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Sample records for activity wheel running

  1. Stereotypic wheel running decreases cortical activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Simon P.; Cui, Nanyi; McKillop, Laura E.; Gemignani, Jessica; Bannerman, David M.; Oliver, Peter L.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness is thought to gradually increase ‘sleep need' and influence subsequent sleep duration and intensity, but the role of specific waking behaviours remains unclear. Here we report the effect of voluntary wheel running during wakefulness on neuronal activity in the motor and somatosensory cortex in mice. We find that stereotypic wheel running is associated with a substantial reduction in firing rates among a large subpopulation of cortical neurons, especially at high speeds. Wheel running also has longer-term effects on spiking activity across periods of wakefulness. Specifically, cortical firing rates are significantly higher towards the end of a spontaneous prolonged waking period. However, this increase is abolished when wakefulness is dominated by running wheel activity. These findings indicate that wake-related changes in firing rates are determined not only by wake duration, but also by specific waking behaviours. PMID:27748455

  2. Running wheel activity restores MPTP-induced functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Anders; Stigsdotter, Ingels Maria; Hurtig, Anders; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice; Archer, Trevor

    2011-03-01

    Wheel-running and treadmill running physical exercise have been shown to alleviate parkinsonism in both laboratory and clinical studies. MPTP was administered to C57/BL6 mice using two different procedures: (a) administration of a double-dose regime (MPTP 2 × 20 or 2 × 40 mg/kg, separated by a 24-h interval), vehicle (saline 5 ml/kg) or saline (vehicle 2 × 5 ml/kg), and (b) administration of a single-dose weekly regime (MPTP 1 × 40 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle 1 × 5 ml/kg) repeated over 4 consecutive weeks. For each procedure, two different physical exercise regimes were followed: (a) after the double-dose MPTP regime, mice were given daily 30-min periods of wheel-running exercise over 5 consecutive days/week or placed in a cage in close proximity to the running wheels for 3 weeks. (b) Mice were either given wheel-running activity on 4 consecutive days (30-min periods) or placed in a cage nearby for 14 weeks. Behavioral testing was as follows: (a) after 3 weeks of exercise/no exercise, mice were tested for spontaneous motor activity (60 min) and subthreshold L-Dopa (5 mg/kg)-induced activity. (b) Spontaneous motor activity was measured on the fifth day during each of the each of the first 5 weeks (Tests 1-5), about 1 h before injections (first 4 weeks), and continued on the 5th days of the 6th to the 14th weeks (Tests 6-14). Subthreshold L-Dopa (5 mg/kg)-induced activity was tested on the 6th, 8th, 10th, 12th and 14th weeks. (b) Mice from the single-dose MPTP weekly regime were killed during the 15th week and striatal regions taken for dopamine analysis, whereas frontal and parietal cortex and hippocampus were taken for analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). It was shown that in both experiments, i.e., the double-dose regime and single-dose weekly regime of MPTP administration, physical activity attenuated markedly the MPTP-induced akinesia/hypokinesia in both the spontaneous motor activity and restored motor activity completely in subthreshold L

  3. Intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin decreases wheel running activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Yumiko; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Toda, Satomi; Taniguchi, Yasuko; Futami, Akari; Sato, Fukiko; Kuroda, Masashi; Sebe, Mayu; Tsutsumi, Rie; Harada, Nagakatsu; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Gotoh, Koro; Ueno, Masaki; Nakaya, Yutaka; Sakaue, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which voluntary exercise is regulated. In this study, we examined how the central nervous system regulates exercise. We used SPORTS rats, which were established in our laboratory as a highly voluntary murine exercise model. SPORTS rats showed lower levels of serum ghrelin compared with those of the parental line of Wistar rats. Intracerebroventricular and intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin decreased wheel-running activity in SPORTS rats. In addition, daily injection of the ghrelin inhibitor JMV3002 into the lateral ventricles of Wistar rats increased wheel-running activity. Co-administration of obestatin inhibited ghrelin-induced increases in food intake but did not inhibit ghrelin-induced suppression of voluntary exercise in rats. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) in the hypothalamus and hippocampus of SPORTS rats was not difference that in control rats. We created an arcuate nucleus destruction model by administering monosodium glutamate (MSG) to neonatal SPORTS rats. Injection of ghrelin into MSG-treated rats decreased voluntary exercise but did not increase food intake, suggesting that wheel-running activity is not controlled by the arcuate nucleus neurons that regulate feeding. These results provide new insights into the mechanism by which ghrelin regulates voluntary activity independent of arcuate nucleus neurons.

  4. Reinforcement value and substitutability of sucrose and wheel running: implications for activity anorexia.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David; Duncan, Ian D

    2006-09-01

    Choice between sucrose and wheel-running reinforcement was assessed in two experiments. In the first experiment, ten male Wistar rats were exposed to concurrent VI 30 s VI 30 s schedules of wheel-running and sucrose reinforcement. Sucrose concentration varied across concentrations of 2.5, 7.5, and 12.5%. As concentration increased, more behavior was allocated to sucrose and more reinforcements were obtained from that alternative. Allocation of behavior to wheel running decreased, but obtained wheel-running reinforcement did not change. Overall, the results suggested that food-deprived rats were sensitive to qualitative changes in food supply (sucrose concentration) while continuing to defend a level of physical activity (wheel running). In the second study, 15 female Long Evans rats were exposed to concurrent variable ratio schedules of sucrose and wheel-running, wheel-running and wheel-running, and sucrose and sucrose reinforcement. For each pair of reinforcers, substitutability was assessed by the effect of income-compensated price changes on consumption of the two reinforcers. Results showed that, as expected, sucrose substituted for sucrose and wheel running substituted for wheel running. Wheel running, however, did not substitute for sucrose; but sucrose partially substituted for wheel running. We address the implications of the interrelationships of sucrose and wheel running for an understanding of activity anorexia.

  5. Running Wheel for Earthworms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. Jeffrey; Johnson, Brandon A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the construction and use of a running wheel responsive to the movement of the earthworm. The wheel employs readily available, inexpensive components and is easily constructed. Movement of the wheel can be monitored visually or via standard behavioral laboratory computer interfaces. Examples of data are presented, and possibilities for use in the teaching classroom are discussed. PMID:27385934

  6. Running-wheel activity and body composition in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Gattermann, Rolf; Weinandy, René; Fritzsche, Peter

    2004-09-15

    Running wheels are frequently used in behavioural and physiological experiments. The function of wheel-running activity in laboratory animals is controversial. In the present long-term study, the influence of this activity was evaluated in male golden hamsters over a period of 52 weeks. Four months after the start of the experiment, hamsters with access to running wheels were significantly heavier than those without these wheels. In addition, food consumption nearly doubled. The absolute values of fat-free mass (FFM), total body water (TBW) and crude fat mass (CFM) increased. However, in contrast to these absolute differences, the relative values were never different and general body composition was therefore unaffected by running-wheel activity. Different organ masses were established for absolute values of kidneys, testes and epididymis; possible effects on reproduction are discussed. The present data indicating improved physical condition leads to the assumption that a running wheel is a useful enrichment, enhancing animal welfare in the golden hamster.

  7. Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running in the mouse is used to assess physical performance and endurance and to model exercise training as a way to enhance health. Wheel running is a voluntary activity in contrast to other experimental exercise models in mice, which rely on aversive stimuli to force active movement. The basic protocol consists of allowing mice to run freely on the open surface of a slanted plastic saucer-shaped wheel placed inside a standard mouse cage. Rotations are electronically transmitted to a USB hub so that frequency and rate of running can be captured to a software program for data storage and analysis for variable time periods. Mice are individually housed so that accurate recordings can be made for each animal. Factors such as mouse strain, gender, age, and individual motivation, which affect running activity, must be considered in the design of experiments using voluntary wheel running. PMID:26629772

  8. Wheel running in the wild.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Johanna H; Robbers, Yuri

    2014-07-07

    The importance of exercise for health and neurogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Wheel running is often used in the laboratory for triggering enhanced activity levels, despite the common objection that this behaviour is an artefact of captivity and merely signifies neurosis or stereotypy. If wheel running is indeed caused by captive housing, wild mice are not expected to use a running wheel in nature. This however, to our knowledge, has never been tested. Here, we show that when running wheels are placed in nature, they are frequently used by wild mice, also when no extrinsic reward is provided. Bout lengths of running wheel behaviour in the wild match those for captive mice. This finding falsifies one criterion for stereotypic behaviour, and suggests that running wheel activity is an elective behaviour. In a time when lifestyle in general and lack of exercise in particular are a major cause of disease in the modern world, research into physical activity is of utmost importance. Our findings may help alleviate the main concern regarding the use of running wheels in research on exercise.

  9. Improved Infrared-Sensing Running Wheel Systems with an Effective Exercise Activity Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Wen; Chang, Ching-Ping; Chang, Wen-Ying; Chang, Shin-Chieh; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Yang, Chin-Lung

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an infrared-sensing running wheel (ISRW) system for the quantitative measurement of effective exercise activity in rats. The ISRW system provides superior exercise training compared with commercially available traditional animal running platforms. Four infrared (IR) light-emitting diode/detector pairs embedded around the rim of the wheel detect the rat’s real-time position; the acrylic wheel has a diameter of 55 cm and a thickness of 15 cm, that is, it is larger and thicker than traditional exercise wheels, and it is equipped with a rubber track. The acrylic wheel hangs virtually frictionless, and a DC motor with an axially mounted rubber wheel, which has a diameter of 10 cm, drives the acrylic wheel from the outer edge. The system can automatically train rats to run persistently. The proposed system can determine effective exercise activity (EEA), with the IR sensors (which are connected to a conventional PC) recording the rat exercise behavior. A prototype of the system was verified by a hospital research group performing ischemic stroke experiments on rats by considering middle cerebral artery occlusion. The experimental data demonstrated that the proposed system provides greater neuroprotection in an animal stroke model compared with a conventional treadmill and a motorized running wheel for a given exercise intensity. The quantitative exercise effectiveness indicator showed a 92% correlation between an increase in the EEA and a decrease in the infarct volume. This indicator can be used as a noninvasive and objective reference in clinical animal exercise experiments. PMID:25875841

  10. Improved infrared-sensing running wheel systems with an effective exercise activity indicator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Wen; Chang, Ching-Ping; Chang, Wen-Ying; Chang, Shin-Chieh; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Yang, Chin-Lung

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an infrared-sensing running wheel (ISRW) system for the quantitative measurement of effective exercise activity in rats. The ISRW system provides superior exercise training compared with commercially available traditional animal running platforms. Four infrared (IR) light-emitting diode/detector pairs embedded around the rim of the wheel detect the rat's real-time position; the acrylic wheel has a diameter of 55 cm and a thickness of 15 cm, that is, it is larger and thicker than traditional exercise wheels, and it is equipped with a rubber track. The acrylic wheel hangs virtually frictionless, and a DC motor with an axially mounted rubber wheel, which has a diameter of 10 cm, drives the acrylic wheel from the outer edge. The system can automatically train rats to run persistently. The proposed system can determine effective exercise activity (EEA), with the IR sensors (which are connected to a conventional PC) recording the rat exercise behavior. A prototype of the system was verified by a hospital research group performing ischemic stroke experiments on rats by considering middle cerebral artery occlusion. The experimental data demonstrated that the proposed system provides greater neuroprotection in an animal stroke model compared with a conventional treadmill and a motorized running wheel for a given exercise intensity. The quantitative exercise effectiveness indicator showed a 92% correlation between an increase in the EEA and a decrease in the infarct volume. This indicator can be used as a noninvasive and objective reference in clinical animal exercise experiments.

  11. Recording and analysis of circadian rhythms in running-wheel activity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2013-01-24

    When rodents have free access to a running wheel in their home cage, voluntary use of this wheel will depend on the time of day. Nocturnal rodents, including rats, hamsters, and mice, are active during the night and relatively inactive during the day. Many other behavioral and physiological measures also exhibit daily rhythms, but in rodents, running-wheel activity serves as a particularly reliable and convenient measure of the output of the master circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In general, through a process called entrainment, the daily pattern of running-wheel activity will naturally align with the environmental light-dark cycle (LD cycle; e.g. 12 hr-light:12 hr-dark). However circadian rhythms are endogenously generated patterns in behavior that exhibit a ~24 hr period, and persist in constant darkness. Thus, in the absence of an LD cycle, the recording and analysis of running-wheel activity can be used to determine the subjective time-of-day. Because these rhythms are directed by the circadian clock the subjective time-of-day is referred to as the circadian time (CT). In contrast, when an LD cycle is present, the time-of-day that is determined by the environmental LD cycle is called the zeitgeber time (ZT). Although circadian rhythms in running-wheel activity are typically linked to the SCN clock, circadian oscillators in many other regions of the brain and body could also be involved in the regulation of daily activity rhythms. For instance, daily rhythms in food-anticipatory activity do not require the SCN and instead, are correlated with changes in the activity of extra-SCN oscillators. Thus, running-wheel activity recordings can provide important behavioral information not only about the output of the master SCN clock, but also on the activity of extra-SCN oscillators. Below we describe the equipment and methods used to record, analyze and display circadian locomotor activity rhythms in laboratory rodents.

  12. Recording and Analysis of Circadian Rhythms in Running-wheel Activity in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Michael; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    When rodents have free access to a running wheel in their home cage, voluntary use of this wheel will depend on the time of day1-5. Nocturnal rodents, including rats, hamsters, and mice, are active during the night and relatively inactive during the day. Many other behavioral and physiological measures also exhibit daily rhythms, but in rodents, running-wheel activity serves as a particularly reliable and convenient measure of the output of the master circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In general, through a process called entrainment, the daily pattern of running-wheel activity will naturally align with the environmental light-dark cycle (LD cycle; e.g. 12 hr-light:12 hr-dark). However circadian rhythms are endogenously generated patterns in behavior that exhibit a ~24 hr period, and persist in constant darkness. Thus, in the absence of an LD cycle, the recording and analysis of running-wheel activity can be used to determine the subjective time-of-day. Because these rhythms are directed by the circadian clock the subjective time-of-day is referred to as the circadian time (CT). In contrast, when an LD cycle is present, the time-of-day that is determined by the environmental LD cycle is called the zeitgeber time (ZT). Although circadian rhythms in running-wheel activity are typically linked to the SCN clock6-8, circadian oscillators in many other regions of the brain and body9-14 could also be involved in the regulation of daily activity rhythms. For instance, daily rhythms in food-anticipatory activity do not require the SCN15,16 and instead, are correlated with changes in the activity of extra-SCN oscillators17-20. Thus, running-wheel activity recordings can provide important behavioral information not only about the output of the master SCN clock, but also on the activity of extra-SCN oscillators. Below we describe the equipment and methods used to record, analyze and display circadian locomotor activity rhythms in laboratory

  13. Circadian wheel-running activity during withdrawal from chronic intermittent ethanol exposure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan W.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Robinson, Stacy L.; Richard, Gregory R.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is associated with affective-behavioral disturbances in both human alcoholics and in animal models. In general, these phenomena are potentiated by increased alcohol exposure duration and by prior withdrawal episodes. Previous studies have also reported locomotor hypoactivity during ethanol withdrawal in rats and mice, but only in novel test environments, not in the home-cage. In the present study, we examined the effects of withdrawal from chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure on the level and circadian periodicity of wheel-running activity in C57BL/6J mice. CIE treatment resulted in reductions in wheel-running activity relative to plain-air controls that persisted for about one week after withdrawal. Analysis of circadian waveforms indicated that reduced activity occurred throughout the night phase, but that daily activity patterns were otherwise unaltered. CIE failed to alter free-running circadian period or phase in animals maintained under constant darkness. These results show that ethanol withdrawal can result in locomotor hypoactivity even in the habitual, home-cage environment, and suggest that withdrawal-related reductions in wheel-running activity may reflect the specific motivational significance of this behavior. PMID:20682191

  14. Alterations in fear conditioning and amygdalar activation following chronic wheel running in rats.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Paul R; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Wilson, Marlene A; Fadel, Jim

    2006-06-01

    Several convergent lines of evidence point to the amygdala as a key site of plasticity underlying most forms of fear conditioning. Studies have shown that chronic physical activity, such as wheel running, can alter learning in a variety of contexts, including aversive conditioning. The ability of chronic wheel running (WR) to alter both behavioral correlates of fear conditioning and indices of amygdalar activation, however, has not been simultaneously assessed. Here, rats were given constant access to either free-turning or--as a control--locked (LC) running wheels in their home cages. After 8 weeks of housing under these conditions, animals were exposed to a series of shocks in a separate testing chamber. Twenty-four hours later, the animals were returned to the shock chamber and freezing behavior was measured as an indicator of contextual fear conditioning. The animals were then sacrificed and their brains processed for immunohistochemical detection of Fos to assess patterns of putative neuronal activation. WR rats spent significantly more time freezing than their LC counterparts upon return to the shock-paired context. The enhanced conditioned freezing response was most pronounced in animals showing high levels of nightly wheel running activity. WR animals also had significantly higher levels of neuronal activation, as indicated by Fos expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala, but less activation in the basolateral nucleus, compared to sedentary controls. These data demonstrate the ability of chronic physical activity to alter contextual fear conditioning and implicate the amygdala as a potential site of plasticity underlying this phenomenon.

  15. Effects of repeated blood samplings on locomotor activity, evasion and wheel-running activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Pfeil, R

    1988-01-01

    The effects of serial blood sampling on nocturnal locomotor activity, evasion, wheel-running activity and body mass were studied in male NMRI mice aged 7-8 weeks. The erythrocyte count, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentration at the beginning and end of the study showed no difference in group 1 (two samples per week, 0.08 ml each) while there was a significant decrease in the group 2 values (three samples per week, 0.08 ml each). The total amount of nocturnal locomotor activity decreased in the animals bled repeatedly while the periods with locomotor activity increased. These alterations appeared particularly after bleeding. In the test-group animals evasion showed a decrease compared with the untreated control animals, but there was no evidence of a relation to the timing of the bleedings.

  16. Reinforcement Value and Substitutability of Sucrose and Wheel Running: Implications for Activity Anorexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belke, Terry W.; Duncan, Ian D.; Pierce, W. David

    2006-01-01

    Choice between sucrose and wheel-running reinforcement was assessed in two experiments. In the first experiment, ten male Wistar rats were exposed to concurrent VI 30 s VI 30 s schedules of wheel-running and sucrose reinforcement. Sucrose concentration varied across concentrations of 2.5, 7.5, and 12.5%. As concentration increased, more behavior…

  17. Increased mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase protein and enzyme activity in rat epididymal fat upon cessation of wheel running.

    PubMed

    Kump, David S; Laye, Matthew J; Booth, Frank W

    2006-03-01

    Triacylglycerol synthesis in rat epididymal fat overshoots sedentary levels at 10, 29, and 53 h of physical inactivity after 21 days of wheel running. The purposes of the present study were to determine 1) whether this effect is also observed after an acute bout of physical activity and 2) what enzymatic changes might contribute to this effect. We show that more than one bout of physical activity, such as that which occurs with 21 days of wheel running, is necessary for palmitic acid incorporation into triacylglyceride (triglyceride synthesis) to overshoot sedentary values, which suggests that pretranslational mechanisms may be responsible for this overshoot effect. Ten hours after 21 days of wheel running, activity of the mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-1 (mtGPAT1) isoform, a key regulator of triacylglycerol synthesis, overshot sedentary values by 48% and remained higher than sedentary values at 29 and 53 h of reduced physical activity. The overshoot in mtGPAT1 activity was accompanied by an increase in mtGPAT protein level. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-binding protein level was higher in sedentary 29 h after 21 days of wheel running. AMP kinase-alpha Thr(172) phosphorylation was increased immediately after treadmill running, but decreased to sedentary values by 5 h after activity. Casein kinase-2alpha protein level and activity were unchanged. We conclude that an increase in mtGPAT protein might contribute to the overshoot in triacylglycerol synthesis.

  18. Wheel running, food intake, and body weight in male rats.

    PubMed

    Looy, H; Eikelboom, R

    1989-02-01

    The acquisition of wheel running, its effects on food intake and body weight, and the effects of wheel deprivation, were examined in male rats. Running increased during the first 15 days of access, then plateaued. When wheels were unlocked after 10 days of deprivation, running was reduced, but quickly recovered to original levels. Animals first given wheel access 49 days into the study ran little, with no increase over days. Food intake dropped each time with wheel access, but recovered to control levels over 10-14 days. Wheel deprivation resulted in a temporary hyperphagia. With wheel access, weight initially dropped and was then maintained at a reduced percentage of homecage-housed animals. In male rats wheel access appears to have temporary effects on food intake, and long term effects on weight. Marked differences in the activity of same-age rats suggest that wheel running is in part a function of housing history.

  19. Increased wheel-running activity in the genetically skeletal muscle fast-twitch fiber-dominant rats.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masataka; Nakano, Hiroshi; Higaki, Yasuki; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Katsuta, Shigeru; Kumagai, Shuzo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether genetic differences in muscle histochemical characteristics were related to the voluntary wheel-running activity level by using genetically fast-twitch fiber-dominant rats (FFDR) and control rats (CR). The rats were divided into four groups; sedentary CR (Sed-CR), wheel-running CR (WR-CR), sedentary FFDR (Sed-FFDR), and wheel-running FFDR (WR-FFDR). Wheel access was started at age 9 wk and lasted for 7 days. The FFDR showed a lower percentage of type I fibers of the deep portion of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and a higher percentage of both type IIX fibers of the gastrocnemius muscle and type IIA fibers of the soleus muscle compared with CR. A higher capillary density and smaller fiber cross-sectional area were also observed in FFDR. The daily running distance in WR-FFDR was higher than in WR-CR for each 7 days. The total running distance for 7 days in WR-FFDR was 3.2-fold higher than in WR-CR. On day 7 of the 7-day test, the total number of active 1-min intervals for 24 h, the average rpm when they were active, and the maximum rpm for any single 1-min period in the WR-FFDR were significantly higher than in the WR-CR (1.5-, 2.9-, and 2.0-fold, respectively). These results suggest that mechanical or physiological muscle characteristics may thus affect the wheel-running activity level.

  20. Molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity on skeletal muscle in late middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Russ, David W; Skelding, Mary B; Dugle, Janis E; Edens, Neile K

    2015-02-01

    We examined the molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity in late middle-aged male Sprague Dawley rats (16-17 months). Rats were assigned either continuous voluntary running wheel access for 8 weeks (RW+) or cage-matched without running wheel access (RW-). The 9 RW+ rats averaged 83 m/day (range: 8-163 m), yet exhibited both 84% reduced individual body weight gain (4.3 g vs. 26.3 g, P = 0.02) and 6.5% reduced individual average daily food intake (20.6 g vs. 22.0 g, P = 0.09) over the 8 weeks. Hindlimb muscles were harvested following an overnight fast. Muscle weights and myofiber cross-sectional area showed no difference between groups. Western blots of gastrocnemius muscle lysates with a panel of antibodies suggest that running wheel activity improved oxidative metabolism (53% increase in PGC1α, P = 0.03), increased autophagy (36% increase in LC3B-II/-I ratio, P = 0.03), and modulated growth signaling (26% increase in myostatin, P = 0.04). RW+ muscle also showed 43% increased glycogen phosphorylase expression (P = 0.04) and 45% increased glycogen content (P = 0.04). Metabolomic profiling of plantaris and soleus muscles indicated that even low-volume voluntary running wheel activity is associated with decreases in many long-chain fatty acids (e.g., palmitoleate, myristoleate, and eicosatrienoate) relative to RW- rats. Relative increases in acylcarnitines and acyl glycerophospholipids were also observed in RW+ plantaris. These data establish that even modest amounts of physical activity during late middle-age promote extensive metabolic remodeling of skeletal muscle.

  1. Molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity on skeletal muscle in late middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Sean M; Russ, David W; Skelding, Mary B; Dugle, Janis E; Edens, Neile K

    2015-01-01

    We examined the molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity in late middle-aged male Sprague Dawley rats (16–17 months). Rats were assigned either continuous voluntary running wheel access for 8 weeks (RW+) or cage-matched without running wheel access (RW−). The 9 RW+ rats averaged 83 m/day (range: 8–163 m), yet exhibited both 84% reduced individual body weight gain (4.3 g vs. 26.3 g, P = 0.02) and 6.5% reduced individual average daily food intake (20.6 g vs. 22.0 g, P = 0.09) over the 8 weeks. Hindlimb muscles were harvested following an overnight fast. Muscle weights and myofiber cross-sectional area showed no difference between groups. Western blots of gastrocnemius muscle lysates with a panel of antibodies suggest that running wheel activity improved oxidative metabolism (53% increase in PGC1α, P = 0.03), increased autophagy (36% increase in LC3B-II/-I ratio, P = 0.03), and modulated growth signaling (26% increase in myostatin, P = 0.04). RW+ muscle also showed 43% increased glycogen phosphorylase expression (P = 0.04) and 45% increased glycogen content (P = 0.04). Metabolomic profiling of plantaris and soleus muscles indicated that even low-volume voluntary running wheel activity is associated with decreases in many long-chain fatty acids (e.g., palmitoleate, myristoleate, and eicosatrienoate) relative to RW− rats. Relative increases in acylcarnitines and acyl glycerophospholipids were also observed in RW+ plantaris. These data establish that even modest amounts of physical activity during late middle-age promote extensive metabolic remodeling of skeletal muscle. PMID:25716928

  2. Intensive voluntary wheel running may restore circadian activity rhythms and improves the impaired cognitive performance of arrhythmic Djungarian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar; Schöttner, Konrad; Müller, Lisa; Wienke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are highly important not only for the synchronization of animals and humans with their periodic environment but also for their fitness. Accordingly, the disruption of the circadian system may have adverse consequences. A certain number of animals in our breeding stock of Djungarian hamsters are episodically active throughout the day. Also body temperature and melatonin lack 24-h rhythms. Obviously in these animals, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) as the central pacemaker do not generate a circadian signal. Moreover, these so-called arrhythmic (AR) hamsters have cognitive deficits. Since motor activity is believed to stabilize circadian rhythms, we investigated the effect of voluntary wheel running. Hamsters were bred and kept under standardized housing conditions with food and water ad libitum and a 14 L/10 D lighting regimen. AR animals were selected according to their activity pattern obtained by means of passive infrared motion detectors. In a first step, the daily activity behavior was investigated for 3 weeks each without and with running wheels. To estimate putative photic masking effects, hamsters were exposed to light (LPs) and DPs and also released into constant darkness for a minimum of 3 weeks. A novel object recognition (NOR) test was performed to evaluate cognitive abilities both before and after 3 weeks of wheel availability. The activity patterns of hamsters with low wheel activity were still AR. With more intense running, daily patterns with higher values in the dark time were obtained. Obviously, this was due to masking as LPs did suppress and DPs induced motor activity. When transferred to constant darkness, in some animals the daily rhythm disappeared. In other hamsters, namely those which used the wheels most actively, the rhythm was preserved and free-ran, what can be taken as indication of a reconstitution of circadian rhythmicity. Also, animals showing a 24-h activity pattern after 3 weeks of extensive wheel running were

  3. Comparative adaptations in oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers in a low voluntary wheel running rat model performing three levels of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, Hayden W; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Ruegsegger, Greg; Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; McGinnis, Graham R; Quindry, John C; Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas N

    2015-01-01

    A unique polygenic model of rat physical activity has been recently developed where rats were selected for the trait of low voluntary wheel running. We utilized this model to identify differences in soleus and plantaris muscles of sedentary low voluntary wheel running rats and physically active low voluntary wheel running rats exposed to moderate amounts of treadmill training. Three groups of 28-day-old male Wistar rats were used: (1) rats without a running wheel (SEDENTARY, n = 7), (2) rats housed with a running wheel (WHEEL, n = 7), and (3) rats housed with a running wheel and exercised on the treadmill (5 days/week for 20 min/day at 15.0 m/min) (WHEEL + TREADMILL, n = 7). Animals were euthanized 5 weeks after the start of the experiment and the soleus and plantaris muscles were excised and used for analyses. Increases in skeletal muscle gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha and fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 in WHEEL + TREADMILL group were observed. Also, WHEEL + TREADMILL had higher protein levels of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreased levels of oxidative damage. Our data demonstrate that the addition of treadmill training induces beneficial muscular adaptations compared to animals with wheel access alone. Furthermore, our data expand our understanding of differential muscular adaptations in response to exercise in mitochondrial, antioxidant, and metabolic markers. PMID:26603455

  4. Comparative adaptations in oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers in a low voluntary wheel running rat model performing three levels of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Hayden W; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Ruegsegger, Greg; Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; McGinnis, Graham R; Quindry, John C; Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas N

    2015-11-01

    A unique polygenic model of rat physical activity has been recently developed where rats were selected for the trait of low voluntary wheel running. We utilized this model to identify differences in soleus and plantaris muscles of sedentary low voluntary wheel running rats and physically active low voluntary wheel running rats exposed to moderate amounts of treadmill training. Three groups of 28-day-old male Wistar rats were used: (1) rats without a running wheel (SEDENTARY, n = 7), (2) rats housed with a running wheel (WHEEL, n = 7), and (3) rats housed with a running wheel and exercised on the treadmill (5 days/week for 20 min/day at 15.0 m/min) (WHEEL + TREADMILL, n = 7). Animals were euthanized 5 weeks after the start of the experiment and the soleus and plantaris muscles were excised and used for analyses. Increases in skeletal muscle gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha and fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 in WHEEL + TREADMILL group were observed. Also, WHEEL + TREADMILL had higher protein levels of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreased levels of oxidative damage. Our data demonstrate that the addition of treadmill training induces beneficial muscular adaptations compared to animals with wheel access alone. Furthermore, our data expand our understanding of differential muscular adaptations in response to exercise in mitochondrial, antioxidant, and metabolic markers.

  5. Wheel-running mitigates psychomotor sensitization initiation but not post-sensitization conditioned activity and conditioned place preference induced by cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Geuzaine, Annabelle; Tirelli, Ezio

    2014-04-01

    Previous literature suggests that physical exercise allowed by an unlimited access to a running wheel for several weeks can mitigate chronic neurobehavioral responsiveness to several addictive drugs in rodents. Here, the potential preventive effects of unlimited wheel-running on the initiation of psychomotor sensitization and the acquisition and extinction of conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by 10 mg/kg cocaine in C56BL/6J mice were assessed in two independent experiments. To this end, half of the mice were singly housed with a running wheel at 28 days of age for 10 weeks prior to psychopharmacological tests, during which housing conditions did not change, and the other half of mice were housed without running wheel. In Experiment 1, prior to initiating sensitization, psychomotor activity on the two first drug-free once-daily sessions was not affected by wheel-running. This was also found for the acute psychomotor-activating effect of cocaine on the first sensitization session. Psychomotor sensitization readily developed over the 9 following once-daily sessions in mice housed without wheel, whereas it was inhibited in mice housed with a wheel. However, that difference did not transfer to post-sensitization conditioned activity. In contrast with the sensitization results, mice housed with a wheel still expressed a clear-cut CPP which did not extinguish differently from that of the other group, a result in disaccord with previous studies reporting either an attenuating or an increasing effect of wheel-running on cocaine-induced conditioned reward. The available results together indicate that interactions between wheel-running and cocaine effects are far from being satisfactorily characterized.

  6. Effects of induced wheel running on the circadian activity rhythms of Syrian hamsters: entrainment and phase response curve.

    PubMed

    Reebs, S G; Mrosovsky, N

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide an example of nonsocial and nonphotic entrainment in Syrian hamsters, together with a corresponding phase response curve (PRC). Fourteen male hamsters were given 2-hr bouts of induced activity (mostly wheel running) at 23.83-hr intervals in constant darkness (DD). The activity onsets of 10 hamsters entrained to this manipulation, with no anticipatory activity present. After entrainment, the rhythms resumed free-running from a time 0.66-3.91 hr after the onset of the last bout of induced activity. Postentrainment free-running periods were shorter than pre-entrainment values. The PRC for 2-hr pulses of induced activity in DD revealed phase advances induced in some animals between circadian time (CT) 4 and CT 11 (approximately the last half of the hamsters' rest period), and delays between CT 23 and CT 3 and between CT 17 and CT 20. The CTs for phase advances are compatible with the phase angle differences observed between rhythm and zeitgeber at the end of entrainment. Many features of the results (not all animals entraining, PRC characteristics, lack of observable anticipation to the daily stimuli, phase relationship between zeitgeber and activity rhythms) are similar to those from a previous study on social entrainment in this species (Mrosovsky, 1988). These similarities reinforce the idea that induced activity and social zeitgebers act on activity rhythms via a common mechanism.

  7. Voluntary Running-Wheel Activity, Arterial Blood Gases, and Thermal Antinociception in Rats after 3 Buprenorphine Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine HCl (BUP) is a μ-opioid agonist used in laboratory rodents. New formulations of buprenorphine (for example, sustained-released buprenorphine [BUP SR], extended-release buprenorphine [BUP ER]) have been developed to extend the analgesic duration. In a crossover design, 8 adult rats were injected subcutaneously with either BUP, BUP SR, BUP ER, or saline, after which voluntary running-wheel activity, arterial blood gases, and thermal withdrawal latency were assessed. Wheel running was decreased at 24 h compared with baseline in all treatment groups but returned to baseline by 48 h. Arterial pH, HCO3–, and CO2 were not changed between groups or over time. However, arterial oxygen was lower than baseline in the BUP (–8 ± 2 mm Hg), BUP SR (–7 ± 1 mm Hg), and BUP ER (–17 ± 2 mm Hg) groups compared with saline controls (3 ± 2 mm Hg); the BUP ER group showed the greatest decrease when all time points were combined. BUP increased the withdrawal latency at 1 h (15% ± 3%), whereas BUP ER increased latencies at 4, 8, 12, and 48 h (35% ± 11%, 21% ± 7%, 26% ± 7%, and 22% ± 9%, respectively) and BUP SR prolonged latencies at 24, 48, and 72 h (15% ± 6%, 18% ± 5%, and 20% ± 8%, respectively). The duration of thermal analgesia varied between buprenorphine formulations, but all 3 formulations reduced voluntary-running activity at 24 h after injection and might cause hypoxemia in normal adult rats. PMID:27177564

  8. Chronic activity wheel running reduces the severity of kainic acid-induced seizures in the rat: possible role of galanin.

    PubMed

    Reiss, J I; Dishman, R K; Boyd, H E; Robinson, J K; Holmes, P V

    2009-04-17

    Studies in both humans and rodents suggest that exercise can be neuroprotective, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are still poorly understood. Three weeks of voluntary, physical activity in rats upregulates prepro-galanin messenger RNA levels in the locus coeruleus. Galanin is a neuropeptide extensively coexisting with norepinephrine that decreases neuronal hyperexcitability both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, exercise may diminish neural hyperexcitability through a galaninergic mechanism. The current experiments tested whether voluntary activity wheel running would protect against kainic acid-evoked seizures and whether galaninergic signaling is a necessary factor in this protection. In experiment 1, rats were given access to running wheels or remained sedentary for three weeks. After this period, rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 0, 7, 10 or 14 mg/kg kainic acid. Exercise decreased the severity of or eliminated seizure behaviors and hippocampal c-fos expression induced by kainic acid. In experiment 2, exercising or sedentary rats were injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) with 0.2 or 0.4 microg of kainic acid following either an injection of M-40 (a galanin receptor antagonist) or saline. Exercise decreased kainic acid-induced seizures at the 0.2 microg dose, and M-40 (6 nmol) decreased this effect. In contrast, there were no detectable differences between exercising and sedentary rats in behavior at the 0.4 microg dose. The results suggest that the protective effects of exercise against seizures are at least partially mediated by regulation of neural excitability through a process involving galanin.

  9. Pairings of a distinctive chamber with the aftereffect of wheel running produce conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Lett, B T; Grant, V L; Byrne, M J; Koh, M T

    2000-02-01

    Wheel running reinforces behavior that precedes it. Also, wheel running can produce activity anorexia, a marked suppression of feeding in food-restricted rats. Some authors propose that the activity anorexia effect is produced by activation of the same reward system that mediates the reinforcing effect. One hypothesis is that such activation persists after wheel running stops and results in a rewarding aftereffect that suppresses feeding. Alternatively, such activation may give rise to an opponent process, an aversive aftereffect that suppresses feeding. The method of place conditioning was used to test whether the aftereffect of wheel running is rewarding or aversive. Food-deprived rats received pairings of a distinctive chamber with the aftereffect of wheel running. In Experiment 1, 2 h in a running wheel followed by 30 min in a distinctive chamber produced conditioned place preference. In Experiment 2, 22-22.5 h in a running wheel was followed by 30 min in the chamber and then a 60-min feeding test. Wheel running suppressed feeding and produced conditioned place preference. The conditioned place preference indicates that the aftereffect of wheel running is reinforcing rather than aversive. This finding supports the idea that the activation of the reward system persists after wheel running stops, thereby suppressing food intake.

  10. 76. Credit FM. Detail showing belts running from water wheel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Credit FM. Detail showing belts running from water wheel to governor and from water wheel to tachometer (foreground). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  11. Selective pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor attenuates light and 8-OH-DPAT induced phase shifts of mouse circadian wheel running activity

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Jonathan; Yun, Sujin; Losee Olson, Susan; Turek, Fred; Bonaventure, Pascal; Dvorak, Curt; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have illustrated a reciprocal relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor may provide a crucial link between the two sides of this equation since the receptor plays a critical role in sleep, depression, and circadian rhythm regulation. To further define the role of the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential pharmacotherapy to correct circadian rhythm disruptions, the current study utilized the selective 5-HT7 antagonist JNJ-18038683 (10 mg/kg) in three different circadian paradigms. While JNJ-18038683 was ineffective at phase shifting the onset of wheel running activity in mice when administered at different circadian time (CT) points across the circadian cycle, pretreatment with JNJ-18038683 blocked non-photic phase advance (CT6) induced by the 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (3 mg/kg). Since light induced phase shifts in mammals are partially mediated via the modulation of the serotonergic system, we determined if JNJ-18038683 altered phase shifts induced by a light pulse at times known to phase delay (CT15) or advance (CT22) wheel running activity in free running mice. Light exposure resulted in a robust shift in the onset of activity in vehicle treated animals at both times tested. Administration of JNJ-18038683 significantly attenuated the light induced phase delay and completely blocked the phase advance. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor by JNJ-18038683 blunts both non-photic and photic phase shifts of circadian wheel running activity in mice. These findings highlight the importance of the 5-HT7 receptor in modulating circadian rhythms. Due to the opposite modulating effects of light resetting between diurnal and nocturnal species, pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT7 receptor in conjunction with bright light therapy may prove therapeutically beneficial by correcting the desynchronization of internal rhythms observed in depressed individuals. PMID:25642174

  12. Selective pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor attenuates light and 8-OH-DPAT induced phase shifts of mouse circadian wheel running activity.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Jonathan; Yun, Sujin; Losee Olson, Susan; Turek, Fred; Bonaventure, Pascal; Dvorak, Curt; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have illustrated a reciprocal relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor may provide a crucial link between the two sides of this equation since the receptor plays a critical role in sleep, depression, and circadian rhythm regulation. To further define the role of the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential pharmacotherapy to correct circadian rhythm disruptions, the current study utilized the selective 5-HT7 antagonist JNJ-18038683 (10 mg/kg) in three different circadian paradigms. While JNJ-18038683 was ineffective at phase shifting the onset of wheel running activity in mice when administered at different circadian time (CT) points across the circadian cycle, pretreatment with JNJ-18038683 blocked non-photic phase advance (CT6) induced by the 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (3 mg/kg). Since light induced phase shifts in mammals are partially mediated via the modulation of the serotonergic system, we determined if JNJ-18038683 altered phase shifts induced by a light pulse at times known to phase delay (CT15) or advance (CT22) wheel running activity in free running mice. Light exposure resulted in a robust shift in the onset of activity in vehicle treated animals at both times tested. Administration of JNJ-18038683 significantly attenuated the light induced phase delay and completely blocked the phase advance. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor by JNJ-18038683 blunts both non-photic and photic phase shifts of circadian wheel running activity in mice. These findings highlight the importance of the 5-HT7 receptor in modulating circadian rhythms. Due to the opposite modulating effects of light resetting between diurnal and nocturnal species, pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT7 receptor in conjunction with bright light therapy may prove therapeutically beneficial by correcting the desynchronization of internal rhythms observed in depressed individuals.

  13. [Differences of behavioral rhythms observed by flat cage and running-wheel cage in female rat].

    PubMed

    Shinoda, M; Miura, T; Tadokoro, S

    1988-10-01

    The ambulatory, wheel-running, and drinking activities were measured in Wistar-Imamichi strain female rats under 12 L:12 D condition (6:00-18:00), using Gundai type ambulo-drinkometer (for simultaneous measurements of ambulation and drinking) and wheel-drinkometer (for simultaneous measurements of wheel-running and drinking) to compare the rhythmicities of each behavioral activity. These apparatuses are able to measure the behavioral activities over a long period, successively and automatically. The circadian patterns of ambulatory activity had two large peaks at 21 or 24:00 and at 6:00 (acrophase). Contrary to the above results, the wheel-running activity exhibited clear mono-peak at 21:00 (acrophase). Thus, apparent differences of the pattern were observed between the two activities. However, ambulatory and wheel-running activities fluctuated showing 4-days rhythmicity, and both activities increased in estrus and proestrus stages, respectively. The circadian rhythms of drinking activities measured by both apparatuses showed almost same patterns with acrophases at 6:00, and 4-days rhythmicities were also observed and were characterized by remarkable decrease of activity in every proestrus stages. From these results, it is concluded that circadian pattern of ambulatory activity is different from that of wheel-running activity, but circadian patterns of drinking activities are stable regardless of different methods of the measurement. The ambulatory, wheel-running and drinking activities reflect the behavioral changes in sexual cycles.

  14. Effects of voluntary wheel running on heart rate, body temperature, and locomotor activity in response to acute and repeated stressor exposures in rats.

    PubMed

    Masini, Cher V; Nyhuis, Tara J; Sasse, Sarah K; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2011-05-01

    Stress often negatively impacts physical and mental health but it has been suggested that voluntary physical activity may benefit health by reducing some of the effects of stress. The present experiments tested whether voluntary exercise can reduce heart rate, core body temperature and locomotor activity responses to acute (novelty or loud noise) or repeated stress (loud noise). After 6 weeks of running-wheel access, rats exposed to a novel environment had reduced heart rate, core body temperature, and locomotor activity responses compared to rats housed under sedentary conditions. In contrast, none of these measures were different between exercised and sedentary rats following acute 30-min noise exposures, at either 85 or 98 dB. Following 10 weeks of running-wheel access, both groups displayed significant habituation of all these responses to 10 consecutive daily 30-min presentations of 98 dB noise stress. However, the extent of habituation of all three responses was significantly enhanced in exercised compared to sedentary animals on the last exposure to noise. These results suggest that in physically active animals, under some conditions, acute responses to stress exposure may be reduced, and response habituation to repeated stress may be enhanced, which ultimately may reduce the negative and cumulative impact of stress.

  15. Social dominance rank influences wheel running behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Pérez, Héctor; Sellings, Laurie; Grieder, Taryn; Díaz, José-Luis

    2009-07-03

    Dominance hierarchies within social groups determine resource distribution. Resources, such as food and access to mating partners, can act as reinforcers. The present study examined the effect of social rank on access to wheel running-a reinforcing behavior performed by laboratory animals. Mice were identified as dominant or subordinate and given access to a running wheel access under solitary or social conditions. In the solitary condition, subordinate and dominant mice spent equal amounts of time on the running wheel. In the social condition, when one wheel was present, subordinate mice spent less time on the wheel than did dominant mice. Conversely, when two wheels were present, subordinates spent more time on the wheel than did dominant mice. When mice were given 24h access to one running wheel in the social condition, dominant mice ran more than subordinates during the dark cycle. Subordinate mice did not compensate for the lack of running wheel access by schedule shifting. These results suggest that social rank influences access to reinforcers by behavioral interference rather than by social inhibition.

  16. Effect of Light/Dark Cycle on Wheel Running and Responding Reinforced by the Opportunity to Run Depends on Postsession Feeding Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belke, T. W.; Mondona, A. R.; Conrad, K. M.; Poirier, K. F.; Pickering, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Do rats run and respond at a higher rate to run during the dark phase when they are typically more active? To answer this question, Long Evans rats were exposed to a response-initiated variable interval 30-s schedule of wheel-running reinforcement during light and dark cycles. Wheel-running and local lever-pressing rates increased modestly during…

  17. Chronic running wheel activity attenuates the antinociceptive actions of morphine and morphine-6-glucouronide administration into the periaqueductal gray in rats.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Wendy Foulds; Kanarek, Robin B

    2006-04-01

    Chronic exercise in a running wheel increases baseline pain sensitivity while attenuating the antinociceptive effects of peripherally administered opiate agonists in laboratory rodents. To determine if these effects are due to exercise-induced changes in the central nervous system (CNS) or an artifact of exercise-induced alterations in peripheral physiology, the present study evaluated the antinociceptive actions of centrally administered opiate agonists in active and inactive female rats. Rats were implanted with cannula into the right periaqueductal gray (PAG) area of the midbrain. After the completion of the surgery, the animals were allowed ad libitum access to running wheels or housed in standard cages for three weeks. Pain sensitivity was measured on the tail flick test before and immediately following microinjections of either morphine (0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 microg/rat) or the more potent morphine metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) (0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 microg/rat). Baseline tail flick latencies were significantly shorter in active than in inactive rats. Additionally, active animals were less sensitive to the antinociceptive effects of morphine and M6G than inactive rats. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of the CNS in exercise-mediated alterations in pain sensitivity and opiate drug actions.

  18. The effects of chronic treadmill and wheel running on behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Paul R; Fulk, Laura J; Hand, Gregory A; Wilson, Marlene A

    2004-09-03

    In order to better understand the behavioral adaptations induced by physical activity, this set of experiments assessed the effects of two modes of running exercise on a battery of behavioral tests. The effects of 8 weeks of forced treadmill running and voluntary wheel running on behavior measures in the elevated plus maze, open field, social interaction and conditioned freezing paradigms were investigated. Eight weeks of treadmill running did not alter behavior in any test paradigm. Rats given unrestricted access to running wheels (WR) had a lower percent open arm time (6.0+/-2.3%) compared to locked wheel controls (LC) (20.7+/-5.7%) in the elevated plus maze. WR also showed decreased entries into center (0.2+/-0.2) and crossed fewer lines (61.0+/-14.9) in the open field compared to control groups. Both WR and LC groups showed increased social interaction; however, these differences are attributed to housing conditions. The effects of 4 weeks of wheel running on elevated plus maze and open field behavior were also investigated to address the possibility of a temporal effect of exercise on behavior. Four weeks of wheel running produced behavioral changes in the open field similar to those found at 8 weeks, but not in the elevated plus maze suggesting a temporal effect of wheel running on plus maze behavior. The behavioral adaptations found after 4 and 8 weeks of wheel running were not due solely to enriched environment and appear to be indicative of enhanced defensive behavior.

  19. Wheel-running reinforcement in free-feeding and food-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David

    2016-03-01

    Rats experiencing sessions of 30min free access to wheel running were assigned to ad-lib and food-deprived groups, and given additional sessions of free wheel activity. Subsequently, both ad-lib and deprived rats lever pressed for 60s of wheel running on fixed ratio (FR) 1, variable ratio (VR) 3, VR 5, and VR 10 schedules, and on a response-initiated variable interval (VI) 30s schedule. Finally, the ad-lib rats were switched to food deprivation and the food-deprived rats were switched to free food, as rats continued responding on the response-initiated VI 30-s schedule. Wheel running functioned as reinforcement for both ad-lib and food-deprived rats. Food-deprived rats, however, ran faster and had higher overall lever-pressing rates than free-feeding rats. On the VR schedules, wheel-running rates positively correlated with local and overall lever pressing rates for deprived, but not ad-lib rats. On the response-initiated VI 30s schedule, wheel-running rates and lever-pressing rates changed for ad-lib rats switched to food deprivation, but not for food-deprived rats switched to free-feeding. The overall pattern of results suggested different sources of control for wheel running: intrinsic motivation, contingencies of automatic reinforcement, and food-restricted wheel running. An implication is that generalizations about operant responding for wheel running in food-deprived rats may not extend to wheel running and operant responding of free-feeding animals.

  20. Locking and unlocking of running wheel affects circadian period stability differently in three inbred strains of rats.

    PubMed

    Kohler, M; Wollnik, F

    1998-08-01

    Running-wheel access has been shown to shorten the circadian period length (tau) of various mammalian species. Due to the close correlation between tau and the level of activity, running wheel-induced changes of the activity level are thought to be responsible for the observed changes in tau. In the present study, the influence of the running wheel on tau and the activity level was examined in three inbred strains of rats (ACI, BH, LEW). Four animals of each strain had free access to their running wheels, while the wheels of the other 4 animals of each strain were mechanically locked. These conditions were changed twice, so that each animal encountered both kinds of changes, that is, from a locked to an unlocked running wheel and vice versa. During the whole study, overall activity was measured by infrared detectors. Running-wheel access resulted in a significant increase of overall activity in strains LEW and ACI. However, significant changes of tau were observed only in LEW rats. These rats showed a significant shortening of tau after the second change of the housing conditions regardless of whether the wheel was locked or unlocked. Consequently, no causal relationship was found between changes of tau and running wheel-induced changes of overall activity. Instead, the results suggest that subtle environmental influences like locking or unlocking the running wheel affect tau in a strain-dependent manner, whereas changes in the activity level are neither necessary nor sufficient to induce changes of tau.

  1. Online measurement for surface defects of running wheel set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kaihua; Zhuang, Fei; Zhu, Feng; Ye, Ting

    2007-12-01

    Wheel set tread defects include scotching and flaking on wheel tread. The paper presents an online measuring method to detect wheel set defects based on optoelectronic technique while the train is running in low-speed within 5-10km/h. Line structure laser illuminates on the wheel tread. High speed CCD cameras were used to gather tread image. Digital image process technique is used to process the data. The measuring device is installed along the straight railway. When the vehicle is running in a limited speed, the devices placed on both sides of the railway can get depth, length and position of possibly existed wheel defects. The measuring accuracy of defects length was 1.0mm.

  2. Wheel running reduces high-fat diet intake, preference and mu-opioid agonist stimulated intake.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nu-Chu; Bello, Nicholas T; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-05-01

    The ranges of mechanisms by which exercise affects energy balance remain unclear. One potential mechanism may be that exercise reduces intake and preference for highly palatable, energy dense fatty foods. The current study used a rodent wheel running model to determine whether and how physical activity affects HF diet intake/preference and reward signaling. Experiment 1 examined whether wheel running affected the ability of intracerebroventricular (ICV) μ opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) to increase HF diet intake. Experiment 2 examined the effects of wheel running on the intake of and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. We also assessed the effects of wheel running and diet choice on mesolimbic dopaminergic and opioidergic gene expression. Experiment 1 revealed that wheel running decreased the ability of ICV DAMGO administration to stimulate HF diet intake. Experiment 2 showed that wheel running suppressed weight gain and reduced intake and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. Furthermore, the mesolimbic gene expression profile of wheel running rats was different from that of their sedentary paired-fed controls but similar to that of sedentary rats with large HF diet consumption. These data suggest that alterations in preference for palatable, energy dense foods play a role in the effects of exercise on energy homeostasis. The gene expression results also suggest that the hedonic effects of exercise may substitute for food reward to limit food intake and suppress weight gain.

  3. Effect of cage enrichment on the daily use of running wheels by Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Reebs, Stéphan G; Maillet, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Institutional animal care committees may one day require for the welfare of captive hamsters more floor space and the introduction of tunnels and toys. As hamsters are popular animal subjects in chronobiological research, and as clock phase is usually measured through running wheel activity, it is important to determine what effect cage enrichment might have on daily wheel use. Here the daily number of wheel revolutions, the daily duration of the running activity phase, the phase relationship between lights-off and onset of running activity, and the free-running period of circadian activity rhythms were measured in Syrian hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus, housed in single cages or in multiple cages linked by tunnels and supplied with commercial wooden toys. Free-running periodicity was not affected by cage enrichment. In multiple-cage systems, there were fewer daily revolutions, shorter wheel-running activity phases, and delayed running activity onsets. These effects, however, were small as compared to interindividual and week-to-week variation. They were statistically significant only under a light:dark cycle, not in constant darkness, and only when interindividual variation was eliminated through a paired design or when the number of cages was increased to five (the maximum tested). Daily wheel use is thus affected by cage enrichment, but only slightly.

  4. Voluntary wheel running modulates glutamate receptor subunit gene expression and stress hormone release in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Makatsori, A; Duncko, R; Schwendt, M; Moncek, F; Johansson, B B; Jezova, D

    2003-07-01

    Lewis rats that are known to be addiction-prone, develop compulsive running if they have access to running wheels. The present experiments were aimed 1) to evaluate the activation of stress systems following chronic and acute voluntary wheel running in Lewis rats by measurement of hormone release and gene expression of neuropeptides related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and 2) to test the hypothesis that wheel running as a combined model of addictive behavior and stress exposure is associated with modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in the ventral tegmental area. Voluntary running for three weeks but not for one night resulted in a rise in plasma corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels (p<0.05) compared to those in control rats. Principal component analysis revealed the relation between POMC gene expression in the intermediate pituitary and running rate. Acute exposure of animals to voluntary wheel running induced a significant decrease in alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA levels (p<0.01), while repeated voluntary physical activity increased levels of GluR1 mRNA in the ventral tegmentum (p<0.05). Neither acute nor chronic wheel running influenced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area. Thus, the present study revealed changes in AMPA receptor subunit gene expression in a reward-related brain structure as well as an activation of HPA axis in response to compulsive wheel running in Lewis rats. It may be suggested that hormones of HPA axis and glutamate receptors belong to the factors that substantiate higher vulnerability to addictive behavior.

  5. Wheel running decreases palatable diet preference in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Moody, Laura; Liang, Joy; Choi, Pique P; Moran, Timothy H; Liang, Nu-Chu

    2015-10-15

    Physical activity has beneficial effects on not only improving some disease conditions but also by preventing the development of multiple disorders. Experiments in this study examined the effects of wheel running on intakes of chow and palatable diet e.g. high fat (HF) or high sucrose (HS) diet in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Experiment 1 demonstrated that acute wheel running results in robust HF or HS diet avoidance in male rats. Although female rats with running wheel access initially showed complete avoidance of the two palatable diets, the avoidance of the HS diet was transient. Experiment 2 demonstrated that male rats developed decreased HF diet preferences regardless of the order of diet and wheel running access presentation. Running associated changes in HF diet preference in females, on the other hand, depended on the testing schedule. In female rats, simultaneous presentation of the HF diet and running access resulted in transient complete HF diet avoidance whereas running experience prior to HF diet access did not affect the high preference for the HF diet. Ovariectomy in females resulted in HF diet preference patterns that were similar to those in male rats during simultaneous exposure of HF and wheel running access but similar to intact females when running occurred before HF exposure. Overall, the results demonstrated wheel running associated changes in palatable diet preferences that were in part sex dependent. Furthermore, ovarian hormones play a role in some of the sex differences. These data reveal complexity in the mechanisms underlying exercise associated changes in palatable diet preference.

  6. VOLUNTARY WHEEL RUNNING ENHANCES CONTEXTUAL BUT NOT TRACE FEAR CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Kohman, Rachel A.; Clark, Peter J.; DeYoung, Erin K.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Venghaus, Christine E.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    Exercise improves performance on a number of hippocampus involved cognitive tasks including contextual fear conditioning, but whether exercise enhances contextual fear when the retention interval is longer than 1 day is not known. Also unknown is whether exercise improves trace conditioning, a task that requires the hippocampus to bridge the time interval between stimuli. Hence, 4-month-old male C57BL/6J mice were housed with or without running wheels. To assess whether hippocampal neurogenesis was associated with behavioral outcomes, during the initial ten days, mice received Bromodeoxyuridine to label dividing cells. After 30 days, one group of mice was trained in a contextual fear conditioning task. Freezing to context was assessed 1, 7, or 21 days post-training. A separate group was trained on a trace procedure, in which a tone and footshock were separated by a 15, 30, or 45 sec interval. Freezing to the tone was measured 24 hrs later in a novel environment, and freezing to training context was measured 48 hrs later. Running enhanced freezing to context when the retention interval was 1, but not 7 or 21 days. Running had no effect on trace conditioning even though runners displayed enhanced freezing to the training context 48 hrs later. Wheel running increased survival of new neurons in the hippocampus. Collectively, findings indicate that wheel running enhances cognitive performance on some tasks but not others and that enhanced neurogenesis is not always associated with improved performance on hippocampus tasks, one example of which is trace conditioning. PMID:21896289

  7. Relaxin-3 receptor (Rxfp3) gene knockout mice display reduced running wheel activity: implications for role of relaxin-3/RXFP3 signalling in sustained arousal.

    PubMed

    Hosken, Ihaia T; Sutton, Steven W; Smith, Craig M; Gundlach, Andrew L

    2015-02-01

    Anatomical and pharmacological evidence suggests the neuropeptide, relaxin-3, is the preferred endogenous ligand for the relaxin family peptide-3 receptor (RXFP3) and suggests a number of putative stress- and arousal-related roles for RXFP3 signalling. However, in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates exogenous relaxin-3 can activate other relaxin peptide family receptors, and the role of relaxin-3/RXFP3 signalling in specific brain circuits and associated behaviours in mice is not well described. In this study, we characterised the behaviour of cohorts of male and female Rxfp3 gene knockout (KO) mice (C57/B6J(RXFP3TM1/DGen)), relative to wild-type (WT) littermates to determine if this receptor KO strain has a similar phenotype to its ligand KO equivalent. Rxfp3 KO mice displayed similar performance to WT littermates in several acute behavioural paradigms designed to gauge motor coordination (rotarod test), spatial memory (Y-maze), depressive-like behaviour (repeat forced-swim test) and sensorimotor gating (prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle). Notably however, male and female Rxfp3 KO mice displayed robust and consistent (dark phase) hypoactivity on voluntary home-cage running wheels (∼20-60% less activity/h), and a small but significant decrease in anxiety-like behavioural traits in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box paradigms. Importantly, this phenotype is near identical to that observed in two independent lines of relaxin-3 KO mice, suggesting these phenotypes are due to the elimination of ligand or receptor and RXFP3-linked signalling. Furthermore, this behavioural characterisation of Rxfp3 KO mice identifies them as a useful experimental model for studying RXFP3-linked signalling and assessing the selectivity and/or potential off-target actions of RXFP3 agonists and antagonists, which could lead to an improved understanding of dysfunctional arousal in mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, insomnia and neurodegenerative

  8. Selection for increased voluntary wheel-running affects behavior and brain monoamines in mice.

    PubMed

    Waters, R Parrish; Pringle, R B; Forster, G L; Renner, K J; Malisch, J L; Garland, T; Swallow, J G

    2013-05-01

    Selective-breeding of house mice for increased voluntary wheel-running has resulted in multiple physiological and behavioral changes. Characterizing these differences may lead to experimental models that can elucidate factors involved in human diseases and disorders associated with physical inactivity, or potentially treated by physical activity, such as diabetes, obesity, and depression. Herein, we present ethological data for adult males from a line of mice that has been selectively bred for high levels of voluntary wheel-running and from a non-selected control line, housed with or without wheels. Additionally, we present concentrations of central monoamines in limbic, striatal, and midbrain regions. We monitored wheel-running for 8 weeks, and observed home-cage behavior during the last 5 weeks of the study. Mice from the selected line accumulated more revolutions per day than controls due to increased speed and duration of running. Selected mice exhibited more active behaviors than controls, regardless of wheel access, and exhibited less inactivity and grooming than controls. Selective-breeding also influenced the longitudinal patterns of behavior. We found statistically significant differences in monoamine concentrations and associated metabolites in brain regions that influence exercise and motivational state. These results suggest underlying neurochemical differences between selected and control lines that may influence the observed differences in behavior. Our results bolster the argument that selected mice can provide a useful model of human psychological and physiological diseases and disorders.

  9. Automated home cage observations as a tool to measure the effects of wheel running on cage floor locomotion.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Leonie; van den Bos, Ruud; Spruijt, Berry M

    2005-05-28

    This paper introduces automated observations in a modular home cage system as a tool to measure the effects of wheel running on the time distribution and daily organization of cage floor locomotor activity in female C57BL/6 mice. Mice (n = 16) were placed in the home cage system for 6 consecutive days. Fifty percent of the subjects had free access to a running wheel that was integrated in the home cage. Overall activity levels in terms of duration of movement were increased by wheel running, while time spent inside a sheltering box was decreased. Wheel running affected the hourly pattern of movement during the animals' active period of the day. Mice without a running wheel, in contrast to mice with a running wheel, showed a clear differentiation between novelty-induced and baseline levels of locomotion as reflected by a decrease after the first day of introduction to the home cage. The results are discussed in the light of the use of running wheels as a tool to measure general activity and as an object for environmental enrichment. Furthermore, the possibilities of using automated home cage observations for e.g. behavioural phenotyping are discussed.

  10. Developmental effects of wheel running on hippocampal glutamate receptor expression in young and mature adult rats.

    PubMed

    Staples, M C; Somkuwar, S S; Mandyam, C D

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the behavioral benefits associated with voluntary wheel running in rodents may be due to modulation of glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in learning and memory. However, the expression of the glutamatergic ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (GluN) in the hippocampus in response to chronic sustained voluntary wheel running has not yet been investigated. Further, the developmental effects during young and mature adulthood on wheel running output and GluN expression in hippocampal subregions has not been determined, and therefore is the main focus of this investigation. Eight-week-old and 16-week-old male Wistar rats were housed in home cages with free access to running wheels and running output was monitored for 4weeks. Wheel access was terminated and tissues from the dorsal and ventral hippocampi were processed for Western blot analysis of GluN subunit expression. Young adult runners demonstrated an escalation in running output but this behavior was not evident in mature adult runners. In parallel, young adult runners demonstrated a significant increase in total GluN (1 and 2A) subunit expression in the dorsal hippocampus (DH), and an opposing effect in the ventral hippocampus (VH) compared to age-matched sedentary controls; these changes in total protein expression were not associated with significant alterations in the phosphorylation of the GluN subunits. In contrast, mature adult runners demonstrated a reduction in total GluN2A expression in the DH, without producing alterations in the VH compared to age-matched sedentary controls. In conclusion, differential running activity-mediated modulation of GluN subunit expression in the hippocampal subregions was revealed to be associated with developmental effects on running activity, which may contribute to altered hippocampal synaptic activity and behavioral outcomes in young and mature adult subjects.

  11. Emotional consequences of wheel running in mice: which is the appropriate control?

    PubMed

    Dubreucq, Sarah; Marsicano, Giovanni; Chaouloff, Francis

    2011-03-01

    An overview of the literature on the emotional impacts of wheel running reveals contradictory findings. Among the hypotheses underlying such a discrepancy, that related to the different housing conditions of the controls, i.e., standard housing without any object or housing with blocked running wheels, merits attention. We addressed this point in C57Bl/6N mice by examining the consequences of chronic wheel running on anxiety, context fear recall, and behavioral despair compared either to standard control housing or to housing with blocked wheels. Compared to standard housing, wheel running proved anxiolytic while facilitating fear memory. On the other hand, wheel running increased behavioral despair but influenced neither anxiety nor fear memory when compared to housing with blocked wheels. This study suggests that investigations aimed at measuring the emotional consequences of wheel running should take into consideration the housing conditions of the controls to which are compared the runners.

  12. Simultaneous introduction of a novel high fat diet and wheel running induces anorexia.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, E T; Matheny, M; Strehler, K Y E; Shapiro, A; Cheng, K Y; Tümer, N; Scarpace, P J

    2012-02-28

    Voluntary wheel running (WR) is a form of physical activity in rodents that influences ingestive behavior. The present report describes an anorexic behavior triggered by the simultaneous introduction of a novel diet and WR. This study examined the sequential, compared with the simultaneous, introduction of a novel high-fat (HF) diet and voluntary WR in rats of three different ages and revealed a surprising finding; the simultaneous introduction of HF food and voluntary WR induced a behavior in which the animals chose not to eat although food was available at all times. This phenomenon was apparently not due to an aversion to the novel HF diet because introduction of the running wheels plus the HF diet, while continuing the availability of the normal chow diet did not prevent the anorexia. Moreover, the anorexia was prevented with prior exposure to the HF diet. In addition, the anorexia was not related to extent of WR but dependent on the act of WR. The introduction a HF diet and locked running wheels did not induce the anorexia. This voluntary anorexia was accompanied by substantial weight loss, and the anorexia was rapidly reversed by removal of the running wheels. Moreover, the HF/WR-induced anorexia is preserved across the age span despite the intrinsic decrease in WR activity and increased consumption of HF food with advancing age. The described phenomenon provides a new model to investigate anorexia behavior in rodents.

  13. Wheel running of kangaroo rats, Dipodomys merriami, as related to food deprivation and body composition.

    PubMed

    Dill, D B; Soholt, L F; Morris, J D

    1978-01-01

    Kangaroo rats deprived of food ran themselves to death in 48 h in wheel cages. Despite the loss of 14.5% of body weight the ratio of water to protein was the same after the run as it was in control rats. Metabolic measurements at rest and in the running wheel and weight loss in the 48-h run were used to estimate fuels used and water expended. Two-thirds of the initial amount of fat and 9% of the protein were metabolized. The terminal mean percentage of body fat was about twice that observed in rats trapped in the spring of 1967, when seed production was low: death in the 48-h run could not have been due to depletion of body fat alone. The powerful activity drive seen in hungary kangaroo rats presumably is intensified in dry years when food is scarce and may deplete their reserves enough to result in death from starvation.

  14. Erythropoietin elevates VO2,max but not voluntary wheel running in mice.

    PubMed

    Kolb, E M; Kelly, S A; Middleton, K M; Sermsakdi, L S; Chappell, M A; Garland, T

    2010-02-01

    Voluntary activity is a complex trait, comprising both behavioral (motivation, reward) and anatomical/physiological (ability) elements. In the present study, oxygen transport was investigated as a possible limitation to further increases in running by four replicate lines of mice that have been selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running and have reached an apparent selection limit. To increase oxygen transport capacity, erythrocyte density was elevated by the administration of an erythropoietin (EPO) analogue. Mice were given two EPO injections, two days apart, at one of two dose levels (100 or 300 microg kg(-1)). Hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), maximal aerobic capacity during forced treadmill exercise (VO2,max) and voluntary wheel running were measured. [Hb] did not differ between high runner (HR) and non-selected control (C) lines without EPO treatment. Both doses of EPO significantly (P<0.0001) increased [Hb] as compared with sham-injected animals, with no difference in [Hb] between the 100 microg kg(-1) and 300 microg kg(-1) dose levels (overall mean of 4.5 g dl(-1) increase). EPO treatment significantly increased VO2,max by approximately 5% in both the HR and C lines, with no dosexline type interaction. However, wheel running (revolutions per day) did not increase with EPO treatment in either the HR or C lines, and in fact significantly decreased at the higher dose in both line types. These results suggest that neither [Hb] per se nor VO2,max is limiting voluntary wheel running in the HR lines. Moreover, we hypothesize that the decrease in wheel running at the higher dose of EPO may reflect direct action on the reward pathway of the brain.

  15. Effects of Withdrawal from Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Vapor on the Level and Circadian Periodicity of Running-Wheel Activity in C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan W.; McCulley, Walter D.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol withdrawal is associated with behavioral and chronobiological disturbances that may persist during protracted abstinence. We previously reported that C57BL/6J (B6) mice show marked but temporary reductions in running-wheel activity, and normal free-running circadian rhythms, following a 4-day chronic intermittent ethanol vapor (CIE) exposure (16 hours of ethanol vapor exposure alternating with 8 hours of withdrawal). In the present experiments, we extend these observations in two ways: (1) by examining post-CIE locomotor activity in C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice, an inbred strain characterized by high sensitivity to ethanol withdrawal, and (2) by directly comparing the responses of B6 and C3H mice to a longer-duration CIE protocol. Methods In Experiment 1, C3H mice were exposed to the same 4-day CIE protocol used in our previous study with B6 mice (referred to here as the 1-cycle CIE protocol). In Experiment 2, C3H and B6 mice were exposed to three successive 4-day CIE cycles, each separated by 2 days of withdrawal (the 3-cycle CIE protocol). Running-wheel activity was monitored prior to and following CIE, and post-CIE activity was recorded in constant darkness to allow assessment of free-running circadian period and phase. Results C3H mice displayed pronounced reductions in running-wheel activity that persisted for the duration of the recording period (up to 30 days) following both 1-cycle (Experiment 1) and 3-cycle (Experiment 2) CIE protocols. In contrast, B6 mice showed reductions in locomotor activity that persisted for about one week following the 3-cycle CIE protocol, similar to the results of our previous study using a 1-cycle protocol in this strain. Additionally, C3H mice showed significant shortening of free-running period following the 3-cycle, but not the 1-cycle, CIE protocol, while B6 mice showed normal free-running rhythms. Conclusions These results reveal genetic differences in the persistence of ethanol withdrawal-induced hypo

  16. Why Animals Run on Legs, Not on Wheels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Jared

    1983-01-01

    Speculates why animals have not developed wheels in place of inefficient legs. One study cited suggests three reasons why animals are better off without wheels: wheels are efficient only on hard surfaces, limitation of wheeled motion due to vertical obstructions, and the problem of turning in spaces cluttered with obstacles. (JN)

  17. Behavioral assessment of intermittent wheel running and individual housing in mice in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Pham, Therese M; Brené, Stefan; Baumans, Vera

    2005-01-01

    Physical cage enrichment--exercise devices for rodents in the laboratory--often includes running wheels. This study compared responses of mice in enriched physical and social conditions and in standard social conditions to wheel running, individual housing, and open-field test. The study divided into 6 groups, 48 female BALB/c mice group housed in enriched and standard conditions. On alternate days, the study exposed 2 groups to individual running wheel cages. It intermittently separated from their cage mates and housed individually 2 groups with no running wheels; 2 control groups remained in enriched or standard condition cages. There were no significant differences between enriched and standard group housed mice in alternate days' wheel running. Over time, enriched, group housed mice ran less. Both groups responded similarly to individual housing. In open-field test, mice exposed to individual housing without running wheel moved more and faster than wheel running and home cage control mice. They have lower body weights than group housed and wheel running mice. Intermittent withdrawal of individual housing affects the animals more than other commodities. Wheel running normalizes some effects of intermittent separation from the enriched, social home cage.

  18. Body weight manipulation, reinforcement value and choice between sucrose and wheel running: a behavioral economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David

    2009-02-01

    Twelve female Long-Evans rats were exposed to concurrent variable (VR) ratio schedules of sucrose and wheel-running reinforcement (Sucrose VR 10 Wheel VR 10; Sucrose VR 5 Wheel VR 20; Sucrose VR 20 Wheel VR 5) with predetermined budgets (number of responses). The allocation of lever pressing to the sucrose and wheel-running alternatives was assessed at high and low body weights. Results showed that wheel-running rate and lever-pressing rates for sucrose and wheel running increased, but the choice of wheel running decreased at the low body weight. A regression analysis of relative consumption as a function of relative price showed that consumption shifted toward sucrose and interacted with price differences in a manner consistent with increased substitutability. Demand curves showed that demand for sucrose became less elastic while demand for wheel running became more elastic at the low body weight. These findings reflect an increase in the difference in relative value of sucrose and wheel running as body weight decreased. Discussion focuses on the limitations of response rates as measures of reinforcement value. In addition, we address the commonalities between matching and demand curve equations for the analysis of changes in relative reinforcement value.

  19. An Innovative Running Wheel-based Mechanism for Improved Rat Training Performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Chun; Yang, Chin-Lung; Chang, Ching-Ping

    2016-09-19

    This study presents an animal mobility system, equipped with a positioning running wheel (PRW), as a way to quantify the efficacy of an exercise activity for reducing the severity of the effects of the stroke in rats. This system provides more effective animal exercise training than commercially available systems such as treadmills and motorized running wheels (MRWs). In contrast to an MRW that can only achieve speeds below 20 m/min, rats are permitted to run at a stable speed of 30 m/min on a more spacious and high-density rubber running track supported by a 15 cm wide acrylic wheel with a diameter of 55 cm in this work. Using a predefined adaptive acceleration curve, the system not only reduces the operator error but also trains the rats to run persistently until a specified intensity is reached. As a way to evaluate the exercise effectiveness, real-time position of a rat is detected by four pairs of infrared sensors deployed on the running wheel. Once an adaptive acceleration curve is initiated using a microcontroller, the data obtained by the infrared sensors are automatically recorded and analyzed in a computer. For comparison purposes, 3 week training is conducted on rats using a treadmill, an MRW and a PRW. After surgically inducing middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), modified neurological severity scores (mNSS) and an inclined plane test were conducted to assess the neurological damages to the rats. PRW is experimentally validated as the most effective among such animal mobility systems. Furthermore, an exercise effectiveness measure, based on rat position analysis, showed that there is a high negative correlation between the effective exercise and the infarct volume, and can be employed to quantify a rat training in any type of brain damage reduction experiments.

  20. A guideline for analyzing circadian wheel-running behavior in rodents under different lighting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jud, Corinne; Schmutz, Isabelle; Hampp, Gabriele; Oster, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Most behavioral experiments within circadian research are based on the analysis of locomotor activity. This paper introduces scientists to chronobiology by explaining the basic terminology used within the field. Furthermore, it aims to assist in designing, carrying out, and evaluating wheel-running experiments with rodents, particularly mice. Since light is an easily applicable stimulus that provokes strong effects on clock phase, the paper focuses on the application of different lighting conditions. PMID:16136228

  1. Investigation of pre-pubertal sex differences in wheel running and social behavior in three mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Elizabeth A.; Corbitt, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in social behaviors exist in mammals during adulthood, and further evidence suggests that sex differences in behavior are present before sexual maturity. In order to model behavioral disorders in animals, it is important to assess baseline sex-related behavioral differences, especially when studying disorders for which sex-related behavioral effects are expected. We investigated the effect of sex on behavior in 3 strains of pre-pubertal mice (C57BL/6, CFW, and CF1) using a wheel-running assay. We found no significant sex differences in latency to run on the wheel or total duration of wheel running within each strain. During the social interaction test, there were no differences between sexes in latency or total duration of contact or following between a subject and novel mouse. We also evaluated behavioral patterns of wheel running and stereotypical behaviors, such as burrowing and grooming. Both sexes showed characteristic wheel running behavior, spending the majority of each trial interacting with the wheel when it was free and more time performing other activities (e.g., stereotypical behaviors, general locomotion) when it was jammed. These results provide evidence that, among various strains of pre-pubertal mice, baseline sex-related behavioral differences are not strong enough to influence the measured behaviors. PMID:26316671

  2. Inhibitory effects of voluntary running wheel exercise on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Michna, Laura; Wagner, George C; Lou, You-Rong; Xie, Jian-Guo; Peng, Qing-Yun; Lin, Yong; Carlson, Kirsten; Shih, Weichung Joe; Conney, Allan H; Lu, Yao-Ping

    2006-10-01

    Earlier studies showed that oral administration of green tea or caffeine to SKH-1 mice inhibited ultraviolet B light (UVB)-induced skin carcinogenesis, decreased dermal fat thickness and increased locomotor activity. In the present study, the effects of voluntary running wheel exercise on thickness of dermal fat as well as on UVB-induced tumorigenesis in SKH-1 mice were studied in UVB-initiated high-risk and UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis models. In the high-risk model, animals were exposed to UVB (30 mJ/cm(2)) 3 times/week for 16 weeks. For 14 weeks subsequent to UVB exposure, half of the animals had access to running wheels in their cages whereas the other half did not. In the complete carcinogenesis model, animals were exposed to UVB (30 mJ/cm(2)) 2 times/week for 33 weeks. From the beginning, half of the animals had access to running wheels whereas the other half did not. At the conclusion of each study, body weights were not different between groups, although animals with running wheels consumed significantly more food and water than animals without running wheels. In addition, animals with running wheels had decreases in parametrial fat pad weight and thickness of the dermal fat layer. In both UVB-initiated high-risk and complete carcinogenesis models, voluntary running wheel exercise delayed the appearance of tumors, decreased the number of tumors per mouse and decreased tumor volume per mouse. Histopathology studies revealed that running wheel exercise decreased the number of non-malignant tumors (primarily keratoacanthomas) by 34% and total tumors per mouse by 32% in both models, and running wheel exercise decreased the formation of squamous cell carcinomas in the UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis model by 27%. In addition, the size of keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas were decreased substantially in both models. The effects described here indicate that voluntary running wheel exercise inhibits UVB-induced skin tumorigenesis and may also

  3. The Influences of the Wheel Profiles on the Wheel Wear and Vibrational Characteristics of the Passenger Cars Running on the Seoul-Pusan Conventional Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bu-Byoung; Lee, Chan-Woo

    Wheels of the railway vehicle play the important role for driving train through wheel-rail interaction. Especially wheel profile is one of the most important design factors to rule the running stability and safety of train. Accordingly maintenance of wheel like wheel profile control is also very important for securing safety and stability of train operation. This study presents the wheel wear measurement results of Saemaeul running on the conventional line. The train set included three different cars which have different shape of wheel profile including KNR profile currently used in Saemaeul. Train set was operated on Seoul-Pusan line with fixed train set formation for commercial service. Wheel wear measurements were performed periodically. We can find the influence of wheel profile on the wheel wear of the train running on the conventional line through the measurement results.

  4. Caffeine stimulates voluntary wheel running in mice without increasing aerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Claghorn, Gerald C; Thompson, Zoe; Wi, Kristianna; Van, Lindsay; Garland, Theodore

    2017-03-01

    The "energy drink" Red Bull and the "sports drink" Gatorade are often marketed to athletes, with claims that they cause performance gains. However, both are high in sugars, and also consumed by non-athletes. Few studies have addressed the effects of these drinks or their biologically active components in rodent exercise models. We used three experiments to test effects on both voluntary exercise behavior and maximal aerobic capacity in lines of mice known to differ in "athletic" traits. Mice from four replicate High Runner (HR) lines have been selectively bred for voluntary running on wheels, and run approximately three times as many revolutions per day as do mice from four non-selected Control (C) lines. HR mice also have higher endurance and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) during forced treadmill exercise. In Experiment 1, we tested the hypothesis that Gatorade or Red Bull might cause or allow mice to increase their voluntary wheel running. On days 5 and 6 of 6days of wheel access, as is used to select breeders, HR mice ran 3.3-fold more than C, and females ran 1.2-fold more than males, with no linetype by sex interaction. On day 7, mice were administered Gatorade, Red Bull or tap water. During the subsequent 19-hour period, Gatorade had no statistical effect on running, but Red Bull significantly increased distance run by both sexes and in both HR and C lines. The increase in distance run caused by Red Bull was attributable to time spent running, not an increase in mean (or maximum) speed. As previous studies have found that sucrose alone does not generally increase wheel running, we tested two other active ingredients in Red Bull, caffeine and taurine, in Experiment 2. With a similar testing protocol, caffeine alone and caffeine+taurine increased running by about half the magnitude of Red Bull. In Experiment 3, we tested the hypothesis that Red Bull or caffeine alone can increase physiological performance ability during aerobic exercise, measured as VO2max

  5. Effects of access to voluntary wheel running on the development of stereotypy.

    PubMed

    Pawlowicz, Artur; Demner, Adam; Lewis, Mark H

    2010-03-01

    Stereotyped motor behaviors are a common consequence of environmental restriction in a wide variety of species. Although environmental enrichment has been shown to substantially reduce stereotypy levels, the various components of enrichment have not been evaluated independently to determine which is responsible for this effect. Exercise, particularly voluntary wheel running, is a promising candidate based on several lines of behavioral and neurobiological evidence. To test the hypothesis that access to wheel running will reduce stereotyped motor behavior, we reared deer mice from weaning with continuous access to either a functional running wheel or a locked wheel. We assessed running behavior throughout this time period and stereotypy levels in a test context at 30 and 45 days post-weaning. We found that exercise did not significantly affect stereotypy level nor was there an association between wheel running and stereotypy. Thus, exercise alone, unlike environmental enrichment, does not prevent the development of stereotypy. These results have important implications for animal welfare.

  6. Effect of sucrose availability and pre-running on the intrinsic value of wheel running as an operant and a reinforcing consequence.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David

    2014-03-01

    The current study investigated the effect of motivational manipulations on operant wheel running for sucrose reinforcement and on wheel running as a behavioral consequence for lever pressing, within the same experimental context. Specifically, rats responded on a two-component multiple schedule of reinforcement in which lever pressing produced the opportunity to run in a wheel in one component of the schedule (reinforcer component) and wheel running produced the opportunity to consume sucrose solution in the other component (operant component). Motivational manipulations involved removal of sucrose contingent on wheel running and providing 1h of pre-session wheel running. Results showed that, in opposition to a response strengthening view, sucrose did not maintain operant wheel running. The motivational operations of withdrawing sucrose or providing pre-session wheel running, however, resulted in different wheel-running rates in the operant and reinforcer components of the multiple schedule; this rate discrepancy revealed the extrinsic reinforcing effects of sucrose on operant wheel running, but also indicated the intrinsic reinforcement value of wheel running across components. Differences in wheel-running rates between components were discussed in terms of arousal, undermining of intrinsic motivation, and behavioral contrast.

  7. A novel mouse running wheel that senses individual limb forces: biomechanical validation and in vivo testing.

    PubMed

    Roach, Grahm C; Edke, Mangesh; Griffin, Timothy M

    2012-08-15

    Biomechanical data provide fundamental information about changes in musculoskeletal function during development, adaptation, and disease. To facilitate the study of mouse locomotor biomechanics, we modified a standard mouse running wheel to include a force-sensitive rung capable of measuring the normal and tangential forces applied by individual paws. Force data were collected throughout the night using an automated threshold trigger algorithm that synchronized force data with wheel-angle data and a high-speed infrared video file. During the first night of wheel running, mice reached consistent running speeds within the first 40 force events, indicating a rapid habituation to wheel running, given that mice generated >2,000 force-event files/night. Average running speeds and peak normal and tangential forces were consistent throughout the first four nights of running, indicating that one night of running is sufficient to characterize the locomotor biomechanics of healthy mice. Twelve weeks of wheel running significantly increased spontaneous wheel-running speeds (16 vs. 37 m/min), lowered duty factors (ratio of foot-ground contact time to stride time; 0.71 vs. 0.58), and raised hindlimb peak normal forces (93 vs. 115% body wt) compared with inexperienced mice. Peak normal hindlimb-force magnitudes were the primary force component, which were nearly tenfold greater than peak tangential forces. Peak normal hindlimb forces exceed the vertical forces generated during overground running (50-60% body wt), suggesting that wheel running shifts weight support toward the hindlimbs. This force-instrumented running-wheel system provides a comprehensive, noninvasive screening method for monitoring gait biomechanics in mice during spontaneous locomotion.

  8. Habituation Training Improves Locomotor Performance in a Forced Running Wheel System in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toval, Angel; Baños, Raúl; De la Cruz, Ernesto; Morales-Delgado, Nicanor; Pallarés, Jesús G.; Ayad, Abdelmalik; Tseng, Kuei Y.; Ferran, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports that physical activity promotes mental health; and regular exercise may confer positive effects in neurological disorders. There is growing number of reports that requires the analysis of the impact of physical activity in animal models. Exercise in rodents can be performed under voluntary or forced conditions. The former presents the disadvantage that the volume and intensity of exercise varies from subject to subject. On the other hand, a major challenge of the forced training protocol is the low level of performance typically achieved within a given session. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of gradual increasing of the volume and intensity (training habituation protocol) to improve the locomotor performance in a forced running-wheel system in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a group that received an exercise training habituation protocol, or a control group. The locomotor performance during forced running was assessed by an incremental exercise test. The experimental results reveal that the total running time and the distance covered by habituated rats was significantly higher than in control ones. We conclude that the exercise habituation protocol improves the locomotor performance in forced running wheels. PMID:28337132

  9. Circadian rhythm disruption by a novel running wheel: roles of exercise and arousal in blockade of the luteinizing hormone surge.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Marilyn J; Franklin, Kathleen M; Peng, Xiaoli; Yun, Christopher; Legan, Sandra J

    2014-05-28

    Exposure of proestrous Syrian hamsters to a new room, cage, and novel running wheel blocks the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge until the next day in ~75% of hamsters [1]. The studies described here tested the hypotheses that 1) exercise and/or 2) orexinergic neurotransmission mediate novel wheel blockade of the LH surge and circadian phase advances. Female hamsters were exposed to a 14L:10D photoperiod and activity rhythms were monitored with infra-red detectors. In Expt. 1, to test the effect of exercise, hamsters received jugular cannulae and on the next day, proestrus (Day 1), shortly before zeitgeber time 5 (ZT 5, 7h before lights-off) the hamsters were transported to the laboratory. After obtaining a blood sample at ZT 5, the hamsters were transferred to a new cage with a novel wheel that was either freely rotating (unlocked), or locked until ZT 9, and exposed to constant darkness (DD). Blood samples were collected hourly for 2days from ZT 5-11 under red light for determination of plasma LH levels by radioimmunoassay. Running rhythms were monitored continuously for the next 10-14days. The locked wheels were as effective as unlocked wheels in blocking LH surges (no Day 1 LH surge in 6/9 versus 8/8 hamsters, P>0.05) and phase advances in the activity rhythms did not differ between the groups (P=0.28), suggesting that intense exercise is not essential for novel wheel blockade and phase advance of the proestrous LH surge. Expt. 2 tested whether orexin neurotransmission is essential for these effects. Hamsters were treated the same as those in Expt. 1 except that they were injected (i.p.) at ZT 4.5 and 5 with either the orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB334867 (15mg/kg per injection) or vehicle (25% DMSO in 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HCD)). SB-334867 inhibited novel wheel blockade of the LH surge (surges blocked in 2/6 SB334867-injected animals versus 16/18 vehicle-injected animals, P<0.02) and also inhibited wheel running and circadian phase shifts, indicating

  10. Wheel-running in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: protection or symptom?

    PubMed

    Richter, Helene; Ambrée, Oliver; Lewejohann, Lars; Herring, Arne; Keyvani, Kathy; Paulus, Werner; Palme, Rupert; Touma, Chadi; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sachser, Norbert

    2008-06-26

    Several studies on both humans and animals reveal benefits of physical exercise on brain function and health. A previous study on TgCRND8 mice, a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease, reported beneficial effects of premorbid onset of long-term access to a running wheel on spatial learning and plaque deposition. Our study investigated the effects of access to a running wheel after the onset of Abeta pathology on behavioural, endocrinological, and neuropathological parameters. From day 80 of age, the time when Abeta deposition becomes apparent, TgCRND8 and wildtype mice were kept with or without running wheel. Home cage behaviour was analysed and cognitive abilities regarding object recognition memory and spatial learning in the Barnes maze were assessed. Our results show that, in comparison to Wt mice, Tg mice were characterised by impaired object recognition memory and spatial learning, increased glucocorticoid levels, hyperactivity in the home cage and high levels of stereotypic behaviour. Access to a running wheel had no effects on cognitive or neuropathological parameters, but reduced the amount of stereotypic behaviour in transgenics significantly. Furthermore, wheel-running was inversely correlated with stereotypic behaviour, suggesting that wheel-running may have stereotypic qualities. In addition, wheel-running positively correlated with plaque burden. Thus, in a phase when plaques are already present in the brain, it may be symptomatic of brain pathology, rather than protective. Whether or not access to a running wheel has beneficial effects on Alzheimer-like pathology and symptoms may therefore strongly depend on the exact time when the wheel is provided during development of the disease.

  11. Effects of Post-Session Wheel Running on Within-Session Changes in Operant Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the effects of post-session wheel running on within-session changes in operant responding. Lever-pressing by six rats was reinforced by a food pellet under a continuous reinforcement (CRF) schedule in 30-min sessions. Two different flavored food pellets were used as reinforcers. In the wheel conditions, 30-min operant-sessions…

  12. Effects of prolonged voluntary wheel-running on muscle structure and function in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Fumihiko; Yamauchi, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keizo; Narusawa, Mistuo; Nakahara, Yoshibumi

    2004-06-01

    We examined the effects of prolonged voluntary wheel-running on skeletal muscle functional and/or structural characteristics in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (5 weeks old) were divided into five groups: (1) 15W-SC, sedentary controls housed in normal plastic cages until age 15 weeks; (2) 15W-VE, housed in a voluntary-exercise (running-wheel) device equipped with housing space until age 15 weeks; (3) 35W-SC, housed in normal plastic cages until age 35 weeks; (4) 35W-VE, housed in the voluntary-exercise device until age 35 weeks, and (5) 35W-MVE, housed in normal plastic cages until age 15 weeks, then in the voluntary-exercise device from age 16 weeks to 35 weeks ("middle age"). At the end of each rat's experimental period, the plantaris muscle was dissected from each hindlimb for analysis of the muscle's functional and/or structural characteristics. Total running distance was similar in 15W-VE and 35W-VE, both being significantly greater than in 35-MVE. The percentage of type IIb myosin heavy chain isoform was significantly lower in each VE group than in the corresponding SC group. This shift from type IIb was significantly greater for 35W-VE than for the other VE groups, which were similar to each other. The cross-sectional area of type IIx fibers was significantly greater in 35W-VE than in 35W-SC, but this was not true for 15W-VE versus 15W-SC or for 35W-MVE versus 35W-SC. No significant difference in citrate synthase activity was detected between any VE group and the corresponding SC group. These results suggest that a prolongation of voluntary wheel-running leads to some advantageous enhancements of functional and/or structural characteristics in rat plantaris.

  13. Voluntary wheel running attenuates ethanol withdrawal-induced increases in seizure susceptibility in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Leslie L; Walls, Shawn A; McCulley, Walter D; Rosenwasser, Alan M

    2012-11-01

    We recently found that voluntary wheel running attenuated ethanol withdrawal-induced increased susceptibility to chemoconvulsant-induced seizures in male rats. Since female rats recover from ethanol withdrawal (EW) more quickly than male rats across several behavioral measures, this study was designed to determine whether the effects of exercise on EW seizures also exhibited sex differences. Animals were maintained under no-wheel, locked-wheel or free-wheel conditions and ethanol was administered by liquid diet for 14 days with control animals pair-fed an isocaloric diet, after which seizure thresholds were determined at 1 day or 3 days of EW. Consistent with previous reports, females ran significantly more than males, regardless of diet condition. Introduction of the ethanol-containing liquid diet dramatically increased running for females during the day (rest) phase, with little impact on night phase activity. Consistent with previous reports, EW increased seizure susceptibility at 1 day in non-exercising males and females and at 3 days in males. These effects were attenuated by access to running wheels in both sexes. We also assessed the effects of sex, ethanol diet and exercise on ethanol clearance following an acute ethanol administration at 1 day EW in a separate set of animals. Blood ethanol concentrations at 30 min post-injection were lower in males, ethanol-exposed animals, and runners, but no interactions among these factors were detected. Interestingly, females displayed more rapid ethanol clearance than males and there were no effects of either diet or wheel access on clearance rates. Taken together, these data suggest that voluntary wheel running during ethanol administration provides protective effects against EW seizures in both males and females. This effect may be mediated, in part, in male, but not in female rat, by effects of exercise on early pharmacokinetic contributions. This supports the idea that encouraging alcoholics to exercise may

  14. Long-term voluntary wheel running is rewarding and produces plasticity in the mesolimbic reward pathway.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Benjamin N; Foley, Teresa E; Le, Tony V; Strong, Paul V; Loughridge, Alice B; Day, Heidi E W; Fleshner, Monika

    2011-03-01

    The mesolimbic reward pathway is implicated in stress-related psychiatric disorders and is a potential target of plasticity underlying the stress resistance produced by repeated voluntary exercise. It is unknown, however, whether rats find long-term access to running wheels rewarding, or if repeated voluntary exercise reward produces plastic changes in mesolimbic reward neurocircuitry. In the current studies, young adult, male Fischer 344 rats allowed voluntary access to running wheels for 6 weeks, but not 2 weeks, found wheel running rewarding, as measured by conditioned place preference (CPP). Consistent with prior reports and the behavioral data, 6 weeks of wheel running increased ΔFosB/FosB immunoreactivity in the nucleus accumbens (Acb). In addition, semi quantitative in situ hybridization revealed that 6 weeks of wheel running, compared to sedentary housing, increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), increased delta opioid receptor (DOR) mRNA levels in the Acb shell, and reduced levels of dopamine receptor (DR)-D2 mRNA in the Acb core. Results indicate that repeated voluntary exercise is rewarding and alters gene transcription in mesolimbic reward neurocircuitry. The duration-dependent effects of wheel running on CPP suggest that as the weeks of wheel running progress, the rewarding effects of a night of voluntary wheel running might linger longer into the inactive cycle thus providing stronger support for CPP. The observed plasticity could contribute to the mechanisms by which exercise reduces the incidence and severity of substance abuse disorders, changes the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse, and facilitates successful coping with stress.

  15. Simple and conditional visual discrimination with wheel running as reinforcement in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, I H

    1998-01-01

    Three experiments explored whether access to wheel running is sufficient as reinforcement to establish and maintain simple and conditional visual discriminations in nondeprived rats. In Experiment 1, 2 rats learned to press a lit key to produce access to running; responding was virtually absent when the key was dark, but latencies to respond were longer than for customary food and water reinforcers. Increases in the intertrial interval did not improve the discrimination performance. In Experiment 2, 3 rats acquired a go-left/go-right discrimination with a trial-initiating response and reached an accuracy that exceeded 80%; when two keys showed a steady light, pressing the left key produced access to running whereas pressing the right key produced access to running when both keys showed blinking light. Latencies to respond to the lights shortened when the trial-initiation response was introduced and became much shorter than in Experiment 1. In Experiment 3, 1 rat acquired a conditional discrimination task (matching to sample) with steady versus blinking lights at an accuracy exceeding 80%. A trial-initiation response allowed self-paced trials as in Experiment 2. When the rat was exposed to the task for 19 successive 24-hr periods with access to food and water, the discrimination performance settled in a typical circadian pattern and peak accuracy exceeded 90%. When the trial-initiation response was under extinction, without access to running, the circadian activity pattern determined the time of spontaneous recovery. The experiments demonstrate that wheel-running reinforcement can be used to establish and maintain simple and conditional visual discriminations in nondeprived rats. PMID:9841250

  16. Chronic wheel running-induced reduction of extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats is associated with reduced number of periaqueductal gray dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Sobieraj, Jeffery C; Kim, Airee; Fannon, McKenzie J; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2016-01-01

    Exercise (physical activity) has been proposed as a treatment for drug addiction. In rodents, voluntary wheel running reduces cocaine and nicotine seeking during extinction, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking triggered by drug-cues. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of chronic wheel running during withdrawal and protracted abstinence on extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats, and to determine a potential neurobiological correlate underlying the effects. Rats were given extended access to methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg, 6 h/day) for 22 sessions. Rats were withdrawn and were given access to running wheels (wheel runners) or no wheels (sedentary) for 3 weeks after which they experienced extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. Extended access to methamphetamine self-administration produced escalation in methamphetamine intake. Methamphetamine experience reduced running output, and conversely, access to wheel running during withdrawal reduced responding during extinction and, context- and cue-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue demonstrated that wheel running during withdrawal did not regulate markers of methamphetamine neurotoxicity (neurogenesis, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2) and cellular activation (c-Fos) in brain regions involved in relapse to drug seeking. However, reduced methamphetamine seeking was associated with running-induced reduction (and normalization) of the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study provides evidence that dopamine neurons of the PAG region show adaptive biochemical changes during methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats and wheel running abolishes these effects. Given that the PAG dopamine neurons project onto the structures of the extended amygdala, the present findings also

  17. Neurotrophin levels and behaviour in BALB/c mice: impact of intermittent exposure to individual housing and wheel running.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shun-Wei; Pham, Therese M; Aberg, Elin; Brené, Stefan; Winblad, Bengt; Mohammed, Abdul H; Baumans, Vera

    2006-02-15

    This study assessed the effects of intermittent individual housing on behaviour and brain neurotrophins, and whether physical exercise could influence alternate individual-housing-induced effects. Five-week-old BALB/c mice were either housed in enhanced social (E) or standard social (S) housing conditions for 2 weeks. Thereafter they were divided into six groups and for 6 weeks remained in the following experimental conditions: Control groups remained in their respective housing conditions (E-control, S-control); enhanced individual (E-individual) and standard individual (S-individual) groups were exposed every other day to individual cages without running-wheels; enhanced running-wheel (E-wheel) and standard running-wheel (S-wheel) groups were put on alternate days in individual running-wheel cages. Animals were assessed for activity in an automated individual cage system (LABORAS) and brain neurotrophins analysed. Intermittent individual housing increased behavioural activity and reduced nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in frontal cortex; while it increased BDNF level in the amygdala and BDNF protein and mRNA in hippocampus. Besides normalizing motor activity and regulating BDNF and NGF levels in hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum, physical exercise did not attenuate reduction of cortical NGF and BDNF induced by intermittent individual housing. This study demonstrates that alternate individual housing has significant impact on behaviour and brain neurotrophin levels in mice, which can be partially altered by voluntary physical exercise. Our results also suggest that some changes in neurotrophin levels induced by intermittent individual housing are not similar to those caused by continuous individual housing.

  18. The protective effects of free wheel-running against cocaine psychomotor sensitization persist after exercise cessation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lespine, L-F; Tirelli, E

    2015-12-03

    Previous literature suggests that free access to a running wheel can attenuate the behavioral responsiveness to addictive drugs in rodents. In a few studies, wheel-running cessation accentuated drug responsiveness. Here, we tested whether free wheel-running cessation is followed by (1) an accentuation or (2) an attenuation of cocaine psychomotor sensitization, knowing that no cessation of (continuous) wheel-running is associated with an attenuation of cocaine responsiveness. Male C57BL/6J mice, aged 35 days, were housed singly either with (exercising mice) or without (non-exercising mice) a running wheel. At the end of a period of 36 days, half of the exercising mice were deprived of their wheel whereas the other half of exercising mice kept their wheel until the end of experimentation (which lasted 85 days). The non-exercising mice were housed without wheel throughout experimentation. Testing took place 3 days after exercise cessation. After 2 once-daily drug-free test sessions, mice were tested for initiation of psychomotor sensitization over 13 once-daily injections of 8 mg/kg cocaine. Post-sensitization conditioned activation (saline challenge) and long-term expression of sensitization were assessed 2 or 30 days after the last sensitizing injection (same treatments as for initiation of sensitization), respectively. Exercising mice and mice undergoing wheel-running cessation exhibited comparable degrees of attenuation of all cocaine effects in comparison with the continuously non-exercising mice, which showed the greatest effects. Thus, the efficaciousness of wheel-running at attenuating cocaine sensitization not only resisted to exercise cessation but was also unambiguously persistent (an important effect rarely reported in previous literature).

  19. Metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle to voluntary wheel running exercise in hypertensive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R L; Kullman, E L; Waters, R P; Huang, H; Kirwan, J P; Gerdes, A M; Swallow, J G

    2013-01-01

    The Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rat mimics the human progression of hypertension from hypertrophy to heart failure. However, it is unknown whether SHHF animals can exercise at sufficient levels to observe beneficial biochemical adaptations in skeletal muscle. Thirty-seven female SHHF and Wistar-Furth (WF) rats were randomized to sedentary (SHHFsed and WFsed) and exercise groups (SHHFex and WFex). The exercise groups had access to running wheels from 6-22 months of age. Hindlimb muscles were obtained for metabolic measures that included mitochondrial enzyme function and expression, and glycogen utilization. The SHHFex rats ran a greater distance and duration as compared to the WFex rats (P<0.05), but the WFex rats ran at a faster speed (P<0.05). Skeletal muscle citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme activity was not altered in the SHHFex group, but was increased (P<0.05) in the WFex animals. Citrate synthase protein and gene expression were unchanged in SHHFex animals, but were increased in WFex rats (P<0.05). In the WFex animals muscle glycogen was significantly depleted after exercise (P<0.05), but not in the SHHFex group. We conclude that despite robust amounts of aerobic activity, voluntary wheel running exercise was not sufficiently intense to improve the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult SHHF animals, indicating an inability to compensate for declining heart function by improving peripheral oxidative adaptations in the skeletal muscle.

  20. A Brief Opportunity to Run Does Not Function as a Reinforcer for Mice Selected for High Daily Wheel-Running Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belke, Terry W.; Garland, Theodore, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Mice from replicate lines, selectively bred based on high daily wheel-running rates, run more total revolutions and at higher average speeds than do mice from nonselected control lines. Based on this difference it was assumed that selected mice would find the opportunity to run in a wheel a more efficacious consequence. To assess this assumption…

  1. The effects of amphetamine and scopolamine on adjunctive drinking and wheel-running in rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, J L; White, J M

    1984-01-01

    Two groups of rats were exposed to a fixed-interval 90 s schedule of food reinforcement. One group had access to a drinking tube containing water and the second had access to a running wheel. Amphetamine (0.3-10.0 mg/kg) and scopolamine (0.1-3.0 mg/kg) were assessed for their effects on lever-pressing, adjunctive drinking and adjunctive wheel-running. Low to moderate doses of amphetamine increased overall rates of lever-pressing, whereas the highest dose decreased them. Scopolamine decreased overall lever-pressing rates in a dose-dependent manner. Both drugs changed the within-interval pattern of lever-pressing from one of increasing probability through the interval to almost constant probability throughout. Overall rates of adjunctive drinking and adjunctive wheel-running were decreased by amphetamine and scopolamine. Amphetamine failed to alter the within-interval patterns of either drinking or wheel-running in any substantial manner. The effect of scopolamine was to make the probabilities of each adjunctive behaviour more even through the interval. Although the two drugs had different actions, there was little difference in the way drinking and wheel-running were affected by each.

  2. Voluntary wheel running improves recovery from a moderate spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Engesser-Cesar, Christie; Anderson, Aileen J; Basso, D Michele; Edgerton, V R; Cotman, Carl W

    2005-01-01

    Recently, locomotor training has been shown to improve overground locomotion in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). This has triggered renewed interest in the role of exercise in rehabilitation after SCI. However, there are no mouse models for voluntary exercise and recovery of function following SCI. Here, we report voluntary wheel running improves recovery from a SCI in mice. C57Bl/10 female mice received a 60-kdyne T9 contusion injury with an IH impactor after 3 weeks of voluntary wheel running or 3 weeks of standard single housing conditions. Following a 7-day recovery period, running mice were returned to their running wheels. Weekly open-field behavior measured locomotor recovery using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS) locomotor rating scale, a scale recently developed specifically for mice. Initial experiments using standard rung wheels show that wheel running impaired recovery, but subsequent experiments using a modified flat-surface wheel show improved recovery with exercise. By 14 days post SCI, the modified flat-surface running group had significantly higher BBB and BMS scores than the sedentary group. A repeated measures ANOVA shows locomotor recovery of modified flat-surface running mice was significantly improved compared to sedentary animals (p < 0.05). Locomotor assessment using a ladder beam task also shows a significant improvement in the modified flat-surface runners (p < 0.05). Finally, fibronectin staining shows no significant difference in lesion size between the two groups. These data represent the first mouse model showing voluntary exercise improves recovery after SCI.

  3. Circadian Periods of Sensitivity for Ramelteon on the onset of Running-wheel Activity and the Peak of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuronal Firing Rhythms in C3H/HeN Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rawashdeh, Oliver; Hudson, Randall L.; Stepien, Iwona; Dubocovich, Margarita L.

    2016-01-01

    Ramelteon, an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist, is used for the treatment of sleep-onset insomnia and circadian sleep disorders. Ramelteon phase shifts circadian rhythms in rodents and humans when given at the end of the subjective day; however, its efficacy at other circadian times is not known. Here, the authors determined in C3H/ HeN mice the maximal circadian sensitivity for ramelteon in vivo on the onset of circadian running-wheel activity rhythms, and in vitro on the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) brain slices. The phase response curve (PRC) for ramelteon (90 μg/mouse, subcutaneous [sc]) on circadian wheel-activity rhythms shows maximal sensitivity during the late mid to end of the subjective day, between CT8 and CT12 (phase advance), and late subjective night and early subjective day, between CT20 and CT2 (phase delay), using a 3-day-pulse treatment regimen in C3H/HeN mice. The PRC for ramelteon resembles that for melatonin in C3H/ HeN mice, showing the same magnitude of maximal shifts at CT10 and CT2, except that the range of sensitivity for ramelteon (CT8–CT12) during the subjective day is broader. Furthermore, in SCN brain slices in vitro, ramelteon (10 pM) administered at CT10 phase advances (5.6 ± 0.29 h, n = 3) and at CT2 phase delays (−3.2 ± 0.12 h, n = 6) the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing, with the shifts being significantly larger than those induced by melatonin (10 pM) at the same circadian times (CT10: 2.7 ± 0.15 h, n = 4, p < .05; CT2: −1.13 ± 0.08 h, n = 6, p < .001, respectively). The phase shifts induced by both melatonin and ramelteon in the SCN brain slice at either CT10 or CT2 corresponded with the period of sensitivity observed in vivo. In conclusion, melatonin and ramelteon showed identical periods of circadian sensitivity at CT10 (advance) and CT2 (delay) to shift the onset of circadian activity rhythms in vivo and the peak of SCN neuronal firing rhythms in vitro

  4. Reduced alcohol consumption in mice with access to a running wheel.

    PubMed

    Ehringer, Marissa A; Hoft, Nicole R; Zunhammer, Matthias

    2009-09-01

    Studies of the behavioral effects of alcohol in humans and rodent models have implicated a number of neurological pathways and genes. Separate studies have shown that certain regions of the brain are involved in behavioral responses to exercise. The aim of this study was to determine whether mice which normally voluntarily consume high amounts of alcohol (C57BL/6 strain) would exhibit reduced alcohol consumption when given access to a running wheel under two different models of voluntary consumption: unlimited access two-bottle choice and limited access drinking in the dark (DID). Under the two-bottle choice model, the animals voluntarily consumed less alcohol when a wheel was present in their cage. However, sex-specific differences emerged because female mice voluntarily consumed less alcohol when they have the opportunity to exercise on a running wheel, whereas male mice consumed less alcohol even if the running wheel was locked. There were no significant differences observed in alcohol metabolism or food consumption. Under the DID protocol, no differences in alcohol consumption were observed in the presence of a running wheel. These results suggest that exercise may be a useful approach to consider for treatment for some types of chronic human alcohol problem behaviors, but may be less applicable to human binge drinking.

  5. A Brief Opportunity to Run Does Not Function as a Reinforcer for Mice Selected for High Daily Wheel-running Rates

    PubMed Central

    Belke, Terry W; GarlandJr, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Mice from replicate lines, selectively bred based on high daily wheel-running rates, run more total revolutions and at higher average speeds than do mice from nonselected control lines. Based on this difference it was assumed that selected mice would find the opportunity to run in a wheel a more efficacious consequence. To assess this assumption within an operant paradigm, mice must be trained to make a response to produce the opportunity to run as a consequence. In the present study an autoshaping procedure was used to compare the acquisition of lever pressing reinforced by the opportunity to run for a brief opportunity (i.e., 90 s) between selected and control mice and then, using an operant procedure, the effect of the duration of the opportunity to run on lever pressing was assessed by varying reinforcer duration over values of 90 s, 30 min, and 90 s. The reinforcement schedule was a ratio schedule (FR 1 or VR 3). Results from the autoshaping phase showed that more control mice met a criterion of responses on 50% of trials. During the operant phase, when reinforcer duration was 90 s, almost all control, but few selected mice completed a session of 20 reinforcers; however, when reinforcer duration was increased to 30 min almost all selected and control mice completed a session of 20 reinforcers. Taken together, these results suggest that selective breeding based on wheel-running rates over 24 hr may have altered the motivational system in a way that reduces the reinforcing value of shorter running durations. The implications of this finding for these mice as a model for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are discussed. It also is proposed that there may be an inherent trade-off in the motivational system for activities of short versus long duration. PMID:17970415

  6. Mu opioid receptor modulation in the nucleus accumbens lowers voluntary wheel running in rats bred for high running motivation.

    PubMed

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Will, Matthew J; Booth, Frank W

    2015-10-01

    The exact role of opioid receptor signaling in mediating voluntary wheel running is unclear. To provide additional understanding, female rats selectively bred for motivation of low (LVR) versus high voluntary running (HVR) behaviors were used. Aims of this study were 1) to identify intrinsic differences in nucleus accumbens (NAc) mRNA expression of opioid-related transcripts and 2) to determine if nightly wheel running is differently influenced by bilateral NAc injections of either the mu-opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyo5-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25, 2.5 μg/side), or its antagonist, naltrexone (5, 10, 20 μg/side). In Experiment 1, intrinsic expression of Oprm1 and Pdyn mRNAs were higher in HVR compared to LVR. Thus, the data imply that line differences in opioidergic mRNA in the NAc could partially contribute to differences in wheel running behavior. In Experiment 2, a significant decrease in running distance was present in HVR rats treated with 2.5 μg DAMGO, or with 10 μg and 20 μg naltrexone between hours 0-1 of the dark cycle. Neither DAMGO nor naltrexone had a significant effect on running distance in LVR rats. Taken together, the data suggest that the high nightly voluntary running distance expressed by HVR rats is mediated by increased endogenous mu-opioid receptor signaling in the NAc, that is disturbed by either agonism or antagonism. In summary, our findings on NAc opioidergic mRNA expression and mu-opioid receptor modulations suggest HVR rats, compared to LVR rats, express higher running levels mediated by an increase in motivation driven, in part, by elevated NAc opioidergic signaling.

  7. Non-peptide oxytocin receptor ligands and hamster circadian wheel running rhythms.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Robert L

    2014-10-17

    The synchronization of circadian rhythms in sleep, endocrine and metabolic functions with the environmental light cycle is essential for health, and dysfunction of this synchrony is thought to play a part in the development of many neurological disorders. There is a demonstrable need to develop new therapeutics for the treatment of neurological disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, and oxytocin is currently being investigated for this purpose. There are no published reports describing activity of oxytocin receptor ligands on mammalian circadian rhythms and that, then, is the purpose of this study. Non-peptide oxytocin receptor ligands that cross the blood brain barrier were systemically injected in hamsters to determine their ability to modulate light-induced phase advances and delays of circadian wheel running rhythms. The oxytocin receptor agonist WAY267464 (10 mg/kg) inhibited light induced phase advances of wheel running rhythms by 55%, but had no effect on light-induced phase delays. In contrast, the oxytocin receptor antagonist WAY162720 (10 mg/kg) inhibited light-induced phase delays by nearly 75%, but had no effect on light-induced phase advances. Additionally, WAY162720 was able to antagonize the inhibitory effects of WAY267464 on light-induced phase advances. These results are consistent for a role of oxytocin in the phase-delaying effects of light on circadian activity rhythms early in the night. Therefore, oxytocin may prove to be useful in developing therapeutics for the treatment of mood disorders with a concomitant dysfunction in circadian rhythms. Investigators should also be cognizant that oxytocin ligands may negatively affect circadian rhythms during clinical trials for other conditions.

  8. Grip force, EDL contractile properties, and voluntary wheel running after postdevelopmental myostatin depletion in mice.

    PubMed

    Personius, Kirkwood E; Jayaram, Aditi; Krull, David; Brown, Roger; Xu, Tianshun; Han, Bajin; Burgess, Kerri; Storey, Christopher; Shah, Bharati; Tawil, Rabi; Welle, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    There is no consensus about whether making muscles abnormally large by reducing myostatin activity affects force-generating capacity or the ability to perform activities requiring muscular endurance. We therefore examined grip force, contractile properties of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, and voluntary wheel running in mice in which myostatin was depleted after normal muscle development. Cre recombinase activity was induced to knock out exon 3 of the myostatin gene in 4-mo-old mice in which this exon was flanked by loxP sequences (Mstn[f/f]). Control mice with normal myostatin genes (Mstn[w/w]) received the same Cre-activating treatment. Myostatin depletion increased the mass of all muscles that were examined (gastrocnemius, quadriceps, tibialis anterior, EDL, soleus, triceps) by approximately 20-40%. Grip force, measured multiple times 2-22 wk after myostatin knockout, was not consistently greater in the myostatin-deficient mice. EDL contractile properties were determined 7-13 mo after myostatin knockout. Twitch force tended to be greater in myostatin-deficient muscles (+24%; P=0.09), whereas tetanic force was not consistently elevated (mean +11%; P=0.36), even though EDL mass was greater than normal in all myostatin-deficient mice (mean +36%; P<0.001). The force deficit induced by eccentric contractions was approximately twofold greater in myostatin-deficient than in normal EDL muscles (31% vs. 16% after five eccentric contractions; P=0.02). Myostatin-deficient mice ran 19% less distance (P<0.01) than control mice during the 12 wk following myostatin depletion, primarily because of fewer running bouts per night rather than diminished running speed or bout duration. Reduced specific tension (ratio of force to mass) and reduced running have been observed after muscle hypertrophy was induced by other means, suggesting that they are characteristics generally associated with abnormally large muscles rather than unique effects of myostatin deficiency.

  9. Wheel running affects seasonal acclimatization of physiological and morphological traits in the Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Scherbarth, Frank; Rozman, Jan; Klingenspor, Martin; Brabant, Georg; Steinlechner, Stephan

    2007-09-01

    Wheel running was previously shown to influence body mass and torpor in short-day-acclimatized Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). To determine whether the exercise-induced effect on body mass depends on the annual phase, hamsters were exposed to the natural change in photoperiod and given access to a running wheel (RW), either before, in the middle of, or at the end of the descending body mass trajectory during seasonal acclimatization. Due to wheel running, the seasonal weight cycle was prevented or aborted by abruptly rising body mass, resulting in a weight appropriate for summer, despite exposure to short days. Torpor was inhibited, and testicular recrudescence was advanced, compared with controls. In contrast, the change into winter fur remained unaltered. Analysis of body composition and plasma leptin revealed a low body fat mass in RW hamsters, not only in winter but also in summer, suggesting a lack of seasonal adiposity. Chronic leptin infusion in winter only decreased body mass in RW individuals, although their relative body fat mass probably was even lower than in sedentary hamsters. A constantly low body fat mass is conceivably reflecting an exercise-dependent change in metabolism, consistent with increased bone mineral content and density in RW hamsters. Additionally, bone area was increased, again supported by elongated vertebral columns. Together, the results show a striking effect of wheel running on body composition and the seasonal pattern of body mass, and they suggest that the photoperiodic regulation of body mass is regulated differently than the reproductive and pelage responses.

  10. Neither environmental enrichment nor voluntary wheel running enhances recovery from incomplete spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Erschbamer, M K; Pham, T M; Zwart, M C; Baumans, V; Olson, L

    2006-09-01

    Environmental enrichment and exercise may be neuroprotective or promote recovery after different forms of CNS injury. Here, we tested the possible effects of moderate environmental enrichment and voluntary exercise on the outcome of incomplete spinal cord injury in rats. We provided rats in standard cages with basic environmental enrichment (carton house, nesting material, tube, gnawing sticks). We also analyzed the effect of increased activity by housing spinal-cord-injured rats in cages with or without access to running wheels. In a third experiment, we looked at the possible effect of pre-injury training. In all experiments, a battery of behavior tests were used. Enriched environment provided before, after or both before and after injury did not alter the outcome on any of these tests. Similarly, despite excessive running after injury, no differences in terms of recovery and behavior were found in the running experiment. Similarly, running prior to injury did not significantly decrease the degree of functional deficit caused by the injury. Since there were no effects of further enrichment, above the possible effects of being socially housed, and since exercise did not improve the outcome, we conclude that these forms of increased activity do not render the animals significantly less sensitive to spinal cord injury and do not cause robust improvement when initiated after injury. While these results pose a limit to how helpful environmental and physical training programs may be in rodent impact injury models, they do not contradict the fact that voluntary and guided training can be effective tools in human spinal cord rehabilitation.

  11. Reduced metabolic disease risk profile by voluntary wheel running accompanying juvenile Western diet in rats bred for high and low voluntary exercise.

    PubMed

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Braselton, Joshua F; Roberts, Christian K; Booth, Frank W

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disease risk is influenced by genetics and modifiable factors, such as physical activity and diet. Beginning at 6 weeks of age, rats selectively bred for high (HVR) versus low voluntary running distance (LVR) behaviors were housed in a complex design with or without voluntary running wheels being fed either a standard or Western (WD, 42% kcal from fat and added sucrose) diet for 8 weeks. Upon intervention completion, percent body fat, leptin, insulin, and mediobasal hypothalamic mRNAs related to appetite control were assessed. Wheel access led to differences in body weight, food intake, and serum leptin and insulin. Intriguingly, percent body fat, leptin, and insulin did not differ between HVR and LVR lines in response to the two levels of voluntary running, regardless of diet, after the 8 wk. experiment despite HVR eating more calories than LVR regardless of diet and voluntarily running 5-7 times further in wheels than LVR. In response to WD, we observed increases in Cart and Lepr mediobasal hypothalamic mRNA in HVR, but no differences in LVR. Npy mRNA was intrinsically greater in LVR than HVR, while wheel access led to greater Pomc and Cart mRNA in LVR versus HVR. These data suggest that despite greater consumption of WD, HVR animals respond similarly to WD as LVR as a result, in part, of their increased wheel running behavior. Furthermore, high physical activity in HVR may offset the deleterious effects of a WD on adiposity despite greater energy intake in this group.

  12. Rapid development of semistarvation-induced hyperactivity in Dark Agouti rats. Excessive wheel running and effect of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA).

    PubMed

    Vidal, Pedro; Pérez-Padilla, Ángeles; Pellón, Ricardo

    2013-02-01

    Clinical studies have found that patients with anorexia develop high activity levels. These data suggest a possible implication of activity in the aetiology of anorexia and are in line with findings obtained in animals during experimental procedures to model interactions between activity and weight loss. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) and semistarvation-induced hyperactivity (SIH) develop when laboratory rats have food access restricted to a single period in the day and are given free access to an activity wheel. This experiment sought to show the effect on weight loss of the excessive activity normally seen in Dark Agouti rats and of hyperactivity induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). To this end, 32 female rats of the Dark Agouti strain were selected and divided into four groups in accordance with a 2 × 2 factorial design, in which one factor was treatment (saline or MDMA) and the other was access or lack of access to an activity wheel. Animals with wheel running access displayed a marked increase in running combined with accelerated weight loss. Although pharmacological treatment resulted in no observable effect on weight loss, rats treated with 12.5mg/kg MDMA generally registered more wheel running than did those treated with saline. Analysis of data on the temporal distribution of wheel running revealed an alteration in circadian activity patterns as a consequence of MDMA. These results, by showing a general high level of wheel running in Dark Agouti rats, once again emphasise the close relationship between activity and weight loss in the development of SIH and related phenomena such as ABA.

  13. Injuries among wheeled shoe users: A comparison with other nonmotorized wheeled activities

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Siddharth; Tram, Janna; Hagel, Brent E; Kyle, Tania; Senger, Trudi; Belanger, Francois

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Nonmotorized wheeled activities are popular among children. However, these activities can result in significant injury if effective injury prevention measures are not taken. Recently, nonmotorized wheeled shoes have become increasingly popular among children. Preliminary research shows that these activities also result in significant injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the injury profiles of nonmotorized wheeled activities among Canadian children presenting to the emergency department. METHODS: A two-year retrospective study was conducted using data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program database, specific to the Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Alberta. Data were analyzed using cross tabulations of the type and nature of injury, helmet use, age and sex, with type of nonmotorized wheeled activity. RESULTS: The most common mechanism of injury for a nonmotorized wheeled activity was bicycling (66.9%), while wheeled shoe use produced the fewest injuries (2.7%). The upper extremity was the most frequently injured body region in all groups, comprising more than 75% of the injuries in wheeled shoe users and approximately 50% of the injuries in participants of other nonmotorized wheeled activities. Forearm fractures were the most common type of injury. Wheeled shoe users had the greatest proportion of forearm fractures. Helmet use was most prevalent in bicyclists (84.6%) and least prevalent in wheeled shoe users (4.7%). DISCUSSION: Nonmotorized wheeled activities can result in significant morbidity. Results from the present study suggest that wheeled shoe and push scooter activities can result in upper extremity injuries. Protective equipment, particularly wrist guards and helmets, should be used when participating in these activities. PMID:20885801

  14. Changes in mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor after wheel running in rats selectively bred for high- and low-aerobic capacity

    PubMed Central

    Groves-Chapman, Jessica L.; Murray, Patrick S.; Stevens, Kristin L.; Monroe, Derek; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Holmes, Philip V.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated levels of exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) messenger RNA (mRNA) within the hippocampal formation in rats selectively bred for 1) high intrinsic (i.e., untrained) aerobic capacity (High Capacity Runners, HCR), 2) low intrinsic aerobic capacity (Low Capacity Runners, LCR), and 3) unselected Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with or without free access to running wheels for three weeks. The specific aim of the study was to determine whether a dose-response relationship exists between cumulative running distance and levels of BDNF mRNA. No additional treatments or behavioral manipulations were used. HCR, LCR, and SD rats were grouped by strain and randomly assigned to sedentary or activity (voluntary access to activity wheel) conditions. Animals were killed after 21 days of exposure to the assigned conditions. Daily running distances (mean ± standard deviation meters/d) during week three were: HCR (4726 ± 3220), SD (2293 ± 3461), LCR (672 ± 323). Regardless of strain, levels of BDNF mRNA in CA1 were elevated in wheel runners compared to sedentary rats and this difference persisted after adjustment for age (p=0.040). BDNF mRNA was not affected by intrinsic aerobic capacity and was not related to total running distance. The results support that BDNF mRNA expression is increased by unlimited access to activity wheel running for 3 weeks but is not dependent upon accumulated running distance. PMID:22024546

  15. Changes in mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor after wheel running in rats selectively bred for high- and low-aerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Groves-Chapman, Jessica L; Murray, Patrick S; Stevens, Kristin L; Monroe, Derek C; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Holmes, Philip V; Dishman, Rod K

    2011-11-24

    We evaluated levels of exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) messenger RNA (mRNA) within the hippocampal formation in rats selectively bred for 1) high intrinsic (i.e., untrained) aerobic capacity (High Capacity Runners, HCR), 2) low intrinsic aerobic capacity (Low Capacity Runners, LCR), and 3) unselected Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with or without free access to running wheels for 3 weeks. The specific aim of the study was to determine whether a dose-response relationship exists between cumulative running distance and levels of BDNF mRNA. No additional treatments or behavioral manipulations were used. HCR, LCR, and SD rats were grouped by strain and randomly assigned to sedentary or activity (voluntary access to activity wheel) conditions. Animals were killed after 21 days of exposure to the assigned conditions. Daily running distances (mean ± standard deviation meters/day) during week three were: HCR (4726 ± 3220), SD (2293 ± 3461), LCR (672 ± 323). Regardless of strain, levels of BDNF mRNA in CA1 were elevated in wheel runners compared to sedentary rats and this difference persisted after adjustment for age (p=0.040). BDNF mRNA was not affected by intrinsic aerobic capacity and was not related to total running distance. The results support that BDNF mRNA expression is increased by unlimited access to activity wheel running for 3 weeks but is not dependent upon accumulated running distance.

  16. Responding for sucrose and wheel-running reinforcement: effect of D-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Belke, T W; Oldford, A C; Forgie, M Y; Beye, J A

    2005-07-01

    The present study assessed the effect of D-amphetamine on responding maintained by wheel-running and sucrose reinforcement. Six male albino Wistar rats were placed in running wheels and exposed to a fixed-interval 30-s schedule that produced either a drop of 5% sucrose solution or the opportunity to run for 15 s as reinforcing consequences for lever pressing. Each reinforcer type was signaled by a different stimulus. Doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mg/kg D-amphetamine were administered by i.p. injection 20 min prior to a session. As the dose increased, index of curvature values decreased toward zero and rate-dependency plots revealed increases in lower rates early in the interval and decreases in higher rates toward the end of the interval. Effects were similar in the presence of both stimuli. However, an analysis of post-reinforcement pauses and local response rates broken down by transitions revealed a differential effect. As the dose increased, local response rates following a wheel-running reinforcer were affected more than those following a sucrose reinforcer.

  17. The effects of food deprivation, nutritive and non-nutritive feeding and wheel running on gastric stress ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, I; Stephan, F K

    1998-01-01

    Feeding and housing conditions that induce gastric lesions were investigated. Rats were housed in activity wheels or in hanging cages and exposed to food deprivation, ad lib cellulose or 6 g of cellulose per day for 5 days. Food-deprived rats in both housing conditions had ulcers in the rumen but many rats also had mucosal ulcers. Cellulose prevented rumenal ulcers but produced a tendency toward more severe mucosal ulcers. Ulcers in wheel-housed rats were somewhat larger but the difference was not significant. In a second experiment, rats were fed 6 g/day laboratory chow or 6 g/day chow + ad lib cellulose until b.wt. reached a preset criterion. On the average, about 10 days on the feeding regimen were required to induce ulcers in these groups. None of the rats had rumenal ulcers. Mucosal ulcers were reliably larger in rats that received cellulose in addition to 6 g of chow. There was no difference in ulcer area between wheel-housed and cage-housed rats. The results indicate that solid bulk, regardless of its caloric value or amount, protects the nonglandular stomach whereas noncaloric bulk tends to aggravate ulcers in the glandular stomach. A small amount of chow delays the rate of b.wt. loss and consequently ulcer formation. Furthermore, wheel running is not necessary to produce mucosal ulcers when food intake is insufficient to maintain b.wt. and b.wt. at sacrifice seems to be a good predictor of ulcer formation.

  18. Voluntary Wheel Running Does not Affect Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior in Young Adult and Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Stephen A.; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W.; Woods, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral stimulation of the innate immune system with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes prolonged depressive-like behavior in aged mice that is dependent on indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) activation. Regular moderate intensity exercise training has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects that might reduce depressive-like behavior in aged mice. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that voluntary wheel running would attenuate LPS-induced depressive-like behavior and brain IDO gene expression in 4-month-old and 22-month-old C57BL/6J mice. Mice were housed with a running wheel (Voluntary Wheel Running, VWR) or no wheel (Standard) for 30 days (young adult mice) or 70 days (aged mice), after which they were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (young adult mice: 0.83 mg/kg; aged mice: 0.33 mg/kg). Young adult VWR mice ran on average 6.9 km/day, while aged VWR mice ran on average 3.4 km/day. Both young adult and aged VWR mice increased their forced exercise tolerance compared to their respective Standard control groups. VWR had no effect on LPS-induced anorexia, weight-loss, increased immobility in the tail suspension test, and decreased sucrose preference in either young adult or aged mice. Four (young adult mice) and twenty-four (aged mice) hours after injection of LPS transcripts for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IDO were upregulated in the whole brain independently of VWR. These results indicate that prolonged physical exercise has no effect on the neuroinflammatory response to LPS and its behavioral consequences. PMID:24281669

  19. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise.

  20. Effect of Intraperitoneal Radiotelemetry Instrumentation on Voluntary Wheel Running and Surgical Recovery in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    small transmitter group; model G2 Emitter, Mini Mitter, Bend, OR). Surgical preparation con- sisted of shaving the abdominal fur and scrubbing the...Sl , No 5 September 2012 Pages 600-608 Effect of Intraperitoneal Radiotelemetry Instrumentation on Voluntary Wheel Running and Surgical Recovery...of the diaphragm, large intestine, and duodenum. These results demonstrate that the large transmitter delayed surgical recovery, disrupted normal

  1. Locomotor trade-offs in mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Chappell, Mark A; McGillivray, David G; Syme, Douglas A; Garland, Theodore

    2009-08-01

    We investigated sprint performance and running economy of a unique ;mini-muscle' phenotype that evolved in response to selection for high voluntary wheel running in laboratory mice (Mus domesticus). Mice from four replicate selected (S) lines run nearly three times as far per day as four control lines. The mini-muscle phenotype, resulting from an initially rare autosomal recessive allele, has been favoured by the selection protocol, becoming fixed in one of the two S lines in which it occurred. In homozygotes, hindlimb muscle mass is halved, mass-specific muscle oxidative capacity is doubled, and the medial gastrocnemius exhibits about half the mass-specific isotonic power, less than half the mass-specific cyclic work and power, but doubled fatigue resistance. We hypothesized that mini-muscle mice would have a lower whole-animal energy cost of transport (COT), resulting from lower costs of cycling their lighter limbs, and reduced sprint speed, from reduced maximal force production. We measured sprint speed on a racetrack and slopes (incremental COT, or iCOT) and intercepts of the metabolic rate versus speed relationship during voluntary wheel running in 10 mini-muscle and 20 normal S-line females. Mini-muscle mice ran faster and farther on wheels, but for less time per day. Mini-muscle mice had significantly lower sprint speeds, indicating a functional trade-off. However, contrary to predictions, mini-muscle mice had higher COT, mainly because of higher zero-speed intercepts and postural costs (intercept-resting metabolic rate). Thus, mice with altered limb morphology after intense selection for running long distances do not necessarily run more economically.

  2. Behavioral Traits are Affected by Selective Breeding for Increased Wheel-Running Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jónás, I.; Schubert, K. A.; Reijne, A. C.; Scholte, J.; Garland, T.; Gerkema, M. P.; Scheurink, A. J. W.; Nyakas, C.

    2010-01-01

    Voluntary physical activity may be related to personality traits. Here, we investigated these relations in two mouse lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel-running behavior and in one non-selected control line. Selection lines were more explorative and “information gathering” in the open-field test, either with increased upright positions or horizontal locomotion toward the middle ring. Furthermore, one of the selection lines had an increased risk-taking behavior relative to the control line in approaching a novel object placed in the center of the open field. However, anxiety behavior was increased in selection lines during the plus-maze test. Maze learning was not statistically different among lines, but routine behavior was increased in both selection lines when the maze exit after 2 days of testing was displaced. Specifically, in the displaced maze, selected mice traveled more frequently to the old, habituated exit, bypassing the new exit attached to their home cage. Although the generality of the results would need to be confirmed in future studies including all eight lines in the selection experiment, the increased routine and exploratory behavior (at least in the lines used in the present study) may be adaptive to sustain high activity levels. PMID:20369280

  3. Chronic wheel running reduces maladaptive patterns of methamphetamine intake: regulation by attenuation of methamphetamine-induced neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Alexander J; Aparicio, Mark B; Kim, Airee; Sobieraj, Jeffery C; Yuan, Clara J; Grant, Yanabel; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2014-03-01

    We investigated whether prior exposure to chronic wheel running (WR) alters maladaptive patterns of excessive and escalating methamphetamine intake under extended access conditions, and intravenous methamphetamine self-administration-induced neurotoxicity. Adult rats were given access to WR or no wheel (sedentary) in their home cage for 6 weeks. A set of WR rats were injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to determine WR-induced changes in proliferation (2-h old) and survival (28-day old) of hippocampal progenitors. Another set of WR rats were withdrawn (WRw) or continued (WRc) to have access to running wheels in their home cages during self-administration days. Following self-administration [6 h/day], rats were tested on the progressive ratio (PR) schedule. Following PR, BrdU was injected to determine levels of proliferating progenitors (2-h old). WRc rats self-administered significantly less methamphetamine than sedentary rats during acquisition and escalation sessions, and demonstrated reduced motivation for methamphetamine seeking. Methamphetamine reduced daily running activity of WRc rats compared with that of pre-methamphetamine days. WRw rats self-administered significantly more methamphetamine than sedentary rats during acquisition, an effect that was not observed during escalation and PR sessions. WR-induced beneficial effects on methamphetamine self-administration were not attributable to neuroplasticity effects in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, but were attributable to WR-induced inhibition of methamphetamine-induced increases in the number of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing neurons and apoptosis in the nucleus accumbens shell. Our results demonstrate that WR prevents methamphetamine-induced damage to forebrain neurons to provide a beneficial effect on drug-taking behavior. Importantly, WR-induced neuroprotective effects are transient and continued WR activity is necessary to prevent compulsive methamphetamine intake.

  4. Forces and mechanical energy fluctuations during diagonal stride roller skiing; running on wheels?

    PubMed

    Kehler, Alyse L; Hajkova, Eliska; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Kram, Rodger

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical energy can be conserved during terrestrial locomotion in two ways: the inverted pendulum mechanism for walking and the spring-mass mechanism for running. Here, we investigated whether diagonal stride cross-country roller skiing (DIA) utilizes similar mechanisms. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that running and DIA would share similar phase relationships and magnitudes of kinetic energy (KE), and gravitational potential energy (GPE) fluctuations, indicating elastic energy storage and return, as if roller skiing is like 'running on wheels'. Experienced skiers (N=9) walked and ran at 1.25 and 3 m s(-1), respectively, and roller skied with DIA at both speeds on a level dual-belt treadmill that recorded perpendicular and parallel forces. We calculated the KE and GPE of the center of mass from the force recordings. As expected, the KE and GPE fluctuated with an out-of-phase pattern during walking and an in-phase pattern during running. Unlike walking, during DIA, the KE and GPE fluctuations were in phase, as they are in running. However, during the glide phase, KE was dissipated as frictional heat and could not be stored elastically in the tendons, as in running. Elastic energy storage and return epitomize running and thus we reject our hypothesis. Diagonal stride cross-country skiing is a biomechanically unique movement that only superficially resembles walking or running.

  5. Techniques for establishing schedules with wheel running as reinforcement in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, I H

    1993-01-01

    In three experiments, access to wheel running was contingent on lever pressing. In each experiment, the duration of access to running was reduced gradually to 4, 5, or 6 s, and the schedule parameters were expanded gradually. The sessions lasted 2 hr. In Experiment 1, a fixed-ratio 20 schedule controlled a typical break-and-run pattern of lever pressing that was maintained throughout the session for 3 rats. In Experiment 2, a fixed-interval schedule of 6 min maintained lever pressing throughout the session for 3 rats, and for 1 rat, the rate of lever pressing was positively accelerated between reinforcements. In Experiment 3, a variable-ratio schedule of 20 or 35 was in effect and maintained lever pressing at a very stable pace throughout the session for 2 of 3 rats; for 1 rat, lever pressing was maintained at an irregular rate. When the session duration was extended to successive 24-hr periods, with food and water accessible in Experiment 3, lever pressing settled into a periodic pattern occurring at a high rate at approximately the same time each day. In each experiment, the rats that developed the highest local rates of running during wheel access also maintained the most stable and highest rates of lever pressing. PMID:8354968

  6. Evidence for positive, but not negative, behavioral contrast with wheel-running reinforcement on multiple variable-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David

    2016-12-01

    Rats responded on a multiple variable-ratio (VR) 10 VR 10 schedule of reinforcement in which lever pressing was reinforced by the opportunity to run in a wheel for 30s in both the changed (manipulated) and unchanged components. To generate positive contrast, the schedule of reinforcement in the changed component was shifted to extinction; to generate negative contrast, the schedule was shifted to VR 3. With the shift to extinction in the changed component, wheel-running and local lever-pressing rates increased in the unchanged component, a result supporting positive contrast; however, the shift to a VR 3 schedule in the changed component showed no evidence of negative contrast in the unaltered setting, only wheel running decreased in the unchanged component. Changes in wheel-running rates across components were consistent in showing a compensation effect, depending on whether the schedule manipulation increased or decreased opportunities for wheel running in the changed component. These findings are the first to demonstrate positive behavioral contrast on a multiple schedule with wheel running as reinforcement in both components.

  7. Voluntary wheel running reduces voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice: identification of candidate genes through striatal gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Darlington, T M; McCarthy, R D; Cox, R J; Miyamoto-Ditmon, J; Gallego, X; Ehringer, M A

    2016-06-01

    Hedonic substitution, where wheel running reduces voluntary ethanol consumption, has been observed in prior studies. Here, we replicate and expand on previous work showing that mice decrease voluntary ethanol consumption and preference when given access to a running wheel. While earlier work has been limited mainly to behavioral studies, here we assess the underlying molecular mechanisms that may account for this interaction. From four groups of female C57BL/6J mice (control, access to two-bottle choice ethanol, access to a running wheel, and access to both two-bottle choice ethanol and a running wheel), mRNA-sequencing of the striatum identified differential gene expression. Many genes in ethanol preference quantitative trait loci were differentially expressed due to running. Furthermore, we conducted Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis and identified gene networks corresponding to each effect behavioral group. Candidate genes for mediating the behavioral interaction between ethanol consumption and wheel running include multiple potassium channel genes, Oprm1, Prkcg, Stxbp1, Crhr1, Gabra3, Slc6a13, Stx1b, Pomc, Rassf5 and Camta2. After observing an overlap of many genes and functional groups previously identified in studies of initial sensitivity to ethanol, we hypothesized that wheel running may induce a change in sensitivity, thereby affecting ethanol consumption. A behavioral study examining Loss of Righting Reflex to ethanol following exercise trended toward supporting this hypothesis. These data provide a rich resource for future studies that may better characterize the observed transcriptional changes in gene networks in response to ethanol consumption and wheel running.

  8. Analysis of inflammation-induced depression of home cage wheel running in rats reveals the difference between opioid antinociception and restoration of function.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Ram; Calsbeek, Jonas J; Morgan, Michael M

    2017-01-15

    Opioids are effective at inhibiting responses to noxious stimuli in rodents, but have limited efficacy and many side effects in chronic pain patients. One reason for this disconnect is that nociception is typically assessed using withdrawal from noxious stimuli in animals, whereas chronic pain patients suffer from abnormal pain that disrupts normal activity. We hypothesized that assessment of home cage wheel running in rats would provide a much more clinically relevant method to assess opioid efficacy to restore normal behavior. Intraplantar injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the right hindpaw depressed wheel running and caused mechanical allodynia measured with the von Frey test in both male and female rats. Administration of an ED50 dose of morphine (3.2mg/kg) reversed mechanical allodynia, but did not reverse CFA-induced depression of wheel running. In contrast, administration of a low dose of morphine (1.0mg/kg) restored running for one hour in both sexes, but had no effect on mechanical allodynia. Administration of the atypical opioid buprenorphine had no effect on inflammation-induced depression of wheel running in male or female rats, but attenuated mechanical allodynia in male rats. Administration of buprenorphine and higher doses of morphine depressed wheel running in non-inflamed rats, suggesting that the side effects of opioids interfere with restoration of function. These data indicate that restoration of pain-depressed function requires antinociception in the absence of disruptive side effects. The disruptive side effects of opioids are consistent with the major limitation of opioid use in human pain patients.

  9. The effects of changes in housing on feeding and wheel running.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, R; Eikelboom, R

    2000-01-01

    The experiments explored the effects on feeding when rats were moved between individual and paired housing. In Experiment 1, rats moved to paired housing showed a 3-day suppression in feeding (initially 23%) compared to chronically individual- or pair-housed rats. In Experiment 2, half of the rats from the two control groups of Experiment 1 were moved between individual and paired housing on alternate days. Only the rats moved to paired housing showed a feeding suppression (initially 40%), but the nature of the suppression differed from Experiment 1: it appeared that only one rat of each pair showed a feeding suppression. Experiment 3 examined simultaneous introduction of running wheels and moves to paired housing. The feeding suppression induced by the move to paired housing was more immediate and shorter lived than the wheel-induced suppression. Unlike wheel access, paired housing produced only a temporary suppression of body weight. These experiments suggest that the relatively simple manipulation of moving rats from individual to paired housing results in a temporary stress-induced decrease in feeding.

  10. Wheel running exercise attenuates vulnerability to self-administer nicotine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Victoria; Lycas, Matthew D; Lynch, Wendy J; Brunzell, Darlene H

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing or postponing tobacco use initiation could greatly reduce the number of tobacco-related deaths. While evidence suggests that exercise is a promising treatment for tobacco addiction, it is not clear whether exercise could prevent initial vulnerability to tobacco use. Thus, using an animal model, we examined whether exercise attenuates vulnerability to the use and reinforcing effects of nicotine, the primary addictive chemical in tobacco. Methods Initial vulnerability was assessed using an acquisition procedure wherein exercising (unlocked running wheel, n = 10) and sedentary (locked or no wheel, n = 12) male adolescent rats had access to nicotine infusions (0.01-mg/kg) during daily 21.5-hr sessions beginning on postnatal day 30. Exercise/sedentary sessions (2-hr/day) were conducted prior to each of the acquisition sessions. The effects of exercise on nicotine’s reinforcing effects were further assessed in separate groups of exercising (unlocked wheel, n = 7) and sedentary (no wheel, n = 5) rats responding for nicotine under a progressive-ratio schedule with exercise/sedentary sessions (2-hr/day) conducted before the daily progressive-ratio sessions. Results While high rates of acquisition of nicotine self-administration were observed among both groups of sedentary controls, acquisition was robustly attenuated in the exercise group with only 20% of exercising rats meeting the acquisition criterion within the 16-day testing period as compared to 67% of the sedentary controls. Exercise also decreased progressive-ratio responding for nicotine as compared to baseline and to sedentary controls. Conclusions Exercise may effectively prevent the initiation of nicotine use in adolescents by reducing the reinforcing effects of nicotine. PMID:26433561

  11. Mutagenesis and behavioral screening for altered circadian activity identifies the mouse mutant, Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pickard, G E; Sollars, P J; Rinchik, E M; Nolan, P M; Bucan, M

    1995-12-24

    The molecular processes underlying the generation of circadian behavior in mammals are virtually unknown. To identify genes that regulate or alter circadian activity rhythms, a mouse mutagenesis program was initiated in conjunction with behavioral screening for alterations in circadian period (tau), a fundamental property of the biological clock. Male mice of the inbred BALB/c strain, treated with the potent mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea were mated with wild-type hybrids. Wheel-running activity of approximately 300 male progeny was monitored for 6-10 weeks under constant dark (DD) conditions. The tau DD of a single mouse (#187) was longer than the population mean by more than three standard deviations (24.20 vs. 23.32 +/- 0.02 h; mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 277). In addition, mouse #187 exhibited other abnormal phenotypes, including hyperactive bi-directional circling/spinning activity and an abnormal response to light. Heterozygous progeny of the founder mouse, generated from outcrossings with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, displayed lengthened tau DD although approximately 20% of the animals showed no wheel-running activity despite being quite active. Under light:dark conditions, all animals displaying circling behavior that ran in the activity wheels exhibited robust wheel-running activity at lights-ON and these animals also showed enhanced wheel-running activity in constant light conditions. The genetic dissection of the complex behavior associated with this mutation was facilitated by the previously described genetic mapping of the mutant locus causing circling behavior, designated Wheels (Whl), to the subcentromeric portion of mouse chromosome 4. In this report, the same locus is shown to be responsible for the abnormal responses to light and presumably for the altered circadian behavior. Characterization of the gene altered in the novel Whl mutation will contribute to understanding the molecular elements involved in mammalian circadian regulation.

  12. Corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptors mediate the motivation for voluntary wheel running in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie-Christine

    2016-09-15

    Physical exercise can improve cognition but whether this is related to motivation levels is unknown. Voluntary wheel running is a rewarding activity proposed as a model of motivation to exercise. To question the potential effects of exercise motivation on subsequent behaviour, we used a pharmacological approach targeting some reward mechanisms. The stress hormone corticosterone has rewarding effects mediated by activation of low affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GR). To investigate whether corticosterone synthesis motivates exercise via activation of GRs and subsequently, impacts on behaviour, we treated C57BL/6J mice acutely with the inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis metyrapone (35mg/kg) or repeatedly with the GR antagonist mifepristone (30mg/kg) prior to 1-h running wheel sessions. To investigate whether reducing motivation to exercise impacts on behaviour, we antagonised running-induced dopamine D2/D3 receptors activation with sulpiride (25 or 50mg/kg) and assessed locomotor, anxiety-related and memory performance after 20 running sessions over 4 weeks. We found that corticosterone synthesis contributes to running levels, but the maintenance of running behaviour was not mediated by activation of GRs. Intermittent exercise was not associated with changes in behavioural or cognitive performance. The persistent reduction in exercise levels triggered by sulpiride also had limited impact on behavioural performance, although the level of performance for some behaviours was related to the level of exercise. Altogether, these findings indicate that corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptor activation contribute to the motivation for wheel running, but suggest that motivation for exercise is not a sufficient factor to alter behaviour in healthy mice.

  13. Systematic autistic-like behavioral phenotyping of 4 mouse strains using a novel wheel-running assay.

    PubMed

    Karvat, Golan; Kimchi, Tali

    2012-08-01

    Three core symptoms of autistic spectrum disorders are stereotypic movements, resistance to change in routines and deficits in social interaction. In order to understand their neuronal mechanisms, there is a dire need for behavioral paradigms to assess those symptoms in rodents. Here we present a novel method which is based on positive reward in a customized wheel-running apparatus to assess these symptoms. As a proof of concept, 4 mouse strains were tested in the new behavioral paradigm; 2 control lines (C57BL/6 and ICR) and 2 mouse-models of autism (BTBR T+ tf/J and Nlgn3(tm1Sud)). We found that the C57BL/6, ICR and Nlgn3(tm1Sud) mice showed a significant reduction in stereotypical behavior in the presence of the running wheel, ability to forfeit the running habit when the running-wheel was jammed, and preference of interacting with a social stimulus over the jammed running-wheel. No difference was found between genotypes of the Nlgn3(tm1Sud) mice. On the other hand, the BTBR mice exhibited persistent, elevated levels of stereotypical behavior. In addition, they presented a deficit in their ability to adjust to a changing environment, as manifested in persistence to interact with the wheel even when it was jammed. Lastly, the BTBR mice exhibited no significant preference to interact with the stranger mouse over the jammed running-wheel. These results were validated by a set of commonly used behavioral tests. Overall, our novel behavioral paradigm detects multiple components of autistic-like phenotypes, including cognitive rigidity, stereotypic behavior and social deficiency.

  14. Disruption of running activity rhythm following restricted feeding in female mice: Preventive effects of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Kazumi; Araki, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Biological rhythms are critical in the etiology of mood disorders; therefore, effective mood disorder treatments should address rhythm disturbances. Among the variables synchronized with the light-dark cycle, spontaneous activity in rodents is useful for investigating circadian rhythms. However, previous studies have focused only on the increase of wheel-running activity under restricted feeding conditions, while little information is available on circadian rhythm of running activity. In this study, chronometrical analysis was used to assess whether circadian rhythms during wheel-running are altered by restricted feeding and affected by antidepressant drugs. Wheel revolutions were automatically recorded and analyzed using cosinor-rhythmometry in 8-week old ICR albino mice. When feeding was restricted to 1 h per day (21:00-22:00), wheel-running rhythms were reliably disrupted. Female mice exhibited marked alterations in the pattern and extent of wheel-running beginning on day 1. Subchronic treatment with imipramine or paroxetine, as well as tandospirone and (-)-DOI, prevented wheel-running rhythm disruption. Thus, altering the circadian activity rhythms of female mice on a 1-h feeding schedule may be useful for investigating disturbances in biological rhythms.

  15. Voluntary wheel running in mice increases the rate of neurogenesis without affecting anxiety-related behaviour in single tests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role played by adult neurogenesis in anxiety is not clear. A recent study revealed a surprising positive correlation between increased anxiety and elevated neurogenesis following chronic voluntary wheel running and multiple behavioural testing in mice, suggesting that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is involved in the genesis of anxiety. To exclude the possible confounding effect of multiple testing that may have occurred in the aforementioned study, we assessed (1) the effects of mouse voluntary wheel running (14 vs. 28 days) on anxiety in just one behavioural test; the open field, and (2), using different markers, proliferation, differentiation, survival and maturation of newly born neurons in the dentate gyrus immediately afterwards. Effects of wheel running on anxiety-related behaviour were confirmed in a separate batch of animals tested in another test of anxiety, the light/dark box test. Results Running altered measures of locomotion and exploration, but not anxiety-related behaviour in either test. 14 days running significantly increased proliferation, and differentiation and survival were increased after both running durations. 28 day running mice also exhibited an increased rate of maturation. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between the amount of proliferation, but not maturation, and anxiety measures in the open field of the 28 day running mice. Conclusions Overall, this evidence suggests that without repeated testing, newly born mature neurons may not be involved in the genesis of anxiety per se. PMID:22682077

  16. Wheel running can accelerate or delay extinction of conditioned place preference for cocaine in male C57BL/6J mice depending on timing of wheel access

    PubMed Central

    Mustroph, Martina L.; Stobaugh, Derrick J.; Miller, Daniel S.; DeYoung, Erin K.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic exercise may represent a useful intervention for drug abuse in predisposed individuals. Exercise increases plasticity in the brain that could be used to reverse learned drug associations. Previous studies report that exposing mice to a complex environment including running wheels after drug conditioning abolishes conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine, whereas running can enhance CPP when administered before conditioning. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that timing of exercise relative to conditioning has opposing effects on cocaine CPP. Male C57BL/6J mice experienced 30 days of running or Sedentary treatments either before or after cocaine conditioning. Control animals always received saline and never cocaine but otherwise underwent the same conditioning and exercise treatments. Animals were administered BrdU injections at the onset of conditioning or exercise and euthanized at the end of the study to quantify survival of new neurons in the hippocampus as a marker of plasticity. Wheel running accelerated extinction of CPP when running occurred entirely after drug conditioning, whereas running delayed extinction when administered before conditioning. A single conditioning day after running was sufficient to abolish the accelerated extinction observed when all conditioning preceded running. Running approximately doubled adult hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas cocaine had no effect. Results suggest exercise-induced plasticity can facilitate learning that context is no longer associated with drug. However, if drug exposure occurs after exercise, running-induced plasticity may strengthen drug associations. Results provide insight into the interaction between exercise and drug conditioning that could have implications for drug abuse treatments. PMID:21864322

  17. Exclusive Preference Develops Less Readily on Concurrent Ratio Schedules with Wheel-Running than with Sucrose Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belke, Terry W.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research suggested that allocation of responses on concurrent schedules of wheel-running reinforcement was less sensitive to schedule differences than typically observed with more conventional reinforcers. To assess this possibility, 16 female Long Evans rats were exposed to concurrent FR FR schedules of reinforcement and the schedule…

  18. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and c-Fos induction during escalation of voluntary wheel running in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Kohman, Rachel A.; Miller, Daniel S.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Haferkamp, Erik H.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2010-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running activates dentate gyrus granule neurons and increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Average daily running distance typically increases over a period of 3 weeks in rodents. Whether neurogenesis and cell activation are greater at the peak of running as compared to the initial escalation period is not known. Therefore, adult C57BL/6J male mice received 5 days of BrdU injections, at the same age, to label dividing cells during the onset of wheel access or after 21 days during peak levels of running or in sedentary conditions. Mice were sampled either 24 hours or 25 days after the last BrdU injection to measure cell proliferation and survival, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was performed on brain sections to identify the numbers of proliferating BrdU labeled cells, and new neurons (BrdU/NeuN co-labeled) in the dentate gyrus. Ki67 was used as an additional mitotic marker. The induction of c-Fos was used to identify neurons activated from running. Mice ran approximately half as far during the first 5 days as compared to after 21 days. Running increased Ki67 cells at the onset but after 21 days levels were similar to sedentary. Numbers of BrdU cells were similar in all groups 24 hours after the final injection. However, after 25 days, running approximately doubled the survival of new neurons born either at the onset or peak of running. These changes co-varied with c-Fos expression. We conclude that sustained running maintains a stable rate of neurogenesis above sedentary via activity-dependent increases in differentiation and survival, not proliferation, of progenitor cells in the C57BL/6J model. PMID:20472002

  19. Interrelationship of CB1R and OBR pathways in regulation of metabolic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral responses to food restriction and voluntary wheel running.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Vine, Donna F; Russell, James C; Heth, C Donald; Pierce, W David; Proctor, Spencer D

    2014-07-15

    We hypothesized the cannabinoid-1 receptor and leptin receptor (ObR) operate synergistically to modulate metabolic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral responses of animals exposed to a survival challenge (food restriction and wheel running). Obese-prone (OP) JCR:LA-cp rats, lacking functional ObR, and lean-prone (LP) JCR:LA-cp rats (intact ObR) were assigned to OP-C and LP-C (control) or CBR1-antagonized (SR141716, 10 mg/kg body wt in food) OP-A and LP-A groups. After 32 days, all rats were exposed to 1.5-h daily meals without the drug and 22.5-h voluntary wheel running, a survival challenge that normally culminates in activity-based anorexia (ABA). Rats were removed from the ABA protocol when body weight reached 75% of entry weight (starvation criterion) or after 14 days (survival criterion). LP-A rats starved faster (6.44 ± 0.24 days) than LP-C animals (8.00 ± 0.29 days); all OP rats survived the ABA challenge. LP-A rats lost weight faster than animals in all other groups (P < 0.001). Consistent with the starvation results, LP-A rats increased the rate of wheel running more rapidly than LP-C rats (P = 0.001), with no difference in hypothalamic and primary neural reward serotonin levels. In contrast, OP-A rats showed suppression of wheel running compared with the OP-C group (days 6-14 of ABA challenge, P < 0.001) and decreased hypothalamic and neural reward serotonin levels (P < 0.01). Thus there is an interrelationship between cannabinoid-1 receptor and ObR pathways in regulation of energy balance and physical activity. Effective clinical measures to prevent and treat a variety of disorders will require understanding of the mechanisms underlying these effects.

  20. Wheel-running exercise alters rat diaphragm action potentials and their regulation by K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Van Lunteren, Erik; Moyer, Michelle

    2003-08-01

    Endurance exercise modifies regulatory systems that control skeletal muscle Na+ and K+ fluxes, in particular Na+-K+-ATPase-mediated transport of these ions. Na+ and K+ ion channels also play important roles in the regulation of ionic movements, specifically mediating Na+ influx and K+ efflux that occur during contractions resulting from action potential depolarization and repolarization. Whether exercise alters skeletal muscle electrophysiological properties controlled by these ion channels is unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that endurance exercise modifies diaphragm action potential properties. Exercised rats spent 8 wk with free access to running wheels, and they were compared with sedentary rats living in conventional rodent housing. Diaphragm muscle was subsequently removed under anesthesia and studied in vitro. Resting membrane potential was not affected by endurance exercise. Muscle from exercised rats had a slower rate of action potential repolarization than that of sedentary animals (P = 0.0098), whereas rate of depolarization was similar in the two groups. The K+ channel blocker 3,4-diaminopyridine slowed action potential repolarization and increased action potential area of both exercised and sedentary muscle. However, these effects were significantly smaller in diaphragm from exercised than sedentary rats. These data indicate that voluntary running slows diaphragm action potential repolarization, most likely by modulating K+ channel number or function.

  1. Spontaneous running activity in male rats - Effect of age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Dolkas, C. B.; Sims, C.; Reaven, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Variations in the intensity and the patterns of spontaneous running activity in wheel cages were studied in male rats aged 7 weeks to one year. Daily running records were obtained for periods of 12 mo, and 24-hour recordings were made for selected runners in order to study variations in running activity during the day. The data indicate that for rats running over two miles/day, the maximum running intensity can be divided into two groups: a group of high achievers running 8 miles/day; and a group of moderate achievers running 4.8 miles/day. For both groups spontaneous activity reached a maximum after 4-5 weeks. An hourly pattern of running activity during the day was identified in rats of increasing age who averaged 9.0, 4.5, 2.6, and 1.2 miles/day, respectively. Progressive losses were observed in both the speed and the duration of spontaneous running as the rats increased in age, with the intensity of exercise falling below 2 miles/day after 7-8 months of age.

  2. Long-term wheel running compromises diaphragm function but improves cardiac and plantarflexor function in the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Acosta, Pedro; Sleeper, Meg M; Barton, Elisabeth R; Sweeney, H Lee

    2013-09-01

    Dystrophin-deficient muscles suffer from free radical injury, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and inflammation, among other pathologies that contribute to muscle fiber injury and loss, leading to wheelchair confinement and death in the patient. For some time, it has been appreciated that endurance training has the potential to counter many of these contributing factors. Correspondingly, numerous investigations have shown improvements in limb muscle function following endurance training in mdx mice. However, the effect of long-term volitional wheel running on diaphragm and cardiac function is largely unknown. Our purpose was to determine the extent to which long-term endurance exercise affected dystrophic limb, diaphragm, and cardiac function. Diaphragm specific tension was reduced by 60% (P < 0.05) in mice that performed 1 yr of volitional wheel running compared with sedentary mdx mice. Dorsiflexor mass (extensor digitorum longus and tibialis anterior) and function (extensor digitorum longus) were not altered by endurance training. In mice that performed 1 yr of volitional wheel running, plantarflexor mass (soleus and gastrocnemius) was increased and soleus tetanic force was increased 36%, while specific tension was similar in wheel-running and sedentary groups. Cardiac mass was increased 15%, left ventricle chamber size was increased 20% (diastole) and 18% (systole), and stroke volume was increased twofold in wheel-running compared with sedentary mdx mice. These data suggest that the dystrophic heart may undergo positive exercise-induced remodeling and that limb muscle function is largely unaffected. Most importantly, however, as the diaphragm most closely recapitulates the human disease, these data raise the possibility of exercise-mediated injury in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  3. Cardiac and skeletal muscle adaptations to voluntary wheel running in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Allen, D L; Harrison, B C; Maass, A; Bell, M L; Byrnes, W C; Leinwand, L A

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the effects of voluntary cage wheel exercise on mouse cardiac and skeletal muscle. Inbred male C57/Bl6 mice (age 6-8 wk; n = 12) [corrected] ran an average of 4.3 h/24 h, for an average distance of 6.8 km/24 h, and at an average speed of 26.4 m/min. A significant increase in the ratio of heart mass to body mass (mg/g) was evident after 2 wk of voluntary exercise, and cardiac atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA levels were significantly increased in the ventricles after 4 wk of voluntary exercise. A significant increase in the percentage of fibers expressing myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIa was observed in both the gastrocnemius and the tibialis anterior (TA) by 2 wk, and a significant decrease in the percentage of fibers expressing IIb MHC was evident in both muscles after 4 wk of voluntary exercise. The TA muscle showed a greater increase in the percentage of IIa MHC-expressing fibers than did the gastrocnemius muscle (40 and 20%, respectively, compared with 10% for nonexercised). Finally, the number of oxidative fibers as revealed by NADH-tetrazolium reductase histochemical staining was increased in the TA but not the gastrocnemius after 4 wk of voluntary exercise. All results are relative to age-matched mice housed without access to running wheels. Together these data demonstrate that voluntary exercise in mice results in cardiac and skeletal muscle adaptations consistent with endurance exercise.

  4. Effects of diet-induced obesity and voluntary wheel running on the microstructure of the murine distal femur

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity and osteoporosis, two possibly related conditions, are rapidly expanding health concerns in modern society. Both of them are associated with sedentary life style and nutrition. To investigate the effects of diet-induced obesity and voluntary physical activity we used high resolution micro-computed tomography (μCT) together with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to examine the microstructure of the distal femoral metaphysis in mice. Methods Forty 7-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were assigned to 4 groups: control (C), control + running (CR), high-fat diet (HF), and high-fat diet + running (HFR). After a 21-week intervention, all the mice were sacrificed and the left femur dissected for pQCT and μCT measurements. Results The mice fed the high-fat diet showed a significant weight gain (over 70% for HF and 60% for HFR), with increased epididymal fat pad mass and impaired insulin sensitivity. These obese mice had significantly higher trabecular connectivity density, volume, number, thickness, area and mass, and smaller trabecular separation. At the whole bone level, they had larger bone circumference and cross-sectional area and higher density-weighted maximal, minimal, and polar moments of inertia. Voluntary wheel running decreased all the cortical bone parameters, but increased the trabecular mineral density, and decreased the pattern factor and structure model index towards a more plate-like structure. Conclusions The results suggest that in mice the femur adapts to obesity by improving bone strength both at the whole bone and micro-structural level. Adaptation to running exercise manifests itself in increased trabecular density and improved 3D structure, but in a limited overall bone growth PMID:21241467

  5. Effect of sucrose availability on wheel-running as an operant and as a reinforcing consequence on a multiple schedule: Additive effects of extrinsic and automatic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David

    2015-07-01

    As a follow up to Belke and Pierce's (2014) study, we assessed the effects of repeated presentation and removal of sucrose solution on the behavior of rats responding on a two-component multiple schedule. Rats completed 15 wheel turns (FR 15) for either 15% or 0% sucrose solution in the manipulated component and lever pressed 10 times on average (VR 10) for an opportunity to complete 15 wheel turns (FR 15) in the other component. In contrast to our earlier study, the components advanced based on time (every 8min) rather than completed responses. Results showed that in the manipulated component wheel-running rates were higher and the latency to initiate running longer when sucrose was present (15%) compared to absent (0% or water); the number of obtained outcomes (sucrose/water), however, did not differ with the presentation and withdrawal of sucrose. For the wheel-running as reinforcement component, rates of wheel turns, overall lever-pressing rates, and obtained wheel-running reinforcements were higher, and postreinforcement pauses shorter, when sucrose was present (15%) than absent (0%) in manipulated component. Overall, our findings suggest that wheel-running rate regardless of its function (operant or reinforcement) is maintained by automatically generated consequences (automatic reinforcement) and is increased as an operant by adding experimentally arranged sucrose reinforcement (extrinsic reinforcement). This additive effect on operant wheel-running generalizes through induction or arousal to the wheel-running as reinforcement component, increasing the rate of responding for opportunities to run and the rate of wheel-running per opportunity.

  6. Increased Skeletal Muscle GLUT4 Expression in Obese Mice After Voluntary Wheel Running Exercise Is Posttranscriptional.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Jami M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2016-10-01

    Exercise promotes glucose clearance by increasing skeletal muscle GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake. Importantly, exercise upregulates muscle GLUT4 expression in an insulin-independent manner under conditions of insulin resistance, such as with type 2 diabetes. However, the insulin-independent mechanism responsible for rescued muscle GLUT4 expression is poorly understood. We used voluntary wheel running (VWR) in mice to test the prevailing hypothesis that insulin-independent upregulation of skeletal muscle GLUT4 protein expression with exercise is through increased Glut4 transcription. We demonstrate that 4 weeks of VWR exercise in obese mice rescued high-fat diet-induced decreased muscle GLUT4 protein and improved both fasting plasma insulin and hepatic triacylglyceride levels, but did not rescue muscle Glut4 mRNA. Persistent reduction in Glut4 mRNA suggests that a posttranscriptional mechanism regulated insulin-independent muscle GLUT4 protein expression in response to exercise in lean and obese mice. Reduction of GLUT4 protein in sedentary animals upon treatment with rapamycin revealed mTORC1-dependent GLUT4 regulation. However, no difference in GLUT4 protein expression was observed in VWR-exercised mice treated with either rapamycin or Torin 1, indicating that exercise-dependent regulation on GLUT4 was mTOR independent. The findings provide new insight into the mechanisms responsible for exercise-dependent regulation of GLUT4 in muscle.

  7. Chronic voluntary wheel running facilitates corticosterone response habituation to repeated audiogenic stress exposure in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Masini, Cher V; Nyhuis, Tara J; Fleshner, Monika; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary exercise is associated with the prevention and treatment of numerous physical and psychological illnesses, yet the mechanisms by which it confers this protection remain unclear. In contrast, stress, particularly under conditions of prolonged or repeated exposure when glucocorticoid levels are consistently elevated, can have a devastating impact on health. It has been suggested that the benefits of physical exercise may lie in an ability to reduce some of the more deleterious health effects of stress and stress hormones. The present series of experiments provides evidence that voluntary exercise facilitates habituation of corticosterone but not adrenocorticotropin hormone responses to repeated stress presentations. After 6 weeks of running wheel access or sedentary housing conditions, rats were exposed to 11 consecutive daily 30 min presentations of 98 dB noise stress. Similar corticosterone responses in exercised rats and sedentary controls were observed following the first, acute stress presentation. While both groups demonstrated habituation of corticosterone secretory responses with repeated noise stress exposures, the rate of habituation was significantly facilitated in exercised animals. These results suggest that voluntary exercise may reduce the negative impact of prolonged or repeated stress on health by enhancing habituation of the corticosterone response ultimately reducing the amount of glucocorticoids the body and brain are exposed to.

  8. Effects of 8 wk of voluntary unloaded wheel running on K+ tolerance and excitability of soleus muscles in rat.

    PubMed

    Broch-Lips, Martin; de Paoli, Frank; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Overgaard, Kristian; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2011-07-01

    During intense exercise, efflux of K(+) from working muscles increases extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) to levels that can compromise muscle excitability and hence cause fatigue. In this context, the reduction in the exercise-induced elevation of [K(+)](o) observed after training in humans is suggested to contribute to the increased performance after training. Although a similar effect could be obtained by an increase in the tolerance of muscle to elevated [K(+)](o), this possibility has not been investigated. To examine this, isolated soleus muscles from sedentary (sedentary) rats and from rats that had voluntarily covered 13.1 ± 0.7 km/day in an unloaded running wheel for 8 wk (active) were compared. In muscles from active rats, the loss of force induced by exposure to an elevated [K(+)](o) of 9 mM was 42% lower than in muscles from sedentary rats (P < 0.001). This apparent increase in K(+) tolerance in active rats was associated with an increased excitability as evident from a 33% reduction in the electrical current needed to excite individual muscle fibers (P < 0.0009). Moreover, muscles from active rats had lower Cl(-) conductance, higher maximal rate of rise of single-fiber action potentials (AP), and higher Na(+)/K(+) pump content. When stimulated intermittently at 6.5 mM K(+), muscles from active rats displayed better endurance than muscles from sedentary rats, whereas no difference was found when the muscles were stimulated continuously at 30 or 120 Hz. We conclude that voluntary running increases muscle excitability, leading to improved tolerance to elevated [K(+)](o).

  9. Increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not necessary for wheel running to abolish conditioned place preference for cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Mustroph, M L; Merritt, J R; Holloway, A L; Pinardo, H; Miller, D S; Kilby, C N; Bucko, P; Wyer, A; Rhodes, J S

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that wheel running can abolish conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine in mice. Running significantly increases the number of new neurons in the hippocampus, and new neurons have been hypothesised to enhance plasticity and behavioral flexibility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that increased neurogenesis was necessary for exercise to abolish cocaine CPP. Male nestin-thymidine kinase transgenic mice were conditioned with cocaine, and then housed with or without running wheels for 32 days. Half of the mice were fed chow containing valganciclovir to induce apoptosis in newly divided neurons, and the other half were fed standard chow. For the first 10 days, mice received daily injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. On the last 4 days, mice were tested for CPP, and then euthanized for measurement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by counting the number of BrdU-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus. Levels of running were similar in mice fed valganciclovir-containing chow and normal chow. Valganciclovir significantly reduced the numbers of neurons (BrdU-positive/NeuN-positive) in the dentate gyrus of both sedentary mice and runner mice. Valganciclovir-fed runner mice showed similar levels of neurogenesis as sedentary, normal-fed controls. However, valganciclovir-fed runner mice showed the same abolishment of CPP as runner mice with intact neurogenesis. The results demonstrate that elevated adult hippocampal neurogenesis resulting from running is not necessary for running to abolish cocaine CPP in mice.

  10. Voluntary wheel running augments aortic l-arginine transport and endothelial function in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martens, Christopher R; Kuczmarski, James M; Kim, Jahyun; Guers, John J; Harris, M Brennan; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon; Edwards, David G

    2014-08-15

    Reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis contributes to risk for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular uptake of the NO precursor l-arginine (ARG) is attenuated in rodents with CKD, resulting in reduced substrate availability for NO synthesis and impaired vascular function. We tested the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running (RUN) and/or ARG supplementation on endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) in rats with CKD. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ⅚ ablation infarction surgery to induce CKD, or SHAM surgery as a control. Beginning 4 wk following surgery, CKD animals either remained sedentary (SED) or received one of the following interventions: supplemental ARG, RUN, or combined RUN+ARG. Animals were euthanized 8 wk after surgery, and EDR was assessed. EDR was significantly impaired in SED vs. SHAM animals after 8 wk, in response to ACh (10(-9)-10(-5) M) as indicated by a reduced area under the curve (AUC; 44.56 ± 9.01 vs 100 ± 4.58, P < 0.05) and reduced maximal response (Emax; 59.9 ± 9.67 vs. 94.31 ± 1.27%, P < 0.05). AUC was not improved by ARG treatment but was significantly improved above SED animals in both RUN and RUN+ARG-treated animals. Maximal relaxation was elevated above SED in RUN+ARG animals only. l-[(3)H]arginine uptake was impaired in both SED and ARG animals and was improved in RUN and RUN+ARG animals. The results suggest that voluntary wheel running is an effective therapy to improve vascular function in CKD and may be more beneficial when combined with l-arginine.

  11. Voluntary wheel running augments aortic l-arginine transport and endothelial function in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Christopher R.; Kuczmarski, James M.; Kim, Jahyun; Guers, John J.; Brennan Harris, M.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis contributes to risk for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular uptake of the NO precursor l-arginine (ARG) is attenuated in rodents with CKD, resulting in reduced substrate availability for NO synthesis and impaired vascular function. We tested the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running (RUN) and/or ARG supplementation on endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) in rats with CKD. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ⅚ ablation infarction surgery to induce CKD, or SHAM surgery as a control. Beginning 4 wk following surgery, CKD animals either remained sedentary (SED) or received one of the following interventions: supplemental ARG, RUN, or combined RUN+ARG. Animals were euthanized 8 wk after surgery, and EDR was assessed. EDR was significantly impaired in SED vs. SHAM animals after 8 wk, in response to ACh (10−9-10−5 M) as indicated by a reduced area under the curve (AUC; 44.56 ± 9.01 vs 100 ± 4.58, P < 0.05) and reduced maximal response (Emax; 59.9 ± 9.67 vs. 94.31 ± 1.27%, P < 0.05). AUC was not improved by ARG treatment but was significantly improved above SED animals in both RUN and RUN+ARG-treated animals. Maximal relaxation was elevated above SED in RUN+ARG animals only. l-[3H]arginine uptake was impaired in both SED and ARG animals and was improved in RUN and RUN+ARG animals. The results suggest that voluntary wheel running is an effective therapy to improve vascular function in CKD and may be more beneficial when combined with l-arginine. PMID:24966085

  12. Contingency discriminability and the generalized matching law describe choice on concurrent ratio schedules of wheel-running reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W

    2012-07-01

    Belke (2010) showed that on concurrent ratio schedules, the difference in ratio requirements required to produce near exclusive preference for the lower ratio alternative was substantively greater when the reinforcer was wheel running than when it was sucrose. The current study replicated this finding and showed that this choice behavior can be described by the matching law and the contingency discriminability model. Eight female Long Evans rats were exposed to concurrent VR schedules of wheel-running reinforcement (30s) and the schedule value of the initially preferred alternative was systematically increased. Two rats rapidly developed exclusive preference for the lower ratio alternative, but the majority did not - even when ratios differed by 20:1. Analysis showed that estimates of slopes from the matching law and the proportion of reinforcers misattributed from the contingency discriminability model were related to the ratios at which near exclusive preference developed. The fit of these models would be consistent with misattribution of reinforcers or poor discrimination between alternatives due to the long duration of wheel running.

  13. Preventing Running Injuries through Barefoot Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Priscilla M.; Smith, Darla R.

    2008-01-01

    Running has become a very popular lifetime physical activity even though there are numerous reports of running injuries. Although common theories have pointed to impact forces and overpronation as the main contributors to chronic running injuries, the increased use of cushioning and orthotics has done little to decrease running injuries. A new…

  14. Serotonin-mediated central fatigue underlies increased endurance capacity in mice from lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running.

    PubMed

    Claghorn, Gerald C; Fonseca, Ivana A T; Thompson, Zoe; Barber, Curtis; Garland, Theodore

    2016-07-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) is implicated in central fatigue, and 5-HT1A pharmaceuticals are known to influence locomotor endurance in both rodents and humans. We studied the effects of a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist on both forced and voluntary exercise in the same set of mice. This cohort of mice was taken from 4 replicate lines of mice that have been selectively bred for high levels of voluntary wheel running (HR) as compared with 4 non-selected control (C) lines. HR mice run voluntarily on wheels about 3× as many revolutions per day as compared with C, and have greater endurance during forced treadmill exercise. We hypothesized that drugs targeting serotonin receptors would have differential effects on locomotor behavior of HR and C mice. Subcutaneous injections of a 5-HT1A antagonist (WAY-100,635), a combination of 5-HT1A agonist and a 5-HT1A/1B partial agonist (8-OH-DPAT+pindolol), or physiological saline were given to separate groups of male mice before the start of each of three treadmill trials. The same manipulations were used later during voluntary wheel running on three separate nights. WAY-100,635 decreased treadmill endurance in HR but not C mice (dose by linetype interaction, P=0.0014). 8-OH-DPAT+pindolol affected treadmill endurance (P<0.0001) in a dose-dependent manner, with no dose by linetype interaction. Wheel running was reduced in HR but not C mice at the highest dose of 8-OH-DPAT+pindolol (dose by linetype, P=0.0221), but was not affected by WAY-100,635 treatment. These results provide further evidence that serotonin signaling is an important determinant of performance during both forced and voluntary exercise. Although the elevated wheel running of HR mice does not appear related to alterations in serotonin signaling, their enhanced endurance capacity does. More generally, our results indicate that both forced and voluntary exercise can be affected by an intervention that acts (primarily) centrally.

  15. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: The importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research. PMID:24055600

  16. Microglial response to Alzheimer's disease is differentially modulated by voluntary wheel running and enriched environments.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J J; Noristani, H N; Verkhratsky, A

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an untreatable neurodegenerative disease that deteriorates memory. Increased physical/cognitive activity reduces dementia risk by promoting neuronal and glial response. Although few studies have investigated microglial response in wild-type rodents following exposure to physical/cognitive stimulation, environmental-induced changes of microglia response to AD have been neglected. We investigated effects of running (RUN) and enriched (ENR) environments on numerical density (N v, #/mm(3)) and morphology of microglia in a triple transgenic (3×Tg-AD) mouse model of AD that closely mimics AD pathology in humans. We used immunohistochemical approach to characterise microglial domain by measuring their overall cell surface, volume and somata volume. 3×Tg-AD mice housed in standard control (STD) environment showed significant increase in microglial N v (11.7 %) in CA1 stratum lacunosum moleculare (S.Mol) of the hippocampus at 12 months compared to non-transgenic (non-Tg) animals. Exposure to combined RUN and ENR environments prevented an increase in microglial N v in 3×Tg-AD and reduced microglial numbers to non-Tg control levels. Interestingly, 3×Tg-AD mice housed solely in ENR environment displayed significant decrease in microglial N v in CA1 subfield (9.3 % decrease), stratum oriens (11.5 % decrease) and S.Mol (7.6 % decrease) of the hippocampus compared to 3×Tg-AD mice housed in STD environment. Morphological analysis revealed microglial hypertrophy due to pronounced increase in microglia surface, volume and somata volume (61, 78 and 41 %) in 3×Tg-AD mice housed in RUN (but not in ENR) compared to STD environment. These results indicate that exposure to RUN and ENR environments have differential effects on microglial density and activation-associated changes in microglial morphology.

  17. Circulating levels of endocannabinoids respond acutely to voluntary exercise, are altered in mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running, and differ between the sexes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Zoe; Argueta, Donovan; Garland, Theodore; DiPatrizio, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    The endocannabinoid system serves many physiological roles, including in the regulation of energy balance, food reward, and voluntary locomotion. Signaling at the cannabinoid type 1 receptor has been specifically implicated in motivation for rodent voluntary exercise on wheels. We studied four replicate lines of high runner (HR) mice that have been selectively bred for 81 generations based on average number of wheel revolutions on days five and six of a six-day period of wheel access. Four additional replicate lines are bred without regard to wheel running, and serve as controls (C) for random genetic effects that may cause divergence among lines. On average, mice from HR lines voluntarily run on wheels three times more than C mice on a daily basis. We tested the general hypothesis that circulating levels of endocannabinoids (i.e., 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG] and anandamide [AEA]) differ between HR and C mice in a sex-specific manner. Fifty male and 50 female mice were allowed access to wheels for six days, while another 50 males and 50 females were kept without access to wheels (half HR, half C for all groups). Blood was collected by cardiac puncture during the time of peak running on the sixth night of wheel access or no wheel access, and later analyzed for 2-AG and AEA content by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. We observed a significant three-way interaction among sex, linetype, and wheel access for 2-AG concentrations, with females generally having lower levels than males and wheel access lowering 2-AG levels in some but not all subgroups. The number of wheel revolutions in the minutes or hours immediately prior to sampling did not quantitatively predict plasma 2-AG levels within groups. We also observed a trend for a linetype-by-wheel access interaction for AEA levels, with wheel access lowering plasma concentrations of AEA in HR mice, while raising them in C mice. In addition, females tended to have higher AEA

  18. Feeding history and obese-prone genotype increase survival of rats exposed to a challenge of food restriction and wheel running.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Pierce, W David; Heth, C Donald; Russell, James C; Richard, Denis; Proctor, Spencer D

    2012-09-01

    We hypothesized that obese-prone genotype and history of food restriction confer a survival advantage to genetically obese animals under environmental challenge. Male juvenile JCR:LA-cp rats, obese-prone and lean-prone, were exposed to 1.5 h daily meals and 22.5-h voluntary wheel running, a procedure inducing activity anorexia (AA). One week before the AA challenge, obese-prone rats were freely fed (obese-FF), or pair fed (obese-PF) to lean-prone, free-feeding rats (lean-FF). Animals were removed from protocol at 75% of initial body weight (starvation criterion) or after 14 days (survival criterion). AA challenge induced weight loss in all rats, but percent weight loss was more rapid and sustained in lean-FF rats than in obese-FF or obese-PF animals (P < 0.04). Weight loss was significantly higher in obese-FF rats than obese-PF rats, 62% of which achieved survival criterion and stabilized with zero weight loss. Obese-PF rats survived longer, on average (12.0 ± 1.1 day) than obese-FF (8.2 ± 1.1 day) and lean-FF rats (3.5 ± 0.2 day) (P < 0.02). Wheel running increased linearly in all groups; lean-FF increased more rapidly than obese-FF (P < 0.05); obese-PF increased at an intermediate rate (P < 0.02), and those rats that survived stabilized daily rates of wheel running. Prior food restriction of juvenile obese-prone rats induces a survival benefit beyond genotype, that is related to achievement of homeostasis. This metabolic adaptive process may help explain the development of human obesity in the presence of an unstable food environment which subsequently transitions to an abundant food supply.

  19. Effects of bedding material and running wheel surface on paw wounds in male and female Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, A; Reebs, S G

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of bedding material (pine shavings versus beta chip) and running wheel surfaces (standard metal bars versus metal bars covered with a plastic mesh) on the occurrence of wounds on the paws of male and female Syrian (golden) hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus. Four groups of 10 males and 10 females were each assigned to one of the following treatments: pine/no mesh, pine/mesh, chips/no mesh and chips/mesh. Each hamster paw was observed at 1-3-day intervals for 60 days. A total of 1-3 wounds, separate in time, developed on the paws (mostly the hind ones) of almost all animals. Wounds appeared as small pinpricks, cuts or scabs, mostly on the palms. Females ran 15% less than males, yet their front paws were more commonly affected and their wounds tended to last longer. Hamsters with plastic mesh inside their wheels took longer to develop wounds but once they appeared, the wounds were larger and lasted longer. Hamsters on pine shavings developed fewer wounds and had more wound-free days. Hamsters kept running at high levels and many wounds did not heal during the study, suggesting a need for veterinary intervention.

  20. DNA microarray‐based analysis of voluntary resistance wheel running reveals novel transcriptome leading robust hippocampal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Chul; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Inoue, Koshiro; Chang, Hyukki; Soya, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In two separate experiments, voluntary resistance wheel running with 30% of body weight (RWR), rather than wheel running (WR), led to greater enhancements, including adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive functions, in conjunction with hippocampal brain‐derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling (Lee et al., J Appl Physiol, 2012; Neurosci Lett., 2013). Here we aimed to unravel novel molecular factors and gain insight into underlying molecular mechanisms for RWR‐enhanced hippocampal functions; a high‐throughput whole‐genome DNA microarray approach was applied to rats performing voluntary running for 4 weeks. RWR rats showed a significant decrease in average running distances although average work levels increased immensely, by about 11‐fold compared to WR, resulting in muscular adaptation for the fast‐twitch plantaris muscle. Global transcriptome profiling analysis identified 128 (sedentary × WR) and 169 (sedentary × RWR) up‐regulated (>1.5‐fold change), and 97 (sedentary × WR) and 468 (sedentary × RWR) down‐regulated (<0.75‐fold change) genes. Functional categorization using both pathway‐ or specific‐disease‐state‐focused gene classifications and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed expression pattern changes in the major categories of disease and disorders, molecular functions, and physiological system development and function. Genes specifically regulated with RWR include the newly identified factors of NFATc1, AVPR1A, and FGFR4, as well as previously known factors, BDNF and CREB mRNA. Interestingly, RWR down‐regulated multiple inflammatory cytokines (IL1B, IL2RA, and TNF) and chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL10, CCL2, and CCR4) with the SYCP3, PRL genes, which are potentially involved in regulating hippocampal neuroplastic changes. These results provide understanding of the voluntary‐RWR‐related hippocampal transcriptome, which will open a window to the underlying mechanisms of the positive effects of exercise

  1. Methods to Record Circadian Rhythm Wheel Running Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siepka, Sandra M.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Forward genetic approaches (phenotype to gene) are powerful methods to identify mouse circadian clock components. The success of these approaches, however, is highly dependent on the quality of the phenotype— specifically, the ability to measure circadian rhythms in individual mice. This article outlines the factors necessary to measure mouse circadian rhythms, including choice of mouse strain, facilities and equipment design and construction, experimental design, high-throughput methods, and finally methods for data analysis. PMID:15817291

  2. Portrait of an Aging Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This plot maps the increasing amounts of energy needed to spin Spirit's right front wheel drive, which has been showing signs of age. The wheel has now traveled six times farther than its design life. Since Spirit's 126th day on Mars, this wheel has required additional electric current to run at normal speeds, as indicated with blue diamonds on this graph. Efforts to improve the situation by redistributing the lubricant in the wheel with heat and rest were only mildly successful (pink squares). To cope with the condition, rover planners have come up with a creative solution: they will drive the rover backwards using five of six wheels. The sixth wheel will be activated only when the terrain demands it.

  3. Central gene expression changes associated with enhanced neuroendocrine and autonomic response habituation to repeated noise stress after voluntary wheel running in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sasse, Sarah K.; Nyhuis, Tara J.; Masini, Cher V.; Day, Heidi E. W.; Campeau, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that regular physical exercise benefits health in part by counteracting some of the negative physiological impacts of stress. While some studies identified reductions in some measures of acute stress responses with prior exercise, limited data were available concerning effects on cardiovascular function, and reported effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis responses were largely inconsistent. Given that exposure to repeated or prolonged stress is strongly implicated in the precipitation and exacerbation of illness, we proposed the novel hypothesis that physical exercise might facilitate adaptation to repeated stress, and subsequently demonstrated significant enhancement of both HPA axis (glucocorticoid) and cardiovascular (tachycardia) response habituation to repeated noise stress in rats with long-term access to running wheels compared to sedentary controls. Stress habituation has been attributed to modifications of brain circuits, but the specific sites of adaptation and the molecular changes driving its expression remain unclear. Here, in situ hybridization histochemistry was used to examine regulation of select stress-associated signaling systems in brain regions representing likely candidates to underlie exercise-enhanced stress habituation. Analyzed brains were collected from active (6 weeks of wheel running) and sedentary rats following control, acute, or repeated noise exposures that induced a significantly faster rate of glucocorticoid response habituation in active animals but preserved acute noise responsiveness. Nearly identical experimental manipulations also induce a faster rate of cardiovascular response habituation in exercised, repeatedly stressed rats. The observed regulation of the corticotropin-releasing factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor systems across several brain regions suggests widespread effects of voluntary exercise on central functions and related adaptations to stress across

  4. Mouse running activity is lowered by Brucella abortus treatment: a potential model to study chronic fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ottenweller, J E; Natelson, B H; Gause, W C; Carroll, K K; Beldowicz, D; Zhou, X D; LaManca, J J

    1998-03-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome, which can occur after acute infection and last for years, is characterized by severe and persistent fatigue. Others have reported decreases in mouse running activity following infection and have suggested this may provide an animal model for studying chronic fatigue. Voluntary running is a highly motivated activity in mice, which will often run 5-7 mi/day in our laboratory. Following 2 weeks of acclimation to running wheels with food and water available ad lib, female BALB/c mice received 0.2-mL tail vein injections of killed Brucella abortus (BA) or saline vehicle. Subsequently the effects on voluntary running and grooming behavior were determined. Injection of BA caused an immediate large decrease in running and a lack of grooming. Vehicle injections produced no changes in behavior. After the first several days of reduced running behavior, levels of running and grooming slowly returned back to normal over the next 2-4 weeks, with substantial individual differences in the rate of recovery. The pattern of running during recovery was intriguing in that BA mice first ran at normal levels just after the lights went out, but they stopped after only 1-2 h. As recovery proceeded, they gradually increased the duration of the running bout during the night. Because this model uses voluntary exertion and the ability to run for longer periods of time characterizes recovery, the model may be a good one for studying the biologic underpinnings of chronic fatigue.

  5. A five-wheel wheelchair with an active-caster drive system.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Yu; Tanaka, Aki; Wada, Masayoshi

    2013-06-01

    A novel wheelchair system with an active-caster drive mechanism is presented in this paper. A manual (hand propelled) wheelchair with an external single-wheel drive system forms a five-wheel configuration. The active-caster mechanism is applied to a drive system to motorize a manual wheelchair. Two electric motors which drive a wheel axis and a steering axis of a drive wheel independently are equipped on the active-caster. A coordinated control of the two motors enables the velocity vector on the steering shaft to direct in an arbitrary direction with an arbitrary magnitude. The generated velocity vector allows a wheelchair to go straight and/or rotate completely in a same way as a standard electric wheelchair. Namely 2DOF of the wheelchair can be controlled independently by a single drive wheel without any constraint, such as the orientation of the drive wheel which is well known as a non-holonomic constraint. In addition to the 2DOF mobility, the proposed system enables wheelchair users to change drive modes, a rear drive and a front drive. The drive wheel on the back side of the wheelchair is vertically actuated by a linear motor to change the height of the drive wheel that can vary load distribution and the number of wheels contacting to the ground. The five-wheel-contact makes the wheelchair to move as the normal mode in which the center of rotation is located at the midpoint of the main wheels. Depressing the drive wheel results in lost contacts of the main wheels from the ground in which the center of rotation is jumped at the midpoint of the front wheels, namely it performs as a front drive wheelchair. In this paper, kinematic models of the wheelchair and that with an active-caster drive system are analyzed and a control method by using a 2DOF joystick is derived. Based on the kinematic model, a prototype mechanism of the active-caster is designed and mounted on a manual wheelchair to realize the five-wheel wheelchair. In the experiments, the independent 2

  6. Activity of D1/2 Receptor Expressing Neurons in the Nucleus Accumbens Regulates Running, Locomotion, and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xianglong; Ottenheimer, David; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2016-01-01

    While weight gain is clearly promoted by excessive energy intake and reduced expenditure, the underlying neural mechanisms of energy balance remain unclear. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is one brain region that has received attention for its role in the regulation of energy balance; its D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons have distinct functions in regulating reward behavior and require further examination. The goal of the present study is to investigate how activation and inhibition of D1 and D2 neurons in the NAc influences behaviors related to energy intake and expenditure. Specific manipulation of D1 vs. D2 neurons was done in both low expenditure and high expenditure (wheel running) conditions to assess behavioral effects in these different states. Direct control of neural activity was achieved using a designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) strategy. Activation of NAc D1 neurons increased food intake, wheel running and locomotor activity. In contrast, activation of D2 neurons in the NAc reduced running and locomotion while D2 neuron inhibition had opposite effects. These results highlight the importance of considering both intake and expenditure in the analysis of D1 and D2 neuronal manipulations. Moreover, the behavioral outcomes from NAc D1 neuronal manipulations depend upon the activity state of the animals (wheel running vs. non-running). The data support and complement the hypothesis of specific NAc dopamine pathways facilitating energy expenditure and suggest a potential strategy for human weight control. PMID:27147989

  7. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Jennifer; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2 to 5 fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running. PMID:25435316

  8. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Jennifer R; Rhodes, Justin S

    2015-03-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2- to 5-fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6 J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2 J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2 J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running.

  9. Environmental enrichment and working memory tasks decrease hippocampal cell proliferation after wheel running--A role for the prefrontal cortex in hippocampal plasticity?

    PubMed

    Schaefers, Andrea T U

    2015-10-22

    Despite an increasing amount of evidence about the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis on the local level, less attention has been paid to its systemic embedding in wider brain circuits. The aim of the present study was to obtain evidence for a potential role of the prefrontal cortex in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We hypothesised that activation of the prefrontal cortex by environmental enrichment or a working-memory task would decrease previously enhanced cell proliferation rates. Wheel running was applied as a common stimulator of cell proliferation in CD1 mice reared under deprivation of natural environmental stimulation. Next, the animals were assigned to four groups for different treatments in the following three days: housing under continued deprivation, environmental enrichment, a spatial-delayed alternation task in an automated T-maze that activates the prefrontal cortex by working-memory requirements or a control task in the automated T-maze differing only in the single parameter working-memory-associated delay. Both the environmental enrichment and spatial-delayed alternation tasks decreased cell proliferation rates in the dentate gyrus compared to deprived housing and the control task in the T-maze. As the control animals underwent the same procedures and stressors and differed only in the single parameter working-memory-associated delay, the working-memory requirement seems to be the crucial factor for decreasing cell proliferation rates. Taken together, these results suggest that the prefrontal cortex may play a role in the regulation of hippocampal cell proliferation.

  10. New neurons generated from running are broadly recruited into neuronal activation associated with three different hippocampus-involved tasks.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter J; Bhattacharya, Tushar K; Miller, Daniel S; Kohman, Rachel A; DeYoung, Erin K; Rhodes, Justin S

    2012-09-01

    Running increases the formation of new neurons in the adult rodent hippocampus. However, the function of new neurons generated from running is currently unknown. One hypothesis is that new neurons from running contribute to enhanced cognitive function by increasing plasticity in the adult hippocampus. An alternative hypothesis is that new neurons generated from running incorporate into experience-specific hippocampal networks that only become active during running. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if new neurons generated from running are selectively activated by running, or can become recruited into granule cell activity occurring during performance on other behavioral tasks that engage the hippocampus. Therefore, the activation of new 5-6 week neurons was detected using BrdU, NeuN, and Zif268 triple-label immunohistochemistry in cohorts of female running and sedentary adult C57BL/6J mice following participation in one of three different tasks: the Morris water maze, novel environment exploration, or wheel running. Results showed that running and sedentary mice displayed a nearly equivalent proportion of new neurons that expressed Zif268 following each task. Since running approximately doubled the number of new neurons, the results demonstrated that running mice had a greater number of new neurons recruited into the Zif268 induction in the granule cell layer following each task than sedentary mice. The results suggest that new neurons incorporated into hippocampal circuitry from running are not just activated by wheel running itself, but rather become broadly recruited into granule cell layer activity during distinct behavioral experiences.

  11. A forced running wheel system with a microcontroller that provides high-intensity exercise training in an animal ischemic stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C.C.; Chang, M.W.; Chang, C.P.; Chan, S.C.; Chang, W.Y.; Yang, C.L.; Lin, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a forced non-electric-shock running wheel (FNESRW) system that provides rats with high-intensity exercise training using automatic exercise training patterns that are controlled by a microcontroller. The proposed system successfully makes a breakthrough in the traditional motorized running wheel to allow rats to perform high-intensity training and to enable comparisons with the treadmill at the same exercise intensity without any electric shock. A polyvinyl chloride runway with a rough rubber surface was coated on the periphery of the wheel so as to permit automatic acceleration training, and which allowed the rats to run consistently at high speeds (30 m/min for 1 h). An animal ischemic stroke model was used to validate the proposed system. FNESRW, treadmill, control, and sham groups were studied. The FNESRW and treadmill groups underwent 3 weeks of endurance running training. After 3 weeks, the experiments of middle cerebral artery occlusion, the modified neurological severity score (mNSS), an inclined plane test, and triphenyltetrazolium chloride were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed platform. The proposed platform showed that enhancement of motor function, mNSS, and infarct volumes was significantly stronger in the FNESRW group than the control group (P<0.05) and similar to the treadmill group. The experimental data demonstrated that the proposed platform can be applied to test the benefit of exercise-preconditioning-induced neuroprotection using the animal stroke model. Additional advantages of the FNESRW system include stand-alone capability, independence of subjective human adjustment, and ease of use. PMID:25140816

  12. A forced running wheel system with a microcontroller that provides high-intensity exercise training in an animal ischemic stroke model.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Chang, M W; Chang, C P; Chan, S C; Chang, W Y; Yang, C L; Lin, M T

    2014-10-01

    We developed a forced non-electric-shock running wheel (FNESRW) system that provides rats with high-intensity exercise training using automatic exercise training patterns that are controlled by a microcontroller. The proposed system successfully makes a breakthrough in the traditional motorized running wheel to allow rats to perform high-intensity training and to enable comparisons with the treadmill at the same exercise intensity without any electric shock. A polyvinyl chloride runway with a rough rubber surface was coated on the periphery of the wheel so as to permit automatic acceleration training, and which allowed the rats to run consistently at high speeds (30 m/min for 1 h). An animal ischemic stroke model was used to validate the proposed system. FNESRW, treadmill, control, and sham groups were studied. The FNESRW and treadmill groups underwent 3 weeks of endurance running training. After 3 weeks, the experiments of middle cerebral artery occlusion, the modified neurological severity score (mNSS), an inclined plane test, and triphenyltetrazolium chloride were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed platform. The proposed platform showed that enhancement of motor function, mNSS, and infarct volumes was significantly stronger in the FNESRW group than the control group (P<0.05) and similar to the treadmill group. The experimental data demonstrated that the proposed platform can be applied to test the benefit of exercise-preconditioning-induced neuroprotection using the animal stroke model. Additional advantages of the FNESRW system include stand-alone capability, independence of subjective human adjustment, and ease of use.

  13. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  14. Conditioned ethanol aversion in rats induced by voluntary wheel running, forced swimming, and electric shock: an implication for aversion therapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2004-01-01

    This study was planned to demonstrate rats' acquisition of aversion to ethanol solution consumed before voluntary running, forced swimming, or electric shock delivery. Wistar rats under water deprivation were allotted to four groups of eight rats each, and all rats were allowed to drink 5% ethanol solution for 15 min. Immediately after the ethanol drinking, rats of Group Run were put into the individual running wheels for 15 min, those of Group Swim were put into the individual swimming pools for 15 min, those of Group Shock received electric shocks for 15 min (15 0.45-mA shocks of 0.7s with the intershock interval of 1 min) in the individual small chambers, and those of Group Control were directly returned back to the home cages. This procedure was repeated for six days, followed by a two-day choice test of ethanol aversion where a bottle containing 5% ethanol solution and a bottle of tap water were simultaneously presented for 15 min. In the test, Groups Run, Swim, and Shock drank ethanol solution significantly less than tapwater, while Group Control drank both fluids equally. The effects of running, swimming, and shock were equivalent. The successful demonstration of acquired ethanol aversion induced by exercise (running and swimming) or shock in rats suggests an avenue for clinical application of exercise and shock treatments for human alcoholics, though there are many issues to be resolved before the practical use.

  15. Early motor deficits in mouse disease models are reliably uncovered using an automated home-cage wheel-running system: a cross-laboratory validation

    PubMed Central

    Mandillo, Silvia; Heise, Ines; Garbugino, Luciana; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P.; Giuliani, Alessandro; Wells, Sara; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in motor function are debilitating features in disorders affecting neurological, neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems. Although these disorders can vary greatly with respect to age of onset, symptomatic presentation, rate of progression and severity, the study of these disease models in mice is confined to the use of a small number of tests, most commonly the rotarod test. To expand the repertoire of meaningful motor function tests in mice, we tested, optimised and validated an automated home-cage-based running-wheel system, incorporating a conventional wheel with evenly spaced rungs and a complex wheel with particular rungs absent. The system enables automated assessment of motor function without handler interference, which is desirable in longitudinal studies involving continuous monitoring of motor performance. In baseline studies at two test centres, consistently significant differences in performance on both wheels were detectable among four commonly used inbred strains. As further validation, we studied performance in mutant models of progressive neurodegenerative diseases – Huntington’s disease [TgN(HD82Gln)81Dbo; referred to as HD mice] and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [Tg(SOD1G93A)dl1/GurJ; referred to as SOD1 mice] – and in a mutant strain with subtle gait abnormalities, C-Snap25Bdr/H (Blind-drunk, Bdr). In both models of progressive disease, as with the third mutant, we could reliably and consistently detect specific motor function deficits at ages far earlier than any previously recorded symptoms in vivo: 7–8 weeks for the HD mice and 12 weeks for the SOD1 mice. We also conducted longitudinal analysis of rotarod and grip strength performance, for which deficits were still not detectable at 12 weeks and 23 weeks, respectively. Several new parameters of motor behaviour were uncovered using principal component analysis, indicating that the wheel-running assay could record features of motor function that are independent of rotarod

  16. Early motor deficits in mouse disease models are reliably uncovered using an automated home-cage wheel-running system: a cross-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mandillo, Silvia; Heise, Ines; Garbugino, Luciana; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Giuliani, Alessandro; Wells, Sara; Nolan, Patrick M

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in motor function are debilitating features in disorders affecting neurological, neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems. Although these disorders can vary greatly with respect to age of onset, symptomatic presentation, rate of progression and severity, the study of these disease models in mice is confined to the use of a small number of tests, most commonly the rotarod test. To expand the repertoire of meaningful motor function tests in mice, we tested, optimised and validated an automated home-cage-based running-wheel system, incorporating a conventional wheel with evenly spaced rungs and a complex wheel with particular rungs absent. The system enables automated assessment of motor function without handler interference, which is desirable in longitudinal studies involving continuous monitoring of motor performance. In baseline studies at two test centres, consistently significant differences in performance on both wheels were detectable among four commonly used inbred strains. As further validation, we studied performance in mutant models of progressive neurodegenerative diseases--Huntington's disease [TgN(HD82Gln)81Dbo; referred to as HD mice] and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [Tg(SOD1G93A)(dl)1/GurJ; referred to as SOD1 mice]--and in a mutant strain with subtle gait abnormalities, C-Snap25(Bdr)/H (Blind-drunk, Bdr). In both models of progressive disease, as with the third mutant, we could reliably and consistently detect specific motor function deficits at ages far earlier than any previously recorded symptoms in vivo: 7-8 weeks for the HD mice and 12 weeks for the SOD1 mice. We also conducted longitudinal analysis of rotarod and grip strength performance, for which deficits were still not detectable at 12 weeks and 23 weeks, respectively. Several new parameters of motor behaviour were uncovered using principal component analysis, indicating that the wheel-running assay could record features of motor function that are independent of rotarod

  17. Progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running increases hypertrophy and differentially affects muscle protein synthesis, ribosome biogenesis, and proteolytic markers in rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Mobley, C B; Holland, A M; Kephart, W C; Mumford, P W; Lowery, R P; Kavazis, A N; Wilson, J M; Roberts, M D

    2017-03-15

    We examined if 6 weeks of progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running in rats induced plantaris, soleus, and/or gastrocnemius hypertrophy and/or affected markers of translational efficiency, ribosome biogenesis, and markers of proteolysis. For 6 weeks, 8 male Sprague-Dawley rats (~9-10 weeks of age, ~300-325 g) rats were assigned to the progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running model (EX), and ten rats were not trained (SED). For EX rats, the wheel-loading paradigm was as follows - days 1-7: free-wheel resistance, days 8-15: wheel resistance set to 20%-25% body mass, days 16-24: 40% body mass, days 25-32: 60% body mass, days 33-42: 40% body mass. Following the intervention, muscles were analysed for markers of translational efficiency, ribosome biogenesis, and muscle proteolysis. Raw gastrocnemius mass (+13%, p < .01), relative (body mass-corrected) gastrocnemius mass (+16%, p < .001), raw plantaris mass (+13%, p < .05), and relative plantaris mass (+15%, p < .01) were greater in EX vs. SED rats. In spite of gastrocnemius hypertrophy, EX animals presented a 54% decrease in basal muscle protein synthesis levels (p < .01), a 125% increase in pan 4EBP1 levels (p < .001) and a 31% decrease in pan eIF4E levels (p < .05). However, in relation to SED animals, EX animals presented a 70% increase in gastrocnemius c-Myc protein levels (p < .05). Most markers of translational efficiency and ribosome biogenesis were not altered in the plantaris or soleus muscles of EX vs. SED animals. Gastrocnemius F-box protein 32 and poly-ubiquinated protein levels were approximately 150% and 200% greater in SED vs. EX rats (p < .001). These data suggest that the employed resistance training model increases hind limb muscle hypertrophy, and this may be mainly facilitated through reductions in skeletal muscle proteolysis, rather than alterations in ribosome biogenesis or translational efficiency.

  18. Influences of activity wheel access on the body temperature response to MDMA and methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, N W; Wright, M J; Dickinson, G; Vandewater, S A; Price, J U; Taffe, M A

    2011-09-01

    Recreational ingestion of the drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") can result in pathologically elevated body temperature and even death in humans. Such incidents are relatively rare which makes it difficult to identify the relative contributions of specific environmental and situational factors. Although animal models have been used to explore several aspects of MDMA-induced hyperthermia and it is regularly hypothesized that prolonged physical activity (e.g., dancing) in the nightclub environment increases risk, this has never been tested directly. In this study the rectal temperature of male Wistar rats was monitored after challenge with doses of MDMA and methamphetamine (MA), another drug frequently ingested in the rave/nightclub environment, either with or without access to an activity wheel. Results showed that wheel activity did not modify the hyperthermia produced by 10.0mg/kg MDMA. However, individual correlations were observed in which wheel activity levels after a locomotor stimulant dose of MDMA were positively related to body temperature change and lethal outcome. A modest increase in the maximum body temperature observed after 5.6mg/kg MA was caused by wheel access but this was mostly attributable to a drop in temperature relative to vehicle treatment in the absence of wheel activity. These results suggest that nightclub dancing in the human Ecstasy consumer may not be a significant factor in medical emergencies.

  19. Effects of daily schedules of forced activity on free-running rhythms in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, R E

    1991-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of hamsters can be phase-shifted or entrained by single or daily sessions of induced wheel running. In contrast, observations of rats under restricted-feeding schedules suggest that their free-running rhythms are not readily entrainable by a daily bout of intense activity. A formal test of this idea was made by subjecting rats to daily 2-hr or 3-hr sessions of forced treadmill activity. None of 18 rats entrained to a daily treadmill schedule when tested in constant dim light, but 1 of 16 did entrain when tested after blinding, when the period of its free-running activity rhythm was very close to the period of the treadmill schedule and when the onset of its daily active phase overlapped with the treadmill sessions. These conditions were recreated in a final group of eight rats; the rats were trained in a light-dark cycle, blinded, and subjected to a treadmill schedule with a period of 23.91 hr that was initiated at the onset of the rats' active phase on day 1. Six of these rats entrained. The mechanism for entrainment by activity schedules clearly exists in rats, but the conditions under which this occurs are highly constrained, suggesting that activity is a very weak zeitgeber in this species. It is argued that the evolution of functionally separable food- and light-entrainable oscillators in the rat demands a very low sensitivity to feedback effects of activity.

  20. Voluntary wheel-running attenuates insulin and weight gain and affects anxiety-like behaviors in C57BL6/J mice exposed to a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jasmin A; Hatzidis, Aikaterini; Arruda, Nicole L; Gelineau, Rachel R; De Pina, Isabella Monteiro; Adams, Kenneth W; Seggio, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    It is widely accepted that lifestyle plays a crucial role on the quality of life in individuals, particularly in western societies where poor diet is correlated to alterations in behavior and the increased possibility of developing type-2 diabetes. While exercising is known to produce improvements to overall health, there is conflicting evidence on how much of an effect exercise has staving off the development of type-2 diabetes or counteracting the effects of diet on anxiety. Thus, this study investigated the effects of voluntary wheel-running access on the progression of diabetes-like symptoms and open field and light-dark box behaviors in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. C57BL/6J mice were placed into either running-wheel cages or cages without a running-wheel, given either regular chow or a high-fat diet, and their body mass, food consumption, glucose tolerance, insulin and c-peptide levels were measured. Mice were also exposed to the open field and light-dark box tests for anxiety-like behaviors. Access to a running-wheel partially attenuated the obesity and hyperinsulinemia associated with high-fat diet consumption in these mice, but did not affect glucose tolerance or c-peptide levels. Wheel-running strongly increased anxiety-like and decreased explorative-like behaviors in the open field and light-dark box, while high-fat diet consumption produced smaller increases in anxiety. These results suggest that voluntary wheel-running can assuage some, but not all, of the physiological problems associated with high-fat diet consumption, and can modify anxiety-like behaviors regardless of diet consumed.

  1. Influence of wheel size on muscle activity and tri-axial accelerations during cross-country mountain biking.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Rylands, Lee; Metcalfe, John

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of different mountain bike wheel diameters on muscle activity and whether larger diameter wheels attenuate muscle vibrations during cross-country riding. Nine male competitive mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) participated in the study. Riders performed one lap at race pace on 26, 27.5 and 29 inch wheeled mountain bikes. sEMG and acceleration (RMS) were recorded for the full lap and during ascent and descent phases at the gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, biceps brachii and triceps brachii. No significant main effects were found by wheel size for each of the four muscle groups for sEMG or acceleration during the full lap and for ascent and descent (P > .05). When data were analysed between muscle groups, significant differences were found between biceps brachii and triceps brachii (P < .05) for all wheel sizes and all phases of the lap with the exception of for the 26 inch wheel during the descent. Findings suggest wheel diameter has no influence on muscle activity and vibration during mountain biking. However, more activity was observed in the biceps brachii during 26 inch wheel descending. This is possibly due to an increased need to manoeuvre the front wheel over obstacles.

  2. Skin blister formation together with patterned intradermal hematoma: a special type of tire mark injury in victims run over by a wheel.

    PubMed

    Pircher, R; Epting, T; Schmidt, U; Geisenberger, D; Pollak, S; Kramer, L

    2015-04-01

    A traffic accident victim run over by a vehicle may show a patterned skin hematoma reflecting the grooves of the tire's profile. Apart from this well-known type of imprint mark, the affected skin can also be blistered provided that the wheel exerts high pressure on the body for a prolonged period of time. The macro- and micromorphological findings as well as the protein composition of the blister fluid were investigated on the basis of a relevant autopsy case. Analogous to blisters associated with hanging marks, the transudation of serous fluid with consecutive detachment of the epidermis is interpreted as a pressure-related effect which cannot be regarded as a sign of vitality.

  3. Effects of the combination of wheel running and atomoxetine on cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement in rats selected for high or low impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aerobic exercise and the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder medication, atomoxetine (ATO), are two monotherapies that have been shown to suppress reinstatement of cocaine seeking in an animal model of relapse. The present study investigated the effects of combining wheel running and ATO vs. each treatment alone on cocaine seeking precipitated by cocaine and cocaine-paired cues in rats with differing susceptibility to drug abuse (i.e., high vs. low impulsive). METHODS Rats were screened for high (HiI) or low impulsivity (LoI) based on their performance on a delay-discounting task and then trained to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/inf) for 10 days. Following 14 days of extinction, both groups were tested for reinstatement of cocaine seeking precipitated by cocaine or cocaine-paired cues in the presence of concurrent running wheel access (W), pretreatment with ATO, or both (W+ATO). RESULTS HiI rats acquired cocaine self-administration more quickly than LoI rats. While both individual treatments and W+ATO significantly attenuated cue-induced cocaine seeking in HiI and LoI rats, only W+ATO was effective in reducing cocaine-induced reinstatement compared to vehicle treatment. There were dose-dependent and phenotype-specific effects of ATO with HiI rats responsive to the low but not high ATO dose. Floor effects of ATO and W on cue-induced reinstatement prevented the assessment of combined treatment effects. CONCLUSIONS These findings demonstrated greater attenuation of cue- vs. cocaine-induced reinstatement by ATO and W alone and recapitulate impulsivity phenotype differences in both acquisition of cocaine self-administration and receptivity to treatment. PMID:25258161

  4. Striatal Enkephalinergic Differences in Rats Selectively Bred for Intrinsic Running Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Derek C.; Holmes, Philip V.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Dishman, Rodney K.

    2014-01-01

    Rats selectively bred for high- and low-capacity for running on a treadmill (HCR; LCR) also differ in wheel-running behavior, but whether wheel-running can be explained by intrinsic or adaptive brain mechanisms is not as yet understood. It is established that motivation of locomotory behavior is driven by dopaminergic transmission in mesolimbic and mesostriatal systems. However, whether voluntary wheel running is associated with enkephalinergic activity in the ventral striatum is not known. Materials & Methods 40 male (20 HCR and 20 LCR) and 40 female (20 HCR and 20 LCR) rats were randomly assigned to 3 weeks of activity wheel exposure or sedentary conditions without wheel access. After 3 weeks of activity-wheel running, rats were decapitated and brains were extracted. Coronal sections were analyzed utilizing in situ hybridization histochemistry for enkephalin (ENK) mRNA in the ventral striatum. Results HCR rats expressed less ENK than LCR rats in the nucleus accumbens among females (p <.01) and in the olfactory tubercle among both females (p <.05) and males (p<.05). There was no effect of wheel running on ENK mRNA expression. Conclusion Line differences in ENK expression in the olfactory tubercle, and possibly the nucleus accumbens, partly explain divergent wheel-running behavior. The lower striatal ENK in the HCR line is consistent with enhanced dopaminergic tone, which may explain the increased motivation for wheel running observed in the HCR line. PMID:24842004

  5. Effects of a ketogenic diet on adipose tissue, liver, and serum biomarkers in sedentary rats and rats that exercised via resisted voluntary wheel running.

    PubMed

    Holland, Angelia Maleah; Kephart, Wesley C; Mumford, Petey W; Mobley, Christopher Brooks; Lowery, Ryan P; Shake, Joshua J; Patel, Romil K; Healy, James C; McCullough, Danielle J; Kluess, Heidi A; Huggins, Kevin W; Kavazis, Andreas N; Wilson, Jacob M; Roberts, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of different diets on adipose tissue, liver, serum morphology, and biomarkers in rats that voluntarily exercised. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼9-10 wk of age) exercised with resistance-loaded voluntary running wheels (EX; wheels loaded with 20-60% body mass) or remained sedentary (SED) over 6 wk. EX and SED rats were provided isocaloric amounts of either a ketogenic diet (KD; 20.2%-10.3%-69.5% protein-carbohydrate-fat), a Western diet (WD; 15.2%-42.7-42.0%), or standard chow (SC; 24.0%-58.0%-18.0%); n = 8-10 in each diet for SED and EX rats. Following the intervention, body mass and feed efficiency were lowest in KD rats, independent of exercise (P < 0.05). Absolute and relative (body mass-adjusted) omental adipose tissue (OMAT) masses were greatest in WD rats (P < 0.05), and OMAT adipocyte diameters were lowest in KD-fed rats (P < 0.05). None of the assayed OMAT or subcutaneous (SQ) protein markers were affected by the diets [total acetyl coA carboxylase (ACC), CD36, and CEBPα or phosphorylated NF-κB/p65, AMPKα, and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)], although EX unexpectedly altered some OMAT markers (i.e., higher ACC and phosphorylated NF-κB/p65, and lower phosphorylated AMPKα and phosphorylated HSL). Liver triglycerides were greatest in WD rats (P < 0.05), and liver phosphorylated NF-κB/p65 was lowest in KD rats (P < 0.05). Serum insulin, glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol were greater in WD and/or SC rats compared with KD rats (P < 0.05), and serum β-hydroxybutyrate was greater in KD vs. SC rats (P < 0.05). In conclusion, KD rats presented a healthier metabolic profile, albeit the employed exercise protocol minimally impacts any potentiating effects that KD has on fat loss.

  6. Effects of replica running shoes upon external forces and muscle activity during running.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana Paula Da Silva; Brandina, Kátia; Bianco, Roberto; Oliveira, Vitor Henrique De; Souza, Juliana Roque De; Mezencio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Júlio Cerca

    2012-05-01

    Twelve participants ran (9 km · h(-1)) to test two types of running shoes: replica and original shoes. Ground reaction force, plantar pressure and electromyographic activity were recorded. The shoes were tested randomly and on different days. Comparisons between the two experimental conditions were made by analysis of variance (ANOVA) test (P ≤ 0.05). The time to first peak, loading rate of the first peak and impulse of the first 75 ms of stance were significantly different between the shoes (P ≤ 0.05), revealing an increase of impact forces for the replica shoes. The peak plantar pressure values were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) when wearing replica shoes. During running, the contact area was significantly smaller (P ≤ 0.05) for the replica shoe. The electromyographic activity of the analysed muscles did not show changes between the two shoes in running. These findings suggest that the use of replica running shoes can increase the external load applied to the human body, but may not change the muscle activity pattern during locomotion. This new mechanical situation may increase the risk of injuries in these movements.

  7. Acute effects of wheel running on adult hippocampal precursor cells in mice are not caused by changes in cell cycle length or S phase length

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Tim J.; Walker, Tara L.; Overall, Rupert W.; Brandt, Moritz D.; Kempermann, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Exercise stimulates cellular brain plasticity by extending the pool of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus. This effect has been investigated extensively, but the most immediate cellular effect induced by exercise that results in this acute increase in the number of cycling cells remained unclear. In the developing brain as well as adult pathological models, cell cycle alterations have a major influence on the balance between proliferative and neurogenic divisions. In this study we investigated whether this might also apply to the acute physiological pro-neurogenic stimulus of physical exercise in adulthood. Do changes in cell cycle precede the measurable increase in proliferation? After 5 days of voluntary wheel running, however, we measured only a very small, statistically not significant acceleration in cell cycle, which could not quantitatively explain the observed increase in proliferating cells after exercise. Thus, at this acute stage, changes at the level of cell cycle control is not the primary causal mechanism for the expansion of the precursor cell population, although with time after the stimulus changes in cell cycle of the entire population of labeled cells might be the result of the expanded pool of cells that have progressed to the advanced neurogenic stages with shorter cell cycle length. PMID:25339861

  8. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity following distance running.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, J B; Brodthagen, U; Gormsen, J; Jordal, R; Nørregaard-Hansen, K; Paulev, P E

    1982-11-01

    6 long distance runners from the Danish marathon elite and 6 non-runners completed test runs of 28 and 12 km, respectively. Distance runners and non-runners showed the same responses in platelet function. We found a significant decrease in ADP induced platelet aggregability, a decreased serotonin release induced by ADP and collagen and an increase in platelet factor 4 immediately following the run. The antithrombin III levels remained constant. Euglobulin lysis time was shortened (by approximately 50%) and the plasminogen levels significantly increased. The last 2 findings indicate an equal increase in fibrinolytic activity during distance running in both groups. While short term, strenuous exercise induces platelet hyperaggregation, long term distance running induces a state of exhaustion of platelet aggregation capacity.

  9. Voluntary wheel running, but not a diet containing (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and β-alanine, improves learning, memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Trisha E.; Pence, Brandt D.; Petr, Geraldine; Ossyra, Jessica M.; Mach, Houston C.; Battacharya, Tushar K.; Perez, Samuel; Martin, Stephen A.; McCusker, Robert H.; Kelley, Keith W.; Rhodes, Justin S.; Johnson, Rodney W.; Woods, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with impaired learning and memory accompanied by reductions in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and brain expression of neurotrophic factors among other processes. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, a green tea catechin), β-alanine (β-ala, the precursor of carnosine), and exercise have independently been shown to be neuroprotective and to reduce inflammation and oxidative stress in the central nervous system. We hypothesized that EGCG, β-ala supplementation or exercise alone would improve learning and memory and increase neurogenesis in aged mice, and the combined intervention would be better than either treatment alone. Male Balb/cByJ mice (19 mo) were given AIN-93M diet with or without EGCG (182 mg/kg/d) and β-ala (417 mg/kg/d). Half of the mice were given access to a running wheel (VWR). The first 10 days, animals received 50 mg/kg bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) daily. After 28 days, learning and memory was assessed by Morris water maze (MWM) and contextual fear conditioning (CFC). Brains were collected for immunohistochemical detection of BrdU and quantitative mRNA expression in the hippocampus. VWR increased the number of BrdU cells in the dentate gyrus, increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, decreased expression of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β, and improved performance in the MWM and CFC tests. The dietary intervention reduced brain oxidative stress as measured by 4-hydroxynonenal in the cerebellum, but had no effect on BrdU labeling or behavioral performance. These results suggest that exercise, but not a diet containing EGCG and β-ala, exhibit pro-cognitive effects in aged mice when given at these doses in this relatively short time frame. PMID:25004447

  10. Running activity profile of adolescent tennis players during match play.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Matthias W; Baumgart, Christian; Bornefeld, Jutta; Sperlich, Billy; Freiwald, Jürgen; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to assess the running activities of adolescent tennis players during match play with respect to velocity, acceleration, and deceleration; (2) to characterize changes in these activities during the course of a match; and (3) to identify potential differences between winners and losers. Twenty well-trained adolescent male athletes (13 ± 1 y) played one simulated match each (giving a total of 10 matches), during which distances covered at different velocity categories (0 to < 1, 1 to < 2, 2 to < 3, 3 to < 4, and ≥ 4 m·s(-1)) and number of running activities involving high velocity (≥ 3 m·s(-1)), acceleration (≥ 2 m·s(-2)), and deceleration (≤ -2 m·s(-2)) were monitored using a global positioning system (10 Hz). Heart rate was also assessed. The total match time, total distance covered, peak velocity, and mean heart rate were 81.2 ± 14.6 min, 3362 ± 869 m, 4.4 ± 0.8 m·s(-1), and 159 ± 12 beats·min(-1), respectively. Running activities involving high acceleration (0.6 ± 0.2 n·min(-1)) or deceleration (0.6 ± 0.2 n·min(-1)) were three times as frequent as those involving high velocity (0.2 ± 0.1 n·min(-1)). No change in the pattern of running activities (P ≥ .13, d ≤ 0.39) and no differences between winners and losers (P ≥ .22, d ≤ 0.53) were evident during match play. We conclude that training of well-trained adolescent male tennis players need not focus on further development of their running abilities, since this physical component of multifactorial tennis performance does not change during the course of a match and does not differ between the winners and losers.

  11. Running for REST: Physical activity attenuates neuroinflammation in the hippocampus of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Dallagnol, Karine Mathilde Campestrini; Remor, Aline Pertile; da Silva, Rodrigo Augusto; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Latini, Alexandra; Aguiar, Aderbal Silva

    2017-03-01

    Exercise improves mental health and synaptic function in the aged brain. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in exercise-induced healthy brain aging are not well understood. Evidence supports the role of neurogenesis and neurotrophins in exercise-induced neuroplasticity. The gene silencing transcription factor neuronal RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST)/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) and an anti-inflammatory role of exercise are also candidate mechanisms. We evaluate the effect of 8weeks of physical activity on running wheels (RW) on motor and depressive-like behavior and hippocampal gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), REST, and interleukins IL-1β and IL-10 of adult and aged C57BL/6 mice. The aged animals exhibited impaired motor function and a depressive-like behavior: decreased mobility in the RW and open field and severe immobility in the tail suspension test. The gene expression of REST, IL-1β, and IL-10 was increased in the hippocampus of aged mice. Physical activity was anxiolytic and antidepressant and improved motor behavior in aged animals. Physical activity also boosted BDNF and REST expression and decreased IL-1β and IL-10 expression in the hippocampus of aged animals. These results support the beneficial role of REST in the aged brain, which can be further enhanced by regular physical activity.

  12. Pneumatic active suspension system for a one-wheel car model using fuzzy reasoning and a disturbance observer.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Toshio; Takagi, Atsushi

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents the construction of a pneumatic active suspension system for a one-wheel car model using fuzzy reasoning and a disturbance observer. The one-wheel car model can be approximately described as a nonlinear two degrees of freedom system subject to excitation from a road profile. The active control is composed of fuzzy and disturbance controls, and functions by actuating a pneumatic actuator. A phase lead-lag compensator is inserted to counter the performance degradation due to the delay of the pneumatic actuator. The experimental result indicates that the proposed active suspension improves much the vibration suppression of the car model.

  13. Cart Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Edson R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper draws attention to cart wheels, two wheels rotating freely about a common axle and rolling on an inclined plane, both as a demonstration and as a satisfying application of dynamical analysis. (BB)

  14. Hand-cycling: an active form of wheeled mobility, recreation, and sports.

    PubMed

    Hettinga, F J; Valent, L; Groen, W; van Drongelen, S; de Groot, S; van der Woude, L H V

    2010-02-01

    By studying exercise and performance in hand-cycling in both activities of daily living and in Paralympic sport settings, new insights can be gained for rehabilitation practice, adapted physical activity, and sports. This review looks into the pros and cons of hand-cycling in both rehabilitation and optimal sports performance settings as suggested from the current-but still limited-scientific literature and experimentation. Despite the limited evidence-base and the diversity of study approaches and methodologies, this study suggests an important role for hand-cycling during and after rehabilitation, and in wheeled mobility recreation and sports. An approach that combines biomechanical, physiological, and psychosocial elements may lead to a better understanding of the benefits of hand-cycling and of the fundamentals of exercise in rehabilitation, activities of daily living, and sports.

  15. Active nutation control of an asymmetric spacecraft using an axial reaction wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmohamadi Ousaloo, Hamed

    2016-12-01

    The focus of this paper is to develop a control scheme for overcoming the nutational motion of an asymmetric spin satellite regardless of its spin-to-transverse inertia ratio using a single reaction wheel mounted along the desired spin axis. In this strategy the basic Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is acted on the precession angle error and, moreover, Lyapunov stability is applied for creating positive spin rate using proper precession command. A Monte Carlo type approach is used to verify the stability for various inertia ratios. The control system makes use of only angular velocity of wheel and spacecraft angular rates to stabilize spin. This active nutation controller globally and asymptotically stabilizes the spacecraft about a revolute motion and provides automatically logical recovery of desired positive spin from any initial state. This straightforward attitude recovery technique does not require accurate estimates of spacecraft inertias and various simulation results demonstrate that stability is not affected by various inertia ratios. Numerical simulations confirm that the approach has typically robust performance.

  16. Magnetic bearing momentum wheels with magnetic gimballing capability for 3-axis active attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindlinger, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic bearings used for the suspension of momentum wheels provide conclusive advantages: the low friction torques and the absence of abrasion allow the realization of lightweight high speed wheels with high angular momentum and energy storage capacity and virtually unlimited lifetime. The use of actively controlled bearings provides a magnetic gimballing capability by applying the external signals to the two servo loops controlling the rotational degrees of freedom. Thus, an attitude control system can be realized by using only one rotating mass for 3-axis active satellite stabilization.

  17. Adelphi on Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Lawrence C.

    1976-01-01

    Adelphi University has awarded 76 Masters in Business Administration degrees to people in the New York City area who attended its Classroom on Wheels, one specially equipped car on each of four commuter train lines. The program, reaching over 1000 people since 1971 is run and promoted solely on tuition. (JT)

  18. Six weeks of voluntary wheel running modulates inflammatory protein (MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-10) and DAMP (Hsp72) responses to acute stress in white adipose tissue of lean rats.

    PubMed

    Speaker, Kristin J; Cox, Stewart S; Paton, Madeline M; Serebrakian, Arman; Maslanik, Thomas; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2014-07-01

    To prime local tissues for dealing with potential infection or injury, exposure to an acute, intense stressor evokes increases in circulating and local tissue inflammatory proteins. Regular physical activity facilitates stress-evoked innate reactivity and modulates the expression of inflammatory proteins in immuno-metabolic tissues such as white adipose tissue (WAT). The impact of regular physical activity on stress-evoked inflammatory protein expression in WAT, however, remains unclear. To investigate this question, lean male F344 rats (150-175g) were allowed voluntary access to a running wheel for 6weeks followed by exposure to an acute stressor (100, 1.5mA-5s inescapable tail shocks). Using ELISAs, corticosterone, heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72), macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 concentrations were measured in plasma and subcutaneous, intraperitoneal (epididymal and retroperitoneal WAT depots) and visceral (omental and mesenteric WAT depots) WAT compartments. Acute stress increased plasma concentrations of all proteins except TNF-α and, depending upon the compartment examined, WAT concentrations of MCP-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10. Exercise ubiquitously increased IL-1β within WAT, potentiated stress-evoked Hsp72 in plasma and WAT, and differentially increased stress-evoked MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-10 within WAT. These data suggest: (a) inflammatory proteins in non-obese WAT may serve compartment-specific immune and metabolic roles important to the acute stress response and; (b) voluntary habitual exercise may optimize stress-induced augmentation of innate immune function through increases in stress-evoked Hsp72, MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-10 and decreases in IL-1β/IL10 and TNF-α/IL10 ratios within white adipose tissue.

  19. Blood coagulation activation and fibrinolysis during a downhill marathon run.

    PubMed

    Sumann, Günther; Fries, Dietmar; Griesmacher, Andrea; Falkensammer, Gerda; Klingler, Anton; Koller, Arnold; Streif, Werner; Greie, Sven; Schobersberger, Beatrix; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Prolonged physical exercise is associated with multiple changes in blood hemostasis. Eccentric muscle activation induces microtrauma of skeletal muscles, inducing an inflammatory response. Since there is a link between inflammation and coagulation we speculated that downhill running strongly activates the coagulation system. Thirteen volunteers participated in the Tyrolean Speed Marathon (42,195 m downhill race, 795 m vertical distance). Venous blood was collected 3 days (T1) and 3 h (T2) before the run, within 30 min after finishing (T3) and 1 day thereafter (T4). We measured the following key parameters: creatine kinase, myoglobin, thrombin-antithrombin complex, prothrombin fragment F1 + 2, D-dimer, plasmin-alpha(2)-antiplasmin complexes, tissue-type plasminogen activator antigen, plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 antigen and thrombelastography with ROTEM [intrinsic pathway (InTEM) clotting time, clot formation time, maximum clot firmness, alpha angle]. Thrombin generation was evaluated by the Thrombin Dynamic Test and the Technothrombin TGA test. Creatine kinase and myoglobin were elevated at T3 and further increased at T4. Thrombin-antithrombin complex, prothrombin fragment F1 + 2, D-dimer, plasmin-alpha(2)-antiplasmin complexes, tissue-type plasminogen activator antigen and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 antigen were significantly increased at T3. ROTEM analysis exhibited a shortening of InTEM clotting time and clot formation time after the marathon, and an increase in InTEM maximum clot firmness and alpha angle. Changes in TGA were indicative for thrombin generation after the marathon. We demonstrated that a downhill marathon induces an activation of coagulation, as measured by specific parameters for coagulation, ROTEM and thrombin generation assays. These changes were paralleled by an activation of fibrinolysis indicating a preserved hemostatic balance.

  20. Telemetry provides new insights into entrainment of activity wheel circadian rhythms and the role of body temperature in the development of ulcers in the activity-stress paradigm.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Helen M; Wideman, Cyrilla H; Aquila, Louise A; Nadzam, George R

    2002-01-01

    Two methods of monitoring the circadian rhythm of activity in rodents: (1) an activity wheel cage, which detects the number of wheel revolutions, and (2) an internal radio transmitter, which records gross motor activity (GMA) of the animal, were compared in both normal circadian cycles and during the development of activity-stress ulcers. Rats were implanted with a biotelemetry transmitter that detected GMA and body temperature (BT) and placed in activity wheel cages. A 12 hour/12 hour light/dark cycle was maintained throughout the experiment. Subjects were subdivided into two groups: (1) unlimited access to activity wheel (AW) cages and (2) locked activity wheel (LW) cages. Following an ad-libitum habituation period, animals were allowed food access for 1 hour/day during the light. In the habituation period, the animals showed higher GMA and BT during the dark phase when housed in AW cages than in LW cages. Both GMA and number of wheel revolutions increased dramatically after the onset of food restriction for the AW animals. There was a deleterious drop in BT in AW animals as the food-restricted period continued and a significant correlation existed between severity of ulcerations and BT. The findings of this experiment demonstrate that the activity wheel imposes an alternation of the circadian cycle, which, in turn, influences rhythmicity through reentrainment. Additionally, in the activity-stress paradigm, a significant drop in BT correlates with severity of ulcerations. A disrupted circadian cycle, involving hypothermia, is proposed as the mechanism underlying the demise of animals in the activity-stress paradigm.

  1. Impact of genetic strain on body fat loss, food consumption, metabolism, ventilation, and motor activity in free running female rats.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Phillips, P M; Johnstone, A F M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exercise is considered as one of the most effective means of countering symptoms of the metabolic syndrome (MS) such as obesity and hyperglycemia. Rodent models of forced or voluntary exercise are often used to study the mechanisms of MS and type 2 diabetes. However, there is little known on the impact of genetic strain on the metabolic response to exercise. We studied the effects of housing rats with running wheels (RW) for 65 days compared to sedentary (SED) housing in five female rat strains: Sprague-Dawley (SD), Long-Evans (LE), Wistar (WIS), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY). Key parameters measured were total distance run, body composition, food consumption, motor activity, ventilatory responses by plethysmography, and resting metabolic rate (MR). WKY and SHR ran significantly more than the WIS, LE, and SD strains. Running-induced reduction in body fat was affected by strain but not by distance run. LE's lost 6% fat after 21 d of running whereas WKY's lost 2% fat but ran 40% more than LE's. LE and WIS lost body weight while the SHR and WKY strains gained weight during running. Food intake with RW was markedly increased in SHR, WIS, and WKY while LE and SD showed modest increases. Exploratory motor activity was reduced sharply by RW in all but the SD strain. Ventilatory parameters were primarily altered by RW in the SHR, WKY, and WIS strains. MR was unaffected by RW. In an overall ranking of physiological and behavioral responses to RW, the SD strain was considered the least responsive whereas the WIS was scored as most responsive. In terms of RW-induced fat loss, the LE strain appears to be the most ideal. These results should be useful in the future selection of rat models to study benefits of volitional exercise.

  2. A Bout of Voluntary Running Enhances Context Conditioned Fear, Its Extinction, and Its Reconsolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siette, Joyce; Reichelt, Amy C.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments used rats to examine the effect of a single bout of voluntary activity (wheel running) on the acquisition, extinction, and reconsolidation of context conditioned fear. In Experiment 1, rats provided with access to a wheel for 3 h immediately before or after a shocked exposure to a context froze more when tested in that context…

  3. Omnidirectional wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumrich, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The apparatus consists of a wheel having a hub with radially disposed spokes which are provided with a plurality of circumferential rim segments. These rim segments carry, between the spokes, rim elements which are rigid relative to their outer support surfaces, and defined in their outer contour to form a part of the circle forming the wheel diameter. The rim segments have provided for each of the rim elements an independent drive means selectively operable when the element is in ground contact to rotatably drive the rim element in a direction of movement perpendicularly lateral to the normal plane of rotation and movement of the wheel. This affords the wheel omnidirectional movement.

  4. Estimating the Backup Reaction Wheel Orientation Using Reaction Wheel Spin Rates Flight Telemetry from a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    A report describes a model that estimates the orientation of the backup reaction wheel using the reaction wheel spin rates telemetry from a spacecraft. Attitude control via the reaction wheel assembly (RWA) onboard a spacecraft uses three reaction wheels (one wheel per axis) and a backup to accommodate any wheel degradation throughout the course of the mission. The spacecraft dynamics prediction depends upon the correct knowledge of the reaction wheel orientations. Thus, it is vital to determine the actual orientation of the reaction wheels such that the correct spacecraft dynamics can be predicted. The conservation of angular momentum is used to estimate the orientation of the backup reaction wheel from the prime and backup reaction wheel spin rates data. The method is applied in estimating the orientation of the backup wheel onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The flight telemetry from the March 2011 prime and backup RWA swap activity on Cassini is used to obtain the best estimate for the backup reaction wheel orientation.

  5. Running per se stimulates the dendritic arbor of newborn dentate granule cells in mouse hippocampus in a duration-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dostes, Sandrine; Dubreucq, Sarah; Ladevèze, Elodie; Marsicano, Giovanni; Abrous, Djoher N; Chaouloff, Francis; Koehl, Muriel

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory rodents provided chronic unlimited access to running wheels display increased neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In addition, recent studies indicate that such an access to wheels stimulates dendritic arborization in newly formed neurons. However, (i) the presence of the running wheel in the housing environment might also bear intrinsic influences on the number and shape of new neurons and (ii) the dendritic arborization of new neurons might be insensitive to moderate daily running activity (i.e., several hours). In keeping with these uncertainties, we have examined neurogenesis and dendritic arborization in newly formed granular cells in adult C57Bl/6N male mice housed for 3 weeks under standard conditions, with a locked wheel, with a running wheel set free 3 h/day, or with a running wheel set permanently free. The results indicate that the presence of a blocked wheel in the home cage increased cell proliferation, but not the number of new neurons while running increased in a duration-dependent manner the number of newborn neurons, as assessed by DCX labeling. Morphological analyses of the dendritic tree of newborn neurons, as identified by BrdU-DCX co-staining, revealed that although the presence of the wheel stimulated their dendritic architecture, the amplitude of this effect was lower than that elicited by running activity, and was found to be running duration-dependent.

  6. Bicycle Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An aerodynamic bicycle wheel developed by two DuPont engineers and a California company incorporates research into NASA airfoils. Computer modeling was accomplished with MSC/NASTRAN. Each of the three spokes in the wheel is, in effect, an airfoil, maximizing aerodynamic efficiency for racing.

  7. Magnetic bearing momentum wheels with magnetic gimballing capability for 3-axis active attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindlinger, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    A 3-axis active attitude control system with only one rotating part was developed using a momentum wheel with magnetic gimballing capability as a torque actuator for all three body axes. A brief description of magnetic bearing technology is given. It is concluded that based on this technology an integrated energy storage/attitude control system with one air of counterrotating rings could reduce the complexity and weight of conventional systems.

  8. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    This is an engineering test {described in SMOV4 Activity Description NICMOS-04} to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in SMOV4. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal operating temperature.Addition of visits G0 - G9 {9/9/09}: Ten visits copied from proposal 11868 {visits 20, 30, ..., 90, A0, B0}. Each visit moves two filter positions, takes lamp ON/OFF exposures and then moves back to the blank position. Visits G0, G1 and G2 will leave the filter wheels disabled. The remaining visits will leave the filter wheels enabled. There are sufficient in between times to allow for data download and analysis. In the case of problem is encountered, the filter wheels will be disabled through a real time command. The in between times are all set to 22-50 hours. It is preferable to have as short as possible in between time.

  9. Reliable fuzzy H∞ control for active suspension of in-wheel motor driven electric vehicles with dynamic damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xinxin; Naghdy, Fazel; Du, Haiping

    2017-03-01

    A fault-tolerant fuzzy H∞ control design approach for active suspension of in-wheel motor driven electric vehicles in the presence of sprung mass variation, actuator faults and control input constraints is proposed. The controller is designed based on the quarter-car active suspension model with a dynamic-damping-in-wheel-motor-driven-system, in which the suspended motor is operated as a dynamic absorber. The Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model is used to model this suspension with possible sprung mass variation. The parallel-distributed compensation (PDC) scheme is deployed to derive a fault-tolerant fuzzy controller for the T-S fuzzy suspension model. In order to reduce the motor wear caused by the dynamic force transmitted to the in-wheel motor, the dynamic force is taken as an additional controlled output besides the traditional optimization objectives such as sprung mass acceleration, suspension deflection and actuator saturation. The H∞ performance of the proposed controller is derived as linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) comprising three equality constraints which are solved efficiently by means of MATLAB LMI Toolbox. The proposed controller is applied to an electric vehicle suspension and its effectiveness is demonstrated through computer simulation.

  10. The Learning Wheel: Ideas and Activities for Multicultural and Holistic Lesson Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Annabelle

    This book describes a conceptual framework for multicultural education that is based on how various cultures lead their members to know about the world. This approach accounts for diverse ways of knowing and learning and is based on the symbol of the wheel as an ancient organizational model from Asia, Europe, Africa, and North America. This model…

  11. Rapid Alterations in Perirenal Adipose Tissue Transcriptomic Networks with Cessation of Voluntary Running

    PubMed Central

    Toedebusch, Ryan G.; Roberts, Christian K.; Roberts, Michael D.; Booth, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    In maturing rats, the growth of abdominal fat is attenuated by voluntary wheel running. After the cessation of running by wheel locking, a rapid increase in adipose tissue growth to a size that is similar to rats that have never run (i.e. catch-up growth) has been previously reported by our lab. In contrast, diet-induced increases in adiposity have a slower onset with relatively delayed transcriptomic responses. The purpose of the present study was to identify molecular pathways associated with the rapid increase in adipose tissue after ending 6 wks of voluntary running at the time of puberty. Age-matched, male Wistar rats were given access to running wheels from 4 to 10 weeks of age. From the 10th to 11th week of age, one group of rats had continued wheel access, while the other group had one week of wheel locking. Perirenal adipose tissue was extracted, RNA sequencing was performed, and bioinformatics analyses were executed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). IPA was chosen to assist in the understanding of complex ‘omics data by integrating data into networks and pathways. Wheel locked rats gained significantly more fat mass and significantly increased body fat percentage between weeks 10–11 despite having decreased food intake, as compared to rats with continued wheel access. IPA identified 646 known transcripts differentially expressed (p < 0.05) between continued wheel access and wheel locking. In wheel locked rats, IPA revealed enrichment of transcripts for the following functions: extracellular matrix, macrophage infiltration, immunity, and pro-inflammatory. These findings suggest that increases in visceral adipose tissue that accompanies the cessation of pubertal physical activity are associated with the alteration of multiple pathways, some of which may potentiate the development of pubertal obesity and obesity-associated systemic low-grade inflammation that occurs later in life. PMID:26678390

  12. A bout of voluntary running enhances context conditioned fear, its extinction, and its reconsolidation

    PubMed Central

    Siette, Joyce; Reichelt, Amy C.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments used rats to examine the effect of a single bout of voluntary activity (wheel running) on the acquisition, extinction, and reconsolidation of context conditioned fear. In Experiment 1, rats provided with access to a wheel for 3 h immediately before or after a shocked exposure to a context froze more when tested in that context than rats provided with access to the wheels 6 h after the shocked exposure or rats not provided with access to the wheels. In Experiment 2, rats provided with access to the wheels immediately before or after a nonshocked exposure to the conditioned context froze less when tested in that context than rats provided with access to the wheels 6 h after the nonshocked exposure or rats not provided with access to the wheels. In Experiment 3, rats provided with access to wheels immediately after an extended nonshocked exposure to the conditioned context again froze less, whereas rats provided with access to the wheels after a brief nonshocked exposure froze more on the subsequent test than sedentary controls. These results show that a single bout of running can enhance acquisition, extinction, and reconsolidation of context conditioned fear. PMID:24429425

  13. A bout of voluntary running enhances context conditioned fear, its extinction, and its reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Siette, Joyce; Reichelt, Amy C; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2014-01-15

    Three experiments used rats to examine the effect of a single bout of voluntary activity (wheel running) on the acquisition, extinction, and reconsolidation of context conditioned fear. In Experiment 1, rats provided with access to a wheel for 3 h immediately before or after a shocked exposure to a context froze more when tested in that context than rats provided with access to the wheels 6 h after the shocked exposure or rats not provided with access to the wheels. In Experiment 2, rats provided with access to the wheels immediately before or after a nonshocked exposure to the conditioned context froze less when tested in that context than rats provided with access to the wheels 6 h after the nonshocked exposure or rats not provided with access to the wheels. In Experiment 3, rats provided with access to wheels immediately after an extended nonshocked exposure to the conditioned context again froze less, whereas rats provided with access to the wheels after a brief nonshocked exposure froze more on the subsequent test than sedentary controls. These results show that a single bout of running can enhance acquisition, extinction, and reconsolidation of context conditioned fear.

  14. Acute changes in kinematic and muscle activity patterns in habitually shod rearfoot strikers while running barefoot.

    PubMed

    Strauts, Janina; Vanicek, Natalie; Halaki, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe changes in the kinematics and muscle activities when barefoot running was initially adopted by six habitually shod, recreational rearfoot striking runners. Participants ran on a treadmill shod for 5 min, completed 3 × 10-min intervals of barefoot running and then completed a final minute of shod running at a self-selected pace. Dependent variables (speed, joint angles at foot-contact, joint range of motion (ROM), mean and peak electromyography (EMG) activity) were compared across conditions using repeated measures ANOVAs. Anterior pelvic tilt and hip flexion significantly decreased during barefoot conditions at foot contact. The ROM for the trunk, pelvis, knee and ankle angles decreased during the barefoot conditions. Mean EMG activity was reduced for biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis and tibialis anterior during barefoot running. The peak activity across the running cycle decreased in biceps femoris, vastus medialis, gastrocnemius medialis and tibialis anterior during barefoot running. During barefoot running, tibialis anterior activity significantly decreased during the pre-activation and initial contact phases; gastrocnemius lateralis and medialis activity significantly decreased during the push-off phase. Barefoot running caused immediate biomechanical and neuromuscular adaptations at the hip and pelvis, which persisted when the runners donned their shoes, indicating that some learning had occurred during an initial short bout of barefoot running.

  15. Pulse width modulated push-pull driven parallel resonant converter with active free-wheel

    DOEpatents

    Reass, William A.; Schrank, Louis

    2004-06-22

    An apparatus and method for high frequency alternating power generation to control kilowatts of supplied power in microseconds. The present invention includes a means for energy storage, push-pull switching means, control electronics, transformer means, resonant circuitry and means for excess energy recovery, all in electrical communication. A push-pull circuit works synchronously with a force commutated free-wheel transistor to provide current pulses to a transformer. A change in the conduction angle of the push-pull circuit changes the amount of energy coupled into the transformer's secondary oscillating circuit, thereby altering the induced secondary resonating voltage. At the end of each pulse, the force commutated free-wheel transistor causes residual excess energy in the primary circuit to be transmitted back to the storage capacitor for later use.

  16. Magnetically suspended reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A. V.; Stocking, G. L.; Dendy, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions offer several advantages over conventional bearings, arising because of the contactless nature of the load support. In application to spacecraft reaction wheels, the advantages are low drag torque, wearfree, unlubricated, vacuum-compatible operation, and unlimited life. By the provision of redundancy in the control electronics, single-point failures are eliminated. The rational for selection of a passive radial, active axial, dc magnetic suspension is presented, and the relative merits of 3-loop and single-loop magnetic suspensions are discussed. The design of a .678 N-m-sec (.5 ft-lb-sec) reaction wheel using the single loop magnetic suspension was developed; the design compares favorably with current ball bearing wheels in terms of weight and power.

  17. Activation Pattern of Lower Leg Muscles in Running on Asphalt, Gravel and Grass.

    PubMed

    Dolenec, Aleš; Štirn, Igor; Strojnik, Vojko

    2015-07-01

    Running is performed on different natural surfaces (outdoor) and artificial surfaces (indoor). Different surface characteristics cause modification of the lower leg muscle activation pattern to adopt ankle stiffness to these characteristics. So the purpose of our investigation was to study changes of lower leg muscles activation pattern in running on different natural running surfaces. Six male and two female runners participated. The participants ran at a freely chosen velocity in trials on asphalt while in trials on gravel, and grass surfaces they were attempting to reach similar velocities as in the trials on asphalt. Muscle activation of the peroneus brevis, tibialis anterior, soleus, and gastrocnemius medialis of the right leg was recorded. Running on asphalt increased average EMG amplitude of the m. tibialis anterior in the pre-activation phase and the m. gastrocnemius medialis in the entire contact phase compared to running on grass from 0.222 ± 0.113 V to 0.276 ± 0.136 V and from 0.214 ± 0.084 V to 0.238 ± 0.088 V, respectively. The average EMG of m. peroneus brevis in pre-activation phase increased from 0.156 ± 0.026 V to 0.184 ± 0.455 V in running on grass in comparison to running on gravel. Running on different surfaces is connected with different activation patterns of lower leg muscles. Running on asphalt requires stiff ankle joints, running on gravel requires greater stability in ankle joints, while running on grass is the least demanding on lower leg muscles.

  18. The effect of cycling on muscle activation in the running leg of an Olympic distance triathlon.

    PubMed

    Heiden, Tamika; Burnett, Angus

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of prior cycling on EMG activity of selected lower leg muscles during running. Ten elite level triathletes underwent two testing sessions at race pace: a 40 km cycle followed by a 2 km run (CR) and a 10 km run followed by a 2 km run (RR). EMG data from selected lower limb muscles were collected at three sections of each run (0 km, 1 km and 2 km) for six strides using a portable data logger. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between condition were found for the level of activation (Lact) for biceps femoris (BF) during stance and vastus lateralis (VL) during flight and stance. Vastus medialis (VM) changed in Lact, during flight, between sections in the 2 km run. Furthermore, significant differences (p < 0.05) between condition were found for BF during stance and for rectus femoris (RF) and VM during flight. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the duration of VL activation (Dact) across sections of the 2 km run. Findings from this investigation highlight changes in muscle function when changing from cycling to running and indicate a need to train specifically for the cycle to run transition. Such training may improve performance and reduce the risk of injury.

  19. Initiating running barefoot: Effects on muscle activation and impact accelerations in habitually rearfoot shod runners.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Priego Quesada, José Ignacio; Giménez, José Vicente; Aparicio, Inma; Jimenez-Perez, Irene; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro

    2016-11-01

    Runners tend to shift from a rearfoot to a forefoot strike pattern when running barefoot. However, it is unclear how the first attempts at running barefoot affect habitually rearfoot shod runners. Due to the inconsistency of their recently adopted barefoot technique, a number of new barefoot-related running injuries are emerging among novice barefoot runners. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse the influence of three running conditions (natural barefoot [BF], barefoot with a forced rearfoot strike [BRS], and shod [SH]) on muscle activity and impact accelerations in habitually rearfoot shod runners. Twenty-two participants ran at 60% of their maximal aerobic speed while foot strike, tibial and head impact accelerations, and tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) muscle activity were registered. Only 68% of the runners adopted a non-rearfoot strike pattern during BF. Running BF led to a reduction of TA activity as well as to an increase of GL and GM activity compared to BRS and SH. Furthermore, BRS increased tibial peak acceleration, tibial magnitude and tibial acceleration rate compared to SH and BF. In conclusion, 32% of our runners showed a rearfoot strike pattern at the first attempts at running barefoot, which corresponds to a running style (BRS) that led to increased muscle activation and impact accelerations and thereby to a potentially higher risk of injury compared to running shod.

  20. Distinct stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis are regulated by running and the running environment.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Matthew R; Hacker, Lindsay C; Fortin-Nunez, Stéphanie; Aumont, Anne; Bergeron, Raynald; Fernandes, Karl J L

    2011-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis continues into adulthood in mammalian vertebrates, and in experimental rodent models it is powerfully stimulated by exposure to a voluntary running wheel. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to a running wheel environment, in the absence of running, is sufficient to regulate specific aspects of hippocampal neurogenesis. Adult mice were provided with standard housing, housing enriched with a running wheel or housing enriched with a locked wheel (i.e., an environment comparable to that of running animals, without the possibility of engaging in running). We found that mice in the running wheel and locked wheel groups exhibited equivalent increases in proliferation within the neurogenic niche of the dentate gyrus; this included comparable increases in the proliferation of radial glia-like stem cells and the number of proliferating neuroblasts. However, only running animals displayed increased numbers of postmitotic neuroblasts and mature neurons. These results demonstrate that the running wheel environment itself is sufficient for promoting proliferation of early lineage hippocampal precursors, while running per se enables newly generated neuroblasts to survive and mature into functional hippocampal neurons. Thus, both running-independent and running-dependent stimuli are integral to running wheel-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

  1. The Influence of External Perturbations on Running Kinematics and Muscle Activity Before and After Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Haudum, Anita; Birklbauer, Jürgen; Müller, Erich

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, the running pattern of the lower extremity was examined while being perturbed through tubes attached between the ankles and the lower back to analyze influences on the running pattern variability before and after a varied running intervention. 3D-kinematics, joint coupling and electromyography (EMG), as well as their variability, were analyzed in ten healthy male participants during treadmill running (10.5 km·h-1). Pre- and post-tests each consisted of 2 x 30 min treadmill running (one with and one without tubes). The results showed major acute effects on EMG and kinematics, as well as joint coordination variability, due to the constraints (p < 0.05). After the intervention, a process of normalization of most kinematic and EMG parameters occurred; however, EMG variability, kinematic variability and joint coordination variability were reduced during tube running below normal running level (p < 0.05). The findings further indicate rapid kinematic adaptations while muscle activity appears to require longer practice to adapt. The constraint serves to acutely increase variability, but may lead to reduced variability when applied for a longer period of time. Key points Normalization of the EMG variability after the training intervention during running with the dynamic constraint Joint coupling variability was reduced after practice intervention during constrained running Kinematic adaptations happen fast while muscle activity requires longer practice Sublevels (i.e., EMGs) were more influenced by the constraint than the macroscopic kinematics. PMID:24150066

  2. Functional differences in the activity of the hamstring muscles with increasing running speed.

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Ayako; Ono, Takashi; Kubota, Jun; Okuwaki, Toru; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we examined hamstring muscle activation at different running speeds to help better understand the functional characteristics of each hamstring muscle. Eight healthy male track and field athletes (20.1 +/- 1.1 years) performed treadmill running at 50%, 75%, 85%, and 95% of their maximum velocity. Lower extremity kinematics of the hip and knee joint were calculated. The surface electromyographic activities of the biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles were also recorded. Increasing the running speed from 85% to 95% significantly increased the activation of the hamstring muscles during the late swing phase, while lower extremity kinematics did not change significantly. During the middle swing phase, the activity of the semitendinosus muscle was significantly greater than that of the biceps femoris muscle at 75%, 85%, and 95% of running speed. Statistically significant differences in peak activation time were observed between the biceps femoris and semitendinosus during 95%max running (P < 0.05 for stance phase, P < 0.01 for late swing phase). Significant differences in the activation patterns between the biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles were observed as running speed was increased, indicating that complex neuromuscular coordination patterns occurred during the running cycle at near maximum sprinting speeds.

  3. Fifth wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, W. P.; Sparks, R. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved fifth wheel for a tractor trailer rig, characterized by a first subassembly including a wear plate was developed and modified to be mounted on a downwardly facing surface of a trailer. A king pin projected normally therefrom, and a second subassembly is adapted to be pivotally mounted on an upwardly facing surface of a tractor. The king pin is brought into contiguous relation with the first sub assembly. A receiver for capturing the king pin is included along with a safety means responsive to a failure of the king pin or its latching mechanism for joining the first subassembly with the second subassembly.

  4. Molecule concept nanocars: chassis, wheels, and motors?

    PubMed

    Joachim, Christian; Rapenne, Gwénael

    2013-01-22

    The design, synthesis, and running of a molecular nanovehicle on a surface assisted by proper nanocommunication channels for feeding and guiding the vehicle now constitute an active field of research and are no longer a nano-joke. In this Perspective, we describe how this field began, its growth, and problems to be solved. Better molecular wheels, a molecular motor with its own gears assembling for torque transmission must be mounted on (i.e., chemically bonded to) a good molecular chassis for the resulting covalently constructed molecular nanovehicle to run on a surface in a controlled manner at the atomic scale. We propose a yearly molecule concept nanocar contest to boost molecular nanovehicle research.

  5. An Acute Bout of Barefoot Running Alters Lower-limb Muscle Activation for Minimalist Shoe Users.

    PubMed

    Snow, N J; Basset, F A; Byrne, J

    2016-05-01

    Despite the abundance of barefoot running-related research, there have been no electromyography studies evaluating the effects of this mode of exercise on habitual users of minimalist footwear. The present study investigated differences in muscle activation during acute bouts of barefoot and shod running, in minimalist shoe users. 8 male participants ran on a motorized treadmill for 10 min under both conditions, at 70% maximal aerobic speed. Electromyographic data were sampled from the biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, gastrocnemius medialis, tibialis anterior, and vastus lateralis during both swing and stance. Root-mean-square analysis of electromyographic data was conducted to compare muscle activation between conditions. During stance, barefoot running resulted in greater muscle activity in gastrocnemius medialis and gluteus maximus, and lower muscle activity in tibialis anterior. During swing, barefoot running resulted in increased muscle activity in vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius medialus. These results indicate that, for minimalist shoe users, an acute bout of barefoot running results in significantly different lower-limb muscle activity. Increased activation in the above muscles presents a possible mechanism for injury, which should be considered during exercise prescription.

  6. Plasma hardening of railway wheel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakaev, E. Kh.; Ivanov, P. P.; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Paristyi, I. L.; Troitsky, A. A.; Yablonsky, A. E.; Filippov, G. A.

    1998-10-01

    A computer-controlled plasma technology was developed for the treatment of rolling stock wheels, providing the thermal hardening of tread and flange working surfaces. As a result of the plasma treatment the surface hardness of the wheel grows from 255 up to 420-450 HB. Herewith, the wear capability of the wheel metal grows 2-3 times and its resistance to the weariness-driven destruction grows 1.5 times due to the pecularities of the structural state of the steel, arising out of the thermal impact and of the alloying of the steel with nitrogen during the plasma treatment. Installation of several plants based on this technology in engine houses allowed to carry out a full scale experiment in order to assess the running characteristics of treated wheel sets in comparison with plain ones. Wheel life between mounting and truing or dismounting doubles due to plasma hardening.

  7. Effects of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity and food consumption in mice: Results from an artificial selection experiment.

    PubMed

    Copes, Lynn E; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Acosta, Wendy; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and food consumption in mice from 4 replicate lines bred for 57 generations for high voluntary wheel running (HR) and from 4 non-selected control (C) lines. Beginning at ~24 days of age, mice were housed in standard cages or in cages with attached wheels. Wheel activity and SPA were monitored in 1-min intervals. Data from the 8th week of the experiment were analyzed because mice were sexually mature and had plateaued in body mass, weekly wheel running distance, SPA, and food consumption. Body mass, length, and masses of the retroperitoneal fat pad, liver, and heart were recorded after the 13th week. SPA of both HR and C mice decreased with wheel access, due to reductions in both duration and average intensity of SPA. However, total activity duration (SPA+wheel running; min/day) was ~1/3 greater when mice were housed with wheels, and food consumption was significantly increased. Overall, food consumption in both HR and C mice was more strongly affected by wheel running than by SPA. Duration of wheel running had a stronger effect than average speed, but the opposite was true for SPA. With body mass as a covariate, chronic wheel access significantly reduced fat pad mass and increased heart mass in both HR and C mice. Given that both HR and C mice housed with wheels had increased food consumption, the energetic cost of wheel running was not fully compensated by concomitant reductions in SPA. The experiment demonstrates that both duration and intensity of both wheel running and SPA were significant predictors of food consumption. This sort of detailed analysis of the effects of different aspects of physical activity on food consumption has not previously been reported for a non-human animal, and it sets the stage for longitudinal examination of energy balance and its components in rodent models.

  8. Match-to-match variability in high-speed running activity in a professional soccer team.

    PubMed

    Carling, Christopher; Bradley, Paul; McCall, Alan; Dupont, Gregory

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated variability in competitive high-speed running performance in an elite soccer team. A semi-automated tracking system quantified running performance in 12 players over a season (median 17 matches per player, 207 observations). Variability [coefficient of variation (CV)] was compared for total sprint distance (TSD, >25.2 km/h), high-speed running (HSR, 19.8-25.2 km/h), total high-speed running (THSR, ≥19.8 km/h); THSR when the team was in and out of ball possession, in individual ball possession, in the peak 5 min activity period; and distance run according to individual maximal aerobic speed (MAS). Variability for % declines in THSR and distance covered at ≥80% MAS across halves, at the end of play (final 15 min vs. mean for all 15 min periods) and transiently (5 min period following peak 5 min activity period), was analysed. Collectively, variability was higher for TSD versus HSR and THSR and lowest for distance run at ≥80% MAS (CVs: 37.1%, 18.1%, 19.8% and 11.8%). THSR CVs when the team was in/out of ball possession, in individual ball possession and during the peak 5 min period were 31.5%, 26.1%, 60.1% and 23.9%. Variability in THSR declines across halves, at the end of play and transiently, ranged from 37.1% to 142.6%, while lower CVs were observed in these metrics for running at ≥80% MAS (20.9-53.3%).These results cast doubt on the appropriateness of general measures of high-speed activity for determining variability in an elite soccer team, although individualisation of HSR thresholds according to fitness characteristics might provide more stable indicators of running performance and fatigue occurrence.

  9. Approach run increases preactivation and eccentric phases muscle activity during drop jumps from different drop heights.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Mianfang; Li, Li

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a horizontal approach run and drop height on the activation of lower extremity muscles during drop jumps. Ten participants performed drop jumps from drop heights of 15, 30, 45 and 60cm with zero (standing), one, two, and three approach run steps. The EMG activities of the Gluteus Maximus (GM), Rectus Femoris (RF), Biceps Femoris (BF), Vastus Lateralis (VL), Tibialis Anterior (TA), Gastrocnemius (GA) and Soleus (SO) were recorded, full-wave rectified, and averaged (aEMG) during the preactivation (50ms before touchdown), downward, and push-off phases. Increasing drop height did not enhance the muscle activation level of any examined muscles except GA. During the preactivation phase, the aEMG of all muscles except TA increased with the number of approach run steps. The aEMG of RF, BF, VL, and SO also increased with the number of approach run steps during the downward phase, while no aEMG changes were observed during the push-off phase. These results suggest that a horizontal approach run preceding the drop jump is an effective strategy for increasing the muscle preactivation level, which contributes to a higher level of muscle activity during the eccentric contraction phase and could potentially contribute to the reported higher power output during the concentric contraction phase.

  10. Effects of Physical Training and Fitness on Running Injuries in Physically Active Young Men.

    PubMed

    Grier, Tyson L; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Anderson, Morgan K; Bushman, Timothy T; Jones, Bruce H

    2017-01-01

    Grier, TL, Canham-Chervak, M, Anderson, MK, Bushman, TT, and Jones, BH. Effects of physical training and fitness on running injuries in physically active young men. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 207-216, 2017-The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of physical training (PT) and fitness on risks for running-related injuries (RRIs) in physically active young men. Personal characteristics, PT, Army Physical Fitness Test scores, and injury data were obtained by survey. Army Physical Fitness Test variables (push-ups, sit-ups, and 2-mile run) were converted into quartiles (Q), where Q1 = lowest performance and Q4 = highest performance. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. Over 4,000 (n = 4,236) soldiers were surveyed. Running injury incidence was 14%. A greater risk of an RRI was associated with older age (OR31+/<22 years = 1.62, 95% CI, 1.21-2.18), higher BMI ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), and total distance ran per week during unit PT (OR16.1+/1-5 miles = 1.66, 95% CI, 1.15-2.41). A lower risk of an RRI was associated with total distance run per week during personal PT (OR5.1-10/1-5 miles = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.53-0.91, OR10.1-16 +/1-5 miles = 0.58, 95% CI, 0.35-0.97, OR16.1+/1-5 miles = 0.54, 95% CI, 0.30-0.98), higher aerobic endurance as measured by 2-mile run performance (ORQ4/Q1 = 0.50, 95% CI, 0.35-0.72), and unit resistance training ≥3 times a week (OR≥3 times per week/none = 0.46, 95% CI, 0.29-0.73). Greater personal PT running mileage decreased injuries in this population suggesting that the increased protective effect of higher aerobic fitness outweighed the injurious effect of running more miles during personal PT. Countermeasures to prevent RRIs could entail enhancing aerobic endurance, providing opportunities for personal aerobic training, monitoring for excessive unit PT running mileage and encouraging unit resistance training ≥3 times per week.

  11. Reduced biceps femoris myoelectrical activity influences eccentric knee flexor weakness after repeat sprint running.

    PubMed

    Timmins, R G; Opar, D A; Williams, M D; Schache, A G; Dear, N M; Shield, A J

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether declines in knee flexor strength following overground repeat sprints were related to changes in hamstrings myoelectrical activity. Seventeen recreationally active men completed maximal isokinetic concentric and eccentric knee flexor strength assessments at 180°/s before and after repeat sprint running. Myoelectrical activity of the biceps femoris (BF) and medial hamstrings (MHs) was measured during all isokinetic contractions. Repeated measures mixed model [fixed factors = time (pre- and post-repeat sprint) and leg (dominant and nondominant), random factor = participants] design was fitted with the restricted maximal likelihood method. Repeat sprint running resulted in significant declines in eccentric, and concentric, knee flexor strength (eccentric = 26 ± 4 Nm, 15% P < 0.001; concentric 11 ± 2 Nm, 10% P < 0.001). Eccentric BF myoelectrical activity was significantly reduced (10%; P = 0.035). Concentric BF and all MH myoelectrical activity were not altered. The declines in maximal eccentric torque were associated with the change in eccentric BF myoelectrical activity (P = 0.013). Following repeat sprint running, there were preferential declines in the myoelectrical activity of the BF, which explained declines in eccentric knee flexor strength.

  12. Reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The fabrication and testing of three reaction wheels with associated drive and system monitoring electronics and brushless dc spin motors are discussed; the wheels are intended for use in a teleoperator simulator. Test results are included as graphs.

  13. Riding the Ferris Wheel: A Sinusoidal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittag, Kathleen Cage; Taylor, Sharon E.

    2011-01-01

    When thinking of models for sinusoidal waves, examples such as tides of the ocean, daily temperatures for one year in your town, light and sound waves, and certain types of motion are used. Many textbooks [1, p. 222] also present a "Ferris wheel description problem" for students to work. This activity takes the Ferris wheel problem out of the…

  14. Are muscle activation patterns altered during shod and barefoot running with a forefoot footfall pattern?

    PubMed

    Ervilha, Ulysses Fernandes; Mochizuki, Luis; Figueira, Aylton; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-09-14

    This study aimed to investigate the activation of lower limb muscles during barefoot and shod running with forefoot or rearfoot footfall patterns. Nine habitually shod runners were asked to run straight for 20 m at self-selected speed. Ground reaction forces and thigh and shank muscle surface electromyographic (EMG) were recorded. EMG outcomes (EMG intensity [iEMG], latency between muscle activation and ground reaction force, latency between muscle pairs and co-activation index between muscle pairs) were compared across condition (shod and barefoot), running cycle epochs (pre-strike, strike, propulsion) and footfall (rearfoot and forefoot) by ANOVA. Condition affected iEMG at pre-strike epoch. Forefoot and rearfoot strike patterns induced different EMG activation time patterns affecting co-activation index for pairs of thigh and shank muscles. All these timing changes suggest that wearing shoes or not is less important for muscle activation than the way runners strike the foot on the ground. In conclusion, the guidance for changing external forces applied on lower limbs should be pointed to the question of rearfoot or forefoot footfall patterns.

  15. Three-Wheel Brush-Wheel Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duckworth, Geoffrey A.; Liu, Jun; Brown, Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    A new sampler is similar to a common snow blower, but is robust and effective in sample collection. The brush wheels are arranged in a triangle shape, each driven by a brushless DC motor and planetary gearhead embedded in the wheel shaft. Its speed can be varied from 800 - 2,000 rpm, depending on the surface regolith resistance. The sample-collecting flow path, and internal features, are designed based on flow dynamics, and the sample-collecting rates have consistently exceeded the requirement under various conditions that span the range of expected surface properties. The brush-wheel sampler (BWS) is designed so that the flow channel is the main body of the apparatus, and links the brush-wheel assembly to the sample canister. The combination of the three brush wheels, the sample flow path, and the canister location make sample collection, storage, and transfer an easier task.

  16. Hyperlocomotor activity and stress vulnerability during adulthood induced by social isolation after early weaning are prevented by voluntary running exercise before normal weaning period.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Junko; Ogawa, Yuko; Owada, Yuji; Ishikawa, Akinori

    2014-05-01

    In rodents, the disruption of social-rearing conditions before normal weaning induces emotional behavioral abnormalities, such as anxiety, motor activity dysregulation, and stress vulnerability. The beneficial effects of exercise after normal weaning on emotional regulation have been well documented. However, effects of exercise before normal weaning on emotion have not been reported. We examined whether voluntary wheel running (R) during social isolation after early weaning (early weaning/isolation; EI) from postnatal day (PD) 14-30 could prevent EI-induced emotional behavioral abnormalities in Sprague-Dawley rats. Compared with control rats reared with their dam and siblings until PD30, rats performed R during EI (EI+R) and EI rats demonstrated greater locomotion and lower grooming activity in the open-field test (OFT) during the juvenile period. Juvenile EI ± R rats showed greater learned helplessness (LH) after exposure to inescapable stress (IS; electric foot shock) than IS-exposed control and EI rats. In contrast, EI rats showed increased locomotion in the OFT and LH after exposure to IS compared with control rats during adulthood; this was not observed in EI ± R rats. Both EI and EI ± R rats exhibited greater rearing activity in the OFT than controls during adulthood. EI did not increase anxiety in the OFT and elevated plus-maze. These results suggested that R during EI until normal weaning prevented some of the EI-induced behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity and greater LH, during adulthood but not in the juvenile period.

  17. Solar attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-08-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control, which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  18. Solar sail attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-01-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar radiation pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  19. Do compression garments enhance the active recovery process after high-intensity running?

    PubMed

    Lovell, Dale I; Mason, Dale G; Delphinus, Elias M; McLellan, Christopher P

    2011-12-01

    Lovell, DI, Mason, DG, Delphinus, EM, and McLellan, CP. Do compression garments enhance the active recovery process after high-intensity running? J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3264-3268, 2011-This study examined the effect of wearing waist-to-ankle compression garments (CGs) on active recovery after moderate- and high-intensity submaximal treadmill running. Twenty-five male semiprofessional rugby league players performed two 30-minute treadmill runs comprising of six 5-minute stages at 6 km·h, 10 km·h, approximately 85% VO(2)max, 6 km·h as a recovery stage followed by approximately 85% VO(2)max and 6 km·h wearing either CGs or regular running shorts in a randomized counterbalanced order with each person acting as his own control. All stages were followed by 30 seconds of rest during which a blood sample was collected to determine blood pH and blood lactate concentration [La]. Expired gases and heart rate (HR) were measured during the submaximal treadmill tests to determine metabolic variables with the average of the last 2 minutes used for data analysis. The HR and [La] were lower (p ≤ 0.05) after the first and second 6 km·h recovery bouts when wearing CGs compared with when wearing running shorts. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was higher and [La] lower (p ≤ 0.05) after the 10 km·h stage, and only RER was higher after both 85% VO(2)max stages when wearing CGs compared with when wearing running shorts. There was no difference in blood pH at any exercise stage when wearing the CGs and running shorts. The results of this study indicate that the wearing of CGs may augment the active recovery process in reducing [La] and HR after high-intensity exercise but not effect blood pH. The ability to reduce [La] and HR has important consequences for many sports that are intermittent in nature and consist of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with periods of low-intensity exercise or recovery.

  20. Solar sail attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-02-01

    In the geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances caused by solar radiation pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control system with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. Roll/yaw control is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators. The design also includes an active nutation damping method.

  1. Carbohydrate affects natural killer cell redistribution but not activity after running.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Henson, D A; Garner, E B; Butterworth, D E; Warren, B J; Utter, A; Davis, J M; Fagoaga, O R; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S L

    1997-10-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was designed to determine the influence of carbohydrate supplementation on the natural killer cell response to 2.5 h of high-intensity running (76.7 +/- 0.4% VO2max). Thirty experienced marathon runners (VO2max 53.4 +/- 1.0 mL x kg[-1] x min[-1], age 41.5 +/- 1.4 yr) were randomized into carbohydrate supplement (N = 17) and placebo (N = 13) groups. Subjects rested for 10-15 min before a blood sample at 0715, and then ingested 0.75 L of carbohydrate beverage (Gatorade) or placebo. At 0730, subjects began running at 75-80% VO2max for 2.5 h and drank 0.25 L of carbohydrate or placebo fluid every 15 min. Immediately after the 2.5 h run (1000), another blood sample was taken, followed by 1.5 h, 3 h, and 6-h recovery samples. Carbohydrate supplementation versus placebo had a significant effect on the pattern of change in glucose, cortisol, and the blood concentration of natural killer cells ([F (4,25) = 3.79, P = 0.015], but not natural killer cell activity following 2.5 h of intensive running.

  2. Differential changes in vascular mRNA levels between rat iliac and renal arteries produced by cessation of voluntary running.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Roberts, Michael D; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Martin, Jeffrey S; Laughlin, M Harold; Booth, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    Early vascular changes at the molecular level caused by adoption of a sedentary lifestyle are incompletely characterized. Herein, we employed the rodent wheel-lock model to identify mRNAs in the arterial wall that are responsive to the acute transition from higher to lower levels of daily physical activity. Specifically, we evaluated whether short-term cessation of voluntary wheel running alters vascular mRNA levels in rat conduit arteries previously reported to have marked increases (i.e. iliac artery) versus marked decreases (i.e. renal artery) in blood flow during running. We used young female Wistar rats with free access to voluntary running wheels. Following 23 days of voluntary running (average distance of ∼15 km per night; ∼4.4 h per night), rats in one group were rapidly transitioned to a sedentary state by locking the wheels for 7 days (n = 9; wheel-lock 7 day rats) or remained active in a second group for an additional 7 days (n = 9; wheel-lock 0 day rats). Real-time PCR was conducted on total RNA isolated from iliac and renal arteries to evaluate expression of 25 pro-atherogenic and anti-atherogenic genes. Compared with the iliac arteries of wheel-lock 0 day rats, iliac arteries of wheel-lock 7 day rats exhibited increased expression of TNFR1 (+19%), ET1 (+59%) and LOX-1 (+31%; all P < 0.05). Moreover, compared with renal arteries of wheel-lock 0 day rats, renal arteries of wheel-lock 7 day rats exhibited decreased expression of ETb (-23%), p47phox (-32%) and p67phox (-19%; all P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that cessation of voluntary wheel running for 7 days produces modest, but differential changes in mRNA levels between the iliac and renal arteries of healthy rats. This heterogeneous influence of short-term physical inactivity could be attributed to the distinct alteration in haemodynamic forces between arteries.

  3. Kinetics and Muscle Activity Patterns during Unweighting and Reloading Transition Phases in Running

    PubMed Central

    Sainton, Patrick; Nicol, Caroline; Cabri, Jan; Barthèlemy-Montfort, Joëlle; Chavet, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Amongst reduced gravity simulators, the lower body positive pressure (LBPP) treadmill is emerging as an innovative tool for both rehabilitation and fundamental research purposes as it allows running while experiencing reduced vertical ground reaction forces. The appropriate use of such a treadmill requires an improved understanding of the associated neuromechanical changes. This study concentrates on the runner’s adjustments to LBPP-induced unweighting and reloading during running. Nine healthy males performed two running series of nine minutes at natural speed. Each series comprised three sequences of three minutes at: 100% bodyweight (BW), 60 or 80% BW, and 100% BW. The progressive unweighting and reloading transitions lasted 10 to 15 s. The LBPP-induced unweighting level, vertical ground reaction force and center of mass accelerations were analyzed together with surface electromyographic activity from 6 major lower limb muscles. The analyses of stride-to-stride adjustments during each transition established highly linear relationships between the LBPP-induced progressive changes of BW and most mechanical parameters. However, the impact peak force and the loading rate systematically presented an initial 10% increase with unweighting which could result from a passive mechanism of leg retraction. Another major insight lies in the distinct neural adjustments found amongst the recorded lower-limb muscles during the pre- and post-contact phases. The preactivation phase was characterized by an overall EMG stability, the braking phase by decreased quadriceps and soleus muscle activities, and the push-off phase by decreased activities of the shank muscles. These neural changes were mirrored during reloading. These neural adjustments can be attributed in part to the lack of visual cues on the foot touchdown. These findings highlight both the rapidity and the complexity of the neuromechanical changes associated with LBPP-induced unweighting and reloading during running

  4. Effect of wheel load on wheel vibration and sound radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian; Wang, Ruiqian; Wang, Di; Guan, Qinghua; Zhang, Yumei; Xiao, Xinbiao; Jin, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    The current researches of wheel vibration and sound radiation mainly focus on the low noise damped wheel. Compared with the traditional research, the relationship between the sound and wheel/rail contact is difficulty and worth studying. However, there are few studies on the effect of wheel load on wheel vibration and sound radiation. In this paper, laboratory test carried out in a semi-anechoic room investigates the effect of wheel load on wheel natural frequencies, damping ratios, wheel vibration and its sound radiation. The laboratory test results show that the vibration of the wheel and total sound radiation decrease significantly with the increase of the wheel load from 0 t to 1 t. The sound energy level of the wheel decreases by 3.7 dB. When the wheel load exceeds 1 t, the attenuation trend of the vibration and sound radiation of the wheel becomes slow. And the increase of the wheel load causes the growth of the wheel natural frequencies and the mode damping ratios. Based on the finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM), a rolling noise prediction model is developed to calculate the influence of wheel load on the wheel vibration and sound radiation. In the calculation, the used wheel/rail excitation is the measured wheel/rail roughness. The calculated results show that the sound power level of the wheel decreases by about 0.4 dB when the wheel load increases by 0.5 t. The sound radiation of the wheel decreases slowly with wheel load increase, and this conclusion is verified by the field test. This research systematically studies the effect of wheel load on wheel vibration and sound radiation, gives the relationship between the sound and wheel/rail contact and analyzes the reasons, therefore, it provides a reference for further research.

  5. Control Electronics For Reaction Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Bidirectional operation achieved with single-polarity main power supply. Control circuitry generates pulse-width-modulated 800-Hz waveforms to drive two-phase ac motor and reaction wheel. Operates partly in response to digital magnitude-and-direction torque command generated by external control subsystem and partly in response to tachometric feedback in form of two once-per-revolution sinusoids with amplitudes proportional to speed. Operation in either of two modes called "normal" and "safehold." In normal mode, drive pulses timed so that, on average over one or few cycles, motor applies commanded torque. In safehold mode, pulses timed to keep motor running at set speed in one direction.

  6. Increases in Physical Activity Result in Diminishing Increments in Daily Energy Expenditure in Mice.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Timothy J; Friend, Danielle M; Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D; Kravitz, Alexxai V

    2017-02-06

    Exercise is a common component of weight loss strategies, yet exercise programs are associated with surprisingly small changes in body weight [1-4]. This may be due in part to compensatory adaptations, in which calories expended during exercise are counteracted by decreases in other aspects of energy expenditure [1, 5-10]. Here we examined the relationship between a rodent model of voluntary exercise- wheel running- and total daily energy expenditure. Use of a running wheel for 3 to 7 days increased daily energy expenditure, resulting in a caloric deficit of ∼1 kcal/day; however, total daily energy expenditure remained stable after the first week of wheel access, despite further increases in wheel use. We hypothesized that compensatory mechanisms accounted for the lack of increase in daily energy expenditure after the first week. Supporting this idea, we observed a decrease in off-wheel ambulation when mice were using the wheels, indicating behavioral compensation. Finally, we asked whether individual variation in wheel use within a group of mice would be associated with different levels of daily energy expenditure. Despite a large variation in wheel running, we did not observe a significant relationship between the amount of daily wheel running and total daily energy expenditure or energy intake across mice. Together, our experiments support a model in which the transition from sedentary to light activity is associated with an increase in daily energy expenditure, but further increases in physical activity produce diminishingly small increments in daily energy expenditure.

  7. Analysis of physical activity profiles when running with the ball in a professional soccer team.

    PubMed

    Carling, Chris

    2010-02-01

    In an analysis of the physical demands when running with the ball in professional soccer, this study (1) determined activity profiles during match-play, (2) examined effects of fatigue, and (3) investigated differences according to playing position. Thirty French League 1 matches from two competitive seasons (2007-2008, 2008-2009) were analysed using multi-camera computerized tracking. Players (n = 28) ran a mean total distance of 191 +/- 38 m with the ball, of which 34.3% was covered at speeds >19.1 km . h(-1), 25.6% between 14.1 and 19.0 km . h(-1), 12.5% between 11.1 and 14.0 km . h(-1), and 27.6% at <11.0 km . h(-1). Mean distance covered per possession was 4.2 +/- 0.7 m, speed at ball reception was 10.3 +/- 0.9 km . h(-1), while mean and peak speed during runs was 12.9 +/- 1.0 km . h(-1) and 24.9 +/- 2.4 km . h(-1), respectively. Mean time in possession, duration, and touches per possession were 53.4 +/- 8.1 s, 1.1 +/- 0.1 s, and 2.0 +/- 0.2, respectively. There were differences across playing positions for all variables (P at least 0.017 and effect size at least 0.54). Total distance run did not differ between halves but varied over the course of matches (P < 0.001), decreasing just before half-time. These findings provide valuable information about the physical and technical requirements of running with the ball that could be useful in the prescription of general and individualized training programmes.

  8. Warning system against locomotive driving wheel flaccidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Peng

    2014-09-01

    Causes of locomotive relaxation are discussed. Alarm system against locomotive driving wheel flaccidity is designed by means of techniques of infrared temperature measurement and Hall sensor measurement. The design scheme of the system, the principle of detecting locomotive driving wheel flaccidity with temperature and Hall sensor is introduced, threshold temperature of infrared alarm is determined. The circuit system is designed by microcontroller technology and the software is designed with the assembly language. The experiment of measuring the flaccid displacement with Hall sensor measurement is simulated. The results show that the system runs well with high reliability and low cost, which has a wide prospect of application and popularization.

  9. Running to Achieve: Engaging Students in Literacy and Physical Activity through an After-School Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanzandt, Christina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this participant-observation study is to describe rural, southern, 3rd-5th grade children's engagement in running and writing in an after-school learning community called "Running to Achieve." This study provides insights into links between physical activity and writing by using one to engage students in the other. Three…

  10. Estrogen influences satellite cell activation and proliferation following downhill running in rats.

    PubMed

    Enns, Deborah L; Tiidus, Peter M

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the influence of estrogen on postexercise muscle repair processes, we examined the effects of estrogen supplementation (0.25-mg pellet) on numbers of myofibers positive for markers of total, activated, and proliferating satellite cells in rat skeletal muscles 72 h following downhill running. Ovariectomized female rats (n = 44) were divided into four groups (n = 11 per group): sham (no estrogen) controls (SC); sham, exercised (SE); estrogen-supplemented controls (EC); and estrogen-supplemented, exercised (EE). After 8 days of estrogen exposure, animals were exposed to 90 min of treadmill running at 17 m/min (-13.5 degrees ). Seventy-two hours later, soleus and white vastus muscles were removed and immunostained for total [paired box homeotic gene 7 (Pax7)], [activated myogenic differentiation factor D (MyoD)], and proliferating [5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] satellite cells. beta-Glucuronidase activity was increased (P < 0.05) in both muscles following exercise; however, the postexercise elevations in enzyme activity were attenuated in the EE group compared with the SE group in the soleus (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that exercised groups displayed increased numbers of myofibers containing total, activated, and proliferating satellite cells compared with control groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, greater numbers of fibers positive for markers of total, activated, and proliferating satellite cells were observed postexercise in EE animals compared with SE animals for both muscles (P < 0.05). The results demonstrate that estrogen may potentially influence post-damage repair of skeletal muscle through activation of satellite cells.

  11. 16 Weeks of Progressive Barefoot Running Training Changes Impact Force and Muscle Activation in Habitual Shod Runners.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana Paula da Silva; Mezêncio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Julio Cerca

    2016-01-01

    Short-term effects of barefoot and simulated barefoot running have been widely discussed in recent years. Consequences of adopting barefoot running for a long period, including as a training approach, still remain unknown. The present study evaluated the influence of 16 weeks of progressive barefoot running training on impact force and muscle activation in habitual shod runners. Six habitual shod runners (3 men and 3 women, 29.5 ± 7.3 years) were tested barefoot (BF) and shod (SH), before and after 16 weeks of progressive barefoot running training. Tests consisted of running on instrumented treadmill at 9 km/h, for 10 minutes in each experimental condition. Nine data acquisitions (10 s) of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and electromyographic (EMG) signal were conducted in each experimental condition for each test. BF training was effective to alter VGRF and EMG parameters of running in habitual shod runners, regardless of footwear condition (SH or BF). The magnitude of first peak of VGRF (Fy1) and the impulse of the first 50 ms decreased after training for BF and SH (p<0.01). The activation reduced from PRE to POST training for four muscles in BF running (p<0.001), whereas only muscle gastrocnemius lateralis decreased significantly its activation (p<0.01) in SH running. A 16-week progressive barefoot running training seems to be an effective training strategy to reduce impact force, improve shock attenuation and to decrease muscle activation intensity, not only in BF running, but also in SH running, although BF condition seems to be more influenced by BF training.

  12. 16 Weeks of Progressive Barefoot Running Training Changes Impact Force and Muscle Activation in Habitual Shod Runners

    PubMed Central

    Mezêncio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Julio Cerca

    2016-01-01

    Short-term effects of barefoot and simulated barefoot running have been widely discussed in recent years. Consequences of adopting barefoot running for a long period, including as a training approach, still remain unknown. The present study evaluated the influence of 16 weeks of progressive barefoot running training on impact force and muscle activation in habitual shod runners. Six habitual shod runners (3 men and 3 women, 29.5 ± 7.3 years) were tested barefoot (BF) and shod (SH), before and after 16 weeks of progressive barefoot running training. Tests consisted of running on instrumented treadmill at 9 km/h, for 10 minutes in each experimental condition. Nine data acquisitions (10 s) of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and electromyographic (EMG) signal were conducted in each experimental condition for each test. BF training was effective to alter VGRF and EMG parameters of running in habitual shod runners, regardless of footwear condition (SH or BF). The magnitude of first peak of VGRF (Fy1) and the impulse of the first 50 ms decreased after training for BF and SH (p<0.01). The activation reduced from PRE to POST training for four muscles in BF running (p<0.001), whereas only muscle gastrocnemius lateralis decreased significantly its activation (p<0.01) in SH running. A 16-week progressive barefoot running training seems to be an effective training strategy to reduce impact force, improve shock attenuation and to decrease muscle activation intensity, not only in BF running, but also in SH running, although BF condition seems to be more influenced by BF training. PMID:27907069

  13. Study on the removal of pesticide in agricultural run off by granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Jusoh, Ahmad; Hartini, W J H; Ali, Nora'aini; Endut, A

    2011-05-01

    In this batch study, the adsorption of malathion by using granular activated carbon with different parameters due to the particle size, dosage of carbons, as well as the initial concentration of malathion was investigated. Batch tests were carried out to determine the potential and the effectiveness of granular activated carbon (GAC) in removal of pesticide in agricultural run off. The granular activated carbon; coconut shell and palm shells were used and analyzed as the adsorbent material. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms models were applied to describe the characteristics of adsorption behavior. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model and Freundlich model with maximum adsorption capacity of 909.1mg/g. The results indicate that the GAC could be used to effectively adsorb pesticide (malathion) from agricultural runoff.

  14. Muscle activity while running at 20%-50% of normal body weight.

    PubMed

    Mercer, John A; Applequist, Bryon C; Masumoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists on how body weight (BW) support influences running biomechanics. The study aim was to determine how reducing BW by 50%-80% influences muscle activity while running at different speeds. Subjects (n = 7) ran at 100%, 115%, 125% of preferred speed at 100%, 50%, 40%, 30%, 20% of BW per speed. Average (AVG) electromyography of the rectified signal was compared (within subject design; 3-speeds × 5-BW, repeated measures ANOVAs; biceps femoris [BF], rectus femoris [RF], tibialis anterior [TA], gastrocnemius [GA]). RF, BF, and GA AVG were not influenced by BW-speed interaction (p > .05) and increased across speeds (p < .05). RF and GA AVG signal was reduced as BW was reduced (p < .05), but BF only tended to be different (p = .08). TA was influenced by BW-speed interaction (p < .05) with EMG decreasing across BW (p < .05) while increasing across speeds except at 100% BW. Overall, muscle activity increased with speed and decreased by BW reductions.

  15. Reimagining the Color Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Color wheels are a traditional project for many teachers. The author has used them in art appreciation classes for many years, but one problem she found when her pre-service art education students created colored wheels was that they were boring: simple circles, with pie-shaped pieces, which students either painted or colored in. This article…

  16. Reinventing the Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mihyeon; Bland, Lori C.; Chandler, Kimberley

    2009-01-01

    "The Wheel of Scientific Investigation and Reasoning" (Kramer 1987; Paul and Binker 1992) is a graphic representation of the scientific investigative process. The scientific process is depicted in a wheel rather than in a list because "the process of scientific inquiry can begin from any stage, and that stage may be revisited as often as the…

  17. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  18. Grinding Wheel System

    DOEpatents

    Malkin, Stephen; Gao, Robert; Guo, Changsheng; Varghese, Biju; Pathare, Sumukh

    2003-08-05

    A grinding wheel system includes a grinding wheel with at least one embedded sensor. The system also includes an adapter disk containing electronics that process signals produced by each embedded sensor and that transmits sensor information to a data processing platform for further processing of the transmitted information.

  19. Grinding Wheel System

    DOEpatents

    Malkin, Stephen; Gao, Robert; Guo, Changsheng; Varghese, Biju; Pathare, Sumukh

    2006-01-10

    A grinding wheel system includes a grinding wheel with at least one embedded sensor. The system also includes an adapter disk containing electronics that process signals produced by each embedded sensor and that transmits sensor information to a data processing platform for further processing of the transmitted information.

  20. Reaction/Momentum Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CTA Space Systems, Inc. has been licensed to sell commercially a reaction/momentum wheel originally developed for NASA's scientific satellites. NASA originally identified a need for the wheel in its Small Explorer program. The Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite required extremely low jitter and a reaction/momentum wheel with a torque greater than any comparably sized commercially available wheel to keep the instrument pointed at celestial objects to a high degree of precision. After development, a market assessment by Research Triangle Institute was completed, showing commercial potential for the flywheel technology. A license was granted to CTA in the fall of 1996. The company currently uses the technology in its complete spacecraft fabrication services and has built over 10 reaction/momentum wheels for commercial, scientific, and military customers.

  1. Two wheeled lunar dumptruck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brus, Michael R.; Haleblain, Ray; Hernandez, Tomas L.; Jensen, Paul E.; Kraynick, Ronald L.; Langley, Stan J.; Shuman, Alan G.

    1988-01-01

    The design of a two wheel bulk material transport vehicle is described in detail. The design consists of a modified cylindrical bowl, two independently controlled direct drive motors, and two deformable wheels. The bowl has a carrying capacity of 2.8 m (100 ft) and is constructed of aluminum. The low speed, high HP motors are directly connected to the wheels, thus yielding only two moving parts. The wheels, specifically designed for lunar applications, utilize the chevron tread pattern for optimum traction. The vehicle is maneuvered by varying the relative angular velocities of the wheels. The bulk material being transported is unloaded by utilizing the motors to oscillate the bowl back and forth to a height at which dumping is achieved. The analytical models were tested using a scaled prototype of the lunar transport vehicle. The experimental data correlated well with theoretical predictions. Thus, the design established provides a feasible alternative for the handling of bulk material on the moon.

  2. 78 FR 62942 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Company-Run...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...; Comment Request; Company-Run Annual Stress Test Reporting Template and Documentation for Covered..., ``Company-Run Annual Stress Test Reporting Template and Documentation for Covered Institutions with Total... information to OMB for review and clearance. Company-Run Annual Stress Test Reporting Template...

  3. Optimal run-and-tumble–based transportation of a Janus particle with active steering

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Tomoyuki; Iwasawa, Junichiro; Sano, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Although making artificial micrometric swimmers has been made possible by using various propulsion mechanisms, guiding their motion in the presence of thermal fluctuations still remains a great challenge. Such a task is essential in biological systems, which present a number of intriguing solutions that are robust against noisy environmental conditions as well as variability in individual genetic makeup. Using synthetic Janus particles driven by an electric field, we present a feedback-based particle-guiding method quite analogous to the “run-and-tumbling” behavior of Escherichia coli but with a deterministic steering in the tumbling phase: the particle is set to the run state when its orientation vector aligns with the target, whereas the transition to the “steering” state is triggered when it exceeds a tolerance angle α. The active and deterministic reorientation of the particle is achieved by a characteristic rotational motion that can be switched on and off by modulating the ac frequency of the electric field, which is reported in this work. Relying on numerical simulations and analytical results, we show that this feedback algorithm can be optimized by tuning the tolerance angle α. The optimal resetting angle depends on signal to noise ratio in the steering state, and it is shown in the experiment. The proposed method is simple and robust for targeting, despite variability in self-propelling speeds and angular velocities of individual particles. PMID:28292904

  4. Optimal run-and-tumble-based transportation of a Janus particle with active steering.

    PubMed

    Mano, Tomoyuki; Delfau, Jean-Baptiste; Iwasawa, Junichiro; Sano, Masaki

    2017-03-14

    Although making artificial micrometric swimmers has been made possible by using various propulsion mechanisms, guiding their motion in the presence of thermal fluctuations still remains a great challenge. Such a task is essential in biological systems, which present a number of intriguing solutions that are robust against noisy environmental conditions as well as variability in individual genetic makeup. Using synthetic Janus particles driven by an electric field, we present a feedback-based particle-guiding method quite analogous to the "run-and-tumbling" behavior of Escherichia coli but with a deterministic steering in the tumbling phase: the particle is set to the run state when its orientation vector aligns with the target, whereas the transition to the "steering" state is triggered when it exceeds a tolerance angle [Formula: see text] The active and deterministic reorientation of the particle is achieved by a characteristic rotational motion that can be switched on and off by modulating the ac frequency of the electric field, which is reported in this work. Relying on numerical simulations and analytical results, we show that this feedback algorithm can be optimized by tuning the tolerance angle [Formula: see text] The optimal resetting angle depends on signal to noise ratio in the steering state, and it is shown in the experiment. The proposed method is simple and robust for targeting, despite variability in self-propelling speeds and angular velocities of individual particles.

  5. Running Away

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Running Away KidsHealth > For Kids > Running Away A A ... life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running away, you ...

  6. A Nontoxic Barlow's Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffron, John A.; Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Barlow's wheel has been a favorite demonstration since its invention by Peter Barlow (1776-1862) in 1822.1 In the form shown in Fig. 1, it represents the first electric motor. The interaction between the electric current passing from the axle of the wheel to the rim and the magnetic field produced by the U-magnet produces a torque that turns the wheel. The original device used mercury to provide electrical contact to the rim, and the dangers involved with the use of this heavy metal have caused the apparatus to disappear from the lecture hall.

  7. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    2003-07-01

    This is an engineering test to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in August 2003. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal Cycle 11 operating temperature.

  8. Science Can Be Wheel Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how teachers can use wheels of tricycles, bicycles, and trains to stimulate children with mathematics, relative position, and engineering concepts. Techniques are offered for measuring circumference of a bicycle wheel, gear ratios, and pedal wheel circumferences. Comparative data are given for various sized wheels. (Author/SA)

  9. Running enhances neurogenesis, learning, and long-term potentiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    van Praag, Henriette; Christie, Brian R.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Gage, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    Running increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a brain structure that is important for memory function. Consequently, spatial learning and long-term potentiation (LTP) were tested in groups of mice housed either with a running wheel (runners) or under standard conditions (controls). Mice were injected with bromodeoxyuridine to label dividing cells and trained in the Morris water maze. LTP was studied in the dentate gyrus and area CA1 in hippocampal slices from these mice. Running improved water maze performance, increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cell numbers, and selectively enhanced dentate gyrus LTP. Our results indicate that physical activity can regulate hippocampal neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and learning. PMID:10557337

  10. Skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-independent kinase activity increases during either hypertrophy or running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fluck, M.; Waxham, M. N.; Hamilton, M. T.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Spikes in free Ca(2+) initiate contractions in skeletal muscle cells, but whether and how they might signal to transcription factors in skeletal muscles of living animals is unknown. Since previous studies in non-muscle cells have shown that serum response factor (SRF) protein, a transcription factor, is phosphorylated rapidly by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase after rises in intracellular Ca(2+), we measured enzymatic activity that phosphorylates SRF (designated SRF kinase activity). Homogenates from 7-day-hypertrophied anterior latissimus dorsi muscles of roosters had more Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase activity than their respective control muscles. However, no differences were noted in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity between control and trained muscles. To determine whether the Ca(2+)-independent and Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent forms of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) might contribute to some of the SRF kinase activity, autocamtide-3, a synthetic substrate that is specific for CaMKII, was employed. While the Ca(2+)-independent form of CaMKII was increased, like the Ca(2+)-independent form of SRF kinase, no alteration in CaMKII occurred at 7 days of stretch overload. These observations suggest that some of SRF phosphorylation by skeletal muscle extracts could be due to CaMKII. To determine whether this adaptation was specific to the exercise type (i.e., hypertrophy), similar measurements were made in the white vastus lateralis muscle of rats that had completed 2 wk of voluntary running. Although Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase was increased, no alteration occurred in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity. Thus any role of Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase signaling has downstream modulators specific to the exercise phenotype.

  11. Serum enzyme activities following long-distance running: comparison between Ethiopian and white athletes.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, A; Nemet, D; Shenkman, L

    1995-11-01

    Ethiopian runners are famous for their achievements in long-distance running. The recent immigration of Ethiopians to Israel provided an opportunity to compare some physiological variables between elite Ethiopian and white Israeli runners. Six Ethiopian and five white Israeli runners, aged 20 to 40 years, were studied before and after an 11 km race. Venous blood was sampled from each runner prior to the race, and 1 h, 48 h, and 5 days following the race. The activities of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured, and levels of serum electrolytes, urea, creatinine, phosphorus, albumin, cholesterol, and alkaline phosphatase were also determined. CK activity rose 2.6-fold with a peak 5 days after the race. LDH and AST levels rose as well (1.4-1.3-fold, respectively). Significant elevations also occurred in serum phosphorus, uric acid, and creatinine concentrations 1 h after the race. In contrast to previous studies in which higher enzyme activities were reported in blacks, we did not detect any difference in serum enzyme values between black and white runners.

  12. Wheeled hopping robot

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2010-08-17

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  13. Development of, and recovery from, activity-based anorexia in female rats.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Deann P; Ackert, Allison M; Eckel, Lisa A

    2003-11-01

    Activity-based anorexia occurs in rats maintained on a restricted-feeding schedule while given free access to running wheels. These conditions induce high levels of wheel running and rapid weight loss. Although this procedure was developed as an animal model of anorexia nervosa, it has been studied primarily in male rats. Our goal was to examine the development of, and recovery from, activity-based anorexia in female rats. Food intake, wheel running, body weight, and phase of the estrous cycle were monitored daily prior to, during, and after a period of restricted feeding in which access to food was limited to 2 h/day. Food intake, body weight, and estrous cyclicity were also monitored in a control group housed without access to running wheels. Prior to food restriction, rats with wheels displayed high levels of wheel running and consumed more food than rats without wheels. Despite that both groups consumed similar amounts of food during the restricted-feeding phase, only rats with wheels developed symptoms of activity-based anorexia, including increased wheel running, rapid weight loss, and disruptions in estrous cyclicity. Recovery from activity-based anorexia was associated with hypoactivity and hyperphagia. Resumption of estrous cycles occurred when the weight lost during food restriction was regained. Hyperphagia, but not hypoactivity, was maintained following resumption of estrous cycles; however, this hyperphagia was limited to nonestrous phases. Our findings suggest that recovery from activity-based anorexia is mediated primarily by an increase in orexigenic signaling that promotes pronounced hyperphagia, and that the increase in satiogenic signaling during estrus abolishes this compensatory hyperphagia.

  14. Effects of early-onset voluntary exercise on adult physical activity and associated phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early-life exercise on adult physical activity (wheel running, home-cage activity), body mass, food consumption, and circulating leptin levels in males from four replicate lines of mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR) and their four non-selected control (C) lines. Half of the mice were given wheel access shortly after weaning for three consecutive weeks. Wheel access was then removed for 52 days, followed by two weeks of adult wheel access for all mice. A blood sample taken prior to adult wheel testing was analyzed for circulating leptin concentration. Early-life wheel access significantly increased adult voluntary exercise on wheels during the first week of the second period of wheel access, for both HR and C mice, and HR ran more than C mice. During this same time period, activity in the home cages was not affected by early-age wheel access, and did not differ statistically between HR and C mice. Throughout the study, all mice with early wheel access had lower body masses than their sedentary counterparts, and HR mice had lower body masses than C mice. With wheel access, HR mice also ate significantly more than C mice. Early-life wheel access increased plasma leptin levels (adjusted statistically for fat-pad mass as a covariate) in C mice, but decreased them in HR mice. At sacrifice, early-life exercise had no statistically significant effects on visceral fat pad, heart (ventricle), liver or spleen masses (all adjusted statistically for variation in body mass). Results support the hypothesis that early-age exercise in mice can have at least transitory positive effects on adult levels of voluntary exercise, in addition to reducing body mass, and may be relevant for the public policy debates concerning the importance of physical education for children.

  15. Analysis of Stress Distributions Under Lightweight Wheeled Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-09

    flexural elements with interchangeable inter- face surfaces that are designed for integration with wheels or other running gear . The sensors allow...0.0254 m thick tem- pered glass wall while the running gear was operated flush against this surface (see Figure 1(b)). It should be noted that stress...completely understand how to model shear stress under running gears . 3.5. Terrain Shear Modulus and Shear Stress Modeling In the WR model, the shear stress is

  16. Running into Trouble: Constructions of Danger and Risk in Girls' Access to Outdoor Space and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers girls' participation in running and other outdoor physical activities in their local areas in London, UK. The paper is concerned with the operation of risk discourses in and around this participation and looks at the way that such discourses impacted on girls' opportunities to take part in physical activities that required…

  17. Running Away

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems of life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running ... more fights. Sounds great and exciting, right? In reality, running away is anything but fun. Kids and ...

  18. Differential segmental strain during active lengthening in a large biarticular thigh muscle during running

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jennifer A.; Ellerby, David J.; Marsh, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO) is the largest muscle in the hindlimb of the guinea fowl and is thought to play an important role during the stance phase of running, both absorbing and producing work. Using sonomicrometry and electromyography, we examined whether the ILPO experiences differential strain between proximal, central and distal portions of the posterior fascicles. When the ILPO is being lengthened while active, the distal portion was found to lengthen significantly more than either the proximal or central portions of the muscle. Our data support the hypothesis that the distal segment lengthened farther and faster because it began activity at shorter sarcomere lengths on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve. Probably because of the self-stabilizing effects of operating on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve, all segments reached the end of lengthening and started shortening at the same sarcomere length. During shortening, this similarity in sarcomere length among the segments was maintained, as predicted from force–velocity effects, and shortening strain was similar in all segments. The differential active strain during active lengthening is thus ultimately determined by differences in strain during the passive portion of the cycle. The sarcomere lengths of all segments of the fascicles were similar at the end of active shortening, but after the passive portion of the cycle the distal segment was shorter. Differential strain in the segments during the passive portion of the cycle may be caused by differential joint excursions at the knee and hip acting on the ends of the muscle and being transmitted differentially by the passive visco-elastic properties of the muscle. Alternatively, the differential passive strain could be due to the action of active or passive muscles in the thigh that transmit force to the IPLO in shear. Based on basic sarcomere dynamics we predict that differential strain is

  19. Activated soil filters for removal of biocides from contaminated run-off and waste-waters.

    PubMed

    Bester, Kai; Banzhaf, Stefan; Burkhardt, Michael; Janzen, Niklas; Niederstrasser, Bernd; Scheytt, Traugott

    2011-11-01

    Building facades can be equipped with biocides to prevent formation of algal, fungal and bacterial films. Thus run-off waters may contain these highly active compounds. In this study, the removal of several groups of biocides from contaminated waters by means of an activated soil filter was studied. A technical scale activated vertical soil filter (biofilter) with different layers (peat, sand and gravel), was planted with reed (Phragmites australis) and used to study the removal rates and fate of hydrophilic to moderate hydrophobic (log K(ow) 1.8-4.4) biocides and biocide metabolites such as: Terbutryn, Cybutryn (Irgarol® 1051), Descyclopropyl-Cybutryn (Cybutryn and Terbutryn metabolite), Isoproturon, Diuron, and its metabolite Diuron-desmonomethyl, Benzo-isothiazolinone, n-Octyl-isothiazolinone, Dichloro-n-octylisothiazolinone and Iodocarbamate (Iodocarb). Three experiments were performed: the first one (36 d) under low flow conditions (61 L m(-2) d(-1)) reached removal rates between 82% and 100%. The second one was performed to study high flow conditions: During this experiment, water was added as a pulse to the filter system with a hydraulic load of 255 L m(-2) within 5 min (retention time <1 h). During this experiment the removal rates of the compounds decreased drastically. For five compounds (Cybutryn, Descyclopropyl-Cybutryn, Diuron, Isoproturon, and Iodocarb) the removal dropped temporarily below 60%, while it was always above 70% for the others (Terbutryn, Benzo-isothiazolinone, n-Octyl-isothiazolinone, Dichloro-n-octylisothiazolinone). However, this removal is a considerable improvement compared to direct discharge into surface waters or infiltration into soil without appropriate removal. In the last experiment the removal efficiencies of the different layers were studied. Though the peat layer was responsible for most of the removal, the sand and gravel layers also contributed significantly for some compounds. All compounds are rather removed by

  20. Active Brownian particles and run-and-tumble particles separate inside a maze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatami, Maryam; Wolff, Katrin; Pohl, Oliver; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza; Stark, Holger

    2016-11-01

    A diverse range of natural and artificial self-propelled particles are known and are used nowadays. Among them, active Brownian particles (ABPs) and run-and-tumble particles (RTPs) are two important classes. We numerically study non-interacting ABPs and RTPs strongly confined to different maze geometries in two dimensions. We demonstrate that by means of geometrical confinement alone, ABPs are separable from RTPs. By investigating Matryoshka-like mazes with nested shells, we show that a circular maze has the best filtration efficiency. Results on the mean first-passage time reveal that ABPs escape faster from the center of the maze, while RTPs reach the center from the rim more easily. According to our simulations and a rate theory, which we developed, ABPs in steady state accumulate in the outermost region of the Matryoshka-like mazes, while RTPs occupy all locations within the maze with nearly equal probability. These results suggest a novel technique for separating different types of self-propelled particles by designing appropriate confining geometries without using chemical or biological agents.

  1. Active Brownian particles and run-and-tumble particles separate inside a maze

    PubMed Central

    Khatami, Maryam; Wolff, Katrin; Pohl, Oliver; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    A diverse range of natural and artificial self-propelled particles are known and are used nowadays. Among them, active Brownian particles (ABPs) and run-and-tumble particles (RTPs) are two important classes. We numerically study non-interacting ABPs and RTPs strongly confined to different maze geometries in two dimensions. We demonstrate that by means of geometrical confinement alone, ABPs are separable from RTPs. By investigating Matryoshka-like mazes with nested shells, we show that a circular maze has the best filtration efficiency. Results on the mean first-passage time reveal that ABPs escape faster from the center of the maze, while RTPs reach the center from the rim more easily. According to our simulations and a rate theory, which we developed, ABPs in steady state accumulate in the outermost region of the Matryoshka-like mazes, while RTPs occupy all locations within the maze with nearly equal probability. These results suggest a novel technique for separating different types of self-propelled particles by designing appropriate confining geometries without using chemical or biological agents. PMID:27876867

  2. Stabilizing Wheels For Rover Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed articulated, normally-four-wheeled vehicle holds extra pair of wheels in reserve. Deployed to lengthen wheelbase on slopes, thereby making vehicle more stable, and to aid vehicle in negotiating ledge or to right vehicle if turned upside down. Extra wheels are drive wheels mounted on arms so they pivot on axis of forward drive wheels. Both extra wheels and arms driven by chains, hydraulic motors, or electric motors. Concept promises to make remotely controlled vehicles more stable and maneuverable in such applications as firefighting, handling hazardous materials, and carrying out operations in dangerous locations.

  3. 14. MACHINERY DETAILS: CENTER WHEEL FRAME AND AXEL, JACK WHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. MACHINERY DETAILS: CENTER WHEEL FRAME AND AXEL, JACK WHEEL FRAME, JACK NUT HOUSING, JACK NUT, ETC. - Niantic River Swing Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  4. Experiments on a Tail-wheel Shimmy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harling, R; Dietz, O

    1954-01-01

    Model tests on the "running belt" and tests with a full-scale tail wheel were made on a rotating drum as well as on a runway in order to investigate the causes of the undesirable shimmy phenomena frequently occurring on airplane tail wheels, and the means of avoiding them. The small model (scale 1:10) permitted simulation of the mass, moments of inertia, and fuselage stiffness of the airplane and determination of their influence on the shimmy, whereas by means of the larger model with pneumatic tires (scale 1:2) more accurate investigations were made on the tail wheel itself. The results of drum and road tests show good agreement with one another and with model values. Detailed investigations were made regarding the dependence of the shimmy tendency on trail, rolling speed, load, size of tires, ground friction,and inclination of the swivel axis; furthermore, regarding the influence of devices with restoring effect on the tail wheel, and the friction damping required for prevention of shimmy. Finally observations from slow-motion pictures are reported and conclusions drawn concerning the influence of tire deformation.

  5. The effect of marathon running on carnitine metabolism and on some aspects of muscle mitochondrial activities and antioxidant mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M B; Jones, D A; Edwards, R H; Corbucci, G C; Montanari, G; Trevisani, C

    1986-01-01

    Carnitine is an essential co-factor in the catabolism of fats as an energy source. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of running a marathon on the metabolism of carnitine by endurance-trained athletes, and to evaluate the effect of carnitine administration on the performance of such exercise. The effects of marathon running on mitochondrial enzymes and cellular anti-oxidants were also examined to assess whether the expression of these activities is altered by exercise. Subjects were 10 experienced male marathon runners aged between 19 and 25 years. Running a marathon caused a fall in the plasma content of unesterified carnitine (37%) and an increase in the level of acetylcarnitine present (288%). Loading of the athletes with L-carnitine for 10 days before running a marathon abolished the exercise-induced fall in plasma-free carnitine (P less than 0.05) whilst amplifying the production of acetylcarnitine (P less than 0.05). Carnitine loading of the athletes studied made no detectable improvement in performance of the marathon (P greater than 0.05). Cytochrome oxidase, succinate cytochrome C reductase and superoxide dismutase activities present in skeletal muscle were unaltered by marathon running. However, such exercise caused a large increase in the tissue content of oxidized glutathione (189%) at the expense of reduced glutathione (-18%).

  6. Wheeling Your Way Through the Outdoors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, John H.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the use of the "Plant Wheel" by the University of California Botanical Garden as a means of providing elementary school children with a structured activity as they explore the Garden at their own pace. This activity accommodates the children's curiosity, energy, and attention span. (JR)

  7. IMPACT OF GENETIC STRAIN ON BODY FAT LOSS, FOOD CONSUMPTION, METABOLISM, VENTILATION, AND MOTOR ACTIVITY IN FREE RUNNING FEMALE RATS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Physiologic data associated with different strains of common laboratory rat strains.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Gordon , C., P. Phillips , and A. Johnstone. Impact of Genetic Strain on Body Fat Loss, Food Consumption, Metabolism, Ventilation, and Motor Activity in Free Running Female Rats. PHYSIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 153: 56-63, (2016).

  8. Long-term voluntary running improves diet-induced adiposity in young adult mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigated the effects of long-term voluntary running on diet-induced adiposity in male C57BL/6 mice. Four-week old mice (n = 15 per group) were fed the AIN93G diet or a 45% high-fat diet (% kcal.) with or without access to in-cage activity wheels for 14 weeks. The high-fat die...

  9. The Wheels of Stress Go 'Round and 'Round

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brey, Rebecca A.; Clark, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    "The Wheels of Stress Go Round and Round" teaching idea uses three activity wheels to reinforce stress-related content and concepts. After presenting a definition of stress, the instructor assists students in identifying stressors, and aids in formulating a list of negative, reactive behaviors and a list of positive coping mechanisms. Using…

  10. Drive Diagnostic Filter Wheel Control

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlich, D.

    2007-07-17

    DrD Filter Wheel Control is National Instrument's Labview software that drives a Drive Diagnostic filter wheel. The software can drive the filter wheel between each end limit, detect the positive and negative limit and each home position and post the stepper motot values to an Excel spreadsheet. The software can also be used to cycle the assembly between the end limits.

  11. Wheel Diameter and Speedometer Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Clifton

    2010-01-01

    Most introductory physics students have seen vehicles with nonstandard wheel diameters; some may themselves drive "low-rider" cars or "big-wheel" pickup trucks. But how does changing wheel diameter affect speedometer readout for a given speed? Deriving the answer can be followed readily by students who have been introduced to rotation, and it…

  12. Stormwater run-off and pollutant transport related to the activities carried out in a modern waste management park.

    PubMed

    Marques, M; Hogland, W

    2001-02-01

    Stormwater run-off from twelve different areas and roads has been characterized in a modern waste disposal site, where several waste management activities are carried out. Using nonparametric statistics, medians and confidence intervals of the medians, 22 stormwater quality parameters were calculated. Suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, as well as run-off from several areas, showed measured values above standard limits for discharge into recipient waters--even higher than those of leachate from covered landfill cells. Of the heavy metals analyzed, copper, zinc and nickel were the most prevalent, being detected in every sample. Higher concentrations of metals such as zinc, nickel, cobalt, iron and cadmium were found in run-off from composting areas, compared to areas containing stored and exposed scrap metal. This suggests that factors other than the total amount of exposed material affect the concentration of metals in run-off, such as binding to organic compounds and hydrological transport efficiency. The pollutants transported by stormwater represent a significant environmental threat, comparable to leachate. Careful design, monitoring and maintenance of stormwater run-off drainage systems and infiltration elements are needed if infiltration is to be used as an on-site treatment strategy.

  13. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-10-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive - running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals' wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity.

  14. Color Wheel Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a painting and drawing lesson which was inspired by the beautiful circular windows found in cathedrals and churches (also known as "rose windows"). This two-week lesson would reinforce both the concept of symmetry and students' understanding of the color wheel. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  15. 3-D Color Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The blending of information from an academic class with projects from art class can do nothing but strengthen the learning power of the student. Creating three-dimensional color wheels provides the perfect opportunity to combine basic geometry knowledge with color theory. In this article, the author describes how her seventh-grade painting…

  16. Aircraft Wheel Life Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    responsible for a significant amount of aircraft dam - age. Many such wheel failures have been catastrophic, resulting in a sudden loss of tire inflation...Fatigue Crack Growth," Fatigue and Fracture in Engineering Materials and Structures, Vol. 10, 419-428, 1987. Cox, B. N., Pardee , W., and Morris, W. L

  17. Rotating Wheel Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Jean-Eloi; Xu, Hui; Moxey, Dave; Sherwin, Spencer

    2016-11-01

    For open wheel race-cars, such as Formula One, or IndyCar, the wheels are responsible for 40 % of the total drag. For road cars, drag associated to the wheels and under-carriage can represent 20 - 60 % of total drag at highway cruise speeds. Experimental observations have reported two, three or more pairs of counter rotating vortices, the relative strength of which still remains an open question. The near wake of an unsteady rotating wheel. The numerical investigation by means of direct numerical simulation at ReD =400-1000 is presented here to further the understanding of bifurcations the flow undergoes as the Reynolds number is increased. Direct numerical simulation is performed using Nektar++, the results of which are compared to those of Pirozzoli et al. (2012). Both proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition, as well as spectral analysis are leveraged to gain unprecedented insight into the bifurcations and subsequent topological differences of the wake as the Reynolds number is increased.

  18. 40 CFR 86.537-90 - Dynamometer test runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dynamometer test runs. 86.537-90... 1978 and Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.537-90 Dynamometer test runs. (a) The vehicle... (505 seconds) is run. (b) The following steps shall be taken for each test: (1) Place drive wheel...

  19. 40 CFR 86.537-90 - Dynamometer test runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer test runs. 86.537-90... 1978 and Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.537-90 Dynamometer test runs. (a) The vehicle... (505 seconds) is run. (b) The following steps shall be taken for each test: (1) Place drive wheel...

  20. Testing Spirit on Five Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This picture shows a model of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit being tested for performance on five wheels at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Spirit's right front wheel, now operating at six times its design life, has been showing signs of age, so rover planners devised a creative approach to keep the rover moving. They will drive Spirit backwards on five wheels, engaging the sixth wheel only sparingly to ensure its availability for tougher terrain. Tests performed at JPL allowed the rover planners to come up with this roundabout solution, and to develop commands that will help the five-wheeled rover steer.

  1. Development of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    An engineering model of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel was designed, fabricated, and tested under laboratory conditions. The basic unit consisted of two magnet bearings, a sculptured aluminum rotor, brushless dc spin motor, and electronics. The magnet bearings, utilizing rare-earth cobltrat-samarium magnets were active radially and passive axially. The results of the program showed that momentum wheels with magnetic bearings are feasible and operable, and that magnetic bearings of this type are capable of being used for applications where high capacity, high stiffness, and low power consumption are required. The tests performed developed criteria for improved performance for future designs.

  2. Investigating Functions with a Ferris Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heather Lynn; Hornbein, Peter; Azeem, Sumbal

    2016-01-01

    The authors provide a dynamic Ferris wheel computer activity that teachers can use as an instructional tool to help students investigate functions. They use a student's work to illustrate how students can use relationships between quantities to further their thinking about functions.

  3. 29 CFR 1910.215 - Abrasive wheel machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Type 27A cutting-off wheels. (g) Certain internal wheels. (h) Type 4 tapered wheels. (i) Diamond wheels, except certain vitrified diamond wheels. (j) Modified Types 6 and 11 wheel (terrazzo)—blotters... internal wheels. (viii) Type 4 tapered wheels. (ix) Diamond wheels, except certain vitrified diamond...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.215 - Abrasive wheel machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Type 27A cutting-off wheels. (g) Certain internal wheels. (h) Type 4 tapered wheels. (i) Diamond wheels, except certain vitrified diamond wheels. (j) Modified Types 6 and 11 wheel (terrazzo)—blotters... internal wheels. (viii) Type 4 tapered wheels. (ix) Diamond wheels, except certain vitrified diamond...

  5. Muscle activities during walking and running at energetically optimal transition speed under normobaric hypoxia on gradient slopes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Energy cost of transport per unit distance (CoT; J·kg-1·km-1) displays a U-shaped fashion in walking and a linear fashion in running as a function of gait speed (v; km·h-1). There exists an intersection between U-shaped and linear CoT-v relationships, being termed energetically optimal transition speed (EOTS; km·h-1). Combined effects of gradient and moderate normobaric hypoxia (15.0% O2) were investigated when walking and running at the EOTS in fifteen young males. The CoT values were determined at eight walking speeds (2.4–7.3 km·h-1) and four running speeds (7.3–9.4 km·h-1) on level and gradient slopes (±5%) at normoxia and hypoxia. Since an alteration of tibialis anterior (TA) activity has been known as a trigger for gait transition, electromyogram was recorded from TA and its antagonists (gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL)) for about 30 steps during walking and running corresponding to the individual EOTS in each experimental condition. Mean power frequency (MPF; Hz) of each muscle was quantified to evaluate alterations of muscle fiber recruitment pattern. The EOTS was not significantly different between normoxia and hypoxia on any slopes (ranging from 7.412 to 7.679 km·h-1 at normoxia and 7.516 to 7.678 km·h-1 at hypoxia) due to upward shifts (enhanced metabolic rate) of both U-shaped and linear CoT-v relationships at hypoxia. GM, but not GL, activated more when switching from walking to running on level and gentle downhill slopes. Significant decreases in the muscular activity and/or MPF were observed only in the TA when switching the gait pattern. Taken together, the EOTS was not slowed by moderate hypoxia in the population of this study. Muscular activities of lower leg extremities and those muscle fiber recruitment patterns are dependent on the gradient when walking and running at the EOTS. PMID:28301525

  6. Wheels With Sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambridge, Dwayne; Clauss, Douglas; Hewson, Fraser; Brown, Robert; Hisrich, Robert; Taylor, Cyrus

    2002-10-01

    We describe a student intrapreneurial project in the Physics Entrepreneurship Program at Case Western Reserve University. At the request of a major fortune 100 company, a study has been made of the technical and marketing issues for a new business of selling sensors on commercial vehicle wheels for monitoring pressure, temperature, rotations, and vibrations, as well as providing identification. The nature of the physics involved in the choice of the appropriate device such as capacitive or piezoresistive sensors is discussed, along with the possibility of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology and RFID (radiofrequency identification) readout on wheels. Five options (status quo, in-house development, external business acquisition, a large business national partnership, and a small-business Cleveland consortium partnership) were studied from both technological and business perspectives to commercialize the technology. The decision making process for making a choice is explained.

  7. Circadian activity rhythms in the spiny mouse, Acomys cahirinus.

    PubMed

    Weber, E T; Hohn, V M

    2005-11-15

    Circadian locomotor rhythms were examined in adult common spiny mice, Acomys cahirinus. Spiny mice demonstrated nocturnal activity, with onset of activity coinciding promptly with onset of darkness. Re-entrainment to 6-h delays of the light-dark cycle was accomplished faster than to 6-h advances. Access to running wheels yielded significant changes in period and duration of daily activity. Novelty-induced wheel running had no effect on phase of activity rhythms. Circadian responses to light at various times of the circadian cycle were temporally similar to those observed in other nocturnal rodent species. No gender differences were observed in any of the parameters measured.

  8. alpha-MSH enhances activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; Kas, Martien J H; Adan, Roger A H

    2005-10-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model of anorexia nervosa (AN). In ABA, scheduled feeding in combination with voluntary access to running wheels, results in hyperactivity, hypophagia, body weight loss and activation of the HPA axis. Since stimulation of the melanocortin (MC) system has similar effects, this system is a candidate system involved in ABA. Here it is shown that chronic alpha-MSH treatment enhances ABA by increasing running wheel activity (RWA), decreasing food intake and increasing HPA axis activation.

  9. Wheel loader round up

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-02-15

    Operator comfort and serviceability remain important features of front-end loaders or wheel loaders. The article reports on features of the latest large loaders from three companies: Caterpillar (the 992G and 994F), Komatsu (the WA800-3, WA900-3 and WA1200-3), and Le Tourneau (the L-950, L-1350, L-1850 and L-2350). 1 tab., 4 photos.

  10. Hopping Robot with Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Edward; Marzwell, Nevellie; Fuller, Sawyer; Fionni, Paolo; Tretton, Andy; Burdick, Joel; Schell, Steve

    2003-01-01

    A small prototype mobile robot is capable of (1) hopping to move rapidly or avoid obstacles and then (2) moving relatively slowly and precisely on the ground by use of wheels in the manner of previously reported exploratory robots of the "rover" type. This robot is a descendant of a more primitive hopping robot described in "Minimally Actuated Hopping Robot" (NPO- 20911), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 50. There are many potential applications for robots with hopping and wheeled-locomotion (roving) capabilities in diverse fields of endeavor, including agriculture, search-and-rescue operations, general military operations, removal or safe detonation of land mines, inspection, law enforcement, and scientific exploration on Earth and remote planets. The combination of hopping and roving enables this robot to move rapidly over very rugged terrain, to overcome obstacles several times its height, and then to position itself precisely next to a desired target. Before a long hop, the robot aims itself in the desired hopping azimuth and at a desired takeoff angle above horizontal. The robot approaches the target through a series of hops and short driving operations utilizing the steering wheels for precise positioning.

  11. Automatic Mechetronic Wheel Light Device

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Mohammed John Fitzgerald

    2004-09-14

    A wheel lighting device for illuminating a wheel of a vehicle to increase safety and enhance aesthetics. The device produces the appearance of a "ring of light" on a vehicle's wheels as the vehicle moves. The "ring of light" can automatically change in color and/or brightness according to a vehicle's speed, acceleration, jerk, selection of transmission gears, and/or engine speed. The device provides auxiliary indicator lights by producing light in conjunction with a vehicle's turn signals, hazard lights, alarm systems, and etc. The device comprises a combination of mechanical and electronic components and can be placed on the outer or inner surface of a wheel or made integral to a wheel or wheel cover. The device can be configured for all vehicle types, and is electrically powered by a vehicle's electrical system and/or battery.

  12. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Four Wheels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images from the front and rear hazard-avoidance cameras make up this brief movie chronicling the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from the ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' Each quadrant shows one of the rover's four corner wheels: left front wheel in upper left, right front wheel in upper right, rear wheels in the lower quadrants. The wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity

  13. Wheel Diameter and Speedometer Reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Clifton

    2010-09-01

    Most introductory physics students have seen vehicles with nonstandard wheel diameters; some may themselves drive "low-rider" cars or "big-wheel" pickup trucks. But how does changing wheel diameter affect speedometer readout for a given speed? Deriving the answer can be followed readily by students who have been introduced to rotation, and it makes a good illustration of how reasoning in physics can lead to a result that is useful outside the classroom.

  14. Robotic Two-Wheeled Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesnas, Issa A. D. (Inventor); Matthews, Jaret B. (Inventor); Edlund, Jeffrey E. (Inventor); Burdick, Joel (Inventor); Abad-Manterola, Pablo (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic two-wheeled vehicle comprising a connection body interposed between the two wheels are described. A drum can be coaxially located in a central region of the connection body and can support a hollow arm projecting radially from the drum. A tether can be inserted in the arm and connected to a second drum. Instruments and sensors can be accommodated in a case housed inside each wheel.

  15. Robotic Two-Wheeled Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesnas, Issa A. D. (Inventor); Matthews, Jaret B. (Inventor); Edlund, Jeffrey E. (Inventor); Burdick, Joel (Inventor); Abad-Manterola, Pablo (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic two-wheeled vehicle comprising a connection body interposed between the two wheels are described. A drum can be coaxially located in a central region of the connection body and can support a hollow arm projecting radially from the drum. A tether can be inserted in the arm and connected to a second drum. Instruments and sensors can be accommodated in a case housed inside each wheel.

  16. Square Wheels and Other Easy-To-Build Hands-On Science Activities. An Exploratorium Science Snackbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathjen, Don; Doherty, Paul

    This book, part of The Exploratorium science "snackbook" series, explains science with a hands-on approach. Activities include: (1) "3-D Shadow"; (2) "Bits and Bytes"; (3) "Circuit Workbench"; (4) "Diamagnetic Repulsion"; (5) "Film Can Racer"; (6) "Fractal Patterns"; (7) "Hoop Nightmares"; (8) "Hydraulic Arm"; (9) "Hyperbolic Slot"; (10) "Light…

  17. Self-Damping Sprung Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Self-damping sprung wheel provides shock-absorbing suspension for wheelchair, reducing user's discomfort when traversing rough terrain or obstacles. Pair of self-damping sprung wheels installed in place of conventional large rear wheels of standard wheelchair, which user operates in conventional manner. Rim deflects in vicinity of contact with ground or floor. Includes inner and outer hoops bending when obstacle encountered. Shear deformation of elastomeric hoop between them absorbs energy. Thus, three hoops act together as damping spring. Alternative version of wheel designed for bicycle.

  18. Magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly (MSRWA) is the product of a development effort funded by the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) at Wright Patterson AFB. The specific objective of the project was to establish the manufacturing processes for samarium cobalt magnets and demonstrate their use in a space application. The development was successful on both counts. The application portion of the program, which involves the magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly, is emphasized. The requirements for the reaction wheel were based on the bias wheel requirements of the DSP satellite. The tasks included the design, fabrication, and test of the unit to the DSP program qualification requirements.

  19. Running Shoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    This guide explains the purpose of running shoes and provides tips for purchasing them. A brief explanation of the difference between training shoes and racing shoes is followed by a list of characteristics of running shoes that should be considered when buying them. These characteristics include heel fit, heel elevation and width, the inner and…

  20. Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sándor, Cs.; Libál, A.; Reichhardt, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2017-01-01

    We examine numerically the transport of an assembly of active run-and-tumble disks interacting with a traveling-wave substrate. We show that as a function of substrate strength, wave speed, disk activity, and disk density, a variety of dynamical phases arise that are correlated with the structure and net flux of disks. We find that there is a sharp transition into a state in which the disks are only partially coupled to the substrate and form a phase-separated cluster state. This transition is associated with a drop in the net disk flux, and it can occur as a function of the substrate speed, maximum substrate force, disk run time, and disk density. Since variation of the disk activity parameters produces different disk drift rates for a fixed traveling-wave speed on the substrate, the system we consider could be used as an efficient method for active matter species separation. Within the cluster phase, we find that in some regimes the motion of the cluster center of mass is in the opposite direction to that of the traveling wave, while when the maximum substrate force is increased, the cluster drifts in the direction of the traveling wave. This suggests that swarming or clustering motion can serve as a method by which an active system can collectively move against an external drift.

  1. Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Cs; Libál, A; Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2017-01-01

    We examine numerically the transport of an assembly of active run-and-tumble disks interacting with a traveling-wave substrate. We show that as a function of substrate strength, wave speed, disk activity, and disk density, a variety of dynamical phases arise that are correlated with the structure and net flux of disks. We find that there is a sharp transition into a state in which the disks are only partially coupled to the substrate and form a phase-separated cluster state. This transition is associated with a drop in the net disk flux, and it can occur as a function of the substrate speed, maximum substrate force, disk run time, and disk density. Since variation of the disk activity parameters produces different disk drift rates for a fixed traveling-wave speed on the substrate, the system we consider could be used as an efficient method for active matter species separation. Within the cluster phase, we find that in some regimes the motion of the cluster center of mass is in the opposite direction to that of the traveling wave, while when the maximum substrate force is increased, the cluster drifts in the direction of the traveling wave. This suggests that swarming or clustering motion can serve as a method by which an active system can collectively move against an external drift.

  2. A Wheeled Mobile Device for Deployment of Surface and Subsurface Instruments and for Subsurface Sampling on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Bernasconi, M.; Haapanala, S.; Steiner, R.; Coste, P.

    2003-04-01

    shifting the center-of-mass, should the vehicle fall on its side. All wheels and the two folding levers are individually driven by brushless DC motors located inside a thermal enclosure in the vehicle cab. Except for the actuators and drive mechanisms, the enclosure houses a central electronics unit which also provides pre-processing of payload data. For the power supply and communications, a tether link to the lander is used, allowing a maximum range of some 20 m. As to the tether type, a flexible printed circuit was chosen which allows efficient packaging of the tether on board the vehicle. The wheel design was based on theoretical and experimental studies on tractive performance of small wheels on planetary soils being one of the subjects of the MIDD activity, involving a dedicated soil channel at DLR. As a result, the vehicle wheels were chosen to be rigid while featuring a wire mesh running surface and chevron-shaped grousers. Mass of a flight unit is projected to be around 2.9 kg, excluding the vehicle payload. The principal design philosophy for MIDD has been: conservative design with sufficient margins (i.e., provision of thermal enclosure for instruments); early component development and realistic environmental testing (mechanism functional testing in Thermal Vacuum; dust sealing test with mechanisms operating in simulated airborne dust environment of Mars).

  3. Four-wheel dual braking for automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. B.

    1981-01-01

    Each master cylinder applies braking power to all four wheels unlike conventional systems where cylinder operates only two wheels. If one master system fails because of fluid loss, other stops car by braking all four wheels although at half force.

  4. Influence of shoes increasing dorsiflexion and decreasing metatarsus flexion on lower limb muscular activity during fitness exercises, walking, and running.

    PubMed

    Bourgit, David; Millet, Guillaume Y; Fuchslocher, Jörg

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare electromyographic activity during fitness exercises, walking, and running among 3 different dorsiflexion shoes (+2 degrees , +4 degrees , and +10 degrees ) and standard shoes (-4 degrees ). The 3 different dorsiflexion shoes tested in this study have a curvature placed in the middle of the sole. This design was specially projected to decrease the metatarsus flexion. Electromyographic activity of 9 lower limb muscles was measured on 12 healthy female subjects during 5 fitness exercises (unload squat, side and front step, submaximal ballistic plantar flexion, and lunge exercise), and during running (10 km x h(-1)) and walking (4.5 km x h(-1)) on a treadmill. EMG signal was analyzed with the root mean square (RMS) and integrated EMG. All RMS data measured during these exercises were expressed as percentages of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. The results show that dorsiflexion affects muscle recruitment and reorganizes the motor pattern. The general tendency was that the tibialis anterior activity increased with dorsiflexion. However, an optimal dorsiflexion existed for various exercises. It is concluded that shoes with moderate dorsiflexion can activate lower limb muscles differently compared with both standard shoes and shoes with large dorsiflexion during submaximal exercises and locomotion.

  5. Submerged water wheel

    SciTech Connect

    Frisz, J. O.

    1985-11-05

    A water wheel for operating fully submerged in an ocean current has a rotating frame member supported on the ocean floor for rotation about a vertical axis. The frame member supports a plurality of vertically extending vanes, each vane being rotatably supported on the frame for limited rotation about a vertical axis. It has a hydrofoil shape in cross-section with the axis of rotation parallel to the leading and trailing edges. Rotation of the vanes is limited relative to the frame by a hydraulic piston control system and shock absorbers.

  6. Wheel speed management control system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodzeit, Neil E. (Inventor); Linder, David M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spacecraft attitude control system uses at least four reaction wheels. In order to minimize reaction wheel speed and therefore power, a wheel speed management system is provided. The management system monitors the wheel speeds and generates a wheel speed error vector. The error vector is integrated, and the error vector and its integral are combined to form a correction vector. The correction vector is summed with the attitude control torque command signals for driving the reaction wheels.

  7. Mechanical Design Engineering Enabler Project wheel and wheel drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutt, Richard E.; Couch, Britt K.; Holley, John L., Jr.; Garris, Eric S.; Staut, Paul V.

    1992-01-01

    Our group was assigned the responsibility of designing the wheel and wheel drive system for a proof-of-concept model of the lunar-based ENABLER. ENABLER is a multi-purpose, six wheeled vehicle designed to lift and transport heavy objects associated with the construction of a lunar base. The resulting design was based on the performance criteria of the ENABLER. The drive system was designed to enable the vehicle to achieve a speed of 7 mph on a level surface, climb a 30 percent grade, and surpass a one meter high object and one meter wide crevice. The wheel assemblies were designed to support the entire weight of the vehicle on two wheels. The wheels were designed to serve as the main component of the vehicle's suspension and will provide suitable traction for lunar-type surfaces. The expected performance of the drive system for the ENABLER was influenced by many mechanical factors. The expected top speed on a level sandy surface is 4 mph instead of the desired 7 mph. This is due to a lack of necessary power at the wheels. The lack of power resulted from dimension considerations that allowed only an eight horsepower engine and also from mechanical inefficiencies of the hydraulic system. However, the vehicle will be able to climb a 30 percent grade, surpass a one meter high object and one meter wide crevice. The wheel assemblies will be able to support the entire weight of the vehicle on two wheels. The wheels will also provide adequate suspension for the vehicle and sufficient traction for lunar-type surfaces.

  8. Constructing a Celestial Calendar Wheel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousineau, Sarah M.

    1999-01-01

    Explains how to create a paper replica of the Bighorn Medicine Wheel, an ancient timepiece thought to have been constructed by the Lakota Indians around 1700 A.D. The Bighorn Wheel uses four key seasonal stars as well as the solstice sunrise and sunset to mark the passage of time through the summer. (WRM)

  9. Triathlon: running injuries.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  10. Gimballing magnetic bearing reaction wheel with digital controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Bernd; Ehinger, Markus; Raue, Hans Knut; Seiler, René

    2005-07-01

    Magnetic bearing reaction wheels provide a number of interesting advantages over ball bearing wheels. They allow high-speed operation with minimum loss torque and generate substantially less micro-vibrations. However, they require dedicated, demanding control electronics. A conroller based on a Digital Signal Processor has been developed. The controller was tested with an 87 Nms wheel prototype equipped with a magnetic bearing allowing active control in five axes. The wheel provides low-noise operation from 0 to 8000 rpm with a rotor gimballing capability of up to ±1.7°. The paper reviews the design principles and presents relevant test results, e.g. regarding the active suppression of micro-vibrations.

  11. The effect of on-hill active recovery performed between runs on blood lactate concentration and fatigue in alpine ski racers.

    PubMed

    White, Gillian E; Wells, Greg D

    2015-03-01

    Alpine skiing is a high-intensity intermittent sport that results in lactate accumulation and muscle acidosis, which has been shown to contribute to peripheral neuromuscular fatigue. Active recovery influences the removal of lactate from the muscle and blood by maintaining blood flow to fatigued muscles and enhancing aerobic utilization of lactate by nonfatigued tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of on-hill active recovery on blood lactate concentration in alpine skiers. Fourteen highly trained alpine skiers (7 women, 7 men) completed 8 training runs in a 45-gate slalom or a 25-gate giant slalom corridor at 2,600 m above sea level. Skiers were randomized to active (ACT) or static recovery (CON) performed at the top of each run. Blood lactate concentration and perceived fatigue were recorded at the top and bottom of each run. Performance was measured by time to complete each training run and rate of incomplete runs. A significant time (p < 0.01) and interaction (p = 0.001) effect was observed for blood lactate concentration measured at the top, with ACT being associated with significantly lower values. A significant time effect (p < 0.001) was observed for blood lactate concentration measured at the bottom. Training run completion time was longer (p ≤ 0.05), and higher rate of incomplete runs were observed in the CON group, despite no between-group differences in rating of perceived fatigue. On-hill active recovery performed between runs promotes blood lactate clearance in alpine skiers and is associated with delayed fatigue as indicated by faster training runs and fewer incomplete runs.

  12. When are active Brownian particles and run-and-tumble particles equivalent? Consequences for motility-induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, M. E.; Tailleur, J.

    2013-01-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs, such as self-phoretic colloids) swim at fixed speed v along a body-axis u that rotates by slow angular diffusion. Run-and-tumble particles (RTPs, such as motile bacteria) swim with constant u until a random tumble event suddenly decorrelates the orientation. We show that when the motility parameters depend on density ρ but not on u, the coarse-grained fluctuating hydrodynamics of interacting ABPs and RTPs can be mapped onto each other and are thus strictly equivalent. In both cases, a steeply enough decreasing v(ρ) causes phase separation in dimensions d = 2,3, even when no attractive forces act between the particles. This points to a generic role for motility-induced phase separation in active matter. However, we show that the ABP/RTP equivalence does not automatically extend to the more general case of u-dependent motilities.

  13. Running Simulations without Ruining Your Life: Simple Ways to Incorporate Active Learning into Your Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazier, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing availability and popularity of simulations and other active teaching techniques, many instructors may be deterred from using simulations because of the potentially high costs involved. Instructors could spend a preponderance of their time and resources developing and executing simulations, but such an approach is not necessary.…

  14. How accurate are the wrist-based heart rate monitors during walking and running activities? Are they accurate enough?

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun-Sung; Dinkel, Danae M; Noble, John M; Lee, Jung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate (HR) monitors are valuable devices for fitness-orientated individuals. There has been a vast influx of optical sensing blood flow monitors claiming to provide accurate HR during physical activities. These monitors are worn on the arm and wrist to detect HR with photoplethysmography (PPG) techniques. Little is known about the validity of these wearable activity trackers. Aim Validate the Scosche Rhythm (SR), Mio Alpha (MA), Fitbit Charge HR (FH), Basis Peak (BP), Microsoft Band (MB), and TomTom Runner Cardio (TT) wireless HR monitors. Methods 50 volunteers (males: n=32, age 19–43 years; females: n=18, age 19–38 years) participated. All monitors were worn simultaneously in a randomised configuration. The Polar RS400 HR chest strap was the criterion measure. A treadmill protocol of one 30 min bout of continuous walking and running at 3.2, 4.8, 6.4, 8.0, and 9.6 km/h (5 min at each protocol speed) with HR manually recorded every minute was completed. Results For group comparisons, the mean absolute percentage error values were: 3.3%, 3.6%, 4.0%, 4.6%, 4.8% and 6.2% for TT, BP, RH, MA, MB and FH, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r) was observed: r=0.959 (TT), r=0.956 (MB), r=0.954 (BP), r=0.933 (FH), r=0.930 (RH) and r=0.929 (MA). Results from 95% equivalency testing showed monitors were found to be equivalent to those of the criterion HR (±10% equivalence zone: 98.15–119.96). Conclusions The results demonstrate that the wearable activity trackers provide an accurate measurement of HR during walking and running activities. PMID:27900173

  15. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Luke A; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2015-01-06

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s⁻¹ and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s⁻¹ on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle-tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission.

  16. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Luke A.; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s−1 and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s−1 on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle–tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission. PMID:25551151

  17. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1982-01-20

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

  18. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.

    1983-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

  19. Orbiter wheel and tire certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The orbiter wheel and tire development has required a unique series of certification tests to demonstrate the ability of the hardware to meet severe performance requirements. Early tests of the main landing gear wheel using conventional slow roll testing resulted in hardware failures. This resulted in a need to conduct high velocity tests with crosswind effects for assurance that the hardware was safe for a limited number of flights. Currently, this approach and the conventional slow roll and static tests are used to certify the wheel/tire assembly for operational use.

  20. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-10-11

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load. 7 figs.

  1. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides shall... Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1964. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides shall... Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1964. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides shall... Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1964. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides shall... Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1964. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding...

  5. Physical activity and body composition outcomes of the GreatFun2Run intervention at 20 month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is recognised as a public health concern within children and interventions to increase physical activity are needed. GreatFun2Run was a school-based healthy lifestyles intervention that showed positive changes in physical activity levels and body composition immediately post-intervention. The purpose of this paper was to examine whether these changes in physical activity and body composition were maintained 18-20 months after the intervention ended. Method Participants (n = 589, aged 7-11 yrs) from 4 intervention and 4 control schools took part in the 10-month intervention, of which 421 (71%) were present for follow-up. The intervention comprised a CD-rom learning and teaching resource for teachers; an interactive website for pupils, teachers and parents; two highlight physical activity events (1 mile school runs/walks); a local media campaign; and a summer activity wall planner and record. Randomisation was not possible because of local media content. Outcome measures were objectively measured physical activity (pedometers and accelerometers) and body composition variables (body mass index, waist circumference, estimated percent body fat, and sum of skinfolds). Teacher interviews and participant focus groups were conducted. Multi-level modelling was employed for the data analysis. Results Both control and intervention participants had increased their physical activity at follow-up but there was no group by time interaction (control: 2726 steps per day increase; intervention 3404 steps per day increase, p > .05). There were significant increases in estimated percent body fat, sum of skinfolds, waist circumference and body mass index (BMI) with increasing age. In the control group, there was evidence for a plateauing in the rate of change in all body composition variables with increasing age, except BMI. In contrast, significant interaction terms suggest that the rate of change in waist circumference, BMI and BMISDS continued to

  6. The Effect of Gender and Menstrual Phase on Serum Creatine Kinase Activity and Muscle Soreness Following Downhill Running

    PubMed Central

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Bosch, Andrew N.

    2017-01-01

    Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity reflects muscle membrane disruption. Oestrogen has antioxidant and membrane stabilising properties, yet no study has compared the CK and muscle soreness (DOMS) response to unaccustomed exercise between genders when all menstrual phases are represented in women. Fifteen eumenorrhoeic women (early follicular, EF (n = 5); late follicular, LF (n = 5); mid-luteal, ML (n = 5) phase) and six men performed 20 min of downhill running (−10% gradient) at 9 km/h. Serum CK activity and visual analogue scale rating of perceived muscle soreness were measured before, immediately, 24-h, 48-h and 72-h after exercise. The 24-h peak CK response (relative to pre-exercise) was similar between women and men (mean change (95% confidence interval): 58.5 (25.2 to 91.7) IU/L; 68.8 (31.3 to 106.3) IU/L, respectively). However, serum CK activity was restored to pre-exercise levels quicker in women (regardless of menstrual phase) than men; after 48-h post exercise in women (16.3 (−4.4 to 37.0) IU/L; 56.3 (37.0 to 75.6) IU/L, respectively) but only after 72-h in men (14.9 (−14.8 to 44.6) IU/L). Parallel to the CK response, muscle soreness recovered by 72-h in men. Conversely, the women still reported muscle soreness at 72-h despite CK levels being restored by 48-h; delayed recovery of muscle soreness appeared mainly in EF and LF. The CK and DOMS response to downhill running is gender-specific. The CK response recovers quicker in women than men. The CK and DOMS response occur in concert in men but not in women. The DOMS response in women is prolonged and may be influenced by menstrual phase. PMID:28241459

  7. The Effect of Gender and Menstrual Phase on Serum Creatine Kinase Activity and Muscle Soreness Following Downhill Running.

    PubMed

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Bosch, Andrew N

    2017-02-23

    Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity reflects muscle membrane disruption. Oestrogen has antioxidant and membrane stabilising properties, yet no study has compared the CK and muscle soreness (DOMS) response to unaccustomed exercise between genders when all menstrual phases are represented in women. Fifteen eumenorrhoeic women (early follicular, EF (n = 5); late follicular, LF (n = 5); mid-luteal, ML (n = 5) phase) and six men performed 20 min of downhill running (-10% gradient) at 9 km/h. Serum CK activity and visual analogue scale rating of perceived muscle soreness were measured before, immediately, 24-h, 48-h and 72-h after exercise. The 24-h peak CK response (relative to pre-exercise) was similar between women and men (mean change (95% confidence interval): 58.5 (25.2 to 91.7) IU/L; 68.8 (31.3 to 106.3) IU/L, respectively). However, serum CK activity was restored to pre-exercise levels quicker in women (regardless of menstrual phase) than men; after 48-h post exercise in women (16.3 (-4.4 to 37.0) IU/L; 56.3 (37.0 to 75.6) IU/L, respectively) but only after 72-h in men (14.9 (-14.8 to 44.6) IU/L). Parallel to the CK response, muscle soreness recovered by 72-h in men. Conversely, the women still reported muscle soreness at 72-h despite CK levels being restored by 48-h; delayed recovery of muscle soreness appeared mainly in EF and LF. The CK and DOMS response to downhill running is gender-specific. The CK response recovers quicker in women than men. The CK and DOMS response occur in concert in men but not in women. The DOMS response in women is prolonged and may be influenced by menstrual phase.

  8. Use of Dendrochronology for Determining the Chronology of Landslide Activity Along Meadow Run, Shenandoah Valley, Virginia USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, L. S.; Yanosky, T. M.; Wieczorek, G. F.

    2003-12-01

    The growth rings of living trees were examined to determine the chronology of landslide activity along Meadow Run, a low-order ungaged stream that emerges from the western flank of the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia and flows into the South River in the eastern Shenandoah Valley. At the study site, Meadow Run meanders over a Pleistocene-Quaternary alluvial fan comprised of fresh and weathered sands and cobbles derived from quartzites and sandstones of the Antietam Formation. The alluvium is underlain by the Shady Dolomite, which has limited exposure as saprolite in some stream cuts and slope failures. Stream migration and undercutting of topographically higher fan surfaces creates bluffs up to 20 m in height that show signs of past and recent slope instability. Tilting of trees and slope surfaces indicate that rotation is the dominant type of slope movement; hence, these landslides are termed earth slumps. Two of these slides are contiguous and were investigated in detail. The geomorphology of the downstream slide suggests episodic movement since the mid 1930s. A white oak near the main scarp of the slide shows an abrupt and sustained decrease in ring width beginning in 1937, suggesting that the tree was tilted and root pruned; a sprout from the base of the tilted trunk started to grow no later than 1940. A nearby sprout that began growth no later than 1941 from a tilted black gum supports the general dating of the initial slide. Along the South River at Harriston, floods were recorded in March 1936 (12,600 cfs) and April 1937 (11,700 cfs), suggesting that slope instability along Meadow Run resulted from the undercutting of bluffs by flood waters or from over-saturation of soils during heavy rains. The synchronous formation of reaction wood beginning in the early 1970s in the oak and gum sprouts, and in the parent trunk of a nearby Virginia pine, suggests an episode of slope movement triggered by the peak flow (21,300 cfs) following Hurricane Agnes in June 1972

  9. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Right Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images of the rover's right front wheel, taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera, make up this brief movie. It chronicles the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from a ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' The rover's wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity weathered its 'Jammerbugt' and is again on its way toward Victoria Crater.

  10. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Left Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images of the rover's left front wheel, taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera, make up this brief movie. It chronicles the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from a ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' The rover's wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity weathered its 'Jammerbugt' and is again on its way toward Victoria Crater.

  11. Wind wheel electric power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, J.W.

    1980-03-04

    Wind wheel electric power generator apparatus is disclosed as including a housing rotatably mounted upon a vertically disposed support column. Primary and auxiliary funnel-type, venturi ducts are fixedly mounted upon the housing for capturing wind currents and for conducting the same to a bladed wheel adapted to be operatively connected with generator apparatus. Additional air flows are also conducted onto the bladed wheel, all of the air flows positively effecting rotation of the wheel in a cumulative manner. The auxiliary ducts are disposed at an acute angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the housing, and this feature , together with the rotatability of the housing and the ducts, permits capture of wind currents within a variable directional range.

  12. Wind wheel electric power generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Wind wheel electric power generator apparatus includes a housing rotatably mounted upon a vertical support column. Primary and auxiliary funnel-type, venturi ducts are fixed onto the housing for capturing wind currents and conducting to a bladed wheel adapted to be operatively connected with the generator apparatus. Additional air flows are also conducted onto the bladed wheel; all of the air flows positively effecting rotation of the wheel in a cumulative manner. The auxiliary ducts are disposed at an acute angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the housing, and this feature, together with the rotatability of the housing and the ducts, permits capture of wind currents within a variable directional range.

  13. Grinding Wheel Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graphic dubbed by engineers as the 'Grinding Wheel Profile' is the detective's tool used by the Opportunity team to help them understand one of the processes that formed the interior of a rock called 'McKittrick.' Scientists are looking for clues as to how layers, grains and minerals helped create this rock, and the engineers who built the rock abrasion tool (RAT) wanted to ensure that their instrument's handiwork did not get confused with natural processes.

    In the original microscopic image underlaying the graphics, engineers and scientists noticed 'layers' or 'scratches' on the spherical object nicknamed 'blueberry' in the lower right part of the image. The designers of the rock abrasion tool noticed that the arc length and width of the scratches were similar to the shape and size of the rock abrasion tool's grinding wheel, which is made out of a pad of diamond teeth.

    The scrapes on the bottom right blueberry appear to be caused by the fact that the berry got dislodged slightly and its surface was scraped with the grinding pad. In this image, the largest yellow circle is the overall diameter of the hole ground by the rock abrasion tool and the largest yellow rectangular shape is the area of the grinding wheel bit. The smaller yellow semi-circle is the path that the center of the grinding tool follows. The orange arrow arcing around the solid yellow circle (center of grinding tool) indicates the direction that the grinding tool spins around its own center at 3,000 revolutions per minute. The tool simultaneously spins in an orbit around the center of the hole, indicated by the larger orange arrow to the left.

    The grinding tool is 22 millimeters (0.9 inches) in length and the actual grinding surface, which consists of the diamond pad, is 1.5 millimeters (0.06 inches) in length, indicated by the two smaller rectangles. You can see that the smaller bottom rectangle fits exactly the width of the scrape marks.

    The grooves on the blueberry are also the

  14. Hip adductor activations during run-to-cut manoeuvres in compression shorts: implications for return to sport after groin injury.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Ajit M W; Jamison, Steven T; McNally, Michael P; Pan, Xueliang; Schmitt, Laura C

    2014-01-01

    Athletes at high risk of groin strains in sports such as hockey and soccer often choose to wear shorts with directional compression to aid in prevention of or recovery from hip adductor strains. Large, eccentric contractions are known to result in or exacerbate strain injuries, but it is unknown if these shorts have a beneficial effect on hip adductor muscle activity. In this study, surface electromyography (EMG) of the adductor longus and ground reaction force (GRF) data were obtained simultaneously on 29 healthy individuals without previous history of serious injury while performing unanticipated 45° run-to-cut manoeuvres in a laboratory setting wearing shorts with non-directional compression (control, HeatGear, Under Armour, USA) or shorts with directional compression (directional, CoreShort PRO, Under Armour, USA), in random order. Average adductor activity in the stance leg was significantly lower in the directional condition than in the control condition during all parts of stance phase (all P < 0.042). From this preliminary analysis, wearing directional compression shorts appears to be associated with reduced stance limb hip adductor activity. Athletes seeking to reduce demand on the hip adductors as they approach full return to activities may benefit from the use of directional compression shorts.

  15. Hip adductor activations during run-to-cut maneuvers in compression shorts: Implications for return to sport after groin injury

    PubMed Central

    CHAUDHARI, AJIT M. W.; JAMISON, STEVEN T.; MCNALLY, MICHAEL P.; PAN, XUELIANG; SCHMITT, LAURA C.

    2014-01-01

    Athletes at high risk of groin strains in sports such as hockey and soccer often choose to wear shorts with directional compression to aid in prevention or recovery from hip adductor strains. Large eccentric contractions are known to result in or exacerbate strain injuries, but it is unknown if these shorts have a beneficial effect on hip adductor muscle activity. In this study, surface electromyography of the adductor longus and ground reaction force (GRF) data were obtained simultaneously on 29 healthy individuals without previous history of serious injury while performing unanticipated 45° run-to-cut maneuvers in a laboratory setting wearing shorts with non-directional compression (control, HeatGear, Under Armour, USA) or shorts with directional compression (directional, CoreShort PRO, Under Armour, USA), in random order. Average adductor activity in the stance leg was significantly lower in the directional condition than in the control condition during all parts of stance phase (all p<0.042). From this preliminary analysis, wearing directional compression shorts appears to be associated with reduced stance limb hip adductor activity. Athletes seeking to reduce demand on the hip adductors as they approach full return to activities may benefit from the use of directional compression shorts. PMID:24669858

  16. Rim seal for turbine wheel

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, Boris; Boyd, Gary L.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine wheel assembly includes a disk having a plurality of blades therearound. A ceramic ring is mounted to the housing of the turbine wheel assembly. A labyrinth rim seal mounted on the disk cooperates with the ceramic ring to seal the hot gases acting on the blades from the disk. The ceramic ring permits a tighter clearance between the labyrinth rim seal and the ceramic ring.

  17. Cardioprotective effect of spontaneous activity.

    PubMed

    Peltier, S; Novel-Chate, V; Malaisse, W J; Molnar, A; Leverve, X M; Favier, R

    2007-12-01

    In the perspective of giving a better understanding of the cardioprotective effects attributable to the tandem low caloric intake and training, Lou/C rats would be an interesting model since these animals exhibit spontaneously these two characteristics for months, without any dietary manipulations or stressor stimuli. No information was so far available on their cardiac function. Therefore, the aim of this pilot study was (i) to document cardiac function before and after ischemia in this strain, and (ii) to investigate whether spontaneous wheel-running activity can improve the ability of cardiac muscle to recover its function after an ischemic period. Cardiac mechanical and metabolic functions were measured in isolated Langendorff hearts from Wistar sedentary, Lou/C sedentary, and Lou/C wheel-running male rats submitted to a 20-min low-flow ischemia and 20-min reperfusion. In Lou/C sedentary rats, rate-pressure product, an index of cardiac work, was decreased before ischemia as compared to Wistar sedentary animals (- 24 %, p < 0.05). After ischemia, cardiac mechanical function recovery did not significantly differ between these two groups. Nevertheless, flux of non-oxidative glycolysis was lower before and after ischemia in Lou/C sedentary animals than in Wistar sedentary rats. In Lou/C rats, during normoxic perfusion, wheel-running activity significantly decreased heart rate (- 15 %), oxygen consumption (- 2.2 %) and cardiac efficiency (- 37 %), whereas coronary flow and flux of non-oxidative glycolysis were significantly increased (+ 15 % and + 263 %, respectively). After ischemia, recovery of cardiac mechanical function and cardiac efficiency were improved in Lou/C wheel-running rats versus Lou/C sedentary animals (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the impact of ischemia-reperfusion is similar between Lou/C- and Wistar sedentary rats. Spontaneous wheel-running activity decreases cardiac efficiency before ischemia and confers a protection against ischemia- and

  18. Weight loss in rats produced by running: effects of prior experience and individual housing.

    PubMed

    Boakes, R A; Dwyer, D M

    1997-05-01

    To investigate factors affecting activity-based anorexia (ABA) or activity-stress (AS), rats were given 2-hr access to a running wheel immediately prior to their daily 1.5-hr food access during the light cycle. This produced a reduction in food intake, a steady increase in running, and a large drop in body weight with a prolonged delay before weight recovery began. Experiment 1 found that these effects were reduced in rats with prior experience of eating at this time of day. In contrast, prior experience of running in the wheel when on ad lib food enhanced these effects in Experiment 2, where a subsequent change for half the subjects to individual housing produced a further decrease in body weight. The latter factor was investigated from the outset of Experiment 3 and again individually housed rats showed greater weight loss than did group-housed rats. This experiment also found that in rats of the same age a low initial body weight predicts greater vulnerability to ABA. It was concluded that ABA results from activity-induced reduction of feeding, which prolongs adaptation to a new feeding schedule and is accentuated by social isolation.

  19. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  20. The ubiquitous photonic wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A circularly polarized electromagnetic plane wave carries an electric field that rotates clockwise or counterclockwise around the propagation direction of the wave. According to the handedness of this rotation, its longitudinal spin angular momentum (AM) density is either parallel or antiparallel to the propagation of light. However, there are also light waves that are not simply plane and carry an electric field that rotates around an axis perpendicular to the propagation direction, thus yielding transverse spin AM density. Electric field configurations of this kind have been suggestively dubbed ‘photonic wheels’. It has been recently shown that photonic wheels are commonplace in optics as they occur in electromagnetic fields confined by waveguides, in strongly focused beams, in plasmonic and evanescent waves. In this work we establish a general theory of electromagnetic waves propagating along a well defined direction, and carrying transverse spin AM density. We show that depending on the shape of these waves, the spin density may be either perpendicular to the mean linear momentum (globally transverse spin) or to the linear momentum density (locally transverse spin). We find that the latter case generically occurs only for non-diffracting beams, such as the Bessel beams. Moreover, we introduce the concept of meridional Stokes parameters to operationally quantify the transverse spin density. To illustrate our theory, we apply it to the exemplary cases of Bessel beams and evanescent waves. These results open a new and accessible route to the understanding, generation and manipulation of optical beams with transverse spin AM density.

  1. Effect of auditory isolation on activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Ángela; De Pedro, Belén; Cerrato, María; Carrera, Olaia; Gutiérrez, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to study male and female rats exposed to Activity-Based Anorexia (ABA; simultaneous exposition to food restriction and free access to an activity wheel) under two conditions of sound attenuation, by means of different arrangements of wheels (standard versus isolation) in the laboratory room. Regardless of the sound attenuation condition, all but one male and one female with access to wheels had to be removed from the experiment, but extended ABA endurance was found in rats in the sound attenuation condition. Furthermore, significantly lower levels of running were observed in both males and females under the sound attenuation arrangement in the isolation condition. The results suggest that external stimulation plays a role in the activity displayed by rats exposed to ABA, and that the reduction of external stimulation diminishes running but does not protect rats from developing ABA.

  2. Analysis of limit forces on the vehicle wheels using an algorithm of Dynamic Square Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukalski, M.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a method named as Dynamic Square Method (DSM) used for dynamic analysis of a vehicle equipped with a four wheel drive system. This method allows determination of maximum (limit) forces acting on the wheels. Here, the maximum longitudinal forces acting on the wheels are assumed and then used to predict whether they can be achieved by a specific dynamic motion or whether the actual friction forces under a given wheel is large enough to transfer lateral forces. For the analysis of DSM a four wheel vehicle model is used. On the basis of this characteristic it is possible to determine the maximum longitudinal force acting on the wheels of the given axle depending on the lateral acceleration of the vehicle. The results of this analysis may be useful in the development of a control algorithm used for example in active differentials.

  3. Research on the 2-axis cup-wheel dressing technology of arc-diamond grinding wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, X. L.; Wu, H. Y.; Peng, Y. F.

    2014-08-01

    The precision dressing of arc-diamond wheel is very hard, expensive and time-consuming because of the super-hard diamond particles and complicated geometrical shape. This paper aims to investigate the cup-wheel dressing technology to realize the high-efficiency regeneration of the arc-diamond wheel. A two-axis cup-wheel dressing technique for precision dressing arc-diamond wheel was suggested and tested. The dressing mechanism of 2-axis cup-wheel was studied. The dressing algorithm and error compensation method were further investigated to improve the dressing precision and efficiency. The experimental results show that the 2-axis cup-wheel dressing technique is valid and applicable to realize the precision dressing of arc-diamond wheel. The machined optical surface condition was apparently improved with the cup-wheel dressed diamond wheel and even became much better when the error compensation algorithm was performed on the arc-diamond wheel.

  4. Muscle Activation and Estimated Relative Joint Force During Running with Weight Support on a Lower-Body Positive-Pressure Treadmill.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bente R; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine L

    2016-08-01

    Running on a lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg muscle activation and to estimate relative knee and ankle joint forces. Runners performed 6-min running sessions at 2.22 m/s and 3.33 m/s, at 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% body weight (BW). Surface electromyography, ground reaction force, and running characteristics were measured. Relative knee and ankle joint forces were estimated. Leg muscles responded differently to unweighting during running, reflecting different relative contribution to propulsion and antigravity forces. At 20% BW, knee extensor EMGpeak decreased to 22% at 2.22 m/s and 28% at 3.33 m/s of 100% BW values. Plantar flexors decreased to 52% and 58% at 20% BW, while activity of biceps femoris muscle remained unchanged. Unweighting with LBPP reduced estimated joint force significantly although less than proportional to the degree of weight support (ankle). It was concluded that leg muscle activation adapted to the new biomechanical environment, and the effect of unweighting on estimated knee force was more pronounced than on ankle force.

  5. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C.; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues—mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations—to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377720

  6. 14 CFR 23.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 23.731 Wheels. (a) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity....

  7. 14 CFR 27.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity. (c)...

  8. 14 CFR 25.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and nose wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center...

  9. 14 CFR 27.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity. (c)...

  10. 14 CFR 27.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity. (c)...

  11. 14 CFR 23.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 23.731 Wheels. (a) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity....

  12. 14 CFR 25.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and nose wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center...

  13. 14 CFR 29.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... landing gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of...

  14. 14 CFR 23.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 23.731 Wheels. (a) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity....

  15. 14 CFR 29.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... landing gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of...

  16. 14 CFR 25.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and nose wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center...

  17. 14 CFR 25.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and nose wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center...

  18. 14 CFR 25.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and nose wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center...

  19. 14 CFR 27.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity. (c)...

  20. 14 CFR 29.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... landing gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of...

  1. 14 CFR 23.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 23.731 Wheels. (a) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity....

  2. 14 CFR 27.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity. (c)...

  3. 14 CFR 29.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... landing gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of...

  4. 14 CFR 23.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 23.731 Wheels. (a) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Design maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of gravity....

  5. 14 CFR 29.731 - Wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... landing gear wheel must be approved. (b) The maximum static load rating of each wheel may not be less than the corresponding static ground reaction with— (1) Maximum weight; and (2) Critical center of...

  6. Propulsion Wheel Motor for an Electric Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figuered, Joshua M. (Inventor); Herrera, Eduardo (Inventor); Waligora, Thomas M. (Inventor); Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Farrell, Logan Christopher (Inventor); Lee, Chunhao J. (Inventor); Vitale, Robert L. (Inventor); Winn, Ross Briant (Inventor); Eggleston, IV, Raymond Edward (Inventor); Guo, Raymond (Inventor); Weber, Steven J. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor); Rogers, James Jonathan (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A wheel assembly for an electric vehicle includes a wheel rim that is concentrically disposed about a central axis. A propulsion-braking module is disposed within an interior region of the wheel rim. The propulsion-braking module rotatably supports the wheel rim for rotation about the central axis. The propulsion-braking module includes a liquid cooled electric motor having a rotor rotatable about the central axis, and a stator disposed radially inside the rotor relative to the central axis. A motor-wheel interface hub is fixedly attached to the wheel rim, and is directly attached to the rotor for rotation with the rotor. The motor-wheel interface hub directly transmits torque from the electric motor to the wheel rim at a 1:1 ratio. The propulsion-braking module includes a drum brake system having an electric motor that rotates a cam device, which actuates the brake shoes.

  7. Compressor wheel assembly for turbochargers

    SciTech Connect

    Joco, F.M.

    1987-11-10

    In a turbocharger having a housing, this patent describes: a rotatable shaft having a threaded end; bearing means for rotatably mounting the shaft to the housing; a boreless turbine wheel secured to an end of the shaft opposite the threaded end; a boreless compressor wheel having a boreless hub supporting a circumferentially arranged array of impeller blades; and an attachment member mounted on the hub generally at one axial end thereof in a position generally centered on a central axis of the hub. The attachment member includes means for attachment to the threaded end of the shaft.

  8. Effects of acute treadmill running at different intensities on activities of serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor neurons, and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomomi; Nishii, Ayu; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kubota, Natsuko; Nishijima, Takeshi; Kita, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise can reduce and prevent the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. Activation of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in antidepressant/anxiolytic properties. In addition, the incidence and symptoms of these disorders may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is initiated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Thus, it is possible that physical exercise produces its antidepressant/anxiolytic effects by affecting these neuronal activities. However, the effects of acute physical exercise at different intensities on these neuronal activation and behavioral changes are still unclear. Here, we examined the activities of 5-HT neurons in the DRN and CRF neurons in the PVN during 30 min of treadmill running at different speeds (high speed, 25 m/min; low speed, 15m/min; control, only sitting on the treadmill) in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos/5-HT or CRF immunohistochemistry. We also performed the elevated plus maze test and the forced swim test to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. Acute treadmill running at low speed, but not high speed, significantly increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT neurons in the DRN compared to the control, whereas high-speed running significantly enhanced c-Fos expression in CRF neurons in the PVN compared with the control and low-speed running. Furthermore, low-speed running resulted in decreased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors compared with high-speed running. These results suggest that acute physical exercise with mild and low stress can efficiently induce optimal neuronal activation that is involved in the antidepressant/anxiolytic effects.

  9. Preference for Western diet coadapts in High Runner mice and affects voluntary exercise and spontaneous physical activity in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Garland, Theodore

    2017-02-01

    Do animals evolve (coadapt) to choose diets that positively affect their performance abilities? We addressed this question from a microevolutionary perspective by examining preference for Western diet (WD: high in fat and sugar, but lower in protein) versus standard rodent chow in adults of both sexes from 4 lines of mice selectively bred for high levels of voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR lines) and 4 non-selected control (C) lines. We also assessed whether food preference or substitution affects physical activity (wheel running and/or spontaneous physical activity [SPA] in the attached home cages). In experiment 1 (generation 56), mice were given 6days of wheel acclimation (as is used routinely to pick breeders in the selection experiment) prior to a 2-day food choice trial. In experiment 2 (generation 56), 17days of wheel acclimation allowed mice to reach a stable level of daily running, followed by a 7-day food-choice trial. In experiment 3 (generation 58), mice had 6days of wheel acclimation with standard chow, after which half were switched to WD for two days. In experiment 1, WD was highly preferred by all mice, with somewhat greater preference in male C mice. In experiment 2, wheel running increased and SPA decreased continuously for the first 14days of adult wheel testing, followed by 3-day plateaus in both. During the subsequent 7-day food choice trial, HR mice of both sexes preferred WD significantly more than did C mice; moreover, wheel running increased in all groups except males from C lines, with the increase being significantly greater in HR than C, while SPA declined further in all groups. In experiment 3, the effect of being switched to WD depended on both linetype and sex. On standard chow, only HR females showed a significant change in wheel running during nights 7+8, increasing by 10%. In contrast, when switched to WD, C females (+28%), HR females (+33%), and HR males (+10%) all significantly increased their daily wheel-running

  10. Fault detection method for railway wheel flat using an adaptive multiscale morphological filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan; Zuo, Ming J.; Lin, Jianhui; Liu, Jianxin

    2017-02-01

    This study explores the capacity of the morphology analysis for railway wheel flat fault detection. A dynamic model of vehicle systems with 56 degrees of freedom was set up along with a wheel flat model to calculate the dynamic responses of axle box. The vehicle axle box vibration signal is complicated because it not only contains the information of wheel defect, but also includes track condition information. Thus, how to extract the influential features of wheels from strong background noise effectively is a typical key issue for railway wheel fault detection. In this paper, an algorithm for adaptive multiscale morphological filtering (AMMF) was proposed, and its effect was evaluated by a simulated signal. And then this algorithm was employed to study the axle box vibration caused by wheel flats, as well as the influence of track irregularity and vehicle running speed on diagnosis results. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by bench testing. Research results demonstrate that the AMMF extracts the influential characteristic of axle box vibration signals effectively and can diagnose wheel flat faults in real time.

  11. Suspension Parameter Measurements of Wheeled Military Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    just behind the wheel location being tested, and a linear interpolation is made to estimate the motion of the vehicle body directly above the wheel...Military Vehicles, Andreatta, et al. Page 3 of 8 lateral (y) directions on linear rails with circulating balls. The effective coefficient of... friction of these rails is in the range of 0.002. Steer motion of the wheel pad is allowed by a large crossed roller bearing under the wheel pad. The

  12. 49 CFR 230.112 - Wheels and tires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wheels and tires. 230.112 Section 230.112... Tenders Wheels and Tires § 230.112 Wheels and tires. (a) Mounting. Wheels shall be securely mounted on... wheels mounted on the same axle shall not vary more than 1/4 inch. (d) Tire thickness. Wheels may...

  13. 49 CFR 230.113 - Wheels and tire defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wheels and tire defects. 230.113 Section 230.113... Tenders Wheels and Tires § 230.113 Wheels and tire defects. Steam locomotive and tender wheels or tires.... Except as provided in § 230.114, welding on wheels and tires is prohibited. A wheel that has been...

  14. Inertia-Wheel Vibration-Damping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromechanical system would damp vibrations in large, flexible structure. In active vibration-damping system motors and reaction wheels at tips of appendages apply reaction torques in response to signals from accelerometers. Velocity signal for vibrations about one axis processes into control signal to oppose each of n vibrational modes. Various modes suppressed one at a time. Intended primarily for use in spacecraft that has large, flexible solar panels and science-instrument truss assembly, embodies principle of control interesting in its own right and adaptable to terrestrial structures, vehicles, and instrument platforms.

  15. An Evaluation of Reaction Wheel Emitted Vibrations for Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Emitted force and torque vibration were measured in three axes for three Sperry reaction wheels. Data were taken for both hard and soft mounts; tests were conducted at constant speeds and during runup-rundown over a 0 to 5000 rpm range. A FSC, 7 ft-lb-sec and HEAO, 30 ft-lb-sec ball bearing reaction wheel and a model magnetic bearing were tested. Data analysis was conducted to identify the principal resonances in the 10 to 120 Hz region. Although some particular phenomena remain unexplained, in general good agreement is attained between the analytical predictions and test data. Predictions were also made of the expected emitted vibrations for an LST sized ball bearing and magnetic bearing reaction wheel using engineering judgment and the test data obtained. Additional tests were also run on the 101H duplex bearing pairs used in the reaction wheel suspension to determine bearing stiffness characteristics in the pre-breakaway zero speed region.

  16. 49 CFR 229.73 - Wheel sets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wheel sets. 229.73 Section 229.73 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Suspension System § 229.73 Wheel sets. (a) The variation in the circumference of wheels on the same axle may not exceed 1/4 inch (two tape...

  17. 49 CFR 229.73 - Wheel sets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wheel sets. 229.73 Section 229.73 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Suspension System § 229.73 Wheel sets. (a...) when applied or turned. (b) The maximum variation in the diameter between any two wheel sets in a...

  18. 49 CFR 229.73 - Wheel sets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wheel sets. 229.73 Section 229.73 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Suspension System § 229.73 Wheel sets. (a...) when applied or turned. (b) The maximum variation in the diameter between any two wheel sets in a...

  19. 49 CFR 229.73 - Wheel sets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wheel sets. 229.73 Section 229.73 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Suspension System § 229.73 Wheel sets. (a...) when applied or turned. (b) The maximum variation in the diameter between any two wheel sets in a...

  20. 49 CFR 229.73 - Wheel sets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wheel sets. 229.73 Section 229.73 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Suspension System § 229.73 Wheel sets. (a...) when applied or turned. (b) The maximum variation in the diameter between any two wheel sets in a...

  1. 49 CFR 230.114 - Wheel centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Tenders Wheels and Tires § 230.114 Wheel centers. (a) Filling blocks and shims. Driving and trailing wheel centers with divided rims shall be properly fitted with iron or steel filling blocks before the tires are applied, and such filling blocks shall be properly maintained. When shims are inserted between the...

  2. A Running Start: Resource Guide for Youth Running Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Seth; Becker, Andrew; Armstrong, Tess

    2016-01-01

    The lack of physical activity is an epidemic problem among American youth today. In order to combat this, many schools are incorporating youth running programs as a part of their comprehensive school physical activity programs. These youth running programs are being implemented before or after school, at school during recess at the elementary…

  3. Identifying Factors Associated With Dropout During Prerandomization Run-in Period From an mHealth Physical Activity Education Study: The mPED Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Caryl; Haskell, William; Arai, Shoshana; Vittinghoff, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background The mobile phone-based physical activity education (mPED) trial is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating a mobile phone-delivered physical activity intervention for women. The study includes a run-in period to maximize the internal validity of the intervention trial, but little is known about factors related to successful run-in completion, and thus about potential threats to external validity. Objective Objectives of this study are (1) to determine the timing of dropout during the run-in period, reasons for dropout, optimum run-in duration, and relevant run-in components, and (2) to identify predictors of failure to complete the run-in period. Methods A total of 318 physically inactive women met preliminary eligibility criteria and were enrolled in the study between May 2011 and April 2014. A 3-week run-in period was required prior to randomization and included using a mobile phone app and wearing a pedometer. Cross-sectional analysis identified predictors of dropout. Results Out of 318 participants, 108 (34.0%) dropped out prior to randomization, with poor adherence using the study equipment being the most common reason. Median failure time was 17 days into the run-in period. In univariate analyses, nonrandomized participants were younger, had lower income, were less likely to drive regularly, were less likely to have used a pedometer prior to the study, were generally less healthy, had less self-efficacy for physical activity, and reported more depressive symptoms than randomized participants. In multivariate competing risks models, not driving regularly in the past month and not having used a pedometer prior to the study were significantly associated with failure to be randomized (P=.04 and .006, respectively), controlling for age, race/ethnicity, education, shift work, and use of a study-provided mobile phone. Conclusions Regular driving and past pedometer use were associated with reduced dropout during the prerandomization run-in period

  4. The effect of rear wheel camber in manual wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Veeger, D; van der Woude, L H; Rozendal, R H

    1989-01-01

    Eight nonimpaired subjects participated in a wheelchair exercise test using a motor-driven treadmill in order to study the effect of rear wheel camber on wheelchair ambulation. The test consisted of four runs with rear wheels in 0, 3, 6, and 9 degrees camber at four speed steps of 2, 3, 4, and 5 km/hr. There were no significant effects upon oxygen cost, heart rate, and mechanical efficiency. The kinematic parameters of push time, push angle, and abduction showed differences between 3 and 6 degrees camber. The relationship between the findings, using surface EMG results for six shoulder muscles, is discussed. For one subject, data were extended to study the angular velocities of shoulder and elbow.

  5. Potter's Wheel I: Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinaccio, Louis

    A course in forming medium size pottery on the potter's wheel and developing skill to reproduce matching forms is presented. Abilities which will be expected of the student at the end of the course include: (1) defining important terms relating to pottery, (2) identifying and differentiating between certain aspects of ceramic art, and (3)…

  6. Getting Off the Hamster Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sammon, Grace

    2005-01-01

    Even with all the external elements of school reform in place, educators can end up spinning their wheels. To make progress, schools must identify the nonnegotiable key elements of their reform plans and use the habits of highly effective schools to turn them into school practice. These habits are: (1) demonstrate high expectations and a vision…

  7. Exercise reduces activation of microglia isolated from hippocampus and brain of aged mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with low-grade neuroinflammation that includes basal increases in proinflammatory cytokines and expression of inflammatory markers on microglia. Exercise can reduce neuroinflammation following infection in aged animals, but whether exercise modulates basal changes in microglia activation is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated changes in basal microglia activation in cells isolated from the hippocampus and remaining brain following running-wheel access. Methods Adult (4 months) and aged (22 months) male and female BALB/c mice were housed with or without running wheels for 10 weeks. Microglia were isolated from the hippocampus or remaining brain. Flow cytometry was used to determine microglia (CD11b+ and CD45low) that co-labeled with CD86, CD206, and MHC II. Results Aged mice showed a greater proportion of CD86 and MHC II positive microglia. In aged females, access to a running wheel decreased proportion of CD86+ and MHC II+ microglia in the hippocampus whereas aged males in the running group showed a decrease in the proportion of CD86+ microglia in the brain and an increase in the proportion of MHC II+ microglia in hippocampus and brain. Conclusion Overall, these data indicate that running-wheel access modulates microglia activation, but these effects vary by age, sex, and brain region. PMID:24044641

  8. Survivability Enhanced Run-Flat Variable Footprint Tires

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-17

    This run-flat technology is built directly into the tire, yet maintains the normal variable footprint of a normal pneumatic tire. This makes the tire...footprint of a normal pneumatic tire. This makes the tire/wheel assembly much lighter and far more survivable than normal military run-flat technology...carcass severely damaged/punctured, provide the same dynamic deflection as the normal pneumatic tire, and provide similar tread life. Could a tire be

  9. The TASC Wheel Supports a Honey Bee Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The concept of TASC (Thinking Actively in a Social Context) was created by Belle Wallace (Wallace et al., 1993) as a model that can be used to nurture and develop thinking skills. As children work through the TASC wheel, the teacher has a very good opportunity to facilitate explicit conversations about thinking. This allows the children to grow in…

  10. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Line; Idorn, Manja; Olofsson, Gitte H; Lauenborg, Britt; Nookaew, Intawat; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Becker, Jürgen C; Pedersen, Katrine S; Dethlefsen, Christine; Nielsen, Jens; Gehl, Julie; Pedersen, Bente K; Thor Straten, Per; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-03-08

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of cancer and disease recurrence. Yet the mechanisms behind this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, tumor-bearing mice randomized to voluntary wheel running showed over 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across five different tumor models. Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell infiltration, and NK cell activation. Together, these results link exercise, epinephrine, and IL-6 to NK cell mobilization and redistribution, and ultimately to control of tumor growth.

  11. Running increases cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    van Praag, H; Kempermann, G; Gage, F H

    1999-03-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult rodents. Environmental enrichment, however, typically consists of many components, such as expanded learning opportunities, increased social interaction, more physical activity and larger housing. We attempted to separate components by assigning adult mice to various conditions: water-maze learning (learner), swim-time-yoked control (swimmer), voluntary wheel running (runner), and enriched (enriched) and standard housing (control) groups. Neither maze training nor yoked swimming had any effect on bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell number. However, running doubled the number of surviving newborn cells, in amounts similar to enrichment conditions. Our findings demonstrate that voluntary exercise is sufficient for enhanced neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

  12. Space shuttle wheels and brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsley, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter wheels were subjected to a combination of tests which are different than any previously conducted in the aerospace industry. The major testing difference is the computer generated dynamic landing profiles used during the certification process which subjected the wheels and tires to simulated landing loading conditions. The orbiter brakes use a unique combination of carbon composite linings and beryllium heat sink to minimize weight. The development of a new lining retention method was necessary in order to withstand the high temperature generated during the braking roll. As with many programs, the volume into which this hardware had to fit was established early in the program, with no provisions made for growth to offset the continuously increasing predicted orbiter landing weight.

  13. Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur; Sokolowski, Witold; Rand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight, self-deployable wheels made of polymer foams have been demonstrated. These wheels are an addition to the roster of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structural applications. Intended originally for use on nanorovers (very small planetary-exploration robotic vehicles), CHEM wheels could also be used for many commercial applications, such as in toys. The CHEM concept was reported in "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56. To recapitulate: A CHEM structure is fabricated from a shape-memory polymer (SMP) foam. The structure is compressed to a very small volume while in its rubbery state above its glass-transition temperature (Tg). Once compressed, the structure can be cooled below Tg to its glassy state. As long as the temperature remains

  14. Four-wheel drive car

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, N.

    1986-03-25

    A drive train in a four-wheel drive vehicle is described having an engine mounted on one end with a crankshaft oriented transverse to the direction of vehicle travel which consists of: a transmission having an output gear driven by the crankshaft and rotatable around an axis parallel to the axis of the crankshaft; a reduction gear operatively engaged with the output gear; a first differential gear having a gear and being concentrically engaged with the reduction gear to transmit the output of the reduction gear in a divided manner; a second differential gear transmitting power from one output of the differential gear to left and right wheels of the one end of the vehicle; a transmission gear meshing with the gear of the first differential gear for transmitting power from another output of the first differential gear in a direction generally perpendicular to the crankshaft through a propeller shaft to the other end of the vehicle, opposite the one end; a third differential gear receiving power from the propeller shaft for transmitting power to left and right wheels on the other end; and wherein a mesh portion where the transmission gear meshes with the gear of the first differential gear is closer to the crankshaft axis of engine than is the axis of the reduction gear.

  15. A Network on Wheels!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Describes mobile computer carts developed at the Lawrence Hall of Science that use IBM PS/2 computers and Personal Science Laboratory probeware. Activities using temperature probes for elementary and secondary school students are described, including greenhouse environments, ice cream/chemical reactions, probe races, motion studies, and…

  16. Classroom on Wheels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murfreesboro City Schools, TN.

    Designed for 3- and 4-year-old disadvantaged children and their parents, a mobile unit consisting of a renovated school bus turned classroom is described which travels to three areas daily for a 2-hour period. The program for children is designed primarily for developmental skills--visual, sensory, auditory, and cognitive. Activities emphasize…

  17. Identification of mouse gaits using a novel force-sensing exercise wheel

    PubMed Central

    Cullingford, Lottie; Usherwood, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The gaits that animals use can provide information on neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, as well as the biomechanics of locomotion. Mice are a common research model in many fields; however, there is no consensus in the literature on how (and if) mouse gaits vary with speed. One of the challenges in studying mouse gaits is that mice tend to run intermittently on treadmills or overground; this paper attempts to overcome this issue with a novel exercise wheel that measures vertical ground reaction forces. Unlike previous instrumented wheels, this wheel is able to measure forces continuously and can therefore record data from consecutive strides. By concatenating the maximum limb force at each time point, a force trace can be constructed to quantify and identify gaits. The wheel was three dimensionally printed, allowing the design to be shared with other researchers. The kinematic parameters measured by the wheel were evaluated using high-speed video. Gaits were classified using a metric called “3S” (stride signal symmetry), which quantifies the half wave symmetry of the force trace peaks. Although mice are capable of using both symmetric and asymmetric gaits throughout their speed range, the continuum of gaits can be divided into regions based on the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric gaits; these divisions are further supported by the fact that mice run less frequently at speeds near the boundaries between regions. The boundary speeds correspond to gait transition speeds predicted by the hypothesis that mice move in a dynamically similar fashion to other legged animals. PMID:26139220

  18. Identification of mouse gaits using a novel force-sensing exercise wheel.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin J H; Cullingford, Lottie; Usherwood, James R

    2015-09-15

    The gaits that animals use can provide information on neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, as well as the biomechanics of locomotion. Mice are a common research model in many fields; however, there is no consensus in the literature on how (and if) mouse gaits vary with speed. One of the challenges in studying mouse gaits is that mice tend to run intermittently on treadmills or overground; this paper attempts to overcome this issue with a novel exercise wheel that measures vertical ground reaction forces. Unlike previous instrumented wheels, this wheel is able to measure forces continuously and can therefore record data from consecutive strides. By concatenating the maximum limb force at each time point, a force trace can be constructed to quantify and identify gaits. The wheel was three dimensionally printed, allowing the design to be shared with other researchers. The kinematic parameters measured by the wheel were evaluated using high-speed video. Gaits were classified using a metric called "3S" (stride signal symmetry), which quantifies the half wave symmetry of the force trace peaks. Although mice are capable of using both symmetric and asymmetric gaits throughout their speed range, the continuum of gaits can be divided into regions based on the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric gaits; these divisions are further supported by the fact that mice run less frequently at speeds near the boundaries between regions. The boundary speeds correspond to gait transition speeds predicted by the hypothesis that mice move in a dynamically similar fashion to other legged animals.

  19. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Apparatus For Wheeled Vehicles In Ground Effect

    DOEpatents

    Ortega, Jason M.; Salari, Kambiz

    2005-12-13

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a wheeled vehicle in a flowstream, the vehicle having a vehicle body and a wheel assembly supporting the vehicle body. The apparatus includes a baffle assembly adapted to be positioned upstream of the wheel assembly for deflecting airflow away from the wheel assembly so as to reduce the incident pressure on the wheel assembly.

  20. Reaction wheels for kinetic energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to all existing reaction wheel implementations, an order of magnitude increase in speed can be obtained efficiently if power to the actuators can be recovered. This allows a combined attitude control-energy storage system to be developed with structure mounted reaction wheels. The feasibility of combining reaction wheels with energy storage wwheels is demonstrated. The power required for control torques is a function of wheel speed but this energy is not dissipated; it is stored in the wheel. The I(2)R loss resulting from a given torque is shown to be constant, independent of the design speed of the motor. What remains, in order to efficiently use high speed wheels (essential for energy storage) for control purposes, is to reduce rotational losses to acceptable levels. Progress was made in permanent magnet motor design for high speed operation. Variable field motors offer more control flexibility and efficiency over a broader speed range.

  1. Four-Wheel Vehicle Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    Four-wheel suspension system uses simple system of levers with no compliant components to provide three-point suspension of chassis of vehicle while maintaining four-point contact with uneven terrain. Provides stability against tipping of four-point rectangular base, without rocking contact to which rigid four-wheel frame susceptible. Similar to six-wheel suspension system described in "Articulated Suspension Without Springs" (NPO-17354).

  2. Wheel brakes and their application to aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, G H

    1928-01-01

    The advantages to be gained from braking have not been ignored, and in the search for a suitable method many schemes have been suggested and tried. Some of the methods discussed in this paper include: 1) increasing the height of the landing gear; 2) air brakes of various forms; 3) sprags on tail skid and axle; and 4) wheel brakes. This report focuses on the design of wheel brakes and wheel brake controls.

  3. Electronic 4-wheel drive control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayato, S.; Takanori, S.; Shigeru, H.; Tatsunori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The internal rotation torque generated during operation of a 4-wheel drive vehicle is reduced using a control device whose clutch is attached to one part of the rear-wheel drive shaft. One torque sensor senses the drive torque associated with the rear wheel drive shaft. A second sensor senses the drive torque associated with the front wheel drive shaft. Revolution count sensors sense the revolutions of each drive shaft. By means of a microcomputer, the engagement of the clutch is changed to insure that the ratio of the torque sensors remains constant.

  4. Alcohol and lithium have opposing effects on the period and phase of the behavioral free-running activity rhythm.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Nara F; Carlson, Karen N; Amaral, Danielle N; Logan, Ryan W; Seggio, Joseph A

    2015-06-01

    Bipolar patients have a high prevalence of comorbid alcohol use and abuse disorders, while chronic alcohol drinking may increase the presence and severity of certain symptoms of bipolar disorder. As such, there may be many individuals that are prescribed lithium to alleviate the manic symptoms of bipolar disorder, but also drink alcohol concurrently. In addition, both alcoholics and individuals with bipolar disorder often exhibit disruptions to their sleep-wake cycles and other circadian rhythms. Interestingly, both ethanol and lithium are known to alter both the period and the phase of free-running rhythms in mammals. While lithium is known to lengthen the period, ethanol seems to shorten the period and attenuate the responses to acute light pulses. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine whether ethanol and lithium have opposing effects on the circadian pacemaker when administered together. C57BL/6J mice were provided drinking solutions containing lithium, alcohol, or both, and their free-running rhythms along with their response to photic phase shifts were investigated. Mice treated with lithium displayed period lengthening, which was almost completely negated when ethanol was added. Moreover, ethanol significantly attenuated light-induced phase delays while the addition of lithium partially restored this response. These results indicate that alcohol and lithium have opposing effects on behavioral circadian rhythms. Individuals with bipolar disorder who are prescribed lithium and who drink alcohol might be inadvertently altering their sleep and circadian cycles, which may exacerbate their symptoms.

  5. 49 CFR 230.113 - Wheels and tire defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Wheels and Tires § 230.113 Wheels and tire defects. Steam locomotive and tender wheels or...

  6. A predictive wheel-soil interaction model for planetary rovers validated in testbeds and against MER Mars rover performance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Ellery, A.; Gao, Y.; Michaud, S.; Schmitz, N.; Weiss, S.

    testbed and in the RCET system-level testbed, the latter permitting drawbar pull vs. slip measurements for complete rover development vehicles under controlled and homogeneous soil conditions. Required modifications of the wheel-soil model, in particular related to modelling the effect of wheel slip, are discussed. To strengthen the model validation base, we have run single wheel measurements using a spare MER Mars rover wheel and have performed comparisons with MER actual mobility performance data, available through one of us (LR) who is a member of the MER Athena science team. Corresponding results will be presented. Keywords: rovers, wheel, soil, mobility, vehicle performance, RCET (Rover Chassis Evaluation Tools), MER (Mars Exploration Rover mission) 2

  7. Non-Circular Wheels: Reuleaux and Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Circular wheels are so familiar on vehicles of all types that it is seldom realized that alternatives do exist. This short non-mathematical article describes Reuleaux and square wheels that, rolling along appropriate tracks, can maintain a moving platform at a constant height. Easily made working models lend themselves to demonstrations at science…

  8. 16 CFR 1507.8 - Wheel devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wheel devices. 1507.8 Section 1507.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.8 Wheel devices. Drivers in fireworks devices commonly known as “wheels” shall...

  9. 16 CFR 1507.8 - Wheel devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wheel devices. 1507.8 Section 1507.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.8 Wheel devices. Drivers in fireworks devices commonly known as “wheels” shall...

  10. 16 CFR 1507.8 - Wheel devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wheel devices. 1507.8 Section 1507.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.8 Wheel devices. Drivers in fireworks devices commonly known as “wheels” shall...

  11. 16 CFR 1507.8 - Wheel devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wheel devices. 1507.8 Section 1507.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.8 Wheel devices. Drivers in fireworks devices commonly known as “wheels” shall...

  12. 16 CFR 1507.8 - Wheel devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wheel devices. 1507.8 Section 1507.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.8 Wheel devices. Drivers in fireworks devices commonly known as “wheels” shall...

  13. Effects of an Activity-Based Anorexia Procedure on Within-Session Changes in Nose-Poke Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effects of an activity-based anorexia (ABA) procedure on within-session changes in responding. In the ABA group (N = 8), rats were given a 60-min feeding session and allowed to run in a running wheel for the remainder of each day. During the daily 60-min feeding session, each nose-poke response was reinforced by a food…

  14. Enlargement of Axo-Somatic Contacts Formed by GAD-Immunoreactive Axon Terminals onto Layer V Pyramidal Neurons in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Adolescent Female Mice Is Associated with Suppression of Food Restriction-Evoked Hyperactivity and Resilience to Activity-Based Anorexia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wable, Gauri Satish; Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Aoki, Chiye

    2016-06-01

    Many, but not all, adolescent female mice that are exposed to a running wheel while food restricted (FR) become excessive wheel runners, choosing to run even during the hours of food availability, to the point of death. This phenomenon is called activity-based anorexia (ABA). We used electron microscopic immunocytochemistry to ask whether individual differences in ABA resilience may correlate with the lengths of axo-somatic contacts made by GABAergic axon terminals onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5P) in the prefrontal cortex. Contact lengths were, on average, 40% greater for the ABA-induced mice, relative to controls. Correspondingly, the proportion of L5P perikaryal plasma membrane contacted by GABAergic terminals was 45% greater for the ABA mice. Contact lengths in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated negatively and strongly with the overall wheel activity after FR (R = -0.87, P < 0.01), whereas those in the prelimbic cortex correlated negatively with wheel running specifically during the hours of food availability of the FR days (R = -0.84, P < 0.05). These negative correlations support the idea that increases in the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) terminal contact lengths onto L5P contribute toward ABA resilience through suppression of wheel running, a behavior that is intrinsically rewarding and helpful for foraging but maladaptive within a cage.

  15. Development of the FASTER Wheeled Bevameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Eder, V.; Hoheneder, W.; Imhof, B.; Lewinger, W.; Ransom, S.; Saaj, C.; Weclewski, P.; Waclavicek, R.,

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a Wheeled Bevameter (WB) within the FASTER project (Forward Acquisition of Soil and Terrain Data for Exploration Rovers), funded by the European Union's FP7 programme. In FASTER, novel and innovative concepts for in situ forward sensing of soil properties and terrain conditions in the planned path of a planetary rover are developed. Terrain strength measurements for assessment of the mobility of crosscountry vehicles have decades of heritage on Earth, but typically trafficability of terrains is only gauged by human operators ahead of vehicle operations rather than in-line by probes deployed from the vehicle itself, as is intended for FASTER. For FASTER, a Wheeled Bevameter (WB) has been selected as the terrain sensing instrument for the vehicle. Wheeled Bevameters are suitable for terrain measurements while driving but traditionally have mostly been employed on terrestrial vehicles to evaluate particular wheel designs. The WB as conceived in FASTER uses a dedicated, passive-rolling test wheel (‚test wheel') placed on the terrain as the loading device to enable to determine bearing strength, compressive strength and shear strength of the terrain immediately ahead of the vehicle, as well as rover-terrain interaction parameters used in semi-empirical vehicle-terrain traction models. The WB includes a placement mechanism for the test wheel. The test wheel would remain lowered onto the ground during nominal rover motion, including when climbing and descending slopes. During normal operations, the placement mechanism assumes the function of a passive suspension of the wheel, allowing it to follow the terrain contour. Quantities measured with the WB are: test wheel sinkage (through a laser sensor), test wheel vertical load, test wheel horizontal reaction force, and test wheel rotation rate. Measurements are performed while the rover is in motion. Measured test wheel rotation rate (with appropriate corrections for slight skid) can

  16. Reaction wheel design, construction and qualification testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proper, Ian

    This thesis examines the design, construction, and space-qualification testing of a microsatellite class reaction wheel. A literature review compares both currently and formerly operational, as well as commercially available reaction wheel assemblies, to assess the torque and momentum generation capabilities relative to the masses of the respective units. Several potential software models for a prototype reaction wheel are constructed and compared to the units described in the literature review to determine feasibility of operation. Choosing a particular model, the prototype wheel is then constructed and baseline tests are performed to determine its operational characteristics. Finally, a series of qualification tests are performed: a life test, a vibration test and a thermal vacuum test. These tests aim to validate the ability of the prototype reaction wheel unit to operate for at least a six-month mission in a typical low Earth orbit environment.

  17. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... storm; (2) A run-off control system from the active portion of the landfill to collect and control at least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion...

  18. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... storm; (2) A run-off control system from the active portion of the landfill to collect and control at least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion...

  19. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... storm; (2) A run-off control system from the active portion of the landfill to collect and control at least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion...

  20. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... storm; (2) A run-off control system from the active portion of the landfill to collect and control at least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion...

  1. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... storm; (2) A run-off control system from the active portion of the landfill to collect and control at least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion...

  2. Validity and reliability of the 1/4 mile run-walk test in physically active children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Castro-Piñero, Jose

    2014-11-30

    We investigated the criterion-related validity and the reliability of the 1/4 mile run-walk test (MRWT) in children and adolescents. A total of 86 children (n=42 girls) completed a maximal graded treadmill test using a gas analyzer and the 1/4MRW test. We investigated the test-retest reliability of the 1/4MRWT in a different group of children and adolescents (n=995, n=418 girls). The 1/4MRWT time, sex, and BMI significantly contributed to predict measured VO2peak (R2= 0.32). There was no systematic bias in the cross-validation group (P>0.1). The root mean sum of squared errors (RMSE) and the percentage error were 6.9 ml/kg/min and 17.7%, respectively, and the accurate prediction (i.e. the percentage of estimations within ±4.5 ml/kg/min of VO2peak) was 48.8%. The reliability analysis showed that the mean inter-trial difference ranged from 0.6 seconds in children aged 6-11 years to 1.3 seconds in adolescents aged 12-17 years (all P.

  3. Detumbling of a rigid spacecraft via torque wheel assisted gyroscopic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yiing-Yuh; Wang, Chin-Tzuo

    2014-01-01

    A time and energy efficient two-part method for detumbling a rigid spacecraft using an onboard torque wheel and a set of three-axis magnetic torquer is presented in this paper. Part-1 of the method manipulates the speed of the wheel, whose spin axis is parallel to a designated body axis of a tumbling spacecraft, and induces a desired gyroscopic-like motion to align the designated axis with its total angular momentum, H. The procedure in effect detumbles the spacecraft to rotate about the designated axis and distributes H, which is conserved during this control period, between the body and the wheel. After the alignment is achieved, Part-2 control, activated with a specified momentum transfer parameter, η, can either quickly stop the body rotation by transferring its angular momentum to the wheel or offload most of the momentum into space, using the wheel and the magnetic torquer. Convergence criteria and control laws for both parts are derived from the Lyapunov stability analysis and the method of feedback linearization. The wheel performs as a momentum storing and transferring device regulating the angular momentum between the wheel and the body. It can also provide gyroscopic stiffness to stabilize the system while the magnetic torquer is offloading the momentum. Simulation results from the included cases indicate that significantly fast detumbling of the spacecraft can be achieved with Part-1 of the proposed method. The results also show that, under the same condition, either by transferring almost all H to the wheel or dumping it, the two-part method, with a chosen η and final residual momentum condition, requires much less time and energy needed than the B-dot method does. Moreover, the stability nature of the two-part method is heuristically substantiated as the wheel torques and the dipole moment were constrained in the simulation.

  4. Dr. Sheehan on Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, George A.

    This book is both a personal and technical account of the experience of running by a heart specialist who began a running program at the age of 45. In its seventeen chapters, there is information presented on the spiritual, psychological, and physiological results of running; treatment of athletic injuries resulting from running; effects of diet…

  5. Effects of activity, genetic selection and their interaction on muscle metabolic capacities and organ masses in mice.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Scott A; Gomes, Fernando R; Kolb, Erik M; Malisch, Jessica L; Garland, Theodore

    2017-03-15

    Chronic voluntary exercise elevates total daily energy expenditure and food consumption, potentially resulting in organ compensation supporting nutrient extraction/utilization. Additionally, species with naturally higher daily energy expenditure often have larger processing organs, which may represent genetic differences and/or phenotypic plasticity. We tested for possible adaptive changes in organ masses of four replicate lines of house mice selected (37 generations) for high running (HR) compared with four non-selected control (C) lines. Females were housed with or without wheel access for 13-14 weeks beginning at 53-60 days of age. In addition to organ compensation, chronic activity may also require an elevated aerobic capacity. Therefore, we also measured hematocrit and both citrate synthase activity and myoglobin concentration in heart and gastrocnemius. Both selection (HR versus C) and activity (wheels versus no wheels) significantly affected morphological and biochemical traits. For example, with body mass as a covariate, mice from HR lines had significantly higher hematocrit and larger ventricles, with more myoglobin. Wheel access lengthened the small intestine, increased relative ventricle and kidney size, and increased skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity and myoglobin concentration. As compared with C lines, HR mice had greater training effects for ventricle mass, hematocrit, large intestine length and gastrocnemius citrate synthase activity. For ventricle and gastrocnemius citrate synthase activity, the greater training was quantitatively explainable as a result of greater wheel running (i.e. 'more pain, more gain'). For hematocrit and large intestine length, differences were not related to amount of wheel running and instead indicate inherently greater adaptive plasticity in HR lines.

  6. The Influence of Damping Changes on Vertical Dynamic Loads of Wheel - Experimental Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślaski, Grzegorz; Pikosz, Hubert

    2011-06-01

    In this paper the results of tests of vertical dynamic wheel loads due to changes in suspension damping level are presented. The changes in damping level were performed using semi-active shock absorbers with by-pass valve. The article presents suspension goals, the definition of dynamic loads of vehicle wheel, testing methods with the information on the used apparatus and sensors. In the end the results are presented, interpreted and compared with other researchers' results.

  7. Influence of polygonal wear of railway wheels on the wheel set axle stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xingwen; Chi, Maoru; Wu, Pingbo

    2015-11-01

    The coupled vehicle/track dynamic model with the flexible wheel set was developed to investigate the effects of polygonal wear on the dynamic stresses of the wheel set axle. In the model, the railway vehicle was modelled by the rigid multibody dynamics. The wheel set was established by the finite element method to analyse the high-frequency oscillation and dynamic stress of wheel set axle induced by the polygonal wear based on the modal stress recovery method. The slab track model was taken into account in which the rail was described by the Timoshenko beam and the three-dimensional solid finite element was employed to establish the concrete slab. Furthermore, the modal superposition method was adopted to calculate the dynamic response of the track. The wheel/rail normal forces and the tangent forces were, respectively, determined by the Hertz nonlinear contact theory and the Shen-Hedrick-Elkins model. Using the coupled vehicle/track dynamic model, the dynamic stresses of wheel set axle with consideration of the ideal polygonal wear and measured polygonal wear were investigated. The results show that the amplitude of wheel/rail normal forces and the dynamic stress of wheel set axle increase as the vehicle speeds rise. Moreover, the impact loads induced by the polygonal wear could excite the resonance of wheel set axle. In the resonance region, the amplitude of the dynamic stress for the wheel set axle would increase considerably comparing with the normal conditions.

  8. The response of a high-speed train wheel to a harmonic wheel-rail force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Xiaozhen; Liu, Yuxia; Zhou, Xin

    2016-09-01

    The maximum speed of China's high-speed trains currently is 300km/h and expected to increase to 350-400km/h. As a wheel travels along the rail at such a high speed, it is subject to a force rotating at the same speed along its periphery. This fast moving force contains not only the axle load component, but also many components of high frequencies generated from wheel-rail interactions. Rotation of the wheel also introduces centrifugal and gyroscopic effects. How the wheel responds is fundamental to many issues, including wheel-rail contact, traction, wear and noise. In this paper, by making use of its axial symmetry, a special finite element scheme is developed for responses of a train wheel subject to a vertical and harmonic wheel-rail force. This FE scheme only requires a 2D mesh over a cross-section containing the wheel axis but includes all the effects induced by wheel rotation. Nodal displacements, as a periodic function of the cross-section angle 6, can be decomposed, using Fourier series, into a number of components at different circumferential orders. The derived FE equation is solved for each circumferential order. The sum of responses at all circumferential orders gives the actual response of the wheel.

  9. Chronic Ethanol Intake Alters Circadian Phase Shifting and Free-Running Period in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seggio, Joseph A.; Fixaris, Michael C.; Reed, Jeffrey D.; Logan, Ryan W.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake is associated with widespread disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both human alcoholics and in experimental animals. Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic and acute ethanol treatments alter fundamental properties of the circadian pacemaker—including free-running period and responsiveness to photic and nonphotic phase-shifting stimuli—in rats and hamsters. In the present work, the authors extend these observations to the C57BL/6J mouse, an inbred strain characterized by very high levels of voluntary ethanol intake and by reliable and stable free-running circadian activity rhythms. Mice were housed individually in running-wheel cages under conditions of either voluntary or forced ethanol intake, whereas controls were maintained on plain water. Forced ethanol intake significantly attenuated photic phase delays (but not phase advances) and shortened free-running period in constant darkness, but voluntary ethanol intake failed to affect either of these parameters. Thus, high levels of chronic ethanol intake, beyond those normally achieved under voluntary drinking conditions, are required to alter fundamental circadian pacemaker properties in C57BL/6J mice. These observations may be related to the relative ethanol insensitivity displayed by this strain in several other phenotypic domains, including ethanol-induced sedation, ataxia, and withdrawal. Additional experiments will investigate chronobiological sensitivity to ethanol in a range of inbred strains showing diverse ethanol-related phenotypes. PMID:19625732

  10. Muon Physics at Run-I and its upgrade plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benekos, Nektarios Chr.

    2015-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its multi-purpose Detector, ATLAS, has been operated successfully at record centre-of-mass energies of 7 and TeV. After this successful LHC Run-1, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb-1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb-1 by around 2030. To cope with the corresponding rate increase, the ATLAS detector needs to be upgraded. The upgrade will proceed in two steps: Phase I in the LHC shutdown 2018/19 and Phase II in 2023-25. The largest of the ATLAS Phase-1 upgrades concerns the replacement of the first muon station of the highrapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel. This configuration copes with the highest rates expected in Phase II and considerably enhances the performance of the forward muon system by adding triggering functionality to the first muon station. Prospects for the ongoing and future data taking are presented. This article presents the main muon physics results from LHC Run-1 based on a total luminosity of 30 fb^-1. Prospects for the ongoing and future data taking are also presented. We will conclude with an update of the status of the project and the steps towards a complete operational system, ready to be installed in ATLAS in 2018/19.

  11. A Shape-Persistent Polyphenylene Spoked Wheel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Narita, Akimitsu; Teyssandier, Joan; Wagner, Manfred; De Feyter, Steven; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2016-12-07

    A shape-persistent polyphenylene with a "spoked wheel" structure was synthesized as a subunit of an unprecedented two-dimensional polyphenylene that we name graphenylene. The synthesis was carried out through a sixfold intramolecular Yamamoto coupling of a dodecabromo-substituted dendritic polyphenylene precursor, which had a central hexaphenylbenzene unit as a template. Characterizations by NMR spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry provided an unambiguous structural proof for the wheel-like molecule with a molar mass of 3815.4 g/mol. Remarkably, scanning tunneling microscopy visualization clearly revealed the defined spoked wheel structure of the molecule with six internal pores.

  12. Medicine Wheels of the Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, David

    Medicine Wheels are unexplained aboriginal boulder configurations found primarily on hilltops and river valley vistas across the northwest Great Plains of North America. Their varied, complex designs have inspired diverse hypotheses concerning their meaning and purpose, including astronomical ones. While initial "observatory" speculations were unfounded, and quests to "decode" these structures remain unfulfilled and possibly misguided, the Medicine Wheels nevertheless represent a uniquely worthwhile case study in archaeoastronomical theory and method. In addition, emerging technologies for data acquisition and analysis pertinent to Medicine Wheels offer prospectively important new sight lines for the future of archaeoastronomy.

  13. Using Single Free Sorting and Multivariate Exploratory Methods to Design a New Coffee Taster's Flavor Wheel

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Emma; Velez, Martin; Guinard, Jean‐Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The original Coffee Taster's Flavor Wheel was developed by the Specialty Coffee Assn. of America over 20 y ago, and needed an innovative revision. This study used a novel application of traditional sensory and statistical methods in order to reorganize the new coffee Sensory Lexicon developed by World Coffee Research and Kansas State Univ. into scientifically valid clusters and levels to prepare a new, updated flavor wheel. Seventy‐two experts participated in a modified online rapid free sorting activity (no tasting) to sort flavor attributes of the lexicon. The data from all participants were compiled and agglomeration hierarchical clustering was used to determine the clusters and levels of the flavor attributes, while multidimensional scaling was used to determine the positioning of the clusters around the Coffee Taster's Flavor Wheel. This resulted in a new flavor wheel for the coffee industry. PMID:27861864

  14. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  19. Head injury from a bungee run.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj; Convery, Fiona; Watt, Michael; Fulton, Ailsa; McKinstry, Steven; Flannery, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    An adaptation of bungee jumping, 'bungee running', involves participants attempting to run as far as they can whilst connected to an elastic rope which is anchored to a fixed point. Usually considered a safe recreational activity, we report a potentially life-threatening head injury following a bungee running accident.

  20. Maximum Torque and Momentum Envelopes for Reaction Wheel Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. G.; Markley, F. Landis

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft reaction wheel maneuvers are limited by the maximum torque and/or angular momentum which the wheels can provide. For an n-wheel configuration, the torque or momentum envelope can be obtained by projecting the n-dimensional hypercube, representing the domain boundary of individual wheel torques or momenta, into three dimensional space via the 3xn matrix of wheel axes. In this paper, the properties of the projected hypercube are discussed, and algorithms are proposed for determining this maximal torque or momentum envelope for general wheel configurations. Practical implementation strategies for specific wheel configurations are also considered.

  1. Dynamics and wheel's slip ratio of a wheel-legged robot in wheeled motion considering the change of height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xilun; Li, Kejia; Xu, Kun

    2012-09-01

    The existing research on dynamics and slip ratio of wheeled mobile robot (WMR) are derived without considering the effect of height, and the existing models can not be used to analyze the dynamics performance of the robot with variable height while moving such as NOROS-II. The existing method of dynamics modeling is improved by adding the constraint equation between perpendicular displacement of body and horizontal displacement of wheel into the constraint conditions. The dynamic model of NOROS-II in wheel motion is built by the Lagrange method under nonholonomic constraints. The inverse dynamics is calculated in three different paths based on this model, and the results demonstrate that torques of hip pitching joints are inversely proportional to the height of robot. The relative error of calculated torques is less than 2% compared with that of ADAMS simulation, by which the validity of dynamic model is verified. Moreover, the relative horizontal motion between fore/hind wheels and body is produced when the height is changed, and thus the accurate slip ratio can not be obtained by the traditional equation. The improved slip ratio equations with the parameter of the vertical velocity of body are introduced for fore wheels and hind wheels respectively. Numerical simulations of slip ratios are conducted to reveal the effect of varied height on slip ratios of different wheels. The result shows that the slip ratios of fore/hind wheels become larger/smaller respectively as the height increases, and as the height is reduced, the reverse applies. The proposed research of dynamic model and slip ratio based on the robot height provides the effective method to analyze the dynamics of WMRs with varying height.

  2. Wheels for the Future: Should the U.S. Army Adopt an Armored Wheeled System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-05

    firepower, maneuver, and protection. These three measurements of combat power are more defined in six inherent capabilities of armored wheeled systems...AD-A234 372 Wheuls for the Future: Should the U.S. Army Adopt ar, Armored Wheeled System? A MonograpL by Major Glenn Davis Infantry School of...TITLE (nudScutClassification) Wheels For the ýFuture-- Should the US Army Adopt an Armored Wncc led Sybtem?, 2, PERSONAL AUTHCOI S ’ATIA Glenn W, Davis

  3. [Fracture of the diaphyseal radius during Cyr wheel practice - an uncommon injury of wheel gymnastics].

    PubMed

    Kauther, M D; Rummel, S; Hussmann, B; Lendemans, S; Nast-Kolb, D; Wedemeyer, C

    2011-12-01

    The cyr wheel is a modified gymnastic wheel with only one ring that can lead to extreme forces on the gymnast. We report on a distal radius shaft fracture (AO 22 A 2.1) and a fracture of the styloid process of the ulna that occurred after holding on to a slipping Cyr wheel and exposition to high pressure on the lower arm. The fracture was fixed by screws and a plate.

  4. Steerability Analysis of Multiaxle Wheeled Vehicles. Report 1. Development of a Soil-Wheel Interaction Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    configuration of the wheel, and the mechanical properties of the soil (both shearing response and compressibility characteristics). The system of equations ...and the development of empirical equations relating the various parameters of the A problem (Turnage 1972). Unfortunately, these equations are not...on the kinematics -’ of the wheel is neglected. Even in the case of the rigid wheel, there is no general equation that can predict accurately the

  5. Progress toward a performance based specification for diamond grinding wheels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Piscotty, M.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1996-11-12

    This work sought to improve the communication between users and makers of fine diamond grinding wheels. A promising avenue for this is to formulate a voluntary product standard that comprises performance indicators that bridge the gap between specific user requirements and the details of wheel formulations. We propose a set of performance specifiers of figures-of-merit, that might be assessed by straightforward and traceable testing methods, but do not compromise proprietary information of the wheel user of wheel maker. One such performance indicator might be wheel hardness. In addition we consider technologies that might be required to realize the benefits of optimized grinding wheels. A non-contact wheel-to- workpiece proximity sensor may provide a means of monitoring wheel wear and thus wheel position, for wheels that exhibit high wear rates in exchange for improved surface finish.

  6. Development of a diagnostic tool: the wastewater collection network odour wheel.

    PubMed

    Decottignies, V; Huyard, A; Kelly, R F; Barillon, B

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of nuisance odour problems and the application of an effective odour management programme for the associated industrial activity may be achieved using a representative odour wheel and Odour Profile Analysis methodology. The odour wheel is a very useful tool for conducting odour quality control monitoring and developing a constructive dialogue regarding nuisance odours with the public. Previously, odours from wastewater treatment plant activities have been identified and described with a dedicated odour wheel. The oxidation state of the organic chemicals responsible for a given odour depends on multiple parameters specific to the individual wastewater collection networks (residence time of wastewater, topographic disposition and network slope, aeration and on line chemical treatment processes). This is especially important for odorous nitrogen, sulfur and volatile fatty acids. Trained sensory odour panels combined with chemical analyses have been used to study wastewater collection network odours and to adapt the wastewater odour wheel accordingly. The wastewater collection network odour wheel has been produced using the results of five sampling campaigns; eight out of the 11 odour families constituting the wastewater odour wheel have been identified and consequently validated for sewer networks. Different groups of odours have been perceived according to the presence or absence of wastewater effluents at the various sampling points.

  7. The Effects of Environmental Conditions on Activity, Feeding, and Body Weight in Male and Female Adolescent Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-31

    exercise because these terms are often misused interchangeably. Physical activity differs from exercise in that exercise is planned, structured, and...distinction between physical activity and exercise is relevant to the current investigations for two reasons. First, this project monitored... physical activity as opposed to a forced exercise program (e.g., swimming or running wheel) in rats. Physical activity was used to examine what

  8. STEM after School: How to Design and Run Great Programs and Activities. A Guidebook for Program Leaders, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This guidebook was prepared by TASC (The After-School Corporation) and their Frontiers in Urban Science Education (FUSE) programs. FUSE is TASC's initiative to help more out-of-school-time programs and expanded learning time schools offer kids engaging, exciting and inspiring activities that promote science inquiry. The guidebook offers a a…

  9. An Animal Model of Active (Act) Versus Sedentary (Sed) Lifestyle and Susceptibility to Air Pollution: Response to Ozone (O3) in Female Sprague-Dawley Rats Allowed to Train Chronically On Running Wheels

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological data suggest that a sedentary lifestyle may contribute to increased suseptibility to environmental pollutants. Furthermore, the association between a sedentary pattern and development of obesity may exacerbate susceptibility. To study the effects of ACT vs. SED l...

  10. Analysis & Test of Reaction Wheel Induced Micro-Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runte, Torben; Brito, Miguel; Bourne, Duncan M.; Mariani, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Microvibrations are a major disturbance source of the pointing stability for high-precision Spacecraft. These undesirable mechanical vibrations are generated by active mechanisms and transferred via the Spacecraft structure.Throughout OHB System's design of Spacecraft platforms for Spacecraft missions with high precision pointing performance, Reaction Wheels (RWs) have been identified as the most dominant source of microvibrations in Spacecraft platforms. The RW perturbations consist of numerous harmonic components whose frequencies and amplitudes depend on the wheel speed and the ball bearing characteristics of each unit. This paper focuses on the analysis methodology used to estimate the disturbance caused by these units, its transmission via the Spacecraft structure and its verification by measurement.

  11. Surface modification with multiphilic ligands at detectable well defined active positions of nano-object of giant wheel shaped molybdenum blue showing third-order nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Yuhao; Zhou, Yunshan

    2010-04-01

    The reaction of an aqueous solution of sodium molybdate with L-tyrosine in the presence of reducing agent results in the formation of a new compound of the formula of Na 8Co 3[Mo VI126 Mo V28O 462H 14(H 2O) 46(HOC 6H 4CH 2CH( NH3+)COO -) 12]·ca. 200H 2O. The compound contains nanosized ring-shaped clusters with tyrosine ligands possessing different types of functional groups (one -CO 2, one -NH3+ and one -ArOH) coordinated through the carboxylate groups at the active sites of the inner cavity. Importantly, the result demonstrates that not only active sites/areas of the cluster surface under a specified condition can be directly monitored and detected but also novel type surfaces within the cavity of a nano-structured ring-shaped cluster can be generated simultaneously. The nonlinear optical properties of the new cluster are studied using the well-known Z-scan technique at a wavelength of 532 nm with laser pulse duration of 18 ps. The results show that the new cluster exhibits interesting self-focusing nonlinear optical response with the real and imaginary parts of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ(3) being 1.069 × 10 -13(esu) and 2.529 × 10 -15(esu), respectively, which may find application in material science.

  12. Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining of Metal Bond Diamond Wheels- Part II: Wheel Wear Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    The use of stereo scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to investigate the wear mechanism of the wire EDM true metal bond diamond wheel for ceramic grinding is presented. On the grinding wheel, a wedge-shape removal part was machined to enable the examination and measurement of the worn wheel surfaces using the stereo SEM. The stereo SEM was calibrated by comparing results of depth profile of a wear groove with the profilometer measurements. On the surface of the grinding wheel after wire EDM truing and before grinding, the diamond protruding heights were measured in the level of 35 {micro}m, comparing to the 54 {micro}m average size of the diamond in the grinding wheel. The gap between the EDM wire and rotating grinding wheel is estimated to be about 35 to 40 {micro}m. This observation indicates that, during the wire EDM, electrical sparks occur between the metal bond and EDM wire, which leaves the diamond protruding in the gap between the wire and wheel. The protruding diamond is immediately fractured at the start of the grinding process, even under a light grinding condition. After heavy grinding, the grinding wheel surface and the diamond protrusion heights are also investigated using the stereo SEM. The height of diamond protrusion was estimated in the 5 to 15 {micro}m range. This study has demonstrated the use of stereo SEM as a metrology tool to study the grinding wheel surface.

  13. The influence of wheel/rail contact conditions on the microstructure and hardness of railway wheels.

    PubMed

    Molyneux-Berry, Paul; Davis, Claire; Bevan, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility of railway wheels to wear and rolling contact fatigue damage is influenced by the properties of the wheel material. These are influenced by the steel composition, wheel manufacturing process, and thermal and mechanical loading during operation. The in-service properties therefore vary with depth below the surface and with position across the wheel tread. This paper discusses the stress history at the wheel/rail contact (derived from dynamic simulations) and observed variations in hardness and microstructure. It is shown that the hardness of an "in-service" wheel rim varies significantly, with three distinct effects. The underlying hardness trend with depth can be related to microstructural changes during manufacturing (proeutectoid ferrite fraction and pearlite lamellae spacing). The near-surface layer exhibits plastic flow and microstructural shear, especially in regions which experience high tangential forces when curving, with consequentially higher hardness values. Between 1 mm and 7 mm depth, the wheel/rail contacts cause stresses exceeding the material yield stress, leading to work hardening, without a macroscopic change in microstructure. These changes in material properties through the depth of the wheel rim would tend to increase the likelihood of crack initiation on wheels toward the end of their life. This correlates with observations from several train fleets.

  14. UT Biomedical Informatics Lab (BMIL) probability wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Cheng; Lee, Sara; Wang, Allen; Cantor, Scott B.; Sun, Clement; Fan, Kaili; Reece, Gregory P.; Kim, Min Soon; Markey, Mia K.

    A probability wheel app is intended to facilitate communication between two people, an "investigator" and a "participant", about uncertainties inherent in decision-making. Traditionally, a probability wheel is a mechanical prop with two colored slices. A user adjusts the sizes of the slices to indicate the relative value of the probabilities assigned to them. A probability wheel can improve the adjustment process and attenuate the effect of anchoring bias when it is used to estimate or communicate probabilities of outcomes. The goal of this work was to develop a mobile application of the probability wheel that is portable, easily available, and more versatile. We provide a motivating example from medical decision-making, but the tool is widely applicable for researchers in the decision sciences.

  15. 21 CFR 880.6910 - Wheeled stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... platform mounted on a wheeled frame that is designed to transport patients in a horizontal position. The device may have side rails, supports for fluid infusion equipment, and patient securement straps....

  16. Mechanics of wheel-soil interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houland, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    An approximate theory for wheel-soil interaction is presented which forms the basis for a practical solution to the problem. It is shown that two fundamental observations render the problem determinate: (1) The line of action of the resultant of radial stresses acting at the wheel soil interface approximately bisects the wheel-soil contact angle for all values of slip. (2) A shear stress surface can be hypothesized. The influence of soil inertia forces is also evaluated. A concept of equivalent cohesion is introduced which allows a convenient experimental comparison for both cohesive and frictional soils. This theory compares favorably with previous analyses and experimental data, and shows that soil inertia forces influencing the motion of a rolling wheel can be significant.

  17. UT Biomedical Informatics Lab (BMIL) Probability Wheel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Cheng; Lee, Sara; Wang, Allen; Cantor, Scott B; Sun, Clement; Fan, Kaili; Reece, Gregory P; Kim, Min Soon; Markey, Mia K

    2016-01-01

    A probability wheel app is intended to facilitate communication between two people, an "investigator" and a "participant," about uncertainties inherent in decision-making. Traditionally, a probability wheel is a mechanical prop with two colored slices. A user adjusts the sizes of the slices to indicate the relative value of the probabilities assigned to them. A probability wheel can improve the adjustment process and attenuate the effect of anchoring bias when it is used to estimate or communicate probabilities of outcomes. The goal of this work was to develop a mobile application of the probability wheel that is portable, easily available, and more versatile. We provide a motivating example from medical decision-making, but the tool is widely applicable for researchers in the decision sciences.

  18. Constant four wheel drive vehicle transaxle

    SciTech Connect

    Weismann, P.H.; Cameron, D.

    1986-04-15

    A dual differential four-wheel drive assembly is described adapted for a two-wheel drive front transaxle vehicle having an internal combustion engine with a transverse oriented crankshaft for driving the vehicle with front and rear pairs of road wheels, a transmission gear unit for the transaxle including transverse input and output shafts, and right and left laterally extending front axle drive shafts, each drive shaft having front wheel mounting means on its outboard end. The dual differential assembly consists of: housing means having a laterally extending passage therethrough aligned on a transverse axis, the housing means having first and second differential casings for associated first and second bevel gear differentials, the casings supported in laterally spaced alignment for rotation about the transverse axis, each first and second differential casing enclosing inboard and outboard side gears in meshing relation with planetary pinion gears, each casing having opposed inboard and outboard axial extensions thereon.

  19. Magnetic Levitation Experiments with the Electrodynamic Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordrey, Vincent; Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Gaul, Nathan; Majewski, Walerian

    Our experiments explored inductive magnetic levitation using circular Halbach arrays with the strong variable magnetic field on the outer rim of the ring. Such a system is usually called an Electrodynamic Wheel (EDW). Rotating this wheel around a horizontal axis above a flat conducting surface should induce eddy currents in said surface through the variable magnetic flux. The eddy currents produce, in turn, their own magnetic fields which interact with the magnets of the EDW. We constructed two Electrodynamic Wheels with different diameters and demonstrated that the magnetic interactions produce both lift and drag forces on the EDW which can be used for levitation and propulsion of the EDW. The focus of our experiments is the direct measurement of lift and drag forces to compare with theoretical models using wheels of two different radii. Supported by Grants from the Virginia Academy of Science, Society of Physics Students, Virginia Community College System, and the NVCC Educational Foundation.

  20. UT Biomedical Informatics Lab (BMIL) Probability Wheel

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sara; Wang, Allen; Cantor, Scott B.; Sun, Clement; Fan, Kaili; Reece, Gregory P.; Kim, Min Soon; Markey, Mia K.

    2016-01-01

    A probability wheel app is intended to facilitate communication between two people, an “investigator” and a “participant,” about uncertainties inherent in decision-making. Traditionally, a probability wheel is a mechanical prop with two colored slices. A user adjusts the sizes of the slices to indicate the relative value of the probabilities assigned to them. A probability wheel can improve the adjustment process and attenuate the effect of anchoring bias when it is used to estimate or communicate probabilities of outcomes. The goal of this work was to develop a mobile application of the probability wheel that is portable, easily available, and more versatile. We provide a motivating example from medical decision-making, but the tool is widely applicable for researchers in the decision sciences. PMID:28105462

  1. An Ultrasonic Wheel-Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, B. W.; Brotherhood, C. J.; Freemantle, R. J.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes the development and modeling of an ultrasonic array wheel probe scanning system. The system operates at 10 MHz using a 64 element array transducer which is 50 mm in length and located in a fluid filled wheel. The wheel is coupled to the test structure dry, or with a small amount of liquid couplant. When the wheel is rolled over the surface of the test structure a defect map (C-Scan) is generated in real-time. The tyre is made from a soft, durable polymer which has very little acoustic loss. Two application studies are presented; the inspection of sealant layers in an aluminum aircraft wing structure and the detection of embedded defects in a thick section carbon composite sample.

  2. On Running and Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Denzel; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Frederic Leer's article "Running as an Adjunct to Psychotherapy" (January 1980 issue of this journal) is criticized by three authors. They focus on the psychological and social effects of running and its usefulness as a treatment for depressed adults. (LAB)

  3. Analytical study of shimmy of airplane wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourcier De Carbon, Christian

    1952-01-01

    The problem of shimmy of a castering wheel, such as the nose wheel of a tricycle gear airplane, is treated analytically. The flexibility of the tire is considered to be the primary cause of shimmy. The rather simple theory developed agrees rather well with previous experimental results. The author suggests that shimmy may be eliminated through a suitable choice of landing gear dimensions in lieu of a damper.

  4. A Nontoxic Barlow's Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daffron, John A.; Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Barlow's wheel has been a favorite demonstration since its invention by Peter Barlow (1776-1862) in 1822. In the form shown in Fig. 1, it represents the first electric motor. The interaction between the electric current passing from the axle of the wheel to the rim and the magnetic field produced by the U-magnet produces a torque that turns…

  5. Fatigue associated with prolonged graded running.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlene; Vernillo, Gianluca; Samozino, Pierre; Horvais, Nicolas; Edwards, W Brent; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2016-10-01

    Scientific experiments on running mainly consider level running. However, the magnitude and etiology of fatigue depend on the exercise under consideration, particularly the predominant type of contraction, which differs between level, uphill, and downhill running. The purpose of this review is to comprehensively summarize the neurophysiological and biomechanical changes due to fatigue in graded running. When comparing prolonged hilly running (i.e., a combination of uphill and downhill running) to level running, it is found that (1) the general shape of the neuromuscular fatigue-exercise duration curve as well as the etiology of fatigue in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles are similar and (2) the biomechanical consequences are also relatively comparable, suggesting that duration rather than elevation changes affects neuromuscular function and running patterns. However, 'pure' uphill or downhill running has several fatigue-related intrinsic features compared with the level running. Downhill running induces severe lower limb tissue damage, indirectly evidenced by massive increases in plasma creatine kinase/myoglobin concentration or inflammatory markers. In addition, low-frequency fatigue (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling failure) is systematically observed after downhill running, although it has also been found in high-intensity uphill running for different reasons. Indeed, low-frequency fatigue in downhill running is attributed to mechanical stress at the interface sarcoplasmic reticulum/T-tubule, while the inorganic phosphate accumulation probably plays a central role in intense uphill running. Other fatigue-related specificities of graded running such as strategies to minimize the deleterious effects of downhill running on muscle function, the difference of energy cost versus heat storage or muscle activity changes in downhill, level, and uphill running are also discussed.

  6. Pigment-dispersing factor affects nocturnal activity rhythms, photic entrainment, and the free-running period of the circadian clock in the cricket gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Hassaneen, Ehab; El-Din Sallam, Alaa; Abo-Ghalia, Ahmad; Moriyama, Yoshiyuki; Karpova, Svetlana G; Abdelsalam, Salah; Matsushima, Ayami; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2011-02-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is a neuropeptide widely distributed in insect brains and plays important roles in the circadian system. In this study, we used RNA interference to study the role of the pigment-dispersing factor (pdf) gene in regulating circadian locomotor rhythms in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. Injections of pdf double-stranded RNA (dspdf) effectively knocked down the pdf mRNA and PDF peptide levels. The treated crickets maintained the rhythm both under light-dark cycles (LD) and constant darkness (DD). However, they showed rhythms with reduced nocturnal activity with prominent peaks at lights-on and lights-off. Entrainability of dspdf-injected crickets was higher than control crickets as they required fewer cycles to resynchronize to the LD cycles shifted by 6 h. The free-running periods of the dspdf-injected crickets were shorter than those of control crickets in DD. These results suggest that PDF is not essential for the rhythm generation but involved in control of the nocturnality, photic entrainment, and fine tuning of the free-running period of the circadian clock.

  7. Modeling muscle activity to study the effects of footwear on the impact forces and vibrations of the human body during running.

    PubMed

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Nikooyan, Ali Asadi

    2010-01-19

    A previously developed mass-spring-damper model of the human body is improved in this paper, taking muscle activity into account. In the improved model, a nonlinear controller mimics the functionality of the Central Nervous System (CNS) in tuning the mechanical properties of the soft-tissue package. Two physiological hypotheses are used to determine the control strategies that are used by the controller. The first hypothesis (constant-force hypothesis) postulates that the CNS uses muscle tuning to keep the ground reaction force (GRF) constant regardless of shoe hardness, wherever possible. It is shown that the constant-force hypothesis can explain the existing contradiction about the effects of shoe hardness on the GRF during running. This contradiction is emerged from the different trends observed in the experiments on actual runners, and experiments in which the leg was fixed and exposed to impact. While the GRF is found to be dependent on shoe hardness in the former set of experiments, no such dependency was observed in the latter. According to the second hypothesis, the CNS keeps the level of the vibrations of the human body constant using muscle tuning. The results of the study show that this second control strategy improves the model such that it can correctly simulate the effects of shoe hardness on the vibrations of the human body during running.

  8. Wheel drives for large telescopes: save the cost and keep the performance over hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Marvin F.

    2014-07-01

    The use of steel wheels on steel tracks has been around since steel was invented, and before that it was iron wheels on iron tracks. Not to be made obsolete by the passage of time, this approach for moving large objects is still valid, even optimal, but the detailed techniques for achieving high performance and long life have been much improved. The use of wheel-and-track designs has been very popular in radio astronomy for the largest of the large radio telescopes (RT), including such notables as the 305m Arecibo RT, the 100m telescopes at Effelsberg, Germany (at 3600 tonnes) and the Robert C. Byrd, Greenbank Telescope (GBT, 7600 tonnes) at Greenbank, West Virginia. Of course, the 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank is the grandfather of all large aperture radio telescopes that use wheel drives. Smaller sizes include NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescopes at 25m and others. Wheel drives have also been used on large radars of significance such as the 410 tonne Ground Based Radar-Prototype (GBR-P) and the 150 foot (45.7m) Altair Radar, and the 2130 tonne Sea Based X-Band Radar (SBX). There are also many examples of wheel driven communications antennas of 18 meters and larger. All of these instruments have one thing in common: they all use steel wheels that run in a circle on one or more flat, level, steel tracks. This paper covers issues related to designing for wheel driven systems. The intent is for managing motion to sub arc-second levels, and for this purpose it is primary for the designer to manage measurement and alignment errors, and to establish repeatability through dimensional control, structural and drive stiffness management, adjustability and error management. In a practical sense, there are very few, if any, fabricators that can machine structural and drive components to sufficiently small decimal places to matter. In fact, coming within 2-3 orders of magnitude of the precision needed is about the best that can be expected. Further, it is

  9. Biomechanics of Distance Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Peter R., Ed.

    Contributions from researchers in the field of running mechanics are included in the 13 chapters of this book. The following topics are covered: (1) "The Mechanics of Distance Running: A Historical Perspective" (Peter Cavanagh); (2) "Stride Length in Distance Running: Velocity, Body Dimensions, and Added Mass Effects" (Peter Cavanagh, Rodger…

  10. Packaging Waste and Hitting Home Runs: How Education and Lightning Strike Detection Technology Supports Company and Community Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Deecke, T.A.; Hyde, J.V.; Hylko, J.M.

    2006-07-01

    The weather is the most significant and unmanageable variable when performing environmental remediation activities. This variable can contribute to the failure of a project in two ways: 1) severe injury to an employee or employees following a cloud-to-ground lightning strike without prior visual or audible warnings; and 2) excessive 'down time' associated with mobilization and demobilization activities after a false alarm (e.g., lightning was seen in the distance but was actually moving away from the site). Therefore, in order for a project to be successful from both safety and financial viewpoints, the uncertainties associated with inclement weather, specifically lightning, need to be understood to eliminate the element of surprise. This paper discusses educational information related to the history and research of lightning, how lightning storms develop, types of lightning, the mechanisms of lightning injuries and fatalities, and follow-up medical treatment. Fortunately, lightning storm monitoring does not have to be either costly or elaborate. WESKEM, LLC selected the Boltek StormTracker Lightning Detection System with the Aninoquisi Lightning 2000{sup TM} software. This fixed system, used in combination with online weather web pages, monitors and alarms WESKEM, LLC field personnel in the event of an approaching lightning storm. This application was expanded to justify the purchase of the hand-held Sky Scan Lightning/Storm Detector Model P5 used by the Heath Youth Athletic Association (HYAA) which is a non-profit, charitable organization offering sports programs for the youth and young adults in the local community. Fortunately, a lightning injury or fatality has never occurred on a WESKEM Paducah project or an HYAA-sponsored event. Using these fixed and hand-held systems will continue to prevent such injuries from occurring in the foreseeable future. (authors)

  11. Prior experience does not alter modulation of cutaneous reflexes during manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling.

    PubMed

    MacGillivray, Megan K; Klimstra, Marc; Sawatzky, Bonita; Zehr, E Paul; Lam, Tania

    2013-05-01

    Previous research has reported that training and experience influence H-reflex amplitude during rhythmic activity; however, little research has yet examined the influence of training on cutaneous reflexes. Manual wheelchair users (MWUs) depend on their arms for locomotion. We postulated that the daily dependence and high amount of use of the arms for mobility in MWUs would show differences in cutaneous reflex modulation during upper limb cyclic movements compared with able-bodied control subjects. We hypothesized that MWUs would demonstrate increased reflex response amplitudes for both manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling tasks. The superficial radial nerve was stimulated randomly at different points of the movement cycle of manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling in MWUs and able-bodied subjects naive to wheeling. Our results showed that there were no differences in amplitude modulation of early- or middle-latency cutaneous reflexes between the able-bodied group and the MWU group. However, there were several differences in amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes between tasks (manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling). Specifically, differences were observed in early-latency responses in the anterior and posterior deltoid muscles and biceps and triceps brachii as well as in middle-latency responses in the anterior and posterior deltoid. These data suggest that manual wheeling experience does not modify the pattern of cutaneous reflex amplitude modulation during manual wheeling. The differences in amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes between tasks may be a result of mechanical differences (i.e., hand contact) between tasks.

  12. Design of an optimised wheel profile for rail vehicles operating on two-track gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, J.; Herreros, J.; Vadillo, E. G.; Correa, N.

    2013-01-01

    This article sets out an optimum synthesis methodology for wheel profiles of railway vehicles in order to secure good dynamic behaviour with different track configurations. Specifically, the optimisation process has been applied to the case of rail wheelsets mounted on double-gauge bogies that move over two different gauges, which also have different types of rail: the Iberian gauge (1668 mm) and the International Union of Railways (UIC) gauge (1435 mm). Optimisation is performed using Genetic Algorithms and traditional optimisation methods in a complementary way. The objective function used is based on an ideal equivalent conicity curve which ensures good stability on straight sections and also proper negotiation of curves. To this end, the curve is constructed in such a way that it is constant with a low value for small lateral wheelset displacements (with regard to stability), and increases as the displacements increase (to facilitate negotiation of curved sections). Using this kind of ideal conicity curve also enables a wheel profile to be secured where the contact points have a larger distribution over the active contact areas, making wear more homogeneous and reducing stresses. The result is a wheel profile with a conicity that is closer to the target conicity for both gauges studied, producing better curve negotiation while maintaining good stability on straight sections of track. The article shows the resultant wheel profile, the contact curves it produces, and a number of dynamic analyses demonstrating better dynamic behaviour of the synthesised wheel on curved sections with respect to the original wheel.

  13. Demisable Reaction-Wheel Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell; Ahronovich, Eliezer; Davis, Milton C., III

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the concept of a demisable motor-drive-and-flywheel assembly [reaction-wheel assembly (RWA)] used in controlling the attitude of a spacecraft. Demisable as used here does not have its traditional legal meaning; instead, it signifies susceptible to melting, vaporizing, and/or otherwise disintegrating during re-entry of the spacecraft into the atmosphere of the Earth so as not to pose a hazard to anyone or anything on the ground. Prior RWAs include parts made of metals (e.g., iron, steel, and titanium) that melt at high temperatures and include structures of generally closed character that shield some parts (e.g., magnets) against re-entry heating. In a demisable RWA, the flywheel would be made of aluminum, which melts at a lower temperature. The flywheel web would not be a solid disk but would have a more open, nearly-spoke-like structure so that it would disintegrate more rapidly; hence, the flywheel rim would separate more rapidly so that parts shielded by the rim would be exposed sooner to re-entry heating. In addition, clearances between the flywheel and other components would be made greater, imparting a more open character and thus increasing the exposure of those components.

  14. Two Dimensional Viscoelastic Stress Analysis of a Prototypical JIMO Turbine Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Gabb, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    The designers of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) are investigating the potential of nuclear powered-electric propulsion technology to provide deep space propulsion. In one design scenario a closed-Brayton-cycle power converter is used to convert thermal energy from a nuclear reactor to electrical power for the spacecraft utilizing an inert gas as the working fluid to run a turboalternator as described in L.S. Mason, "A Power Conversion for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter," Journal of Propulsion and Power, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 902-910. A key component in the turboalternator is the radial flow turbine wheel which may be fabricated from a cast superalloy. This turbine wheel is envisioned to run continuously over the life of the mission, which is anticipated to be about ten years. This scenario places unusual material requirements on the turbine wheel. Unlike the case of terrestrial turbine engines, fatigue, associated with start-up and shut-down of the engine, foreign-object damage, and corrosion issues are insignificant and thus creep issues become dominate. The purpose of this paper is to present estimates for creep growth of a prototypical JIMO turbine wheel over a ten year life. Since an actual design and bill of materials does not exist, the results presented in this paper are based on preliminary concepts which are likely to evolve over time. For this reason, as well as computational efficiency, a simplified 2-D, in lieu of a 3-D, viscoelastic, finite element model of a prototypical turbine wheel will be utilized employing material properties for the cast superalloy MAR-M247. The creep data employed in this analysis are based on preliminary data being generated at NASA Glenn Research Center.

  15. Reduced sleep spindle activity in early-onset and elevated risk for depression Running head: Sleep Spindles and Adolescent MDD

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jorge; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective Sleep disturbances are common in major depressive disorder (MDD), although polysomnographic (PSG) abnormalities are more prevalent in adults than in children and adolescents with MDD. Sleep spindle activity (SPA) is associated with neuroplasticity mechanisms during brain maturation and is more abundant in childhood and adolescence than in adulthood, and as such, may be a more sensitive measure of sleep alteration than PSG in early-onset depression. This study investigated SPA changes related to early-onset MDD, comparing those already ill and those at high-risk for MDD to healthy non-depressed controls. Method The study included 63 participants (8-15 year-olds): 21 currently depressed, 21 at high-risk for MDD based on positive family history of MDD, and 21 healthy controls with no personal or family history of psychiatric illness. All participants maintained a regular sleep/wake schedule for 5 days, followed by 2 nights in the lab. SPA was analyzed in Stage 2 of non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep. Results SPA differed significantly between groups, particularly in the late part of the night (F2,62=7.3 p=0.001). Although, the difference was greatest between MDD and healthy controls, both the MDD (p=0.0004) and at high-risk groups (p=0.02) had significantly lower SPA compared to healthy controls. SPA deficit was more prominent in females than males (F5,62=5.19 p=0.005). Conclusions Low SPA characterizes youths with MDD and those at high-risk, particularly among girls, suggesting that early-onset depression and risk for the illness are associated with decreased neuroplasticity. PMID:20732629

  16. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems: A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Norman; Wang, Michael; Weber, Trudy; Darlington, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    An accurate assessment of future fuel/propulsion system options requires a complete vehicle fuel-cycle analysis, commonly called a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis. This WTW study analyzes energy use and emissions associated with fuel production (or well-to-tank [WTT]) activities and energy use and emissions associated with vehicle operation (or tank-to-wheels [TTW]) activities.

  17. The Running Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Henning, P. Troy

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pelvic stress fractures, osteitis pubis, and snapping hip syndrome account for a portion of the overuse injuries that can occur in the running athlete. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed searches were performed for each entity using the following keywords: snapping hip syndrome, coxa sultans, pelvic stress fracture, and osteitis pubis from 2008 to 2013. Topic reviews, case reports, case series, and randomized trials were included for review. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Collectively, 188 articles were identified. Of these, 58 were included in this review. Conclusion: Based on the available evidence, the majority of these overuse injuries can be managed non-operatively. Primary treatment should include removal from offending activity, normalizing regional muscle strength/length imbalances and nutritional deficiencies, and mitigating training errors through proper education of the athlete and training staff. Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy: C PMID:24587861

  18. Diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission --wheel wear mechanisms and the effects of process variables

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jianshe; Dornfeld, D.; Syoji, Katsuo

    1996-12-31

    The wear of diamond wheels has significant influence on the surface finish of ground ceramics and the resulting subsurface fracture damage. For optimization and control of the grinding process it is necessary to monitor the wear states of the grinding wheels. A project on diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission was started recently in the Laboratory of Manufacturing Automation at the University of California at Berkeley. The main aims of the project are: (a) to identify the possible wheel wear patterns at different combinations of bond materials, grits, and grinding conditions; (b) to develop suitable AE signal processing methods to extract the AE features to represent the wheel wear characteristics, and establish a strategy for using AE for in-process monitoring of diamond wheel wear in grinding of ceramics. This paper presents the results of part of the project. It mainly focuses on the diamond wheel wear mechanisms, the effects of process variables including basic wheel elements and grinding parameters, and the relationship with AErms and AE frequency content.

  19. 75 FR 56469 - Safety Zone; Ohio River, Wheeling, WV, Wheeling Heritage Port Sternwheel Foundation Fireworks...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ohio River, Wheeling, WV, Wheeling Heritage... Ohio River extending the full width of the river. The safety zone is needed to protect spectators and... Marker 90.5 on the Ohio River extending the full width of the river. The safety zone is needed to...

  20. Model Predictive Control considering Reachable Range of Wheels for Leg / Wheel Mobile Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Naito; Nonaka, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Kazuma

    2016-09-01

    Obstacle avoidance is one of the important tasks for mobile robots. In this paper, we study obstacle avoidance control for mobile robots equipped with four legs comprised of three DoF SCARA leg/wheel mechanism, which enables the robot to change its shape adapting to environments. Our previous method achieves obstacle avoidance by model predictive control (MPC) considering obstacle size and lateral wheel positions. However, this method does not ensure existence of joint angles which achieves reference wheel positions calculated by MPC. In this study, we propose a model predictive control considering reachable mobile ranges of wheels positions by combining multiple linear constraints, where each reachable mobile range is approximated as a convex trapezoid. Thus, we achieve to formulate a MPC as a quadratic problem with linear constraints for nonlinear problem of longitudinal and lateral wheel position control. By optimization of MPC, the reference wheel positions are calculated, while each joint angle is determined by inverse kinematics. Considering reachable mobile ranges explicitly, the optimal joint angles are calculated, which enables wheels to reach the reference wheel positions. We verify its advantages by comparing the proposed method with the previous method through numerical simulations.

  1. The Goal Wheel: Adapting Navajo Philosophy and the Medicine Wheel to Work with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Holly; Bruce, Mary Alice; Stellern, John

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a group counseling model that is based on the indigenous medicine wheel as well as Navajo philosophy by which to help troubled adolescents restore harmony and balance in their lives, through establishing goals and sequential steps to accomplish these goals. The authors call this model the Goal Wheel. A…

  2. Thermal fatigue performance of integrally cast automotive turbine wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, V. E.; Hofer, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    Fluidized bed thermal fatigue testing was conducted on 16 integrally cast automotive turbine wheels for 1000-10,000 (600 sec total) thermal cycles at 935/50 C. The 16 wheels consisted of 14 IN-792 + 1% Hf and 2 gatorized AF2-1DA wheels; 6 of the IN-792 + Hf wheels contained crack arrest pockets inside the blade root flange. Temperature transients during the thermal cycling were measured in three calibration tests using either 18 or 30 thermocouples per wheel. Thermal cracking based on crack length versus accumulated cycles was greatest for unpocketed wheels developing cracks in 8-13 cycles compared to 75-250 cycles for unpocketed wheels. However, pocketed wheels survived up to 10,000 cycles with crack lengths less than 20 mm, whereas two unpocketed wheels developed 45 mm long cracks in 1000-2000 cycles.

  3. Wire Electrical Discharge Truing of Metal Bond Diamond Grinding Wheels

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-24

    Cylindrical wire EDM profile truing of the metal bond diamond wheel for precision form grinding of ceramics is presented in this report. First a corrosion-resistant, precise spindle with the high-electrical current capability for wire EDM truing of grinding wheel was fabricated. An arc profile was adopted in order to determine form tolerances capabilities of this process. Results show the wire EDM process can generate {micro}m-scale precision form on the diamond wheel efficiently. The wheel, after truing, was used to grind silicon nitride. Grinding forces, surface finish of ground components, and wheel wear were measured. The EDM trued wheel showed a reduction in grinding force from that of the stick dressed wheel. Surface finishes between the two truing methods were similar. In the beginning of the grinding, significant wheel wear rate was identified. The subsequent wheel wear rate stabilized and became considerably lower.

  4. Project considerations and design of systems for wheeling cogenerated power

    SciTech Connect

    Tessmer, R.G. Jr.; Boyle, J.R.; Fish, J.H. III; Martin, W.A.

    1994-08-01

    Wheeling electric power, the transmission of electricity not owned by an electric utility over its transmission lines, is a term not generally recognized outside the electric utility industry. Investigation of the term`s origin is intriguing. For centuries, wheel has been used to describe an entire machine, not just individual wheels within a machine. Thus we have waterwheel, spinning wheel, potter`s wheel and, for an automobile, wheels. Wheel as a verb connotes transmission or modification of forces and motion in machinery. With the advent of an understanding of electricity, use of the word wheel was extended to be transmission of electric power as well as mechanical power. Today, use of the term wheeling electric power is restricted to utility transmission of power that it doesn`t own. Cogeneration refers to simultaneous production of electric and thermal power from an energy source. This is more efficient than separate production of electricity and thermal power and, in many instances, less expensive.

  5. Hippocampal Morphology in a Rat Model of Depression: The Effects of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sierakowiak, Adam; Mattsson, Anna; Gómez-Galán, Marta; Feminía, Teresa; Graae, Lisette; Aski, Sahar Nikkhou; Damberg, Peter; Lindskog, Mia; Brené, Stefan; Åberg, Elin

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating in vivo and ex vivo evidences show that humans suffering from depression have decreased hippocampal volume and altered spine density. Moreover, physical activity has an antidepressant effect in humans and in animal models, but to what extent physical activity can affect hippocampal volume and spine numbers in a model for depression is not known. In this study we analyzed whether physical activity affects hippocampal volume and spine density by analyzing a rodent genetic model of depression, Flinders Sensitive Line Rats (FSL), with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and ex vivo Golgi staining. We found that physical activity in the form of voluntary wheel running during 5 weeks increased hippocampal volume. Moreover, runners also had larger numbers of thin spines in the dentate gyrus. Our findings support that voluntary wheel running, which is antidepressive in FSL rats, is associated with increased hippocampal volume and spine numbers. PMID:25674191

  6. Paper recycling framework, the "Wheel of Fiber".

    PubMed

    Ervasti, Ilpo; Miranda, Ruben; Kauranen, Ilkka

    2016-06-01

    At present, there is no reliable method in use that unequivocally describes paper industry material flows and makes it possible to compare geographical regions with each other. A functioning paper industry Material Flow Account (MFA) that uses uniform terminology and standard definitions for terms and structures is necessary. Many of the presently used general level MFAs, which are called frameworks in this article, stress the importance of input and output flows but do not provide a uniform picture of material recycling. Paper industry is an example of a field in which recycling plays a key role. Additionally, terms related to paper industry recycling, such as collection rate, recycling rate, and utilization rate, are not defined uniformly across regions and time. Thus, reliably comparing material recycling activity between geographical regions or calculating any regional summaries is difficult or even impossible. The objective of this study is to give a partial solution to the problem of not having a reliable method in use that unequivocally describes paper industry material flows. This is done by introducing a new material flow framework for paper industry in which the flow and stage structure supports the use of uniform definitions for terms related to paper recycling. This new framework is termed the Detailed Wheel of Fiber.

  7. Biomechanics and analysis of running gait.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Sheila A; Bhat, Krishna P

    2005-08-01

    Physical activity, including running, is important to general health by way of prevention of chronic illnesses and their precursors. To keep runners healthy, it is paramount that one has sound knowledge of the biomechanics of running and assessment of running gait. More so, improving performance in competitive runners is based in sound training and rehabilitation practices that are rooted firmly in biomechanical principles. This article summarized the biomechanics of running and the means with which one can evaluate running gait. The gait assessment techniques for collecting and analyzing kinetic and kinematic data can provide insights into injury prevention and treatment and performance enhancement.

  8. Rodent model of activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Olaia; Fraga, Ángela; Pellón, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Emilio

    2014-04-10

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) consists of a procedure that involves the simultaneous exposure of animals to a restricted feeding schedule, while free access is allowed to an activity wheel. Under these conditions, animals show a progressive increase in wheel running, a reduced efficiency in food intake to compensate for their increased activity, and a severe progression of weight loss. Due to the parallelism with the clinical manifestations of anorexia nervosa including increased activity, reduced food intake and severe weight loss, the ABA procedure has been proposed as the best analog of human anorexia nervosa (AN). Thus, ABA research could both allow a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying AN and generate useful leads for treatment development in AN.

  9. A School for Unsqueaky Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The Davidson Academy of Nevada may have one of the most-intelligent student bodies in America, with each student required to be in the 99th percentile on IQ or achievement tests. But these kids need room to run and jump and have someone to talk to as much as any middle schooler. The 44 students now at the academy are at the precarious stage of…

  10. The flickering wheel illusion: when α rhythms make a static wheel flicker.

    PubMed

    Sokoliuk, Rodika; VanRullen, Rufin

    2013-08-14

    α oscillations (8-14 Hz) greatly influence brain activity, yet we generally do not experience them consciously: the world does not appear to oscillate. Dedicated strategies must exist in the brain to prevent these oscillations from disrupting normal processing. Could suitable stimuli fool these strategies and lead to the conscious experience of our own brain oscillations? We describe and explore a novel illusion in which the center of a static wheel stimulus (with 30-40 spokes) is experienced as flickering when viewed in the visual periphery. The key feature of this illusion is that the stimulus fluctuations are experienced as a regular and consistent flicker, which our human observers estimated at ~9 Hz during a psychophysical matching task. Correspondingly, the occipital α rhythm of the EEG was the only oscillation that showed a time course compatible with the reported illusion: when α amplitude was strong, the probability of reporting illusory flicker increased. The peak oscillatory frequency for these flicker-induced modulations was significantly correlated, on a subject-by-subject basis, with the individual α frequency measured during rest, in the absence of visual stimulation. Finally, although the effect is strongest during eye movements, we showed that stimulus motion relative to the retina is not necessary to perceive the illusion: the flicker can also be perceived on the afterimage of the wheel, yet by definition this afterimage is stationary on the retina. We conclude that this new flickering illusion is a unique way to experience the α rhythms that constantly occur in the brain but normally remain unnoticed.

  11. Activity-Based Anorexia Alters the Expression of BDNF Transcripts in the Mesocorticolimbic Reward Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Emily V.; Klenotich, Stephanie J.; McMurray, Matthew S.; Dulawa, Stephanie C

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex eating disorder with severe dysregulation of appetitive behavior. The activity-based anorexia (ABA) paradigm is an animal model in which rodents exposed to both running wheels and scheduled feeding develop aspects of AN including paradoxical hypophagia, dramatic weight loss, and hyperactivity, while animals exposed to only one condition maintain normal body weight. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an activity-dependent modulator of neuronal plasticity, is reduced in the serum of AN patients, and is a known regulator of feeding and weight maintenance. We assessed the effects of scheduled feeding, running wheel access, or both on the expression of BDNF transcripts within the mesocorticolimbic pathway. We also assessed the expression of neuronal cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) to explore the specificity of effects on BDNF within the mesocorticolimbic pathway. Scheduled feeding increased the levels of both transcripts in the hippocampus (HPC), increased NCAM1 mRNA expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and decreased BDNF mRNA levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In addition, wheel running increased BDNF mRNA expression in the VTA. No changes in either transcript were observed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, no changes in either transcript were induced by the combined scheduled feeding and wheel access condition. These data indicate that scheduled feeding or wheel running alter BDNF and NCAM1 expression levels in specific regions of the mesocorticolimbic pathway. These findings contribute to our current knowledge of the molecular alterations induced by ABA and may help elucidate possible mechanisms of AN pathology. PMID:27861553

  12. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software - RWDMES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaurock, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The RWDMES is a tool for modeling the disturbances imparted on spacecraft by spinning reaction wheels. Reaction wheels are usually the largest disturbance source on a precision pointing spacecraft, and can be the dominating source of pointing error. Accurate knowledge of the disturbance environment is critical to accurate prediction of the pointing performance. In the past, it has been difficult to extract an accurate wheel disturbance model since the forcing mechanisms are difficult to model physically, and the forcing amplitudes are filtered by the dynamics of the reaction wheel. RWDMES captures the wheel-induced disturbances using a hybrid physical/empirical model that is extracted directly from measured forcing data. The empirical models capture the tonal forces that occur at harmonics of the spin rate, and the broadband forces that arise from random effects. The empirical forcing functions are filtered by a physical model of the wheel structure that includes spin-rate-dependent moments (gyroscopic terms). The resulting hybrid model creates a highly accurate prediction of wheel-induced forces. It accounts for variation in disturbance frequency, as well as the shifts in structural amplification by the whirl modes, as the spin rate changes. This software provides a point-and-click environment for producing accurate models with minimal user effort. Where conventional approaches may take weeks to produce a model of variable quality, RWDMES can create a demonstrably high accuracy model in two hours. The software consists of a graphical user interface (GUI) that enables the user to specify all analysis parameters, to evaluate analysis results and to iteratively refine the model. Underlying algorithms automatically extract disturbance harmonics, initialize and tune harmonic models, and initialize and tune broadband noise models. The component steps are described in the RWDMES user s guide and include: converting time domain data to waterfall PSDs (power spectral

  13. Can Unshod Running Reduce Running Injuries?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    protein? Lieberman considered how humans could take down a boar or antelope while other predators like lions and hyenas were on the prowl. He...referenced research that reported African hunters chasing antelopes and Tarahumara Indians running down deer till their hooves fell off.35 Lieberman...

  14. Well liner running shoe

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.F.

    1994-01-11

    Wellbore liners are set with a running shoe comprising a cylindrical body, end cap, check valve and receiver member in assembly. The receiver member includes threads for receiving the coupling sleeve of a running tool, and retaining wickers for engagement with a cement plug or dart to retain the same permanently engaged with and blocking the flow of fluid through the running shoe. A running tool for use with the shoe includes a coupling sleeve which is retained on a support mandrel by a collar which is secured to the mandrel with a shear pin so that pressuring up the workstring, in the event of a stuck coupling sleeve, will permit retrieval of the main part of the running tool and the workstring. The interior parts of the running shoe are made of aluminum or plastic for easy drill-out to extend the wellbore beyond the end of the liner. 3 figs.

  15. Brush-Wheel Samplers for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso

    2003-01-01

    A report proposes brush-wheel mechanisms for acquiring samples of soils from remote planets. In simplest terms, such a mechanism would contain brush wheels that would be counter-rotated at relatively high speed. The mechanism would be lowered to the ground from a spacecraft or other exploratory vehicle. Upon contact with the ground, the counter-rotating brush wheels would kick soil up into a collection chamber. Thus, in form and function, the mechanism would partly resemble traditional street and carpet sweepers. The main advantage of using of brush wheels (in contradistinction to cutting wheels or other, more complex mechanisms) is that upon encountering soil harder than expected, the brushes could simply deflect and the motor(s) could continue to turn. That is, sufficiently flexible brushes would afford resistance to jamming and to overloading of the motors used to rotate the brushes, and so the motors could be made correspondingly lighter and less power hungry. Of course, one could select the brush stiffnesses and motor torques and speeds for greatest effectiveness in sampling soil of a specific anticipated degree of hardness.

  16. Precision truing of diamond wheel with sharp edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Cheng; Guo, Bing; Zhao, QIngliang; Chen, Bing; Wang, Jinhu

    2014-08-01

    Diamond wheel with sharp edge has small contour structures, which can lead to fast wear of wheel in the grinding process. Traditional truing methods are hard to apply to this kind of wheels. Therefore, as for the difficulty of precision truing of diamond wheel with sharp edge, the novel methods for resin and metal bonded diamond wheels with sharp edge are presented, respectively. In this experiment, a conditioning procedure with rare metal alloy block Ta was used to true the resin bonded diamond grinding wheel and in the same way Nb alloy block was utilized to complete rough truing of metal bonded diamond grinding wheel. Then a CNC truing technique with rotational green carbide (GC) truing stick was applied to precise truing of metal bonded diamond grinding wheel. Methods mentioned above were measured in order to evaluate the performance of truing. Geometric features of the wheel sharp edge were duplicated on the organic glass (PMMA) in order to measure and calculate the radius of the sharp edge. The edge radius of trued resin bonded wheel and metal bonded wheel is perceived as an important assessment. The experiments results revealed that the edge radius of 12.45μm for the resin bonded wheel and the edge radius of 30.17μm for the metal bonded wheel could be achieved.

  17. Stability of Castering Wheels for Aircraft Landing Gears, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1937-01-01

    In many installations of castering rubber-tired wheels there is a tendency for the wheel to oscillate violently about the spindle axis. This phenomenon, popularly called 'shimmy,' has occurred in some airplane tail wheels and has been corrected in two ways: first by the application of friction in the spindles of the tail wheels; and, second, by locking the wheels while taxiing at high speeds. Shimmy is common with the large wheels used as nose wheels in tricycle landing gears and, since it is impossible to lock the wheels, friction in the nose-wheel spindle has been the sole means of correction. Because the nose wheel is larger than the conventional tail wheel and usually carries a greater load, the larger amounts of spindle friction necessary to prevent shimmy are objectionable. the present paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of the problem of the stability of castering wheels for airplane landing gears. On the basis of simplified assumptions induced from experimental observations, a theoretical study has been made of the shimmy of castering wheels. The theory is based on the discovery of a phenomenon called 'kinematic shimmy' and is compared quantitatively with the results of model experiments. Experimental checks, using a model having low-pressure tires, are reported and the applicability of the results to full scale is discussed. Theoretical methods of estimating the spindle viscous damping and spindle solid friction necessary to avoid shimmy - lateral freedom - is introduced.

  18. Grain edge detection of diamond grinding wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lijun; Cui, Changcai; Huang, Chunqi; Huang, Hui; Ye, Ruifang

    2013-01-01

    The topograpgy characterization of grinding wheel grain is indispensable for precision grinding, it depends on accurate edge detecting and recognition of abrasive grains from wheel bond to a large extent. Due to different reflective characteristics arising among different materials, difference between maximum and minimum intensity (Δ ) of diamond is larger than that of bond. This paper uses a new method for grain edge detection of resin-bonded diamond grinding wheel that combines the improved Canny operator in Method of Maximum Classes Square Error (called as OTSU) with ΔI obtained by the white light interferometry (WLI). The experimental results show that the method based on improved Canny operator can effectively detect the edge of diamond grain.

  19. Slow Progress in Dune (Right Rear Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The right rear wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's rear hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The wheel is largely hidden by a cable bundle. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

  20. Maximum Torque and Momentum Envelopes for Reaction Wheel Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Reynolds, Reid G.; Liu, Frank X.; Lebsock, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft reaction wheel maneuvers are limited by the maximum torque and/or angular momentum that the wheels can provide. For an n-wheel configuration, the torque or momentum envelope can be obtained by projecting the n-dimensional hypercube, representing the domain boundary of individual wheel torques or momenta, into three dimensional space via the 3xn matrix of wheel axes. In this paper, the properties of the projected hypercube are discussed, and algorithms are proposed for determining this maximal torque or momentum envelope for general wheel configurations. Practical strategies for distributing a prescribed torque or momentum among the n wheels are presented, with special emphasis on configurations of four, five, and six wheels.