yellowstone National Park we have found an active microbial mat community that can form a laminated, lithified, accretionary structure that is likely the best example of a living and growing stromatolite. In the outfall channel of the sulfidic Stinking Spring, Utah, we have found examples of both naturally occurring laminated and floating mats where the carbon flux is controlled by abiotic degassing of CO2 rather than metabolism. δ13C-bicarbonate uptake experiments reveal an autotrophic growth rate of 0 - 0.16%/day while δ13C-acetate reveals a higher heterotrophic growth rate of 0.03 - 0.65%/day, which highlights the role of heterotrophs in these mats. Similar growth experiments on Little Hot Creek, California laminated microbial mats reveal a trend for top-down microbial growth with similar microbial taxonomy and diversity to other mat-types. Of a curious note is that incubation experiments with Little Hot Creek mats reveals the importance of particular metals in mat structure and function. Statistically, alpha- and beta-diversity metrics are often used to characterize microbial communities in such systems, but from an analysis of a wastewater treatment system, Hill diversities can better interpret the effective number of species to produce an ecologically intuitive quantity to better understand a microbial mat ecosystem.

  8. Nitrogen cycle in microbial mats: completely unknown?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coban, O.; Bebout, B.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are thought to have originated around 3.7 billion years ago, most likely in the areas around submarine hydrothermal vents, which supplied a source of energy in the form of reduced chemical species from the Earth's interior. Active hydrothermal vents are also believed to exist on Jupiter's moon Europa, Saturn's moon Enceladus, and on Mars, earlier in that planet's history. Microbial mats have been an important force in the maintenance of Earth's ecosystems and the first photosynthesis was also originated there. Microbial mats are believed to exhibit most, if not all, biogeochemical processes that exist in aquatic ecosystems, due to the presence of different physiological groups of microorganisms therein. While most microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations have been shown to occur within microbial mats, the nitrogen cycle in the microbial mats has received very little study in spite of the fact that nitrogen usually limits growth in marine environments. We will present the first results in the determination of a complete nitrogen budget for a photosynthetic microbial mat. Both in situ sources and sinks of nitrogen in photosynthetic microbial mats are being measured using stable isotope techniques. Our work has a particular focus on recently described, but poorly understood, processes, e.g., anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and an emphasis on understanding the role that nitrogen cycling may play in generating biogenic nitrogen isotopic signatures and biomarker molecules. Measurements of environmental controls on nitrogen cycling should offer insight into the nature of co-evolution of these microbial communities and their planets of origin. Identifying the spatial (microscale) as well as temporal (diel and seasonal) distribution of nitrogen transformations, e.g., rates of nitrification and denitrification, within mats, particularly with respect to the distribution of photosynthetically-produced oxygen, is anticipated. The results

  9. Mucoadhesive electrospun chitosan-based nanofibre mats for dental caries prevention.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Sukma, Monrudee; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-03-01

    The mucoadhesive electrospun nanofibre mats were developed using chitosan (CS) and thiolated chitosan (CS-SH) as mucoadhesive polymers. Garcinia mangostana (GM) extract was incorporated into nanofibre mats. The antibacterial activity in the single and combined agents was evaluated against dental caries pathogens. The morphology of mats was observed using SEM. The mats were evaluated for GM extract amount, mucoadhesion, in vitro release, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity. The mucoadhesion and antibacterial activity were determined in healthy human volunteers. The prepared mats were in nanoscale with good physical and mucoadhesive properties. The CS-SH caused the higher mucoadhesion. All mats rapidly released active substances, which had the synergistic antibacterial activity. In addition, the reduction of bacteria and good mucoadhesion in the oral cavity occurred without cytotoxicity. The results suggest that mats have the potential to be mucoadhesive dosage forms to maintain oral hygiene by reducing the bacterial growth that causes the dental caries.

  10. Elastic-plastic behavior of non-woven fibrous mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Meredith N.; Pai, Chia-Ling; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2012-02-01

    Electrospinning is a novel method for creating non-woven polymer mats that have high surface area and high porosity. These attributes make them ideal candidates for multifunctional composites. Understanding the mechanical properties as a function of fiber properties and mat microstructure can aid in designing these composites. Further, a constitutive model which captures the membrane stress-strain behavior as a function of fiber properties and the geometry of the fibrous network would be a powerful design tool. Here, mats electrospun from amorphous polyamide are used as a model system. The elastic-plastic behavior of single fibers are obtained in tensile tests. Uniaxial monotonic and cyclic tensile tests are conducted on non-woven mats. The mat exhibits elastic-plastic stress-strain behavior. The transverse strain behavior provides important complementary data, showing a negligible initial Poisson's ratio followed by a transverse:axial strain ratio greater than -1:1 after an axial strain of 0.02. A triangulated framework has been developed to emulate the fibrous network structure of the mat. The micromechanically based model incorporates the elastic-plastic behavior of single fibers into a macroscopic membrane model of the mat. This representative volume element based model is shown to capture the uniaxial elastic-plastic response of the mat under monotonic and cyclic loading. The initial modulus and yield stress of the mat are governed by the fiber properties, the network geometry, and the network density. The transverse strain behavior is linked to discrete deformation mechanisms of the fibrous mat structure including fiber alignment, fiber bending, and network consolidation. The model is further validated in comparison to experiments under different constrained axial loading conditions and found to capture the constraint effect on stiffness, yield, post-yield hardening, and post-yield transverse strain behavior. Due to the direct connection between

  11. Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-07-09

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

  12. Compositions of constructed microbial mats

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Judith A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    1999-01-01

    Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats, comprising cyanobacteria and purple autotrophic bacteria and an organic nutrient source, in a laminated structure, are described. The constructed microbial mat is used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  13. M.A.T. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    A proposal is presented for developing a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program at California State University, Bakersfield. The criteria for a MAT program are examined by outlining existing programs at: (1) Harvard Graduate School; (2) University of California, Berkeley; (3) Portland State University; (4) Stanford University; (5) University of…

  14. Hospital use of decontaminating mats.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, M G; Finzi, G; Cugini, P; Manfrini, M; Salvatorelli, G

    2003-09-01

    Decontaminating mats made of several layers of adhesive sheets (water-based acrylic 6 g/m2) supplemented with a bactericidal agent (3-1 benzoisothiazolin) at a concentration of 25% were placed in the passages providing access to the operating rooms of an orthopaedic service. Contact plates containing tryptone soy agar were used to assess bacterial concentration at specific points in front of and beyond the mats. For trolley passageways two areas were defined: central and lateral paths, corresponding to the areas walked upon by the personnel pushing the trolleys and to the paths covered by the trolley wheels, respectively. In order to exclude a simple mechanical effect, a comparison of bacterial loads at defined sites beyond the mats was carried out in the presence and in the absence of decontaminating mats. Bacterial colony counts in the presence of decontaminating mats were substantially and statistically significantly reduced compared with the absence of mats. The lower mean number of colony-forming units detected at points located beyond the mats parallels this finding; this difference is also statistically significant. We thus conclude that decontaminating mats are potentially useful in decreasing micro-organism carry-over due to personnel or the passage of trolleys into areas at high risk of infection such as operating rooms.

  15. Electrospun graphene-ZnO nanofiber mats for photocatalysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Seongpil; Joshi, Bhavana N.; Lee, Min Wook; Kim, Na Young; Yoon, Sam S.

    2014-03-01

    Graphene-decorated zinc oxide (G-ZnO) nanofibers were fabricated, for the first time, by electrospinning. The effect of graphene concentration on the properties of G-ZnO mats were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermo gravimetric analysis. The G-ZnO mats decorated with 0.5 wt.% of graphene showed excellent photocatalytic activity through degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. The highest photocatalytic activity (80% degradation) was observed for 0.5 wt.% G-ZnO mats annealed at 400 °C after 4 h of UV irradiation.

  16. MueMat Multicrid Toolbox

    2010-11-23

    MueMat is intended for the research and development of multigrid algorithms used in the solution of sparse linear systems arising from systems of partial differential equations. The software can generate example linear systems and provides short programs to demonstrate the various interfaces for creating, accessing, and applying the solvers. MueMat currently includes two types of algebraic multigrid methods and many commonly used smoothers. However, the software is intended to be extensible, and new methods canmore » be incorporated easily. MueMat also allows for advanced usage, such as combining multiple methods and segregated solves. The library supports point and block access to matrix data. MueMat has been designed for use within the programming environment of the Mathworks program MATLAB®. All algorithms and methods in MueMat have been or will be published in the open scientific literature.« less

  17. MueMat Multicrid Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-23

    MueMat is intended for the research and development of multigrid algorithms used in the solution of sparse linear systems arising from systems of partial differential equations. The software can generate example linear systems and provides short programs to demonstrate the various interfaces for creating, accessing, and applying the solvers. MueMat currently includes two types of algebraic multigrid methods and many commonly used smoothers. However, the software is intended to be extensible, and new methods can be incorporated easily. MueMat also allows for advanced usage, such as combining multiple methods and segregated solves. The library supports point and block access to matrix data. MueMat has been designed for use within the programming environment of the Mathworks program MATLAB®. All algorithms and methods in MueMat have been or will be published in the open scientific literature.

  18. Benthic Marine Cyanobacterial Mat Ecosystems: Biogeochemistry and Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats are complete ecosystems that can include processes of primary production, diagenesis and lithification. Light sustains oxygenic photosynthesis, which in turn provides energy, organic matter and oxygen to the community. Due to both absorption and scattering phenomena, incident light is transformed with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition. Mobile photo synthesizers optimize their position with respect to this light gradient. When photosynthesis ceases at night, the upper layers of the mat become reduced and sulfidic. Counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide combine to provide daily-contrasting environments separated on a scale of a few mm. The functional complexity of mats, coupled with the highly proximal and ordered spatial arrangement of biota, offers the potential for a staggering number of interactions. At a minimum, the products of each functional group of microorganisms affect the other groups both positively and negatively. For example, cyanobacteria generate organic matter (potential substrates) but also oxygen (a toxin for many anaerobes). Anaerobic activity recycles nutrients to the photosynthesizers but also generates potentially toxic sulfide. The combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods, and to various depths in the mat. Observations of mats have produced numerous surprises. For example, obligately anaerobic processes can occur in the presence of abundant oxygen, highly reduced gases are produced in the presence of abundant sulfate, meiofauna thrive at high sulfide concentrations, and the mats' constituent populations respond to environmental changes in complex ways. While photosynthetic bacteria dominate the biomass and productivity of the mat, nonphotosynthetic, anaerobic processes constitute the ultimate biological filter on the ecosystem's emergent biosignatures, including those

  19. Poly(L-lactide)/halloysite nanotube electrospun mats as dual-drug delivery systems and their therapeutic efficacy in infected full-thickness burns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiazhi; Guo, Rui; Xu, Jiqing; Lan, Yong; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren; Zhao, Yaowu

    2015-11-01

    In this study, poly(L-lactide) (PLLA)/halloysite nanotube (HNT) electrospun mats were prepared as a dual-drug delivery system. HNTs were used to encapsulate polymyxin B sulphate (a hydrophilic drug). Dexamethasone (a hydrophobic drug) was directly dissolved in the PLLA solution. The drug-loaded HNTs with optimised encapsulation efficiency were then mixed with the PLLA solution for subsequent electrospinning to form composite dual-drug-loaded fibre mats. The structure, morphology, degradability and mechanical properties of the electrospun composite mats were characterised in detail. The results showed that the HNTs were uniformly distributed in the composite PLLA mats. The HNTs content in the mats could change the morphology and average diameter of the electrospun fibres. The HNTs improved both the tensile strength of the PLLA electrospun mats and their degradation ratio. The drug-release kinetics of the electrospun mats were investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. The HNTs/PLLA ratio could be varied to adjust the release of polymyxin B sulphate and dexamethasone. The antibacterial activity in vitro of the mats was evaluated using agar diffusion and turbidimetry tests, which indicated the antibacterial efficacy of the dual-drug delivery system against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Healing in vivo of infected full-thickness burns and infected wounds was investigated by macroscopic observation, histological observation and immunohistochemical staining. The results indicated that the electrospun mats were capable of co-loading and co-delivering hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, and could potentially be used as novel antibacterial wound dressings.

  20. Fast releasing oral electrospun PVP/CD nanofiber mats of taste-masked meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Akkaramongkolporn, Prasert; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-06-20

    Fast release and taste masking of meloxicam (MX)-loaded polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/cyclodextrin (CD) nanofiber mats were developed using an electrospinning process. CDs were blended to improve the stability of the mats. The morphology and diameter of the mats were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM); physical and mechanical properties were also studied. The MX content, disintegration time, MX release and cytotoxicity of the mats were investigated. In vivo studies were also performed in healthy human volunteers. The results indicated that the mats were successfully prepared with fiber in the nanometer range. MX was well incorporated into the mats, with an amorphous form. The mats showed suitable tensile strength. CDs improved the physical stability by their cage-like supramolecular structure to protect from humidity and moisture, and create bead free nanofiber mats. The nanofiber mats with CDs were physically stable without any hygroscopicity and fusion. A fast disintegration and release of MX was achieved. Moreover, this mat released MX faster than the MX powder and commercial tablets. The cytotoxicity test revealed that mats were safe for a 5-min incubation. The disintegration studies indicated that in vivo disintegration agreed with the in vitro studies; the mat rapidly disintegrated in the mouth. The less bitter of MX was occurred in the mats that incorporated CD, menthol and aspartame. In addition, this mat was physical stable for 6 months. The results suggest that these mats may be a good candidate for fast dissolving drug delivery systems of bitter drugs to increase the palatability of dosage forms. PMID:25899284

  1. The MATS satellite mission - tomographic perspectives on the mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Ole Martin; Gumbel, Jörg; Megner, Linda; Murtagh, Donal P.; Ivchenko, Nickolay

    2016-04-01

    MATS (Mesospheric Airglow/Aerosol Tomography and Spectroscopy) is a Swedish satellite mission scheduled for launch in 2019. MATS science focuses on mesospheric wave activity and noctilucent clouds. Primary measurement targets are O2 Atmospheric band dayglow and nightglow in the near infrared (759-767 nm) and sunlight scattered from noctilucent clouds in the ultraviolet (270-300 nm). While tomography provides horizontally and vertically resolved data, spectroscopy allows analysis in terms of mesospheric composition, temperature and cloud properties. During 2015, the design of the MATS instrument was finalized, and the first complete instrument design will be shown in this presentation. As a part of this work, simulated measurements were performed and inverted using a 3 dimensional tomographic algorithm based on the optimal estimation method. As a result, the first quantitative estimation of the instruments capabilities and performance figures can now be presented, and hence give a more accurate picture of the scientific opportunities that the MATS mission provides.

  2. Capillography of Mats of Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noca, Flavio; Sansom, Elijah; Zhou, Jijie; Gharib, Mory

    2008-01-01

    Capillography (from the Latin capillus, 'hair', and the Greek graphein, to write ) is a recently conceived technique for forming mats of nanofibers into useful patterns. The concept was inspired by experiments on carpetlike mats of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Capillography may have the potential to be a less-expensive, less-time-consuming alternative to electron-beam lithography as a means of nanoscale patterning for the fabrication of small devices and instruments. In capillography, one exploits the lateral capillary forces exerted on small objects that pierce the surface of a liquid. If the small objects are identical, then the forces are always attractive. Two examples of the effects of such forces are the agglomeration of small particles floating on the surface of a pond and the drawing together of hairs of a wet paintbrush upon removal of the brush from water. Because nanoscale objects brought into contact remain stuck together indefinitely due to Van der Waals forces, patterns formed by capillography remain even upon removal of the liquid. For the experiments on the mats of carbon nanotubes, a surfactant solution capable of wetting carbon nanotubes (which are ultra-hydrophobic) was prepared. The mats were wetted with the solution, then dried. Once the mats were dry, it was found that the nanotubes had become ordered into various patterns, including nestlike indentations, trenches, and various combinations thereof. It may be possible to exploit such ordering effects through controlled wetting and drying of designated portions of mats of carbon nanotubes (and, perhaps, mats of nanofibers of other materials) to obtain patterns similar to those heretofore formed by use of electron-beam lithography. For making patterns that include nestlike indentations, it has been conjectured that it could be possible to control the nesting processes by use of electrostatic fields. Further research is needed to understand the physics of the patterning processes in order to

  3. Identification of the DNA sequences controlling the expression of the MAT alpha locus of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Siliciano, P G; Tatchell, K

    1986-01-01

    We have excised a 28-base-pair DNA fragment from the MAT alpha intergenic region and tested its ability to direct diploid-specific transcriptional repression. This fragment (1643-1671, 5'-GCTTCCCAATGTAGAAAAGTACA-TCATA-3') lies within a region required for the normal diploid-specific repression of the MAT alpha transcripts. First, the fragment was inserted into a 53-base-pair MAT alpha deletion that expresses alpha 1 and alpha 2 constitutively. Insertion of the fragment restores proper diploid regulation to the MAT alpha transcripts: alpha 1 mRNA is strongly repressed and alpha 2 mRNA is reduced by a factor of approximately equal to 10 from its haploid level. The fragment works equally well in either orientation, and two copies of the fragment do not lead to stronger repression than a single copy. We also inserted the fragment at three sites upstream of the CYC1-lacZ fusion gene. Insertions placing the regulatory fragment between the CYC1 upstream activator sequence (UAS) and the coding region make beta-galactosidase efficiently in alpha haploids but produce 1/40th the enzyme in a/alpha diploids. This diploid-specific repression requires functional MATa-1 gene product. Insertion of the MAT fragment on the opposite side of the UAS (37 base pairs upstream of the UAS) also caused diploid repression of the fusion gene, but only by a factor of 7. When the regulatory fragment is inserted at a large distance on the far side of the UAS (375 base pairs), it has little if any effect on beta-galactosidase expression. We postulate that this sequence is the operator recognized by the diploid-specific repressor. Images PMID:3517864

  4. Total mercury and methyl-mercury contents and accumulation in polar microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Antonio; Rochera, Carlos; Hennebelle, Raphaëlle; Ferrari, Christophe; Quesada, Antonio

    2015-03-15

    Although polar regions are considered isolated and pristine areas, the organisms that inhabit these zones are exposed to global pollution. Heavy metals, such as mercury, are global pollutants and can reach almost any location on Earth. Mercury may come from natural, volcanic or geological sources, or result from anthropogenic sources, in particular industrial or mining activities. In this study, we have investigated one of the most prominent biological non-marine communities in both polar regions, microbial mats, in terms of their Hg and methyl-mercury (MeHg) concentrations and accumulation capacities. The main hypotheses posed argued on the importance of different factors, and to test them, we have measured Hg concentrations in microbial mats that were collected from 6 locations in different ecological situations. For this purpose, the direct anthropogenic impacts, volcanic influences, proximity to the seashore, latitudinal gradients and C contents were investigated. Our results show that, other than the direct anthropogenic influence, none of the other hypotheses alone satisfactorily explains the Hg content in microbial mats. In contrast, the MeHg contents were noticeably different between the investigated locations, with a higher proportion of MeHg on the McMurdo Ice Shelf (Antarctica) and a lower proportion on Ward Hunt Island (High Arctic). Furthermore, our results from in situ experiments indicated that the microbial mats from South Shetland Islands could quickly accumulate (48 h) Hg when Hg dissolved salts were supplied. Over short-term periods, these mats do not transform Hg into MeHg under field conditions.

  5. Formation and Biopharmaceutical Characterization of Electrospun PVP Mats with Propolis and Silver Nanoparticles for Fast Releasing Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Adomavičiūtė, Erika; Stanys, Sigitas; Žilius, Modestas; Juškaitė, Vaida; Pavilonis, Alvydas; Briedis, Vitalis

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities of propolis and its ability to stimulate the immune system and promote wound healing make it a proper component for wound dressing materials. Silver nanoparticles are recognized to demonstrate strong antiseptic and antimicrobial activity; thus, it also could be considered in the development of products for wound healing. Combining propolis and silver nanoparticles can result in improved characteristics of products designed for wound healing and care. The aim of this study was to formulate electrospun fast dissolving mats for wound dressing containing propolis ethanolic extract and silver nanoparticles. Produced electrospun nano/microfiber mats were evaluated studying their structure, dissolution rate, release of propolis phenolic compounds and silver nanoparticles, and antimicrobial activity. Biopharmaceutical characterization of electrospun mats demonstrated fast release of propolis phenolic compounds and silver nanoparticles. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and Candida albicans strains confirmed the ability of electrospun mats to inhibit the growth of the tested microorganisms. PMID:26981531

  6. Formation and Biopharmaceutical Characterization of Electrospun PVP Mats with Propolis and Silver Nanoparticles for Fast Releasing Wound Dressing.

    PubMed

    Adomavičiūtė, Erika; Stanys, Sigitas; Žilius, Modestas; Juškaitė, Vaida; Pavilonis, Alvydas; Briedis, Vitalis

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities of propolis and its ability to stimulate the immune system and promote wound healing make it a proper component for wound dressing materials. Silver nanoparticles are recognized to demonstrate strong antiseptic and antimicrobial activity; thus, it also could be considered in the development of products for wound healing. Combining propolis and silver nanoparticles can result in improved characteristics of products designed for wound healing and care. The aim of this study was to formulate electrospun fast dissolving mats for wound dressing containing propolis ethanolic extract and silver nanoparticles. Produced electrospun nano/microfiber mats were evaluated studying their structure, dissolution rate, release of propolis phenolic compounds and silver nanoparticles, and antimicrobial activity. Biopharmaceutical characterization of electrospun mats demonstrated fast release of propolis phenolic compounds and silver nanoparticles. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and Candida albicans strains confirmed the ability of electrospun mats to inhibit the growth of the tested microorganisms.

  7. Cyanobacterial reuse of extracellular organic carbon in microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Rhona K; Mayali, Xavier; Lee, Jackson Z; Craig Everroad, R; Hwang, Mona; Bebout, Brad M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacterial organic matter excretion is crucial to carbon cycling in many microbial communities, but the nature and bioavailability of this C depend on unknown physiological functions. Cyanobacteria-dominated hypersaline laminated mats are a useful model ecosystem for the study of C flow in complex communities, as they use photosynthesis to sustain a more or less closed system. Although such mats have a large C reservoir in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), the production and degradation of organic carbon is not well defined. To identify extracellular processes in cyanobacterial mats, we examined mats collected from Elkhorn Slough (ES) at Monterey Bay, California, for glycosyl and protein composition of the EPS. We found a prevalence of simple glucose polysaccharides containing either α or β (1,4) linkages, indicating distinct sources of glucose with differing enzymatic accessibility. Using proteomics, we identified cyanobacterial extracellular enzymes, and also detected activities that indicate a capacity for EPS degradation. In a less complex system, we characterized the EPS of a cyanobacterial isolate from ES, ESFC-1, and found the extracellular composition of biofilms produced by this unicyanobacterial culture were similar to that of natural mats. By tracing isotopically labeled EPS into single cells of ESFC-1, we demonstrated rapid incorporation of extracellular-derived carbon. Taken together, these results indicate cyanobacteria reuse excess organic carbon, constituting a dynamic pool of extracellular resources in these mats. PMID:26495994

  8. Cyanobacterial reuse of extracellular organic carbon in microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Rhona K; Mayali, Xavier; Lee, Jackson Z; Craig Everroad, R; Hwang, Mona; Bebout, Brad M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacterial organic matter excretion is crucial to carbon cycling in many microbial communities, but the nature and bioavailability of this C depend on unknown physiological functions. Cyanobacteria-dominated hypersaline laminated mats are a useful model ecosystem for the study of C flow in complex communities, as they use photosynthesis to sustain a more or less closed system. Although such mats have a large C reservoir in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), the production and degradation of organic carbon is not well defined. To identify extracellular processes in cyanobacterial mats, we examined mats collected from Elkhorn Slough (ES) at Monterey Bay, California, for glycosyl and protein composition of the EPS. We found a prevalence of simple glucose polysaccharides containing either α or β (1,4) linkages, indicating distinct sources of glucose with differing enzymatic accessibility. Using proteomics, we identified cyanobacterial extracellular enzymes, and also detected activities that indicate a capacity for EPS degradation. In a less complex system, we characterized the EPS of a cyanobacterial isolate from ES, ESFC-1, and found the extracellular composition of biofilms produced by this unicyanobacterial culture were similar to that of natural mats. By tracing isotopically labeled EPS into single cells of ESFC-1, we demonstrated rapid incorporation of extracellular-derived carbon. Taken together, these results indicate cyanobacteria reuse excess organic carbon, constituting a dynamic pool of extracellular resources in these mats. PMID:26495994

  9. ON TEACHING ARCELLANA'S "THE MATS".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANDERSON, TOMMY R.

    FRANCISCO ARCELLANA'S "THE MATS," LIKE ANY WELL-CONSTRUCTED SHORT STORY, CAN SERVE AS AN IMPORTANT TEACHING DEVICE IN GUIDING STUDENTS, ESPECIALLY THOSE LEARNING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE, TO READ WITH UNDERSTANDING AND APPRECIATION, THE TECHNIQUES OF CONVERTING VERBALS BACK INTO VERBS, REPLACING ALL PRONOUNS WITH THEIR ANTECEDENTS IN PARALLEL…

  10. Stress-strain dependence for soy-protein nanofiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khansari, S.; Sinha-Ray, S.; Yarin, A. L.; Pourdeyhimi, B.

    2012-02-01

    Soy protein/nylon 6 monolithic and core-shell nanofibers were solution-blown and collected on a rotating drum as fiber mats. Tensile tests of rectangular strips of these mats revealed their stress-strain dependences. These dependences were linear at low strains which correspond to their elastic behavior. Then, a plastic-like nonlinearity sets in, which is followed by catastrophic rupture. Parameters such as Young's modulus, yield stress, and specific strain energy were measured. The results were rationalized in the framework of the phenomenological elastic-plastic model, as well as a novel micromechanical model (the latter attributes plasticity to bond rapture between the individual overstressed fibers in the mat). Besides, the effects of stretching history, rate of stretching, and winding velocity of the collector drum on the strength-related parameters are studied. The results for soy protein/nylon 6 nanofiber mats are also compared to those for solution blown pure nylon 6 mats, which were produced and tested in the same way.

  11. A field operational test on valve-regulated lead-acid absorbent-glass-mat batteries in micro-hybrid electric vehicles. Part I. Results based on kernel density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Karspeck, T.; Ott, C.; Weckler, M.; Stoermer, A. O.

    2011-03-01

    In March 2007 the BMW Group has launched the micro-hybrid functions brake energy regeneration (BER) and automatic start and stop function (ASSF). Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology are applied in vehicles with micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). In both part I and part II of this publication vehicles with MHPS and AGM batteries are subject to a field operational test (FOT). Test vehicles with conventional power system (CPS) and flooded batteries were used as a reference. In the FOT sample batteries were mounted several times and electrically tested in the laboratory intermediately. Vehicle- and battery-related diagnosis data were read out for each test run and were matched with laboratory data in a data base. The FOT data were analyzed by the use of two-dimensional, nonparametric kernel estimation for clear data presentation. The data show that capacity loss in the MHPS is comparable to the CPS. However, the influence of mileage performance, which cannot be separated, suggests that battery stress is enhanced in the MHPS although a battery refresh function is applied. Anyway, the FOT demonstrates the unsuitability of flooded batteries for the MHPS because of high early capacity loss due to acid stratification and because of vanishing cranking performance due to increasing internal resistance. Furthermore, the lack of dynamic charge acceptance for high energy regeneration efficiency is illustrated. Under the presented FOT conditions charge acceptance of lead-acid (LA) batteries decreases to less than one third for about half of the sample batteries compared to new battery condition. In part II of this publication FOT data are presented by multiple regression analysis (Schaeck et al., submitted for publication [1]).

  12. Earth's Earliest Ecosystems in the Classroom: The Use of Microbial Mats to Illustrate and Demonstrate General Principles of Scientific Inquiry and Microbial Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, B. M.; Bucaria, R.

    2004-12-01

    Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communities on Earth. As Earth's earliest ecosystems, they are centrally important to understanding the history of life on our planet and are useful models for the search for life elsewhere. As relatively small (but complete) ecosystems, microbial mats are also extremely useful for educational activities. Mats may be used to demonstrate a wide variety of concepts in general and microbial ecology, including the biogeochemical cycling of elements, photosynthesis and respiration, and the and the origin of the Earth's present oxygen containing atmosphere. Microbial mats can be found in a number of common environments accessible to teachers, and laboratory microbial mats can even be constructed using materials purchased from biological supply houses. With funding from NASA's Exobiology program, provided as a supplement to our research funding, we are developing curriculum and web-based activities centered on the use of microbial mats as tools for demonstrating general principles in ecology, and the scientific process. A web site with useful background information and links is now on-line. The curriculum, now in the pilot phase, is an integrated module having Science, Math and Language Art threads. A "Web Lab", featuring living mats maintained in a mini-aquarium, and complete with remotely-operable instrumentation not commonly available in classrooms, will be available to classrooms over the Internet. Using that system, the responses of the mat community to changes in environmental parameters, (e.g., light, pH, flow, and temperature) can be monitored using microsensors. Students will be able to develop hypotheses and propose experiments in the Web Lab to test them. Data from these experiments will be posted in real time and students will be able to collect the data, analyze it, and post results and conclusions back to the web page in a true implementation of the scientific inquiry process. The web site

  13. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  14. Molecular Ecological and Stable Isotopic Studies of Nitrogen Fixation in Modern Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, B. M.; Crumbliss, L. L.; DesMarais, D. J.; Hogan, M. E.; Omoregie, E.; Turk, K. A.; Zehr, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen is usually the element limiting biological productivity in the marine environment. Microbial mats, laminated microbial communities analogous to some of the oldest forms of life on Earth, are often the sites of high rates of N fixation (the energetically expensive conversion of atmospheric dinitrogen into a biologically useful form). The N fixing enzyme nitrogenase is generally considered to be of ancient origin, and is widely distributed throughout the Bacterial and Archaeal domains of life, indicating an important role for this process over evolutionary time. The stable isotopic signature of N fixation is purportedly recognizable in organic matter (ancient kerogens as well as present-day microbial mats) as a delta (15)N(sub organic) near zero. We studied two microbial mats exhibiting different rates of N fixation in order to better understand the impact of N fixation on the delta (15)N (sub organic) of the mats, as well as what organisms are important in this process. Mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes grow in permanently submerged hypersaline salterns, and exhibit low rates of N fixation, whereas mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Lyngbya spp grow in an intertidal area, and exhibit rates of N fixation an order of magnitude higher. To examine successional stages in mat growth, both developing and established mats at each location were sampled. PCR and RT-PCR based approaches were used to identify, respectively, the organisms containing nifH (one of the genes that encode nitrogenase) as well as those expressing nifH in these mats. Both mats exhibited a distinct diel cycle of N fixation, with highest rates occurring at night. The delta (15)N(sub organic) of the subtidal Microcoleus mats is near zero whereas the delta (15)N(sub organic) is slightly more positive (+ 2-3%), in the intertidal Lyngbya mats, an interesting difference in view of the fact that overall rates of activity in the intertidal mats are much higher that those

  15. BOTH MAT1-1 AND MAT1-2 MATING TYPES OF MYCOSPHAERELLA GRAMINICOLA OCCUR AT EQUAL FREQUENCIES IN ALGERIA.

    PubMed

    Allioui, N; Siah, A; Brinis, L; Reignault, Ph; Halama, P

    2014-01-01

    Septoria tritici blotch caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola is currently the most devastating disease on wheat crops worldwide. Mycosphaerella graminicola sexual reproduction involves two mating type idiomorphs that were previously studied in several areas around the world, but not in Algeria so far. The objective of this study was thus to determine the frequencies and distribution of M. graminicola mating types in this country. One hundred and twenty monoconidial isolates of this fungus (60 from bread wheat and 60 from durum wheat) were collected during the 2012 growing season from five distinct geographical locations in Algeria. The mating type of each isolate was identified using a multiplex PCR that amplifies either MAT1-1 or MAT1-2 fragment from mating type loci. Both idiomorphs were found at equal frequencies according to the chi-square test at the whole country level (46% MAT1-1 and 54% MAT1-2) and in each of the sampled locations. The two mating types were also detected at equal frequencies on both host species (47% MAT1-1 vs 53% MAT1-2 on bread wheat and 45% MAT1-1 vs 55% MAT1-2 on durum wheat). Our study showed that the two mating types of M. graminicola occur at equal proportions in Algeria and suggests a strong potential for sexual reproduction of the pathogen in this country that may eventually lead to either adaptation to local conditions, plant resistance overcoming or the emergence of resistance to fungicides.

  16. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  17. Geothermal reservoir characterization through active thermal testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Martin; Klepikova, Maria; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Fisch, Hansruedi; Loew, Simon; Amann, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Development and deployment of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) as renewable energy resources are part of the Swiss Energy Strategy 2050. To pioneer further EGS projects in Switzerland, a decameter-scale in-situ hydraulic stimulation and circulation (ISC) experiment has been launched at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS). The experiments are hosted in a low fracture density volume of the Grimsel granodiorite, similar to those expected at the potential enhanced geothermal system sites in the deep basement rocks of Northern Switzerland. One of the key goals of this multi-disciplinary experiment is to provide a pre- and post-stimulation characterization of the hydraulic and thermal properties of the stimulated fracture network with high resolution and to determine natural structures controlling the fluid flow and heat transport. Active thermal tests including thermal dilution tests and heat tracer tests allow for investigation of groundwater fluid flow and heat transport. Moreover, the spatial and temporal integrity of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) monitoring upgrades the potential and applicability of thermal tests in boreholes (e.g. Read et al., 2013). Here, we present active thermal test results and discuss the advantages and limitations of this method compared to classical approaches (hydraulic packer tests, solute tracer tests, flowing fluid electrical conductivity logging). The experimental tests were conducted in two boreholes intersected by a few low to moderately transmissive fault zones (fracture transmissivity of about 1E-9 m2/s - 1E-7 m2/s). Our preliminary results show that even in low-permeable environments active thermal testing may provide valuable insights into groundwater and heat transport pathways. Read T., O. Bour, V. Bense, T. Le Borgne, P. Goderniaux, M.V. Klepikova, R. Hochreutener, N. Lavenant, and V. Boschero (2013), Characterizing groundwater flow and heat transport in fractured rock using Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

  18. Low-molecular-weight sulfonates, a major substrate for sulfate reducers in marine microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Visscher, P T; Gritzer, R F; Leadbetter, E R

    1999-08-01

    Several low-molecular-weight sulfonates were added to microbial mat slurries to investigate their effects on sulfate reduction. Instantaneous production of sulfide occurred after taurine and cysteate were added to all of the microbial mats tested. The rates of production in the presence of taurine and cysteate were 35 and 24 microM HS(-) h(-1) in a stromatolite mat, 38 and 36 microM HS(-) h(-1) in a salt pond mat, and 27 and 18 microM HS(-) h(-1) in a salt marsh mat, respectively. The traditionally used substrates lactate and acetate stimulated the rate of sulfide production 3 to 10 times more than taurine and cysteate stimulated the rate of sulfide production in all mats, but when ethanol, glycolate, and glutamate were added to stromatolite mat slurries, the resulting increases were similar to the increases observed with taurine and cysteate. Isethionate, sulfosuccinate, and sulfobenzoate were tested only with the stromatolite mat slurry, and these compounds had much smaller effects on sulfide production. Addition of molybdate resulted in a greater inhibitory effect on acetate and lactate utilization than on sulfonate use, suggesting that different metabolic pathways were involved. In all of the mats tested taurine and cysteate were present in the pore water at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations. An enrichment culture from the stromatolite mat was obtained on cysteate in a medium lacking sulfate and incubated anaerobically. The rate of cysteate consumption by this enrichment culture was 1.6 pmol cell(-1) h(-1). Compared to the results of slurry studies, this rate suggests that organisms with properties similar to the properties of this enrichment culture are a major constituent of the sulfidogenic population. In addition, taurine was consumed at some of highest dilutions obtained from most-probable-number enrichment cultures obtained from stromatolite samples. Based on our comparison of the sulfide production rates found in various mats, low

  19. Counting Viruses and Bacteria in Photosynthetic Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Staal, Marc; Middelboe, Mathias; Brussaard, Corina P. D.

    2015-01-01

    Viral abundances in benthic environments are the highest found in aquatic systems. Photosynthetic microbial mats represent benthic environments with high microbial activity and possibly high viral densities, yet viral abundances have not been examined in such systems. Existing extraction procedures typically used in benthic viral ecology were applied to the complex matrix of microbial mats but were found to inefficiently extract viruses. Here, we present a method for extraction and quantification of viruses from photosynthetic microbial mats using epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) and flow cytometry (FCM). A combination of EDTA addition, probe sonication, and enzyme treatment applied to a glutaraldehyde-fixed sample resulted in a substantially higher viral (5- to 33-fold) extraction efficiency and reduced background noise compared to previously published methods. Using this method, it was found that in general, intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats harbor very high viral abundances (2.8 × 1010 ± 0.3 × 1010 g−1) compared with benthic habitats (107 to 109 g−1). This procedure also showed 4.5- and 4-fold-increased efficacies of extraction of viruses and bacteria, respectively, from intertidal sediments, allowing a single method to be used for the microbial mat and underlying sediment. PMID:25595761

  20. Mating-Type Genes and MAT Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break. PMID:22555442

  1. Mating-type genes and MAT switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2012-05-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break.

  2. Studying Microbial Mat Functioning Amidst "Unexpected Diversity": Methodological Approaches and Initial Results from Metatranscriptomes of Mats Over Diel cycles, iTags from Long Term Manipulations, and Biogeochemical Cycling in Simplified Microbial Mats Constructed from Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Lee, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial mats are famously amongst the most diverse microbial ecosystems on Earth, inhabiting some of the most inclement environments known, including hypersaline, dry, hot, cold, nutrient poor, and high UV environments. The high microbial diversity of microbial mats makes studies of microbial ecology notably difficult. To address this challenge, we have been using a combination of metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, iTags and culture-based simplified microbial mats to study biogeochemical cycling (H2 production, N2 fixation, and fermentation) in microbial mats collected from Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, California. Metatranscriptomes of microbial mats incubated over a diel cycle have revealed that a number of gene systems activate only during the day in Cyanobacteria, while the remaining appear to be constitutive. The dominant cyanobacterium in the mat (Microcoleus chthonoplastes) expresses several pathways for nitrogen scavenging undocumented in cultured strains, as well as the expression of two starch storage and utilization cycles. Community composition shifts in response to long term manipulations of mats were assessed using iTags. Changes in community diversity were observed as hydrogen fluxes increased in response to a lowering of sulfate concentrations. To produce simplified microbial mats, we have isolated members of 13 of the 15 top taxa from our iTag libraries into culture. Simplified microbial mats and simple co-cultures and consortia constructed from these isolates reproduce many of the natural patterns of biogeochemical cycling in the parent natural microbial mats, but against a background of far lower overall diversity, simplifying studies of changes in gene expression (over the short term), interactions between community members, and community composition changes (over the longer term), in response to environmental forcing.

  3. The MATS Satellite Mission - Tomographic Perspectives on the Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, B.; Gumbel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Tomography in combination with space-borne limb imaging opens exciting new ways of probing atmospheric structures. MATS (Mesospheric Airglow/Aerosol Tomography and Spectroscopy) is a new Swedish satellite mission that applies these ideas to the mesosphere. MATS science questions focus on mesospheric wave activity and noctilucent clouds. Primary measurement targets are O2 Atmospheric band dayglow and nightglow in the near infrared (759-767 nm) and sunlight scattered from noctilucent clouds in the ultraviolet (270-300 nm). While tomography provides horizontally and vertically resolved data, spectroscopy allows analysis in terms of mesospheric composition, temperature and cloud properties. This poster introduces instrument and analysis ideas, and discusses scientific perspectives and connections to other missions. MATS is being prepared for a launch in 2018.

  4. Facile and green fabrication of electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibrous mats doped with narrowly dispersed silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Song; Wang, Run-Ze; Yi, Ying; Wang, Zheng; Hao, Li-Mei; Wu, Jin-Hui; Hu, Guo-Han; He, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Submicrometer-scale poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibrous mats loaded with aligned and narrowly dispersed silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are obtained via the electrospinning process from pure water. This facile and green procedure did not need any other chemicals or organic solvents. The doped AgNPs are narrowly distributed, 4.3±0.7 nm and their contents on the nanofabric mats can be easily tuned via in situ ultraviolet light irradiation or under preheating conditions, but with different particle sizes and size distributions. The morphology, loading concentrations, and dispersities of AgNPs embedded within PVA nanofiber mats are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Moreover, the biocidal activities and cytotoxicity of the electrospun nanofiber mats are determined by zone of inhibition, dynamic shaking method, and cell counting kit (CCK)-8 assay tests. PMID:25170264

  5. An Energy Balance Model to Predict Chemical Partitioning in a Photosynthetic Microbial Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Albert, Daniel B.; DesMarais, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of biosignature formation in photosynthetic microbial mat communities offer potentially useful insights with regards to both solar and extrasolar astrobiology. Biosignature formation in such systems results from the chemical transformation of photosynthetically fixed carbon by accessory microorganisms. This fixed carbon represents a source not only of reducing power, but also energy, to these organisms, so that chemical and energy budgets should be coupled. We tested this hypothesis by applying an energy balance model to predict the fate of photosynthetic productivity under dark, anoxic conditions. Fermentation of photosynthetically fixed carbon is taken to be the only source of energy available to cyanobacteria in the absence of light and oxygen, and nitrogen fixation is the principal energy demand. The alternate fate for fixed carbon is to build cyanobacterial biomass with Redfield C:N ratio. The model predicts that, under completely nitrogen-limited conditions, growth is optimized when 78% of fixed carbon stores are directed into fermentative energy generation, with the remainder allocated to growth. These predictions were compared to measurements made on microbial mats that are known to be both nitrogen-limited and populated by actively nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. In these mats, under dark, anoxic conditions, 82% of fixed carbon stores were diverted into fermentation. The close agreement between these independent approaches suggests that energy balance models may provide a quantitative means of predicting chemical partitioning within such systems - an important step towards understanding how biological productivity is ultimately partitioned into biosignature compounds.

  6. Regulation of biphasic drug release behavior by graphene oxide in polyvinyl pyrrolidone/poly(ε-caprolactone) core/sheath nanofiber mats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Yang, Peng; Jia, Yongtang; Zhang, Yumei; Ye, Qiuying; Zeng, Simin

    2016-10-01

    One of the key issues for drug delivery systems is to develop a drug carrier with a time-programmed, biphasic release behavior. Using vancomycin hydrochloride (VAN) as a model drug, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) blended with graphene oxide (GO) sheets as the core matrix, and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) as the sheath polymer, core/sheath PVP/PCL nanofiber mats were fabricated via a coaxial electrospinning process. We hypothesized that the addition of GO sheets would lead to their molecular interactions with VAN molecules, thereby adjusting the VAN release behavior. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of the fiber mats revealed their nanofibrous structure and clear core/sheath boundary. Raman analysis demonstrated the presence of GO sheets in the PVP/PCL nanofiber mats. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated the formation of hydrogen bonds between GO sheets and VAN molecules. In vitro studies showed that the PVP/PCL nanofiber mats were biocompatible, despite the addition of GO sheets, and exhibited typical biphasic drug release profiles, which were tailored by adjusting the content of GO sheets. Furthermore, an antimicrobial test showed different antimicrobial activities of the medicated nanofiber mats, depending on the GO content. Collectively, the results of the present study provide a simple approach to obtaining time-programmed drug release profiles. PMID:27259160

  7. Effects of tacky mat contamination on bond degradation for Chemlok/liner and NBR/liner bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Tacky mats are placed by the rubber lay-up areas for the solid rocket motor segments. These mats dust off the shoes prior to entering the platform where the lay-up work is performed. The possibility exists that a tacky mat could be touched with gloved hands prior to handling the uncured nitride butadiene rubber (NBR). Tests were run to determine if NBR were accidentally touched would there be any degradation of the liner/NBR bond. The tacky mats were judged solely on the basis of bond degradation caused by either direct or indirect contamination. Test results all indicate that there was no notable NBR/Chemlok or liner/NBR bond degradation on samples that came into contact with the tacky mat material. Testing procedures are described. The tacky mat adhesive composition does not contain fluorocarbons or release agents that would affect bonding.

  8. Bacterial contamination control mats: a comparative study.

    PubMed Central

    Meddick, H. M.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of six different types of contamination control mats currently in use at the entrances to theatre suites and other clean areas to remove bacteria-carrying particles from theatre trolley wheeels was compared. Marked differences in the effectiveness of this property were obtained; and all mats showed some disadvantages. Modification of one of the mats has resulted in improved efficiency under working conditions. Images Plate 1 PMID:267665

  9. Archaean metabolic evolution of microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Nisbet, E. G.; Fowler, C. M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Microbial mats of coexisting bacteria and archaea date back to the early Archaean: many of the major steps in early evolution probably took place within them. The earliest mats may have formed as biofilms of cooperative chemolithotrophs in hyperthermophile settings, with microbial exploitation of diversifying niches. Anoxygenic photosynthesis using bacteriochlorophyll could have allowed mats, including green gliding bacteria, to colonize anaerobic shallow-water mesothermophile habitats. Exploitation of the Calvin–Benson cycle by purple bacteria allowed diversification of microbial mats, with some organisms in more aerobic habitats, while green sulphur bacteria specialized in anaerobic niches. Cyanobacterial evolution led to more complex mats and plankton, allowing widespread colonization of the globe and the creation of further aerobic habitat. Microbial mat structure may reflect this evolutionary development in broad terms, with anaerobic lower levels occupied by archaeal and bacterial respirers, fermenters and green bacteria, while the higher levels contain aerobic purple bacteria and are dominated by cyanobacteria. A possible origin of eukaryotes is from a fusion of symbiotic partners living across a redox boundary in a mat. The geological record of Archaean mats may be present as isotopic fingerprints: with the presence of cyanobacteria, mats may have had a nearly modern structure as early as 3.5 Ga ago (1 Ga = 109 years).

  10. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  11. Lentivirus-mediated downregulation of MAT2B inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yaohua; Zhao, Yuan; Sun, Jingying; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most lethal of skin cancers and its pathogenesis is complex and heterogeneous. The efficacy of conventional therapeutic regimens for melanoma remains limited. Thus, it is important to explore novel effective therapeutic targets in the treatment of melanoma. The MAT2B gene encodes for the regulatory subunit of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). Recent studies have suggested that MAT2B may have functional roles other than modulating catalytic activity of MAT. In order to identify the roles of MAT2B in the tumorigenesis of malignant melanoma, we compared MAT2B expression profile in melanoma tissues with that in benign nevus samples. We employed lentivirus-mediated RNAi to downregulate the expression of MAT2B in malignant melanoma cell lines (A375 and Mel-RM), and investigated the effects of MAT2B on cell growth, colony-formation ability and apoptosis in vitro, as well as tumor growth of a xenograft model in vivo. The expression levels of BCL2 and XAF1 proteins, which were closely related to tumor cell apoptosis, were analyzed by western blot analysis. Our data showed that MAT2B was elevated in both primary and metastatic melanoma tissues compared with benign nevus samples. Lentivirus-mediated downregulation of MAT2B suppressed cell growth, colony formation and induced apoptosis in A375 and Mel-RM cell lines in vitro, affected protein expression of BCL2 and XAF1, extended the transplanted tumor growth in vivo. These results indicated that MAT2B was critical in the proliferation of melanoma cells and tumorigenicity. It may be considered as a potential anti-melanoma therapeutic target. PMID:27573889

  12. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  13. Organization and evolutionary trajectory of the mating type (MAT) locus in dermatophyte and dimorphic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size ( approximately 3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens. PMID:19880755

  14. Antimicrobial application of nanofibrous mats self-assembled with quaternized chitosan and soy protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Huang, Xingjian; Shi, Xiaowen; Zhan, Yingfei; Fan, Gang; Pan, Siyi; Tian, Jing; Deng, Hongbing; Du, Yumin

    2015-11-20

    Positively charged N-[(2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium) propyl] chitosan chloride (HTCC) and negatively charged soy protein isolate (SPI) were alternately assembled on cellulose acetate (CA) electrospun nanofibrous mats via electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. CA nanofibrous mats coated with bilayers of HTCC and SPI possessed more orderly-arranged structure than uncoated CA mats according to the observation from scanning electron microscopy images. The average diameter of the nanofibers was enlarged by the increase of the bilayer number. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that HTCC and SPI were coated on the surface of the CA mats successfully. The average diameters of inhibition zones of (HTCC/SPI)10.5-films-coated nanofibrous mats against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were 9.6mm and 11.53mm, respectively, which demonstrated the highest antimicrobial activity among samples in presented study. PMID:26344276

  15. An MAT Program to Meet Future Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuman, R. Baird

    1981-01-01

    The history of Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) programs is outlined. The areas in which teaching shortages continue to exist are identified and MAT programs are urged to work to alleviate these shortages. Teacher shortages for prison inmates, youngsters with reading and language handicaps, and ghetto children are described. (MLW)

  16. User's guide to the MATS data

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Data collected for the 37 Mesoscale Transport Studies (MATS) experiments are available on a single, double-sided, high-density (1.2MB), IBM-formatted, 5.25 in. floppy disk (MATS disk). Standard ASCII characters are used. This report discusses how to install this disk, symbols used, format of the ratio, and the sample experiment.

  17. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  18. F-15B ACTIVE test stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This November 13, 1995, photograph of the underside of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept. The twin-engine F-15 research aircraft is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. They give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. Ground testing during the first two weeks of November 1995 went well, and flight tests began in March 1996. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.

  19. Dynamic Docking Test System (DDTS) active table frequency response test results. [Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of the frequency response test performed on the dynamic docking test system (DDTS) active table. Sinusoidal displacement commands were applied to the table and the dynamic response determined from measured actuator responses and accelerometers mounted to the table and one actuator.

  20. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  1. The MAT1-1:MAT1-2 ratio of Sporothrix globosa isolates in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kano, Rui; Tsui, Clement K-M; Hamelin, Richard C; Anzawa, Kazushi; Mochizuki, Takashi; Nishimoto, Katsutaro; Hiruma, Masataro; Kamata, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2015-02-01

    In order to understand the reproductive biology of pathogenic species in the Sporothrix schenckii complex, we characterized the partial mating type (MAT1-1) loci of Sporothrix schenckii, as well as the S. globosa MAT1-1-1 gene, which encoded 262 amino acid sequences. The data confirmed that the MAT1-1 locus of S. globosa was divergent from the MAT1-2 locus of the opposite mating type, suggesting that the fungus is heterothallic. To determine the mating type ratio of 20 isolates from Japanese patients, we analyzed the MAT loci by specific PCR amplification of MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes. The MAT1-1-1 was detected in 5 isolates but not in the other 15 isolates with the presence of MAT1-2-1. The MAT1-1:1-2 ratio of S. globosa isolates in Japan was estimated to be 1:3. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the sequences of the MAT1-1-1 were identical among S. globosa isolates but different from S. schenckii and Ophiostoma montium.

  2. Spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of a hypersaline microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in north-central Washington. High rates of evapotranspiration coupled with its location in an endorrheic basin contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate; hypolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M magnesium sulfate concentrations. In addition to extreme salinity, horizons within the lake seasonally exceed 50 °C, in part due to the enhanced light absorption by magnesium sulfate-saturated water. Despite extreme and highly variable seasonal conditions (salinity, temperature, photon flux), dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria and bacterial heterotroph populations develop annually at the lake. These mats may exceed 5 mm in thickness and display stratification observable by eye associated with dominant bacterial phototrophic pigments. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer followed by green and purple layers at increasing depth into the mat. Carbonates including aragonite and magnesite are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial activities. While not exclusively limited to the green stratum in the mat, maximum carbonate content is within this layer. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling within the system. Namely, we seek to understand the rates of carbon accumulation in the mat and associated sediments and the various forms this carbon takes (organic or inorganic species). We are assessing mat development, community composition, and carbon accumulation in pre-cleaned devices installed at the lake as they are colonized by native mat. We are using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS) to provide spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of mat cross-sections. Currently, this technique permits isotope analysis at the 50 μm scale, and can provide multiple isotope analyses within the thickness of each major layer of the mat. We

  3. Validity Study of a Jump Mat Compared to the Reference Standard Force Plate

    PubMed Central

    Rogan, Slavko; Radlinger, Lorenz; Imhasly, Caroline; Kneubuehler, Andrea; Hilfiker, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the field of vertical jump diagnostics, force plates (FP) are the reference standard. Recently, despite a lack of evidence, jump mats have been used increasingly. Important factors in favor of jumping mats are their low cost and portability. Objectives: This validity study compared the Haynl-Elektronik jump mat (HE jump mat) with the reference standard force plate. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy volunteers participated and each participant completed three series of five drop jumps (DJ). The parameters ground contact time (GCT) and vertical jump height (VJH) from the HE jump mat and the FP were used to evaluate the concurrent validity. The following statistical calculations were performed: Pearson's correlation (r), Bland-Altman plots (standard and for adjusted trend), and regression equations. Results: The Bland-Altman plots suggest that the HE jump mat measures shorter contact times and higher jump heights than the FP. The trend-adjusted Bland-Altman plot shows higher mean differences and wider wing-spreads of confidence limits during longer GCT. During the VJH the mean differences and the wing-spreads of the confidence limits throughout the range present as relatively constant. The following regression equations were created, as close as possible to the true value: GCT = 5.920385 + 1.072293 × [value HE jump mat] and VJH = -1.73777 + 1.011156 × [value HE jump mat]. Conclusions: The HE jump mat can be recommended in relation to the validity of constraints. In this study, only a part of the quality criteria were examined. For the final recommendation it is advised to examine the HE jump mat on the other quality criteria (test-retest reliability, sensitivity change). PMID:26715970

  4. Antibacterial electrospun chitosan-polyethylene oxide nanocomposite mats containing ZIF-8 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kohsari, Iraj; Shariatinia, Zahra; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    Antimicrobial chitosan-polyethylene oxide (CS-PEO) nanofiber mats loaded with 3, 5 and 10% (w/w) of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 nanoparticles (ZIF-8 NPs, ∼60nm diameter) were developed by electrospinning technique. The CS-PEO-GA-3% ZIF-8 NPs crosslinked with glutaraldehyde (GA) vapor was also prepared. The electrospun mats were characterized by various analysis including FE-SEM, EDAX, elemental mapping, FT-IR, contact angle, TGA/DSC as well as tensile strength analysis. The nanofibers had average diameters within the range ∼70-120nm. Antimicrobial activities of the CS-PEO and CS-PEO-3% ZIF-8 mats were evaluated by the viable cell-counting method for determining their effectiveness in reducing or halting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria so that the CS-PEO mat containing 3% ZIF-8 revealed 100% bactericidal activity against both kinds of bacteria. The crosslinked CS-PEO-GA-3% ZIF-8 NPs sample was less thermally stable but more hydrophilic than its related non-crosslinked mat reflecting there was no need to crosslink the fibers using a chemical crosslinker having adverse effects. The highest hydrophobicity and appropriate thermal and tensile properties of CS-PEO-3% ZIF-8 NPs among those of the mats including 5 and 10% ZIF-8 NPs suggested that the mentioned mat is the most suitable sample for food coating applications. PMID:27311504

  5. Epidermal growth factor upregulates motility of Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cells partially via voltage-gated Na+ channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yanning; Brackenbury, William J.; Onganer, Pinar U.; Montano, Ximena; Porter, Louise M.; Bates, Lucy F.; Djamgoz, Mustafa B. A.

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this investigation was to determine whether a functional relationship existed between epidermal growth factor (EGF) and voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) upregulation, both associated with strongly metastatic prostate cancer cells. Incubation with EGF for 24 h more than doubled VGSC current density. Similar treatment with EGF significantly and dose-dependently enhanced the cells’ migration through Transwell filters. Both the patch clamp recordings and the migration assay suggested that endogenous EGF played a similar role. Importantly, co-application of EGF and tetrodotoxin, a highly selective VGSC blocker, abolished 65% of the potentiating effect of EGF. It is suggested that a significant portion of the EGF-induced enhancement of migration occurred via VGSC activity. PMID:17960590

  6. A silk derived carbon fiber mat modified with Au@Pt urchilike nanoparticles: A new platform as electrochemical microbial biosensor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liu; Guo, Shaojun; Zhou, Ming; Liu, Ling; Liu, Chang; Dong, Shaojun

    2010-06-15

    We present here a facile and efficient route to prepare silk derived carbon mat modified with Au@Pt urchilike nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) and develop an Escherichia coli (E. coli)-based electrochemical sensor using this material. Silk is a natural protein fiber, and it is abundant with kinds of functionalities which are important in the development of the derived material. The S-derived carbon fiber mat have amino, pyridine and carbonyl functional groups, these natural existent functionalities allow the Au@Pt NPs to self-assemble on the carbon fiber surface and provide a biocompatible microenvironment for bacteria. The Au@Pt NPs modified S-derived carbon fiber is sensitive to detect the E. coli activities with a low detection limit, where glucose is used as a prelimiltary substrate to evaluate them. The performance of Au@Pt/carbon fiber mat based biosensor is much better than that of commercial carbon paper based biosensor. The high sensitivity of this biosensor stems from the unique electrocatalytic properties of Au@Pt urchilike NPs and quinone groups presented in S-derived carbon fiber. This biosensor is also tested for detection of organophosphate pesticides, fenamiphos. The relative inhibition of E. coli activity is linear with -log[fenamiphos] at the concentration range from 0.5mg/L to 36.6 mg/L with lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of 0.09 mg/L. The Au@Pt NPs modified S-derived carbon fiber mat possesses high conductivity, biocompatibility and high electrocatalytic activity and be can used as advanced electrode materials for microbial biosensor improvement. The microbial biosensor based on this material shows potential applications in environmental monitoring.

  7. Microbial communities and exopolysaccharides from Polynesian mats.

    PubMed

    Rougeaux, H; Guezennec, M; Che, L M; Payri, C; Deslandes, E; Guezennec, J

    2001-03-01

    Microbial mats present in two shallow atolls of French Polynesia were characterized by high amounts of exopolysaccharides associated with cyanobacteria as the predominating species. Cyanobacteria were found in the first centimeters of the gelatinous mats, whereas deeper layers showing the occurrence of the sulfate reducers Desulfovibrio and Desulfobacter species as determined by the presence of specific biomarkers. Exopolysaccharides were extracted from these mats and partially characterized. All fractions contained both neutral sugars and uronic acids with a predominance of the former. The large diversity in monosaccharides can be interpreted as the result of exopolymer biosynthesis by either different or unidentified cyanobacterial species. PMID:14961381

  8. Morphology, release characteristics, and antimicrobial effect of nisin-loaded electrospun gelatin fiber mat.

    PubMed

    Dheraprasart, Chanuttaporn; Rengpipat, Sirirat; Supaphol, Pitt; Tattiyakul, Jirarat

    2009-11-01

    Gelatin electrospun (e-spun) fiber mats containing nisin were produced by electrostatic spinning of gelatin-nisin in 70% (vol/vol) acetic acid aqueous solutions. Varying nisin loading concentration (0 to 3% [wt/wt]) did not affect the fiber average diameter, whereas increasing gelatin concentration from 20 to 24% (wt/vol) caused an increase in the average diameter. All nisin-loaded gelatin e-spun fiber mats demonstrated inhibition against Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 850. However, all fiber mats were fragile and easily dissolved in water. Cross-linking by saturated glutaraldehyde vapor at 37 degrees C for 5 min was done to strengthen the mat. Tensile strength, Young's modulus, and elongation of the cross-linked gelatin-nisin e-spun fiber mats varied in the range of 2.6 to 20.3 MPa, 163 to 966 MPa, and 1.7 to 5.9% , respectively. Cross-linking did not affect the mat's inhibition activity against L. plantarum TISTR 850. Nisin retention in cross-linked antimicrobial gelatin e-spun fiber mats was in the range of 1.0 to 1.22% . Increasing temperature caused an increase in nisin release, but increasing water activity did not cause a significant difference in nisin release over 50 h. After storage at 25 degrees C for 5 months, the antimicrobial gelatin e-spun fiber mat still showed inhibition against L. plantarum TISTR 850. The mats also inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes but not Salmonella Typhimurium. PMID:19903391

  9. Effect of oxygen concentration on photosynthesis and respiration in two hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Grötzschel, S; de Beer, D

    2002-10-01

    The effects of oxygen concentration on photosynthesis and respiration in two hypersaline cyanobacterial mats were investigated. Experiments were carried out on mats from Eilat, Israel, with moderate photosynthetic activity, and mats from Mallorca, Spain, with high photosynthetic activity. The oxygen concentration in the overlying water above the mats was increased stepwise from 0% to 100% O2. Subsequent changes in oxygen concentration, gross photosynthetic rates, and pH values inside the mats were measured with microelectrodes. According to published reports on the regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the key enzyme in the CO2-fixation pathway of phototrophs, we expected photosynthetic activity to decrease with increasing oxygen concentration. Gross photosynthetic and total respiration rates in both mats were highest when the O2 concentration was at 0% in the overlying water. Net oxygen production rates under these conditions were the same as under air saturation (21% O2), while gross photosynthetic and respiration rates were lowest at air saturation. In both mats, gross photosynthetic and respiration rates increased upon gradually increasing the oxygen concentration in the overlying water from 21% to 100%. These results contradict the expectation that photosynthesis decreases with increasing oxygen concentration. Increased photosynthetic rates at oxygen concentrations above 21% were probably caused by enhanced oxidation of organic matter and concomitant CO2 production due to the increased oxygen availability. The cause of the high respiration rates at 0% O2 in the overlying water was presumably the enhanced excretion of photosynthetic products during increased photosynthesis. We conclude that the effect of the O2/CO2 concentration ratio on the activity of Rubisco as demonstrated in vitro on enzyme extracts cannot be extrapolated to the situation in intact microbial mats, because the close coupling of the activity of primary

  10. Thermal actuation of graphene oxide nanoribbon mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Carretero-González, Javier; Castillo-Martínez, Elizabeth; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-03-01

    Graphene oxide nanoribbons (GOr), obtained by chemically unzipping multi-walled carbon nanotubes, were assembled into macroscopic mats by vacuum filtration. These mats exhibited up to 1.6% reversible contraction when electrically heated at ambient. The experimentally derived work capacity of the mats was about 40 J/kg, which is similar to that of natural muscle. It was limited by the mechanical strength of mats and can be increased upon optimization of their preparation conditions. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated reversible changes in the interplanar spacing of GOr layers during heating. These dimensional changes can be associated with reversible adsorption/desorption of water molecules between GOr layers and used in thermally-driven high performance artificial muscles and moisture sensors.

  11. Electrospun poly(l-lactide)/zein nanofiber mats loaded with Rana chensinensis skin peptides for wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Li, Xueqi; Li, Siming; Liu, Yongjia; Hao, Linlin

    2016-09-01

    Electrospun nanofiber mats can display impressive performance as an ideal wound dressing. In this study, poly(l-lactide)(PLLA)/zein nanofiber mats loaded with Rana chensinensis skin peptides (RCSPs) were successfully produced by two different electrospinning techniques, blend and coaxial, with the goal of developing a wound dressing material. The nanofiber mats were investigated by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), water contact angle, mechanical tests and cell viability. The resulting nanofiber mats exhibited smooth surfaces, tiny diameters and different cross-sectional shapes from pure PLLA and zein nanofibers. The FTIR result showed that PLLA, zein and RCSPs were well dispersed, without chemical interactions. Compared with coaxial nanofiber mats, blending zein-RCSPs with PLLA enhanced hydrophilicity but decreased mechanical properties. Adding RCSPs into the electrospun nanofibers significantly improved the mechanical properties of the mats. Cell viability studies with human foreskin fibroblasts demonstrated that cell growth on PLLA/zein-RCSPs nanofiber mats was significantly higher than that on PLLA/zein nanofiber mats. The results indicate that nanofiber mats containing RCSPs are potential candidates for wound dressing. PMID:27432415

  12. Estimation of axial stiffness of plant fibres from compaction of non-woven mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamstedt, E. K.; Bommier, E.; Madsen, B.

    2014-03-01

    Plant fibres are known to show a large variability in stiffness, which makes it time-consuming to experimentally characterize this property by conventional tensile testing. In this work, an alternative method is used, where the average fibre stiffness is back-calculated from compaction tests of in-plane randomly oriented fibre mats. The model by Toll is used to relate the load-displacement curve from the test to the Young modulus of the fibre, taking into account the natural variability in fibre cross section. Several tests have been performed on hemp fibre mats and compared with results from single-fibre tensile testing. The average back-calculated Young's modulus of the fibres was 45 GPa, whereas the average value from tensile testing ranged from 30 to 60 GPa. The straightforward compaction test can be useful in ranking of fibre stiffness, provided that the mat is composed of well-separated fibres and not of twisted yarns.

  13. Nonwoven filtration mat production by electrospinning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackowski, M.; Krupa, A.; Jaworek, A.

    2011-06-01

    The filtration of nanoparticles and submicron particles is an important problem in industry and health protection. One of the methods which can be used to solve this problem is to use nonwoven nanofibrous filters. The process of producing filtration mats of different thickness by electrospinning is presented in the paper. The experimental results on filtration properties of nanofibrous filter mat, including the efficiency of removal of cigarette smoke particles from a gas are also presented.

  14. Long Term Manipulations of Intact Microbial Mat Communities in a Greenhouse Collaboratory: Simulating Earth's Present and Past Field Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; DesMarais, David J.; Discipulo, Mykell; Embaye, Tsegereda; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Hogan, Mary; Jahnke, Linda L.; Keller, Richard M.; Miller, Scott R.; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie E.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mat communities were obtained from marine hypersaline saltern ponds, maintained in a greenhouse facility, and examined for the effects of salinity variations. Because these microbial mats are considered to be useful analogs of equivalent ancient marine communities, they offer insights about evolutionary events during the greater than 3 billion year time interval wherein mats co-evolved with Earth's geosphere and atmosphere. Although photosynthetic mats can be highly dynamic and exhibit extremely high activity, the mats in the present study have been maintained for more than one year with relatively minor changes. The major groups of microorganisms, as assayed using microscopic, genetic, and biomarker methodologies, are essentially the same as those in the original field samples. Field and greenhouse mats were similar with respect to rates of exchange of oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon across the mat-water interface, both during the day and at night. Field and greenhouse mats exhibited similar rates of efflux of methane and hydrogen. Manipulations of salinity in the water overlying the mats produced changes in the community that strongly resemble those observed in the field. A collaboratory testbed and an array of automated features are being developed to support remote scientific experimentation with the assistance of intelligent software agents. This facility will permit teams of investigators to explore ancient environmental conditions that are rare or absent today but might have influenced the early evolution of these photosynthetic ecosystems.

  15. Flow visualization study of the HiMAT RPRV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Water tunnel studies were performed to qualitatively define the flow field of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology remotely piloted research vehicle (HiMAT RPRV). Particular emphasis was placed on defining the vortex flows generated at high angles of attack. The flow visualization tests were conducted in the Northrop water tunnel using a 1/15 scale model of the HiMAT RPRV. Flow visualization photographs were obtained for angles of attack up to 40 deg and sideslip angles up to 5 deg. The HiMAT model was investigated in detail to determine the canard and wing vortex flow field development, vortex paths, and vortex breakdown characteristics as a function of angle of attack and sideslip. The presence of the canard caused the wing vortex to form further outboard and delayed the breakdown of the wing vortex to higher angles of attack. An increase in leading edge camber of the maneuver configuration delayed both the formation and the breakdown of the wing and canard vortices. Additional tests showed that the canard vortex was sensitive to variations in inlet mass flow ratio and canard flap deflection angle.

  16. Testing and optimizing active rotary flux compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, B.M.; Eimerl, D.; Goodwin, E.J.; Trenholme, J.; Foley, R.J.; Bird, W.L.

    1981-06-01

    The test program for an Active Rotary Flux Compressor (ARFC) has demonstrated conclusively that large compression factors can be obtained with a laminated-iron, wave-wound, rotary flux compressor. Peak-current to startup-current ratios of 17 have been produced with a rotor tip speed of 60 meters per second. Sub-millisecond pulse widths were also measured: the minimum, 590 ..mu..sec (FWHM), was obtained at 5607 rpm with an 8-inch diameter, 4-pole rotor. The machine was operated without a high current output switch, proving the feasibility of a novel commutation scheme described. A computational code has been developed that will calculate the output waveshape of the model ARFC with reasonable accuracy. The code is being refined to better account for saturation in the iron laminations. A second optimization code selects the best design for a given application. This code shows favorable cost effectiveness of large ARFC's over the conventional capacitors to drive flashlamps for large lasers.

  17. Electrospun antimicrobial hybrid mats: Innovative packaging material for meat and meat-products.

    PubMed

    Amna, Touseef; Yang, Jieun; Ryu, Kyeong-Seon; Hwang, I H

    2015-07-01

    To prevent the development and spread of spoilage/pathogenic microorganisms via meat foodstuffs, antimicrobial nanocomposite packaging can serve as a potential alternative. The objective of this study was to develop a new class of antimicrobial hybrid packaging mat composed of biodegradable polyurethane supplemented with virgin olive oil and zinc oxide via electrospinning. Instead of mixing antimicrobial compounds directly with food, incorporation in packaging materials allows the functional effect at food surfaces where microbial activity is localized. The nanofibers were characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD and TEM. The antibacterial activity was tested against two common foodborne pathogens viz., Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhimurium. The present results indicated that incorporation of olive oil in the polymer affected morphology of PU nanofibers and nanocomposite packaging were able to inhibit growth of pathogens. Thus; as-spun mat can be used as prospective antimicrobial packaging, which potentially reduces contamination of meat/meat-products. Moreover, introduced biodegradable packaging for meat products could serve to replace PVC films and simultaneously help to protect natural environment.

  18. Spatially-resolved carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Lindemann, S. R.; Cory, A. B.; Courtney, S.; Cole, J. K.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in an endorheic basin in north-central Washington. Low annual rainfall and high evaporation rates contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate, of which monimolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M concentrations. Induced by its high salinity and meromictic nature, Hot Lake displays an inverse thermal gradient with deep horizons seasonally exceeding 50 °C. Despite extreme conditions, dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria, anoxygenic photoheterotrophs, and bacterial heterotroph populations develop in the lake. These mats can exceed 1 cm in thickness and display vertical stratification in color due to bacterial pigmentation. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer underlain by green and purple layers at increasing depth. Carbonates, including aragonite and magnesite, are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial metabolic activities and associated pH excursions. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling. Cyanobacteria are the dominant CO2-fixing organisms in the mat and we seek to understand the spatial and metabolic controls on how the carbon initially fixed by mat cyanobacteria is transferred to associated heterotrophic populations spread throughout the mat strata. Secondly, we seek to understand the overall net carbon balance of the mat through a growing season. We are using a stable isotope probing approach for assessing carbon uptake and migration through representative mat samples. We performed a series of ex situ incubations of freshly harvested mat samples in lake water amended with 13C-labeled bicarbonate or substrates commonly consumed by heterotrophs (including acetate and glucose) and using multiple stable isotope techniques to track label uptake, residence time, remineralization, and location within the mat. In addition to bulk isotope

  19. rMATS: robust and flexible detection of differential alternative splicing from replicate RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Park, Juw Won; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Lin, Lan; Henry, Michael D; Wu, Ying Nian; Zhou, Qing; Xing, Yi

    2014-12-23

    Ultra-deep RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has become a powerful approach for genome-wide analysis of pre-mRNA alternative splicing. We previously developed multivariate analysis of transcript splicing (MATS), a statistical method for detecting differential alternative splicing between two RNA-Seq samples. Here we describe a new statistical model and computer program, replicate MATS (rMATS), designed for detection of differential alternative splicing from replicate RNA-Seq data. rMATS uses a hierarchical model to simultaneously account for sampling uncertainty in individual replicates and variability among replicates. In addition to the analysis of unpaired replicates, rMATS also includes a model specifically designed for paired replicates between sample groups. The hypothesis-testing framework of rMATS is flexible and can assess the statistical significance over any user-defined magnitude of splicing change. The performance of rMATS is evaluated by the analysis of simulated and real RNA-Seq data. rMATS outperformed two existing methods for replicate RNA-Seq data in all simulation settings, and RT-PCR yielded a high validation rate (94%) in an RNA-Seq dataset of prostate cancer cell lines. Our data also provide guiding principles for designing RNA-Seq studies of alternative splicing. We demonstrate that it is essential to incorporate biological replicates in the study design. Of note, pooling RNAs or merging RNA-Seq data from multiple replicates is not an effective approach to account for variability, and the result is particularly sensitive to outliers. The rMATS source code is freely available at rnaseq-mats.sourceforge.net/. As the popularity of RNA-Seq continues to grow, we expect rMATS will be useful for studies of alternative splicing in diverse RNA-Seq projects. PMID:25480548

  20. Halotaxis of cyanobacteria in an intertidal hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Kohls, Katharina; Abed, Raeid M M; Polerecky, Lubos; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk

    2010-03-01

    An intertidal hypersaline cyanobacterial mat from Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) exhibited a reversible change in its surface colour within several hours upon changes in salinity of the overlying water. The mat surface was orange-reddish at salinities above 15% and turned dark green at lower salinities. We investigated this phenomenon using a polyphasic approach that included denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral imaging, absorption spectroscopy, oxygen microsensor measurements and modelling of salinity dynamics. Filaments of Microcoleus chthonoplastes, identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphology, were found to migrate up and down when salinity was decreased below or increased above 15%, respectively, causing the colour change of the mat uppermost layer. Migration occurred in light and in the dark, and could be induced by different salts, not only NaCl. The influence of salinity-dependent and independent physico-chemical parameters, such as water activity, oxygen solubility, H2S, gravity and light, was excluded, indicating that the observed migration was due to a direct response to salt stress. We propose to term this salinity-driven cyanobacterial migration as 'halotaxis', a process that might play a vital role in the survival of cyanobacteria in environments exposed to continuous salinity fluctuations such as intertidal flats.

  1. Mineralogy of Iron Microbial Mats from Loihi Seamount

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Brandy M.; Berquó, Thelma S.; Michel, F. Marc; Sorensen, Jeffry V.; Templeton, Alexis S.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings – freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents – where ever opposing Fe(II)-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of Fe-phases using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering, low-temperature magnetic measurements, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Particle sizes of 3.5–4.6 nm were estimated from magnetism data, and coherent scattering domain (CSD) sizes as small as 1.6 nm are indicated by pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Disorder in the nanostructured Fe-bearing phases results in limited intermediate-range structural order: less than that of standard two-line ferrihydrite (Fh), except for the Pohaku site. The short-range ordered natural Fh (FhSRO) phases were stable at 4°C in the presence of oxygen for at least 1 year and during 400°C treatment. The observed stability of the FhSRO is consistent with magnetic observations that point to non-interacting nanoparticles. PDF analyses of total scattering data provide further evidence for FhSRO particles with a poorly ordered silica coating. The presence of coated particles explains the small CSD for the mat minerals, as well as the stability of the minerals over time and against heating. The mineral properties observed here provide a starting point from which progressively older and more extensively altered Fe deposits may be examined, with the ultimate goal of improved interpretation of past biogeochemical conditions and diagenetic processes. PMID:22485113

  2. Cryogenic Active Magnetic Regenerator Test Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tura, A.; Roszmann, J.; Dikeos, J.; Rowe, A.

    2006-04-01

    An AMR Test Apparatus (AMRTA) used in experiments near room-temperature required a number of modifications to allow for testing at cryogenic temperatures and with a 5 T magnetic field. The impacts of parasitic heat leaks, frictional heat generation, and eddy current heating in the AMRTA are analyzed. A low temperature gas circulation (LTGC) system to control the operating temperature was developed. The LTGC consists of a GM cryocooler coupled to a compressor and helium circuit which circulates fluid through a set of heat exchangers and flexible transfer lines connected to the AMRTA. Design features are discussed as is some initial test data.

  3. Identification of the Mating-Type (MAT) Locus That Controls Sexual Reproduction of Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Walton, Eric; Averette, Anna Floyd; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Cuomo, Christina A.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungal pathogen that primarily causes blastomycosis in the midwestern and northern United States and Canada. While the genes controlling sexual development have been known for a long time, the genes controlling sexual reproduction of B. dermatitidis (teleomorph, Ajellomyces dermatitidis) are unknown. We identified the mating-type (MAT) locus in the B. dermatitidis genome by comparative genomic approaches. The B. dermatitidis MAT locus resembles those of other dimorphic fungi, containing either an alpha-box (MAT1-1) or an HMG domain (MAT1-2) gene linked to the APN2, SLA2, and COX13 genes. However, in some strains of B. dermatitidis, the MAT locus harbors transposable elements (TEs) that make it unusually large compared to the MAT locus of other dimorphic fungi. Based on the MAT locus sequences of B. dermatitidis, we designed specific primers for PCR determination of the mating type. Two B. dermatitidis isolates of opposite mating types were cocultured on mating medium. Immature sexual structures were observed starting at 3 weeks of coculture, with coiled-hyphae-containing cleistothecia developing over the next 3 to 6 weeks. Genetic recombination was detected in potential progeny by mating-type determination, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses, suggesting that a meiotic sexual cycle might have been completed. The F1 progeny were sexually fertile when tested with strains of the opposite mating type. Our studies provide a model for the evolution of the MAT locus in the dimorphic and closely related fungi and open the door to classic genetic analysis and studies on the possible roles of mating and mating type in infection and virulence. PMID:23143684

  4. Targeting accurate object extraction from an image: a comprehensive study of natural image matting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingsong; Shao, Ling; Li, Xuelong; Wang, Lei

    2015-02-01

    With the development of digital multimedia technologies, image matting has gained increasing interests from both academic and industrial communities. The purpose of image matting is to precisely extract the foreground objects with arbitrary shapes from an image or a video frame for further editing. It is generally known that image matting is inherently an ill-posed problem because we need to output three images out of only one input image. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of the existing image matting algorithms and evaluate their performance. In addition to the blue screen matting, we systematically divide all existing natural image matting methods into four categories: 1) color sampling-based; 2) propagation-based; 3) combination of sampling-based and propagation-based; and 4) learning-based approaches. Sampling-based methods assume that the foreground and background colors of an unknown pixel can be explicitly estimated by examining nearby pixels. Propagation-based methods are instead based on the assumption that foreground and background colors are locally smooth. Learning-based methods treat the matting process as a supervised or semisupervised learning problem. Via the learning process, users can construct a linear or nonlinear model between the alpha mattes and the image colors using a training set to estimate the alpha matte of an unknown pixel without any assumption about the characteristics of the testing image. With three benchmark data sets, the various matting algorithms are evaluated and compared using several metrics to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of each method both quantitatively and qualitatively. Finally, we conclude this paper by outlining the research trends and suggesting a number of promising directions for future development. PMID:25423658

  5. Ecological succession leads to chemosynthesis in mats colonizing wood in sea water.

    PubMed

    Kalenitchenko, Dimitri; Dupraz, Marlène; Le Bris, Nadine; Petetin, Carole; Rose, Christophe; West, Nyree J; Galand, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    Chemosynthetic mats involved in cycling sulfur compounds are often found in hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and whale falls. However, there are only few records of wood fall mats, even though the presence of hydrogen sulfide at the wood surface should create a perfect niche for sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report the growth of microbial mats on wood incubated under conditions that simulate the Mediterranean deep-sea temperature and darkness. We used amplicon and metagenomic sequencing combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to test whether a microbial succession occurs during mat formation and whether the wood fall mats present chemosynthetic features. We show that the wood surface was first colonized by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Arcobacter genus after only 30 days of immersion. Subsequently, the number of sulfate reducers increased and the dominant Arcobacter phylotype changed. The ecological succession was reflected by a change in the metabolic potential of the community from chemolithoheterotrophs to potential chemolithoautotrophs. Our work provides clear evidence for the chemosynthetic nature of wood fall ecosystems and demonstrates the utility to develop experimental incubation in the laboratory to study deep-sea chemosynthetic mats. PMID:26905628

  6. Bacterial Diversity and Spatial Variability Found in a Mn-Fe Oxide Encrusted Microbial Mat From the 5000 Meter-Deep Hydrothermal Vent 'Ula Nui, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. E.; Moyer, C. L.; Curtis, A. C.; Staudigel, H.; Tebo, B. M.

    2007-12-01

    'Ula Nui Vent Field was discovered on the southern flank of Loihi Seamount during the 2006 FeMO Microbial Observatory expedition at over 5000 meters depth. The vent field exhibited abundant low temperature (<2°C above ambient) seeps which were covered with extensive mineral-encrusted microbial mat material. The microbial mats consisted of a 0.5-3 cm thick upper mat which was comprised of laminated layers of manganese oxides and iron oxides which overlayed a flocculent iron oxide mat that could attain depths of over 1 m deep. Bacterial communities from the top and bottom mats were analyzed using SSU rRNA terminal-restriction fragment polymorphisms (T-RFLP) coupled with traditional clone library analysis. T-RFLP chromatograms indicate dominance of the ζ- Proteobacteria in both the top and lower mat. Cluster analysis of the T- RFLP fingerprints show a strong correlation between the bottom mat and iron oxide-encrusted microbial mats found in the hydrothermally active Pele's Pit near the summit of Loihi Seamount. The top mat clusters with iron and manganese oxide encrusted microbial mats found at various sites on Loihi Seamount not associated with measurable active hydrothermal venting. Clone library analysis show that the top mat was dominated by phylotypes related to the δ- γ- and the recently described ζ- Proteobacteria, along with members of the Planctomycete Division. The dominance of ζ- Proteobacteria and Planctomycete phylotypes implies that neutrophilic iron oxidation and anaerobic ammonia oxidation are active metabolisms in the top mat bacterial community. Anaerobic ammonia oxidation coupled with nitrite reduction may also be an integral metabolism in this community since some Planctomycete phylotypes from the top mat cluster within the anammox clade.

  7. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jackson Z; Burow, Luke C; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R Craig; Kubo, Mike D; Spormann, Alfred M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M; Hoehler, Tori M

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico-permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)-were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with (13)C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.

  8. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jackson Z; Burow, Luke C; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R Craig; Kubo, Mike D; Spormann, Alfred M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M; Hoehler, Tori M

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico-permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)-were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with (13)C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi. PMID:24616716

  9. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R. Craig; Kubo, Mike D.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.

    2013-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico—permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)—were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi. PMID:24616716

  10. Antibacterial electrospun chitosan-polyethylene oxide nanocomposite mats containing bioactive silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kohsari, Iraj; Shariatinia, Zahra; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi

    2016-04-20

    The antimicrobial chitosan-polyethylene oxide (CS-PEO) nanofibrous mats were developed by electrospinning technique for wound dressing applications. Indeed, a green route was introduced for fabrication of antibacterial mats loaded with 0.25% and 0.50% (w/w) of bioactive silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, ∼70nm diameter) reduced by Falcaria vulgaris herbal extract. The mats were characterized by FE-SEM, EDAX, elemental mapping, FT-IR, contact angle, TGA/DSC as well as tensile strength analysis. All of the nanofibers had an average ∼200nm diameter. Interestingly, both of the CS-PEO mats containing 0.25% and 0.50% bioactive F. vulgaris-Ag NPs revealed 100% bactericidal activities against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria. The silver release from nanofiber mats was sharply increased within first eight hours for both CS-PEO mats including 0.25% and 0.50% F. vulgaris-Ag NPs but after that the Ag nanoparticles were released very slowly (almost constant). The improved hydrophilicity, higher tensile strength and much greater silver release for CS-PEO-0.50% F. vulgaris-Ag NPs relative to those of the CS-PEO 0.25% F. vulgaris-Ag NPs suggested that the former was superior for biomedical applications. PMID:26876856

  11. Characterization of metal-binding bioflocculants produced by the cyanobacterial component of mixed microbial mats.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, J; Rodriguez-Eaton, S; Ekanemesang, U M; Phillips, P

    1994-01-01

    Mixed-species microbial mats that were dominated by the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. and contained heterotrophic and purple autotrophic bacteria were constructed for specific bioremediation applications. When the mats were challenged with metals, production and secretion of metal-binding extracellular polysaccharide bioflocculants were observed. The concentration of these negatively charged polysaccharides was correlated with the removal of manganese from the water column beneath a surface microbial mat. Bioflocculants from an Oscillatoria sp. that was isolated from the mat were collected and concentrated for characterization. A chromatographic analysis revealed a heterogeneous population of polysaccharides with respect to charge density and molecular size. The subpopulation of polysaccharides which exhibited the highest level of flocculating activity was polyanionic and had a molecular weight of more than 200,000. A glycosyl analysis of the bioflocculants revealed the presence of galacturonic acid (2.2%) and glucuronic acid (1.86%). The presence of these components, which were negatively charged at the pH levels generated by the mats during photosynthesis (pH > 7.5), may account for the metal-binding properties of the mats. PMID:8074512

  12. Active diffraction gratings: Development and tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bonora, S.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L.; Zanchetta, E.; Della Giustina, G.; Brusatin, G.

    2012-12-15

    We present the realization and characterization of an active spherical diffraction grating with variable radius of curvature to be used in grazing-incidence monochromators. The device consists of a bimorph deformable mirror on the top of which a diffraction grating with laminar profile is realized by UV lithography. The experimental results show that the active grating can optimize the beam focalization of visible wavelengths through its rotation and focus accommodation.

  13. Active diffraction gratings: development and tests.

    PubMed

    Bonora, S; Frassetto, F; Zanchetta, E; Della Giustina, G; Brusatin, G; Poletto, L

    2012-12-01

    We present the realization and characterization of an active spherical diffraction grating with variable radius of curvature to be used in grazing-incidence monochromators. The device consists of a bimorph deformable mirror on the top of which a diffraction grating with laminar profile is realized by UV lithography. The experimental results show that the active grating can optimize the beam focalization of visible wavelengths through its rotation and focus accommodation.

  14. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  15. An Overview of Follow-On Testing Activities of the A-3 Subscale Diffuser Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James E.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of NASA Stennis Space Center's (SSC) A-3 Subscale Diffuser Test (SDT) Project is presented. The original scope of the SDT Project, conducted from April 2007 to January 2008, collected data to support mitigation of risk associated with design and procurement activities of the A-3 Test Stand Project, an effort to construct a simulated altitude test facility at SSC in support of NASA's Constellation Program. Follow-on tests were conducted from May 2008 through August 2009, utilizing the SDT test setup as a testbed for additional risk mitigation activities. Included are descriptions of the Subscale Diffuser (SD) test article, the test facility configuration, and test approaches.

  16. Learning Geomicrobiology as a Team Using Microbial Mats, a Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Casillas-Martinez, Lilliam; Visscher, Pieter T.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial mats are one of the best suited laminar organo-sedimentary ecosystems for students from different educational backgrounds to visualize the direct relationship between microbes and minerals. We have used tropical hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico as educational tools to promote active learning of geomicrobiology introductory concepts for undergraduate students organized in multidisciplinary teams with biological and geological backgrounds. Besides field trips and independent research projects focused on microbial mats, four intensive workshops and one capstone activity were designed to expose students to the different geomicrobiology subdisciplines (microbiology, molecular biology, geology, and geochemistry). The teaching-learning process was assessed using pre- and posttests, group discussions, activities including Gallery Walks and exquisite cadaver’s, case studies, and focal interviews. While the posttest showed a significant difference in conceptual understanding, the Gallery Walk and the capstone activities demonstrated increase in the depth, coherence, and thoughtfulness in answering questions, including a clear integration of the different subdisciplines during their presentations. Finally, the main themes described by the students as important outcomes of their participation in the Research at Undergraduate Institutions: Microbial Observatory (RUI-MO) program were: (i) the opportunity to study and learn new and different science disciplines, (ii) the microbial mats were excellent tools to learn from and integrate different science disciplines, and (iii) working in multidisciplinary teams gave them the opportunity to learn from their peers’ discipline backgrounds. To our knowledge this is the first educational initiative that uses tropical hypersaline microbial mats to teach geomicrobiology in a multidisciplinary fashion. PMID:23653817

  17. Designing an Active Target Test Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koci, James; Tan Ahn Collaboration, Dr.; Nicolas Dixneuf Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The development of instrumentation in nuclear physics is crucial for advancing our ability to measure the properties of exotic nuclei. One limitation of the use of exotic nuclei in experiment is their very low production intensities. Recently, detectors, called active-target dectectors, have been developed to address this issue. Active-target detectors use a gas medium to image charged-particle tracks that are emitted in nuclear reactions. Last semester, I designed a vacuum chamber to be used in developing Micro-Pattern Gas detectors that will upgrade the capabilities of an active-target detector called the Prototype AT-TPC. With the exterior of the chamber complete, I have now been using an electric field modeling program, Garfield, developed by CERN to design a field cage to be placed within the vacuum chamber. The field cage will be a box-like apparatus consisting of two parallel metal plates connected with a resistor chain and attached to wires wrapped between them. The cage will provide a uniform electric field within the chamber to drift electrons from nuclear reactions down to the detector in the bottom of the chamber. These signals are then amplified by a proportional counter, and the data is sent to a computer. For the long term, we would like to incorporate a Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors in the interior of the chamber and eventually use the AT-TPC to examine various nuclei. Dr. Ahn is my advising professor.

  18. Bacillamides from a hypersaline microbial mat bacterium.

    PubMed

    Socha, Aaron M; Long, Richard A; Rowley, David C

    2007-11-01

    Chemical studies of a Bacillus endophyticus isolated from a Bahamian hypersaline microbial mat led to the isolation of bacillamides B and C, new tryptamide thiazole metabolites. Bioassay-guided fractionation using a HPLC-UV-MS bioassay technique enabled the detection of these trace fermentation products, and their total structures were elucidated by combined spectroscopic techniques.

  19. Study of multi-functional electrospun composite nanofibrous mats for smart wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lin; Hu, Jinlian; Huang, Huahua; Han, Jianping; Hu, Huawen

    2015-08-01

    Composite nanofibers derived from synthetic and natural polymers normally show desirable characteristics in biomedical applications. In this study, composite nanofibrous mats (denoted as CNMs) with diameters of around 300 nm were fabricated facilely using blends of chitosan, gelatin and shape memory polyurethane (SMPU) by electrospinning and subsequent post-treatment with a silver nitrate solution. The obtained CNMs have shape memory effect and show desirable water vapor transmission ratio, surface wettability, satisfactory biological properties including antibacterial activity against the common Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, cytocompatibility demonstrated to fibroblast, and the hemostatic property through a whole-blood clotting test. In addition, such CNMs can possibly benefit the wound healing through shape fixation-assisted easy processing and shape recovery-assisted closure of cracked wounds, which can be fine-tuned by pre-programming. Therefore, the CNMs presented in this study can be used as potential smart wound dressings.

  20. Study of multi-functional electrospun composite nanofibrous mats for smart wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lin; Hu, Jinlian; Huang, Huahua; Han, Jianping; Hu, Huawen

    2015-08-01

    Composite nanofibers derived from synthetic and natural polymers normally show desirable characteristics in biomedical applications. In this study, composite nanofibrous mats (denoted as CNMs) with diameters of around 300 nm were fabricated facilely using blends of chitosan, gelatin and shape memory polyurethane (SMPU) by electrospinning and subsequent post-treatment with a silver nitrate solution. The obtained CNMs have shape memory effect and show desirable water vapor transmission ratio, surface wettability, satisfactory biological properties including antibacterial activity against the common Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, cytocompatibility demonstrated to fibroblast, and the hemostatic property through a whole-blood clotting test. In addition, such CNMs can possibly benefit the wound healing through shape fixation-assisted easy processing and shape recovery-assisted closure of cracked wounds, which can be fine-tuned by pre-programming. Therefore, the CNMs presented in this study can be used as potential smart wound dressings. PMID:26003301

  1. The Purification and Characterization of Superoxide Dismutase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and the Effects of UV Radiation on the Activity of SOD and Catalase in Hydrothermal Mats of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Vanessa; Blankenship, Robert E.; Rothschild, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermotolerant anoxygenic green phototrophic bacterium that is prominent in alkaline hot springs at temperatures between 52 and 60 C. This species often grows in the hyperoxic environment beneath cyanobacterial mats at higher temperatures up to 70 - 72 C. Cf. aurantiacus is an evolutionarily important organism since it is in the earliest branch of the eubacteria that are capable of photosynthesis and many of its characteristics can be found in other diverse groups of phototrophic bacteria. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Evaluation of the test method activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Y.; Nagase, H.; Ose, Y.; Sato, T.

    1986-12-01

    The test method of activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD was critically carried out and compared with other test methods. Investigation of test conditions showed that the moderate deviation from the test conditions defined by the OECD Test Guidelines did not have much effect on the result, and some modifications were proposed to improve the method. This method had a poor detection limit compared with the LC50 test with Oryzias latipes and EC50 of the growth inhibition test with Tetrahymena pyriformis. The susceptivity of the method was particularly poor for the chemicals which were highly toxic in the other two tests.

  3. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    SciTech Connect

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  4. Diversity techniques for omnidirectional telemetry coverage of the HiMAT research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harney, P. F.

    1981-01-01

    The highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) was flight tested and a number of technological advances applicable to future fighter aircraft were demonstrated. The aircraft control system uses airborne and ground-based computers which communicate via uplink and downlink telemetry. Antenna radiation patterns are normally much less than ideal for continuous reception or transmission for all aircraft attitudes. After flight qualification and testing on other aircraft, a frequency diversity concept and an antenna diversity concept were implemented on the HiMAT vehicle to obtain omnidirectional telemetry coverage.

  5. Severe Accident Test Station Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing safety margins in light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents is currently the focus of a number of international R&D programs. The current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system is particularly susceptible since the Zr-based cladding experiences rapid oxidation kinetics in steam at elevated temperatures. Therefore, alternative cladding materials that offer slower oxidation kinetics and a smaller enthalpy of oxidation can significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident. In the U.S. program, the high temperature steam oxidation performance of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding solutions has been evaluated in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2012. This report summarizes the capabilities of the SATS and provides an overview of the oxidation kinetics of several candidate cladding materials. A suggested baseline for evaluating ATF candidates is a two order of magnitude reduction in the steam oxidation resistance above 1000ºC compared to Zr-based alloys. The ATF candidates are categorized based on the protective external oxide or scale that forms during exposure to steam at high temperature: chromia, alumina, and silica. Comparisons are made to literature and SATS data for Zr-based alloys and other less-protective materials.

  6. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (<5 μm). Aerobic chemolithotrophic activity of the SOB depended entirely on oxygen produced locally by cyanobacteria during high light conditions. In contrast, B/C mats formed at locations where oxygen in the water column was comparatively abundant (>45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater. PMID:26405833

  7. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (<5 μm). Aerobic chemolithotrophic activity of the SOB depended entirely on oxygen produced locally by cyanobacteria during high light conditions. In contrast, B/C mats formed at locations where oxygen in the water column was comparatively abundant (>45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater.

  8. Chlorpheniramine-induced anaphylaxis diagnosed by basophil activation test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Seung; Song, Woo-Jung; Lee, Ji-Won; Cho, Young-Yoon; Park, Han-Ki; Kang, Min-Gyu; Cho, Sang-Heon; Sohn, Seong-Wook

    2015-07-01

    Chlorpheniramine is a widely prescribed H1-antihistamine for relieving urticaria or histamine-mediated allergic reactions. However, although rare, it may cause immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The diagnosis is usually made by provocation test, but its application is often limited due to comorbidities or potential risk of severe reactions. In those cases, skin tests and basophil activation tests can be considered as additional diagnostic tests for the drug allergy. Here, we report a 33-year-old female with underlying chronic urticaria, who recurrently developed anaphylaxis after chlorpheniramine administration. Intradermal test showed positive responses in the patient at 0.02 mg/mL of chlorpheniramine, but not in healthy controls. Basophil activation test showed significant up-regulation of CD63 and CD203c by chlorpheniramine. The present case reminds the rare but potential allergic risk of chlorpheniramine, and also suggests the potential utility of basophil activation test in making the diagnosis.

  9. Indications for near-surface fluid circulation cells at bacterial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubsch, S.; Haeckel, M.; Wallmann, K.

    2009-04-01

    At submarine cold vents off Costa Rica detailed sediment sampling along transects across bacterial mats was conducted during expedition M66/2 with RV METEOR deploying a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Bacterial mats occurred in patches of several m2 in size covering the sediment surface. Porewater analyses of the pushcore sediments revealed rapid sulfate consumption due to anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) below the bacterial mats. SO4 was depleted at ~5 cm sediment depth in the center of the mat and penetrating deeper into the sediment towards the rim of the mat. Pushcores taken in the center of these mats, however, showed a subsequent increase of sulfate concentrations below a sediment depth of ~10 cm. Other dissolved compounds, such as Cl, Br, H2S, TA, NH4, PO4, and SiO4, showed a similar behaviour with concentrations returning towards bottomwater values. Since this trend is common to all of the solutes, it is most likely explained by a physical process. We assume that focussed fluid outflow near the center of the bacterial mat creates a convective flow cell with bottom waters penetrating into the adjacent sediment area and directed towards the flow channel. A set of different 2-D and 3-D transport-reaction models were developed to test this hypothesis. Fluid flow in the central channel turned out to be homogeneous and thus, could be resembled as boundary condition of the surrounding sediment domain. The model also includes AMO as the most important reaction of a cold vent system. Model results indicate that the observed porewater sulfate and chloride profiles can be reproduced fairly well, for example, when applying an advection velocity of 100 cm/a in the central fluid channel and a mean background advection of 3 cm/a in the sediment domain. A detailed sensitivity study has been performed determining the parameters dominating the establishment of the near-surface flow cell.

  10. Effects of macroalgal mats and hypoxia on burrowing depth of the New Zealand cockle ( Austrovenus stutchburyi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Islay D.; Bressington, Melanie J.

    2009-02-01

    Macroalgal mats commonly occur in estuaries and sheltered embayments where they are thought to affect the oxygen conditions in the sediment, influence the geochemical process and influence the burrowing activity of bivalves. Laboratory experiments evaluated the effects of sediment hypoxia and algal mats on the burrowing ability and survival of the New Zealand cockle Austrovenus stutchburyi at 15 °C. Both dissolved oxygen concentration and time affected the burial depth of the cockles over the 12 days of the experiment. In hypoxic conditions (<2 mg L -1), cockles migrated to the sediment surface after 3.5 days and mortality occurred after 11 days. Bivalves exposed to oxygen concentrations of 2-3 mg L -1 buried closer to the sediment surface than those in the other treatments. Using a simulated tidal regime, in a mesocosm, burrowing behaviour of the cockle and pore-water oxygen conditions in the sediment were measured on exposure to experimental mats of Gracilaria chilensis and Ulva spp. for over 6 days. Algal mats on the surface of the sediment significantly lowered the dissolved oxygen concentration of the sediment pore-water and this effect was greater for the Ulva spp. treatment than the G. chilensis treatment. Cockles were buried more deeply in the control treatment without algae than in either of the two algal treatments. It is concluded that reduced oxygen conditions (<3.5 mg L -1) develop under macroalgal mats and that this reduces the burial depth of cockles. The potential harmful effects of the mats can depend on the species forming the mat and these effects are likely to be greater in the field than they are in controlled laboratory conditions.

  11. UV B-induced vertical migrations of cyanobacteria in a microbial mat

    SciTech Connect

    Rebout, B.M.; Garcia-Pichel, F.

    1995-12-01

    Exposure to moderate doses of UV B (0.35 to 0.79 W m{sup -2} s{sup -1} or 0.98 to 2.2 {mu}mol of photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1} at 310 nm) caused the surface layers of microbial mats from Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt, to become visibly lighter green. Concurrent with the color change were rapid and dramatic reductions in gross photosynthesis and in the resultant high porewater oxygen concentrations in the surface layers of the mats. The depths at which both maximum gross photosynthesis and maximum oxygen concentrations occurred were displaced downward. In contrast, gross photosynthesis in the deeper layers of the mats increased in response to UV B incident upon the surface. The cessation of exposure to UV B partially reversed all of these changes. Taken together, these responses suggest that photoautotrophic members of the mat community, most likely the dominant cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes, were migrating in response to the added UV B. The migration phenomenon was also observed in response to increases in visible radiation and UV A, but UV B was ca. 100-fold more effective than visible radiation and ca. 20-fold more effective than UV A in provoking the response. Migrating microorganisms within this mat are apparently able to sense UV B directly and respond behaviorally to limit their exposure to UV. Because of strong vertical gradients of light and dissolved substances in microbial mats, the migration and the resultant vertical redistribution of photosynthetic activity have important consequences for both the photobiology of the cyanobacteria and the net primary productivity of the mat ecosystem.

  12. UV B-Induced Vertical Migrations of Cyanobacteria in a Microbial Mat.

    PubMed

    Bebout, B M; Garcia-Pichel, F

    1995-12-01

    Exposure to moderate doses of UV B (0.35 to 0.79 W m(sup-2) s(sup-1) or 0.98 to 2.2 (mu)mol of photons m(sup-2) s(sup-1) at 310 nm) caused the surface layers of microbial mats from Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt, to become visibly lighter green. Concurrent with the color change were rapid and dramatic reductions in gross photosynthesis and in the resultant high porewater oxygen concentrations in the surface layers of the mats. The depths at which both maximum gross photosynthesis and maximum oxygen concentrations occurred were displaced downward. In contrast, gross photosynthesis in the deeper layers of the mats increased in response to UV B incident upon the surface. The cessation of exposure to UV B partially reversed all of these changes. Taken together, these responses suggest that photoautotrophic members of the mat community, most likely the dominant cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes, were migrating in response to the added UV B. The migration phenomenon was also observed in response to increases in visible radiation and UV A, but UV B was ca. 100-fold more effective than visible radiation and ca. 20-fold more effective than UV A in provoking the response. Migrating microorganisms within this mat are apparently able to sense UV B directly and respond behaviorally to limit their exposure to UV. Because of strong vertical gradients of light and dissolved substances in microbial mats, the migration and the resultant vertical redistribution of photosynthetic activity have important consequences for both the photobiology of the cyanobacteria and the net primary productivity of the mat ecosystem.

  13. ChemMatCARS Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    ChemMatCARS is a high-brilliance national synchrotron x-ray facility dedicated primarily to static and dynamic condensed matter chemistry and materials science. The scientific focus of the facility includes the study of surface and interfacial properties of liquids and solids as well as their bulk structure at atomic, molecular and mesoscopic length scales with high spatial and energy resolution. Experimental techniques supported by the facility include: 1) Liquid Surface X-ray Scattering; 2) Solid Surface X-ray Scattering; 3) Time-Resolved Crystallography; 4) Micro-Crystal Diffraction; 5) Small and Wide-angle X-ray Scattering. The data archive referenced here contains data for various components along the beamline within the First Optics Enclosure and is intended to be input or parameter data. See the Science Nuggets at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/chemmat/pages/nuggets.html for leads to some of the research conducted at the ChemMatCARS beamline.

  14. Bioflumology: Microbial mat growth in flumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airo, A.; Weigert, S.; Beck, C.

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis resulted in a transformational change of Earth's geochemical cycles and the subsequent evolution of life. However, it remains vigorously debated when this metabolic ability had evolved in cyanobacteria. This is largely because studies of Archean microfossil morphology, molecular biomarkers, and isotopic characteristics are frequently ambiguous. However, the high degree of morphological similarities between modern photosynthetic and Archean fossil mats has been interpreted to indicate phototactic microbial behavior or oxygenic photosynthesis. In order to better evaluate the relationship between mat morphology and metabolism, we here present a laboratory set-up for conducting month-long experiments in several sterilizable circular flumes designed to allow single-species cyanobacterial growth under adjustable fluid-flow conditions and protected from contamination.

  15. Microbial mats: an ecological niche for fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Sharon A.; Duval-Pérez, Lisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Fungi were documented in tropical hypersaline microbial mats and their role in the degradation of complex carbohydrates (exopolymeric substance – EPS) was explored. Fungal diversity is higher during the wet season with Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium among the more common genera. Diversity is also higher in the oxic layer and in young and transient mats. Enrichments with xanthan (a model EPS) show that without antibiotics (full community) degradation is faster than enrichments with antibacterial (fungal community) and antifungal (bacterial community) agents, suggesting that degradation is performed by a consortium of organisms (bacteria and fungi). The combined evidence from all experiments indicates that bacteria carried out approximately two-third of the xanthan degradation. The pattern of degradation is similar between seasons and layers but degradation is faster in enrichments from the wet season. The research suggests that fungi thrive in these hypersaline consortia and may participate in the carbon cycle through the degradation of complex carbohydrates. PMID:23577004

  16. Commander Mattingly prepares meal on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Mattingly, wearing flight coveralls, opens beverage container using a pair of scissors in front of middeck lockers (covered with spacecrew supplies, meal tray assemblies, and additional food items). Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System (CFES) and control panel ML86B appear on port side wall. CFES is designed to separate biological materials according to their surface electrical charges as they pass through an electrical field.

  17. The Archaea of a Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, C.; Spear, J. R.; Pace, N. R.

    2006-12-01

    The overarching goal of this work is to describe and understand the organismal composition within the domain Archaea for the microbial ecosystem of a hypersaline microbial mat. Sea salt is crystallized by solar evaporation at North America's largest saltworks, the Exportadora de Sal, in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur. Sea water flows through a series of evaporative basins with an increase in salinity until saturation is reached and halite crystallization begins. Several of these ponds are underlined with thick microbial mats. To date, it has not been known what kinds of organisms comprise these complex microbial ecosystems. Here, we report a survey of the stratified microbial communities for the distribution of representatives of Archaea in layers of the mats. This survey uses molecular approaches, based on cloning and sequencing of SSU rRNA genes for phylogenetic analyses, to determine the nature and extent of archaeal diversity that constitute these ecosystems. We compiled an altogether new phylogenetic backbone for the domain Archaea and placed representative sequences from this hypersaline analysis onto that framework. Analyses to date indicate the ubiquitous dominance of uncultured organisms of phylogenetic kinds not generally thought to be associated with hypersaline environments. Collectively, the results indicate that the diversity of life is extensive even in this seemingly inhospitable "extreme" environment.

  18. NASA Stennis Space Center Test Technology Branch Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a short history of NASA Stennis Space Center's Test Technology Laboratory and briefly describes the variety of engine test technology activities and developmental project initiatives. Theoretical rocket exhaust plume modeling, acoustic monitoring and analysis, hand held fire imaging, heat flux radiometry, thermal imaging and exhaust plume spectroscopy are all examples of current and past test activities that are briefly described. In addition, recent efforts and visions focused on accomodating second, third, and fourth generation flight vehicle engine test requirements are discussed.

  19. Rapid Reactivation of Cyanobacterial Photosynthesis and Migration upon Rehydration of Desiccated Marine Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Chennu, Arjun; Grinham, Alistair; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk; Al-Najjar, Mohammad A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Desiccated cyanobacterial mats are the dominant biological feature in the Earth’s arid zones. While the response of desiccated cyanobacteria to rehydration is well-documented for terrestrial systems, information about the response in marine systems is lacking. We used high temporal resolution hyperspectral imaging, liquid chromatography, pulse-amplitude fluorometry, oxygen microsensors, and confocal laser microscopy to study this response in a desiccated microbial mat from Exmouth Gulf, Australia. During the initial 15 min after rehydration chlorophyll a concentrations increased 2–5 fold and cyanobacterial photosynthesis was re-established. Although the mechanism behind this rapid increase of chlorophyll a remains unknown, we hypothesize that it involves resynthesis from a precursor stored in desiccated cyanobacteria. The subsequent phase (15 min–48 h) involved migration of the reactivated cyanobacteria toward the mat surface, which led, together with a gradual increase in chlorophyll a, to a further increase in photosynthesis. We conclude that the response involving an increase in chlorophyll a and recovery of photosynthetic activity within minutes after rehydration is common for cyanobacteria from desiccated mats of both terrestrial and marine origin. However, the response of upward migration and its triggering factor appear to be mat-specific and likely linked to other factors. PMID:26733996

  20. Rapid Reactivation of Cyanobacterial Photosynthesis and Migration upon Rehydration of Desiccated Marine Microbial Mats.

    PubMed

    Chennu, Arjun; Grinham, Alistair; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk; Al-Najjar, Mohammad A A

    2015-01-01

    Desiccated cyanobacterial mats are the dominant biological feature in the Earth's arid zones. While the response of desiccated cyanobacteria to rehydration is well-documented for terrestrial systems, information about the response in marine systems is lacking. We used high temporal resolution hyperspectral imaging, liquid chromatography, pulse-amplitude fluorometry, oxygen microsensors, and confocal laser microscopy to study this response in a desiccated microbial mat from Exmouth Gulf, Australia. During the initial 15 min after rehydration chlorophyll a concentrations increased 2-5 fold and cyanobacterial photosynthesis was re-established. Although the mechanism behind this rapid increase of chlorophyll a remains unknown, we hypothesize that it involves resynthesis from a precursor stored in desiccated cyanobacteria. The subsequent phase (15 min-48 h) involved migration of the reactivated cyanobacteria toward the mat surface, which led, together with a gradual increase in chlorophyll a, to a further increase in photosynthesis. We conclude that the response involving an increase in chlorophyll a and recovery of photosynthetic activity within minutes after rehydration is common for cyanobacteria from desiccated mats of both terrestrial and marine origin. However, the response of upward migration and its triggering factor appear to be mat-specific and likely linked to other factors. PMID:26733996

  1. Description of the HiMAT Tailored composite structure and laboratory measured vehicle shape under load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The aeroelastically tailored outer wing and canard of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) vehicle are closely examined and a general description of the overall structure of the vehicle is provided. Test data in the form of laboratory measured twist under load and predicted twist from the HiMAT NASTRAN structural design program are compared. The results of this comparison indicate that the measured twist is generally less than the NASTRAN predicted twist. These discrepancies in twist predictions are attributed, at least in part, to the inability of current analytical composite materials programs to provide sufficiently accurate properties of matrix dominated laminates for input into structural programs such as NASTRAN.

  2. Use of polymer mats in series for sequential reactive barrier remediation of ammonium-contaminated groundwater: laboratory column evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, B M; Grassi, M E; Davis, G B; Robertson, B S; McKinley, A J

    2002-08-01

    Large-scale column experiments were undertaken to evaluate the potential of in situ polymer mats (installed in series) to be used as permeable reactive barriers for delivery of oxidants and reductants to induce sequential bioremediation of ammonium-contaminated groundwater (approximately 120mg L(-1) NH4+-N), without bioaugmentation. The strategy was for the first group of polymer mats to deliver oxygen to induce bacterial nitrification of the ammonium to nitrite/ nitrate as the groundwater moved past and for the second group of polymer mats to deliver hydrogen or ethanol, to induce bacterial denitrification of the nitrite/nitrate to produce nitrogen gas. Once purging of the first polymer mat commenced, ammonium concentrations decreased downgradient from the polymer mats. Nitrification rates increased and stabilized over the 6-month experiment, with stable nitrification half-lives in the range 0.07-0.25 days. Nitrification most likely occurred in a biologically active zone at the polymer wall/aqueous interface. With hydrogen delivery via the polymer mats, a denitrification half-life (nitrate plus nitrite removal) of 3.5 days was induced. Denitrification rates were significantly enhanced when ethanol was delivered via a polymer mat, with denitrification half-lives in the range of 0.12-0.34 days. Nitrification/ denitrification rates were maintained for groundwater flow rates up to 300 m yr(-1), suggesting oxygen and ethanol delivery rates via the polymer mats were sufficient not to limit nitrification or denitrification. In soil columns, the polymer mat delivery system provided an effective and reliable technique for delivery of oxygen and hydrogen or ethanol for sequential nitrification/denitrification of ammonium-contaminated groundwater. Scale-up of this concept to a field pilot-scale is currently underway.

  3. Launch Deployment Assembly Extravehicular Activity Neutral Buoyancy Development Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T.

    1996-01-01

    This test evaluated the Launch Deployment Assembly (LDA) design for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) work sites (setup, igress, egress), reach and visual access, and translation required for cargo item removal. As part of the LDA design, this document describes the method and results of the LDA EVA Neutral Buoyancy Development Test to ensure that the LDA hardware support the deployment of the cargo items from the pallet. This document includes the test objectives, flight and mockup hardware description, descriptions of procedures and data collection used in the testing, and the results of the development test at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS).

  4. Size, Expenditures, MAT6 Scores, and Dropout Rates: A Correlational Study of Arkansas School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Robert L.; And Others

    This study investigated school district size, the consolidation of small school districts to make larger ones, and the linear relationships of school district size to expense per average daily attendance (ADA), basic and composite scores on the MAT6 standard achievement test, and secondary school dropout rate. Correlational analysis revealed that…

  5. Antimicrobial wound dressing nanofiber mats from multicomponent (chitosan/silver-NPs/polyvinyl alcohol) systems.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Abdelrahman M; Hudson, Samuel M; Rojas, Orlando J

    2014-01-16

    Novel hybrid nanomaterials have been developed for antimicrobial applications. Here we introduce a green route to produce antibacterial nanofiber mats loaded with silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs, 25 nm diameter) enveloped in chitosan after reduction with glucose. The nanofiber mats were obtained from colloidal dispersions of chitosan-based Ag-NPs blended with polyvinyl alcohol. Nanofibers (150 nm average diameter and narrow size distribution) were obtained by electrospinning and cross-linked with glutaraldhyde. The effect of crosslinking on the release of silver was studied by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Antimicrobial activity was studied by the viable cell-counting; mats loaded with silver and control samples (chitosan/PVA) with different degrees of cross-linking were compared for their effectiveness in reducing or halting the growth of aerobic bacteria. The results showed superior properties and synergistic antibacterial effects by combining chitosan with Ag-NPs.

  6. Design and Performance of an Enhanced Bioremediation Pilot Test in a Tidal Wetland Seep, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majcher, Emily H.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Phelan, Daniel J.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2009-01-01

    unconsolidated sediments between 1.5 and 6 years following installation of the reactive mat. To ensure hydraulic compatibility in the mat design, mat materials that had a hydraulic conductivity greater than the surrounding wetland sediments were selected, and the mixture was optimized to consist of 1.5 parts compost, 1.5 parts peat and 1 part sand as a safeguard against fluidization. Sediment and matrix properties also indicated that a nonwoven geotextile with a cross-plane flow greater than that of the native sediments was suitable as the base of the reactive mat. Another nonwoven geotextile was selected for installation between the iron mix and organic zones of the mat to create more laminar flow conditions within the mat. Total metals and sequential extraction procedure analyses of mat materials, which were conducted to evaluate water-quality compatibility of the mat materials, showed that concentrations of metals in the compost ranged from one-half to one order of magnitude below consensus-based probable effect concentrations in sediment. A 22-inch-thick reactive mat, containing 0.5 percent WBC-2 by volume, was constructed at seep area 3-4W and monitored from October 2004 through October 2005 for the pilot test. No local, immediate failure of the mat or of wetland sediments was observed during mat installation, indicating that design estimates of bearing capacity and geotextile textile selection ensured the integrity of the mat and wetland sediments during and following installation. Measurements of surface elevation of the mat showed an average settlement of the mat surface of approximately 0.25 feet after 10 months, which was near the predicted settlement for unconsolidated sediment. Monitoring showed rapid establishment and sustainment throughout the year of methanogenic conditions conducive to anaerobic biodegradation and efficient dechlorination activity by WBC-2. The median mass removal of chloromethanes and total chloroethenes and ethane during the

  7. Predicting Work Activities with Divergent Thinking Tests: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Maria M.; Cowdery, Edwina M.; King, Kelly E.; Montang, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether divergent thinking test scores obtained from engineering students during college predicted creative work activities fifteen years later. Results showed that a subscore of the "Owens Creativity Test", which assesses divergent thinking about mechanical objects, correlated significantly with self-ratings of creative work…

  8. Electrospun nanofibrous mats: from vascular repair to osteointegration.

    PubMed

    Ribba, L; Parisi, M; D'Accorso, N B; Goyanes, S

    2014-12-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique for generating a mat of continuous fibers with diameters from a few nanometers to several micrometers. The diversity of electrospinnable materials, and the unique features associated with electrospun fibers make this technique and its resultant structures attractive for applications in the biomedical field. This article presents an overview of this technique focusing on its application for tissue engineering. In particular, the advantages and disadvantages of using an electrospinning mat for biomedical applications are discussed. It reviews the different available electrospinning configurations, detailing how the different process variables and material types determine the obtained fibers characteristics. Then a description of how nanofiber based scaffolds offer great promise in the regeneration or function restoration of damaged or diseased bones, muscles or nervous tissue is reported. Different methods for incorporating active agents on nanofibers and controlling their release mechanisms are also reviewed. The review concludes with some personal perspectives on the future work to be done in order to include electrospinning technique in the industrial development of biomedical materials.

  9. Diurnal Cycles of Sulfate Reduction under Oxic Conditions in Cyanobacterial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Fründ, Claudia; Cohen, Yehuda

    1992-01-01

    Diurnal cycles of sulfate reduction were examined in a well-developed cyanobacterial mat which grew in an outdoor experimental hypersaline pond system at a constant salinity of 75 ± 5% for 3 years. Vertical profiles of sulfate reduction were determined for the upper 12 mm of the microbial mat. Sulfate reduction activities were compared with diurnal variations of oxygen and sulfide concentrations measured by microelectrodes. Significant activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected under aerobic conditions during the daytime, with maximal activity at 2 p.m. When comparing sulfate reduction activities in sediment cores taken at 6 a.m. and 12 a.m. and incubated at a constant temperature in the light and in the dark, a distinct stimulation of the activity in the vertical profile of sulfate reduction by light was evident. It is therefore concluded that the maximal in situ activities, measured at 2 p.m. in the chemocline of the cyanobacterial mat, cannot be attributed to diurnal changes of temperature alone. The response of sulfate-reducing bacteria to the addition of specific carbon sources was significantly different in the cyanobacterial layer, the anoxygenic phototrophic bacterial layer, and the permanently reduced layer of the microbial mat. Sulfate reduction in the mat layer exposed to high oxygen concentrations as a result of cyanobacterial oxygenic photosynthesis was enhanced only by glycolate; in the microzone where the chemocline is found during the daytime, ethanol was the only carbon source to enhance sulfate reduction, while both ethanol and lactate enhanced this activity in the permanently reduced zone. PMID:16348641

  10. Physical Activity and Cervical Cancer Testing among American Indian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla B.; Bogart, T. Andy; Duncan, Glen E.; Jacobsen, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that women who engage in high levels of physical activity have higher rates of cancer screening, including Papanicalaou (Pap) tests. Because American Indian (AI) women are at high risk for cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, we examined Pap screening prevalence and assessed whether physical activity was associated…

  11. Effects of Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity on Mathematics Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David S.; Hannon, James C.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an acute bout of physical activity on academic performance in school-based settings is under researched. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between a single, vigorous (70-85%) bout of physical activity completed during physical education on standardized mathematics test performance among 72, eighth grade students…

  12. Eight-Week Traditional Mat Pilates Training-Program Effects on Adult Fitness Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Kate; Gibson, Ann L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated responses of adult, novice practitioners (n = 9) to an 8-week traditional mat Pilates program (P) that met 1 hr/day three times/week. Classes consisted primarily of beginner and intermediate level exercises. Compared to an active control group (C; n = 13) that showed no improvements, those in P significantly (p less than 0.05)…

  13. Using the 4MAT Framework to Design a Problem-Based Learning Biostatistics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowacki, Amy S.

    2011-01-01

    The study presents and applies the 4MAT theoretical framework to educational planning to transform a biostatistics course into a problem-based learning experience. Using a four-question approach, described are specific activities/materials utilized at both the class and course levels. Two web-based instruments collected data regarding student…

  14. Active Protection of an MgB2 Test Coil

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Keun; Hahn, Seungyong; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study, experimental and computational, of a detect-and-activate-the-heater protection technique applied to a magnesium diboride (MgB2) test coil operated in semi-persistent mode. The test coil with a winding ID of 25 cm and wound with ~500-m long reacted MgB2 wire was operated at 4.2 K immersed in a bath of liquid helium. In this active technique, upon the initiation of a “hot spot” of a length ~10 cm, induced by a “quench heater,” a “protection heater” (PH) of ~600-cm long planted within the test coil is activated. The normal zone created by the PH is large enough to absorb the test coil’s entire initial stored energy and still keeps the peak temperature within the winding below ~260 K. PMID:22081754

  15. Optimization and characterization of poly(phthalazinone ether ketone) (PPEK) heat-resistant porous fiberous mat by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, R.; Bin, Y. Z.; Yang, W. X.; Wang, D.; Wang, J. Y.; Jian, X. G.

    2016-08-01

    Poly(phthalazinone ether ketone) (PPEK) is noted for its outstanding heat-resistance property and mechanical strength. A one-step electrospinning method was conducted to produce PPEK micro-nano porous fibrous mat. We gave emphasis study on the spinnability, optimized conditions, fibers' morphology, surface science and fracture mechanism. The uniform electrospun fibrous mat resulted from PPEK/chloroform binary system indicated that PPEK would be a prospective material to be applied in electrospinning. Addition of a small amount of non-solvent (ethanol) turned out to be advantageous to the reduction of fiber diameter and the alleviation of choking during spinning process. Organic salt (benzyltrimethylammonium chloride) was employed to increase the conductivity of solution for the formation of thin fiber. After trials, PPEK/chloroform/ethanol system with salt and PPEK/NMP system were taken as two optimized systems. These two systems showed different pore fraction in N2 adsorption test, and displayed different mechanical behaviors in uniaxial tension test. The fibrous mat from PPEK/chloroform/ethanol system showed a feature of ductile fracture with relatively low fracture strength but long fracture deformation, while the fibrous mat from PPEK/NMP system showed a feature of brittle fracture with small deformation but quite large fracture strength of ca. 6 MPa. Finally thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the resultant PPEK fibrous mat did not decompose until the temperature reached 478 °C, which qualified the resultant fibrous mat as a promising material used under high-temperature condition.

  16. Flight test and performance of a nongated active television system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John L.; Kelly, John M.; Ehlen, Jon

    1999-07-01

    A series of helicopter flight tests were conducted to test the feasibility and assess the performance of a gimbaled active television system and co-located IR system. The laser light was provided to the gimbal via a fiber optic cable from a remote semiconductor laser. A high power, divergent beam was used to illuminate a scene providing enhanced performance in poor weather, the recording of registry and augmentation to existing night vision devices. The flight tests were conducted in clear-weather conditions over land and water. Additionally, a series of ground test were conducted.

  17. MATS: Global coverage estimates for 4CMenB, a novel multicomponent meningococcal B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Medini, Duccio; Stella, Maria; Wassil, James

    2015-05-28

    Recently approved in the EU, US, Australia, and Canada, 4CMenB (Bexsero(®), GSK Vaccines) is a multi-component meningococcal B (MenB) vaccine containing 3 surface exposed recombinant proteins (fHbp, NadA, and NHBA) and New Zealand strain outer membrane vesicles (NZ OMV) containing PorA 1.4. The accepted correlate of protection to assess response to MenB vaccines, the serum bactericidal assay with human complement, is impractical for large panels of strains with diverse antigenic profile and expression. Therefore, the Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) was developed to identify MenB strains with a high likelihood of being covered by 4CMenB. MATS is used to assess MenB strain coverage without requiring sera, an advantage for testing large panels of bacterial isolates. MATS provides an accurate, conservative estimate of 4CMenB coverage. In a public-private partnership, 10 reference laboratories around the world were established and standardized to facilitate the timely collection and analysis of regional data. MATS has global public health implications for informing local policy makers of the predicted effect of the implementation of the 4CMenB vaccine. Coverage estimates are similar to or better than other recently approved vaccines, ranging from 66% to 91%. The use of MATS in post-vaccine implementation surveillance could provide data regarding vaccine effectiveness in the field and duration of protection on a global scale that will aid in the development of vaccine booster schedules, if necessary. This MATS approach could potentially be applied rapidly to assess epidemiology of other bacterial pathogens and coverage by other protein-based vaccines.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper

  19. Nitrogen fixation in a non-heterocystous cyanobacterial mat from a mountain river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrendero, Esther; Valiente, Eduardo Fernández; Perona, Elvira; Gómez, Claudia L.; Loza, Virginia; Muñoz-Martín, M. Ángeles; Mateo, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    In situ nitrogen fixation was investigated in a cyanobacterial mat growing on the bed of rocks of the Muga River, Spain. The filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Schizothrix dominated the mat, showing nitrogenase activity in the light at similar rates to those found in nearby heterocystous Rivularia colonies. N2 fixation in the light was significantly increased by an inhibitor of PSII and oxygen evolution, DCMU (3-[3,4-dichlorophenyl]-1,1-dimethylurea), and anaerobic conditions. However, no nitrogenase activity was found in the dark. Addition of fructose as a respiratory substrate induced nitrogenase activity in samples incubated under aerobic conditions in the dark but not in anaerobic conditions. Microelectrode oxygen profiles showed internal microaerobic microzones where nitrogen fixation might concentrate. Analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed only the presence of sequences belonging to filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacteria. nifH gene diversity showed that the major phylotypes also belonged to this group. One of the three strains isolated from the Schizothrix mat was capable of fixing N2 and growing in the absence of combined N. This was consistent with the nifH gene analysis. These results suggest a relevant contribution of non-heterocystous cyanobacteria to nitrogen fixation in these mats.

  20. Nitrogen fixation in a non-heterocystous cyanobacterial mat from a mountain river

    PubMed Central

    Berrendero, Esther; Valiente, Eduardo Fernández; Perona, Elvira; Gómez, Claudia L.; Loza, Virginia; Muñoz-Martín, M. Ángeles; Mateo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    In situ nitrogen fixation was investigated in a cyanobacterial mat growing on the bed of rocks of the Muga River, Spain. The filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Schizothrix dominated the mat, showing nitrogenase activity in the light at similar rates to those found in nearby heterocystous Rivularia colonies. N2 fixation in the light was significantly increased by an inhibitor of PSII and oxygen evolution, DCMU (3-[3,4-dichlorophenyl]-1,1-dimethylurea), and anaerobic conditions. However, no nitrogenase activity was found in the dark. Addition of fructose as a respiratory substrate induced nitrogenase activity in samples incubated under aerobic conditions in the dark but not in anaerobic conditions. Microelectrode oxygen profiles showed internal microaerobic microzones where nitrogen fixation might concentrate. Analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed only the presence of sequences belonging to filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacteria. nifH gene diversity showed that the major phylotypes also belonged to this group. One of the three strains isolated from the Schizothrix mat was capable of fixing N2 and growing in the absence of combined N. This was consistent with the nifH gene analysis. These results suggest a relevant contribution of non-heterocystous cyanobacteria to nitrogen fixation in these mats. PMID:27476439

  1. Nitrogen fixation in a non-heterocystous cyanobacterial mat from a mountain river.

    PubMed

    Berrendero, Esther; Valiente, Eduardo Fernández; Perona, Elvira; Gómez, Claudia L; Loza, Virginia; Muñoz-Martín, M Ángeles; Mateo, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    In situ nitrogen fixation was investigated in a cyanobacterial mat growing on the bed of rocks of the Muga River, Spain. The filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Schizothrix dominated the mat, showing nitrogenase activity in the light at similar rates to those found in nearby heterocystous Rivularia colonies. N2 fixation in the light was significantly increased by an inhibitor of PSII and oxygen evolution, DCMU (3-[3,4-dichlorophenyl]-1,1-dimethylurea), and anaerobic conditions. However, no nitrogenase activity was found in the dark. Addition of fructose as a respiratory substrate induced nitrogenase activity in samples incubated under aerobic conditions in the dark but not in anaerobic conditions. Microelectrode oxygen profiles showed internal microaerobic microzones where nitrogen fixation might concentrate. Analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed only the presence of sequences belonging to filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacteria. nifH gene diversity showed that the major phylotypes also belonged to this group. One of the three strains isolated from the Schizothrix mat was capable of fixing N2 and growing in the absence of combined N. This was consistent with the nifH gene analysis. These results suggest a relevant contribution of non-heterocystous cyanobacteria to nitrogen fixation in these mats.

  2. Nitrogen fixation in a non-heterocystous cyanobacterial mat from a mountain river.

    PubMed

    Berrendero, Esther; Valiente, Eduardo Fernández; Perona, Elvira; Gómez, Claudia L; Loza, Virginia; Muñoz-Martín, M Ángeles; Mateo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    In situ nitrogen fixation was investigated in a cyanobacterial mat growing on the bed of rocks of the Muga River, Spain. The filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Schizothrix dominated the mat, showing nitrogenase activity in the light at similar rates to those found in nearby heterocystous Rivularia colonies. N2 fixation in the light was significantly increased by an inhibitor of PSII and oxygen evolution, DCMU (3-[3,4-dichlorophenyl]-1,1-dimethylurea), and anaerobic conditions. However, no nitrogenase activity was found in the dark. Addition of fructose as a respiratory substrate induced nitrogenase activity in samples incubated under aerobic conditions in the dark but not in anaerobic conditions. Microelectrode oxygen profiles showed internal microaerobic microzones where nitrogen fixation might concentrate. Analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed only the presence of sequences belonging to filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacteria. nifH gene diversity showed that the major phylotypes also belonged to this group. One of the three strains isolated from the Schizothrix mat was capable of fixing N2 and growing in the absence of combined N. This was consistent with the nifH gene analysis. These results suggest a relevant contribution of non-heterocystous cyanobacteria to nitrogen fixation in these mats. PMID:27476439

  3. Earth's Earliest Ecosystems in the C: The Use of Microbial Mats to Demonstrate General Principles of Scientific Inquiry and Microbial Ecology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Bucaria, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communities on Earth. As Earth's earliest ecosystems, they are centrally important to understanding the history of life on our planet and are useful models for the search for life elsewhere. As relatively compact (but complete) ecosystems, microbial mats are also extremely useful for educational activities. Mats may be used to demonstrate a wide variety of concepts in general and microbial ecology, including the biogeochemical cycling of elements, photosynthesis and respiration, and the origin of the Earth's present oxygen containing atmosphere. Microbial mats can be found in a number of common environments accessible to teachers, and laboratory microbial mats can be constructed using materials purchased from biological supply houses. With funding from NASA's Exobiology program, we have developed curriculum and web-based activities centered on the use of microbial mats as tools for demonstrating general principles in ecology, and the scientific process. Our web site (http://microbes.arc.nasa.gov) includes reference materials, lesson plans, and a "Web Lab", featuring living mats maintained in a mini-aquarium. The site also provides information as to how research on microbial mats supports NASA's goals, and various NASA missions. A photo gallery contains images of mats, microscopic views of the organisms that form them, and our own research activities. An animated educational video on the web site uses computer graphic and video microscopy to take students on a journey into a microbial mat. These activities are targeted to a middle school audience and are aligned with the National Science Standards.

  4. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Activity and Toxicity Test of Pilea microphylla

    PubMed Central

    Modarresi Chahardehi, Amir; Ibrahim, Darah; Fariza Sulaiman, Shaida

    2010-01-01

    A total of 9 plant extracts were tested, using two different kinds of extracting methods to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities from Pilea microphylla (Urticaceae family) and including toxicity test. Antioxidant activity were tested by using DPPH free radical scavenging, also total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents were determined. Toxicity assay carried out by using brine shrimps. Methanol extract of method I (ME I) showed the highest antioxidant activity at 69.51 ± 1.03. Chloroform extract of method I (CE I) showed the highest total phenolic contents at 72.10 ± 0.71 and chloroform extract of method II (CE II) showed the highest total flavonoid contents at 60.14 ± 0.33. The antimicrobial activity of Pilea microphylla extract was tested in vitro by using disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The Pilea microphylla extract showed antibacterial activity against some Gram negative and positive bacteria. The extracts did not exhibit antifungal and antiyeast activity. The hexane extract of method I (HE I) was not toxic against brine shrimp (LC50 value was 3880 μg/ml). Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antimicrobial and antioxidative agents in food industry. PMID:20652052

  5. Test-Takers' Background, Literacy Activities, and Views of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Ying; Klinger, Don A.; Cheng, Liying; Fox, Janna; Doe, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among students' background information and their in-school and after-school literacy activities, as well as the relationships between students' background and their views of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). The results showed that students' literacy activities could be grouped into three…

  6. Bioremediation of metals, organic and mixed contaminants with microbial mats

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, J.

    1995-12-31

    Microbial mats are natural heterotrophic and autotrophic communities dominated by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). They are self-organized laminated structures annealed tightly together by slimy secretions from various microbial components. The surface slime of the mats effectively immobilizes the ecosystem to a variety of substrates, thereby stabilizing the most efficient internal microbial structure. Cyanobacteria mats are generated for bioremediation applications by enriching a water surface with ensiled grass clippings. These constructed mats have been used to reduce selenate to elemental selenium, remove Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Co, Cr, Fe and Mn from water and to remove Pb from sediments of shallow laboratory ponds. Uranium, U{sup 238}, was removed from groundwater samples at the rate of 3.19 Mg/m{sup 2}/h. Degradation of recalcitrant organic contaminants by mats is relatively rapid under both dark and light conditions. The following contaminants have been degraded in water and/or soil media by constructed mats: TNT, chrysene, naphthalene, hexadecane, phenanthrene, PCB, TCE, pulp and paper mill wastes, and three pesticides: chlordane, carbofuran and paraquat. Radio-labeled experiments with mat-treated carbofuran, petroleum distillates, TNT, chlordane, PCB and TCE show that these compounds are mineralized by the constructed mats. Mats applied to mixed contaminant solutions (TCE + Zn and TNT + pb) sequestered the metal while mineralizing the TCE. Remediation rates of the organic and inorganic components were the same in mixed solution as they were in single application.

  7. Reduced Gas Cycling in Microbial Mats: Implications for Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Bebout, Brad M.; DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    For more than half the history of life on Earth, biological productivity was dominated by photosynthetic microbial mats. During this time, mats served as the preeminent biological influence on earth's surface and atmospheric chemistry and also as the primary crucible for microbial evolution. We find that modern analogs of these ancient mat communities generate substantial quantities of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane. Escape of these gases from the biosphere would contribute strongly to atmospheric evolution and potentially to the net oxidation of earth's surface; sequestration within the biosphere carries equally important implications for the structure, function, and evolution of anaerobic microbial communities within the context of mat biology.

  8. Space shuttle orbiter approach and landing test evaluation report. Captive-active flight test summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Captive-active tests consisted of three mated carrier aircraft/Orbiter flights with an active manned Orbiter. The objectives of this series of flights were to (1) verify the separation profile, (2) verify the integrated structure, aerodynamics, and flight control system, (3) verify Orbiter integrated system operations, and (4) refine and finalize carrier aircraft, Orbiter crew, and ground procedures in preparation for free flight tests. A summary description of the flights is presented with assessments of flight test requirements, and of the performance operations, and of significant flight anomalies is included.

  9. Engineering and Scientific Applications: Using MatLab(Registered Trademark) for Data Processing and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Syamal K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2011-01-01

    practIcal scripts (pro grams) that extend the basic features of MatLab TOPICS mclude (1) Ma trix and vector analysis and manipulations (2) Mathematical functions (3) Symbolic calculations & functions (4) Import/export data files (5) Program lOgic and flow control (6) Writing function and passing parameters (7) Test application programs

  10. Following the kinetics: iron-oxidizing microbial mats in cold icelandic volcanic habitats and their rock-associated carbonaceous signature.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S; Kelly, Laura C; Summers, Stephen; Marteinsson, Viggo

    2011-09-01

    Icelandic streams with mean annual temperatures of less than 5 °C, which receive the cationic products of basaltic rock weathering, were found to host mats of iron-cycling microorganisms. We investigated two representative sites. Iron-oxidizing Gallionella and iron-reducing Geobacter species were present. The mats host a high bacterial diversity as determined by culture-independent methods. β-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, α-Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were abundant microbial taxa. The mat contained a high number of phototroph sequences. The carbon compounds in the mat displayed broad G and D bands with Raman spectroscopy. This signature becomes incorporated into the weathered oxidized surface layer of the basaltic rocks and was observed on rocks that no longer host mats. The presence of iron-oxidizing taxa in the stream microbial mats, and the lack of them in previously studied volcanic rocks in Iceland that have intermittently been exposed to surface water flows, can be explained by the kinetic limitations to the extraction of reduced iron from rocks. This type of ecosystem illustrates key factors that control the distribution of chemolithotrophs in cold volcanic environments. The data show that one promising sample type for which the hypothesis of the existence of past life on Mars can be tested is the surface of volcanic rocks that, previously, were situated within channels carved by flowing water. Our results also show that the carbonaceous signatures of life, if life had occurred, could be found in or on these rocks.

  11. Bootstrap testing for cross-correlation under low firing activity.

    PubMed

    González-Montoro, Aldana M; Cao, Ricardo; Espinosa, Nelson; Cudeiro, Javier; Mariño, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    A new cross-correlation synchrony index for neural activity is proposed. The index is based on the integration of the kernel estimation of the cross-correlation function. It is used to test for the dynamic synchronization levels of spontaneous neural activity under two induced brain states: sleep-like and awake-like. Two bootstrap resampling plans are proposed to approximate the distribution of the test statistics. The results of the first bootstrap method indicate that it is useful to discern significant differences in the synchronization dynamics of brain states characterized by a neural activity with low firing rate. The second bootstrap method is useful to unveil subtle differences in the synchronization levels of the awake-like state, depending on the activation pathway.

  12. Automated Activation and Deactivation of a System Under Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The MPLM Automated Activation/Deactivation application (MPLM means Multi-Purpose Logistic Module) was created with a three-fold purpose in mind: 1. To reduce the possibility of human error in issuing commands to, or interpreting telemetry from, the MPLM power, computer, and environmental control systems; 2. To reduce the amount of test time required for the repetitive activation/deactivation processes; and 3. To reduce the number of on-console personnel required for activation/ deactivation. All of these have been demonstrated with the release of the software. While some degree of automated end-item commanding had previously been performed for space-station hardware in the test environment, none approached the functionality and flexibility of this application. For MPLM activation, it provides mouse-click selection of the hardware complement to be activated, activates the desired hardware and verifies proper feedbacks, and alerts the user when telemetry indicates an error condition or manual intervention is required. For MPLM deactivation, the product senses which end items are active and deactivates them in the proper sequence. For historical purposes, an on-line log is maintained of commands issued and telemetry points monitored. The benefits of the MPLM Automated Activation/ Deactivation application were demonstrated with its first use in December 2002, when it flawlessly performed MPLM activation in 8 minutes (versus as much as 2.4 hours for previous manual activations), and performed MPLM deactivation in 3 minutes (versus 66 minutes for previous manual deactivations). The number of test team members required has dropped from eight to four, and in actuality the software can be operated by a sole (knowledgeable) system engineer.

  13. Validation of an electronic jump mat to assess stretch-shortening cycle function.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Ian C; Ó Cairealláin, Ainle; Comyns, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the concurrent validity of a commonly used electronic switch mat (ESM), or jump mat, compared with force plate (FP) data. The efficiency of collection and accuracy of data are paramount to athlete and player field testing for the strength and conditioning coach who often has access only to a jump mat. Ten subjects from 5 different sporting backgrounds completed 3 squat jumps (SJs), 3 countermovement jumps (CMJs), and 3 drop jumps (DJs). The jumps were performed on an AMTI FP operating at 1,000 Hz with an ESM positioned on top of the platform. All the subjects were experienced with the protocols involved with jump testing. The resulting absolute errors between FP and ESM data were 0.01, 0.02, and 0.01 m for CMJ, SJ, and DJ heights, respectively. However, the coefficient of variation for the DJ contact time (CT) was 57.25%, CMJ (r = 0.996), and SJ (r = 0.958) heights correlated very strongly with force platform data, and DJ data were not as strong (r = 0.683). Confidence interval tests revealed bias toward CMJ and SJ (p < 0.05). The jump mat can accurately calculate the CMJ height, SJ height, and reactive strength index for all the 3 jump protocols. However, the faster CTs and rapid movements involved in a DJ may limit its reliability when giving measures of CT, flight time, and height jumped for DJs. Strength and conditioning coaches can use such a jump mat device with the confidence that it is accurately producing valid measurements of their athlete's performance for CMJ and SJ slow SSC protocols.

  14. Testing a Theoretical Model of Immigration Transition and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Ju; Im, Eun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to develop a theoretical model to explain the relationships between immigration transition and midlife women's physical activity and test the relationships among the major variables of the model. A theoretical model, which was developed based on transitions theory and the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity theory, consists of 4 major variables, including length of stay in the United States, country of birth, level of acculturation, and midlife women's physical activity. To test the theoretical model, a secondary analysis with data from 127 Hispanic women and 123 non-Hispanic (NH) Asian women in a national Internet study was used. Among the major variables of the model, length of stay in the United States was negatively associated with physical activity in Hispanic women. Level of acculturation in NH Asian women was positively correlated with women's physical activity. Country of birth and level of acculturation were significant factors that influenced physical activity in both Hispanic and NH Asian women. The findings support the theoretical model that was developed to examine relationships between immigration transition and physical activity; it shows that immigration transition can play an essential role in influencing health behaviors of immigrant populations in the United States. The NH theoretical model can be widely used in nursing practice and research that focus on immigrant women and their health behaviors. Health care providers need to consider the influences of immigration transition to promote immigrant women's physical activity. PMID:26502554

  15. Testing a Theoretical Model of Immigration Transition and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Ju; Im, Eun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to develop a theoretical model to explain the relationships between immigration transition and midlife women's physical activity and test the relationships among the major variables of the model. A theoretical model, which was developed based on transitions theory and the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity theory, consists of 4 major variables, including length of stay in the United States, country of birth, level of acculturation, and midlife women's physical activity. To test the theoretical model, a secondary analysis with data from 127 Hispanic women and 123 non-Hispanic (NH) Asian women in a national Internet study was used. Among the major variables of the model, length of stay in the United States was negatively associated with physical activity in Hispanic women. Level of acculturation in NH Asian women was positively correlated with women's physical activity. Country of birth and level of acculturation were significant factors that influenced physical activity in both Hispanic and NH Asian women. The findings support the theoretical model that was developed to examine relationships between immigration transition and physical activity; it shows that immigration transition can play an essential role in influencing health behaviors of immigrant populations in the United States. The NH theoretical model can be widely used in nursing practice and research that focus on immigrant women and their health behaviors. Health care providers need to consider the influences of immigration transition to promote immigrant women's physical activity.

  16. Environmental controls on photosynthetic microbial mat distribution and morphogenesis on a 3.42 Ga clastic-starved platform.

    PubMed

    Tice, Michael M

    2009-12-01

    Three morphotypes of microbial mats are preserved in rocks deposited in shallow-water facies of the 3.42 Ga Buck Reef chert (BRC). Morphotype alpha consists of fine anastomosing and bifurcating carbonaceous laminations, which loosely drape underlying detrital grains or form silica-filled lenses. Morphotype beta consists of meshes of fine carbonaceous strands intergrown with detrital grains and dark laminations, which loosely drape coarse detrital grains. Morphotype gamma consists of fine, even carbonaceous laminations that tightly drape underlying detrital grains. Preservation of nearly uncompacted mat morphologies and detrital grains deposited during mat growth within a well-characterized sedimentary unit makes quantitative correlation between morphology and paleoenvironment possible. All mats are preserved in the shallowest-water interval of those rocks deposited below normal wave base and above storm wave base. This interval is bounded below by a transgressive lag formed during regional flooding and above by a small condensed section that marks a local relative sea-level maximum. Restriction of all mat morphotypes to the shallowest interval of the storm-active layer in the BRC ocean reinforces previous interpretations that these mats were constructed primarily by photosynthetic organisms. Morphotypes alpha and beta dominate the lower half of this interval and grew during deposition of relatively coarse detrital carbonaceous grains, while morphotype gamma dominates the upper half and grew during deposition of fine detrital carbonaceous grains. The observed mat distribution suggests that either light intensity or, more likely, small variations in ambient current energy acted as a first-order control on mat morphotype distribution. These results demonstrate significant environmental control on biological morphogenetic processes independent of influences from siliciclastic sedimentation.

  17. Spacecraft Environmental Testing SMAP (Soil, Moisture, Active, Passive)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Testing a complete full up spacecraft to verify it will survive the environment, in which it will be exposed to during its mission, is a formidable task in itself. However, the ''test like you fly'' philosophy sometimes gets compromised because of cost, design and or time. This paper describes the thermal-vacuum and mass properties testing of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) earth orbiting satellite. SMAP will provide global observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state (the hydrosphere state). SMAP hydrosphere state measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. It will explain the problems encountered, and the solutions developed, which minimized the risk typically associated with such an arduous process. Also discussed, the future of testing on expensive long lead-time spacecraft. Will we ever reach the ''build and shoot" scenario with minimal or no verification testing?

  18. The design and realization of a large-area flexible nanofiber-based mat for pollutant degradation: an application in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Meng; Wang, Wenzhong; Sun, Songmei; Gao, Erping; Zhang, Zhijie; Zhang, Ling; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2013-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel multifunctional nanofibrous mat for photocatalytic applications based on TiO2 nanocables functionalized by Ag nanoparticles and coated with a thin (~2 nm) graphitic shell. In this mat, which was realized by an electrospinning technique, each component serves a unique function: the carbon coating acts as both an adsorption material for capturing pollutants and as a charge-transfer material, the Ag nanoparticles act as a visible-light sensitizing agent and also as a charge-transfer material, finally the TiO2 nanocable mat acts as a UV sensitive photocatalytic matrix and as the flexible substrate for the other functional components. This multicomponent nanocable mat exhibits excellent photocatalytic activity under simulated solar irradiation for the degradation of model pollutants including RhB and phenol. The significant photocatalytic properties are attributed to the synergetic effect of the three functional components and the unique charge transport ``freeway'' property of the nanofibrous mat. In addition, the porous carbon coating infiltrated into the nanocable matrix endows the mat with excellent flexibility and enables robust, large-area (10 × 10 cm) fabrication, representing a significant advantage over previous brittle ceramic nanofibrous mat photocatalyst substrates. This study provides new insight into the design and preparation of an advanced, yet commercially practical and scaleable photocatalytic composite membrane material. The as-prepared photocatalytic mat might also be of interest in solar cell, catalysis, separation technology, biomedical engineering, and nanotechnology.

  19. The design and realization of a large-area flexible nanofiber-based mat for pollutant degradation: an application in photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Meng; Wang, Wenzhong; Sun, Songmei; Gao, Erping; Zhang, Zhijie; Zhang, Ling; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2013-06-01

    This work demonstrates a novel multifunctional nanofibrous mat for photocatalytic applications based on TiO2 nanocables functionalized by Ag nanoparticles and coated with a thin (~2 nm) graphitic shell. In this mat, which was realized by an electrospinning technique, each component serves a unique function: the carbon coating acts as both an adsorption material for capturing pollutants and as a charge-transfer material, the Ag nanoparticles act as a visible-light sensitizing agent and also as a charge-transfer material, finally the TiO2 nanocable mat acts as a UV sensitive photocatalytic matrix and as the flexible substrate for the other functional components. This multicomponent nanocable mat exhibits excellent photocatalytic activity under simulated solar irradiation for the degradation of model pollutants including RhB and phenol. The significant photocatalytic properties are attributed to the synergetic effect of the three functional components and the unique charge transport "freeway" property of the nanofibrous mat. In addition, the porous carbon coating infiltrated into the nanocable matrix endows the mat with excellent flexibility and enables robust, large-area (10 × 10 cm) fabrication, representing a significant advantage over previous brittle ceramic nanofibrous mat photocatalyst substrates. This study provides new insight into the design and preparation of an advanced, yet commercially practical and scaleable photocatalytic composite membrane material. The as-prepared photocatalytic mat might also be of interest in solar cell, catalysis, separation technology, biomedical engineering, and nanotechnology.

  20. Apollo 11 prime crew during manned altitude chamber test activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Interior view of the chamber in the Kennedy Space Center's Operations Building showing Apollo Spacecraft 107 Command Module during manned altitude chamber test activity. The prime crew of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission is Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot.

  1. 26 CFR 1.141-2 - Private activity bond tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.141-2 Private... and deliberate actions—(1) In general. An issue is an issue of private activity bonds if the issuer reasonably expects, as of the issue date, that the issue will meet either the private business tests or...

  2. 26 CFR 1.141-2 - Private activity bond tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.141-2 Private... and deliberate actions—(1) In general. An issue is an issue of private activity bonds if the issuer reasonably expects, as of the issue date, that the issue will meet either the private business tests or...

  3. Matting of hair: what is the role of conditioners?

    PubMed

    Rigopoulos, D; Kontochristopoulos, G; Kalogirou, O; Gregoriou, S; Katsambas, A

    2006-03-01

    Matting of the hair is a very rare and multifactorial condition affecting usually women. We present three female patients with matting of the hair as a result of the shampoo used. In all three cases, cutting of the affected hair was unavoidable. PMID:16503900

  4. MAT@USC Candidates and Latino English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomeli, Cynthia Leticia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further understand the perceptions of MAT@USC teacher candidates and how their perceptions and previous experiences affect the educational experiences of Latino English language learners. Three questions were developed to guide this study: (1) What are the perceptions of MAT@USC candidates in selected courses…

  5. User`s guide to the MATS data

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.

    1990-08-01

    Data collected for the 37 Mesoscale Transport Studies (MATS) experiments are available on a single, double-sided, high-density (1.2MB), IBM-formatted, 5.25 in. floppy disk (MATS disk). Standard ASCII characters are used. This report discusses how to install this disk, symbols used, format of the ratio, and the sample experiment.

  6. Use of constructed mixed microbial mats for landfill leachate treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Goodroad, L.; Bender, J.; Phillips, P.

    1995-12-31

    BIOMAT{trademark} (Mats) is a system of constructed microbial mats which are natural heterotrophic and autotrophic communities dominated by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). Mats constructed with specific microbial components have been developed for various bioremediation applications: removal of metals, organic degradation, removal of radionuclides, treatment of mixed contaminants, biological treatment ponds, and soil remediation. Based on the potential applications of the constructed microbial mat system, a pilot scale leachate treatment system has been constructed at the Waste Management, Inc. Outer Loop RDF near Louisville, KY in conjunction with M.A.T.S., Inc. The system consists of two lined lagoons with various constructed mat configurations. Changes in leachate chemistry including: pH, dissolved oxygen, color, nitrate/nitrite and ammonium concentration were monitored on influent and effluent leachate streams and within the pilot system to determine operational characteristics of the constructed microbial mat system. The M.A.T.S., Inc. treatment system is expected to reduce capital costs for leachate treatment plants, decrease leachate treatment operating costs, and create a {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} self-contained image for landfills.

  7. Compositions and method of use of constructed microbial mats

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Judith A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    1997-01-01

    Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats, comprising cyanobacteria and purple autotrophic bacteria and an organic nutrient source, in a laminated structure, are described. The constructed microbial mat is used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  8. Microbial mats for multiple applications in aquaculture and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Bender, Judith; Phillips, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Microbial mats occur in nature as stratified communities of cyanobacteria and bacteria, but they can be cultured on large-scale and manipulated for a variety of functions. They are complex systems, but require few external inputs. The functional uses of mats broadly cover the areas of aquaculture and bioremediation. Preliminary research also points to promising uses in agriculture and energy production. Regarding aquaculture, mats were shown to produce protein, via nitrogen fixation, and were capable of supplying nutrition to tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Current research is examining the role of mats in the nitrification of nutrient-enriched effluents from aquaculture. Most research has addressed bioremediation, within which two majors categories of contaminants were examined: metals and radionuclides, and organic contaminants. Mats sequester or precipitate metals/radionuclides by surface absorption or by conditioning the surrounding chemical environment, thus bioconcentrating the metal/radionuclide in a small volume. Organic contaminants are degraded and may be completely mineralized. For agriculture mats hold promise as a soil amendment and nitrogen fertilizer. The use of mats in biohydrogen production has been verified, but is in a preliminary phase of development. We propose a comprehensive closed system based on microbial mats for aquaculture and waste management.

  9. Biofunctionalized electrospun silk mats as a topical bioactive dressing for accelerated wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A; Wang, X Y; Kaplan, D L; Garlick, J A; Egles, C

    2009-09-01

    Materials able to deliver topically bioactive molecules represent a new generation of biomaterials. In this article, we describe the use of silk mats, made of electrospun nanoscale silk fibers containing epidermal growth factor (EGF), for the promotion of wound healing processes. In our experiments, we demonstrated that EGF is incorporated into the silk mats and slowly released in a time-dependent manner (25% EGF release in 170h). We tested these materials using a new model of wounded human skin-equivalents displaying the same structure as human skin and able to heal using the same molecular and cellular mechanisms found in vivo. This human three-dimensional model allows us to demonstrate that the biofunctionalized silk mats, when placed on the wounds as a dressing, aid the healing by increasing the time of wound closure by the epidermal tongue by 90%. The preservation of the structure of the mats during the healing period as demonstrated by electronic microscopy, the biological action of the dressing, as well as the biocompatibility of the silk demonstrate that this biomaterial is a new and very promising material for medical applications, especially for patients suffering from chronic wounds.

  10. A review of DOE HEPA filter component test activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slawski, J.W.; Bresson, J.F.; Scripsick, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    All HEPA filters purchased for installation in DOE nuclear facilities are required to be tested at a Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. The number of HEPA filters purchased by DOE has been reduced so much that the Hanford FTF was closed. From Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to 1994, funding was not provided to the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As a consequence, Round Robin Tests (RRTs), performed twice each year by the FTFs to assess constituency of test results among the FTFs, were not performed in FY 1992 and FY 1993. The Annual Reports of FTF test activities were not prepared for FY 1992 - 1995. Technical support provided to the FTFs was minimal. There is talk of closing a second FTF, and ongoing discussions as to whether DOE will continue to fund operation of the FTFs. In FY 1994, DOE Defense Programs commenced funding the TSG. RRT data for FY 1994 and 1995 have been entered into the database; the FY 1994 RRT report has been issued; and the FY 1995 RRT report is in progress. Data from semiannual reports have been retrieved and entered into the database. Standards related to HEPA filter test and procurement activities are now scheduled for issuance by FY 1996. Continuation of these activities depends on whether DOE will continue to support the HEPA filter test program. The history and activities of the FTFs and the TSG at Los Alamos have been reported at previous Air Cleaning Conferences. Data from the FY 1991 Annual Report of FTF activities was presented at the 1992 Air Cleaning Conference. Preparation of the Annual Reports was temporarily suspended in 1992. However, all of the FTF Semiannual report data have been retrieved and entered into the data base. This paper focuses primarily on the results of HEPA filter tests conducted by FTFs during FY 1992 - FY 1995, and the possible effects of the DOE program uncertainties on the quality of HEPA filters for installation at the DOE sites. 15 refs., 13 tabs.

  11. Diurnal Cycle of Oxygen and Sulfide Microgradients and Microbial Photosynthesis in a Cyanobacterial Mat Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Bo B.; Revsbech, Niels P.; Blackburn, T. Henry; Cohen, Yehuda

    1979-01-01

    The diurnal variation in the microgradients of O2, H2S, and Eh were studied in the benthic cyanobacterial mats of a hypersaline desert lake (Solar Lake, Sinai). The results were related to light intensity, light penetration into the mat, temperature, pH, NH4+, photosynthetic activity, pigments, and the zonation of the microbial community. Extreme diurnal variation was found, with an O2 peak of 0.5 mM at 1 to 2 mm of depth below the mat surface during day and a H2S peak of 2.5 mM at 2 to 3 mm of depth at night. At the O2-H2S interface, the two compounds coexisted over a depth interval of 0.2 to 1 mm and with a turnover time of a few minutes. The photic zone reached 2.5 mm into the mat in summer, and the main 14CO2 light fixation took place at 1 to 2 mm of depth. During winter, light and photosynthesis were restricted to the uppermost 1 mm. The quantitative dynamics of O2 and H2S were calculated from the chemical gradients and from the measured diffusion coefficients. PMID:16345415

  12. Super-Hydrophobic High Throughput Electrospun Cellulose Acetate (CA) Nanofibrous Mats as Oil Selective Sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chao

    The threat of oil pollution increases with the expansion of oil exploration and production activities, as well as the industrial growth around the world. Use of sorbents is a common method to deal with the oil spills. In this work, an advanced sorbent technology is described. A series of non-woven Cellulose Acetate (CA) nanofibrous mats with a 3D fibrous structure were synthesized by a novel high-throughput electrospinning technique. The precursor was solutions of CA/ acetic acid-acetone in various concentrations. Among them, 15.0% CA exhibits a superhydrophobic surface property, with a water contact angle of 128.95°. Its oil sorption capacity is many times higher the oil sorption capacity of the best commercial sorbent available in the market. Also, it showed good buoyancy properties on the water both as dry-mat and oil-saturated mat. In addition, it is biodegradable, easily available, easily manufactured, so the CA nanofibrous mat is an excellent candidate as oil sorbent for oil spill in water treatment.

  13. Carbon and Oxygen Budgets of Hypersaline Cyanobacterial Mats: Effects of Tidal Cycle and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; Bebout, Brad M.; Carpenter, Steven; Discipulo, Mykell; Turk, Kendra

    2003-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines the rates of processes that shape Earth#s environment, define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred, and create biosignatures in sediments and atmospheres. In cyanobacterial mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides energy, organic substrates and oxygen to the ecosystem. Incident light changes with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition, and counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide shape the chemical microenvironment. A combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Microbiota produce hydrogen, small organic acids, and nitrogen and sulfur species. Such compounds fuel a flow of energy and electrons in these ecosystems and thus shape interactions between groups of microorganisms. Coordinated observations of population distribution, abundance, and activity for an entire community are making fundamental questions in ecology accessible. These questions address those factors that sustain the remarkable diversity of microorganisms that are now being revealed by molecular techniques. These questions also target the processes that shape the various kinds of biosignatures that we will seek, both in ancient rocks from Earth and Mars, and in atmospheres of distant planets beyond our Solar System.

  14. An extraterrestrial habitat on earth: The algal mat of Don Jaun Pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.; Chen, J.; Larock, P.

    On the edge of Don Juan Pond in the Wright Valley of Antarctica lies a mat of mineral and detritus cemented by organic matter. In spite of a CaCl2 concentration of about 33% (w/v), the mat contains Oscillatoria and other cyanobacteria, unicellular forms, colonial forms rich in carotenoids, and diatoms. Bacteria are rare; fungal filaments are not. Oscillatoria showed motility, but only at temperatures <10°C. Acetone extracts of the mat and nearby muds yielded visible spectra similar to those of laboratory grown O. sancta, with 50- to 70-fold molar ratio of chlorophyll a to b. Although rare, tardigrades were also found. The algal mat had enzymatic activities characteristic of peroxidase, catalase, dehydrogenase, and amylase. Cellulose, chitin, protein, lipid and ATP were present. Previously, algae in the Wright Valley have been described in melt water, not in the brine itself. Wright Valley has been used as a near sterile Martian model. It obviously contains an array of hardy terrestrial organisms.

  15. A Biofilm Treatment Approach for Produced Water from Hydraulic Fracturing Using Engineered Microbial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyon, B.; Stachler, E.; Bibby, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing results in large volumes of wastewater, called "produced water". Treatment of produced water is challenged by its high salt, organic compound, and radionuclide concentrations. Current disposal approaches include deep well injection and physical-chemical treatment for surface disposal; however, deep well injection has been recently linked to induced seismicity and physical-chemical treatments suffer from fouling and high cost. The reuse of the produced water has emerged as a desirable management option; however, this requires pretreatment to generate a water of usable quality and limit microbial activity. Biological treatment is an underexplored area in produced water management and has the potential to remove organics and reduce overall costs for physiochemical treatment or reuse. Suspended growth biological treatment techniques are known to be limited by salinity motivating a more robust biofilm approach: 'microbial mats'. In this study, we used engineered microbial mats as a biofilm treatment for the produced water. Evaluation of the biodegradation performance of microbial mats in synthetic and real produced waters showed microbial activity at up to 100,000 mg/L TDS concentration (three times the salt concentration of the ocean). Organic removal rates reached to 1.45 mg COD/gramwet-day at 91,351 mg/L TDS in real produced water samples and initial evaluation demonstrated the potential for field-scale application. Metagenomic analyses of microbial mats demonstrated an adaptive shift in the microbial community treating different samples, suggesting the wide applicability of this treatment approach for produced waters with varying chemical composition. On-going studies focus on the evaluation of the removal of the organics and the contaminants of high concern in produced water using microbial mats as well as the effect of the biofilm growth conditions on the biodegradation in changing salt concentrations.

  16. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments in solar saltern microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Joan; Grimalt, Joan O.; de Wit, Rutger; Keely, Brendan J.; Maxwell, James R.

    1994-11-01

    The distributions of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and their degradation products have been studied in two microbial mat systems developed in the calcite and calcite/gypsum evaporite domains of a solar saltern system. Phormidium valderianum and Microcoleus chthonoplastes are the dominant cyanobacterial species, respectively, and large amounts of Chloroflexus-like bacteria occur in the carbonate/gypsum mat. In both systems, the major pigments are chlorophyll a, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and myxoxanthophyll, which originate from these mat-building cyanobacteria. This common feature contrasts with differences in other pigments that are specific for each mat community. Thus, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin, reflecting diatom inputs, are only found in the calcite mat, whereas the calcite/gypsum mat contains high concentrations of bacteriochlorophylls c produced by the multicellular green filamentous bacteria. In both cases, the depth concentration profiles (0-30 and 0-40 mm) show a relatively good preservation of the cyanobacterial carotenoids, zeaxanthin, β-carotene, myxoxanthophyll, and echinenone. This contrasts with the extensive biodegradation of cyanobacterial remains observed microscopically. Fucoxanthin in the calcite mat is also transformed at a faster rate than the cyanobacterial carotenoids. Chlorophyll a, the major pigment in both mats, exhibits different transformation pathways. In the calcite/gypsum mat, it is transformed via C-13 2 carbomethoxy defunctionalization prior to loss of the phytyl chain, leading to the formation of pyrophaeophytin a and, subsequently, pyrophaeophorbide a. On the other hand, the occurrence of the enzyme chlorophyllase, attributed to diatoms in the calcite mat, gives rise to extensive phytyl hydrolysis, with the formation of chlorophyllide a, pyrophaeophorbide a and, in minor proportion, phaeophorbide a. Studies of the sources of the photosynthetic pigments and of their transformation pathways in such simplified ecosystems provide a

  17. Characterization and Modification of Electrospun Fiber Mats for Use in Composite Proton Exchange Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarino, Matthew Marchand

    conducting material or forms a continuous fuel-blocking film. The LbL component consists of a proton-conducting, methanolimpermeable poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride)/sulfonated poly(2,6-dimethyl 1,4-phenylene oxide) (PDAC/sPPO) thin film. The electrospun fiber component consists of PA 6(3)T fibers of average diameter between 400 and 800 nm, in a nonwoven matrix of 60-90% porosity depending on the temperature of thermal annealing utilized to improve the mechanical properties. This thesis demonstrates the versatility and flexibility of this fabrication technique, since any ion conducting LbL system may be sprayed onto any electrospun fiber mat, allowing for independent control of functionality and mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the spray coated electrospun mats are shown to be superior to the LbL-only system, and possess intrinsically greater dimensional stability and lower mechanical hysteresis than Nafion under hydration cycling. The electrochemical selectivity of the composite LbL-electrospun membrane is found to be superior to Nafion, which makes them a viable alternative proton exchange membrane for fuel cell applications. The composite proton exchange membranes fabricated in this work were tested in an operational direct methanol fuel cell, with results showing the capability for higher open circuit voltages (OCV) and comparable cell resistances when compared to Nafion. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  18. Electrospun lignin-derived carbon nanofiber mats surface-decorated with MnO2 nanowhiskers as binder-free supercapacitor electrodes with high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaojing; Kolla, Praveen; Zhao, Yong; Smirnova, Alevtina L.; Fong, Hao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explore innovative materials for the development of next-generation supercapacitor electrodes. The hypothesis is that, upon the surface-decoration with appropriate amount of MnO2 nanowhiskers, freestanding and highly graphitic electrospun carbon nanofiber (ECNF) mats (with fiber diameters of ∼200 nm and BET specific surface areas of ∼583 m2 g-1) derived from a natural product of lignin would be binder-free supercapacitor electrodes with high performance. To test the hypothesis, the ECNF mats have been prepared first; thereafter, the acquired ECNF mats have been surface-decorated with varied amounts of MnO2 nanowhiskers to prepare three types of ECNF/MnO2 mats. The morphological and structural properties of ECNF and ECNF/MnO2 mats are characterized by SEM, TEM and XRD, the weight percentages of MnO2 nanowhiskers in three ECNF/MnO2 mats are determined by thermal gravimetric analysis; while the electrochemical performance of each mat/electrode is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge method, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study reveals that, all of the three ECNF/MnO2 mats/electrodes have significantly enhanced electrochemical performances compared to the ECNF mat/electrode; while the ECNF/MnO2 (1:1) mat/electrode exhibits the highest gravimetric capacitance of 83.3 F g-1, energy density of 84.3 W h kg-1, and power density of 5.72 kW kg-1.

  19. Design of an active magnetic regenerator test apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, A. M.; Barclay, J. A.

    2002-05-01

    The Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) has been shown to be a refrigeration technology with high efficiencies. Complex thermodynamic interactions in the regenerator, a shortage of suitable magnetic refrigerants, and difficulty in acquiring accurate experimental data have combined to hamper the development of AMR refrigerators. An apparatus to dynamically characterize the behavior of AMR beds is a valuable tool in furthering the development of the technology. This paper describes the design and construction of an AMR test apparatus. For initial tests, the apparatus has been used to examine the performance of Gd AMR beds operating in 2 T fields.

  20. Taming Test Anxiety: The Activation of Failure-Related Concepts Enhances Cognitive Test Performance of Test-Anxious Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempel, Tobias; Neumann, Roland

    2016-01-01

    We investigated processes underlying performance decrements of highly test-anxious persons. Three experiments contrasted conditions that differed in the degree of activation of concepts related to failure. Participants memorized a list of words either containing words related to failure or containing no words related to failure in Experiment 1. In…

  1. The Activity of Antimicrobial Surfaces Varies by Testing Protocol Utilized

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Matias D.; Zucchi, Paola C.; Phung, Ann; Leonard, Steven N.; Hirsch, Elizabeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Contaminated hospital surfaces are an important source of nosocomial infections. A major obstacle in marketing antimicrobial surfaces is a lack of efficacy data based on standardized testing protocols. Aim We compared the efficacy of multiple testing protocols against several “antimicrobial” film surfaces. Methods Four clinical isolates were used: one Escherichia coli, one Klebsiella pneumoniae, and two Staphylococcus aureus strains. Two industry methods (modified ISO 22196 and ASTM E2149), a “dried droplet”, and a “transfer” method were tested against two commercially available antimicrobial films, one film in development, an untreated control, and a positive (silver) control film. At 2 (only ISO) and 24 hours following inoculation, bacteria were collected from film surfaces and enumerated. Results Compared to untreated films in all protocols, there were no significant differences in recovery on either commercial brand at 2 or 24 hours after inoculation. The silver surface demonstrated significant microbicidal activity (mean loss 4.9 Log10 CFU/ml) in all methods and time points with the exception of 2 hours in the ISO protocol and the transfer method. Using our novel droplet method, no differences between placebo and active surfaces were detected. The surface in development demonstrated variable activity depending on method, organism, and time point. The ISO demonstrated minimal activity at 2 hours but significant activity at 24 hours (mean 4.5 Log10 CFU/ml difference versus placebo). The ASTEM protocol exhibited significant differences in recovery of staphylococci (mean 5 Log10 CFU/ml) but not Gram-negative isolates (10 fold decrease). Minimal activity was observed with this film in the transfer method. Conclusions Varying results between protocols suggested that efficacy of antimicrobial surfaces cannot be easily and reproducibly compared. Clinical use should be considered and further development of representative methods is needed. PMID

  2. Topographic control of mat-surface structures evolution: Examples from modern evaporitic carbonate (Abu Dhabi) and evaporitic siliciclastic (Tunisia) tidal flats.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafid Bouougri, El; Porada, Hubertus

    2010-05-01

    typical shore-parallel zonality. In contrast, in tidal flats with slight changes in topography, the typical shore-parallel zonality appears disturbed mainly along the intertidal and lower supratidal zones. The mat surface structures within each tidal zone show local and lateral transitions but all evolve from an incipient flat or polygonal mat. On the mat scale, microtopographic differences are created by the mats themselves, e.g., in the form of upturned crack margins, bulges and domes. All these are small-scale topographic highs that influence the distribution of microbial activity and mat growth dynamics. In the Abu Dhabi area it is observed that smooth or polygonal mats may grade temporally into mammilate, cinder or pustular and tufted mats along an evolutionary path controlled by preferred growth along bulges and upturned crack margins. A similar temporal evolution appears in the intertidal and supratidal zones in Tunisia where local changes on mat-surface induce a variety of mat-growth struc¬tures on and along upturned crack margins, gas domes and isolated to polygonal bulges and petee ridges. References Kendall C.G.St.C, Skipwith, P.A.d'E. (1968) Recent algal mats of a Persian gulf lagoon. J. Sedim. Res., 38, 1040-1058. Logan B.W. Hoffman P. Gebelein, C.D. (1974) Algal mats, cryptalgal fabrics, and structures, Hamelin Pool, Western Australia. AAPG Mem., 22, 140-194.

  3. Metagenomic analysis of stress genes in microbial mat communities from Antarctica and the High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Varin, Thibault; Lovejoy, Connie; Jungblut, Anne D; Vincent, Warwick F; Corbeil, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Polar and alpine microbial communities experience a variety of environmental stresses, including perennial cold and freezing; however, knowledge of genomic responses to such conditions is still rudimentary. We analyzed the metagenomes of cyanobacterial mats from Arctic and Antarctic ice shelves, using high-throughput pyrosequencing to test the hypotheses that consortia from these extreme polar habitats were similar in terms of major phyla and subphyla and consequently in their potential responses to environmental stresses. Statistical comparisons of the protein-coding genes showed similarities between the mats from the two poles, with the majority of genes derived from Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria; however, the relative proportions differed, with cyanobacterial genes more prevalent in the Antarctic mat metagenome. Other differences included a higher representation of Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria in the Arctic metagenomes, which may reflect the greater access to diasporas from both adjacent ice-free lands and the open ocean. Genes coding for functional responses to environmental stress (exopolysaccharides, cold shock proteins, and membrane modifications) were found in all of the metagenomes. However, in keeping with the greater exposure of the Arctic to long-range pollutants, sequences assigned to copper homeostasis genes were statistically (30%) more abundant in the Arctic samples. In contrast, more reads matching the sigma B genes were identified in the Antarctic mat, likely reflecting the more severe osmotic stress during freeze-up of the Antarctic ponds. This study underscores the presence of diverse mechanisms of adaptation to cold and other stresses in polar mats, consistent with the proportional representation of major bacterial groups. PMID:22081564

  4. Use of modified Fraser's stain in Promoting Activity Test (PAT).

    PubMed

    Borràs, M

    1988-09-01

    The Promoting Activity Test (PAT) requires a staining procedure that allows rapid, accurate and reliable counting of mitotic figures. We propose use of Fraser's kernechtrot-crystal violet technique, but eliminating the picric-alcoholic differentiation to avoid fading. This modified protocol gives higher mitotic counts in adult mouse adrenal cortex than the hematoxylin-eosin originally used, especially with respect to less conspicuous prophases. PMID:2464217

  5. Photocatalytic and antibacterial properties of a TiO2/nylon-6 electrospun nanocomposite mat containing silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pant, Hem Raj; Pandeya, Dipendra Raj; Nam, Ki Taek; Baek, Woo-Il; Hong, Seong Tshool; Kim, Hak Yong

    2011-05-15

    Silver-impregnated TiO(2)/nylon-6 nanocomposite mats exhibit excellent characteristics as a filter media with good photocatalytic and antibacterial properties and durability for repeated use. Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were successfully embedded in electrospun TiO(2)/nylon-6 composite nanofibers through the photocatalytic reduction of silver nitrate solution under UV-light irradiation. TiO(2) NPs present in nylon-6 solution were able to cause the formation of a high aspect ratio spider-wave-like structure during electrospinning and facilitated the UV photoreduction of AgNO(3) to Ag. TEM images, UV-visible and XRD spectra confirmed that monodisperse Ag NPs (approximately 4 nm in size) were deposited selectively upon the TiO(2) NPs of the prepared nanocomposite mat. The antibacterial property of a TiO(2)/nylon-6 composite mat loaded with Ag NPs was tested against Escherichia coli, and the photoactive property was tested against methylene blue. All of the results showed that TiO(2)/nylon-6 nanocomposite mats loaded with Ag NPs are more effective than composite mats without Ag NPs. The prepared material has potential as an economically friendly photocatalyst and water filter media because it allows the NPs to be reused.

  6. Multi-Analytic Based Determination of Substrate Fate From in situ Stable Isotope Labeled Exposures of Natural Microbial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, M. S.; Cory, A.; Riha, K. M.; Huang, E. L.; Boaro, A. A.; Metz, T. O.; Gritsenko, M. A.; Mobberley, J. M.; Nelson, W.; Kim, Y. M.; Moran, J.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial communities play impactful roles in almost every aspect of our society including the environment, climate, agriculture and human health, expanding the functional capacity of life on earth. The recent emergence of a suite of omics driven technologies offers powerful tools for investigating functionality of this community. However, these tools provide only a static snapshot of the community in space and time. The temporal nature of stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments expands the depth at which microbial communities can be investigated and understood. While selectively targeting only metabolically active organisms in a community, the labeled substrate can be tracked spatially, temporally and phylo-genetically and linked to active functions, organism interactions and exchanges. Single SIP technologies are limited in their ability to describe the biological system as a whole. However, integration of multiple SIP based analytics offers a more comprehensive description of substrate fate. The phototroph based microbial mat community resident in Hot Lake, a hypersaline lake located in Washington State, offers a tractable system for testing the multi analytic approach. We exposed the mat to three different 13C-labeled substrates (HCO3-, glucose and acetate) in situ at midday, and subsequently analyzed the mat 24 hours after incubation. The approach revealed different metabolic fates and organism specific uptake. When compared to acetate, glucose and HCO3- showed a greater incorporation into extracellular material, while acetate had a greater conversion to intracellular fatty acids, suggesting that HCO3- and glucose could be more readily shared as a community currency than acetate. All substrates were converted to amino acids and proteins, but while glucose and HCO3- demonstrated considerable incorporation into heterotrophic proteins, the conversion of acetate to these proteins was minimal, potentially implying that acetate derived intermediates are not a

  7. Preference as a Function of Active Interresponse Times: A Test of the Active Time Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misak, Paul; Cleaveland, J. Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe a test of the active time model for concurrent variable interval (VI) choice. The active time model (ATM) suggests that the time since the most recent response is one of the variables controlling choice in concurrent VI VI schedules of reinforcement. In our experiment, pigeons were trained in a multiple concurrent…

  8. First insights into fern matK phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Yaung; Li, Fay-Wei; Chiou, Wen-Liang; Wang, Chun-Neng

    2011-06-01

    MatK, the only maturase gene in the land plant plastid genome, is a very popular phylogenetic marker that has been extensively applied in reconstructing angiosperm phylogeny. However, the use of matK in fern phylogeny is largely unknown, due to difficulties with amplification: ferns have lost the flanking trnK exons, typically the region used for designing stable priming sites. We developed primers that are either universal or lineage-specific that successfully amplify matK across all fern families. To evaluate whether matK is as powerful a phylogenetic marker in ferns as in angiosperms, we compared its sequence characteristics and phylogenetic performance to those of rbcL and atpA. Among these three genes, matK has the highest variability and substitution evenness, yet shows the least homoplasy. Most importantly, applying matK in fern phylogenetics better resolved relationships among families, especially within eupolypods I and II. Here we demonstrate the power of matK for fern phylogenetic reconstruction, as well as provide primers and extensive sequence data that will greatly facilitate future evolutionary studies of ferns.

  9. Potential for bioremediating using constructed mixed microbial mats

    SciTech Connect

    Goodroad, L.; Bender, J.; Phillips, P.; Gould, J.; Saha, G.; Rodriguez-Eaton, S.; Vatcharapijarn, Y.; Lee, R.; Word, J.

    1994-12-31

    Microbial mats are natural heterotrophic and autotrophic communities dominated by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). They are self-organized laminated structures annealed tightly together by slimy secretions from various Microbial components. The surface slime of the mats effectively immobilizes the ecosystem to a variety of substrates, thereby stabilizing the most efficient internal microbial structure. Constructed microbial mats can be generated rapidly by enriching a water surface with ensiled grass clippings. These constructed mats are durable, tolerant to a variety of toxins and resilient under changing environmental conditions. The mats can he designed for specific tasks by inoculating the cyanobacteria/silage with selected microorganisms. Mats constructed with specific microbial components have been developed for various bioremediation applications: removal of metals, organic degradation, treatment of mixed contaminants, biological treatment ponds, and soil remediation. Constructed mats offer a broad range of mechanisms related to the sequestration of heavy metals, the biodegradation of recalcitrant organic compounds, and the remediation of mixed organic/inorganic contaminants such as TCE and carbofuran with heavy metals.

  10. The MAT locus genes play different roles in sexual reproduction and pathogenesis in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qian; Hou, Rui; Juanyu; Zhang; Ma, Jiwen; Wu, Zhongshou; Wang, Guanghui; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction plays a critical role in the infection cycle of Fusarium graminearum because ascospores are the primary inoculum. As a homothallic ascomycete, F. graminearum contains both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2-1 loci in the genome. To better understand their functions and regulations in sexual reproduction and pathogenesis, in this study we assayed the expression, interactions, and mutant phenotypes of individual MAT locus genes. Whereas the expression of MAT1-1-1 and MAT12-1 rapidly increased after perithecial induction and began to decline after 1 day post-perithecial induction (dpi), the expression of MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 peaked at 4 dpi. MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 had a similar expression profile and likely are controlled by a bidirectional promoter. Although none of the MAT locus genes were essential for perithecium formation, all of them were required for ascosporogenesis in self-crosses. In outcrosses, the mat11-1-2 and mat11-1-3 mutants were fertile but the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants displayed male- and female-specific defects, respectively. The mat1-2-1 mutant was reduced in FgSO expression and hyphal fusion. Mat1-1-2 interacted with all other MAT locus transcription factors, suggesting that they may form a protein complex during sexual reproduction. Mat1-1-1 also interacted with FgMcm1, which may play a role in controlling cell identity and sexual development. Interestingly, the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants were reduced in virulence in corn stalk rot assays although none of the MAT locus genes was important for wheat infection. The MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes may play a host-specific role in colonization of corn stalks. PMID:23826182

  11. The MAT Locus Genes Play Different Roles in Sexual Reproduction and Pathogenesis in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Juanyu; Zhang; Ma, Jiwen; Wu, Zhongshou; Wang, Guanghui; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction plays a critical role in the infection cycle of Fusarium graminearum because ascospores are the primary inoculum. As a homothallic ascomycete, F. graminearum contains both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2-1 loci in the genome. To better understand their functions and regulations in sexual reproduction and pathogenesis, in this study we assayed the expression, interactions, and mutant phenotypes of individual MAT locus genes. Whereas the expression of MAT1-1-1 and MAT12-1 rapidly increased after perithecial induction and began to decline after 1 day post-perithecial induction (dpi), the expression of MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 peaked at 4 dpi. MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 had a similar expression profile and likely are controlled by a bidirectional promoter. Although none of the MAT locus genes were essential for perithecium formation, all of them were required for ascosporogenesis in self-crosses. In outcrosses, the mat11-1-2 and mat11-1-3 mutants were fertile but the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants displayed male- and female-specific defects, respectively. The mat1-2-1 mutant was reduced in FgSO expression and hyphal fusion. Mat1-1-2 interacted with all other MAT locus transcription factors, suggesting that they may form a protein complex during sexual reproduction. Mat1-1-1 also interacted with FgMcm1, which may play a role in controlling cell identity and sexual development. Interestingly, the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants were reduced in virulence in corn stalk rot assays although none of the MAT locus genes was important for wheat infection. The MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes may play a host-specific role in colonization of corn stalks. PMID:23826182

  12. The MAT locus genes play different roles in sexual reproduction and pathogenesis in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qian; Hou, Rui; Juanyu; Zhang; Ma, Jiwen; Wu, Zhongshou; Wang, Guanghui; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction plays a critical role in the infection cycle of Fusarium graminearum because ascospores are the primary inoculum. As a homothallic ascomycete, F. graminearum contains both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2-1 loci in the genome. To better understand their functions and regulations in sexual reproduction and pathogenesis, in this study we assayed the expression, interactions, and mutant phenotypes of individual MAT locus genes. Whereas the expression of MAT1-1-1 and MAT12-1 rapidly increased after perithecial induction and began to decline after 1 day post-perithecial induction (dpi), the expression of MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 peaked at 4 dpi. MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 had a similar expression profile and likely are controlled by a bidirectional promoter. Although none of the MAT locus genes were essential for perithecium formation, all of them were required for ascosporogenesis in self-crosses. In outcrosses, the mat11-1-2 and mat11-1-3 mutants were fertile but the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants displayed male- and female-specific defects, respectively. The mat1-2-1 mutant was reduced in FgSO expression and hyphal fusion. Mat1-1-2 interacted with all other MAT locus transcription factors, suggesting that they may form a protein complex during sexual reproduction. Mat1-1-1 also interacted with FgMcm1, which may play a role in controlling cell identity and sexual development. Interestingly, the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants were reduced in virulence in corn stalk rot assays although none of the MAT locus genes was important for wheat infection. The MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes may play a host-specific role in colonization of corn stalks.

  13. Benchscale Assessment of the Efficacy of a Reactive Core Mat to Isolate PAH-spiked Aquatic Sediments.

    PubMed

    Meric, Dogus; Barbuto, Sara; Sheahan, Thomas C; Shine, James P; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a benchscale testing program to assess the efficacy of a reactive core mat (RCM) for short term isolation and partial remediation of contaminated, subaqueous sediments. The 1.25 cm thick RCM (with a core reactive material such as organoclay with filtering layers on top and bottom) is placed on the sediment, and approximately 7.5 - 10 cm of overlying soil is placed on the RCM for stability and protection. A set of experiments were conducted to measure the sorption characteristics of the mat core (organoclay) and sediment used in the experiments, and to determine the fate of semi-volatile organic contaminants and non-reactive tracers through the sediment and reactive mat. The experimental study was conducted on naphthalene-spiked Neponset River (Milton, MA) sediment. The results show nonlinear sorption behavior for organoclay, with sorption capacity increasing with increasing naphthalene concentration. Neponset River sediment showed a notably high sorption capacity, likely due to the relatively high organic carbon fraction (14%). The fate and transport experiments demonstrated the short term efficiency of the reactive mat to capture the contamination that is associated with the post-capping period during which the highest consolidation-induced advective flux occurs, driving solid particles, pore fluid and soluble contaminants toward the reactive mat. The goal of the mat placement is to provide a physical filtering and chemically reactive layer to isolate contamination from the overlying water column. An important finding is that because of the high sorption capacity of the Neponset River sediment, the physical filtering capability of the mat is as critical as its chemical reactive capacity.

  14. Benchscale Assessment of the Efficacy of a Reactive Core Mat to Isolate PAH-spiked Aquatic Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Meric, Dogus; Barbuto, Sara; Sheahan, Thomas C.; Shine, James P.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a benchscale testing program to assess the efficacy of a reactive core mat (RCM) for short term isolation and partial remediation of contaminated, subaqueous sediments. The 1.25 cm thick RCM (with a core reactive material such as organoclay with filtering layers on top and bottom) is placed on the sediment, and approximately 7.5 – 10 cm of overlying soil is placed on the RCM for stability and protection. A set of experiments were conducted to measure the sorption characteristics of the mat core (organoclay) and sediment used in the experiments, and to determine the fate of semi-volatile organic contaminants and non-reactive tracers through the sediment and reactive mat. The experimental study was conducted on naphthalene-spiked Neponset River (Milton, MA) sediment. The results show nonlinear sorption behavior for organoclay, with sorption capacity increasing with increasing naphthalene concentration. Neponset River sediment showed a notably high sorption capacity, likely due to the relatively high organic carbon fraction (14%). The fate and transport experiments demonstrated the short term efficiency of the reactive mat to capture the contamination that is associated with the post-capping period during which the highest consolidation-induced advective flux occurs, driving solid particles, pore fluid and soluble contaminants toward the reactive mat. The goal of the mat placement is to provide a physical filtering and chemically reactive layer to isolate contamination from the overlying water column. An important finding is that because of the high sorption capacity of the Neponset River sediment, the physical filtering capability of the mat is as critical as its chemical reactive capacity. PMID:24367237

  15. Using Intact Iron Microbial Mats to Gain Insights Into Mat Ecology and Geochemical Niche at the Microbial Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, B. T.; Chan, C. S. Y.; Mcallister, S.; Leavitt, A.; Emerson, D.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are formed by microorganisms working in coordinated symbiosis, often benefitting the community by controlling the local geochemical or physical environment. Thus, the ecology of the mat depends on the individual roles of microbes organized into niches within a larger architecture. Chemolithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) form distinctive Fe oxyhydroxide biominerals which constitute the building blocks of the mat. However, the majority of our progress has been in understanding the overall community structure. Understanding the physical mat structure on the microbial scale is important to unraveling FeOB evolution, the biogeochemistry and ecology of Fe-rich habitats, and ultimately interpreting FeOB biosignatures in the rock record. Mats in freshwater and marine environments contain strikingly similar biomineral morphologies, yet they are formed by phylogenetically distinct microorganisms. This suggests that the overall architecture and underlying genetics of freshwater and marine mats has evolved to serve particular roles specific to Fe oxidation. Thus, we conducted a comparative study of Fe seep freshwater mats and marine hydrothermal mats. We have developed a new approach to sampling Fe mats in order to preserve the delicate structure for analysis by confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Our analyses of these intact mats show that freshwater and marine mats are similarly initiated by a single type of structure-former. These ecosystem engineers form either a hollow sheath or a twisted stalk biomineral during mat formation, with a highly directional structure. These microbes appear to be the vanguard organisms that anchor the community within oxygen/Fe(II) gradients, further allowing for community succession in the mat interior as evidenced by other mineralized morphologies. Patterns in biomineral thickness and directionality were indicative of redox gradients and temporal changes in the geochemical environment. These observations show that

  16. Characterization of Chemosynthetic Microbial Mats Associated with Intertidal Hydrothermal Sulfur Vents in White Point, San Pedro, CA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Priscilla J.; McLain, Nathan K.; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Orphan, Victoria J.; Dillon, Jesse G.

    2016-01-01

    The shallow-sea hydrothermal vents at White Point (WP) in Palos Verdes on the southern California coast support microbial mats and provide easily accessed settings in which to study chemolithoautotrophic sulfur cycling. Previous studies have cultured sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the WP mats; however, almost nothing is known about the in situ diversity and activity of the microorganisms in these habitats. We studied the diversity, micron-scale spatial associations and metabolic activity of the mat community via sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and aprA genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy and sulfate reduction rate (SRR) measurements. Sequence analysis revealed a diverse group of bacteria, dominated by sulfur cycling gamma-, epsilon-, and deltaproteobacterial lineages such as Marithrix, Sulfurovum, and Desulfuromusa. FISH microscopy suggests a close physical association between sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing genotypes, while radiotracer studies showed low, but detectable, SRR. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicate the WP sulfur vent microbial mat community is similar, but distinct from other hydrothermal vent communities representing a range of biotopes and lithologic settings. These findings suggest a complete biological sulfur cycle is operating in the WP mat ecosystem mediated by diverse bacterial lineages, with some similarity with deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities. PMID:27512390

  17. Characterization of Chemosynthetic Microbial Mats Associated with Intertidal Hydrothermal Sulfur Vents in White Point, San Pedro, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Priscilla J; McLain, Nathan K; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Orphan, Victoria J; Dillon, Jesse G

    2016-01-01

    The shallow-sea hydrothermal vents at White Point (WP) in Palos Verdes on the southern California coast support microbial mats and provide easily accessed settings in which to study chemolithoautotrophic sulfur cycling. Previous studies have cultured sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the WP mats; however, almost nothing is known about the in situ diversity and activity of the microorganisms in these habitats. We studied the diversity, micron-scale spatial associations and metabolic activity of the mat community via sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and aprA genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy and sulfate reduction rate (SRR) measurements. Sequence analysis revealed a diverse group of bacteria, dominated by sulfur cycling gamma-, epsilon-, and deltaproteobacterial lineages such as Marithrix, Sulfurovum, and Desulfuromusa. FISH microscopy suggests a close physical association between sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing genotypes, while radiotracer studies showed low, but detectable, SRR. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicate the WP sulfur vent microbial mat community is similar, but distinct from other hydrothermal vent communities representing a range of biotopes and lithologic settings. These findings suggest a complete biological sulfur cycle is operating in the WP mat ecosystem mediated by diverse bacterial lineages, with some similarity with deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities. PMID:27512390

  18. Characterization of Chemosynthetic Microbial Mats Associated with Intertidal Hydrothermal Sulfur Vents in White Point, San Pedro, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Priscilla J; McLain, Nathan K; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Orphan, Victoria J; Dillon, Jesse G

    2016-01-01

    The shallow-sea hydrothermal vents at White Point (WP) in Palos Verdes on the southern California coast support microbial mats and provide easily accessed settings in which to study chemolithoautotrophic sulfur cycling. Previous studies have cultured sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the WP mats; however, almost nothing is known about the in situ diversity and activity of the microorganisms in these habitats. We studied the diversity, micron-scale spatial associations and metabolic activity of the mat community via sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and aprA genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy and sulfate reduction rate (SRR) measurements. Sequence analysis revealed a diverse group of bacteria, dominated by sulfur cycling gamma-, epsilon-, and deltaproteobacterial lineages such as Marithrix, Sulfurovum, and Desulfuromusa. FISH microscopy suggests a close physical association between sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing genotypes, while radiotracer studies showed low, but detectable, SRR. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicate the WP sulfur vent microbial mat community is similar, but distinct from other hydrothermal vent communities representing a range of biotopes and lithologic settings. These findings suggest a complete biological sulfur cycle is operating in the WP mat ecosystem mediated by diverse bacterial lineages, with some similarity with deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities.

  19. First Test of Fan Active Noise Control (ANC) Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    With the advent of ultrahigh-bypass engines, the space available for passive acoustic treatment is becoming more limited, whereas noise regulations are becoming more stringent. Active noise control (ANC) holds promise as a solution to this problem. It uses secondary (added) noise sources to reduce or eliminate the offending noise radiation. The first active noise control test on the low-speed fan test bed was a General Electric Company system designed to control either the exhaust or inlet fan tone. This system consists of a "ring source," an induct array of error microphones, and a control computer. Fan tone noise propagates in a duct in the form of spinning waves. These waves are detected by the microphone array, and the computer identifies their spinning structure. The computer then controls the "ring source" to generate waves that have the same spinning structure and amplitude, but 180 out of phase with the fan noise. This computer generated tone cancels the fan tone before it radiates from the duct and is heard in the far field. The "ring source" used in these tests is a cylindrical array of 16 flat-plate acoustic radiators that are driven by thin piezoceramic sheets bonded to their back surfaces. The resulting source can produce spinning waves up to mode 7 at levels high enough to cancel the fan tone. The control software is flexible enough to work on spinning mode orders from -6 to 6. In this test, the fan was configured to produce a tone of order 6. The complete modal (spinning and radial) structure of the tones was measured with two builtin sets of rotating microphone rakes. These rakes provide a measurement of the system performance independent from the control system error microphones. In addition, the far-field noise was measured with a semicircular array of 28 microphones. This test represents the first in a series of tests that demonstrate different active noise control concepts, each on a progressively more complicated modal structure. The tests are

  20. The cyanobacterium Mastigocladus fulfills the nitrogen demand of a terrestrial hot spring microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Estrella Alcamán, María; Fernandez, Camila; Delgado, Antonio; Bergman, Birgitta; Díez, Beatriz

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria from Subsection V (Stigonematales) are important components of microbial mats in non-acidic terrestrial hot springs. Despite their diazotrophic nature (N2 fixers), their impact on the nitrogen cycle in such extreme ecosystems remains unknown. Here, we surveyed the identity and activity of diazotrophic cyanobacteria in the neutral hot spring of Porcelana (Northern Patagonia, Chile) during 2009 and 2011-2013. We used 16S rRNA and the nifH gene to analyze the distribution and diversity of diazotrophic cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate the dominance of the heterocystous genus Mastigocladus (Stigonematales) along the entire temperature gradient of the hot spring (69-38 °C). In situ nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction), nitrogen fixation rates (cellular uptake of (15)N2) and nifH transcription levels in the microbial mats showed that nitrogen fixation and nifH mRNA expression were light-dependent. Nitrogen fixation activities were detected at temperatures ranging from 58 °C to 46 °C, with maximum daily rates of 600 nmol C2H4 cm(-2) per day and 94.1 nmol N cm(-2) per day. These activity patterns strongly suggest a heterocystous cyanobacterial origin and reveal a correlation between nitrogenase activity and nifH gene expression during diurnal cycles in thermal microbial mats. N and C fixation in the mats contributed ~3 g N m(-2) per year and 27 g C m(-2) per year, suggesting that these vital demands are fully met by the diazotrophic and photoautotrophic capacities of the cyanobacteria in the Porcelana hot spring.

  1. The cyanobacterium Mastigocladus fulfills the nitrogen demand of a terrestrial hot spring microbial mat

    PubMed Central

    Estrella Alcamán, María; Fernandez, Camila; Delgado, Antonio; Bergman, Birgitta; Díez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria from Subsection V (Stigonematales) are important components of microbial mats in non-acidic terrestrial hot springs. Despite their diazotrophic nature (N2 fixers), their impact on the nitrogen cycle in such extreme ecosystems remains unknown. Here, we surveyed the identity and activity of diazotrophic cyanobacteria in the neutral hot spring of Porcelana (Northern Patagonia, Chile) during 2009 and 2011–2013. We used 16S rRNA and the nifH gene to analyze the distribution and diversity of diazotrophic cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate the dominance of the heterocystous genus Mastigocladus (Stigonematales) along the entire temperature gradient of the hot spring (69–38 °C). In situ nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction), nitrogen fixation rates (cellular uptake of 15N2) and nifH transcription levels in the microbial mats showed that nitrogen fixation and nifH mRNA expression were light-dependent. Nitrogen fixation activities were detected at temperatures ranging from 58 °C to 46 °C, with maximum daily rates of 600 nmol C2H4 cm−2 per day and 94.1 nmol N cm−2 per day. These activity patterns strongly suggest a heterocystous cyanobacterial origin and reveal a correlation between nitrogenase activity and nifH gene expression during diurnal cycles in thermal microbial mats. N and C fixation in the mats contributed ~3 g N m−2 per year and 27 g C m−2 per year, suggesting that these vital demands are fully met by the diazotrophic and photoautotrophic capacities of the cyanobacteria in the Porcelana hot spring. PMID:26230049

  2. Antinociceptive activity of atranorin in mice orofacial nociception tests.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Rosana S; Bonjardim, Leonardo R; Araújo, Adriano A S; Araújo, Bruno E S; Melo, Marcélia G D; Oliveira, Marília G B; Gelain, Daniel P; Silva, Francilene A; DeSantana, Josimari M; Albuquerque-Júnior, Ricardo L C; Rocha, Ricardo F; Moreira, José C F; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization and antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of atranorin (AT) extracted from Cladina kalbii Ahti in formalin- and capsaicin-induced orofacial pain and anti-inflammatory tests in rodents were studied. Physicochemical characterization showed that AT has the general formula C19H18O8. Male Swiss mice were pretreated with AT (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, i.p.), morphine (3 mg/kg, i.p.), or vehicle (0.9% saline with two drops of 0.2% Tween 80) before formalin (20 microl, 2%) or capsaicin (20 microl, 2.5 microg) were injected into the right vibrissa. Our results showed that i.p. treatment with AT displayed marked inhibitory effects in different orofacial pain tests in mice. AT (400 mg/kg, i.p.) was effective in reducing the nociceptive face-rubbing behavioural response in both phases of the formalin test, which was also naloxone-sensitive. Additionally, AT produced a significant antinociceptive effect at all doses in the capsaicin test. Such results were unlikely to be provoked by motor abnormality, since AT-treated mice exhibited no performance alteration on the rota rod apparatus. AT exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in the acute model of inflammation (leukocyte migration to the peritoneal cavity), carrageenan- and arachidonic acid-induced hind paw edema in rats. Additionally, AT exhibited a dose-dependent antioxidant activity in vitro, as assessed by total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter and total antioxidant reactivity assays. All these findings suggest that AT might represent an important tool for the management of orofacial pain and/or inflammatory disorders. PMID:21138055

  3. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    Floating fens are valuable wetlands, found in North-Western Europe, that are formed by floating root mats when old turf ponds are colonized by plants. These terrestrialization ecosystems are known for their biodiversity and the presence of rare plant species, and the root mats reveal different vegetation zones at a small scale. The vegetation zones are a result of strong gradients in abiotic conditions, including groundwater dynamics, nutrients and pH. To prevent irreversible drought effects such as land subsidence and mineralization of peat, water management involves import of water from elsewhere to maintain constant surface water levels. Imported water may have elevated levels of salinity during dry summers, and salt exposure may threaten the vegetation. To assess the risk of exposure of the rare plant species to salinity, the hydrology of such root mats must be understood. Physical properties of root mats have scarcely been investigated. We have measured soil characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, vertical root mat movement and groundwater dynamics in a floating root mat in the nature reserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, in the Netherlands. The root mat mostly consists of roots and organic material, in which the soil has a high saturated water content, and strongly varies in its stage of decomposition. We have found a distinct negative correlation between degree of decomposition and hydraulic conductivity, similar to observations for bogs in the literature. Our results show that the relatively young, thin edge of the root mat that colonizes the surface water has a high hydraulic conductivity and floats in the surface water, resulting in very small groundwater fluctuations within the root mat. The older part of the root mat, that is connected to the deeper peat layers is hydrologically more isolated and the material has a lower conductivity. Here, the groundwater fluctuates strongly with atmospheric forcing. The zones of hydraulic properties and vegetation, appear to

  4. Protocyanobacteria: Oxygenic and Anoxygenic photosynthesis in mat-forming bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The oldest record of life is preserved in prePhanerozoic stromatolites dated 3500 million years old and is most likely of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria. The sedimentary records of cyanobacterial mats in stromatolites are the most abundant record of life throughout the prePhanerozoic. Stromatolites persisted into the Phanerozoic Eon, yet they become much less pronounced relative to earlier ones. The abundance and persistence of cyanobacterial mats throughout most of geological time point to the evolutionary success of these kinds of microbial communities and their possible role in the evolution of the earth and atmosphere.

  5. The Function of the Superficial Root Mat in the Biogeochemical Cycles of Nutrients in Congolese Eucalyptus Plantations

    PubMed Central

    LACLAU, JEAN‐PAUL; TOUTAIN, FRANÇOIS; M’BOU, ARMEL THONGO; ARNAUD, MICHEL; JOFFRE, RICHARD; RANGER, JACQUES

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims The importance of superficial root mats inside the forest floor for the nutrition of Amazonian rain forests has been extensively investigated. The present study was aimed at assessing the function of a root mat adherent to decomposing organic material observed in Eucalyptus plantations. • Methods The development of the root mat was studied through micromorphological observations of thin litter sections, and the influence of soil microtopography and soil water repellency on root mat biomass was assessed in situ on an area of 5 m2. In addition, input–output budgets of nutrients within the forest floor were established from measurements of litterfall, dissolved nutrients in gravitational solutions, and forest floor nutrient contents. • Key Findings The amounts of nutrients released during litter decay in this ecosystem during the period of study were, on average, 46, 3, 4, 19 and 17 kg ha–1 year–1 for N, P, K, Ca and Mg, respectively. The simultaneous measurements of the chemical composition of throughfall solutions and leachates beneath the forest floor showed a very quick uptake of nutrients by the root mat during the decomposition processes. Indeed, the solutions did not become noticeably enriched in nutrients during their passage through the holorganic layer, despite large amounts of elements being released during litter decay. The root mat biomass decreased significantly during the dry season, and a preferential development in microdepressions at the soil surface was observed. A strong water repellency observed in these depressions might enhance the ability of the roots to take up water and nutrients during the dry periods. • Conclusions The root mat was active throughout the year to catch the flux of nutrients from the biodegradation of the forest floor, preventing the transfer of dissolved nutrients toward deeper soil horizons. This mechanism is involved in the successful adaptation of this Eucalyptus hybrid in areas

  6. Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (AMOLED) Environmental Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, George A.

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits

  7. Activated carbon passes tests for acid-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-06-24

    Use of activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid-gas feed to Claus sulfur-recovery units has been successfully pilot tested in Saudi Arabia. Pilot plant results are discussed here along with issues involved in scale-up to commercial size. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}+s from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated by use of low-pressure steam. A post-regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. The paper discusses feed contaminants, vapor-phase cleanup, testing design, test parameters and results, bed drying after regeneration, regeneration conditions, basic flow, system control, and full-scale installation.

  8. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  9. Test-retest stability of the oral niacin test and electrodermal activity in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, B M; Hultman, C M; Ekselius, L

    2009-01-01

    In schizophrenia, well-replicated findings support an attenuated niacin skin-flush response. We have previously reported a delayed skin-flush after niacin ingestion and also an association between niacin non-responding and electrodermal non-responding in schizophrenia. The stability of the niacin and electrodermal tests was now studied in a test-retest design. An additional aim was to assess the association previously found. Twenty-three patients with schizophrenia underwent two sessions 3 months apart during which an oral niacin test was conducted and electrodermal activity was measured. Despite similar values for niacin outcome variables at the group level, there was high intraindividual variation. Test-retest stability for the oral niacin test was thus low, although a trend toward correlation for the dichotomous response criterion was found. Most electrodermal measures correlated between baseline and retest. A significant association between the tests was again found; niacin non-responding implied electrodermal non-responding, providing further support for a common underlying aberration in schizophrenia. PMID:19864122

  10. Converting the Active Digital Controller for Use in Two Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    The Active Digital Controller is a system used to control the various functions of wind tunnel models. It has the capability of digitizing and saving of up to sixty-four channels of analog data. It can output up to 16 channels of analog command signals. In addition to its use as a general controller, it can run up to two distinct control laws. All of this is done at a regulated speed of two hundred hertz. The Active Digital Controller (ADC) was modified for use in the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) tests and for side-wall pressure data acquisition. The changes included general maintenance and updating of the controller as well as setting up special modes of operation. The ACROBAT tests required that two sets of output signals be available. The pressure data acquisition needed a sampling rate of four hundred hertz, twice the standard ADC rate. These modifications were carried out and the ADC was used during the ACROBAT wind tunnel entry.

  11. Information Technology Measurement and Testing Activities at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Michael D.; Carnahan, Lisa J.; Carpenter, Robert J.; Flater, David W.; Fowler, James E.; Frechette, Simon P.; Gray, Martha M.; Johnson, L. Arnold; McCabe, R. Michael; Montgomery, Douglas; Radack, Shirley M.; Rosenthal, Robert; Shakarji, Craig M.

    2001-01-01

    Our high technology society continues to rely more and more upon sophisticated measurements, technical standards, and associated testing activities. This was true for the industrial society of the 20th century and remains true for the information society of the 21st century. Over the last half of the 20th century, information technology (IT) has been a powerful agent of change in almost every sector of the economy. The complexity and rapidly changing nature of IT have presented unique technical challenges to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and to the scientific measurement community in developing a sound measurement and testing infrastructure for IT. This measurement and testing infrastructure for the important non-physical and non-chemical properties associated with complex IT systems is still in an early stage of development. This paper explains key terms and concepts of IT metrology, briefly reviews the history of the National Bureau of Standards/National Institute of Standards and Technology (NBS/NIST) in the field of IT, and reviews NIST’s current capabilities and work in measurement and testing for IT. It concludes with a look at what is likely to occur in the field of IT over the next ten years and what metrology roles NIST is likely to play. PMID:27500026

  12. Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Models And Initial Active Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-04-23

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from MCNPX model simulations and initial testing of the active mode variation of the Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was previously reported.

  13. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 μg/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  14. A pilot study on the improvement of the lying area of finishing pigs by a soft lying mat.

    PubMed

    Savary, Pascal; Gygax, Lorenz; Jungbluth, Thomas; Wechsler, Beat; Hauser, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    In this pilot study, we tested whether a soft mat (foam covered with a heat-sealed thermoplastic) reduces alterations and injuries at the skin and the leg joints.The soft mat in the lying area of partly slatted pens was compared to a lying area consisting of either bare or slightly littered (100 g straw per pig and day) concrete flooring. In this study we focused on skin lesions on the legs of finishing pigs as indicators of impaired welfare. Pigs were kept in 19 groups of 8-10 individuals and were examined for skin lesions around the carpal and tarsal joints either at a weight of <35 kg, or at close to 100 kg. The likelihood of hairless patches and wounds at the tarsal joints was significantly lower in pens with the soft lying mat than in pens with a bare concrete floor. Pens with a littered concrete floor did not differ compared to pens with a bare concrete floor. The soft lying mat thus improved floor quality in the lying area in terms of preventing skin lesions compared to bare and slightly littered concrete flooring. Such soft lying mats have thus the potential to improve lying comfort and welfare of finishing pigs.

  15. Utilisation of Wearable Computing for Space Programmes Test Activities Optimasation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, V.; Lazzari, D.; Alemanni, M.

    2004-08-01

    New technologies are assuming a relevant importance in the Space business domain also in the Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) activities allowing process optimization and capability that were unthinkable only few years ago. This paper has the aim to describe Alenia Spazio (ALS) gained experience on the remote interaction techniques as a results of collaborations established both on European Communities (EC) initiatives, with Alenia Aeronautica (ALA) and Politecnico of Torino (POLITO). The H/W and S/W components performances increase and costs reduction due to the home computing massive utilization (especially demanded by the games business) together with the network technology possibility (offered by the web as well as the hi-speed links and the wireless communications) allow today to re-think the traditional AIT process activities in the light of the multimedia data exchange: graphical, voice video and by sure more in the future. Aerospace business confirm its innovation vocation which in the year '80 represents the cradle of the CAD systems and today is oriented to the 3D data visualization/ interaction technologies and remote visualisation/ interaction in collaborative way on a much more user friendly bases (i.e. not for specialists). Fig. 1 collects AIT extended scenario studied and adopted by ALS in these years. ALS experimented two possibilities of remote visualization/interaction: Portable [e.g. Fig.2 Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), Wearable] and walls (e.g.VR-Lab) screens as both 2D/3D visualisation and interaction devices which could support many types of traditional (mainly based on EGSE and PDM/CAD utilisation/reports) company internal AIT applications: 1. design review support 2. facility management 3. storage management 4. personnel training 5. integration sequences definition 6. assembly and test operations follow up 7. documentation review and external access to AIT activities for remote operations (e.g. tele-testing) EGSE Portable Clean room

  16. Development and testing of an active area neutron dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Brushwood, J M; Gow, J P D; Beeley, P A; Spyrou, N M

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and testing of an active area neutron dosemeter (AAND). The classic moderator and central detector is retained but in AAND this arrangement is augmented by small thermal neutron detectors positioned within the moderating body. The outputs from these detectors are combined using an appropriately weighted linear superposition to fit both the ambient dose equivalent and the radiation weighting factor. Experimental verifications of both the modelled detector energy reponses and the overall AAND response are given. In the relatively soft D2O moderated 252Cf spectra, the AAND determined both the H*(10) and mean radiation weighting factor to better than +10%.

  17. Standards Development Activities at White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. L.; Beeson, H. D.; Saulsberry, R. L.; Julien, H. L.; Woods, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of standards and standard activities at the JSC White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has been expanded to include the transfer of technology and standards to voluntary consensus organizations in five technical areas of importance to NASA. This effort is in direct response to the National Technology Transfer Act designed to accelerate transfer of technology to industry and promote government-industry partnerships. Technology transfer is especially important for WSTF, whose longterm mission has been to develop and provide vital propellant safety and hazards information to aerospace designers, operations personnel, and safety personnel. Meeting this mission is being accomplished through the preparation of consensus guidelines and standards, propellant hazards analysis protocols, and safety courses for the propellant use of hydrogen, oxygen, and hypergols, as well as the design and inspection of spacecraft pressure vessels and the use of pyrovalves in spacecraft propulsion systems. The overall WSTF technology transfer program is described and the current status of technology transfer activities are summarized.

  18. Scribble tracker: a matting-based approach for robust tracking.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jialue; Shen, Xiaohui; Wu, Ying

    2012-08-01

    Model updating is a critical problem in tracking. Inaccurate extraction of the foreground and background information in model adaptation would cause the model to drift and degrade the tracking performance. The most direct yet difficult solution to the drift problem is to obtain accurate boundaries of the target. We approach such a solution by proposing a novel model adaptation framework based on the combination of matting and tracking. In our framework, coarse tracking results automatically provide sufficient and accurate scribbles for matting, which makes matting applicable in a tracking system. Meanwhile, accurate boundaries of the target can be obtained from matting results even when the target has large deformation. An effective model combining short-term features and long-term appearances is further constructed and successfully updated based on such accurate boundaries. The model can successfully handle occlusion by explicit inference. Extensive experiments show that our adaptation scheme largely avoids model drift and significantly outperforms other discriminative tracking models. PMID:22745003

  19. A Modular Sensorized Mat for Monitoring Infant Posture

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Marco; Cecchi, Francesca; Bonaccorso, Filippo; Branciforte, Marco; Dario, Paolo; Vitiello, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel sensorized mat for monitoring infant's posture through the measure of pressure maps. The pressure-sensitive mat is based on an optoelectronic technology developed in the last few years at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna: a soft silicone skin cover, which constitutes the mat, participates in the transduction principle and provides the mat with compliance. The device has a modular structure (with a minimum of one and a maximum of six sub-modules, and a total surface area of about 1 m2) that enables dimensional adaptation of the pressure-sensitive area to different specific applications. The system consists of on-board electronics for data collection, pre-elaboration, and transmission to a remote computing unit for analysis and posture classification. In this work we present a complete description of the sensing apparatus along with its experimental characterization and validation with five healthy infants. PMID:24385029

  20. BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC MICROBIAL MATS AND THEIR BIOTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David; Discipulo, M.; Turk, K.; Londry, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time. their biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self- sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a dial (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  1. Microbial mats and the early evolution of life.

    PubMed

    Des Marais, D J

    1990-05-01

    Microbial mats have descended from perhaps the oldest and most widespread biological communities known. Mats harbor microbes that are crucial for studies of bacterial phylogeny and physiology. They illustrate how several oxygen-sensitive biochemical processes have adapted to oxygen, and they show how life adapted to dry land long before the rise of plants. The search for the earliest grazing protists and metazoa in stromatolites is aided by observations of mats: in them, organic compounds characteristic of ancient photosynthetic protists can be identified. Recent mat studies suggest that the 13C/12C increase observed over geological time in stromatolitic organic matter was driven at least in part by a long-term decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  2. Microbial mats and the early evolution of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Microbial mats have descended from perhaps the oldest and most widespread biological communities known. Mats harbor microbes that are crucial for studies of bacterial phylogeny and physiology. They illustrate how several oxygen-sensitive biochemical processes have adapted to oxygen, and they show how life adapted to dry land long before the rise of plants. The search for the earliest grazing protists and metazoa in stromatolites is aided by observations of mats: in them, organic compounds characteristic of ancient photosynthetic protists can be identified. Recent mat studies suggest that the 13C/12C increase observed over geological time in stromatolitic organic matter was driven at least in part by a long-term decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  3. Fabrication of nanofiber mats from electrospinning of functionalized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktay, Burcu; Kayaman-Apohan, Nilhan; Erdem-Kuruca, Serap

    2014-08-01

    Electrospinning technique enabled us to prepare nanofibers from synthetic and natural polymers. In this study, it was aimed to fabricate electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based nanofibers by reactive electrospinning process. To improve endurance of fiber toward to many solvents, PVA was functionalized with photo-crosslinkable groups before spinning. Afterward PVA was crosslinked by UV radiation during electrospinning process. The nanofiber mats were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that homogenous, uniform and crosslinked PVA nanofibers in diameters of about 200 nm were obtained. Thermal stability of the nanofiber mat was investigated with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Also the potential use of this nanofiber mats for tissue engineering was examined. Osteosarcoma (Saos) cells were cultured on the nanofiber mats.

  4. Microbial mats and modern stromatolites in Shark Bay, Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubic, S.

    1985-01-01

    Distribution, external morphology, texture, and microbial composition of microbial mats in Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia, have been studied and reviewed along a composite representative profile starting from the permanently submerged zone, across the zones of periodic flooding, toward permanently emerged land and coastal dunes. The following nine types of algal mats have been recognized: colloform, gelatinous, smooth, pincushion, tufted, mamillate, film, reticulate, and blister. Solar ponds represent a particular environment. The mat types represent microbial communities that are characterized by one or more dominant microorganisms. The colonization and stabilization of loose sediment is carried out by a microbial assemblage of generalists that prepare the ground for later replacement and succession by specialized microflora. Lithification of microbial mats takes place periodically, mainly during the austral summer. This process is destructive for the microbial community but increases the preservation potential of the stromatolitic structures.

  5. Fate of Immediate Methane Precursors in Low-Sulfate, Hot-Spring Algal-Bacterial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Sandbeck, Kenneth A.; Ward, David M.

    1981-01-01

    The fates of acetate and carbon dioxide were examined in several experiments designed to indicate their relative contributions to methane production at various temperatures in two low-sulfate, hot-spring algal-bacterial mats. [2-14C]acetate was predominantly incorporated into cell material, although some 14CH4 and 14CO2 was produced. Acetate incorporation was reduced by dark incubation in short-term experiments and severely depressed by a 2-day preincubation in darkness. Autoradiograms showed that acetate was incorporated by long filaments resembling phototrophic microorganisms of the mat communities. [3H]acetate was not converted to C3H4 in samples from Octopus Spring collected at the optimum temperature for methanogenesis. NaH14CO3 was readily converted to 14CH4 at temperatures at which methanogenesis was active in both mats. Comparisons of the specific activities of methane and carbon dioxide suggested that of the methane produced, 80 ± 6% in Octopus Spring and 71 ± 21% in Wiegert Channel were derived from carbon dioxide. Addition of acetate to 1 mM did not reduce the relative importance of carbon dioxide as a methane precursor in samples from Octopus Spring. Experiments with pure cultures of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum suggested that the measured ratio of specific activities might underestimate the true contribution of carbon dioxide in methanogenesis. Images PMID:16345736

  6. Characterizing Microbial Mat Morphology with Structure from Motion Techniques in Ice-Covered Lake Joyce, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, T. J.; Leidman, S. Z.; Allen, B.; Hawes, I.; Lawrence, J.; Jungblut, A. D.; Krusor, M.; Coleman, L.; Sumner, D. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Structure from Motion (SFM) techniques can provide quantitative morphological documentation of otherwise inaccessible benthic ecosystems such as microbial mats in Lake Joyce, a perennially ice-covered lake of the Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV). Microbial mats are a key ecosystem of MDV lakes, and diverse mat morphologies like pinnacles emerge from interactions among microbial behavior, mineralization, and environmental conditions. Environmental gradients can be isolated to test mat growth models, but assessment of mat morphology along these gradients is complicated by their inaccessibility: the Lake Joyce ice cover is 4-5 m thick, water depths containing diverse pinnacle morphologies are 9-14 m, and relevant mat features are cm-scale. In order to map mat pinnacle morphology in different sedimentary settings, we deployed drop cameras (SeaViewer and GoPro) through 29 GPS referenced drill holes clustered into six stations along a transect spanning 880 m. Once under the ice cover, a boom containing a second GoPro camera was unfurled and rotated to collect oblique images of the benthic mats within dm of the mat-water interface. This setup allowed imaging from all sides over a ~1.5 m diameter area of the lake bottom. Underwater lens parameters were determined for each camera in Agisoft Lens; images were reconstructed and oriented in space with the SFM software Agisoft Photoscan, using the drop camera axis of rotation as up. The reconstructions were compared to downward facing images to assess accuracy, and similar images of an object with known geometry provided a test for expected error in reconstructions. Downward facing images identify decreasing pinnacle abundance in higher sedimentation settings, and quantitative measurements of 3D reconstructions in KeckCAVES LidarViewer supplement these mat morphological facies with measurements of pinnacle height and orientation. Reconstructions also help isolate confounding variables for mat facies trends with measurements

  7. Contrasted effects of natural complex mixtures of PAHs and metals on oxygen cycle in a microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Pringault, Olivier; Aube, Johanne; Bouchez, Olivier; Klopp, Christophe; Mariette, Jérome; Escudie, Frédéric; Senin, Pavel; Goni-Urriza, Marisol

    2015-09-01

    The contamination of polluted environments is often due to a complex mixture of pollutants sometimes at trace levels which nevertheless may have significant effects on the diversity and functioning of organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the functional responses of a microbial mat exposed to a natural complex mixture of PAHs and metals as a function of the maturation stage of the biofilm. Microbial mats sampled in a slightly polluted environment were exposed to contaminated water of a retention basin of an oil refinery. The responses of the microbial mats differed according to season. In spring 2012, strong inhibition of both oxygen production and respiration was observed relative to the control, with rates representing less than 5% of the control after 72 h of incubation. A decrease of microbial activities was followed by a decrease of the coupling between autotrophs and heterotrophs. In contrast, in autumn 2012, no significant changes for oxygen production and respiration were observed and the coupling between autotrophs and heterotrophs was not altered. The differences observed between the spring and autumn mats might be explained by the maturity of the microbial mat with dominance of heterotrophic bacteria in spring, and diatoms and cyanobacteria in autumn, as well as by the differences in the chemical composition of the complex mixture of PAHs and metals. PMID:25957138

  8. Contrasted effects of natural complex mixtures of PAHs and metals on oxygen cycle in a microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Pringault, Olivier; Aube, Johanne; Bouchez, Olivier; Klopp, Christophe; Mariette, Jérome; Escudie, Frédéric; Senin, Pavel; Goni-Urriza, Marisol

    2015-09-01

    The contamination of polluted environments is often due to a complex mixture of pollutants sometimes at trace levels which nevertheless may have significant effects on the diversity and functioning of organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the functional responses of a microbial mat exposed to a natural complex mixture of PAHs and metals as a function of the maturation stage of the biofilm. Microbial mats sampled in a slightly polluted environment were exposed to contaminated water of a retention basin of an oil refinery. The responses of the microbial mats differed according to season. In spring 2012, strong inhibition of both oxygen production and respiration was observed relative to the control, with rates representing less than 5% of the control after 72 h of incubation. A decrease of microbial activities was followed by a decrease of the coupling between autotrophs and heterotrophs. In contrast, in autumn 2012, no significant changes for oxygen production and respiration were observed and the coupling between autotrophs and heterotrophs was not altered. The differences observed between the spring and autumn mats might be explained by the maturity of the microbial mat with dominance of heterotrophic bacteria in spring, and diatoms and cyanobacteria in autumn, as well as by the differences in the chemical composition of the complex mixture of PAHs and metals.

  9. Commander Mattingly tangles with NOSL experiment on aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Mattingly uses Nighttime / Daytime Optical Survey of Lightning (NOSL) experiment on aft flight deck. Cables connecting the data recorder to 16mm data aquisition camera (DAC), electronic package, and optical sensor package become tangled as Mattingly points NOSL instrument out overhead aft flight deck window. His cap is also lost amidst the maze of wiring, tape recorder, and camera equipment onboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102.

  10. Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacteria in a Coastal Microbial Mat.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haoxin; Bolhuis, Henk; Stal, Lucas J

    2015-01-01

    The first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, can be performed by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). We investigated the presence of these two groups in three structurally different types of coastal microbial mats that develop along the tidal gradient on the North Sea beach of the Dutch barrier island Schiermonnikoog. The abundance and transcription of amoA, a gene encoding for the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase that is present in both AOA and AOB, were assessed and the potential nitrification rates in these mats were measured. The potential nitrification rates in the three mat types were highest in autumn and lowest in summer. AOB and AOA amoA genes were present in all three mat types. The composition of the AOA and AOB communities in the mats of the tidal and intertidal stations, based on the diversity of amoA, were similar and clustered separately from the supratidal microbial mat. In all three mats AOB amoA genes were significantly more abundant than AOA amoA genes. The abundance of neither AOB nor AOA amoA genes correlated with the potential nitrification rates, but AOB amoA transcripts were positively correlated with the potential nitrification rate. The composition and abundance of amoA genes seemed to be partly driven by salinity, ammonium, temperature, and the nitrate/nitrite concentration. We conclude that AOB are responsible for the bulk of the ammonium oxidation in these coastal microbial mats. PMID:26648931

  11. The biogeochemistry of microbial mats, stromatolites and the ancient biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D. J.; Canfield, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    Stromatolites offer an unparalleled geologic record of early life, because they constitute the oldest and most abundant recognizable remains of microbial ecosystems. Microbial mats are living homologs of stromatolites; thus, the physiology of the microbiota as well as the processes which create those features of mats (e.g., biomarker organic compounds, elemental and stable isotopic compositions) which are preserved in the ancient record. Observations of the carbon isotopic composition (delta C-13) of stromatolites and microbial mats were made and are consistent with the hypothesis that atmospheric CO2 concentrations have declined by at least one to two orders of magnitude during the past 2.5 Ga. Whereas delta C-13 values of carbonate carbon average about 0 permil during both the early and mid-Proterozoic, the delta C-13 values of stromatolitic organic matter increase from an average of -35 between 2.0 and 2.6 Ga ago to an average of about -28 about 1.0 Ga ago. Modern microbial mats in hypersaline environments have delta C-13 values typically in the range of -5 to -9, relative to an inorganic bicarbonate source at 0 permil. Both microbial mats and pur cultures of cyanobacteria grown in waters in near equilibrium with current atmospheric CO2 levels exhibit minimal discrimination against C-13. In contrast, hot spring cyanobacterial mats or cyanobacterial cultures grown under higher CO2 levels exhibit substantially greater discrimination. If care is taken to compare modern mats with stromatolites from comparable environments, it might be possible to estimate ancient levels of atmospheric CO2. In modern microbial mats, a tight coupling exists between photosynthetic organic carbon production and subsequent carbon oxidation, mostly by sulfate reduction. The rate of one process fuels a high rate of the other, with much of the sulfate reduction occurring within the same depth interval as oxygenic photosynthesis. Other aspects of this study are presented.

  12. Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacteria in a Coastal Microbial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Haoxin; Bolhuis, Henk; Stal, Lucas J.

    2015-01-01

    The first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, can be performed by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). We investigated the presence of these two groups in three structurally different types of coastal microbial mats that develop along the tidal gradient on the North Sea beach of the Dutch barrier island Schiermonnikoog. The abundance and transcription of amoA, a gene encoding for the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase that is present in both AOA and AOB, were assessed and the potential nitrification rates in these mats were measured. The potential nitrification rates in the three mat types were highest in autumn and lowest in summer. AOB and AOA amoA genes were present in all three mat types. The composition of the AOA and AOB communities in the mats of the tidal and intertidal stations, based on the diversity of amoA, were similar and clustered separately from the supratidal microbial mat. In all three mats AOB amoA genes were significantly more abundant than AOA amoA genes. The abundance of neither AOB nor AOA amoA genes correlated with the potential nitrification rates, but AOB amoA transcripts were positively correlated with the potential nitrification rate. The composition and abundance of amoA genes seemed to be partly driven by salinity, ammonium, temperature, and the nitrate/nitrite concentration. We conclude that AOB are responsible for the bulk of the ammonium oxidation in these coastal microbial mats. PMID:26648931

  13. Highly Porous Regenerated Cellulose Fiber Mats via the Co-Forcespinning of Cellulose Acetate for Separator Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Alejandro; Mao, Yuanbing

    2015-03-01

    Improvements in battery technology are necessary for the transition away from a fossil fuel based economy. An important bottle-neck in battery efficiency is the quality of the separator, which separates the cathode and anode to prevent a short-circuit while still allowing the ions in solution to flow as close to unabated as possible. In this work solutions of cellulose acetate, polyvinyldiflourine (pvdf), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (pvp) dissolved in a 2:1 v/v acetone/dimethylacetamide solvent mixture were Forcespun to create nonwoven fiber mats of nanoscale diameter. These mats were then soaked in a NaOH solution so as to both strip the pvp from the fiber as well as regenerate cellulose from its acetate derivative for the purpose of creating high surface area, nanoporous, hydrophilic, and ioniclly conductive cellulose/pvdf nonwoven mats for the purposes of testing their suitability as battery separators

  14. Microbial Diversity in Sediment Ecosystems (Evaporites Domes, Microbial Mats, and Crusts) of Hypersaline Laguna Tebenquiche, Salar de Atacama, Chile.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ana B; Rasuk, Maria C; Visscher, Pieter T; Contreras, Manuel; Novoa, Fernando; Poire, Daniel G; Patterson, Molly M; Ventosa, Antonio; Farias, Maria E

    2016-01-01

    We combined nucleic acid-based molecular methods, biogeochemical measurements, and physicochemical characteristics to investigate microbial sedimentary ecosystems of Laguna Tebenquiche, Atacama Desert, Chile. Molecular diversity, and biogeochemistry of hypersaline microbial mats, rhizome-associated concretions, and an endoevaporite were compared with: The V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by pyrosequencing to analyze the total microbial diversity (i.e., bacteria and archaea) in bulk samples, and in addition, in detail on a millimeter scale in one microbial mat and in one evaporite. Archaea were more abundant than bacteria. Euryarchaeota was one of the most abundant phyla in all samples, and particularly dominant (97% of total diversity) in the most lithified ecosystem, the evaporite. Most of the euryarchaeal OTUs could be assigned to the class Halobacteria or anaerobic and methanogenic archaea. Planctomycetes potentially also play a key role in mats and rhizome-associated concretions, notably the aerobic organoheterotroph members of the class Phycisphaerae. In addition to cyanobacteria, members of Chromatiales and possibly the candidate family Chlorotrichaceae contributed to photosynthetic carbon fixation. Other abundant uncultured taxa such as the candidate division MSBL1, the uncultured MBGB, and the phylum Acetothermia potentially play an important metabolic role in these ecosystems. Lithifying microbial mats contained calcium carbonate precipitates, whereas endoevoporites consisted of gypsum, and halite. Biogeochemical measurements revealed that based on depth profiles of O2 and sulfide, metabolic activities were much higher in the non-lithifying mat (peaking in the least lithified systems) than in lithifying mats with the lowest activity in endoevaporites. This trend in decreasing microbial activity reflects the increase in salinity, which may play an important role in the biodiversity. PMID:27597845

  15. Antiobesity effects of yerba maté extract (Ilex paraguariensis) in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Arçari, Demétrius P; Bartchewsky, Waldemar; dos Santos, Tanila W; Oliveira, Karim A; Funck, Alexandre; Pedrazzoli, José; de Souza, Marina F F; Saad, Mario J; Bastos, Deborah H M; Gambero, Alessandra; Carvalho, Patricia de O; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2009-12-01

    Because the potential of yerba maté (Ilex paraguariensis) has been suggested in the management of obesity, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of yerba maté extract on weight loss, obesity-related biochemical parameters, and the regulation of adipose tissue gene expression in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. Thirty animals were randomly assigned to three groups. The mice were introduced to standard or high-fat diets. After 12 weeks on a high-fat diet, mice were randomly assigned according to the treatment (water or yerba maté extract 1.0 g/kg). After treatment intervention, plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and glucose were evaluated. Adipose tissue was examined to determine the mRNA levels of several genes such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), leptin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-C motif chemokine ligand-2 (CCL2), CCL receptor-2 (CCR2), angiotensinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), adiponectin, resistin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma(2) (PPAR-gamma(2)), uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1), and PPAR-gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha). The F4/80 levels were determined by immunoblotting. We found that obese mice treated with yerba maté exhibited marked attenuation of weight gain, adiposity, a decrease in epididymal fat-pad weight, and restoration of the serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and glucose. The gene and protein expression levels were directly regulated by the high-fat diet. After treatment with yerba maté extract, we observed a recovery of the expression levels. In conclusion, our data show that yerba maté extract has potent antiobesity activity in vivo. Additionally, we observed that the treatment had a modulatory effect on the expression of several genes related to obesity.

  16. Microbial Diversity in Sediment Ecosystems (Evaporites Domes, Microbial Mats, and Crusts) of Hypersaline Laguna Tebenquiche, Salar de Atacama, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Ana B.; Rasuk, Maria C.; Visscher, Pieter T.; Contreras, Manuel; Novoa, Fernando; Poire, Daniel G.; Patterson, Molly M.; Ventosa, Antonio; Farias, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    We combined nucleic acid-based molecular methods, biogeochemical measurements, and physicochemical characteristics to investigate microbial sedimentary ecosystems of Laguna Tebenquiche, Atacama Desert, Chile. Molecular diversity, and biogeochemistry of hypersaline microbial mats, rhizome-associated concretions, and an endoevaporite were compared with: The V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by pyrosequencing to analyze the total microbial diversity (i.e., bacteria and archaea) in bulk samples, and in addition, in detail on a millimeter scale in one microbial mat and in one evaporite. Archaea were more abundant than bacteria. Euryarchaeota was one of the most abundant phyla in all samples, and particularly dominant (97% of total diversity) in the most lithified ecosystem, the evaporite. Most of the euryarchaeal OTUs could be assigned to the class Halobacteria or anaerobic and methanogenic archaea. Planctomycetes potentially also play a key role in mats and rhizome-associated concretions, notably the aerobic organoheterotroph members of the class Phycisphaerae. In addition to cyanobacteria, members of Chromatiales and possibly the candidate family Chlorotrichaceae contributed to photosynthetic carbon fixation. Other abundant uncultured taxa such as the candidate division MSBL1, the uncultured MBGB, and the phylum Acetothermia potentially play an important metabolic role in these ecosystems. Lithifying microbial mats contained calcium carbonate precipitates, whereas endoevoporites consisted of gypsum, and halite. Biogeochemical measurements revealed that based on depth profiles of O2 and sulfide, metabolic activities were much higher in the non-lithifying mat (peaking in the least lithified systems) than in lithifying mats with the lowest activity in endoevaporites. This trend in decreasing microbial activity reflects the increase in salinity, which may play an important role in the biodiversity.

  17. Characterization of Microbial Mat Microbiomes in the Modern Thrombolite Ecosystem of Lake Clifton, Western Australia Using Shotgun Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Warden, John G; Casaburi, Giorgio; Omelon, Christopher R; Bennett, Philip C; Breecker, Daniel O; Foster, Jamie S

    2016-01-01

    Microbialite-forming communities interact with the environment and influence the precipitation of calcium carbonate through their metabolic activity. The functional genes associated with these metabolic processes and their environmental interactions are therefore critical to microbialite formation. The microbiomes associated with microbialite-forming ecosystems are just now being elucidated and the extent of shared pathways and taxa across different environments is not fully known. In this study, we profiled the microbiome of microbial communities associated with lacustrine thrombolites located in Lake Clifton, Western Australia using metagenomic sequencing and compared it to the non-lithifying mats associated with surrounding sediments to determine whether differences in the mat microbiomes, particularly with respect to metabolic pathways and environmental interactions, may potentially contribute to thrombolite formation. Additionally, we used stable isotope biosignatures to delineate the dominant metabolism associated with calcium carbonate precipitation in the thrombolite build-ups. Results indicated that the microbial community associated with the Lake Clifton thrombolites was predominantly bacterial (98.4%) with Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria comprising the majority of annotated reads. Thrombolite-associated mats were enriched in photoautotrophic taxa and functional genes associated with photosynthesis. Observed δ(13)C values of thrombolite CaCO3 were enriched by at least 3.5‰ compared to theoretical values in equilibrium with lake water DIC, which is consistent with the occurrence of photoautotrophic activity in thrombolite-associated microbial mats. In contrast, the microbiomes of microbial communities found on the sandy non-lithifying sediments of Lake Clifton represented distinct microbial communities that varied in taxa and functional capability and were enriched in heterotrophic taxa compared to the thrombolite

  18. Microbial Diversity in Sediment Ecosystems (Evaporites Domes, Microbial Mats, and Crusts) of Hypersaline Laguna Tebenquiche, Salar de Atacama, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Ana B.; Rasuk, Maria C.; Visscher, Pieter T.; Contreras, Manuel; Novoa, Fernando; Poire, Daniel G.; Patterson, Molly M.; Ventosa, Antonio; Farias, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    We combined nucleic acid-based molecular methods, biogeochemical measurements, and physicochemical characteristics to investigate microbial sedimentary ecosystems of Laguna Tebenquiche, Atacama Desert, Chile. Molecular diversity, and biogeochemistry of hypersaline microbial mats, rhizome-associated concretions, and an endoevaporite were compared with: The V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by pyrosequencing to analyze the total microbial diversity (i.e., bacteria and archaea) in bulk samples, and in addition, in detail on a millimeter scale in one microbial mat and in one evaporite. Archaea were more abundant than bacteria. Euryarchaeota was one of the most abundant phyla in all samples, and particularly dominant (97% of total diversity) in the most lithified ecosystem, the evaporite. Most of the euryarchaeal OTUs could be assigned to the class Halobacteria or anaerobic and methanogenic archaea. Planctomycetes potentially also play a key role in mats and rhizome-associated concretions, notably the aerobic organoheterotroph members of the class Phycisphaerae. In addition to cyanobacteria, members of Chromatiales and possibly the candidate family Chlorotrichaceae contributed to photosynthetic carbon fixation. Other abundant uncultured taxa such as the candidate division MSBL1, the uncultured MBGB, and the phylum Acetothermia potentially play an important metabolic role in these ecosystems. Lithifying microbial mats contained calcium carbonate precipitates, whereas endoevoporites consisted of gypsum, and halite. Biogeochemical measurements revealed that based on depth profiles of O2 and sulfide, metabolic activities were much higher in the non-lithifying mat (peaking in the least lithified systems) than in lithifying mats with the lowest activity in endoevaporites. This trend in decreasing microbial activity reflects the increase in salinity, which may play an important role in the biodiversity. PMID:27597845

  19. Characterization of Microbial Mat Microbiomes in the Modern Thrombolite Ecosystem of Lake Clifton, Western Australia Using Shotgun Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Warden, John G.; Casaburi, Giorgio; Omelon, Christopher R.; Bennett, Philip C.; Breecker, Daniel O.; Foster, Jamie S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbialite-forming communities interact with the environment and influence the precipitation of calcium carbonate through their metabolic activity. The functional genes associated with these metabolic processes and their environmental interactions are therefore critical to microbialite formation. The microbiomes associated with microbialite-forming ecosystems are just now being elucidated and the extent of shared pathways and taxa across different environments is not fully known. In this study, we profiled the microbiome of microbial communities associated with lacustrine thrombolites located in Lake Clifton, Western Australia using metagenomic sequencing and compared it to the non-lithifying mats associated with surrounding sediments to determine whether differences in the mat microbiomes, particularly with respect to metabolic pathways and environmental interactions, may potentially contribute to thrombolite formation. Additionally, we used stable isotope biosignatures to delineate the dominant metabolism associated with calcium carbonate precipitation in the thrombolite build-ups. Results indicated that the microbial community associated with the Lake Clifton thrombolites was predominantly bacterial (98.4%) with Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria comprising the majority of annotated reads. Thrombolite-associated mats were enriched in photoautotrophic taxa and functional genes associated with photosynthesis. Observed δ13C values of thrombolite CaCO3 were enriched by at least 3.5‰ compared to theoretical values in equilibrium with lake water DIC, which is consistent with the occurrence of photoautotrophic activity in thrombolite-associated microbial mats. In contrast, the microbiomes of microbial communities found on the sandy non-lithifying sediments of Lake Clifton represented distinct microbial communities that varied in taxa and functional capability and were enriched in heterotrophic taxa compared to the thrombolite

  20. Microbial Diversity in Sediment Ecosystems (Evaporites Domes, Microbial Mats, and Crusts) of Hypersaline Laguna Tebenquiche, Salar de Atacama, Chile.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ana B; Rasuk, Maria C; Visscher, Pieter T; Contreras, Manuel; Novoa, Fernando; Poire, Daniel G; Patterson, Molly M; Ventosa, Antonio; Farias, Maria E

    2016-01-01

    We combined nucleic acid-based molecular methods, biogeochemical measurements, and physicochemical characteristics to investigate microbial sedimentary ecosystems of Laguna Tebenquiche, Atacama Desert, Chile. Molecular diversity, and biogeochemistry of hypersaline microbial mats, rhizome-associated concretions, and an endoevaporite were compared with: The V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by pyrosequencing to analyze the total microbial diversity (i.e., bacteria and archaea) in bulk samples, and in addition, in detail on a millimeter scale in one microbial mat and in one evaporite. Archaea were more abundant than bacteria. Euryarchaeota was one of the most abundant phyla in all samples, and particularly dominant (97% of total diversity) in the most lithified ecosystem, the evaporite. Most of the euryarchaeal OTUs could be assigned to the class Halobacteria or anaerobic and methanogenic archaea. Planctomycetes potentially also play a key role in mats and rhizome-associated concretions, notably the aerobic organoheterotroph members of the class Phycisphaerae. In addition to cyanobacteria, members of Chromatiales and possibly the candidate family Chlorotrichaceae contributed to photosynthetic carbon fixation. Other abundant uncultured taxa such as the candidate division MSBL1, the uncultured MBGB, and the phylum Acetothermia potentially play an important metabolic role in these ecosystems. Lithifying microbial mats contained calcium carbonate precipitates, whereas endoevoporites consisted of gypsum, and halite. Biogeochemical measurements revealed that based on depth profiles of O2 and sulfide, metabolic activities were much higher in the non-lithifying mat (peaking in the least lithified systems) than in lithifying mats with the lowest activity in endoevaporites. This trend in decreasing microbial activity reflects the increase in salinity, which may play an important role in the biodiversity.

  1. Anoxygenic Photosynthesis and Nitrogen Fixation by a Microbial Mat Community in a Bahamian Hypersaline Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Pinckney, J. L.; Paerl, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of photosynthesis (both oxygenic and anoxygenic) and N(inf2) fixation were conducted to discern the relationships between photosynthesis, N(inf2) fixation, and environmental factors potentially regulating these processes in microbial mats in a tropical hypersaline lagoon (Salt Pond, San Salvador Island, Bahamas). Major photoautotrophs included cyanobacteria, purple phototrophic bacteria, and diatoms. Chemosystematic photopigments were used as indicators of the relative abundance of mat phototrophs. Experimental manipulations consisted of light and dark incubations of intact mat samples exposed to the photosystem II inhibitor DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea], a dissolved organic carbon source (D-glucose), and normal seawater (37(permil)). Photosynthetic rates were measured by both O(inf2) and (sup14)C methods, and nitrogenase activity (NA) was estimated by the acetylene reduction assay. Moderate reductions in salinity (from 74 to 37(permil)) had no measurable effect on photosynthesis, O(inf2) consumption, or NA. CO(inf2) fixation in DCMU-amended samples was (symbl)25% of that in the control (nonamended) samples and demonstrated photosynthetic activity by anoxygenic phototrophs. NA in DCMU-amended samples, which was consistently higher (by a factor of 2 to 3) than the other (light and dark) treatments, was also attributed to purple phototrophic bacteria. The ecological implication is that N(inf2) fixation by anoxygenic phototrophs (purple phototrophic bacteria and possibly cyanobacteria) may be regulated by the activity of oxygenic phototrophs (cyanobacteria and diatoms). Consortial interactions that enhance the physiological plasticity of the mat community may be a key for optimizing production, N(inf2) fixation, and persistence in these extreme environments. PMID:16535506

  2. Universal multiplexable matK primers for DNA barcoding of angiosperms1

    PubMed Central

    Heckenhauer, Jacqueline; Barfuss, Michael H. J.; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: PCR amplification of the matK barcoding region is often difficult when dealing with multiple angiosperm families. We developed a primer cocktail to amplify this region efficiently across angiosperm diversity. Methods and Results: We developed 14 matK primers (seven forward, seven reverse) for multiplex PCR, using sequences available in GenBank for 178 taxa belonging to 123 genera in 41 families and 18 orders. Universality of these new multiplexed primers was tested with 53 specimens from 44 representative angiosperm families in 23 different orders. Our primers showed high PCR amplification and sequencing success. Conclusions: These results show that our newly developed primers are highly effective for multiplex PCR and can be employed in future barcode projects involving taxonomically diverse samples across angiosperms. Using multiplex primers for barcoding will reduce the cost and time needed for PCR amplification. PMID:27347449

  3. Diversity and Distribution in Hypersaline Microbial Mats of Bacteria Related to Chloroflexus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Nübel, Ulrich; Bateson, Mary M.; Madigan, Michael T.; Kühl, Michael; Ward, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria containing bacteriochlorophylls c and a were enriched from hypersaline microbial mats. Based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences, these organisms form a previously undescribed lineage distantly related to Chloroflexus spp. We developed and tested a set of PCR primers for the specific amplification of 16S rRNA genes from filamentous phototrophic bacteria within the kingdom of “green nonsulfur bacteria.” PCR products recovered from microbial mats in a saltern in Guerrero Negro, Mexico, were subjected to cloning or denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and then sequenced. We found evidence of a high diversity of bacteria related to Chloroflexus which exhibit different distributions along a gradient of salinity from 5.5 to 16%. PMID:11526049

  4. Methane Production by Microbial Mats Under Low Sulfate Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.; Thamdrup, Bo; Albert, Dan; Carpenter, Steven P.; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra; DesMarais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats collected in hypersaline salterns were incubated in a greenhouse under low sulfate concentrations ([SO4]) and examined for their primary productivity and emissions of methane and other major carbon species. Atmospheric greenhouse warming by gases such as carbon dioxide and methane must have been greater during the Archean than today in order to account for a record of moderate to warm paleoclemates, despite a less luminous early sun. It has been suggested that decreased levels of oxygen and sulfate in Archean oceans could have significantly stimulated microbial methanogenesis relative to present marine rates, with a resultant increase in the relative importance of methane in maintaining the early greenhouse. We maintained modern microbial mats, models of ancient coastal marine communities, in artificial brine mixtures containing both modern [SO4=] (ca. 70 mM) and "Archean" [SO4] (less than 0.2 mM). At low [SO4], primary production in the mats was essentially unaffected, while rates of sulfate reduction decreased by a factor of three, and methane fluxes increased by up to ten-fold. However, remineralization by methanogenesis still amounted to less than 0.4 % of the total carbon released by the mats. The relatively low efficiency of conversion of photosynthate to methane is suggested to reflect the particular geometry and chemical microenvironment of hypersaline cyanobacterial mats. Therefore, such mats w-ere probably relatively weak net sources of methane throughout their 3.5 Ga history, even during periods of low- environmental levels oxygen and sulfate.

  5. Invasive algal mats degrade coral reef physical habitat quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Jonathan A.; Smith, Celia M.; Richmond, Robert H.

    2012-03-01

    Invasive species alter the ecology of marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms or combination of mechanisms. This study documented critical physical parameters altered by the invasive red macroalga Gracilaria salicornia in situ, including: reduced irradiance, increased sedimentation, and marked variation in diurnal dissolved oxygen and pH cycles in Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i. Paired studies showed that algal mats reduced irradiance by 99% and doubled sediment accumulation. Several mats developed hypoxia and hyperoxia in the extreme minima and maxima, though there was no statistical difference detected in the mean or the variability of dissolved oxygen between different 30 min time points of 24 h cycles between algal mat-open reef pairs. The algal mat significantly acidified the water under the algal mat by decreasing pH by 0.10-0.13 pH units below open reef pH. A minimum of pH 7.47 occurred between 14 and 19 h after sunrise. Our combined results suggest that mats of G. salicornia can alter various physical parameters on a fine scale and time course not commonly detected. These changes in parameters give insight into the underlying basis for negative impact, and suggest new ways in which the presence of invasive species leads to decline of coral reef ecosystems.

  6. Design and test of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Adams, William M.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1991-01-01

    Three flutter suppression control law design techniques are presented. Each uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals together with dynamic compensation to synthesize the modal rate of the critical mode for feedback to distributed control surfaces. The second uses traditional tools (pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) to develop a good understanding of the flutter mechanism and produce a controller with minimal complexity and good robustness to plant uncertainty. The third starts with a minimum energy Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller, applies controller order reduction, and then modifies weight and noise covariance matrices to improve multi-variable robustness. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model. Test results presented here include plant characteristics, maximum attained closed-loop dynamic pressure, and Root Mean Square control surface activity. A key result is that simultaneous symmetric and antisymmetric flutter suppression was achieved by the second control law, with a 24 percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure.

  7. Identification of the Sources of Energy for Nitrogen Fixation and Physiological Characterization of Nitrogen-Fixing Members of a Marine Microbial Mat Community

    PubMed Central

    Bebout, Brad M.; Fitzpatrick, Matthew W.; Paerl, Hans W.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental manipulations of a microbial mat community were performed to determine sources of energy and reductant used for nitrogen fixation and to physiologically characterize the responsible diazotrophs. The dominant photolithotrophic members of this community were nonheterocystous cyanobacteria, but other potential nitrogen-fixing microorganisms were also present. Pronounced diel variability in rates of acetylene reduction was observed, with nighttime rates a factor of three to four higher than daytime rates. Acetylene reduction measured at night was dependent upon the occurrence of oxygenic photosynthesis the preceding day; mats incubated in the dark during the daytime reduced acetylene at rates comparable to those of light-incubated mats but were not able to reduce acetylene at the normally high rates the following night. The addition of various exogenous carbon compounds to these dark-incubated mats did not elicit nighttime acetylene reduction. Nighttime acetylene reduction apparently proceeds under anoxic conditions in these mats; the highest rates of acetylene reduction occur late at night. Additions of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis) to mats resulted in a pronounced stimulation of acetylene reduction during the day, but acetylene reduction the next night proceeded at greatly reduced rates (relative to untreated mats). This daytime stimulation, under the 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea-induced anoxic conditions in the experimentally treated mats, was light dependent. These results suggest that nitrogen fixation in these mats may be attributed to the activities of nonheterocystous cyanobacteria utilizing storage products of oxygenic photosynthesis under anoxic conditions at night. PMID:16348935

  8. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  9. Le matérialisme scientifique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Jean-François

    2004-03-01

    De nos jours, il arrive quotidiennement aux grands hommes d'avoir à fréquenter d'ignorants mortels épris d'une conviction maladive que la science est la grande responsable de tous les maux du monde. Évidemment sans physique atomique, il n'y aurait pas eu d'Hiroshima et sans révolution industrielle, pas de pollution et etc. Cependant, ces accusations envers le progrès technique sont tout à fait injustes, irréfléchies et, j'irai même jusqu'à dire, irresponsables, puisque le calcul, i.e. la planification, même la plus élémentaire, est ce qui caractérise le mieux, pragmatiquement, la société humaine. À mon avis, les problèmes sociaux tireraient plutôt leur origine de sciences sociales irréalistes, qui, concrètment, inspireraient ou serviraient d'alibis à ceux qui détiennent véritablement le pouvoir. Dans cet article, je tenterai donc de démontrer la meilleure véracité et efficacité du matérialisme scientifique. Cette doctrine, dont Mario Bunge est le plus illustre représentant, s'appuy sur les résultats théoriques et expérimentaux des sciences factuelles ainsi que sur l'exactitude logique des mathématiques, utilisées ici comme langage universel de l'expression des idées. Cette conception philosophique qui s'inspire principalement du modèle des théories physiques, stipule que les réalités sociales sont, comme tout autre réalité, matérielles, mathématisables et représentables comme des systèmes en interaction. En fait, le modèle des physiciens ayant historiquement fait ses preuves en matière de testabilité et de cohérence interne est proposé d'être appliquer aux sciences sociales, aujourd'hui scindées des sciences dites pures sous l'inspiration des pseudo penseurs néo-kantiens, phénoménologiques et post-moderne. Cette nouvelle approche permettrait ainsi d'évoluer plus exactement vers une compréhension des bases sociales et biologiques du comportement humain afin de développer une éthique sans cesse plus r

  10. Field-Testing of an Active Laser Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, V.; Khiznyak, A.; Woll, D.; Liu, S.

    Comprehensive space surveillance demands a more accurate technique in tracking multi-dimensional state vector (3D coordinate, velocity, vibration, etc.) of the space objects. RF radiometric techniques typically can not provide the needed accuracy, while passive optical (and laser) tracking systems can provide distance to the object and its angular position, but not a direct reading of velocity, the parameter of primary importance for space object tracking and characterization. Addressing this problem with active optical tracking techniques is challenging because of the great distances involved, the high velocity of the satellites, and the optical aberrations induced by the atmosphere. We have proposed a phase conjugation based laser tracking concept, and accomplished the first version of design and engineering of a prototype for an Active Laser Tracking System (ALTS). In its current state the ALTS is capable to demonstrate the very basics operational principles of the proposed active tracking technique. We then performed a number of experiments to prove operational capabilities of this prototype both at MetroLaser's lab environment and at Edwards AFB Test Range. In its current architecture the ALTS is comprised of two laser cavities, Master and Slave that are coupled through a Phase Conjugate Mirror (PCM) formed in a non-linear medium (NLM) set at Master laser cavity. By pumping NLM and forming PCM, Master laser establishes the cavities coupling mode and injects the photons in the slave cavity. It is essential that the specific features of the PCM not only serve to couple ALTS cavities, but also serves to compensate optical aberrations of the ALTS (gain media and optical elements of the laser resonator). Due to its ability to compensate optical aberrations, phase conjugate resonators are capable of sustaining oscillation with a remote target as an output coupler. The entire system comprises of several modules, including a laser, emitting/receiving telescope, gimbal

  11. Mat-related sedimentary structures in Neoproterozoic peritidal passive margin deposits of the West African Craton (Anti-Atlas, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouougri, E.; Porada, H.

    2002-11-01

    Proterozoic inliers in the central Anti-Atlas mountains expose predominantly siliciclastic sedimentary successions deposited in peritidal zones along the Neoproterozoic continental margin of the West African Craton (WAC). The low-grade metamorphic and modestly deformed sediments contain a wealth of sedimentary structures related to the former presence and activities of microbial mats and respective physicobiological processes. The well-preserved structures include wrinkle structures, erosion marks, microbial sand chips, spindle-shaped and subcircular microbial shrinkage cracks, and possibly gas domes and cabbage-head structures. Thin sections exhibit mat fragments and dispersed grains of hematite/limonite after pyrite in fine-grained quartzitic storm deposits. Post-storm layers frequently consist of matrix-supported sand-sized to silt-sized grains and are overlain by argillaceous veneers including isolated silt-sized grains and black carbonaceous laminae. The muddy veneers are considered to represent compacted stacks of microbial mats (biolaminites), which colonized and biostabilized storm and post-storm layers, and thus prevented them from eroding. In the absence of grazing and burrowing organisms and at suitable depositional and hydrodynamic conditions, it may be expected that Proterozoic microbial mats extensively grew from the supratidal to the intertidal zones and occasionally, e.g. behind protective barriers, in the subtidal zone and beyond. Mat-related structures, however, need specific conditions for their formation and preservation: Wrinkle structures, erosion marks, and microbial sand chips require tractional currents and soon deposition and burial, respectively. Such conditions are preferably met in intertidal and supratidal zones. Spindle-shaped and subcircular cracks require mat shrinkage due to either desiccation or "syneresis". Crack propagation implies progressive shrinkage, while superposition of crack generations indicates repeated alternation

  12. Testing and evaluation for astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) operability.

    PubMed

    Shields, N; King, L C

    1998-09-01

    Because it is the human component that defines space mission success, careful planning is required to ensure that hardware can be operated and maintained by crews on-orbit. Several methods exist to allow researchers and designers to better predict how hardware designs will behave under the harsh environment of low Earth orbit, and whether designs incorporate the necessary features for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) operability. Testing under conditions of simulated microgravity can occur during the design concept phase when verifying design operability, during mission training, or concurrently with on-orbit mission operations. The bulk of testing is focused on normal operations, but also includes evaluation of credible mission contingencies or "what would happen if" planning. The astronauts and cosmonauts who fly these space missions are well prepared and trained to survive and be productive in Earth's orbit. The engineers, designers, and training crews involved in space missions subject themselves to Earth based simulation techniques that also expose them to extreme environments. Aircraft falling ten thousand feet, alternating g-loads, underwater testing at 45 foot depth, enclosure in a vacuum chamber and subject to thermal extremes, each carries with it inherent risks to the humans preparing for space missions.

  13. German National Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) Testing Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habrich, Heinz; Söhne, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The European Global Navigation System (GNSS) Galileo is going to be established in the near future. Currently, four satellites are in place forming the In-Orbit-Testing (IOT) phase. Within the next years, the constellation will be filled. Full Operational Capability (FOC) will be reached 2019. Beside the Open Service (OS) which is comparable to other OS of existing GNSS, e.g., GPS C/A, there is a so-called Public Regulated Service (PRS) included in the IOT satellites already. The PRS will have improved robustness, i.e. robust signals which will be resistant against involuntary interferences, jamming and spoofing. The PRS signal is encrypted and there will be a restricted access to authorized users, e.g. safety and emergency services, authorities with security task, critical infrastructure organizations etc. The access to the PRS which will be controlled through a special key management will be managed and supervised within the European Union (EU) Member States (MS) by national authorities, the Competent PRS Authority (CPA). But a set of Common Minimum Standards (CMS) will define the minimum requirements applicable to each PRS participant. Nevertheless, each MS is responsible for its national key management. This presentation will inform about the testing activities for Galileo PRS in Germany. The coarse concept for the testing is explained, the schedule is outlined. Finally, the paper will formulate some expectations to the Galileo PRS, e.g. for international cooperation.

  14. ERB master archival tape specification no. T 134081 ERB MAT, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Earth radiation budget (ERB)MAT tapes are generated by the ERB MATGEN software using the IBM 3081 computer system operated by the Science and Applications Computer Center at Goddard Space Flight Center. All MAT's are 9-track and MAT data are in ascending time order. The gross tape format for NIMBUS year-1 and year-2 MAT's is different from the format of MAT's starting with year-3. The MATs from the first two years are to contain one day's worth of data while all other MATs are to contain multiple day's worth of data stacked onto the tapes.

  15. Laser active thermography for non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; Grisolia, C.; Fomichev, S. V.; Thro, P.-Y.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography methods have found their applications in different fields of human activity. The non-destructive feature of these methods along with the additional advantage by automated remote control and tests of nuclear installations without personnel attendance in the contaminated zone are of particular interest. Laser active pyrometry and laser lock-in thermography for in situ non-destructive characterization of micrometric layers on graphite substrates from European tokamaks were under extensive experimental and theoretical studies in CEA (France). The studies were aimed to obtain layer characterization with cross-checking the layer thermal contact coefficients determined by active laser pyrometry and lock-in thermography. The experimental installation comprised a Nd-YAG pulsed repetition rate laser (1 Hz - 10 kHz repetition rate frequency, homogeneous spot) and a home-made pyrometer system based on two pyrometers for the temperature measurements in 500 - 2600 K range. For both methods, the layer characterization was provided by the best fit of the experimental results and simulations. The layer thermal contact coefficients determined by both methods were quite comparable. Though there was no gain in the measurements accuracy, lock-in measurements have proved their advantage as being much more rapid. The obtained experimental and theoretical results are presented. Some practical applications and possible improvements of the methods are discussed.

  16. Fabrication and Formation Mechanism of Ag Nanoplate-Decorated Nanofiber Mats and Their Application in SERS.

    PubMed

    Jia, Peng; Chang, Jiao; Wang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Pan; Cao, Bing; Geng, Yuting; Wang, Xiuxing; Pan, Kai

    2016-01-01

    We report a new simple method to fabricate a highly active SERS substrate consisting of poly-m-phenylenediamine/polyacrylonitrile (PmPD/PAN) decorated with Ag nanoplates. The formation mechanism of Ag nanoplates is investigated. The synthetic process of the Ag nanoplate-decorated PmPD/PAN (Ag nanoplates@PmPD/PAN) nanofiber mats consists of the assembly of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of PmPD/PAN nanofibers as crystal nuclei followed by in situ growth of Ag nanoparticles exclusively into nanoplates. Both the reducibility of the polymer and the concentration of AgNO3 are found to play important roles in the formation and the density of Ag nanoplates. The optimized Ag nanoplates@PmPD/PAN nanofiber mats exhibit excellent activity and reproducibility in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) with a detection limit of 10(-10)  m, making the Ag nanoplates@PmPD/PAN nanofiber mats a promising substrate for SERS detection of chemical molecules. In addition, this work also provides a design and fabrication process for a 3D SERS substrate made of a reducible polymer with noble metals.

  17. Archaeal populations in hypersaline sediments underlying orange microbial mats in the Napoli mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the "active" archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano.

  18. Basophil activation test: food challenge in a test tube or specialist research tool?

    PubMed

    Santos, Alexandra F; Lack, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Oral food challenge (OFC) is the gold-standard to diagnose food allergy; however, it is a labour and resource-intensive procedure with the risk of causing an acute allergic reaction, which is potentially severe. Therefore, OFC are reserved for cases where the clinical history and the results of skin prick test and/or specific IgE do not confirm or exclude the diagnosis of food allergy. This is a significant proportion of patients seen in Allergy clinics and results in a high demand for OFC. The basophil activation test (BAT) has emerged as a new diagnostic test for food allergy. With high diagnostic accuracy, it can be particularly helpful in the cases where skin prick test and specific IgE are equivocal and may allow reducing the need for OFC. BAT has high specificity, which confers a high degree of certainty in confirming the diagnosis of food allergy and allows deferring the performance of OFC in patients with a positive BAT. The diagnostic utility of BAT is allergen-specific and needs to be validated for different allergens and in specific patient populations. Standardisation of the laboratory methodology and of the data analyses would help to enable a wider clinical application of BAT. PMID:26981234

  19. Basophil activation test: food challenge in a test tube or specialist research tool?

    PubMed

    Santos, Alexandra F; Lack, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Oral food challenge (OFC) is the gold-standard to diagnose food allergy; however, it is a labour and resource-intensive procedure with the risk of causing an acute allergic reaction, which is potentially severe. Therefore, OFC are reserved for cases where the clinical history and the results of skin prick test and/or specific IgE do not confirm or exclude the diagnosis of food allergy. This is a significant proportion of patients seen in Allergy clinics and results in a high demand for OFC. The basophil activation test (BAT) has emerged as a new diagnostic test for food allergy. With high diagnostic accuracy, it can be particularly helpful in the cases where skin prick test and specific IgE are equivocal and may allow reducing the need for OFC. BAT has high specificity, which confers a high degree of certainty in confirming the diagnosis of food allergy and allows deferring the performance of OFC in patients with a positive BAT. The diagnostic utility of BAT is allergen-specific and needs to be validated for different allergens and in specific patient populations. Standardisation of the laboratory methodology and of the data analyses would help to enable a wider clinical application of BAT.

  20. Laser cleaning of 19th century Congo rattan mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, N.; Oujja, M.; Roemich, H.; Castillejo, M.

    2011-09-01

    There is a growing interest by art conservators for laser cleaning of organic materials, such as wooden artworks, paper and textiles, since traditional cleaning with solvents can be a source of further decay and mechanical cleaning may be too abrasive for sensitive fibers. In this work we present a successful laser cleaning approach for 19th century rattan mats from the Brooklyn Museum collection of African Art, now part of the study collection at the Conservation Center in New York. Tests were carried out using the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) wavelength of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser to measure threshold values both for surface damage and color changes for different types of rattan samples. The irradiated substrates were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and by UV-vis spectroscopy in order to determine the efficiency of laser cleaning and to assess possible deterioration effects that may have occurred as a result of laser irradiation. The study showed that by using the laser emission at 532 nm, a wavelength for which photon energy is below the bond dissociation level of the main cellulosic compounds and the water absorption is negligible, it is possible to select a range of laser fluences to remove the black dust layer without damaging the rattan material.

  1. Phototrophs in high-iron-concentration microbial mats: physiological ecology of phototrophs in an iron-depositing hot spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, B. K.; Parenteau, M. N.; Griffin, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    At Chocolate Pots Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park the source waters have a pH near neutral, contain high concentrations of reduced iron, and lack sulfide. An iron formation that is associated with cyanobacterial mats is actively deposited. The uptake of [(14)C]bicarbonate was used to assess the impact of ferrous iron on photosynthesis in this environment. Photoautotrophy in some of the mats was stimulated by ferrous iron (1.0 mM). Microelectrodes were used to determine the impact of photosynthetic activity on the oxygen content and the pH in the mat and sediment microenvironments. Photosynthesis increased the oxygen concentration to 200% of air saturation levels in the top millimeter of the mats. The oxygen concentration decreased with depth and in the dark. Light-dependent increases in pH were observed. The penetration of light in the mats and in the sediments was determined. Visible radiation was rapidly attenuated in the top 2 mm of the iron-rich mats. Near-infrared radiation penetrated deeper. Iron was totally oxidized in the top few millimeters, but reduced iron was detected at greater depths. By increasing the pH and the oxygen concentration in the surface sediments, the cyanobacteria could potentially increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ. This high-iron-content hot spring provides a suitable model for studying the interactions of microbial photosynthesis and iron deposition and the role of photosynthesis in microbial iron cycling. This model may help clarify the potential role of photosynthesis in the deposition of Precambrian banded iron formations.

  2. Phototrophs in High-Iron-Concentration Microbial Mats: Physiological Ecology of Phototrophs in an Iron-Depositing Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, B. K.; Parenteau, M. N.; Griffin, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    At Chocolate Pots Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park the source waters have a pH near neutral, contain high concentrations of reduced iron, and lack sulfide. An iron formation that is associated with cyanobacterial mats is actively deposited. The uptake of [14C]bicarbonate was used to assess the impact of ferrous iron on photosynthesis in this environment. Photoautotrophy in some of the mats was stimulated by ferrous iron (1.0 mM). Microelectrodes were used to determine the impact of photosynthetic activity on the oxygen content and the pH in the mat and sediment microenvironments. Photosynthesis increased the oxygen concentration to 200% of air saturation levels in the top millimeter of the mats. The oxygen concentration decreased with depth and in the dark. Light-dependent increases in pH were observed. The penetration of light in the mats and in the sediments was determined. Visible radiation was rapidly attenuated in the top 2 mm of the iron-rich mats. Near-infrared radiation penetrated deeper. Iron was totally oxidized in the top few millimeters, but reduced iron was detected at greater depths. By increasing the pH and the oxygen concentration in the surface sediments, the cyanobacteria could potentially increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ. This high-iron-content hot spring provides a suitable model for studying the interactions of microbial photosynthesis and iron deposition and the role of photosynthesis in microbial iron cycling. This model may help clarify the potential role of photosynthesis in the deposition of Precambrian banded iron formations. PMID:10584006

  3. Phototrophs in high-iron-concentration microbial mats: physiological ecology of phototrophs in an iron-depositing hot spring.

    PubMed

    Pierson, B K; Parenteau, M N; Griffin, B M

    1999-12-01

    At Chocolate Pots Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park the source waters have a pH near neutral, contain high concentrations of reduced iron, and lack sulfide. An iron formation that is associated with cyanobacterial mats is actively deposited. The uptake of [(14)C]bicarbonate was used to assess the impact of ferrous iron on photosynthesis in this environment. Photoautotrophy in some of the mats was stimulated by ferrous iron (1.0 mM). Microelectrodes were used to determine the impact of photosynthetic activity on the oxygen content and the pH in the mat and sediment microenvironments. Photosynthesis increased the oxygen concentration to 200% of air saturation levels in the top millimeter of the mats. The oxygen concentration decreased with depth and in the dark. Light-dependent increases in pH were observed. The penetration of light in the mats and in the sediments was determined. Visible radiation was rapidly attenuated in the top 2 mm of the iron-rich mats. Near-infrared radiation penetrated deeper. Iron was totally oxidized in the top few millimeters, but reduced iron was detected at greater depths. By increasing the pH and the oxygen concentration in the surface sediments, the cyanobacteria could potentially increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ. This high-iron-content hot spring provides a suitable model for studying the interactions of microbial photosynthesis and iron deposition and the role of photosynthesis in microbial iron cycling. This model may help clarify the potential role of photosynthesis in the deposition of Precambrian banded iron formations.

  4. Soil stabilization mat for lunar launch/landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acord, Amy L.; Cohenour, Mark W.; Ephraim, Daniel; Gochoel, Dennis; Roberts, Jefferson G.

    1990-01-01

    Facilities which are capable of handling frequent arrivals and departures of spaceships between Earth and a lunar colony are necessary. The facility must be able to provide these services with minimal interruption of operational activity within the colony. The major concerns associated with the space traffic are the dust and rock particles that will be kicked up by the rocket exhaust. As a result of the reduced gravitation of the Moon, these particles scatter over large horizontal distances. This flying debris will not only seriously interrupt the routine operations of the colony, but could cause damage to the equipment and facilities surrounding the launch site. An approach to overcome this problem is presented. A proposed design for a lunar take-off/landing mat is presented. This proposal goes beyond dealing with the usual problems of heat and load resistances associated with take-off and landing, by solving the problem of soil stabilization at the site. Through adequate stabilization, the problem of flying debris is eliminated.

  5. Photosynthetic Microbial Mats are Exemplary Sources of Diverse Biosignatures (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.

    2013-12-01

    Marine cyanobacterial microbial mats are widespread, compact, self-contained ecosystems that create diverse biosignatures and have an ancient fossil record. Within the mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides organic substrates and O2 to the community. Both the absorption and scattering of light change the intensity and spectral composition of incident radiation as it penetrates a mat. Some phototrophs utilize infrared light near the base of the photic zone. A mat's upper layers can become highly reduced and sulfidic at night. Counteracting gradients of O2 and sulfide shape the chemical environment and provide daily-contrasting microenvironments separated on a scale of a few mm. Radiation hazards (UV, etc.), O2 and sulfide toxicity elicit motility and other physiological responses. This combination of benefits and hazards of light, O2 and sulfide promotes the allocation of various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Associated nonphotosynthetic communities, including anaerobes, strongly influence many of the ecosystem's overall characteristics, and their processes affect any biosignatures that enter the fossil record. A biosignature is an object, substance and/or pattern whose origin specifically requires a biological agent. The value of a biosignature depends not only on the probability of life creating it, but also on the improbability of nonbiological processes producing it. Microbial mats create biosignatures that identify particular groups of organisms and also reveal attributes of the mat ecosystem. For example, branched hydrocarbons and pigments can be diagnostic of cyanobacteria and other phototrophic bacteria, and isoprenoids can indicate particular groups of archea. Assemblages of lipid biosignatures change with depth due to changes in microbial populations and diagenetic transformations of organic matter. The 13C/12C values of organic matter and carbonates reflect isotopic discrimination by particular

  6. Neutron activation analysis; A sensitive test for trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z. . Ward Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron activation analysis (NAA), an extremely sensitive technique for determining the elemental constituents of an unknown specimen. Currently, there are some twenty-five moderate-power TRIGA reactors scattered across the United States (fourteen of them at universities), and one of their principal uses is for NAA. NAA is procedurally simple. A small amount of the material to be tested (typically between one and one hundred milligrams) is irradiated for a period that varies from a few minutes to several hours in a neutron flux of around 10{sup 12} neutrons per square centimeter per second. A tiny fraction of the nuclei present (about 10{sup {minus}8}) is transmuted by nuclear reactions into radioactive forms. Subsequently, the nuclei decay, and the energy and intensity of the gamma rays that they emit can be measured in a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  7. Test results of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degregoria, A. J.; Feuling, L. J.; Laatsch, J. F.; Rowe, J. R.; Trueblood, J. R.; Wang, A. A.

    The principle of the Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) is tested with an experimental refrigerator designed to operate within the temperature range of about 4 to 80 K. Applications, including helium and hydrogen liquefaction and hydrogen slush generation, are envisioned. The device uses a single moveable superconducting solenoidal magnet in persistent mode to alternately charge and discharge two in-line beds of magnetic material. Between magnet motions, a double-acting piston displacer moves heat transfer fluid in the form of helium gas through the beds, absorbing heat at the cold heat exchanger and rejecting heat at the hot heat exchanger. A description of the refrigerator and performance results are presented. Comparisons to a detailed AMR model are shown.

  8. Mycobactericidal activity of selected disinfectants using a quantitative suspension test.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, P A; Babb, J R; Fraise, A P

    1999-02-01

    In this study, a quantitative suspension test carried out under both clean and dirty conditions was used to assess the activity of various instrument and environmental disinfectants against the type strain NCTC 946 and an endoscope washer disinfector isolate of Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium fortuitum NCTC 10,394, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 Rv NCTC 7416 and a clinical isolate of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The disinfectants tested were; a chlorine releasing agent, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) at 1000 ppm and 10,000 ppm av Cl; chlorine dioxide at 1100 ppm av ClO2 (Tristel, MediChem International Limited); 70% industrial methylated spirits (IMS); 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde (Asep, Galan); 10% succinedialdehyde and formaldehyde mixture (Gigasept, Schulke & Mayr); 0.35% peracetic acid (NuCidex, Johnson & Johnson); and a peroxygen compound at 1% and 3% (Virkon, Antec International). Results showed that the clinical isolate of MAI was much more resistant than M. tuberculosis to all the disinfectants, while the type strains of M. chelonae and M. fortuitum were far more sensitive. The washer disinfector isolate of M. chelonae was extremely resistant to 2% alkaline activated glutaraldehyde and appeared to be slightly more resistant than the type strain to Nu-Cidex, Gigasept, Virkon and the lower concentration of NaDCC. This study has shown peracetic acid (Nu-Cidex), chlorine dioxide (Tristel), alcohol (IMS) and high concentrations of a chlorine releasing agent (NaDCC) are rapidly mycobactericidal. Glutaraldehyde, although effective, is a slow mycobactericide. Gigasept and Virkon are poor mycobactericidal agents and are not therefore recommended for instruments or spillage if mycobacteria are likely to be present. PMID:10063473

  9. Diel Migrations of Microorganisms within a Benthic, Hypersaline Mat Community

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Mechling, Margaret; Castenholz, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    We studied the diel migrations of several species of microorganisms in a hypersaline, layered microbial mat. The migrations were quantified by repeated coring of the mat with glass capillary tubes. The resulting minicores were microscopically analyzed by using bright-field and epifluorescence (visible and infrared) microscopy to determine depths of coherent layers and were later dissected to determine direct microscopic counts of microorganisms. Microelectrode measurements of oxygen concentration, fiber optic microprobe measurements of light penetration within the mat, and incident irradiance measurements accompanied the minicore sampling. In addition, pigment content, photosynthesis and irradiance responses, the capacity for anoxygenic photosynthesis, and gliding speeds were determined for the migrating cyanobacteria. Heavily pigmented Oscillatoria sp. and Spirulina cf. subsalsa migrated downward into the mat during the early morning and remained deep until dusk, when upward migration occurred. The mean depth of the migration (not more than 0.4 to 0.5 mm) was directly correlated with the incident irradiance over the mat surface. We estimated that light intensity at the upper boundary of the migrating cyanobacteria was attenuated to such an extent that photoinhibition was effectively avoided but that intensities which saturated photosynthesis were maintained through most of the daylight hours. Light was a cue of paramount importance in triggering and modulating the migration of the cyanobacteria, even though the migrating phenomenon could not be explained solely in terms of a light response. We failed to detect diel migration patterns for other cyanobacterial species and filamentous anoxyphotobacteria. The sulfide-oxidizing bacterium Beggiatoa sp. migrated as a band that followed low oxygen concentrations within the mat during daylight hours. During the nighttime, part of this population migrated toward the mat surface, but a significant proportion remained deep

  10. Correlations between the Metropolitan Achievement Tests, Seventh Edition, and the Ohio Ninth-Grade Proficiency Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Robert E.

    This study examines correlations between the Metropolitan Achievement Tests, seventh edition (MAT-7), and analogous portions of the 1995 Ohio Ninth-Grade Proficiency Tests. The MAT-7 scores of 156 eighth-grade students who had completed both test batteries were paired with complementary sections of the Proficiency test. Correlations between the…

  11. Design, test, and evaluation of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    Three control law design techniques for flutter suppression are presented. Each technique uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first method uses traditional tools (such as pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) for producing a controller that has minimal complexity and which is sufficiently robust to handle plant uncertainty. The second procedure uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals and dynamic compensation to synthesize the model rate of the critical mode for feedback to the distributed control surfaces. The third technique starts with a minimum-energy linear quadratic Gaussian controller, iteratively modifies intensity matrices corresponding to input and output noise, and applies controller order reduction to achieve a low-order, robust controller. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Only the traditional pole/zero loci design was sufficiently robust to errors in the nominal plant to successfully suppress flutter during the test. The traditional pole/zero loci design provided simultaneous suppression of symmetric and antisymmetric flutter with a 24-percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure. Posttest analyses are shown which illustrate the problems encountered with the other laws.

  12. Basophil activation test with food additives in chronic urticaria patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Gyu; Song, Woo-Jung; Park, Han-Ki; Lim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Su-Jung; Lee, Suh-Young; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    The role of food additives in chronic urticaria (CU) is still under investigation. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between food additives and CU by using the basophil activation test (BAT). The BAT using 15 common food additives was performed for 15 patients with CU who had a history of recurrent urticarial aggravation following intake of various foods without a definite food-specific IgE. Of the 15 patients studied, two (13.3%) showed positive BAT results for one of the tested food additives. One patient responded to monosodium glutamate, showing 18.7% of CD203c-positive basophils. Another patient showed a positive BAT result to sodium benzoate. Both patients had clinical correlations with the agents, which were partly determined by elimination diets. The present study suggested that at least a small proportion of patients with CU had symptoms associated with food additives. The results may suggest the potential utility of the BAT to identity the role of food additives in CU.

  13. Basophil Activation Test with Food Additives in Chronic Urticaria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Gyu; Song, Woo-Jung; Park, Han-Ki; Lim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Su-Jung; Lee, Suh-Young; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up

    2014-01-01

    The role of food additives in chronic urticaria (CU) is still under investigation. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between food additives and CU by using the basophil activation test (BAT). The BAT using 15 common food additives was performed for 15 patients with CU who had a history of recurrent urticarial aggravation following intake of various foods without a definite food-specific IgE. Of the 15 patients studied, two (13.3%) showed positive BAT results for one of the tested food additives. One patient responded to monosodium glutamate, showing 18.7% of CD203c-positive basophils. Another patient showed a positive BAT result to sodium benzoate. Both patients had clinical correlations with the agents, which were partly determined by elimination diets. The present study suggested that at least a small proportion of patients with CU had symptoms associated with food additives. The results may suggest the potential utility of the BAT to identity the role of food additives in CU. PMID:24527415

  14. Experimental Studies on Geocells and Mat Systems for Stabilization of Unpaved Shoulders and Temporary Roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun

    Geosynthetics have been used to improve the performance of geomaterials, especially when weak soil exists in roadway applications. In this study, two types of geosynthetic materials, geocell and a mat system, were studied for their applications for unpaved roads and shoulders. The study of geocell was focused on its application for unpaved shoulders. The ability of geocell to improve different geomaterials over intermediate strength subgrade and its possible effect on vegetation were investigated. The study of the mat system was focused on investigating the performance of the mat system over soft and intermediate subgrade with different strengths under cyclic loading to simulate temporary roadway conditions. In the study of geocell for the application for unpaved shoulders, six large scale plate loading tests were conducted on a single type of geocell on target 5% CBR subgrade to investigate the benefits of geocell reinforcement on different base course and topsoil combinations. Different base course and topsoil combinations were investigated including: 200-mm thick unreinforced aggregate, 200-mm thick soil-aggregate mixture (50% aggregate and 50% top soil) with and without geocell reinforcement, 200-mm thick geocell-reinforced topsoil, 50-mm thick aggregate over 150-mm soil-aggregate mixture (50% aggregate and 50% top soil), and 50-mm thick top soil over 150-mm thick geocell-reinforced soil-aggregate mixture (50% aggregate and 50% top soil). Earth pressure cells were install at the interface between subgrade and base course to monitor the load distribution. The cyclic plate loading tests showed that geocell effectively reduced the permanent deformation and the geocell-reinforced soil-aggregate mixture slightly outperformed the unreinforced aggregate at the same thickness. The plate loading tests also suggested the topsoil cover resulted in large permanent deformations. A one-year long outdoor field vegetation test was conducted on base courses with different

  15. Vertical differences in species turnover and diversity of amphipod assemblages associated with coralline mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, M.; Tanaka, M. O.; Flores, A. A. V.; Leite, F. P. P.

    2016-11-01

    Environmental gradients are common in rocky shore habitats and may determine species spatial distributions at different scales. In this study, we tested whether environmental filtering affects amphipod assemblages inhabiting coralline algal mats at different vertical heights in southeastern Brazil. Samples obtained from the upper and lower zones of the infralittoral fringe were used to estimate mat descriptors (algal mass, sediment retention, organic matter contents, grain size and sediment sorting) and describe amphipod assemblages (abundance, species richness and diversity indices). Coralline algal mats and amphipod assemblages were similar between intertidal zones in several aspects. However, a more variable retention of sediment (positively related to algal mass), together with the accumulation of larger grains lower on the shore, likely provide higher habitat heterogeneity that hosts generally more diverse (both α- and β-diversity, as well as higher species turnover) amphipod assemblages in the lower intertidal zone. Poorer assemblages in the upper intertidal zone are dominated by omnivores, while carnivorous species are more often found in richer assemblages in the lower intertidal zone, as predicted by traditional niche theory.

  16. Use of Lightweight Cellular Mats to Reduce the Settlement of Structure on Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganasan, R.; Lim, A. J. M. S.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Construction of structures on soft soils gives rise to some difficulties in Malaysia and other country especially in settlement both in short and long term. The focus of this research is to minimize the differential and non-uniform settlement on peat soil with the use of an innovative cellular mat. The behaviour and performance of the lightweight geo-material (in block form) is critically investigated and in particular the use as a fill in embankment on soft ground. Hemic peat soil, sponge and innovative cellular mat will be used as the main material in this study. The monitoring in settlement behavior from this part of research will be done as laboratory testing only. The uneven settlement in this problem was uniquely monitored photographically using spot markers. In the end of the research, it is seen that the innovative cellular mat has reduce the excessive and differential settlement up to 50% compare to flexible and rigid foundations. This had improve the stiffness of soils as well as the porous contain in cellular structure which help in allowing water/moisture to flow through in or out thus resulting in prevent the condition of floating.

  17. The effects of pilates mat exercise on the balance ability of elderly females.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Ju; Hwangbo, Kak; Lee, Chae-Woo

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Pilates exercise on a mat and balance exercise on an unstable base of support for trunk stability on the balance ability of elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly women aged 65 or older were equally assigned to a Pilates mat exercise (PME) group and an unstable support surface exercise (USSE) group. They conducted exercise three times per week for 12 weeks for 40 minutes each time. In order to examine balance, sway length and the speed of the center of foot pressure were measured for one minute, and in order to examine dynamic balance, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test was conducted. [Results] After the intervention, sway length, sway speed, and TUG significantly decreased in both groups. A comparison of sway speed after the intervention between the two groups revealed that the PME group showed larger decreases than the USSE group. [Conclusion] PME and USSE elicited significant effects on the static and dynamic balance of elderly female subjects, suggesting that those exercises are effective at enhancing the balance ability of this group of subjects. However, the Pilates mat exercise is regarded as being safer than exercise on an unstable base of support. PMID:24648651

  18. Millimeter-scale patterns of phylogenetic and trait diversity in a salt marsh microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Armitage, David W; Gallagher, Kimberley L; Youngblut, Nicholas D; Buckley, Daniel H; Zinder, Stephen H

    2012-01-01

    Intertidal microbial mats are comprised of distinctly colored millimeter-thick layers whose communities organize in response to environmental gradients such as light availability, oxygen/sulfur concentrations, and redox potential. Here, slight changes in depth correspond to sharp niche boundaries. We explore the patterns of biodiversity along this depth gradient as it relates to functional groups of bacteria, as well as trait-encoding genes. We used molecular techniques to determine how the mat's layers differed from one another with respect to taxonomic, phylogenetic, and trait diversity, and used these metrics to assess potential drivers of community assembly. We used a range of null models to compute the degree of phylogenetic and functional dispersion for each layer. The SSU-rRNA reads were dominated by Cyanobacteria and Chromatiales, but contained a high taxonomic diversity. The composition of each mat core was significantly different for developmental stage, year, and layer. Phylogenetic richness and evenness positively covaried with depth, and trait richness tended to decrease with depth. We found evidence for significant phylogenetic clustering for all bacteria below the surface layer, supporting the role of habitat filtering in the assembly of mat layers. However, this signal disappeared when the phylogenetic dispersion of particular functional groups, such as oxygenic phototrophs, was measured. Overall, trait diversity measured by orthologous genes was also lower than would be expected by chance, except for genes related to photosynthesis in the topmost layer. Additionally, we show how the choice of taxa pools, null models, spatial scale, and phylogenies can impact our ability to test hypotheses pertaining to community assembly. Our results demonstrate that given the appropriate physiochemical conditions, strong phylogenetic, and trait variation, as well as habitat filtering, can occur at the millimeter-scale.

  19. Improving cytoactive of endothelial cell by introducing fibronectin to the surface of poly L-Lactic acid fiber mats via dopamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wufeng; Zhang, Xiazhi; Wu, Keke; Liu, Xiaoyan; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren

    2016-12-01

    A simple but straightforward approach was reported to prepare fiber mats modified with fibronectin (Fn) protein for endothelial cells activity study. Based on the self-polymerization and strong adhesion feature of dopamine, poly L-Lactic acid (PLLA) fibers mat was modified via simply immersing them into dopamine solution for 16h. Subsequently, Fn was immobilized onto the fiber mats surface by the coupling reactive polydopamine (PDA) layer and Fn. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the chemical compositions of fiber mats surface, which confirmed the successful immobilization of PDA and Fn molecules on the fiber surface. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface morphology changes after modification with PDA and Fn. The data of water contact angle showed that the hydrophilicity of the fiber mats was improved after surface modification. The data of in vitro cell culture proved that the PDA and Fn modified surface significantly enhanced the adhesion, proliferation and cell activity of endothelial cells on the fiber mats. And the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by endothelial cells on the modified surface was suppressed compared to that on culture plate and PLLA film at 2 and 4days, while the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was increased compared to that on culture plate and PLLA film at 2days. PMID:27612725

  20. Improving cytoactive of endothelial cell by introducing fibronectin to the surface of poly L-Lactic acid fiber mats via dopamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wufeng; Zhang, Xiazhi; Wu, Keke; Liu, Xiaoyan; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren

    2016-12-01

    A simple but straightforward approach was reported to prepare fiber mats modified with fibronectin (Fn) protein for endothelial cells activity study. Based on the self-polymerization and strong adhesion feature of dopamine, poly L-Lactic acid (PLLA) fibers mat was modified via simply immersing them into dopamine solution for 16h. Subsequently, Fn was immobilized onto the fiber mats surface by the coupling reactive polydopamine (PDA) layer and Fn. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the chemical compositions of fiber mats surface, which confirmed the successful immobilization of PDA and Fn molecules on the fiber surface. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface morphology changes after modification with PDA and Fn. The data of water contact angle showed that the hydrophilicity of the fiber mats was improved after surface modification. The data of in vitro cell culture proved that the PDA and Fn modified surface significantly enhanced the adhesion, proliferation and cell activity of endothelial cells on the fiber mats. And the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by endothelial cells on the modified surface was suppressed compared to that on culture plate and PLLA film at 2 and 4days, while the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was increased compared to that on culture plate and PLLA film at 2days.

  1. Heterolayered, one-dimensional nanobuilding block mat batteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Keun-Ho; Cho, Sung-Ju; Chun, Sang-Jin; Yoo, Jong Tae; Lee, Chang Kee; Kim, Woong; Wu, Qinglin; Park, Sang-Bum; Choi, Don-Ha; Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Sang-Young

    2014-10-01

    The rapidly approaching smart/wearable energy era necessitates advanced rechargeable power sources with reliable electrochemical properties and versatile form factors. Here, as a unique and promising energy storage system to address this issue, we demonstrate a new class of heterolayered, one-dimensional (1D) nanobuilding block mat (h-nanomat) battery based on unitized separator/electrode assembly (SEA) architecture. The unitized SEAs consist of wood cellulose nanofibril (CNF) separator membranes and metallic current collector-/polymeric binder-free electrodes comprising solely single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-netted electrode active materials (LiFePO4 (cathode) and Li4Ti5O12 (anode) powders are chosen as model systems to explore the proof of concept for h-nanomat batteries). The nanoporous CNF separator plays a critical role in securing the tightly interlocked electrode-separator interface. The SWNTs in the SEAs exhibit multifunctional roles as electron conductive additives, binders, current collectors and also non-Faradaic active materials. This structural/physicochemical uniqueness of the SEAs allows significant improvements in the mass loading of electrode active materials, electron transport pathways, electrolyte accessibility and misalignment-proof of separator/electrode interface. As a result, the h-nanomat batteries, which are easily fabricated by stacking anode SEA and cathode SEA, provide unprecedented advances in the electrochemical performance, shape flexibility and safety tolerance far beyond those achievable with conventional battery technologies. We anticipate that the h-nanomat batteries will open 1D nanobuilding block-driven new architectural design/opportunity for development of next-generation energy storage systems.

  2. Spatial and temporal diversity of microbial mats in the shallow-water hydrothermal system of Milos Island (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, D.; Foustoukos, D.; Le Bris, N.; Sievert, S. M.; Yucel, M.; Vetriani, C.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow-water hydrothermal vents are ubiquitous but poorly studied geothermal environments. The shallow-water hydrothermal system of Milos Island is a unique study site with vents exhibiting steep geothermal gradients in the presence of light that allows the co-occurrence of photosynthesis and chemosynthesis. The active hydrothermal emissions of the Milos hydrothermal system support complex microbial mats, which are fundamental in engineering the environmental niche in which extremophiles thrive. Because of the shallow depth, the mat community is wiped out during every major storm, when swell and wave action increase, and then it reconstitutes itself over a brief period of time (days). While most studies are focused on the diversity of the community residing in the underlying sediments, little information is available on the diversity and functioning of the mat community, and how it responds to abrupt geodynamic events. Here we report the results of a joint geochemical and microbiological survey of the microbial mats of Milos island, and analyze the spatial and temporal evolution of the mat community following a major storm. Our results show that the community is dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria, although significant variability is present within the systemm. The observed variability correlates with spatial profiles and in situ measurement of temperature and sulfide carried out over a 6 days periods, showing that tides, winds, and abrupt geodynamic events generate intermittent mixing conditions lasting for several hours to days. Diversity and metagenomic analyses of the mature mat provide further information on the metabolic potential of the community and on the influence of environmental factors on ecosystem functioning. Our work lays the basis for studies aimed at resolving the spatial and temporal dynamics of chemoautotrophic microbial communities in shallow-water hydrothermal systems.

  3. Precipitation of iron in microbial mats of the spring waters of Borra Caves, Vishakapatnam, India: some geomicrobiological aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, Sushmitha; Baskar, R.; Lee, Natuschka; Kaushik, A.; Theophilus, P. K.

    2008-11-01

    The Borra caves, Vishakapatnam, India, can be described as a speleothem cave with significant amounts of unexplored microbial mats in spring waters. Here, we present the first observations and hypotheses on the possible impact of the microorganisms in these mats on the cave formation, focusing on their role on iron mineral precipitation. The spring waters (pH neutral 7.5 7.7) contained dissolved metals like iron and the organic mat sludge (pH 7.0 7.3) had a TOC content of approximately 5.4 wt%. Geochemically, the spring waters deep below the microbial mats contained Fe 369 ppb, Sr 198 ppb; and the organic mat sludge contained Mg 9 ppm, Fe 427 ppb, Zn 149 ppb, Sr 190 ppb. XRD observations displayed Fe minerals (dominantly hematite), minor amounts of zinc gallium sulfide and nitrofuryl compounds. At least four groups of bacteria identified by direct microscopy and SEM-EDX on the basis of morphology could be observed in all samples: Leptothrix-like organisms, entombed bacterial mineral sheaths, a few stalks of Gallionella-like organisms and some additional bacteria that could not be further identified. Leptothrix-like organisms contained 43.22 60.08 wt % Fe and the mineral precipitated near and around these bacteria (in the actual unaltered samples on site) contained 30.76 45.22 wt% Fe as identified and quantified by SEM-EDX. This study indicates that the precipitation of these iron-rich mats in the spring waters could be linked to the presence of abundant active communities of iron precipitating bacteria at Borra caves, Vishakapatanam.

  4. Formation and fate of fermentation products in hot spring cyanobacterial mats

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.L.; Tayne, T.A.; Ward, D.M.

    1987-10-01

    The fate of representative fermentation products (acetate, propionate, butyrate, lactate, and ethanol) in hot spring cyanobacterial mats was investigated. The major fate during incubations in the light was photoassimilation by filamentous bacteria resembling Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Some metabolism of all compounds occurred under dark aerobic conditions. Under dark anaerobic conditions, only lactate was oxidized extensively to carbon dioxide. Extended preincubation under dark anaerobic conditions did not enhance anaerobic catabolism of acetate, propionate, or ethanol. Acetogenesis of butyrate was suggested by the hydrogen sensitivity of butyrate conversion to acetate and by the enrichment of butyrate-degrading acetogenic bacteria. Accumulation of fermentation products which were not catabolized under dark anaerobic conditions revealed their importance. Acetate and propionate were the major fermentation products which accumulated in samples collected at temperatures ranging from 50 to 70/sup 0/C. Other organic acids and alcohols accumulated to a much lesser extent. Fermentation occurred mainly in the top 4 mm of the mat. Exposure to light decreased the accumulation of acetate and presumably of other fermentation products. The importance of interspecies hydrogen transfer was investigated by comparing fermentation product accumulation at a 65/sup 0/C site, with naturally high hydrogen levels, and a 55/sup 0/C site, where active methanogenesis prevented significant hydrogen accumulation. There was a greater relative accumulation of reduced products, notably ethanol, in the 65/sup 2/C mat.

  5. Resilience and receptivity worked in tandem to sustain a geothermal mat community amidst erratic environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Roy, Chayan; Roy, Rimi; Nilawe, Pravin; Mukherjee, Ambarish; Haldar, Prabir Kumar; Chauhan, Neeraj Kumar; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Agarwal, Atima; George, Ashish; Pyne, Prosenjit; Mandal, Subhrangshu; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Bala, Goutam

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate how geothermal irregularities affect the sustainability of high-temperature microbiomes we studied the synecological dynamics of a geothermal microbial mat community (GMMC) vis-à-vis fluctuations in its environment. Spatiotemporally-discrete editions of a photosynthetic GMMC colonizing the travertine mound of a circum-neutral hot spring cluster served as the model-system. In 2010 a strong geyser atop the mound discharged mineral-rich hot water, which nourished a GMMC continuum from the proximal channels (PC) upto the slope environment (SE) along the mound’s western face. In 2011 that geyser extinguished and consequently the erstwhile mats disappeared. Nevertheless, two relatively-weaker vents erupted in the southern slope and their mineral-poor outflow supported a small GMMC patch in the SE. Comparative metagenomics showed that this mat was a relic of the 2010 community, conserved via population dispersal from erstwhile PC as well as SE niches. Subsequently in 2012, as hydrothermal activity augmented in the southern slope, ecological niches widened and the physiologically-heterogeneous components of the 2011 “seed-community” split into PC and SE meta-communities, thereby reclaiming either end of the thermal gradient. Resilience of incumbent populations, and the community’s receptiveness towards immigrants, were the key qualities that ensured the GMMC’s sustenance amidst habitat degradation and dispersal to discrete environments. PMID:26184838

  6. Resilience and receptivity worked in tandem to sustain a geothermal mat community amidst erratic environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Roy, Chayan; Roy, Rimi; Nilawe, Pravin; Mukherjee, Ambarish; Haldar, Prabir Kumar; Chauhan, Neeraj Kumar; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Agarwal, Atima; George, Ashish; Pyne, Prosenjit; Mandal, Subhrangshu; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Bala, Goutam

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate how geothermal irregularities affect the sustainability of high-temperature microbiomes we studied the synecological dynamics of a geothermal microbial mat community (GMMC) vis-à-vis fluctuations in its environment. Spatiotemporally-discrete editions of a photosynthetic GMMC colonizing the travertine mound of a circum-neutral hot spring cluster served as the model-system. In 2010 a strong geyser atop the mound discharged mineral-rich hot water, which nourished a GMMC continuum from the proximal channels (PC) upto the slope environment (SE) along the mound's western face. In 2011 that geyser extinguished and consequently the erstwhile mats disappeared. Nevertheless, two relatively-weaker vents erupted in the southern slope and their mineral-poor outflow supported a small GMMC patch in the SE. Comparative metagenomics showed that this mat was a relic of the 2010 community, conserved via population dispersal from erstwhile PC as well as SE niches. Subsequently in 2012, as hydrothermal activity augmented in the southern slope, ecological niches widened and the physiologically-heterogeneous components of the 2011 "seed-community" split into PC and SE meta-communities, thereby reclaiming either end of the thermal gradient. Resilience of incumbent populations, and the community's receptiveness towards immigrants, were the key qualities that ensured the GMMC's sustenance amidst habitat degradation and dispersal to discrete environments. PMID:26184838

  7. Resilience and receptivity worked in tandem to sustain a geothermal mat community amidst erratic environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Roy, Chayan; Roy, Rimi; Nilawe, Pravin; Mukherjee, Ambarish; Haldar, Prabir Kumar; Chauhan, Neeraj Kumar; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Agarwal, Atima; George, Ashish; Pyne, Prosenjit; Mandal, Subhrangshu; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Bala, Goutam

    2015-07-17

    To elucidate how geothermal irregularities affect the sustainability of high-temperature microbiomes we studied the synecological dynamics of a geothermal microbial mat community (GMMC) vis-à-vis fluctuations in its environment. Spatiotemporally-discrete editions of a photosynthetic GMMC colonizing the travertine mound of a circum-neutral hot spring cluster served as the model-system. In 2010 a strong geyser atop the mound discharged mineral-rich hot water, which nourished a GMMC continuum from the proximal channels (PC) upto the slope environment (SE) along the mound's western face. In 2011 that geyser extinguished and consequently the erstwhile mats disappeared. Nevertheless, two relatively-weaker vents erupted in the southern slope and their mineral-poor outflow supported a small GMMC patch in the SE. Comparative metagenomics showed that this mat was a relic of the 2010 community, conserved via population dispersal from erstwhile PC as well as SE niches. Subsequently in 2012, as hydrothermal activity augmented in the southern slope, ecological niches widened and the physiologically-heterogeneous components of the 2011 "seed-community" split into PC and SE meta-communities, thereby reclaiming either end of the thermal gradient. Resilience of incumbent populations, and the community's receptiveness towards immigrants, were the key qualities that ensured the GMMC's sustenance amidst habitat degradation and dispersal to discrete environments.

  8. Archaeal Populations in Hypersaline Sediments Underlying Orange Microbial Mats in the Napoli Mud Volcano▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the “active” archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano. PMID:21335391

  9. Evidence of novel phylogenetic lineages of methanogenic archaea from hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    García-Maldonado, José Q; Bebout, Brad M; Everroad, R Craig; López-Cortés, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenesis in hypersaline and high-sulfate environments is typically dominated by methylotrophic methanogens because sulfate reduction is thermodynamically favored over hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis in these environments. We characterized the community composition of methanogenic archaea in both unmanipulated and incubated microbial mats from different hypersaline environments in Baja California Sur, Mexico. Clone libraries of methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) sequences and DGGE band patterns of 16S rRNA and mcrA sequences showed that the methanogen community in these microbial mats is dominated by methylotrophic methanogens of the genus Methanohalophilus. However, phylogenetic analyses of mcrA sequences from these mats also revealed two new lineages corresponding to putative hydrogenotrophic methanogens related with the strictly hydrogenotrophic order Methanomicrobiales. Stimulated methane production under decreased salinity and sulfate concentrations also suggested the presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in these samples. The relative abundance of mcrA gene and transcripts, estimated by SYBR green I qPCR assays, suggested the activity of different phylogenetic groups of methanogens, including the two novel clusters, in unmanipulated samples of hypersaline microbial mats. Using geochemical and molecular approaches, we show that substrate limitation and values of salinity and sulfate higher than 3 % and 25 mM (respectively) are potential environmental constraints for methanogenesis in these environments. Microcosm experiments with modifications of salinity and sulfate concentrations and TMA addition showed that upper salt and sulfate concentrations for occurrence of methylotrophic methanogenesis were 28 % and 263 mM, respectively. This study provides phylogenetic information about uncultivated and undescribed methanogenic archaea from hypersaline environments.

  10. HAL/S-360 compiler test activity report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmers, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The levels of testing employed in verifying the HAL/S-360 compiler were as follows: (1) typical applications program case testing; (2) functional testing of the compiler system and its generated code; and (3) machine oriented testing of compiler implementation on operational computers. Details of the initial test plan and subsequent adaptation are reported, along with complete test results for each phase which examined the production of object codes for every possible source statement.

  11. Angiosperm phylogeny based on matK sequence information.

    PubMed

    Hilu, Khidir W; Borsch, Thomas; Müller, Kai; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Savolainen, Vincent; Chase, Mark W; Powell, Martyn P; Alice, Lawrence A; Evans, Rodger; Sauquet, Hervé; Neinhuis, Christoph; Slotta, Tracey A B; Rohwer, Jens G; Campbell, Christopher S; Chatrou, Lars W

    2003-12-01

    Plastid matK gene sequences for 374 genera representing all angiosperm orders and 12 genera of gymnosperms were analyzed using parsimony (MP) and Bayesian inference (BI) approaches. Traditionally, slowly evolving genomic regions have been preferred for deep-level phylogenetic inference in angiosperms. The matK gene evolves approximately three times faster than the widely used plastid genes rbcL and atpB. The MP and BI trees are highly congruent. The robustness of the strict consensus tree supercedes all individual gene analyses and is comparable only to multigene-based phylogenies. Of the 385 nodes resolved, 79% are supported by high jackknife values, averaging 88%. Amborella is sister to the remaining angiosperms, followed by a grade of Nymphaeaceae and Austrobaileyales. Bayesian inference resolves Amborella + Nymphaeaceae as sister to the rest, but with weak (0.42) posterior probability. The MP analysis shows a trichotomy sister to the Austrobaileyales representing eumagnoliids, monocots + Chloranthales, and Ceratophyllum + eudicots. The matK gene produces the highest internal support yet for basal eudicots and, within core eudicots, resolves a crown group comprising Berberidopsidaceae/Aextoxicaceae, Santalales, and Caryophyllales + asterids. Moreover, matK sequences provide good resolution within many angiosperm orders. Combined analyses of matK and other rapidly evolving DNA regions with available multigene data sets have strong potential to enhance resolution and internal support in deep level angiosperm phylogenetics and provide additional insights into angiosperm evolution.

  12. Documentation generator application for MatLab source codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niton, B.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    The UML, which is a complex system modeling and description technology, has recently been expanding its uses in the field of formalization and algorithmic approach to such systems like multiprocessor photonic, optoelectronic and advanced electronics carriers; distributed, multichannel measurement systems; optical networks, industrial electronics, novel R&D solutions. The paper describes a realization of an application for documenting MatLab source codes. There are presented own novel solution based on Doxygen program which is available on the free license, with accessible source code. The used supporting tools for parser building were Bison and Flex. There are presented the practical results of the documentation generator. The program was applied for exemplary MatLab codes. The documentation generator application is used for design of large optoelectronic and electronic measurement and control systems. The paper consists of three parts which describe the following components of the documentation generator for photonic and electronic systems: concept, MatLab application and VHDL application. This is part two which describes the MatLab application. MatLab is used for description of the measured phenomena.

  13. Microcosm experiments of oil degradation by microbial mats.

    PubMed

    de Oteyza, Tirso García; Grimalt, Joan O; Llirós, Marc; Esteve, Isabel

    2006-03-15

    Several microcosm experiments were run in parallel to evaluate the efficiency of microbial mats for crude oil degradation as compared with physico-chemical weathering. The oils used in the experiments constituted representative examples of those currently used for commercial purposes. One was aliphatic and of low viscosity (33.4 American Petroleum Institute degrees, degrees API) and the other was predominantly aromatic, with high sulphur content (ca. 2.7%) and viscosity (16.6 degrees API). After crude oil introduction, the microcosms were kept under cyclic changes in water level to mimic coastal tidal movements. The transformations observed showed that water weathering leads to more effective and rapid elimination of low molecular weight hydrocarbons than microbial mat metabolism, e.g. n-alkanes with chain length shorter than n-pentadecane or n-heptadecane, regular isoprenoid hydrocarbons with chain length lower than C16 or C18 or lower molecular weight naphthalenes. Microbial mats preserved these hydrocarbons from volatilization and water washing. However, hydrocarbons of lower volatility such as the C24-C30 n-alkanes or containing nitrogen atoms, e.g. carbazoles, were eliminated in higher proportion by microbial mats than by water weathering. The strong differences in composition between the two oils used for the experiments were also reflected in significant differences between water weathering and microbial mat biodegradation. Higher oil viscosity seemed to hinder the former but not the later. PMID:15935450

  14. A Test of Learned Industriousness in the Physical Activity Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Eduardo E.; Davis, Catherine L.; Marquez, David X.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Theory of Learned Industriousness states that durable individual differences in industriousness are due in part to differences in the extent to which individuals were rewarded for high effort at an earlier time. Individuals rewarded for high effort during training are thought to generalize greater persistence to subsequent tasks than those rewarded for low effort. This study tested whether rewarded physical and/or mental effort at different intensities generalized to greater persistence at a subsequent mental task. Methods 80 inactive 18–25 year-olds were randomized into four groups: Low Mental Effort, High Mental Effort, Low Physical Effort, and High Physical Effort. Each completed group-specific effort training and a mental persistence task at baseline and posttest. Results Factorial analysis of covariance revealed a significant domain x effort interaction on persistence (F[1,75]=4.93, p=.029). High Mental Effort and Low Mental Effort groups demonstrated similar gains in persistence (d=-0.08, p>.05) and points earned (d=0.11, p>.05) following effort training. High Physical Effort and Low Physical Effort diverged on persistence (d=-0.49, p=.004) but not points earned (d =-0.12, p>.05). Conclusions Findings suggest either that training and test stimuli were too dissimilar to cue effects of associative learning in physical effort groups, or that effects were present but overpowered by the affective and neurocognitive consequences of an acute bout of intense aerobic physical activity. Findings do not support the Theory of Learned Industriousness nor generalization of effort across physical and mental domains. PMID:26052372

  15. [Automation of immunohematologic testing activities at French blood transfusion centers].

    PubMed

    Muller, A; Girard, M

    1983-11-01

    In May 1982, a questionnaire was sent to all of the 170 French Blood Transfusion Services (BTS), on behalf of the French Society of Blood Transfusion. The purpose was to determine the types of automated equipment used for immunohematological controls, the way in which they are used and the result of automation and computerization in daily laboratory operations. We received 135 replies (80%). A generalized conclusion can be drawn from the collected information. 50% of the respondents are neither automated nor computerized. 30% are both automated and computerized. 10% are automated but not computerized and 8% are not automated but are computerized. In the field of automated serology there is an increased tendency to complete the ABO/Rh testing by Cc D Ee and Kell phenotyping. The use of computers allows the current test determination to be compared with previous donation data. However, no fully automated equipment, which can conduct antibody screening, exists, cost effectively, in small or average BTS. In France, there has been a significant increase in automation between 1970 and 1980 but only the most important BTS have carried out automation at the same time as computerization. The smaller BTS have usually become automated without becoming computerized. In 1978, Codabar was first used. This has been one of the principal advances of the last 10 years, allowing all the users of automation to start moving towards complete computerization. This advance was assisted by the use of prepackaged software. This questionnaire also determined that the current emphasis is now to computerize administrative and management activities before laboratory activities. This survey has been conducted during a turning point of the automation of French BTS. It shows that they are, on the whole, satisfied with their automation. As far as the safety and the efficiency of the service are concerned, it is only fair to consider that the main purposes of the automation have been achieved. But

  16. Tough Stretchable Physically-Cross-linked Electrospun Hydrogel Fiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiming; Wang, Chao; Wiener, Clinton G; Hao, Jinkun; Shatas, Sophia; Weiss, R A; Vogt, Bryan D

    2016-09-01

    Nature uses supramolecular interactions and hierarchical structures to produce water-rich materials with combinations of properties that are challenging to obtain in synthetic systems. Here, we demonstrate hierarchical supramolecular hydrogels from electrospun, self-associated copolymers with unprecedented elongation and toughness for high porosity hydrogels. Hydrophobic association of perfluoronated comonomers provides the physical cross-links for these hydrogels based on copolymers of dimethyl acrylamide and 2-(N-ethylperfluorooctane sulfonamido)ethyl methacrylate (FOSM). Intriguingly, the hydrogel fiber mats show an enhancement in toughness in comparison to compression molded bulk hydrogels. This difference is attributed to the size distribution of the hydrophobic aggregates where narrowing the distribution in the electrospun material enhances the toughness of the hydrogel. These hydrogel fiber mats exhibit extensibility more than double that of the bulk hydrogel and a comparable modulus despite the porosity of the fiber mat leading to >25 wt % increase in water content. PMID:27548013

  17. Pressure Mapping Mat for Tele-Home Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Cogollo, Jose Francisco; Pau, Massimiliano; Fraboni, Beatrice; Bonfiglio, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the development of a mat-like pressure mapping system based on a single layer textile sensor and intended to be used in home environments for monitoring the physical condition of persons with limited mobility. The sensor is fabricated by embroidering silver-coated yarns on a light cotton fabric and creating pressure-sensitive resistive elements by stamping the conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) at the crossing points of conductive stitches. A battery-operated mat prototype was developed and includes the scanning circuitry and a wireless communication module. A functional description of the system is presented together with a preliminary experimental evaluation of the mat prototype in the extraction of plantar pressure parameters. PMID:26978369

  18. Community structure of a microbial mat: The phylogenetic dimension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risatti, J.B.; Capman, W.C.; Stahl, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional studies of microbial communities are incomplete because of the inability to identify and quantify all contributing populations. In the present study, we directly determine the abundance and distribution of sulfate-reducing bacterial populations in a microbial mat community by using hybridization probes complementary to the 16S-like rRNAs of major phylogenetic groups. Most of the major groups were found in this single community, distributed for the most part in nonoverlapping depth intervals of the mat. The reflection of the phylogenetic structure in the community structure suggests that those species making up the major phylogenetic groups perform specific interrelated metabolic functions in the community. Comparison of population profiles to previously observed rates of sulfate reduction suggests there are additional populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria both within the photooxic zone and deeper in the mat.

  19. MatLab program for precision calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2004-06-01

    Optical tweezers are used as force transducers in many types of experiments. The force they exert in a given experiment is known only after a calibration. Computer codes that calibrate optical tweezers with high precision and reliability in the ( x, y)-plane orthogonal to the laser beam axis were written in MatLab (MathWorks Inc.) and are presented here. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number of factors that affect this power spectrum. First, cross-talk between channels in 2D position measurements is tested for, and eliminated if detected. Then, the Lorentzian power spectrum that results from the Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck theory, is fitted to the low-frequency part of the experimental spectrum in order to obtain an initial guess for parameters to be fitted. Finally, a more complete theory is fitted, a theory that optionally accounts for the frequency dependence of the hydrodynamic drag force and hydrodynamic interaction with a nearby cover slip, for effects of finite sampling frequency (aliasing), for effects of anti-aliasing filters in the data acquisition electronics, and for unintended "virtual" filtering caused by the position detection system. Each of these effects can be left out or included as the user prefers, with user-defined parameters. Several tests are applied to the experimental data during calibration to ensure that the data comply with the theory used for their interpretation: Independence of x- and y-coordinates, Hooke's law, exponential distribution of power spectral values, uncorrelated Gaussian scatter of residual values. Results are given with statistical errors and covariance matrix. Program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier: ADTV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV Computer for

  20. Layer-by-layer immobilized catalase on electrospun nanofibrous mats protects against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Deng, Hongbing; Cai, Tongjian; Zhan, Yingfei; Wang, Xiankai; Chen, Xuanxuan; Ji, Ailing; Lil, Xueyong

    2014-07-01

    Catalase, a kind of redox enzyme and generally recognized as an efficient agent for protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxicity. The immobilization of catalase was accomplished by depositing the positively charged chitosan and the negatively charged catalase on electrospun cellulose nanofibrous mats through electrospining and layer-by-layer (LBL) techniques. The morphology obtained from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that more orderly arranged three-dimension (3D) structure and roughness formed with increasing the number of coating bilayers. Besides, the enzyme-immobilized nanofibrous mats were found with high enzyme loading and activity, moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further demonstrated the successful immobilization of chitosan and catalase on cellulose nanofibers support. Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells with or without pretreatment of nanofibrous mats by MTT assay, LDH activity and Flow cytometric evaluation, and confirmed the pronounced hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity, but pretreatment of immobilized catalase reduced the cytotoxicity and protected cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxic effects which were further demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images. The data pointed toward a role of catalase-immobilized nanofibrous mats in protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular damage and their potential application in biomedical field.

  1. Rapid toxicity testing based on mitochondrial respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenstricker, M.E. ); Holodnick, S.E.; Mancy, K.H. ); Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The need exists for rapid and inexpensive methods to determine the health effects of environmental contaminants on biological systems. One of the current research approaches for assessing cytotoxicity is to monitor the respiratory activity of the mitochondrion, a sensitive, nonspecific subcellular target site. Detected changes in mitochondrial function after the addition of a test chemical could be correlated to toxic effects. Mitochondrial respiration can be characterized by three indices: state 3 and state 4 respiratory rates, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR). State 4, the idle or resting state, results when coupled mitochondrial respire in a medium containing inorganic phosphate and a Kreb's cycle substrate in the absence of a phosphate acceptor such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP). In the presence of ADP the respiration rate increases to a maximum (state 3), accompanied by phosphorylation of ADP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The ratio of state 3 to state 4, or RCR, indicates how tightly the oxidative phosphorylation process is coupled. The synthesis of ATP by mitochondria is influenced by a number of compounds, most of which are either uncouplers or inhibitors.

  2. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per μmol L(-1) H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  3. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P.; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5–5 pA per μmol L-1 H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8–10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1–2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats. PMID:26257714

  4. Replacement of asphalt in glass-mat roofing shingles. Final report, March 1980-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Bastian, E.J. Jr.; McCandlish, E.F.K.; Sieling, F.W.

    1982-05-01

    Up to 50% of the asphalt now used in glass-mat shingles may be replaceable by increasing the mineral filler content and/or extending the asphalt with elemental sulfur. Highly filled, lab-made shingles containing asphalt flux perform acceptably in fire tests, slide tests, blister tests, granule adhesion, and freeze-thaw cracking tests. They have high stain and scuff potential and are too limp for convenient application around 110/sup 0/F. Lab-made shingles containing asphalt saturant are satisfactory in most respects, but they are still too limp for high temperature application. Various methods to stiffen highly filled shingles were tried. The most promising method is the use of two lightweight glass mats, laminated together with asphalt. Shingles made in this way have handling properties superior to conventional shingles and are economically feasible. In the area of replacement of asphalt with sulfur, five small-scale plant trials produced shingles which, after a year of outdoor exposure, are satisfactory. On the basis of preliminary measurements, no important difference in tensile or flexural properties between asphalt and sulfur/asphalt shingles is expected. In Weather-Ometer tests, sulfur/asphalt tends to have lower durability than conventional coating. This is confirmed by outside weathering of sulfur/asphalt films. By choosing the correct asphalt softening point and correct filler level, sulfur/asphalt/filler can have equal durability to conventional asphalt/filler combinations.

  5. LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

    2014-04-03

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although

  6. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    PubMed Central

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W; Cortés, Alejandro López; Hoehler, Tori M; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Spormann, Alfred M; Wagner, Michael; Weber, Peter K; Bebout, Brad M

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell isotope analysis to investigate the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats at Laguna Ojo de Liebre near Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Acetylene reduction assays with specific metabolic inhibitors suggested that both sulfate reducers and members of the Cyanobacteria contributed to N2 fixation, whereas 15N2 tracer experiments at the bulk level only supported a contribution of Cyanobacteria. Cyanobacterial and nifH Cluster III (including deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers) sequences dominated the nifH gene pool, whereas the nifH transcript pool was dominated by sequences related to Lyngbya spp. Single-cell isotope analysis of 15N2-incubated mat samples via high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) revealed that Cyanobacteria were enriched in 15N, with the highest enrichment being detected in Lyngbya spp. filaments (on average 4.4 at% 15N), whereas the Deltaproteobacteria (identified by CARD-FISH) were not significantly enriched. We investigated the potential dilution effect from CARD-FISH on the isotopic composition and concluded that the dilution bias was not substantial enough to influence our conclusions. Our combined data provide evidence that members of the Cyanobacteria, especially Lyngbya spp., actively contributed to N2 fixation in the intertidal mats, whereas support for significant N2 fixation activity of the targeted deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers could not be found. PMID:25303712

  7. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    DOE PAGES

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C.; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D.; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W.; Cortes, Alehandro Lopez; Hoehler, Tori M.; et al

    2014-10-10

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell isotope analysis to investigate the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats at Laguna Ojo de Liebre near Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Acetylene reduction assays with specific metabolic inhibitors suggested that both sulfate reducers andmore » members of the Cyanobacteria contributed to N2 fixation, whereas 15N2 tracer experiments at the bulk level only supported a contribution of Cyanobacteria. Cyanobacterial and nifH Cluster III (including deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers) sequences dominated the nifH gene pool, whereas the nifH transcript pool was dominated by sequences related to Lyngbya spp. Single-cell isotope analysis of 15N2-incubated mat samples via high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) revealed that Cyanobacteria were enriched in 15N, with the highest enrichment being detected in Lyngbya spp. filaments (on average 4.4 at% 15N), whereas the Deltaproteobacteria (identified by CARD-FISH) were not significantly enriched. We investigated the potential dilution effect from CARD-FISH on the isotopic composition and concluded that the dilution bias was not substantial enough to influence our conclusions. As a result, our combined data provide evidence that members of the Cyanobacteria, especially Lyngbya spp., actively contributed to N2 fixation in the intertidal mats, whereas support for significant N2 fixation activity of the targeted deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers could not be found.« less

  8. 30 CFR 551.7 - Test drilling activities under a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test drilling activities under a permit. 551.7... GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 551.7 Test drilling activities under a permit. (a) Shallow test drilling. Before you begin shallow test drilling under a permit,...

  9. 30 CFR 551.7 - Test drilling activities under a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test drilling activities under a permit. 551.7... GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSCIAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 551.7 Test drilling activities under a permit. (a) Shallow test drilling. Before you begin shallow test drilling under a permit,...

  10. 30 CFR 551.7 - Test drilling activities under a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test drilling activities under a permit. 551.7... GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 551.7 Test drilling activities under a permit. (a) Shallow test drilling. Before you begin shallow test drilling under a permit,...

  11. Effects of yerba maté, a plant extract formulation ("YGD") and resveratrol in 3T3-L1 adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Gotardo, Erica M F; Brianti, Mitsue T; Piraee, Mahmood; Gambero, Alessandra; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2014-10-21

    We aimed to evaluate the in vitro effects of yerba maté, YGD (a herbal preparation containing yerba maté, guarana and damiana), and resveratrol on adipogenesis. The anti-adipogenic effects of yerba mate, YGD, resveratrol and YGD + resveratrol and yerba mate + resveratrol combinations were evaluated in 3T3-L1 cells by Oil Red staining, cellular triglyceride content, and PCR quantitative array. The results demonstrated that all of the tested compounds inhibited adipogenesis. Yerba maté extract significantly down-regulated the expression of genes that play an important role in regulating adipogenesis, such as Adig, Axin, Cebpa, Fgf10, Lep, Lpl, and Pparγ2. In addition, these genes, YGD also repressed Bmp2, Ccnd1, Fasn, and Srebf1. Resveratrol also modulated the expression of Adig, Bmp2, Ccnd1, C/EBPα, Fasn, Fgf10, Lep, Lpl, and Pparγ2. Moreover, resveratrol repressed Cebpb, Cdk4, Fgf2, and Klf15. The yerba maté extract and YGD up-regulated the expression of genes involved in inhibiting adipogenesis, such as Dlk-1, Klf2, and Ucp1. Resveratrol also induced the expression of Klf2 and Ucp1. In addition resveratrol modulated the Ddit3, Foxo1, Sirt1, and Sirt2. The combined effects of these compounds on gene expression showed similar results observed from individual treatments. Our data indicates that the synergy between the compounds favors the inhibition of adipogenesis.

  12. Involvement of microbial mats in early fossilization by decay delay and formation of impressions and replicas of vertebrates and invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iniesto, Miguel; Buscalioni, Ángela D.; Carmen Guerrero, M.; Benzerara, Karim; Moreira, David; López-Archilla, Ana I.

    2016-05-01

    Microbial mats have been hypothesized to improve the persistence and the preservation of organic remains during fossilization processes. We test this hypothesis with long-term experiments (up to 5.5 years) using invertebrate and vertebrate corpses. Once placed on mats, the microbial community coats the corpses and forms a three-dimensional sarcophagus composed of microbial cells and exopolymeric substances (EPS). This coverage provides a template for i) moulding superficial features, resulting in negative impressions, and ii) generating replicas. The impressions of fly setulae, fish scales and frog skin verrucae are shaped mainly by small cells in an EPS matrix. Microbes also replicate delicate structures such as the three successive layers that compose a fish eye. The sarcophagus protects the body integrity, allowing the persistence of inner organs such as the ovaries and digestive apparatus in flies, the swim bladder and muscles in fish, and the bone marrow in frog legs. This study brings strong experimental evidence to the idea that mats favour metazoan fossilization by moulding, replicating and delaying decay. Rapid burial has classically been invoked as a mechanism to explain exceptional preservation. However, mats may play a similar role during early fossilization as they can preserve complex features for a long time.

  13. Effects of yerba maté, a plant extract formulation ("YGD") and resveratrol in 3T3-L1 adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Gotardo, Erica M F; Brianti, Mitsue T; Piraee, Mahmood; Gambero, Alessandra; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the in vitro effects of yerba maté, YGD (a herbal preparation containing yerba maté, guarana and damiana), and resveratrol on adipogenesis. The anti-adipogenic effects of yerba mate, YGD, resveratrol and YGD + resveratrol and yerba mate + resveratrol combinations were evaluated in 3T3-L1 cells by Oil Red staining, cellular triglyceride content, and PCR quantitative array. The results demonstrated that all of the tested compounds inhibited adipogenesis. Yerba maté extract significantly down-regulated the expression of genes that play an important role in regulating adipogenesis, such as Adig, Axin, Cebpa, Fgf10, Lep, Lpl, and Pparγ2. In addition, these genes, YGD also repressed Bmp2, Ccnd1, Fasn, and Srebf1. Resveratrol also modulated the expression of Adig, Bmp2, Ccnd1, C/EBPα, Fasn, Fgf10, Lep, Lpl, and Pparγ2. Moreover, resveratrol repressed Cebpb, Cdk4, Fgf2, and Klf15. The yerba maté extract and YGD up-regulated the expression of genes involved in inhibiting adipogenesis, such as Dlk-1, Klf2, and Ucp1. Resveratrol also induced the expression of Klf2 and Ucp1. In addition resveratrol modulated the Ddit3, Foxo1, Sirt1, and Sirt2. The combined effects of these compounds on gene expression showed similar results observed from individual treatments. Our data indicates that the synergy between the compounds favors the inhibition of adipogenesis. PMID:25338179

  14. Crosslinked Electro-Spun Chitosan Nanofiber Mats with Cd(II) as Template Ions for Adsorption Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xu, Cong; Qiu, Tianbao; Xu, Xiaoyan

    2015-06-01

    The Cd(II) ion imprinting electro-spun crosslinked chitosan nanofiber mats were successfully prepared using Cd(II) as template ions and glutaraldehyde (GA) as crosslinker to investigate the adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in aqueous solutions. The Cd(II) ion imprinting electro-spun crosslinked chitosan nanofiber mats were characterized by the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), elemental analysis and solubility tests. The prepared chitosan nanofiber mats exhibited a higher adsorption capacity for both Cd(II) (364.3 mg/g) and Pb(II) (272.0 mg/g) ions. The dynamic study demonstrated that the adsorption process followed the second-order kinetic equation. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used to analyze the equilibrium isotherm data. The results showed that the Langmuir model was best suitable for predicting the adsorption isotherm of the studied system. The as prepared Cd(II) ion imprinting electro-spun crosslinked chitosan nanofiber mats might be used as an effective adsorbent for Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal from heavy metal wastewater. PMID:26369036

  15. Involvement of microbial mats in early fossilization by decay delay and formation of impressions and replicas of vertebrates and invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Iniesto, Miguel; Buscalioni, Ángela D; Carmen Guerrero, M; Benzerara, Karim; Moreira, David; López-Archilla, Ana I

    2016-01-01

    Microbial mats have been hypothesized to improve the persistence and the preservation of organic remains during fossilization processes. We test this hypothesis with long-term experiments (up to 5.5 years) using invertebrate and vertebrate corpses. Once placed on mats, the microbial community coats the corpses and forms a three-dimensional sarcophagus composed of microbial cells and exopolymeric substances (EPS). This coverage provides a template for i) moulding superficial features, resulting in negative impressions, and ii) generating replicas. The impressions of fly setulae, fish scales and frog skin verrucae are shaped mainly by small cells in an EPS matrix. Microbes also replicate delicate structures such as the three successive layers that compose a fish eye. The sarcophagus protects the body integrity, allowing the persistence of inner organs such as the ovaries and digestive apparatus in flies, the swim bladder and muscles in fish, and the bone marrow in frog legs. This study brings strong experimental evidence to the idea that mats favour metazoan fossilization by moulding, replicating and delaying decay. Rapid burial has classically been invoked as a mechanism to explain exceptional preservation. However, mats may play a similar role during early fossilization as they can preserve complex features for a long time. PMID:27162204

  16. Involvement of microbial mats in early fossilization by decay delay and formation of impressions and replicas of vertebrates and invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Iniesto, Miguel; Buscalioni, Ángela D.; Carmen Guerrero, M.; Benzerara, Karim; Moreira, David; López-Archilla, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial mats have been hypothesized to improve the persistence and the preservation of organic remains during fossilization processes. We test this hypothesis with long-term experiments (up to 5.5 years) using invertebrate and vertebrate corpses. Once placed on mats, the microbial community coats the corpses and forms a three-dimensional sarcophagus composed of microbial cells and exopolymeric substances (EPS). This coverage provides a template for i) moulding superficial features, resulting in negative impressions, and ii) generating replicas. The impressions of fly setulae, fish scales and frog skin verrucae are shaped mainly by small cells in an EPS matrix. Microbes also replicate delicate structures such as the three successive layers that compose a fish eye. The sarcophagus protects the body integrity, allowing the persistence of inner organs such as the ovaries and digestive apparatus in flies, the swim bladder and muscles in fish, and the bone marrow in frog legs. This study brings strong experimental evidence to the idea that mats favour metazoan fossilization by moulding, replicating and delaying decay. Rapid burial has classically been invoked as a mechanism to explain exceptional preservation. However, mats may play a similar role during early fossilization as they can preserve complex features for a long time. PMID:27162204

  17. Monkey Feeding Assay for Testing Emetic Activity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Keun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are unique bacterial toxins that cause gastrointestinal toxicity as well as superantigenic activity. Since systemic administration of SEs induces superantigenic activity leading to toxic shock syndrome that may mimic enterotoxic activity of SEs such as vomiting and diarrhea, oral administration of SEs in the monkey feeding assay is considered as a standard method to evaluate emetic activity of SEs. This chapter summarizes and discusses practical considerations of the monkey feeding assay used in studies characterizing classical and newly identified SEs.

  18. Myocardial Cell Pattern on Piezoelectric Nanofiber Mats for Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Wang, X.; Zhao, H.; Du, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents in vitro contractile myocardial cell pattern on piezoelectric nanofiber mats with applications in energy harvesting. The cell-based energy harvester consists of myocardial cell sheet and a PDMS substrate with a PVDF nanofiber mat on. Experimentally, cultured on specifically distributed nanofiber mats, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes are characterized with the related morphology and contraction. Previously, we have come up with the concept of energy harvesting from heart beating using piezoelectric material. A bio-hybrid energy harvester combined living cardiomyocytes, PDMS polymer substrate and piezoelectric PVDF film with the electrical output of peak current 87.5nA and peak voltage 92.3mV. However, the thickness of the cardiomyocyte cultured on a two-dimensional substrate is much less than that of the piezoelectric film. The Micro Contact Printing (μCP) method used in cell pattern on the PDMS thin film has tough requirement for the film surface. As such, in this paper we fabricated nanofiber-constructed PDMS thin film to realize cell pattern due to PVDF nanofibers with better piezoelectricity and microstructures of nanofiber mats guiding cell distribution. Living cardiomyocytes patterned on those distributed piezoelectric nanofibers with the result of the same distribution as the nanofiber pattern.

  19. Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium by a cyanobacterial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Dhara; Vankar, Padma S.; Srivastava, Sarvesh Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The study comprises the use of cyanobacterial mat (collected from tannery effluent site) to remove hexavalent chromium. This mat was consortium of cyanobacteria/blue-green algae such as Chlorella sp., Phormidium sp. and Oscillatoria sp. The adsorption experiments were carried out in batches using chromium concentrations 2-10, 15-30 and 300 ppm at pH 5.5-6.2. The adsorption started within 15 min; however, 96 % reduction in metal concentration was observed within 210 min. The adsorption phenomenon was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. This biosorption fitted Freundlich adsorption isotherm very well. It was observed that the best adsorption was at 4 ppm, and at 25 ppm in the chosen concentration ranges. Scanning electron micrograph showed the physiology of mat, indicating sites for metal uptake. The main focus was collection of the cyanobacterial mat from local environments and its chromium removal potential at pH 5.5-6.2.

  20. Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Judith A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    Compositions, methods and devices for bioremediation that comprise components of constructed microbial mats with organic and inorganic materials are described. The compositions, methods and devices can be used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  1. HiMAT highly maneuverable aircraft technology, flight report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Flight verification of a primary flight control system, designed to control the unstable HiMAT aircraft is presented. The initial flight demonstration of a maneuver autopilot in the level cruise mode and the gathering of a limited amount of airspeed calibration data.

  2. Weighted color and texture sample selection for image matting.

    PubMed

    Varnousfaderani, Ehsan Shahrian; Rajan, Deepu

    2013-11-01

    Color sampling based matting methods find the best known samples for foreground and background colors of unknown pixels. Such methods do not perform well if there is an overlap in the color distribution of foreground and background regions because color cannot distinguish between these regions and hence, the selected samples cannot reliably estimate the matte. Furthermore, current sampling based matting methods choose samples that are located around the boundaries of foreground and background regions. In this paper, we overcome these two problems. First, we propose texture as a feature that can complement color to improve matting by discriminating between known regions with similar colors. The contribution of texture and color is automatically estimated by analyzing the content of the image. Second, we combine local sampling with a global sampling scheme that prevents true foreground or background samples to be missed during the sample collection stage. An objective function containing color and texture components is optimized to choose the best foreground and background pair among a set of candidate pairs. Experiments are carried out on a benchmark data set and an independent evaluation of the results shows that the proposed method is ranked first among all other image matting methods.

  3. Method and system of culturing an algal mat

    DOEpatents

    Das, Keshav C; Cannon, Benjamin R; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil

    2014-05-13

    A system and method for culturing algae are presented. The system and method utilize a fog of growth medium that is delivered to an algal mat generator along with a stream of CO.sub.2 to promote growth of algal cells contained in the generator.

  4. Electrospinning of caseinates to create protective fibrous mats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrospinning is a nonthermal process that produces fibers on the micron- or nano-scale from a polymer solution. If produced by electrospinning of biopolymer solutions, fibrous mats may be created for protecting foods and allowing for the preservation and controlled release of bioactives for healt...

  5. Electrospinning of caseinates to create protective fibrous mats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    JUSTIFICATION Electrospinning is a nonthermal process that produces fibers with diameters on the micron- or nano-scales from a polymer solution. If produced by electrospinning of biopolymer solutions, fibrous mats may be created for protecting foods, improving food quality and allowing for the prese...

  6. Pressure load on specific body areas of gestating sows lying on rubber mats with different softness.

    PubMed

    Schubbert, A; Hartung, E; Schrader, L

    2014-08-01

    Rubber mats offer a possibility to increase lying comfort for sows with positive effects on sow lying behavior and health. However, until now, no information has been reported about the relationship between the softness of rubber mats and the pressure load on certain body areas of sows. We used a total of 68 (40 multiparous, 28 primiparous) German Landrace × German Landrace sows with a BW within the range of 90 to 330 kg (divided in 3 weight classes) to measure peak force and distribution of pressure during lying in the sternal and half recumbent position. Measures were done in an experimental pen that was equipped with a pressure sensor map system (5400 NTL; Tekscan Inc., Boston, MA). Three rubber mats differing in softness (penetration depth: hard mat, 4.0 mm [HM]; soft mat, 14.6 mm [SM]; very soft mat, 43.0 mm [VSM]) were tested and compared to concrete floor (CF) as a reference. Pressure load was analyzed in the sternal position for the sternum, belly, and ham body regions and also in the half recumbent position for the shoulder. For each lying position we determined the body region with the highest pressure load and analyzed the peak force (PF) and the contact area (CA) using a mixed model ANOVA (MIXED procedure of SAS Enterprise, version 4.3., SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC) with floor type, weight class of sows, and their interaction as fixed factors. Overall, the highest values for PF in the sternal position were found on the sternum (median: 1.62 N/cm(2)) and in the half recumbent position on the shoulder (median: 2.72 N/cm(2)). In the sternal position PF on the sternum was lower on VSM compared to CF (P = 0.001). In the half-recumbent position PF on the shoulder was lower on VSM compared to CF (P = 0.013) and compared to HM (P = 0.011). The weight of the sows affected PF on the sternum in the sternal position, with lower values in weight class 1 compared to weight class 2 (P = 0.001) and weight class 3 (P = 0.002). Contact area under the sternum was larger on

  7. MatSeis and the GNEM R&E regional seismic anaylsis tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Chael, Eric Paul; Hart, Darren M.; Young, Christopher John; Merchant, Bion John

    2003-08-01

    To improve the nuclear event monitoring capability of the U.S., the NNSA Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research & Engineering (GNEM R&E) program has been developing a collection of products known as the Knowledge Base (KB). Though much of the focus for the KB has been on the development of calibration data, we have also developed numerous software tools for various purposes. The Matlab-based MatSeis package and the associated suite of regional seismic analysis tools were developed to aid in the testing and evaluation of some Knowledge Base products for which existing applications were either not available or ill-suited. This presentation will provide brief overviews of MatSeis and each of the tools, emphasizing features added in the last year. MatSeis was begun in 1996 and is now a fairly mature product. It is a highly flexible seismic analysis package that provides interfaces to read data from either flatfiles or an Oracle database. All of the standard seismic analysis tasks are supported (e.g. filtering, 3 component rotation, phase picking, event location, magnitude calculation), as well as a variety of array processing algorithms (beaming, FK, coherency analysis, vespagrams). The simplicity of Matlab coding and the tremendous number of available functions make MatSeis/Matlab an ideal environment for developing new monitoring research tools (see the regional seismic analysis tools below). New MatSeis features include: addition of evid information to events in MatSeis, options to screen picks by author, input and output of origerr information, improved performance in reading flatfiles, improved speed in FK calculations, and significant improvements to Measure Tool (filtering, multiple phase display), Free Plot (filtering, phase display and alignment), Mag Tool (maximum likelihood options), and Infra Tool (improved calculation speed, display of an F statistic stream). Work on the regional seismic analysis tools (CodaMag, EventID, PhaseMatch, and Dendro

  8. Characterization of MAT gene functions in the life cycle of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum reveals a lineage-specific MAT gene functioning in apothecium morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Doughan, Benjamin; Rollins, Jeffrey A

    2016-09-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a phytopathogenic fungus that relies on the completion of the sexual cycle to initiate aerial infections. The sexual cycle produces apothecia required for inoculum dispersal. In this study, insight into the regulation of apothecial multicellular development was pursued through functional characterization of mating-type genes. These genes are hypothesized to encode master regulatory proteins required for aspects of sexual development ranging from fertilization through fertile fruiting body development. Experimentally, loss-of-function mutants were created for the conserved core mating-type genes (MAT1-1-1, and MAT1-2-1), and the lineage-specific genes found only in S. sclerotiorum and closely related fungi (MAT1-1-5, and MAT1-2-4). The MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-5, and MAT1-2-1 mutants are able to form ascogonia but are blocked in all aspects of apothecium development. These mutants also exhibit defects in secondary sexual characters including lower numbers of spermatia. The MAT1-2-4 mutants are delayed in carpogenic germination accompanied with altered disc morphogenesis and ascospore production. They too produce lower numbers of spermatia. All four MAT gene mutants showed alterations in the expression of putative pheromone precursor (Ppg-1) and pheromone receptor (PreA, PreB) genes. Our findings support the involvement of MAT genes in sexual fertility, gene regulation, meiosis, and morphogenesis in S. sclerotiorum. PMID:27567717

  9. Doppler shift radar monitoring of activity of rats in a behavioural test situation.

    PubMed

    Rose, F D; Dell, P A; Love, S

    1985-07-01

    The present study investigates the use of an activity monitoring system based upon Doppler shift radar for monitoring general activity of rats in a standard open field test situation. Significant positive correlations were found between the radar activity counts and the conventional lines crossed measure of activity. On the basis of these correlations it is suggested that this method of activity monitoring might be used in conjunction with other behavioural test situations. Further potential benefits of this activity monitoring system are discussed.

  10. Biogeochemistry of Stinking Springs, Utah. Part II: Microbial Diversity and Photo- and Chemo-Autotrophic Growth Rates in a Layered Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteverde, D.; Metzger, J. G.; Bournod, C.; Kelly, H.; Johnson, H.; Sessions, A. L.; Osburn, M.; Shapiro, R. S.; Rideout, J.; Johnston, D. T.; Stevenson, B.; Stamps, B. W.; Vuono, D.; Hanselmann, K.; Spear, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Layered microbial mats have garnered attention for their high phylogenetic diversity and exploitation of geochemical gradients often on the mm scale. However, despite their novelty and implications for early life diversification, little is known about layered microbial mat growth rates or the interdependence of the microbial communities within the system. Stinking Springs, a warm, sulfidic, saline spring northeast of the Great Salt Lake, serves as our test-site to investigate some of these questions. Stinking Springs undergoes downstream changes in pH (6.59-8.14), sulfide (527μM - below detection), sulfate (13-600μM), TCO2 (7.77-3.71mM), and temperature (40-21°C) along its ~150m flow path. The first 10m of discharge is channelized, beyond that, the spring supports a 10 to 40mm-thick layered microbial mat covering ~40% of the total spring runoff area. The mat was divided into four texturally-distinct layers which were each analyzed for 16S rRNA, lipid abundance, and bicarbonate and acetate uptake rates in addition to standard microscopy analyses. 16S rRNA analyses confirmed high taxa diversity within each layer, which varied significantly in taxa makeup such that no single phylum dominated the abundance (>33%) in more than one mat layer. The taxonomic diversity tended to increase with mat depth, a similar finding to other studies on layered microbial mats. A mat sampling transect across 16 meters showed that layer taxonomic diversity was conserved horizontally for all four mat layers, which implies mat depth has a larger control on diversity than physical or chemical parameters. Microscopy indicated the presence of diatoms in all layers which was confirmed by lipid abundance of sterols and long-branch fatty acid methyl esters. Incubation experiments were conducted in light and dark conditions over 24 hours with separate 13C-tagged bicarbonate and acetate additions. Heterotrophic growth rates (acetate uptake; 0.03-0.65%/day) were higher than autotrophic growth

  11. Reduced oxide soldering activation (ROSA) PWB solderability testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Reed, J.; Tench, D.M.; White, J.

    1996-02-01

    The effect of ROSA pretreatment on the solderability of environmentally stressed PWB test coupons was investigated. The PWB surface finish was an electroplated, reflowed solder. Test results demonstrated the ability to recover plated-through-hole fill of steam aged samples with solder after ROSA processing. ROSA offers an alternative method for restoring the solderability of aged PWB surfaces.

  12. Effect of photografting 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate on the hemocompatibility of electrospun poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) fibroporous mats.

    PubMed

    Mayuri, P V; Bhatt, Anugya; Joseph, Roy; Ramesh, P

    2016-03-01

    Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL) has been recommended as a material suitable for blood contacting applications. Effect of ethylene content and associated hydrophobicity of EVAL on the blood-material interactions have been documented in the literature. In this work, surface chemistry of EVAL substrate was altered by photografting a hydrophilic monomer, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) with the aid of a photoinitiator, benzophenone (BP), and the effect of surface modification on the blood-material interactions was investigated. Since the modified material was intended to be used as leukodepletion filters, a solution containing EVAL, HEA and BP was electrospun into fibroporous mats and UV treated to induce grafting. Degree of grafting, bonding between fibers and fiber diameter increased with increase in UV exposure time whereas mechanical properties showed a decreasing trend. Decreased water contact angle indicated improved wetting characteristics. In vitro hemocompatibility tests revealed that the modified EVAL surface exhibited significantly lower hemolytic activity, protein adsorption and platelet adhesion than neat EVAL. The modification did not have any substantial effect on the activation of the complement system and coagulation parameters. Photografting led to significant reduction in the adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) whereas white blood cell (WBC) consumption remained above 90%. The results implied that photografting HEA on EVAL substantially improves hemocompatibility of EVAL and when it is used as a filter, it selectively removes leukocytes and allows easy passage of other blood components. PMID:26706502

  13. Introduction of Current JAXA Test Standard and Recent Updating Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qinzhong; Uchikawa, Hideaki; Yanagase, Kenchi

    2012-07-01

    JAXA has been promoting to build up background knowledge of testing in these recent 5 years under the promotion committee, consists of members of different space project managers, R&D research groups and spacecraft prime manufactures. Those outputs are documented each test handbooks. After the establishment of environmental test handbooks, JAXA has started from 2010 to reverse test standard, JERG-2- 002(General Engineering Requirement Guidance), which had been succeed from one of the three former originations, National Space Development Agency (NASDA). The major objectives of this first reverse from the old test standard are, 1) clarification of requirements from engineering guidance and explanation, 2) classifies the baseline requirements and tailoring guideline, 3) deletes the numbers of specific launchers and makes it more general, 4) compatibility with other JAXA design requirements. In this paper, the plan and structure of reversing test standard, the state of art of current reversed JAXA test standard, and discussion issues within the working group, the next future step for the next revision are introduced.

  14. Variation in Isotopic Biosignatures From Carbonate Rich, Microbial Mats in Saline, Alkaline Lakes on the Cariboo Plateau, B.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, A.; Slater, G.; Druschel, G.; Lim, D.

    2009-05-01

    Cyanobacteria dominated, carbonate rich microbial mats found in saline, alkaline lakes on the Cariboo Plateau, B.C. represent potential analogues of the evaporative systems that might have occurred on early Earth or Mars. These evaporative lakes generally have pH values > 10, salinities of up to 33 psu and alkalinities of > 15, 000 mg CaCO3/L but differ in other geochemical parameters. The ability to understand natural variations in microbial activity and biosignatures in such modern analogues is central to our understanding of the capabilities and limits of life, the interpretation of the geologic record and potentially one day to the interpretation of astrobiological data. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiling, voltammetry, and stable isotope analysis of organic and inorganic carbon pools highlighted the spatial and seasonal variability that exists in modern evaporative microbial mat dominated lakes. Variations in microbial PLFA distribution demonstrated that Cariboo Plateau microbial mat community composition varied seasonally and spatially. Voltammetry results showed that photosynthetic oxygen production occurred in the upper 5 mm of mats resulting in supersaturation of oxygen in surface waters. Depletion of oxygen generally occurred just below 5 mm and sulfide production began at 10 - 15 mm from the mat surface. Isotope analysis (13C) of Cariboo microbial mats showed inorganic (dissolved inorganic carbon) to organic (bulk cell) isotopic discriminations of 23-25 ‰, indicating non-CO2 limited photosynthesis. These results are in contrast to high organic content analogue mats previously reported that show evidence of CO2 limitation. Further, the Cariboo mats demonstrated significant intra- and inter-mat variations in carbonate δ13C values with respect to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) ranging from enrichment to 13C-depleted carbonate. In Deer Lake, isotopic enrichment of surface water DIC by 2-3 ‰ above atmospheric equilibrium indicated microbial

  15. Hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle performance testing by the US Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karner, Donald; Francfort, James

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), part of the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, has conducted testing of advanced technology vehicles since August 1995 in support of the AVTA goal to provide benchmark data for technology modeling, and vehicle development programs. The AVTA has tested full size electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, and hydrogen internal combustion engine powered vehicles. Currently, the AVTA is conducting baseline performance, battery benchmark and fleet tests of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). Testing has included all HEVs produced by major automotive manufacturers and spans over 2.5 million test miles. Testing is currently incorporating PHEVs from four different vehicle converters. The results of all testing are posted on the AVTA web page maintained by the Idaho National Laboratory.

  16. Manufacturing and thermomechanical testing of actively cooled all beryllium high heat flux test pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, N.N.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shatalov, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    One of the problems affiliated to ITER high heat flux elements development is a problem of interface of beryllium protection with heat sink routinely made of copper alloys. To get rid of this problem all beryllium elements could be used as heat receivers in places of enhanced thermal loads. In accordance with this objectives four beryllium test pieces of two types have been manufactured in {open_quotes}Institute of Beryllium{close_quotes} for succeeding thermomechanical testing. Two of them were manufactured in accordance with JET team design; they are round {open_quotes}hypervapotron type{close_quotes} test pieces. Another two ones are rectangular test sections with a twisted tape installed inside of the circular channel. Preliminary stress-strain analysis have been performed for both type of the test pieces. Hypervapotrons have been shipped to JET where they were tested on JET test bed. Thermomechanical testing of pieces of the type of {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} have been performed on Kurchatov Institute test bed. Chosen beryllium grade properties, some details of manufacturing, results of preliminary stress-strain analysis and thermomechanical testing of the test pieces {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} type are given in this report.

  17. The Effects of Low Sulfate Concentrations on Modern Microbial Mat Communities: A Long Term Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; Carpenter, Steve; DesMarais, David J.; Discipulo, Mykell; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra

    2002-01-01

    Microbial mats were widespread during the first ca. 2 Ga. of our biosphere's history. To better understand microbial ecosystems and their biomarkers under the low sulfate levels present in early oceans, we attempted a long-term (ca. 1 year) manipulation of sulfate in modem mats. Mats collected from salt ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja Calif. Sur were incubated in a Greenhouse "Collaboratory" at Ames. Mats were maintained in artificial seawater brine containing either: 1) sulfate levels normal for these mats (70 mM), or 2) brine in which sulfate was replaced by chloride. Sulfate concentrations in the "low sulfate" brine gradually approached their lowest (to date) value of 0. 1 mM as sulfate was consumed and/or diffused out of the mat over a period of ca. 4 months. During that period of time, a number of differences between the treatments emerged. Relative to the "low sulfate" mats, "normal sulfate" mats had: 1) lower consumption of oxygen in the lower levels of the mat, 2) higher efficiencies of oxygenic photosynthesis, and 3) higher rates of nitrogen fixation. Rates of methane production by the mats increased greatly as sulfate concentrations fell below ca. 0.2 mM. In contrast, "low" and "normal" sulfate mats had similar net rates of exchange of O2 and dissolved inorganic C between the mats and overlying water. Reduced sulfate levels have diverse impacts upon these ecosystems.

  18. Users guide for ERB 7 MAT (including the first year quality control)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groveman, B.

    1984-01-01

    In the first section of this report background information for the use of the ERB-7 Master Archival Tapes (MAT) is provided. The second section gives details regarding the scientific validity and quality of the MAT. The MAT data analyzed covers the period from November 16, 1978 to October 31, 1979.

  19. Plutonium recycle test reactor characterization activities and results

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1997-05-01

    Report contains results of PRTR core and associated structures characterization performed in January and February of 1997. Radiation survey data are presented, along with recommendations for stabilization activities before transitioning to a decontamination and decommissioning function. Recommendations are also made about handling the waste generated by the stabilization activities, and actions suggested by the Decontamination and Decommissioning organization.

  20. Determination of stabilogram diffusion analysis coefficients and invariant density analysis parameters to understand postural stability associated with standing on anti-fatigue mats.

    PubMed

    Soangra, Rahul; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged standing has been associated with loss of balance, onset of low back pain symptoms and development of fatigue in lower extremity muscles in working populations. Although so far, it is unknown how individuals’ postural stability is affected by standing on rigid versus cushioned platform but many industries are opting for anti-fatigue mats at workstations to reduce fall and injury related socio-economic cost. The goal of this study is to test SATECH's anti-fatigue mat for its effects on postural stability. A pilot test with seven healthy subjects (25–35 years old) has been conducted with a force plate to obtain kinetics of body when standing on two different platforms. The centers of pressure (COP) position of subjects were determined on rigid and anti-fatigue mats for quiet stance (each trial 60 seconds). In order to understand postural control along with dynamic or stochastic characteristics of the COP, stabilogram diffusion analysis (SDA) and Invariant density analysis methods are used. Subject specific patterns were seen in stabilogram diffusion plots and associated parameters in both conditions. We also found differences in some postural sway SDA parameters with anti-fatigue mats compared to rigid vinyl floor standing with open eyes condition. But no significant differences were found in sway IDA parameters. This work further provides insights whether anti fatigue mats can be helpful to workers involved with prolonged standing tasks. PMID:22846314

  1. Evolution of motor activity tests into a screening reality.

    PubMed

    Mullenix, P J

    1989-03-01

    Measures of activity have changed in ways that their utility in screening for neurotoxicity has vastly improved. New computer pattern recognition systems now provide rapid, objective tools for identifying animal behavior. Advances in data analysis procedures have replaced the percent change in overall activity level with measures of initiations, total time and temporal structure for multiple behaviors and sequences. These advances can distinguish hyperactivities induced by different mechanisms and rank their neurotoxic potential, a feat not possible with photocell devices generally used in laboratories today. With the recent technological improvements, it is possible that a measure of activity will become one of the best predictors of malfunction in the central nervous system.

  2. Expanding Test Specifications with Rhetorical Genre Studies and Activity Theory Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Lauren Culzean

    2007-01-01

    This research paper describes the benefits of using an activity-based rhetorical perspective to develop English for specific purposes (ESP) test specifications. This approach expands the potential of ESP test specifications to analyze and describe target language use (TLU) situations, TLU tasks, and ESP test tasks. Multiple activity systems are…

  3. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-12-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety.

  4. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  5. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Various lipids associated with specific microbial groups can serve as biomarkers for establishing organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids), and by analogy, potential relevance to ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids). As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments. Our recent work has focused on lipid biomarker analysis of a potential analogue for such ancient mats growing in a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aerobic, surface layer of this mat (0 to 1 mm) contained a variety of ester-bound fatty acids (FA) representing a diverse bacterial population including cyanobacteria, sulphate reducers (SRB) and heterotrophs. Biomarkers for microeukaryotes detected in this layer included sterols, C-20 polyunsaturated FA and a highly branched isoprenoid, diagnostic for diatoms. Cyanobacteria were also indicated by the presence of a diagnostic set of mid-chain methylalkanes. C-28, to C-34 wax esters (WXE) present in relatively small amounts in the upper 3 mm of the mat are considered biomarkers for green non-sulphur bacteria. Ether-bound isoprenoids were also identified although in considerably lower abundance than ester-bound FA (approx. 1:l0). These complex ether lipids included archatol, hydroxyarchaeol and a C-40 tetraether, all in small amounts. After ether cleavage with boron tribromide, the major recovered isoprenyl was a C-30:1. This C(sub 30;1) yelded squalane after hydrogenation, a known geobiomarker for hypersaline environments in ancient oils and sediments. In this mat, it represents the dominant Archaeal population. The carbon isotopic composition of biomarker lipids were generally depleted relative to the bulk organic material (delta C-13 TOC -10%). Most

  11. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  12. Exceptional preservation of aragonite in a circa 3.3 billion year old microbial mat from the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, Frances; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Lemelle, Laurence; Marrochhi, Yves; Rouzaud, Jean-Noel; Simionovici, Alexandre; Andreazza, Caroline; Foucher, Frédéric; Thiel, Volker; Hofmann, Axel

    2010-05-01

    Exceptional preservation of aragonite in a circa 3.3 billion year old microbial mat from the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa Frances Westall, Barbara Cavalazzi, Laurence Lemelle, Yves Marrocchi, Jean-Noël Rouzaud, Alexandre Simionovici, Murielle Salomé, Smail Mostefaoui, Caroline Andreazza, Frédéric Foucher, Jan Toporski, Andrea Jauss, Volker Thiel, Axel Hofmann, Anders Meibom, François Robert Aragonite occurs as a biologically-formed mineral precipitate within modern calcifying microbial mats. It is, however, rarely preserved in the geological record because, as one of the least stable polymorphs of calcium carbonate, it readily converts to calcite in present environmental conditions at the Earth's surface. In an in situ investigation at the micro- to nanometer-scale, we show that 5-10 nm sized nanocrystals of aragonite are preserved within the organic framework of a partially calcified microbial mat from the ~ 3.3 billion year-old Josefsdal Chert in the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa. Transformation of the aragonite to calcite was blocked by a combination of chemical inhibitors within the crystal lattice, organic molecules coating the nanocrystals and, in particular, to the precocious permeation of the mat by hydrothermal silica. Apart from its exceptional preservation for 3.3 billion years, the identification of aragonite in the Josefsdal microbial mat is the earliest evidence for in situ calcification of a microbial mat. Furthermore, the indications of associated sulphur-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity with calcification strongly support a photosynthetic origin for the mat. This is the most direct evidence for photosynthesis in early Archaean rocks.

  13. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  14. Millimeter-Scale Patterns of Phylogenetic and Trait Diversity in a Salt Marsh Microbial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, David W.; Gallagher, Kimberley L.; Youngblut, Nicholas D.; Buckley, Daniel H.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Intertidal microbial mats are comprised of distinctly colored millimeter-thick layers whose communities organize in response to environmental gradients such as light availability, oxygen/sulfur concentrations, and redox potential. Here, slight changes in depth correspond to sharp niche boundaries. We explore the patterns of biodiversity along this depth gradient as it relates to functional groups of bacteria, as well as trait-encoding genes. We used molecular techniques to determine how the mat’s layers differed from one another with respect to taxonomic, phylogenetic, and trait diversity, and used these metrics to assess potential drivers of community assembly. We used a range of null models to compute the degree of phylogenetic and functional dispersion for each layer. The SSU-rRNA reads were dominated by Cyanobacteria and Chromatiales, but contained a high taxonomic diversity. The composition of each mat core was significantly different for developmental stage, year, and layer. Phylogenetic richness and evenness positively covaried with depth, and trait richness tended to decrease with depth. We found evidence for significant phylogenetic clustering for all bacteria below the surface layer, supporting the role of habitat filtering in the assembly of mat layers. However, this signal disappeared when the phylogenetic dispersion of particular functional groups, such as oxygenic phototrophs, was measured. Overall, trait diversity measured by orthologous genes was also lower than would be expected by chance, except for genes related to photosynthesis in the topmost layer. Additionally, we show how the choice of taxa pools, null models, spatial scale, and phylogenies can impact our ability to test hypotheses pertaining to community assembly. Our results demonstrate that given the appropriate physiochemical conditions, strong phylogenetic, and trait variation, as well as habitat filtering, can occur at the millimeter-scale. PMID:22908010

  15. Do Collaborative Practical Tests Encourage Student-Centered Active Learning of Gross Anatomy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Rodney A.; Cates, Tanya; White, Lloyd; Farchione, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of collaborative testing have been identified in many disciplines. This study sought to determine whether collaborative practical tests encouraged active learning of anatomy. A gross anatomy course included a collaborative component in four practical tests. Two hundred and seven students initially completed the test as individuals and…

  16. Microbial mats in playa lakes and other saline habitats: Early Mars analog?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, John

    1989-01-01

    Microbial mats are cohesive benthic microbial communities which inhabit various Terra (Earth-based) environments including the marine littoral and both permanent and ephemeral (playa) saline lakes. Certain geomorphological features of Mars, such as the Margaritifer Sinus, were interpreted as ancient, dried playa lakes, presumably formed before or during the transition to the present Mars climate. Studies of modern Terran examples suggest that microbial mats on early Mars would have had the capacity to survive and propagate under environmental constraints that would have included irregularly fluctuating regimes of water activity and high ultraviolet flux. Assuming that such microbial communities did indeed inhabit early Mars, their detection during the Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) mission depends upon the presence of features diagnostic of the prior existence of these communities or their component microbes or, as an aid to choosing suitable landing, local exploration or sampling sites, geomorphological, sedimentological or chemical features characteristic of their playa lake habitats. Examination of modern Terran playas (e.g., the Lake Eyre basin) shows that these features span several orders of magnitude in size. While stromatolites are commonly centimeter-meter scale features, bioherms or fields of individuals may extend to larger scales. Preservation of organic matter (mats and microbes) would be favored in topographic lows such as channels or ponds of high salinity, particularly those receiving silica-rich groundwaters. These areas are likely to be located near former zones of groundwater emergence and/or where flood channels entered the paleo-playa. Fossil playa systems which may aid in assessing the applicability of this particular Mars analog include the Cambrian Observatory Hill Beds of the Officer Basin and the Eocene Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation.

  17. Ecosystem function decays by fungal outbreaks in Antarctic microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, David; López-Bueno, Alberto; Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; de los Ríos, Asunción; Alcamí, Antonio; Quesada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica harbours a remarkably diverse range of freshwater bodies and terrestrial ecosystems, where microbial mats are considered the most important systems in terms of biomass and metabolic capabilities. We describe the presence of lysis plaque-like macroscopic blighted patches within the predominant microbial mats on Livingston Island (Antarctic Peninsula). Those blighting circles are associated with decay in physiological traits as well as nitrogen depletion and changes in the spatial microstructure; these alterations were likely related to disruption of the biogeochemical gradients within the microbial ecosystem caused by an unusually high fungal abundance and consequent physical alterations. This phenomenon has been evidenced at a time of unprecedented rates of local warming in the Antarctic Peninsula area, and decay of these ecosystems is potentially stimulated by warmer temperatures. PMID:26972923

  18. Application of materials database (MAT.DB.) to materials education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1994-01-01

    Finding the right material for the job is an important aspect of engineering. Sometimes the choice is as fundamental as selecting between steel and aluminum. Other times, the choice may be between different compositions in an alloy. Discovering and compiling materials data is a demanding task, but it leads to accurate models for analysis and successful materials application. Mat. DB. is a database management system designed for maintaining information on the properties and processing of engineered materials, including metals, plastics, composites, and ceramics. It was developed by the Center for Materials Data of American Society for Metals (ASM) International. The ASM Center for Materials Data collects and reviews material property data for publication in books, reports, and electronic database. Mat. DB was developed to aid the data management and material applications.

  19. MatSeis developer's guide:version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Lane Christopher; Young, Christopher John

    2007-05-01

    This guide is intended to enable researchers working with seismic data, but lacking backgrounds in computer science and programming, to develop seismic algorithms using the MATLAB-based MatSeis software. Specifically, it presents a series of step-by-step instructions to write four specific functions of increasing complexity, while simultaneously explaining the notation, syntax, and general program design of the functions being written. The ultimate goal is that that the user can use this guide as a jumping off point from which he or she can write new functions that are compatible with and expand the capabilities of the current MatSeis software that has been developed as part of the Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (GNEMRE) program at Sandia National Laboratories.

  20. Ecosystem function decays by fungal outbreaks in Antarctic microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, David; López-Bueno, Alberto; Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; de los Ríos, Asunción; Alcamí, Antonio; Quesada, Antonio

    2016-03-14

    Antarctica harbours a remarkably diverse range of freshwater bodies and terrestrial ecosystems, where microbial mats are considered the most important systems in terms of biomass and metabolic capabilities. We describe the presence of lysis plaque-like macroscopic blighted patches within the predominant microbial mats on Livingston Island (Antarctic Peninsula). Those blighting circles are associated with decay in physiological traits as well as nitrogen depletion and changes in the spatial microstructure; these alterations were likely related to disruption of the biogeochemical gradients within the microbial ecosystem caused by an unusually high fungal abundance and consequent physical alterations. This phenomenon has been evidenced at a time of unprecedented rates of local warming in the Antarctic Peninsula area, and decay of these ecosystems is potentially stimulated by warmer temperatures.

  1. MatSeis: A Seismic toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.M.; Young, C.J.

    1996-08-01

    To support the signal processing and data visualization needs of CTBT related projects at SNL, a MATLAB based GUI was developed. This program is known as MatSeis. MatSeis was developed quickly using the available MATLAB functionality. It provides a time-distance profile plot integrating origin, waveform, travel-time, and arrival data. Graphical plot controls, data manipulation, and signal processing functions provide a user friendly seismic analysis package. In addition, the full power of MATLAB (the premier tool for general numeric processing and visualization) is available for prototyping new functions by end users. This package is being made available to the seismic community in the hope that it will aid CTBT research and will facilitate cooperative signal processing development. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Recent applications of basophil activation tests in the diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Immediate-type drug hypersensitivity is an increasingly significant clinical issue; however, the diagnosis is frequently hindered due to lack of safe and precise diagnostic tests. Flow cytometry-assisted basophil activation test is a safe in vitro diagnostic tool for assessing basophil activation upon allergen stimulation. In this review, we have summarized current literature on the diagnostic utilities, new indications, and methodological aspects of the basophil activation test for the diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24260732

  3. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  4. EVAPORITE MICROBIAL FILMS, MATS, MICROBIALITES AND STROMATOLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R; Penny Morris, P; Garriet Smith, G

    2008-01-28

    Evaporitic environments are found in a variety of depositional environments as early as the Archean. The depositional settings, microbial community and mineralogical composition vary significantly as no two settings are identical. The common thread linking all of the settings is that evaporation exceeds precipitation resulting in elevated concentrations of cations and anions that are higher than in oceanic systems. The Dead Sea and Storrs Lake are examples of two diverse modern evaporitic settings as the former is below sea level and the latter is a coastal lake on an island in the Caribbean. Each system varies in water chemistry as the Dead Sea dissolved ions originate from surface weathered materials, springs, and aquifers while Storrs Lake dissolved ion concentration is primarily derived from sea water. Consequently some of the ions, i.e., Sr, Ba are found at significantly lower concentrations in Storrs Lake than in the Dead Sea. The origin of the dissolved ions are ultimately responsible for the pH of each system, alkaline versus mildly acidic. Each system exhibits unique biogeochemical properties as the extreme environments select certain microorganisms. Storrs Lake possesses significant biofilms and stromatolitic deposits and the alkalinity varies depending on rainfall and storm activity. The microbial community Storrs Lake is much more diverse and active than those observed in the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea waters are mildly acidic, lack stromatolites, and possess a lower density of microbial populations. The general absence of microbial and biofilm fossilization is due to the depletion of HCO{sub 3} and slightly acidic pH.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of MAT1 gene in black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Fu, M J; Zhao, C; Bao, W Y; Zhou, F L; Yang, Q B; Jiang, S G; Qiu, L H

    2016-01-01

    MAT1 (ménage à trois 1), an assembly factor and targeting subunit of the CDK-dependent kinase (CAK), can regulate the cell cycle, transcription, and DNA repair. This study was intended to investigate the role of MAT1 in the reproductive maturation of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon). In this study, the P. monodon MAT1 (PmMAT1) gene was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of PmMAT1 was 1490 bp in length with an open-reading frame of 993 bp corresponding to 330 amino acids. The temporal expression of PmMAT1 in various tissues was measured by quantitative real-time PCR with the highest expression observed in ovaries. In the ovaries, the PmMAT1 gene was continuously but differentially expressed during the maturation stages. Comparative analyses of MAT1, CDK7, and cyclin H in the CAK complex of P. monodon indicated that the expression of CDK7 and cyclin H coincided with that of MAT1 during the ovary maturation stages. Serotonin (5-HT) injection promoted the expression level of PmMAT1 in the ovaries of shrimp at 6-48 h post-injection. These results indicate that PmMat1 plays a prominent role in the process of ovarian maturation. PMID:26909956

  6. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works. We infer from the data the various sinks for O2 as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. Although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O2 produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O2 that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O2 respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O2 respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount.

  7. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of MAT1 gene in black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Fu, M J; Zhao, C; Bao, W Y; Zhou, F L; Yang, Q B; Jiang, S G; Qiu, L H

    2016-01-01

    MAT1 (ménage à trois 1), an assembly factor and targeting subunit of the CDK-dependent kinase (CAK), can regulate the cell cycle, transcription, and DNA repair. This study was intended to investigate the role of MAT1 in the reproductive maturation of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon). In this study, the P. monodon MAT1 (PmMAT1) gene was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of PmMAT1 was 1490 bp in length with an open-reading frame of 993 bp corresponding to 330 amino acids. The temporal expression of PmMAT1 in various tissues was measured by quantitative real-time PCR with the highest expression observed in ovaries. In the ovaries, the PmMAT1 gene was continuously but differentially expressed during the maturation stages. Comparative analyses of MAT1, CDK7, and cyclin H in the CAK complex of P. monodon indicated that the expression of CDK7 and cyclin H coincided with that of MAT1 during the ovary maturation stages. Serotonin (5-HT) injection promoted the expression level of PmMAT1 in the ovaries of shrimp at 6-48 h post-injection. These results indicate that PmMat1 plays a prominent role in the process of ovarian maturation.

  8. Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) glove evaluation test protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman-Sweeney, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most critical components of a space suit is the gloves, yet gloves have traditionally presented significant design challenges. With continued efforts at glove development, a method for evaluating glove performance is needed. This paper presents a pressure-glove evaluation protocol. A description of this evaluation protocol, and its development is provided. The protocol allows comparison of one glove design to another, or any one design to bare-handed performance. Gloves for higher pressure suits may be evaluated at current and future design pressures to drive out differences in performance due to pressure effects. Using this protocol, gloves may be evaluated during design to drive out design problems and determine areas for improvement, or fully mature designs may be evaluated with respect to mission requirements. Several different test configurations are presented to handle these cases. This protocol was run on a prototype glove. The prototype was evaluated at two operating pressures and in the unpressurized state, with results compared to bare-handed performance. Results and analysis from this test series are provided, as is a description of the configuration used for this test.

  9. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. A hetero-core fiber optic smart mat sensor for discrimination between a moving human and object on temporal loss peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoki, Ai; Nishiyama, Michiko; Choi, Yongwoon; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we propose discrimination method between a moving human and object by means of a hetero-core fiber smart mat sensor which induces the optical loss change in time. In addition to several advantages such as flexibility, thin size and resistance to electro-magnetic interference for a fiber optic sensor, a hetero-core fiber optic sensor is sensitive to bending action of the sensor portion and independent of temperature fluctuations. Therefore, the hetero-core fiber thin mat sensor can have a fewer sensing portions than the conventional floor pressure sensors, furthermore, can detect the wide area covering the length of strides. The experimental results for human walking tests showed that the mat sensors were reproducibly working in real-time under limiting locations the foot passed in the mat sensor. Focusing on the temporal peak numbers in the optical loss, human walking and wheeled platform moving action induced the peak numbers in the range of 1 - 3 and 5 - 7, respectively, for the 10 persons including 9 male and 1 female. As a result, we conclude that the hetero-core fiber mat sensor is capable of discriminating between the moving human and object such as a wheeled platform focusing on the peak numbers in the temporal optical loss.

  11. Interlocking mats support drilling rig on frozen swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-15

    This paper discusses how a company employed a unique mat system to reduce environmental impact and to support the drilling rig on its Astosch No. 1 exploratory well at Granite Point in the Trading Bay Wildlife Refuge. The site is on the west side of Cook Inlet. During winter, the travel time from Anchorage to the base camp near the Tyonek Indian village was 5 hr by ice road or 45 min by fixed wing aircraft. Eighteen miles of existing gravel roads were used from this base camp to the edge of the frozen muskeg swamp, and from there, they constructed 7 miles of ice road to the well site. They constructed a snow and ice pad with two impermeable liners and then installed Uni-Mat International Inc.'s patented interlocking mats for the final foundation. After moving in the rig, a snow berm was built around the perimeter of the location and an impermeable liner was then draped and secured over the berm.

  12. Simulated Carbon Cycling in a Model Microbial Mat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present here the novel addition of detailed organic carbon cycling to our model of a hypersaline microbial mat ecosystem. This ecosystem model, MBGC (Microbial BioGeoChemistry), simulates carbon fixation through oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the release of C and electrons for microbial heterotrophs via cyanobacterial exudates and also via a pool of dead cells. Previously in MBGC, the organic portion of the carbon cycle was simplified into a black-box rate of accumulation of simple and complex organic compounds based on photosynthesis and mortality rates. We will discuss the novel inclusion of fermentation as a source of carbon and electrons for use in methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and the influence of photorespiration on labile carbon exudation rates in cyanobacteria. We will also discuss the modeling of decomposition of dead cells and the ultimate release of inorganic carbon. The detailed modeling of organic carbon cycling is important to the accurate representation of inorganic carbon flux through the mat, as well as to accurate representation of growth models of the heterotrophs under different environmental conditions. Because the model ecosystem is an analog of ancient microbial mats that had huge impacts on the atmosphere of early earth, this MBGC can be useful as a biological component to either early earth models or models of other planets that potentially harbor life.

  13. Iron microbial mats in modern and phanerozoic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baele, Jean-Marc; Bouvain, Frédéric; De Jong, Jeroen; Matielli, Nadine; Papier, Séverine; Préat, Alain

    2008-08-01

    The recognition of iron microbial mats in terrestrial environments is of great relevance for the search for extraterrestrial life, especially on mars where significant iron minerals were identified in the subsurface. Most researches focused on very ancient microbial mats (e.g. BIFs) since they formed on Earth at a time where similar conditions are supposed to have prevailed on Mars too. However, environmental proxies are often difficult to use for these deposits on Earth which, in addition, may be heavily transformed due to diagenesis or even metamorphism. Here we present modern and phanerozoic iron microbial mats occurrences illustrating the wide variety of environments in which they form, including many marine settings, ponds, creeks, caves, volcanoes, etc. Contrarily to their Precambrian counterparts, Modern and Phanerozoic deposits are usually less affected by diagenesis and the environmental conditions likely to be better constrained. Therefore, their investigation may help for the search for morphological and geochemical biosignatures (e.g. iron isotopes) in ancient iron microbial occurrences on Earth but also on other Planets. In particular, many of the case studies presented here show that microstromatolithe-like morphologies may be valuable targets for screening potential biosignatures in various rock types.

  14. Hydroponic root mats for wastewater treatment-a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbing; Cuervo, Diego Paredes; Müller, Jochen A; Wiessner, Arndt; Köser, Heinz; Vymazal, Jan; Kästner, Matthias; Kuschk, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Hydroponic root mats (HRMs) are ecotechnological wastewater treatment systems where aquatic vegetation forms buoyant filters by their dense interwoven roots and rhizomes, sometimes supported by rafts or other floating materials. A preferential hydraulic flow is created in the water zone between the plant root mat and the bottom of the treatment system. When the mat touches the bottom of the water body, such systems can also function as HRM filter; i.e. the hydraulic flow passes directly through the root zone. HRMs have been used for the treatment of various types of polluted water, including domestic wastewater; agricultural effluents; and polluted river, lake, stormwater and groundwater and even acid mine drainage. This article provides an overview on the concept of applying floating HRM and non-floating HRM filters for wastewater treatment. Exemplary performance data are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of this technology are discussed in comparison to those of ponds, free-floating plant and soil-based constructed wetlands. Finally, suggestions are provided on the preferred scope of application of HRMs. PMID:27164889

  15. Hydroponic root mats for wastewater treatment-a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbing; Cuervo, Diego Paredes; Müller, Jochen A; Wiessner, Arndt; Köser, Heinz; Vymazal, Jan; Kästner, Matthias; Kuschk, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Hydroponic root mats (HRMs) are ecotechnological wastewater treatment systems where aquatic vegetation forms buoyant filters by their dense interwoven roots and rhizomes, sometimes supported by rafts or other floating materials. A preferential hydraulic flow is created in the water zone between the plant root mat and the bottom of the treatment system. When the mat touches the bottom of the water body, such systems can also function as HRM filter; i.e. the hydraulic flow passes directly through the root zone. HRMs have been used for the treatment of various types of polluted water, including domestic wastewater; agricultural effluents; and polluted river, lake, stormwater and groundwater and even acid mine drainage. This article provides an overview on the concept of applying floating HRM and non-floating HRM filters for wastewater treatment. Exemplary performance data are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of this technology are discussed in comparison to those of ponds, free-floating plant and soil-based constructed wetlands. Finally, suggestions are provided on the preferred scope of application of HRMs.

  16. A simple green route to obtain poly(vinyl alcohol) electrospun mats with improved water stability for use as potential carriers of drugs.

    PubMed

    López-Córdoba, Alex; Castro, Guillermo R; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is a hydrophilic, biocompatible and nontoxic polymer. However, because of its low water-resistance, some applications for PVA-based materials are limited (e.g., drug delivery systems and wound dressings). In the current work, PVA mats containing tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) were successfully developed by electrospinning. In order to improve the water stability of the systems, the cross-linking of the PVA matrix was induced by citric acid (CA) addition together with heating treatments (150°C or 190°C for 3min). TC presence led to a strong increase in the electrical conductivity of the blends and as a result, fibers with about 44% lower diameter (270nm) than that of the corresponding unloaded mats (485nm) were obtained. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images indicated that TC was well distributed along the PVA nanofibers. The mats were evaluated by FTIR, which revealed chemical interactions between PVA hydroxyl groups and CA carboxylic ones. The treatment at 150°C for 3min proved to be the more suitable for the preparation of TC-containing mats with improved water resistance, maintaining the TC antimicrobial activity against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus almost unaltered. These mats showed a burst release of TC, giving around 95% of the drug within the first hour of immersion in water. PMID:27612766

  17. A simple green route to obtain poly(vinyl alcohol) electrospun mats with improved water stability for use as potential carriers of drugs.

    PubMed

    López-Córdoba, Alex; Castro, Guillermo R; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is a hydrophilic, biocompatible and nontoxic polymer. However, because of its low water-resistance, some applications for PVA-based materials are limited (e.g., drug delivery systems and wound dressings). In the current work, PVA mats containing tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) were successfully developed by electrospinning. In order to improve the water stability of the systems, the cross-linking of the PVA matrix was induced by citric acid (CA) addition together with heating treatments (150°C or 190°C for 3min). TC presence led to a strong increase in the electrical conductivity of the blends and as a result, fibers with about 44% lower diameter (270nm) than that of the corresponding unloaded mats (485nm) were obtained. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images indicated that TC was well distributed along the PVA nanofibers. The mats were evaluated by FTIR, which revealed chemical interactions between PVA hydroxyl groups and CA carboxylic ones. The treatment at 150°C for 3min proved to be the more suitable for the preparation of TC-containing mats with improved water resistance, maintaining the TC antimicrobial activity against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus almost unaltered. These mats showed a burst release of TC, giving around 95% of the drug within the first hour of immersion in water.

  18. Investigation of an Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Mat Community Located near Aarhus, Denmark: Laboratory Studies

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    1994-01-01

    We constructed a small flow chamber in which suboxic medium containing 60 to 120 μM FeCl2 flowed up through a sample well into an aerated reservoir, thereby creating an suboxic-oxic interface similar to the physicochemical conditions that exist in natural iron seeps. When microbial mat material from the Marselisborg iron seep that contained up to 109 bacterial cells per cm3 (D. Emerson and N. P. Revsbech, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:4022-4031, 1994) was placed in the sample well of the chamber, essentially all of the Fe2+ flowing through the sample well was oxidized at rates of up to 1,200 nmol of Fe2+ oxidized per h per cm3 of mat material. The oxidation rates of samples of the mat that were pasteurized prior to inoculation were only about 20 to 50% of the oxidation rates of unpasteurized samples. Sodium azide also significantly inhibited oxidation. These results suggest that at least 50% and up to 80% of the Fe oxidation in the chamber were actively mediated by the microbes in the mat. It also appeared that Fe stimulated the growth of the community since chambers fed with FeCl2 accumulated masses of either filamentous or particulate growth, both in the sample well and attached to the walls of the chamber. Control chambers that did not receive FeCl2 showed no sign of such growth. Furthermore, after 4 to 5 days the chambers fed with FeCl2 contained 35 to 75% more protein than chambers not supplemented with FeCl2. Leptothrix ochracea and, to a lesser extent, Gallionella spp. were responsible for the filamentous growth, and the sheaths and stalks, respectively, of these two organisms harbored large numbers of Fe-encrusted, nonappendaged unicellular bacteria. In chambers where particulate growth predominated, the unicellular bacteria alone appeared to be the primary agents of iron oxidation. These results provide the first clear evidence that the “iron bacteria” commonly found associated with neutral-pH iron seeps are responsible for most of the iron oxidation

  19. Further evaluation of the CSNI separate effect test activity

    SciTech Connect

    D`Auria, F.; Aksan, S.N.; Glaeser, H.

    1995-09-01

    An internationally agreed Separate Effect Test (SET) Validation Matrix for the thermalhydraulic system codes has been established by a subgroup of the Task Group on Thermalhydraulic System Behaviour as requested by OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) Principal Working Group No. 2 on Coolant System Behavior. The construction of such matrix constituted an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data to select for code validation. As a final result, 67 phenomena have been identified and characterized, roughly 200 facilities have been considered and more than 1000 experiments have been selected as useful for the validation of the codes. The objective of the present paper is to provide additional evaluation of the obtained data base and to supply an a-posteriori judgement in relation to (a) the data base adequacy, (b) the phenomenon, and (c) the need for additional experiments. This has been provided independently by each of the authors. The main conclusions are that large amount of data are available for certain popular phenomena e.g. heat transfer, but data are severely lacking in more esoteric areas e.g. for characterizing phenomena such as parallel channel instability and boron mixing and transport.

  20. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.

    1999-06-22

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  1. Surface Wave Simulation and Processing with MatSeis

    SciTech Connect

    THOMPSON,BEVERLY D.; CHAEL,ERIC P.; YOUNG,CHRISTOPHER J.; WALTER,WILLIAM R.; PASYANOS,MICHAEL E.

    2000-08-07

    In order to exploit the information on surface wave propagation that is stored in large seismic event datasets, Sandia and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories have developed a MatSeis interface for performing phase-matched filtering of Rayleigh arrivals. MatSeis is a Matlab-based seismic processing toolkit which provides graphical tools for analyzing seismic data from a network of stations. Tools are available for spectral and polarization measurements, as well as beam forming and f-k analysis with array data, to name just a few. Additionally, one has full access to the Matlab environment and any functions available there. Previously the authors reported the development of new MatSeis tools for calculating regional discrimination measurements. The first of these performs Lg coda analysis as developed by Mayeda and coworkers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A second tool measures regional phase amplitude ratios for an event and compares the results to ratios from known earthquakes and explosions. Release 1.5 of MatSeis includes the new interface for the analysis of surface wave arrivals. This effort involves the use of regionalized dispersion models from a repository of surface wave data and the construction of phase-matched filters to improve surface wave identification, detection, and magnitude calculation. The tool works as follows. First, a ray is traced from source to receiver through a user-defined grid containing different group velocity versus period values to determine the composite group velocity curve for the path. This curve is shown along with the upper and lower group velocity bounds for reference. Next, the curve is used to create a phase-matched filter, apply the filter, and show the resultant waveform. The application of the filter allows obscured Rayleigh arrivals to be more easily identified. Finally, after screening information outside the range of the phase-matched filter, an inverse version of the filter is applied to obtain a

  2. Primary production and respiration of hypersaline microbial mats as a response for high and low CO2 availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bento, L.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Nielsen, L. P.

    2012-09-01

    Here we report a time series of experiments performed in a microcosm to test the response of hypersaline microbial mats to diverse atmospheric CO2 conditions. Different from most part of the literature, our study used a sample chamber were carbon dioxide concentration was controlled. Our aim was to test the effect of different atmospheric CO2 conditions in benthic gross and net primary production, and respiration. This study showed for the first time to our knowledge absolute carbon limitation in a microbial mat. Oxygen concentration profile varied from a flattened shape to almost linear when atmospheric CO2 at the chamber reached 0 ppm, with NPP reaching 0 nmol cm-3 s-1 throughout most part of the profile. In this conditions sediment community respiration represented 100% of GPP. Extreme close coupling between primary production and respiration in microbial mats can be even self-sustainable in environments with temporally no atmospheric CO2 available. When submitted to even high CO2 concentrations (550 ppm), our sample showed a characteristic shape that indicate limitation composed by a more rectilinear oxygen profile, and NPP peaks mainly restricted to deeper layers. Therefore, we suggest that phototrophic communities in aquatic shallow ecosystems can be carbon limited. This limitation could be common especially in ecosystems submitted to variable water depth conditions, like coastal lagoons and intertidal sediments.

  3. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Cold Weather On-road Testing of the Chevrolet Volt

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, John

    2015-03-01

    This report details cold weather on-road testing of a Chevrolet Volt. It quantifies changes in efficiency and electric range as ambient temperature changes. It will be published to INL's AVTA website as an INL technical report and will be accessible to the general public.

  4. Mutagenic activity of isoxazolylnaphthoquinoneimines assayed by micronucleus bone marrow test.

    PubMed

    Sicardi, S M; Ferrato, E

    1995-05-01

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate the ability of various quinoneimines to induce micronuclei in bone marrow cells as a measure of their genotoxicity. Accordingly, 2-hydroxy-N-(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone-4-imine (I), its 2-acetyl derivative (II) and 2-[(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)amino]-N-(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)-1 ,4- naphthoquinone-4-imine (III), as well as two of their precursors, 2-hydroxynaphthoquinone (NQ-2-OH) and 3,4-dimethyl-5-aminoisoxazole (DMAI) were given by intraperitoneal injection at 5, 50, 100 and 200 mg/Kg doses to S.J.L. Swiss mice with 24 h sampling time. Compounds I and II displayed highly significant differences at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses (p < 0.01) and their mutagenic dose response curves correlated closely with an inverted U-shaped form whose interpretation is still the subject of controversy. NQ-2-OH only produced a significant increase in micronucleus frequency at 50 mg/kg, whereas no mutagenic activity was found for compound III and DMAI at the doses assayed. At 50 mg/kg the order of relative mutagenic potencies was I > II > NQ-2-OH. Mechanisms advanced to explain loss of drug activity at high doses include capture saturation, enzymatic induction during metabolism and participation of an independent defense system. PMID:7753107

  5. Pilot Testing of the Pathway Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Christopher M.; Murphy, Sytil K.; Zollman, Dean A.; Christel, Michael; Stevens, Scott

    2010-10-01

    We present an initial analysis of data taken to test the technical functionality and student usability of an interactive synthetic tutoring system administered online. The system allows students to ask questions and receive prerecorded video responses from knowledgeable tutors in real-time. It logs student interactions with a timestamp and username to generate a time-resolved picture of students' use of the system. The tutoring interaction is structured by lessons covering Newton's laws. Time on-task estimates indicate that students spent about 2.5 hours working through our materials, about as much as intended. Data show students' reluctance to query the tutor or that their focus is on other aspects of the system. This suggests modifications to the system that may encourage students to take advantage of its interactive capabilities. The system combines lessons, images, and video technology designed to emulate conversation to produce a supplemental teaching tool that may be useful for studying multimedia effects on learning.

  6. Rapid toxicity testing based on yeast respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenstricker, M.E. ); Meier, P.G.; Mancy, K.H. ); Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Rapid and economical techniques are needed to determine the effects of environmental contaminants. At present, the main methods to assess the impact of pollutants are based on chemical analysis of the samples. Invertebrate and vertebrate exposures have been used over the last two decades in assessing acute and chronic toxicities. However, these tests are labor intensive and require several days to complete. An alternative to whole organism exposure is to determine toxic effects in monocellular systems. Another approach for assessing toxicity is to monitor sensitive, nonspecific, subcellular target sites such as mitochondria. Changes in mitochondrial function which could indicate a toxic effect can be demonstrated readily after addition of a foreign substance. In initial assessments of various chemicals, rat liver mitochondria (RLM) were evaluated as a biological sensor of toxicity. False toxicity assessments will result if these ions are present even though they are generally considered nontoxic. Because of these disadvantages, an alternative mitochondrial system, such as found in bakers yeast, was evaluated.

  7. Training traditional birth attendants to use misoprostol and an absorbent delivery mat in home births.

    PubMed

    Prata, Ndola; Quaiyum, Md Abdul; Passano, Paige; Bell, Suzanne; Bohl, Daniel D; Hossain, Shahed; Azmi, Ashrafi Jahan; Begum, Mohsina

    2012-12-01

    A 50-fold disparity in maternal mortality exists between high- and low-income countries, and in most contexts, the single most common cause of maternal death is postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). In Bangladesh, as in many other low-income countries, the majority of deliveries are conducted at home by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) or family members. In the absence of skilled birth attendants, training TBAs in the use of misoprostol and an absorbent delivery mat to measure postpartum blood loss may strengthen the ability of TBAs to manage PPH. These complementary interventions were tested in operations research among 77,337 home births in rural Bangladesh. The purpose of this study was to evaluate TBAs' knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, and changes in attitudes and practices related to PPH management in home births after undergoing training on the use of misoprostol and the blood collection delivery mat. We conclude that the training was highly effective and that the two interventions were safely and correctly used by TBAs at home births. Data on TBA practices indicate adherence to protocol, and 18 months after the interventions were implemented, TBA knowledge retention remained high. This program strengthens the case for community-based use of misoprostol and warrants consideration of this intervention as a potential model for scale-up in settings where complete coverage of skilled birth attendants (SBAs) remains a distant goal. PMID:22921713

  8. Earth's Earliest Ecosystems in the Classroom: The Use of Microbial Mats to Teach General Principles in Microbial Ecology, and Scientific Inquiry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beboutl, Brad M.; Bucaria, Robin

    2004-01-01

    Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communities on earth, and may also be useful models for the search for life elsewhere. They are centrally important to Astrobiology. In this lecture, we will present an introduction to microbial mats, as well as an introduction to our web-based educational module on the subject of microbial ecology, featuring living mats maintained in a mini "Web Lab" complete with remotely-operable instrumentation. We have partnered with a number of outreach specialists in order to produce an informative and educational web-based presentation, aspects of which will be exported to museum exhibits reaching a wide audience. On our web site, we will conduct regularly scheduled experimental manipulations, linking the experiments to our research activities, and demonstrating fundamental principles of scientific research.

  9. The effect of the 4MAT learning model on the achievement and motivation of 7th grade students on the subject of particulate nature of matter and an examination of student opinions on the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, İdris; Bılgın, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background:Many researchers agree that students, especially primary students, have learning difficulties on the 'Particulate Nature of Matter' unit. One reason for this difficulty is not considering individual differences for teaching science. In 4MAT model learning, environment is arranged according to individual differences. Purpose:The purpose of this study is to examine (1) the effects of the 4MAT learning model on the7th grade students' academic achievement and motivation on the 'Particulate Nature of Matter' unit and (2) identify student opinions on the 4MAT model. Sample:The sample consists of 235 students (115 experimental, 120 control) in Turkey. Design and methods:Experimental groups were instructed with the 4MAT model while control groups were instructed with a traditional method. Achievement Test (AchToM) and Motivation Scale (MotScl) were administered to students as pre- and post-tests. Moreover, the opinions of students in the experimental groups on the 4MAT model were ascertained through open-ended questions after the application. Results:According to independent t-test results, statistical difference in favour of the experimental groups was detected between the post-AchToM (ES = 1.43; p < .0001) and post-MotScl (ES = 0.32; p < .05) scores. According to data obtained from the questionnaire, the application of the 4MAT model increases student motivation and participation in the lesson, lessons are more amusing and enjoyable, and the self-confidence of the students increases. Besides these positive opinions, however, a few students stated that the method took too much time, they were not motivated and it did not help them in understanding the subject. Conclusions:The 4MAT model is more effective than traditional method in terms of increasing achievement and motivation. The model takes all learners into account. Thus, the teacher or educator should use the 4MAT model to ensure all students' learning in their classroom.

  10. Synchronous droplets as a test bed for pulsatory active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsikis, Georgios; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    Collective behavior in many-body systems has been studied extensively focusing on a wide range of interacting entities including: flocking animals, sedimenting particles and microfluidic droplets among others. Here, we propose an experimental platform to explore an oscillatory active fluid with synchronous ferrofluid droplets immersed in an immiscible carrier fluid in a Hele-Shaw configuration. The droplets are organized and actuated on a 2-D uniform grid through application of a precessive magnetic field. The state of our system is dependent on three parameters: the grid occupancy with fluid droplets, the grid geometry and the magnetic field. We study the long range orientational order of our system over a range of those parameters by tracking the motion of the droplets and analyzing the PIV data of the carrier fluid flow. Numerical simulations are juxtaposed with experimental data for prediction of the system's behavior.

  11. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation.

    PubMed

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J; Tivey, Margaret K; Biddle, Jennifer F; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G; Lever, Mark A; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B; Mendlovitz, Howard P; MacGregor, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region.

  12. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G.; Lever, Mark A.; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B.; Mendlovitz, Howard P.; MacGregor, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region. PMID:26925032

  13. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation.

    PubMed

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J; Tivey, Margaret K; Biddle, Jennifer F; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G; Lever, Mark A; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B; Mendlovitz, Howard P; MacGregor, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region. PMID:26925032

  14. Classroom Activity Connections: Demonstrating Various Flame Tests Using Common Household Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Bruce W.; Hasbrouck, Scott; Smith, Jordan; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    In "JCE" Activity #67, "Flame Tests: Which Ion Causes the Color?", Michael Sanger describes how to conduct flame tests with household items. We have used this activity in outreach settings, and have extended it in a variety of ways. For example, we have demonstrated large-scale strontium (red), copper (green), and carbon (blue) flames using only…

  15. DD3MAT - a code for yield criteria anisotropy parameters identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, P. D.; Carvalho, P. D.; Alves, J. L.; Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the main strategies and algorithms adopted in the DD3MAT inhouse code, specifically developed for identifying the anisotropy parameters. The algorithm adopted is based on the minimization of an error function, using a downhill simplex method. The set of experimental values can consider yield stresses and r -values obtained from in-plane tension, for different angles with the rolling direction (RD), yield stress and r -value obtained for biaxial stress state, and yield stresses from shear tests performed also for different angles to RD. All these values can be defined for a specific value of plastic work. Moreover, it can also include the yield stresses obtained from in-plane compression tests. The anisotropy parameters are identified for an AA2090-T3 aluminium alloy, highlighting the importance of the user intervention to improve the numerical fit.

  16. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  17. Characterization of carbon nanofiber mats produced from electrospun lignin-g-polyacrylonitrile copolymer.

    PubMed

    Youe, Won-Jae; Lee, Soo-Min; Lee, Sung-Suk; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Yong Sik

    2016-01-01

    The graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) onto methanol-soluble kraft lignin (ML) was achieved through a two-step process in which AN was first polymerized with an α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile initiator, followed by radical coupling with activated ML. A carbon nanofiber material was obtained by electrospinning a solution of this copolymer in N,N-dimethylformamide, then subjecting it to a heat treatment including thermostabilization at 250°C and subsequent carbonization at 600-1400°C. Increasing the carbonization temperature was found to increase the carbon content of the resulting carbon nanofibers from 70.5 to 97.1%, which had the effect of increasing their tensile strength from 35.2 to 89.4 MPa, their crystallite size from 13.2 to 19.1 nm, and their electrical conductivity from ∼0 to 21.3 Scm(-1). The morphology of the mats, in terms of whether they experienced beading or not, was found to be dependent on the concentration of the initial electrospinning solution. From these results, it is proposed that these mats could provide the basis for a new class of carbon fiber material.

  18. Characterization of carbon nanofiber mats produced from electrospun lignin-g-polyacrylonitrile copolymer.

    PubMed

    Youe, Won-Jae; Lee, Soo-Min; Lee, Sung-Suk; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Yong Sik

    2016-01-01

    The graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) onto methanol-soluble kraft lignin (ML) was achieved through a two-step process in which AN was first polymerized with an α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile initiator, followed by radical coupling with activated ML. A carbon nanofiber material was obtained by electrospinning a solution of this copolymer in N,N-dimethylformamide, then subjecting it to a heat treatment including thermostabilization at 250°C and subsequent carbonization at 600-1400°C. Increasing the carbonization temperature was found to increase the carbon content of the resulting carbon nanofibers from 70.5 to 97.1%, which had the effect of increasing their tensile strength from 35.2 to 89.4 MPa, their crystallite size from 13.2 to 19.1 nm, and their electrical conductivity from ∼0 to 21.3 Scm(-1). The morphology of the mats, in terms of whether they experienced beading or not, was found to be dependent on the concentration of the initial electrospinning solution. From these results, it is proposed that these mats could provide the basis for a new class of carbon fiber material. PMID:26459170

  19. Micromorphological characterization and lithification of microbial mats from the Ebro Delta (Spain).

    PubMed

    Wierzchos, Jacek; Berlanga, Mercedes; Ascaso, Carmen; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2006-12-01

    The structural organization of microbial mats from the Ebro Delta (Spain) and their accretion and partial lithification processes were explored using scanning electron microscopy in back-scattered electron mode and low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. Two differentiated zones were distinguished in a transverse section of a fragment taken from the mat at a depth of 2.5 mm. The first consisted of an upper layer in which the dominant microorganisms, Microcoleus spp., actively grew in an embedded slack matrix of exopolysaccharides. Microcoleus filaments were oriented parallel to the surface and to each other, with filaments below arranged perpendicularly to one another but without crossing. Most of the minerals present were allochthonous grains of calcium phosphate biocorroded by cyanobacteria. The second zone was below a depth of 1 mm and made up of accretion layers with large deposits of calcium carbonate and smaller amounts of calcium phosphate of biological origin. The predominance of a particular type of mineral precipitation with a characteristic external shape and/or texture within a zone, e.g., sponge-like deposits of calcium phosphate, appears to depend on the taxa of the prevailing microorganisms.

  20. Phototrophic phylotypes dominate mesothermal microbial mats associated with hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kimberly A; Feazel, Leah M; Robertson, Charles E; Fathepure, Babu Z; Wright, Katherine E; Turk-Macleod, Rebecca M; Chan, Mallory M; Held, Nicole L; Spear, John R; Pace, Norman R

    2012-07-01

    The mesothermal outflow zones (50-65°C) of geothermal springs often support an extensive zone of green and orange laminated microbial mats. In order to identify and compare the microbial inhabitants of morphologically similar green-orange mats from chemically and geographically distinct springs, we generated and analyzed small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons from six mesothermal mats (four previously unexamined) in Yellowstone National Park. Between three and six bacterial phyla dominated each mat. While many sequences bear the highest identity to previously isolated phototrophic genera belonging to the Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Chlorobi phyla, there is also frequent representation of uncultured, unclassified members of these groups. Some genus-level representatives of these dominant phyla were found in all mats, while others were unique to a single mat. Other groups detected at high frequencies include candidate divisions (such as the OP candidate clades) with no cultured representatives or complete genomes available. In addition, rRNA genes related to the recently isolated and characterized photosynthetic acidobacterium "Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum" were detected in most mats. In contrast to microbial mats from well-studied hypersaline environments, the mesothermal mats in this study accrue less biomass and are substantially less diverse, but have a higher proportion of known phototrophic organisms. This study provides sequences appropriate for accurate phylogenetic classification and expands the molecular phylogenetic survey of Yellowstone microbial mats.

  1. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, D.E.; Des Marais, D.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works located in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Included in the budget are measured rates of O[sub 2] production, sulfate reduction, and elemental exchange across the mat/brine interface, day and night, at various temperatures and times of the year. The authors infer from this data the various sinks for O[sub 2], as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. To summarize, although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O[sub 2] produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O[sub 2] that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O[sub 2] respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O[sub 2] respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Also, oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation, although anoxygenic photosynthesis may have been important at low light levels during some times of the year. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount. These mats are thus closely coupled systems where rapid rates of photosynthesis both require and fuel rapid rates of heterotrophic carbon oxidation. 43 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-08-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works located in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Included in the budget are measured rates of O 2 production, sulfate reduction, and elemental exchange across the mat/brine interface, day and night, at various temperatures and times of the year. We infer from this data the various sinks for O 2, as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. To summarize, although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O 2 produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O 2 that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O 2 respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O 2 respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Also, oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation, although anoxygenic photosynthesis may have been important at low light levels during some times of the year. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount. These mats are thus closely coupled systems where rapid rates of photosynthesis both require and fuel rapid rates of heterotrophic carbon oxidation.

  3. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    PubMed

    Canfield, D E; Des Marais, D J

    1993-08-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works located in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Included in the budget are measured rates of O2 production, sulfate reduction, and elemental exchange across the mat/brine interface, day and night, at various temperatures and times of the year. We infer from this data the various sinks for O2, as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. To summarize, although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O2 produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O2 that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O2 respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O2 respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Also, oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation, although anoxygenic photosynthesis may have been important at low light levels during some times of the year. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount. These mats are thus closely coupled systems where rapid rates of photosynthesis both require and fuel rapid rates of heterotrophic carbon oxidation.

  4. Anxiolytic activity of tenoten and diazepam depends on conditions in Vogel conflict test.

    PubMed

    Kheyfets, I A; Voronina, T A; Dugina, J L; Molodavkin, G M; Sergeeva, S A

    2011-07-01

    We compared two modifications of Vogel conflict test and assessed anxyolitic activity of two drugs: diazepam (benzodiazepine anxiolitic) and tenoten (ultra-low doses of antibodies to S-100 protein) in both modifications of the test. It was found that the intensity of anxiolitic effect of the drugs depends on the conditions of Vogel test.

  5. Fitness Testing in Physical Education--A Misdirected Effort in Promoting Healthy Lifestyles and Physical Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cale, Lorraine; Harris, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Physical fitness testing is commonplace within schools and the physical education (PE) curriculum, with advocates claiming one of the key purposes of testing to be the promotion of healthy lifestyles and physical activity. Despite this, much controversy has surrounded the fitness testing of young people. Purpose: This paper draws on…

  6. A color test for the convenient identification of an ingested surface activating agent.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naoko; Jamal, Mostofa; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tobiume, Tadashi; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Color tests are easy, simple and inexpensive methods for the qualitative identification of chemicals. A color test was applied to the stomach contents of a forensic autopsy case. The result of the test, using bromophenol blue reagent, indicated the ingestion of a commercial cleaning product containing a cationic surface activating agent. Our findings suggest that forensic investigators should consider the additives used in commercial chemical products, such as surface activating agents, when determining the cause of death. PMID:26419519

  7. Regulation of nif gene expression and the energetics of N2 fixation over the diel cycle in a hot spring microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Jensen, Sheila I; Brecht, Eric; Becraft, Eric D; Bateson, Mary M; Kilian, Oliver; Bhaya, Devaki; Ward, David M; Peters, John W; Grossman, Arthur R; Kühl, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation, a prokaryotic, O2-inhibited process that reduces N2 gas to biomass, is of paramount importance in biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. We analyzed the levels of nif transcripts of Synechococcus ecotypes, NifH subunit and nitrogenase activity over the diel cycle in the microbial mat of an alkaline hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. The results showed a rise in nif transcripts in the evening, with a subsequent decline over the course of the night. In contrast, immunological data demonstrated that the level of the NifH polypeptide remained stable during the night, and only declined when the mat became oxic in the morning. Nitrogenase activity was low throughout the night; however, it exhibited two peaks, a small one in the evening and a large one in the early morning, when light began to stimulate cyanobacterial photosynthetic activity, but O2 consumption by respiration still exceeded the rate of O2 evolution. Once the irradiance increased to the point at which the mat became oxic, the nitrogenase activity was strongly inhibited. Transcripts for proteins associated with energy-producing metabolisms in the cell also followed diel patterns, with fermentation-related transcripts accumulating at night, photosynthesis- and respiration-related transcripts accumulating during the day and late afternoon, respectively. These resul