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Sample records for activity-based functional screening

  1. Activity-Based Screening of Metagenomic Libraries for Hydrogenase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nicole; Perner, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    Here we outline how to identify hydrogenase enzymes from metagenomic libraries through an activity-based screening approach. A metagenomic fosmid library is constructed in E. coli and the fosmids are transferred into a hydrogenase deletion mutant of Shewanella oneidensis (ΔhyaB) via triparental mating. If a fosmid exhibits hydrogen uptake activity, S. oneidensis' phenotype is restored and hydrogenase activity is indicated by a color change of the medium from yellow to colorless. This new method enables screening of 48 metagenomic fosmid clones in parallel.

  2. Activity-based metagenomic screening and biochemical characterization of bovine ruminal protozoan glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Findley, Seth D; Mormile, Melanie R; Sommer-Hurley, Andrea; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Tipton, Peter; Arnett, Krista; Porter, James H; Kerley, Monty; Stacey, Gary

    2011-11-01

    The rumen, the foregut of herbivorous ruminant animals such as cattle, functions as a bioreactor to process complex plant material. Among the numerous and diverse microbes involved in ruminal digestion are the ruminal protozoans, which are single-celled, ciliated eukaryotic organisms. An activity-based screen was executed to identify genes encoding fibrolytic enzymes present in the metatranscriptome of a bovine ruminal protozoan-enriched cDNA expression library. Of the four novel genes identified, two were characterized in biochemical assays. Our results provide evidence for the effective use of functional metagenomics to retrieve novel enzymes from microbial populations that cannot be maintained in axenic cultures.

  3. Screening Test Items for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    A method for medical screening is adapted to differential item functioning (DIF). Its essential elements are explicit declarations of the level of DIF that is acceptable and of the loss function that quantifies the consequences of the two kinds of inappropriate classification of an item. Instead of a single level and a single function, sets of…

  4. An optimized micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on the molybdenum blue method and its application in screening natural product inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Kou, Jun-Ping; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Myosin II plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological functions through its ATPase activity. The present study was designed to optimize a micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on molybdenum blue method, using a known myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blebbistatin. Several parameters were observed in the enzymatic reaction procedure, including the concentrations of the substrate (ATP) and calcium chloride, pH, and the reaction and incubation times. The proportion of coloration agent was also investigated. The sensitivity of this assay was compared with the malachite green method and bioluminescence method. Additionally, 20 natural compounds were studied for myosin II ATPase inhibitory activity using the optimized method. Our results showed that ATP at the concentration of 5 mmol·L(-1) and ammonium molybdate : stannous chloride at the ratio of 15 : 1 could greatly improve the sensitivity of this method. The IC50 of blebbistatin obtained by this method was consistent with literature. Compound 8 was screened with inhibitory activity on myosin II ATPase. The optimized method showed similar accuracy, lower detecting limit, and wider linear range, which could be a promising approach to screening myosin II ATPase inhibitors in vitro.

  5. Functional genomic screening to enhance oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, D J; Stojdl, D F

    2013-02-05

    Functional genomic screening has emerged as a powerful approach for understanding complex biological phenomena. Of the available tools, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) technology is unquestionably the most incisive, as it directly probes gene function. Recent applications of RNAi screening have been impressive. Notable amongst these are its use in elucidated mechanism(s) for signal transduction, various aspects of cell biology, tumourigenesis and metastasis, resistance to cancer therapeutics, and the host's response to a pathogen. Herein we discuss how recent RNAi screening efforts have helped turn our attention to the targetability of non-oncogene support pathways for cancer treatment, with a particular focus on a recent study that identified a non-oncogene addiction to the ER stress response as a synergist target for oncolytic virus therapy (OVT). Moreover, we give our thoughts on the future of RNAi screening as a tool to enhance OVT and describe recent technical improvements that are poised to make genome-scale RNAi experiments more sensitive, less noisy, more applicable in vivo, and more easily validated in clinically relevant animal models.

  6. Virtual screening of mandelate racemase mutants with enhanced activity based on binding energy in the transition state.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiali; Liu, Min; Guo, Fei; Xie, Wenping; Lu, Wenqiang; Ye, Lidan; Chen, Zhirong; Yuan, Shenfeng; Yu, Hongwei

    2014-02-05

    Mandelate racemase (MR) is a promising candidate for the dynamic kinetic resolution of racemates. However, the poor activity of MR towards most of its non-natural substrates limits its widespread application. In this work, a virtual screening method based on the binding energy in the transition state was established to assist in the screening of MR mutants with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Using R-3-chloromandelic acid as a model substrate, a total of 53 mutants were constructed based on rational design in the two rounds of screening. The number of mutants for experimental validation was brought down to 17 by the virtual screening method, among which 14 variants turned out to possess improved catalytic efficiency. The variant V26I/Y54V showed 5.2-fold higher catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) towards R-3-chloromandelic acid than that observed for the wild-type enzyme. Using this strategy, mutants were successfully obtained for two other substrates, R-mandelamide and R-2-naphthylglycolate (V26I and V29L, respectively), both with a 2-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency. These results demonstrated that this method could effectively predict the trend of mutational effects on catalysis. Analysis from the energetic and structural assays indicated that the enhanced interactions between the active sites and the substrate in the transition state led to improved catalytic efficiency. It was concluded that this virtual screening method based on the binding energy in the transition state was beneficial in enzyme rational redesign and helped to better understand the catalytic properties of the enzyme.

  7. Activity Based High-Throughput Screening for Novel O-GlcNAc Transferase Substrates Using a Dynamic Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Sharif, Suhela; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Pieters, Roland J.

    2016-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible and dynamic protein post-translational modification in mammalian cells. The O-GlcNAc cycle is catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA). O-GlcNAcylation plays important role in many vital cellular events including transcription, cell cycle regulation, stress response and protein degradation, and altered O-GlcNAcylation has long been implicated in cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, numerous approaches have been developed to identify OGT substrates and study their function, but there is still a strong demand for highly efficient techniques. Here we demonstrated the utility of the peptide microarray approach to discover novel OGT substrates and study its specificity. Interestingly, the protein RBL-2, which is a key regulator of entry into cell division and may function as a tumor suppressor, was identified as a substrate for three isoforms of OGT. Using peptide Ala scanning, we found Ser 420 is one possible O-GlcNAc site in RBL-2. Moreover, substitution of Ser 420, on its own, inhibited OGT activity, raising the possibility of mechanism-based development for selective OGT inhibitors. This approach will prove useful for both discovery of novel OGT substrates and studying OGT specificity. PMID:26960196

  8. Development of Activity-based Cost Functions for Cellulase, Invertase, and Other Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowers, Chris C.; Ferguson, Elizabeth M.; Tanner, Robert D.

    As enzyme chemistry plays an increasingly important role in the chemical industry, cost analysis of these enzymes becomes a necessity. In this paper, we examine the aspects that affect the cost of enzymes based upon enzyme activity. The basis for this study stems from a previously developed objective function that quantifies the tradeoffs in enzyme purification via the foam fractionation process (Cherry et al., Braz J Chem Eng 17:233-238, 2000). A generalized cost function is developed from our results that could be used to aid in both industrial and lab scale chemical processing. The generalized cost function shows several nonobvious results that could lead to significant savings. Additionally, the parameters involved in the operation and scaling up of enzyme processing could be optimized to minimize costs. We show that there are typically three regimes in the enzyme cost analysis function: the low activity prelinear region, the moderate activity linear region, and high activity power-law region. The overall form of the cost analysis function appears to robustly fit the power law form.

  9. High-throughput screening of chemicals as functional ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Identifying chemicals that provide a specific function within a product, yet have minimal impact on the human body or environment, is the goal of most formulation chemists and engineers practicing green chemistry. We present a methodology to identify potential chemical functional substitutes from large libraries of chemicals using machine learning based models. We collect and analyze publicly available information on the function of chemicals in consumer products or industrial processes to identify a suite of harmonized function categories suitable for modeling. We use structural and physicochemical descriptors for these chemicals to build 41 quantitative structure–use relationship (QSUR) models for harmonized function categories using random forest classification. We apply these models to screen a library of nearly 6400 chemicals with available structure information for potential functional substitutes. Using our Functional Use database (FUse), we could identify uses for 3121 chemicals; 4412 predicted functional uses had a probability of 80% or greater. We demonstrate the potential application of the models to high-throughput (HT) screening for “candidate alternatives” by merging the valid functional substitute classifications with hazard metrics developed from HT screening assays for bioactivity. A descriptor set could be obtained for 6356 Tox21 chemicals that have undergone a battery of HT in vitro bioactivity screening assays. By applying QSURs, we wer

  10. Model dielectric function for 2D semiconductors including substrate screening

    PubMed Central

    Trolle, Mads L.; Pedersen, Thomas G.; Véniard, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Dielectric screening of excitons in 2D semiconductors is known to be a highly non-local effect, which in reciprocal space translates to a strong dependence on momentum transfer q. We present an analytical model dielectric function, including the full non-linear q-dependency, which may be used as an alternative to more numerically taxing ab initio screening functions. By verifying the good agreement between excitonic optical properties calculated using our model dielectric function, and those derived from ab initio methods, we demonstrate the versatility of this approach. Our test systems include: Monolayer hBN, monolayer MoS2, and the surface exciton of a 2 × 1 reconstructed Si(111) surface. Additionally, using our model, we easily take substrate screening effects into account. Hence, we include also a systematic study of the effects of substrate media on the excitonic optical properties of MoS2 and hBN. PMID:28117326

  11. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  12. Functional analysis screening for problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Querim, Angie C; Iwata, Brian A; Roscoe, Eileen M; Schlichenmeyer, Kevin J; Ortega, Javier Virués; Hurl, Kylee E

    2013-01-01

    A common finding in previous research is that problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement continues to occur in the alone condition of a functional analysis (FA), whereas behavior maintained by social reinforcement typically is extinguished. Thus, the alone condition may represent an efficient screening procedure when maintenance by automatic reinforcement is suspected. We conducted a series of 5-min alone (or no-interaction) probes for 30 cases of problem behavior and compared initial predictions of maintenance or extinction to outcomes obtained in subsequent FAs. Results indicated that data from the screening procedure accurately predicted that problem behavior was maintained by automatic reinforcement in 21 of 22 cases and by social reinforcement in 7 of 8 cases. Thus, results of the screening accurately predicted the function of problem behavior (social vs. automatic reinforcement) in 28 of 30 cases.

  13. Phenotypic lentivirus screens to identify functional single domain antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian I.; Hanke, Leo; Morin, Benjamin; Brewer, Rebeccah; Brusic, Vesna; Whelan, Sean P.J.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of proteins is key in assessing their in vivo function. While genetic ablation is straightforward, reversible and specific perturbation of protein function remains a challenge. Single domain antibody fragments, such as camelid-derived VHHs, can serve as inhibitors or activators of intracellular protein function, but functional testing of identified VHHs is laborious. To address this challenge, we developed a lentiviral screening approach to identify VHHs that elicit a phenotype when expressed intracellularly. We identified 19 antiviral VHHs that protect human A549 cells from lethal infection with influenza A virus (IAV) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), respectively. Both negative-sense RNA viruses are vulnerable to VHHs uniquely specific for their respective nucleoproteins. Antiviral VHHs prevented nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins or mRNA transcription, respectively, and may provide clues for novel antiviral reagents. In principle, the screening approach described here should be applicable to identify inhibitors of any pathogen or biological pathway. PMID:27573105

  14. MUSCULOSKELETAL SCREENING AND FUNCTIONAL TESTING: CONSIDERATIONS FOR BASKETBALL ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Markwick, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Youth participation in basketball is on the rise, with basketball one of the top five participation sports in Australia. With increased participation there is a need for greater awareness of the importance of the pre-participation examination, including musculoskeletal screening and functional performance testing as part of a multidisciplinary approach to reducing the risk for future injuries. As majority of all basketball injuries affect the lower extremities, pre-participation musculoskeletal screening and functional performance testing should assess fundamental movement qualities throughout the kinetic chain with an emphasis on lower extremity force characteristics, specifically eccentric loading tasks. Thus, the purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the existing literature elucidating pre-participation musculoskeletal screening and functional performance tests that can be used as a framework for rehabilitation professionals in assessing basketball athletes’ readiness to safely perform the movement demands of their sport. Methods Relevant articles published between 2000 and 2016 using the search terms ‘musculoskeletal screening’, ‘functional testing’, ‘youth athletes’, and ‘basketball’ were identified using MEDLINE. From a basketball-specific perspective, several relevant musculoskeletal assessments were identified, including: the Functional Hop Test Combination, the Landing Error Scoring System, the Tuck Jump Assessment, the Weight-Bearing Lunge Test, and the Star Excursion Balance Test. Each of these assessments creates movement demands that allow for easy identification of inefficient and/or compensatory movement tendencies. A basic understanding of musculoskeletal deficits including bilateral strength and flexibility imbalances, lower crossed syndrome, and dominance-related factors are key components in determination of injury risk. Discussion Assessment of sport-specific movement demands through

  15. Strain screening, fermentation, separation, and encapsulation for production of nattokinase functional food.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuetuan; Luo, Mingfang; Xie, Yuchun; Yang, Liangrong; Li, Haojian; Xu, Lin; Liu, Huizhou

    2012-12-01

    This study presents a novel and integrated preparation technology for nattokinase functional food, including strain screening, fermentation, separation, and encapsulation. To rapidly screen a nattokinase-productive strain, PCR-based screening method was combined with fibrinolytic activity-based method, and a high productive strain, Bacillus subtilis LSSE-22, was isolated from Chinese soybean paste. Reduction of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) concentration may contribute to separation of nattokinase and reduction of late-onset anaphylaxis risk. Chickpeas were confirmed as the favorable substrate for enhancement of nattokinase production and reduction of γ-PGA yield. Using cracked chickpeas, the nattokinase activity reached 356.25 ± 17.18 FU/g (dry weight), which is much higher than previous reports. To further reduce γ-PGA concentration, ethanol fractional extraction and precipitation were applied for separation of nattokinase. By extraction with 50 % and precipitation with 75 % ethanol solution, 4,000.58 ± 192.98 FU/g of nattokinase powders were obtained, and the activity recovery reached 89 ± 1 %, while γ-PGA recovery was reduced to 21 ± 2 %. To improve the nattokinase stability at acidic pH condition, the nattokinase powders were encapsulated, and then coated with methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate copolymer. After encapsulation, the nattokinase was protected from being denatured under various acid conditions, and pH-responsible controlled release at simulated intestinal fluid was realized.

  16. A Screen for Modifiers of Deformed Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Harding, K. W.; Gellon, G.; McGinnis, N.; McGinnis, W.

    1995-01-01

    Proteins produced by the homeotic genes of the Hox family assign different identities to cells on the anterior/posterior axis. Relatively little is known about the signalling pathways that modulate their activities or the factors with which they interact to assign specific segmental identities. To identify genes that might encode such functions, we performed a screen for second site mutations that reduce the viability of animals carrying hypomorphic mutant alleles of the Drosophila homeotic locus, Deformed. Genes mapping to six complementation groups on the third chromosome were isolated as modifiers of Deformed function. Products of two of these genes, sallimus and moira, have been previously proposed as homeotic activators since they suppress the dominant adult phenotype of Polycomb mutants. Mutations in hedgehog, which encodes secreted signalling proteins, were also isolated as Deformed loss-of-function enhancers. Hedgehog mutant alleles also suppress the Polycomb phenotype. Mutations were also isolated in a few genes that interact with Deformed but not with Polycomb, indicating that the screen identified genes that are not general homeotic activators. Two of these genes, cap `n' collar and defaced, have defects in embryonic head development that are similar to defects seen in loss of function Deformed mutants. PMID:7498774

  17. Zebrafish Model for Functional Screening of Flow-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; de Luca, Amalia; Warboys, Christina; Ferreira, Pedro F.; Luong, Le A.; Hsiao, Sarah; Gauci, Ismael; Mahmoud, Marwa; Feng, Shuang; Souilhol, Celine; Bowden, Neil; Ashton, John-Paul; Walczak, Henning; Firmin, David; Krams, Rob; Mason, Justin C.; Haskard, Dorian O.; Sherwin, Spencer; Ridger, Victoria; Chico, Timothy J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective— Atherosclerosis is initiated at branches and bends of arteries exposed to disturbed blood flow that generates low shear stress. This mechanical environment promotes lesions by inducing endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis and dysfunction via mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Although transcriptome-based studies have identified multiple shear-responsive genes, most of them have an unknown function. To address this, we investigated whether zebrafish embryos can be used for functional screening of mechanosensitive genes that regulate EC apoptosis in mammalian arteries. Approach and Results— First, we demonstrated that flow regulates EC apoptosis in developing zebrafish vasculature. Specifically, suppression of blood flow in zebrafish embryos (by targeting cardiac troponin) enhanced that rate of EC apoptosis (≈10%) compared with controls exposed to flow (≈1%). A panel of candidate regulators of apoptosis were identified by transcriptome profiling of ECs from high and low shear stress regions of the porcine aorta. Genes that displayed the greatest differential expression and possessed 1 to 2 zebrafish orthologues were screened for the regulation of apoptosis in zebrafish vasculature exposed to flow or no-flow conditions using a knockdown approach. A phenotypic change was observed in 4 genes; p53-related protein (PERP) and programmed cell death 2–like protein functioned as positive regulators of apoptosis, whereas angiopoietin-like 4 and cadherin 13 were negative regulators. The regulation of perp, cdh13, angptl4, and pdcd2l by shear stress and the effects of perp and cdh13 on EC apoptosis were confirmed by studies of cultured EC exposed to flow. Conclusions— We conclude that a zebrafish model of flow manipulation coupled to gene knockdown can be used for functional screening of mechanosensitive genes in vascular ECs, thus providing potential therapeutic targets to prevent or treat endothelial injury at atheroprone sites. PMID:27834691

  18. Functional screening of an asthma QTL in YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Symula, Derek J.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ueda, Yukihiko; Denefle, Patrice; Stevens, Mary E.; Wang, Zhi-En; Locksley, Richard; Rubin, Edward M.

    1999-07-02

    While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. To screen for genes contributing to an asthma QTL mapped to human chromosome 5q33, the authors characterized a panel of large-insert 5q31 transgenics based on studies demonstrating that altering gene dosage frequently affects quantitative phenotypes normally influenced by that gene. This panel of human YAC transgenics, propagating a one megabase interva2048 chromosome 5q31 containing 23 genes, was screened for quantitative changes in several asthma-associated phenotypes. Multiple independent transgenic lines with altered IgE response to antigen treatment shared a 180 kb region containing 5 genes, including human interleukin 4 (IL4) and interleukin 13 (IL13), which induce IgE class switching in B cells5. Further analysis of these mice and mice transgenic for only murine Il4 and Il13 demonstrated that moderate changes in murine Il4 and Il13 expression affect asthma-associated phenotypes in vivo. This functional screen of large-insert transgenics enabled them to sift through multiple genes in the 5q3 asthma QTL without prior consideration of assumed individual gene function and identify genes that influence the QTL phenotype in vivo.

  19. Functional movement screen scores in a group of running athletes.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Janice K; Parkerson-Mitchell, Amy J; Hildebrand, Laurie D; Teague, Connie

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mean values of the functional movement screen (FMS) in a group of long-distance runners. The secondary aims were to investigate whether the FMS performance differed between sexes and between young and older runners. Forty-three runners, 16 women (mean age = 33.5 years, height = 165.2 cm, weight = 56.3 kg, and body mass index [BMI] = 20.6) and 27 men (mean age = 39.3 years, height = 177.6 cm, weight = 75.8 kg, and BMI = 24.2) performed the FMS. All the runners were injury-free and ran >30 km·wk. Independent t-tests were performed on the composite scores to examine the differences between men and women and also between young (<40 years) and older runners (>40 years). Contingency tables (2 × 2) were developed for each of the 7 screening tests to further look at the differences in groups for each single test. The χ values were calculated to determine significant differences. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. There was no significant difference in the composite score between women and men. There were significant differences between the sexes in the push-up and straight leg test scores, with the women scoring better on each test. A significant difference was found in the composite scores between younger and older runners (p < 0.000). Additional score differences were found for the squat, hurdle step, and in-line lunge tests with the younger runners scoring better. This study provided mean values for the FMS in a cohort of long-distance runners. These values can be used as a reference for comparing FMST scores in other runners who are screened with this tool.

  20. A selective screen reveals discrete functional domains in Drosophila Nanos.

    PubMed Central

    Arrizabalaga, G; Lehmann, R

    1999-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Nanos encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein with two zinc finger motifs. In the embryo, Nanos protein function is required for establishment of the anterior-posterior body pattern and for the migration of primordial germ cells. During oogenesis, Nanos protein is involved in the establishment and maintenance of germ-line stem cells and the differentiation of oocyte precursor cells. To establish proper embryonic patterning, Nanos acts as a translational regulator of hunchback RNA. Nanos' targets for germ cell migration and development are not known. Here, we describe a selective genetic screen aimed at isolating new nanos alleles. The molecular and genetic analysis of 68 new alleles has allowed us to identify amino acids critical for nanos function. This analysis shows that the CCHC motifs, which coordinate two metal ions, are essential for all known functions of Nanos protein. Furthermore, a region C-terminal to the zinc fingers seems to constitute a novel functional domain within the Nanos protein. This "tail region" of Nanos is required for abdomen formation and germ cell migration, but not for oogenesis. PMID:10581288

  1. Reliability and validity of the functional analysis screening tool.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Brian A; Deleon, Iser G; Roscoe, Eileen M

    2013-01-01

    The Functional Analysis Screening Tool (FAST) is a 16-item questionnaire about antecedent and consequent events that might be correlated with the occurrence of problem behavior. Items are organized into 4 functional categories based on contingencies that maintain problem behavior. We assessed interrater reliability of the FAST with 196 problem behaviors through independent administration to pairs of raters (Study 1). Mean item-by-item agreement between pairs of raters was 71.5%. Agreement for individual items ranged from 53.3% to 84.5%. Agreement on FAST outcomes, based on comparison of informants' highest totals, was 64.8%. We assessed the validity of the FAST by comparing its outcomes with results of 69 functional analyses (Study 2). The FAST score predicted the condition of the functional analysis in which the highest rate of problem behavior occurred in 44 cases (63.8%). Potential uses of the FAST in the context of a clinical interview, as well as limitations, are discussed.

  2. Adapting CRISPR/Cas9 for functional genomics screens.

    PubMed

    Malina, Abba; Katigbak, Alexandra; Cencic, Regina; Maïga, Rayelle Itoua; Robert, Francis; Miura, Hisashi; Pelletier, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The use of CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein) for targeted genome editing has been widely adopted and is considered a "game changing" technology. The ease and rapidity by which this approach can be used to modify endogenous loci in a wide spectrum of cell types and organisms makes it a powerful tool for customizable genetic modifications as well as for large-scale functional genomics. The development of retrovirus-based expression platforms to simultaneously deliver the Cas9 nuclease and single guide (sg) RNAs provides unique opportunities by which to ensure stable and reproducible expression of the editing tools and a broad cell targeting spectrum, while remaining compatible with in vivo genetic screens. Here, we describe methods and highlight considerations for designing and generating sgRNA libraries in all-in-one retroviral vectors for such applications.

  3. Pain on Functional Movement Screen Tests and Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Timothy T; Grier, Tyson L; Canham-Chervak, Michelle C; Anderson, Morgan K; North, William J; Jones, Bruce H

    2015-11-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a tool intended to evaluate limitations or asymmetries of movement to detect individuals at risk for exercise- and sports-related injury. The purpose was to determine the association and predictive value of specific FMS tests with injury risk in physically active men. Soldiers aged 18-57 years completed the FMS (n = 2,476). Demographic and fitness data were collected by survey. Medical record data for any, overuse, and traumatic injury 6 months after the assessment were obtained. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were calculated along with receiver operator characteristics to determine area under the curve (AUC). Risks, risk ratios, odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to assess injury risks. Multivariate logistic regression identified that pain on 5 of the 7 tests was associated with greater risk for any injury (OR = 1.50-3.51): deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, trunk stability push-up, and rotary stability. However, FMS registered low sensitivity, PPV, and AUC for all 7 tests for the 3 injury types (2-24% sensitivity, 16-74% PPV, and 50-58% AUC). Although the presence of pain was associated with a higher risk of injury on 5 tests, a low sensitivity, PPV, and AUC were displayed. Therefore, caution is advised when implementing the FMS as a screening tool in an Army or similarly active population as it could lead to prevention and treatment resources being directed toward individuals who are not at greater risk for injury.

  4. Imaging and Functional Analysis of γ-Secretase and Substrate in a Proteolipobead System with an Activity-Based Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, M. Lane; Ahn, Kwangwook; Li, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of intramembranal protease catalysis demands the generation of intact biomembrane assemblies with structural integrity and lateral mobility. Here, we report the development of a microsphere supported-biomembrane platform enabling characterization of γ-secretase and substrate within proteolipobead assemblies via microscopy and flow cytometry. The active enzyme loading levels were tracked using an activity-based probe, with the biomembranes delineated by carbocyanine lipid reporters. Proteolipobeads formed from HeLa proteoliposomes gave rise to homogeneous distributions of active γ-secretase within supported biomembranes with native-like fluidity. The substrate loading into supported biomembranes was detergent-dependent, as evidenced by even colocalization of substrate and lipid tracers in confocal 3D imaging of individual proteolipobeads. Moreover, the loading level was tunable with bulk substrate concentration. γ-Secretase substrate cleavage and its inhibition within γ-secretase proteolipobeads were observed. This platform offers a means to visualize enzyme and substrate loading, activity, and inhibition in a controllable biomembrane microenvironment. PMID:26699370

  5. A yeast functional screen predicts new candidate ALS disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Couthouis, Julien; Hart, Michael P.; Shorter, James; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Erion, Renske; Oristano, Rachel; Liu, Annie X.; Ramos, Daniel; Jethava, Niti; Hosangadi, Divya; Epstein, James; Chiang, Ashley; Diaz, Zamia; Nakaya, Tadashi; Ibrahim, Fadia; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Solski, Jennifer A.; Williams, Kelly L.; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Ingre, Caroline; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Clay-Falcone, Dana; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Greene, Robert; Kalb, Robert G.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ludolph, Albert; Robberecht, Wim; Andersen, Peter M.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Blair, Ian P.; King, Oliver D.; Bonini, Nancy M.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Rademakers, Rosa; Mourelatos, Zissimos; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating and universally fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in two related RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, that harbor prion-like domains, cause some forms of ALS. There are at least 213 human proteins harboring RNA recognition motifs, including FUS and TDP-43, raising the possibility that additional RNA-binding proteins might contribute to ALS pathogenesis. We performed a systematic survey of these proteins to find additional candidates similar to TDP-43 and FUS, followed by bioinformatics to predict prion-like domains in a subset of them. We sequenced one of these genes, TAF15, in patients with ALS and identified missense variants, which were absent in a large number of healthy controls. These disease-associated variants of TAF15 caused formation of cytoplasmic foci when expressed in primary cultures of spinal cord neurons. Very similar to TDP-43 and FUS, TAF15 aggregated in vitro and conferred neurodegeneration in Drosophila, with the ALS-linked variants having a more severe effect than wild type. Immunohistochemistry of postmortem spinal cord tissue revealed mislocalization of TAF15 in motor neurons of patients with ALS. We propose that aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins might contribute very broadly to ALS pathogenesis and the genes identified in our yeast functional screen, coupled with prion-like domain prediction analysis, now provide a powerful resource to facilitate ALS disease gene discovery. PMID:22065782

  6. 49 CFR 1546.407 - Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform screening functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... who perform screening functions. 1546.407 Section 1546.407 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... training. This paragraph does not prohibit the performance of screening functions during on-the-job...-job training, a screener trainee must pass the screener readiness test prescribed by TSA. (e)...

  7. 49 CFR 1546.407 - Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform screening functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... who perform screening functions. 1546.407 Section 1546.407 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... training. This paragraph does not prohibit the performance of screening functions during on-the-job...-job training, a screener trainee must pass the screener readiness test prescribed by TSA. (e)...

  8. Comparison between human awake, meditation and drowsiness EEG activities based on directed transfer function and MVDR coherence methods.

    PubMed

    Dissanayaka, Chamila; Ben-Simon, Eti; Gruberger, Michal; Maron-Katz, Adi; Sharon, Haggai; Hendler, Talma; Cvetkovic, Dean

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the electroencephalogram functional connectivity (coherence) and effective connectivity (flow of information) of selected brain regions during three different attentive states: awake, meditation and drowsiness. For the estimation of functional connectivity (coherence), Welch and minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) methods were compared. The MVDR coherence was found to be more suitable since it is both data and frequency dependent and enables higher spectral resolution, while Welch's periodogram-based approach is both data and frequency independent. The directed transfer function (DTF) method was applied in order to estimate the effective connectivity or brain's flow of information between different regions during each state. DTF enables to identify the main brain areas that initiate EEG activity and the spatial distribution of these activities with time. Analysis was conducted using the EEG data of 30 subjects (ten awake, ten drowsy and ten meditating) focusing on six main electrodes (F3, F4, C3, C4, P3, P4, O1 and O2). For each subject, EEG data were recorded during 5-min baseline and 15 min of a specific condition (awake, meditation or drowsiness). Statistical analysis included the Kruskal-Wallis (KW) nonparametric analysis of variance followed by post hoc tests with Bonferroni alpha correction. The results reveal that both states of drowsiness and meditation states lead to a marked difference in the brain's flow of information (effective connectivity) as shown by DTF analyses. In specific, a significant increase in the flow of information in the delta frequency band was found only in the meditation condition and was further found to originate from frontal (F3, F4), parietal (P3, P4) and occipital (O1, O2) regions. Altogether, these results suggest that a change in attentiveness leads to significant changes in the spectral profile of the brain's information flow as well as in its functional connectivity and that these changes can

  9. Multiplexed Activity-based Protein Profiling of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus Reveals Large Functional Changes upon Exposure to Human Serum

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Fortuin, Suereta; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ansong, Charles; Panisko, Ellen A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-08-03

    Environmental and metabolic adaptability is critical for survival of the fungal human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus in the immunocompromised lung. We employed an activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) approach utilizing a new aryl vinyl sulfonate probe and a serine hydrolase probe combined with quantitative LC-MS based accurate mass and time (AMT) tag proteomics for the identification of functional pathway adaptation of A. fumigatus to environmental variability relevant to pulmonary Invasive Aspergillosis. When the fungal pathogen was grown with human serum, metabolism and energy processes were markedly decreased compared to no serum culture. Additionally, functional pathways associated with amino acid and protein biosynthesis were limited as the fungus scavenged from the serum to obtain essential nutrients. Our approach revealed significant metabolic adaptation by A. fumigatus, and provides direct insight into this pathogen’s ability to survive and proliferate.

  10. Functional genomics down under: RNAi screening in the Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel W; Gould, Cathryn M; Handoko, Yanny; Simpson, Kaylene J

    2014-05-01

    The Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics (VCFG) is an RNAi screening facility housed at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne, Australia. The Peter Mac is Australia's largest dedicated Cancer Research Institute, home to a team of over 520 scientists that focus on understanding the genetic risk of cancer, the molecular events regulating cancer growth and dissemination and improving detection through new diagnostic tools (www.petermac.org). Peter Mac is a well recognised technology leader and established the VCFG with a view to enabling researchers Australia and New Zealand-wide access to cutting edge functional genomics technology, infrastructure and expertise. This review documents the technology platforms operated within the VCFG and provides insight into the workflows and analysis pipelines currently in operation.

  11. A Novel Functional Screen for New Breast Cancer Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    activity [25]. Transfection of a MED1 mutant lacking the methyl binding domain was associated with microsatellite instability. These findings...allow us to perform a more complete screen as mutator target genes may be uniquely expressed following reduction of estrogen levels and/or following... estrogen receptor. In addition, we isolated poly A+ RNA from breast tumor cell lines that have no wild-type BRCA1 expression, cell lines that have

  12. Functional genomic and high-content screening for target discovery and deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Pache, Lars; Chanda, Sumit K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Functional genomic screens apply knowledge gained from the sequencing of the human genome toward rapid methods of identifying genes involved in cellular function based on a specific phenotype. This approach has been made possible through the use of advances in both molecular biology and automation. The utility of this approach has been further enhanced through the application of image-based high content screening, an automated microscopy and quantitative image analysis platform. These approaches can significantly enhance acquisition of novel targets for drug discovery. Areas covered Both the utility and potential issues associated with functional genomic screening approaches are discussed along with examples that illustrate both. The considerations for high content screening applied to functional genomics are also presented. Expert opinion Functional genomic and high content screening are extremely useful in the identification of new drug targets. However, the technical, experimental, and computational parameters have an enormous influence on the results. Thus, although new targets are identified, caution should be applied toward interpretation of screening data in isolation. Genomic screens should be viewed as an integral component of a target identification campaign that requires both the acquisition of orthogonal data, as well as a rigorous validation strategy. PMID:22860749

  13. [Cognitions and functioning in euthymic bipolar patients: screening and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bellivier, Frank

    2012-12-01

    Persistent cognitive deficits in euthymic bipolar patients are now well documented. Indeed, several studies and meta-analyzes clearly establish the existence of cognitive deficits in specific domains: attention (in particular sustained attention), Memory (in particular verbal memory) and executive functions. The impact of cognitive deficits on patient's functioning is also well documented and their role appear to be more important than expected by comparison with the impairment related to thymic residual symptoms. The development of specific cognitive remediation strategies is therefore a major hope for improving the quality of remission and functional outcome. The aetiology of these deficits remains poorly understood. However, the implication of factors related to the biological/genetic vulnerability to bipolar disorder is likely well as a "neurotoxic" effects of major mood episodes, in particular acute manic episodes that seems to play a important role in the worsening of these deficits over time. This further stresses the importance maintenance strategies for long-term functional outcome.

  14. Screened-exchange density functionals with broad accuracy for chemistry and solid-state physics.

    PubMed

    Peverati, Roberto; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-12-21

    We present two new exchange-correlation functionals for hybrid Kohn-Sham electronic structure calculations based on the nonseparable functional form introduced recently in the N12 and MN12-L functionals but now with the addition of screened Hartree-Fock exchange. The first functional depends on the density and the density gradient and is called N12-SX; the second functional depends on the density, the density gradient, and the kinetic energy density and is called MN12-SX. Both new functionals include a portion of the Hartree-Fock exchange at short-range, but Hartree-Fock exchange is screened at long range. The accuracies of the two new functionals are compared to those of the recent N12 and MN12-L local functionals to show the effect of adding screened exchange, are compared to the previously best available screened exchange functional, HSE06, and are compared to the best available global-hybrid generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and to a high-performance long-range-corrected meta-GGA.

  15. A functional proteomics screen of proteases in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    McKerrow, J. H.; Bhargava, V.; Hansell, E.; Huling, S.; Kuwahara, T.; Matley, M.; Coussens, L.; Warren, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteases facilitate several steps in cancer progression. To identify proteases most suitable for drug targeting, actual enzyme activity and not messenger RNA levels or immunoassay of protein is the ideal assay readout. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An automated microtiter plate assay format was modified to allow detection of all four major classes of proteases in tissue samples. Fifteen sets of colorectal carcinoma biopsies representing primary tumor, adjacent normal colon, and liver metastases were screened for protease activity. RESULTS: The major proteases detected were matrix metalloproteases (MMP9, MMP2, and MMP1), cathepsin B, cathepsin D, and the mast cell serine proteases, tryptase and chymase. Matrix metalloproteases were expressed at higher levels in the primary tumor than in adjacent normal tissue. The mast cell proteases, in contrast, were at very high levels in adjacent normal tissue, and not detectable in the metastases. Cathepsin B activity was significantly higher in the primary tumor, and highest in the metastases. The major proteases detected by activity assays were then localized in biopsy sections by immunohistochemistry. Mast cell proteases were abundant in adjacent normal tissue, because of infiltration of the lamina propria by mast cells. Matrix metalloproteases were localized to the tumor cells themselves; whereas, cathepsin B was predominantly expressed by macrophages at the leading edge of invading tumors. Although only low levels of urinary plasminogen activator were detected by direct enzyme assay, immunohistochemistry showed abundant protein within the tumor. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis, surveying all major classes of proteases by assays of activity rather than immunolocalization or in situ hybridization alone, serves to identify proteases whose activity is not completely balanced by endogenous inhibitors and which may be essential for tumor progression. These proteases are logical targets for initial efforts to produce low

  16. Clickable SBA-15 to screen functional groups for adsorption of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinsuo; Zhang, Xueying; Xu, Shutao; Liu, Jian; Tan, Feng; Li, Xinyong; Qu, Zhenping; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie

    2014-03-01

    Pharmaceutical antibiotics, as emerging contaminants, are usually composed of several functional groups that endow them with the ability to interact with adsorbents through different interactions. This makes the preparation of adsorbents tedious and time-consuming to screen appropriate functionalized materials. Herein, we describe the synthesis of clickable SBA-15 and demonstrate its feasibility as a screening material for the adsorption of antibiotics based on similar adsorption trends on materials with similar functional groups obtained by a click reaction and cocondensation/grafting methods.

  17. The screening effects of the screened exchange hybrid functional in surface systems: A case study on the CO/Pt(111) problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Gillen, R.; Robertson, J.

    2016-06-01

    The screened exchange (sX) hybrid functional has been widely used in computational material science. Although it has widely been studied in bulk systems, less is known about its functional behavior in surface systems which are crucial to many technologies such as materials synthesis and nano-electronic devices. Assessing the screening dependent functional behaviors in the surface systems is therefore important for its application in such systems. In this work, we investigate the screening effects of the sX in CO adsorption on Pt(111) surface. The differences between the sX and Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06) hybrid functionals, and the effects of screening parameters are studied. The screening has two effects: first, the HOMO-LUMO gap is screening dependent. This affects the site preference most significantly. In this work, atop adsorption of CO/Pt(111) is predicted by the hybrid functionals with screened exchange potential. The sX(1.44) gives the largest HOMO-LUMO gap for the isolated CO molecule. The adsorption energy difference between the atop and fcc site is also the largest by the sX(1.44) which is explained by the reduced metal d states to the CO 2π* state back-donation, with stronger effect for the fcc adsorption than for the atop adsorption; second, the adsorption energy is screening dependent. This can be seen by comparing the sX(2.38) and HSE06 which have different screening strengths. They show similar surface band structures for the CO adsorption but different adsorption energies, which is explained by the stronger CO 5σ state to the metal d states donation or the effectively screened Pauli repulsion. This work underlines the screening strength as a main difference between sX and HSE06, as well as an important hybrid functional parameter for surface calculation.

  18. Density-functional calculation of static screening in two-dimensional materials: The long-wavelength dielectric function of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohier, Thibault; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    We calculate the long-wavelength static screening properties of both neutral and doped graphene in the framework of density-functional theory. We use a plane-wave approach with periodic images in the third dimension and truncate the Coulomb interactions to eliminate spurious interlayer screening. We carefully address the issue of extracting two-dimensional dielectric properties from simulated three-dimensional potentials. We compare this method with analytical expressions derived for two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions in the random phase approximation. We evaluate the contributions of the deviation from conical bands, exchange correlation, and local fields. For momenta smaller than twice the Fermi wave vector, the static screening of graphene within the density-functional perturbative approach agrees with the results for conical bands within the random phase approximation and neglecting local fields. For larger momenta, we find that the analytical model underestimates the static dielectric function by ≈10 % , mainly due to the conical band approximation.

  19. Functional communication screening in individuals with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Sakina S; Boss, Michelle R

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of a novel instrument, the Functional Communication Scale (FCS), was determined for individuals with moderate-to-mild cognitive-communication deficits secondary to traumatic brain injury (TBI). A group design including 30 adults with confirmed diagnosis and communication problems was utilized. Conversational samples with each participant were videotaped and rated for 13 FCS items. Three raters with diverse clinical experiences rated the elicited samples. Results identified significant and positive relationships between the cognitive-communication severities and the total FCS scores. Significant inter- and intra-rater reliability scores were found for the three raters. The FCS also determined significant differences between individuals with and without concurrent aphasia or dysarthria. No obvious differences were found between males and females nor between individuals with the primary diagnosis of TBI vs other neurological aetiologies. These findings have implications for assessing the adequacy of functional communication of individuals who are candidates for community re-entry.

  20. Pose prediction and virtual screening performance of GOLD scoring functions in a standardized test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebeschuetz, John W.; Cole, Jason C.; Korb, Oliver

    2012-06-01

    The performance of all four GOLD scoring functions has been evaluated for pose prediction and virtual screening under the standardized conditions of the comparative docking and scoring experiment reported in this Edition. Excellent pose prediction and good virtual screening performance was demonstrated using unmodified protein models and default parameter settings. The best performing scoring function for both pose prediction and virtual screening was demonstrated to be the recently introduced scoring function ChemPLP. We conclude that existing docking programs already perform close to optimally in the cognate pose prediction experiments currently carried out and that more stringent pose prediction tests should be used in the future. These should employ cross-docking sets. Evaluation of virtual screening performance remains problematic and much remains to be done to improve the usefulness of publically available active and decoy sets for virtual screening. Finally we suggest that, for certain target/scoring function combinations, good enrichment may sometimes be a consequence of 2D property recognition rather than a modelling of the correct 3D interactions.

  1. Relationships between functional movement screen scores, maturation and physical performance in young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Radnor, John M; Rhodes, Benjamin C; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between functional movement screen scores, maturation and physical performance in young soccer players. Thirty males (11-16 years) were assessed for maturation, functional movement screen scores and a range of physical performance tests (squat jump, reactive strength index protocol and reactive agility cut). Older players significantly outperformed younger participants in all tests (P < 0.05; effect sizes = 1.25-3.40). Deep overhead squat, in-line lunge, active straight leg raise and rotary stability test were significantly correlated to all performance tests. In-line lunge performance explained the greatest variance in reactive strength index (adjusted R(2) = 47%) and reactive agility cut (adjusted R(2) = 38%) performance, whilst maturation was the strongest predictor of squat jump performance (adjusted R(2) = 46%). This study demonstrated that variation of physical performance in youth soccer players could be explained by a combination of both functional movement screen scores and maturation.

  2. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function. PMID:28265157

  3. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  4. Effects of screen size on smartphone functionality and usability for stroke patients with hemiparalysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Nam-Hae; Chang, Moonyoung

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The effect of screen size on smartphone functionality and usability for patients with stroke, considering both the non-dominant and dominant hand smartphone usage, was investigated in this study. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen patients with stroke participated in this study-five pre-non-dominant hand users and eight pre-dominant hand users. The smartphone screen sizes used were 4.2, 4.5, and 5.6 inches. Usability was assessed in terms of discomfort experienced during dragging operations, which was self-reported using a four-point Likert scale. Functionality was assessed in terms of completion time and the frequency of errors in the task requiring users to quickly touch numbers 0 through 9 in order on the keypad. [Results] For all three screen sizes, a significant difference between the dominant and non-dominant hands was found in usability, completion time, and frequency of errors. For dominant hand users, differences in usability and completion time were found among the three screen sizes. Among the three screen sizes, no difference in the frequency of errors was found in either of the groups. [Conclusion] This study will be useful as basic research on usability and functionality with stroke patients using only pre-non-dominant or pre-dominant hand.

  5. Screened hybrid density functionals for solid-state chemistry and physics.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2009-01-21

    Density functional theory incorporating hybrid exchange-correlation functionals has been extraordinarily successful in providing accurate, computationally tractable treatments of molecular properties. However, conventional hybrid functionals can be problematic for solids. Their nonlocal, Hartree-Fock-like exchange term decays slowly and incorporates unphysical features in metals and narrow-bandgap semiconductors. This article provides an overview of our group's work on designing hybrid functionals for solids. We focus on the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof screened hybrid functional [J. Chem. Phys. 2003, 118, 8207], its applications to the chemistry and physics of solids and surfaces, and our efforts to build upon its successes.

  6. 49 CFR 1544.407 - Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform screening functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... who perform screening functions. 1544.407 Section 1544.407 Transportation Other Regulations Relating...-job training as provided in § 1544.409 (b). (b) Use of training programs. Training for screeners must.... Before beginning on-the-job training, a screener trainee must pass the screener readiness test...

  7. A genetic screen of the Drosophila X chromosome for mutations that modify Deformed function.

    PubMed Central

    Florence, B; McGinnis, W

    1998-01-01

    We have screened the Drosophila X chromosome for genes whose dosage affects the function of the homeotic gene Deformed. One of these genes, extradenticle, encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that heterodimerizes with Deformed and other homeotic Hox proteins. Mutations in the nejire gene, which encodes a transcriptional adaptor protein belonging to the CBP/p300 family, also interact with Deformed. The other previously characterized gene identified as a Deformed interactor is Notch, which encodes a transmembrane receptor. These three genes underscore the importance of transcriptional regulation and cell-cell signaling in Hox function. Four novel genes were also identified in the screen. One of these, rancor, is required for appropriate embryonic expression of Deformed and another homeotic gene, labial. Both Notch and nejire affect the function of another Hox gene, Ultrabithorax, indicating they may be required for homeotic activity in general. PMID:9832527

  8. Measuring error rates in genomic perturbation screens: gold standards for human functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Traver; Brown, Kevin R; Sircoulomb, Fabrice; Rottapel, Robert; Moffat, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancement has opened the door to systematic genetics in mammalian cells. Genome-scale loss-of-function screens can assay fitness defects induced by partial gene knockdown, using RNA interference, or complete gene knockout, using new CRISPR techniques. These screens can reveal the basic blueprint required for cellular proliferation. Moreover, comparing healthy to cancerous tissue can uncover genes that are essential only in the tumor; these genes are targets for the development of specific anticancer therapies. Unfortunately, progress in this field has been hampered by off-target effects of perturbation reagents and poorly quantified error rates in large-scale screens. To improve the quality of information derived from these screens, and to provide a framework for understanding the capabilities and limitations of CRISPR technology, we derive gold-standard reference sets of essential and nonessential genes, and provide a Bayesian classifier of gene essentiality that outperforms current methods on both RNAi and CRISPR screens. Our results indicate that CRISPR technology is more sensitive than RNAi and that both techniques have nontrivial false discovery rates that can be mitigated by rigorous analytical methods. PMID:24987113

  9. The great screen anomaly--a new frontier in product discovery through functional metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Kielak, Anna Maria; Elsas, Jan Dirk van

    2012-02-01

    Functional metagenomics, the study of the collective genome of a microbial community by expressing it in a foreign host, is an emerging field in biotechnology. Over the past years, the possibility of novel product discovery through metagenomics has developed rapidly. Thus, metagenomics has been heralded as a promising mining strategy of resources for the biotechnological and pharmaceutical industry. However, in spite of innovative work in the field of functional genomics in recent years, yields from function-based metagenomics studies still fall short of producing significant amounts of new products that are valuable for biotechnological processes. Thus, a new set of strategies is required with respect to fostering gene expression in comparison to the traditional work. These new strategies should address a major issue, that is, how to successfully express a set of unknown genes of unknown origin in a foreign host in high throughput. This article is an opinionating review of functional metagenomic screening of natural microbial communities, with a focus on the optimization of new product discovery. It first summarizes current major bottlenecks in functional metagenomics and then provides an overview of the general metagenomic assessment strategies, with a focus on the challenges that are met in the screening for, and selection of, target genes in metagenomic libraries. To identify possible screening limitations, strategies to achieve optimal gene expression are reviewed, examining the molecular events all the way from the transcription level through to the secretion of the target gene product.

  10. Screening of Cognitive Function and Hearing Impairment in Older Adults: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lena Lar Nar; Yu, Joannie Ka Yin; Chan, Shaina Shing; Tong, Michael Chi Fai

    2014-01-01

    Background. Previous research has found that hearing loss is associated with poorer cognitive function. The question is that when a hearing impairment is being compensated for by appropriately fitted monaural hearing aids, special precautions are still needed when screening cognitive function in older adults. Objective. This research examined cognitive function in elderly hearing aid users who used monaural hearing aids and whether the presence of a hearing impairment should be accounted for when screening cognitive function in these individuals. Methods. Auditory thresholds, sentence reception thresholds, and self-reported outcomes with hearing aids were measured in 34 older hearing aid users to ensure hearing aids were appropriately fitted. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) results obtained in these participants were then compared to normative data obtained in a general older population exhibiting similar demographic characteristics. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to examine the effects of demographic and auditory variables on MMSE scores. Conclusions. Results showed that, even with appropriately fitted hearing aids, cognitive decline was significant. Besides the factors commonly measured in the literature, we believed that auditory deprivation was not being fully compensated for by hearing aids. Most importantly, screening of cognitive function should take into account the effects of hearing impairment, even when hearing devices have been appropriately fitted. PMID:25140321

  11. Efficacy of screening immune system function in at-risk newborns.

    PubMed

    Pavlovski, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the introduction of a screening test to highlight impaired immune system status for newborn infants and its efficacy as a preventative clinical measure. Moreover, it is suggested that screening of the infantile immune system has the potential to highlight susceptibility to a range of infant and childhood diseases, bestowing an opportunity to introduce early intervention to reduce the incidence of these diseases. Development of the neonatal immune system is an important health issue, implicated in many childhood problems such as allergies, infection, and autoimmunity. The neonate has a limited immune system and ability to combat bacteria. Depleted levels of the tripeptide reduced glutathione (GSH) have been linked to numerous conditions and its intracellular level is acknowledged as an indicator of immune system function. Introduction of an immune system screening programme for infants is formally reviewed and assessed. Several benefits are reported in the treatment of impaired immune systems, a trial screening programme is proposed for at-risk infants to gather further evidence as to its efficacy. Infants at risk of impaired immune system function include cystic fibrosis, premature infants, and low birth weight infants. The interventions include breastfeeding, milk banks, and appropriate formula to support the immune system.

  12. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D. B.; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A.; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A.; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila. PMID:26215380

  13. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D B; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-07-28

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila.

  14. A Multi-Functional Imaging Approach to High-Content Protein Interaction Screening

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Daniel R.; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O.; Weitsman, Gregory; Carlin, Leo M.; Ofo, Enyinnaya; Keppler, Melanie; Barber, Paul R.; Tullis, Iain D. C.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M.

    2012-01-01

    Functional imaging can provide a level of quantification that is not possible in what might be termed traditional high-content screening. This is due to the fact that the current state-of-the-art high-content screening systems take the approach of scaling-up single cell assays, and are therefore based on essentially pictorial measures as assay indicators. Such phenotypic analyses have become extremely sophisticated, advancing screening enormously, but this approach can still be somewhat subjective. We describe the development, and validation, of a prototype high-content screening platform that combines steady-state fluorescence anisotropy imaging with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). This functional approach allows objective, quantitative screening of small molecule libraries in protein-protein interaction assays. We discuss the development of the instrumentation, the process by which information on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be extracted from wide-field, acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging and cross-checking of this modality using lifetime imaging by time-correlated single-photon counting. Imaging of cells expressing protein constructs where eGFP and mRFP1 are linked with amino-acid chains of various lengths (7, 19 and 32 amino acids) shows the two methodologies to be highly correlated. We validate our approach using a small-scale inhibitor screen of a Cdc42 FRET biosensor probe expressed in epidermoid cancer cells (A431) in a 96 microwell-plate format. We also show that acceptor fluorescence anisotropy can be used to measure variations in hetero-FRET in protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate this using a screen of inhibitors of internalization of the transmembrane receptor, CXCR4. These assays enable us to demonstrate all the capabilities of the instrument, image processing and analytical techniques that have been developed. Direct correlation between acceptor anisotropy and donor FLIM is observed for FRET assays, providing

  15. ScreenBEAM: a novel meta-analysis algorithm for functional genomics screens via Bayesian hierarchical modeling | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Functional genomics (FG) screens, using RNAi or CRISPR technology, have become a standard tool for systematic, genome-wide loss-of-function studies for therapeutic target discovery. As in many large-scale assays, however, off-target effects, variable reagents' potency and experimental noise must be accounted for appropriately control for false positives.

  16. Certain Actions from the Functional Movement Screen Do Not Provide an Indication of Dynamic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lockie, Robert G.; Callaghan, Samuel J.; Jordan, Corrin A.; Luczo, Tawni M.; Jeffriess, Matthew D.; Jalilvand, Farzad; Schultz, Adrian B.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stability is an essential physical component for team sport athletes. Certain Functional Movement Screen (FMS) exercises (deep squat; left- and right-leg hurdle step; left- and right-leg in-line lunge [ILL]; left- and right-leg active straight-leg raise; and trunk stability push-up [TSPU]) have been suggested as providing an indication of dynamic stability. No research has investigated relationships between these screens and an established test of dynamic stability such as the modified Star Excursion Balance Test (mSEBT), which measures lower-limb reach distance in posteromedial, medial, and anteromedial directions, in team sport athletes. Forty-one male and female team sport athletes completed the screens and the mSEBT. Participants were split into high-, intermediate-, and low-performing groups according to the mean of the excursions when both the left and right legs were used for the mSEBT stance. Any between-group differences in the screens and mSEBT were determined via a one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc adjustment (p < 0.05). Data was pooled for a correlation analysis (p < 0.05). There were no between-group differences in any of the screens, and only two positive correlations between the screens and the mSEBT (TSPU and right stance leg posteromedial excursion, r = 0.37; left-leg ILL and left stance leg posteromedial excursion, r = 0.46). The mSEBT clearly indicated participants with different dynamic stability capabilities. In contrast to the mSEBT, the selected FMS exercises investigated in this study have a limited capacity to identify dynamic stability in team sport athletes. PMID:26557187

  17. Genetic screens and functional genomics using CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    PubMed

    Hartenian, Ella; Doench, John G

    2015-04-01

    Functional genomics attempts to understand the genome by perturbing the flow of information from DNA to RNA to protein, in order to learn how gene dysfunction leads to disease. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is the newest tool in the geneticist's toolbox, allowing researchers to edit DNA with unprecedented ease, speed and accuracy, and representing a novel means to perform genome-wide genetic screens to discover gene function. In this review, we first summarize the discovery and characterization of CRISPR/Cas9, and then compare it to other genome engineering technologies. We discuss its initial use in screening applications, with a focus on optimizing on-target activity and minimizing off-target effects. Finally, we comment on future challenges and opportunities afforded by this technology.

  18. Effects of d-electrons in pseudopotential screened-exchange density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang; Canning, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    We report a theoretical study on the role of shallow d states in the screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA) band structure of binary semiconductor systems. We found that inaccurate pseudo-wave functions can lead to (1) an overestimation of the screened-exchange interaction between the localized d states and the delocalized higher energy s and p states, and (2) an underestimation of the screened-exchange interaction between the d states. The resulting sX-LDA band structures have substantially smaller band gaps compared with experiments. We correct the pseudo-wave functions of d states by including the semicore s and p states of the same shell in the valence states. The correction of pseudo-wave functions yields band gaps and d-state binding energies in good agreement with experiments and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave sX-LDA calculations. Compared with the quasiparticle GW method, our sX-LDA results shows not only similar quality on the band gaps but also much better d-state binding energies. Combined with its capability of ground-state structure calculation, the sX-LDA is expected to be a valuable theoretical tool for the II-VI and III-V (especially the III-N) bulk semiconductors and nanostructure studies.

  19. Function-specific virtual screening for GPCR ligands using a combined scoring method

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Vischer, Henry F.; McNaught-Flores, Daniel; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J. P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The ability of scoring functions to correctly select and rank docking poses of small molecules in protein binding sites is highly target dependent, which presents a challenge for structure-based drug discovery. Here we describe a virtual screening method that combines an energy-based docking scoring function with a molecular interaction fingerprint (IFP) to identify new ligands based on G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) crystal structures. The consensus scoring method is prospectively evaluated by: 1) the discovery of chemically novel, fragment-like, high affinity histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonists/inverse agonists, 2) the selective structure-based identification of ß2-adrenoceptor (ß2R) agonists, and 3) the experimental validation and comparison of the combined and individual scoring approaches. Systematic retrospective virtual screening simulations allowed the definition of scoring cut-offs for the identification of H1R and ß2R ligands and the selection of an optimal ß-adrenoceptor crystal structure for the discrimination between ß2R agonists and antagonists. The consensus approach resulted in the experimental validation of 53% of the ß2R and 73% of the H1R virtual screening hits with up to nanomolar affinities and potencies. The selective identification of ß2R agonists shows the possibilities of structure-based prediction of GPCR ligand function by integrating protein-ligand binding mode information. PMID:27339552

  20. Functional Movement Screen Factorial Validity and Measurement Invariance Across Sex Among Collegiate Student-Athletes.

    PubMed

    Gnacinski, Stacy L; Cornell, David J; Meyer, Barbara B; Arvinen-Barrow, Monna; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E

    2016-12-01

    Gnacinski, SL, Cornell, DJ, Meyer, BB, Arvinen-Barrow, M, and Earl-Boehm, JE. Functional Movement Screen factorial validity and measurement invariance across sex among collegiate student-athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3388-3395, 2016-The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a screening tool used to evaluate functional movement quality and subsequent musculoskeletal injury risk. Despite recent research on the factorial validity of the FMS, no confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) has been conducted to examine measurement invariance across sex among student-athletes. The primary purpose of the current study was to confirm the factor structure of the FMS measurement model in a collegiate student-athlete population. It was hypothesized that the 1-factor model would demonstrate better model fit than the recently proposed 2-factor model. The secondary purpose of the study was to examine FMS measurement invariance across sex using the previously identified measurement model. It was hypothesized that FMS measurement invariance would hold across sex. Male (n = 88) and female (n = 88) collegiate student-athletes completed FMS screening during the off-season. Factorial validity was examined using CFA procedures, and model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood estimation. Measurement invariance was examined by comparison of fit indices between hierarchically constrained models. Results revealed support for both the 1- and the 2-factor models; however, the 2-factor model failed to fit the data significantly better than the 1-factor model. Results also indicated that measurement invariance did not hold across sex, indicating that the FMS sum score construct is not measured equivalently in male and female populations. Collectively, results provide evidence for the use of the unidimensional FMS sum score among collegiate student-athletes, yet prompt caution because it relates to the evaluation of sex differences in sum or movement pattern scores.

  1. To examine the relationship between the Functional Movement Screen and the Landing Error Scoring System in an active collegiate population.

    PubMed

    Everard, E; Harrison, Aj; Lyons, M

    2016-07-25

    In recent years there has been an increasing focus on movement screening as the principal aspect of pre-participation testing. Two of the most common movement screening tools are the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS). Several studies have examined the reliability and validity of these tools but so far there have been no studies comparing the results of these two screening tools against each other. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between Functional Movement Screen (FMS) scores and Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) scores. Ninety-eight male college athletes actively competing in sport (Gaelic games, soccer, athletics, boxing/mixed martial arts, Olympic weight lifting) participated in the study and performed the FMS and LESS screens. Both the 21 point and 100 point scoring systems were used to score the FMS. Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between the two screening scores. The results showed a significant moderate correlation between FMS and LESS scores (rho 100 and 21 point = -.528; -.487; p< .001). In addition, r values of .26 and .23 indicate a poor shared variance between the two screens. The results indicate that performing well in one of the screens does not necessarily equate to performing well in the other. This has practical implications as it highlights that both screens may assess different movement patterns and should not be used as a substitute for each other.

  2. Novel High-Throughput Screening Approach for Functional Metal/Oxide Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Ofer; Toroker, Maytal Caspary

    2016-04-12

    Metal/oxide interfaces have long been studied for their fundamental importance in material microstructure as well as their broad applicability in electronic devices. However, the challenge involved in characterizing the relation between structure and electron transport of a large number of metal/oxide combinations inhibits the search for interfaces with improved functionality. Therefore, we develop a novel high-throughput screening approach that combines computational and theoretical techniques. We use a Density Functional Theory + U (DFT+U) quantum mechanical formalism to produce effective Schrödinger equations, which are solved by wave packet propagation to simulate charge transport across the metal/oxide interface. We demonstrate this method on α-Fe2O3/Mt interfaces, for Mt = Ag, Al, Au, Ir, Pd, or Pt metals. We use this novel method to screen for binary alloys of these metals at the α-Fe2O3/Mt interface and perform a successful validation test of the methodology. Finally, we correlate the interface potential energy and the charge transport permeability through the interface. Counterintuitively, among the interfaces studied, we find that higher mismatch interfaces have better charge transport permeability. We anticipate that this method will be useful as a computationally tractable strategy to perform high-throughput screening for new metal/oxide interfaces.

  3. Yeast functional screen to identify genes conferring salt stress tolerance in Salicornia europaea

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Yoshiki; Sawabe, Shogo; Kainuma, Kenta; Katsuhara, Maki; Shibasaka, Mineo; Suzuki, Masanori; Yamamoto, Kosuke; Oguri, Suguru; Sakamoto, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is a critical environmental factor that adversely affects crop productivity. Halophytes have evolved various mechanisms to adapt to saline environments. Salicornia europaea L. is one of the most salt-tolerant plant species. It does not have special salt-secreting structures like a salt gland or salt bladder, and is therefore a good model for studying the common mechanisms underlying plant salt tolerance. To identify candidate genes encoding key proteins in the mediation of salt tolerance in S. europaea, we performed a functional screen of a cDNA library in yeast. The library was screened for genes that allowed the yeast to grow in the presence of 1.3 M NaCl. We obtained three full-length S. europaea genes that confer salt tolerance. The genes are predicted to encode (1) a novel protein highly homologous to thaumatin-like proteins, (2) a novel coiled-coil protein of unknown function, and (3) a novel short peptide of 32 residues. Exogenous application of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 32 residues improved salt tolerance of Arabidopsis. The approach described in this report provides a rapid assay system for large-scale screening of S. europaea genes involved in salt stress tolerance and supports the identification of genes responsible for such mechanisms. These genes may be useful candidates for improving crop salt tolerance by genetic transformation. PMID:26579166

  4. A functional genomics screen in planarians reveals regulators of whole-brain regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H; Brubacher, John L; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-01-01

    Planarians regenerate all body parts after injury, including the central nervous system (CNS). We capitalized on this distinctive trait and completed a gene expression-guided functional screen to identify factors that regulate diverse aspects of neural regeneration in Schmidtea mediterranea. Our screen revealed molecules that influence neural cell fates, support the formation of a major connective hub, and promote reestablishment of chemosensory behavior. We also identified genes that encode signaling molecules with roles in head regeneration, including some that are produced in a previously uncharacterized parenchymal population of cells. Finally, we explored genes downregulated during planarian regeneration and characterized, for the first time, glial cells in the planarian CNS that respond to injury by repressing several transcripts. Collectively, our studies revealed diverse molecules and cell types that underlie an animal’s ability to regenerate its brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17002.001 PMID:27612384

  5. A functional genomics screen in planarians reveals regulators of whole-brain regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H; Brubacher, John L; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-09-09

    Planarians regenerate all body parts after injury, including the central nervous system (CNS). We capitalized on this distinctive trait and completed a gene expression-guided functional screen to identify factors that regulate diverse aspects of neural regeneration in Schmidtea mediterranea. Our screen revealed molecules that influence neural cell fates, support the formation of a major connective hub, and promote reestablishment of chemosensory behavior. We also identified genes that encode signaling molecules with roles in head regeneration, including some that are produced in a previously uncharacterized parenchymal population of cells. Finally, we explored genes downregulated during planarian regeneration and characterized, for the first time, glial cells in the planarian CNS that respond to injury by repressing several transcripts. Collectively, our studies revealed diverse molecules and cell types that underlie an animal's ability to regenerate its brain.

  6. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F.; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  7. A loss of function screen identifies nine new radiation susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B. Sugyo, Aya; Imai, Takashi; Saga, Tsuneo; Harada, Yoshi-nobu

    2007-12-21

    Genomic instability is considered a hallmark of carcinogenesis, and dysfunction of DNA repair and cell cycle regulation in response to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation are thought to be important factors in the early stages of genomic instability. We performed cell-based functional screening using an RNA interference library targeting 200 genes in human cells. We identified three known and nine new radiation susceptibility genes, eight of which are linked directly or potentially with cell cycle progression. Cell cycle analysis on four of the genes not previously linked to cell cycle progression demonstrated that one, ZDHHC8, was associated with the G{sub 2}/M checkpoint in response to DNA damage. Further study of the 12 radiation susceptibility genes identified in this screen may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle progression, DNA repair, cell death, cell growth and genomic instability, and to develop new radiation sensitizing agents for radiotherapy.

  8. Towards Functional Annotation of the Preimplantation Transcriptome: An RNAi Screen in Mammalian Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wei; Dai, Xiangpeng; Marcho, Chelsea; Han, Zhengbin; Zhang, Kun; Tremblay, Kimberly D.; Mager, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    With readily available transcriptome-wide data, understanding the role of each expressed gene is an essential next step. Although RNAi technologies allow for genome-wide screens in cell culture, these approaches cannot replace strategies for discovery in the embryo. Here we present, for the first time, a knockdown screen in mouse preimplantation embryos. Early mammalian development encompasses dynamic cellular, molecular and epigenetic events that are largely conserved from mouse to man. We assayed 712 genes for requirements during preimplantation. We identified 59 genes required for successful development or outgrowth and implantation. We have characterized each phenotype and revealed cellular, molecular, and lineage specific defects following knockdown of transcript. Induced network analyses demonstrate this as a valid approach to identify networks of genes that play important roles during preimplantation. Our approach provides a robust and efficient strategy towards identification of novel phenotypes during mouse preimplantation and facilitates functional annotation of the mammalian transcriptome. PMID:27869233

  9. Reliability of clinician scoring of the functional movement screen to assess movement patterns.

    PubMed

    Stobierski, Lisa M; Fayson, Shirleeah D; Minthorn, Lindsay M; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Welch, Cailee E

    2015-05-01

    Clinical Scenario: Injuries are inevitable in the physically active population. As a part of preventive medicine, health care professionals often seek clinical tools that can be used in real time to identify factors that may predispose individuals to these injuries. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS), a clinical tool consisting of 7 individual tasks, has been reported as useful in identifying individuals in various populations that may be susceptible to musculoskeletal injuries. If factors that may predispose physically active individuals to injury could be identified before participation, clinicians may be able to develop a training plan based on FMS scores, which could potentially decrease the likelihood of injury and overall time missed from physical activities. However, in order for a screening tool to be used clinically, it must demonstrate acceptable reliability. Focused Clinical Question: Are clinicians reliable at scoring the FMS, in real time, to assess movement patterns of physically active individuals?

  10. Differences in performance on the functional movement screen between chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Min-Joo; Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Differences in scores on the Functional Movement Screen between patients with chronic lower back pain and healthy control subjects were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] In all, 20 chronic lower back pain patients and 20 healthy control subjects were recruited. Chronic lower back pain patients and healthy controls performed the Functional Movement Screen (deep squat, hurdle step, inline lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability pushup, and rotary stability). The Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze differences in Functional Movement Screen scores between the two groups. [Results] Chronic lower back pain patients scored lower on the Functional Movement Screen total composite compared with healthy control subjects. Chronic lower back pain patients scored lower on Functional Movement Screen subtests including the deep squat, hurdle step, active straight leg raise, and rotary stability tests. [Conclusion] The deep squat, hurdle step, active straight leg raise, and rotary stability tasks of the Functional Movement Screen can be recommended as a functional assessment tools to identify functional deficits in chronic lower back pain patients. PMID:27512272

  11. Differences in performance on the functional movement screen between chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    Ko, Min-Joo; Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] Differences in scores on the Functional Movement Screen between patients with chronic lower back pain and healthy control subjects were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] In all, 20 chronic lower back pain patients and 20 healthy control subjects were recruited. Chronic lower back pain patients and healthy controls performed the Functional Movement Screen (deep squat, hurdle step, inline lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability pushup, and rotary stability). The Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze differences in Functional Movement Screen scores between the two groups. [Results] Chronic lower back pain patients scored lower on the Functional Movement Screen total composite compared with healthy control subjects. Chronic lower back pain patients scored lower on Functional Movement Screen subtests including the deep squat, hurdle step, active straight leg raise, and rotary stability tests. [Conclusion] The deep squat, hurdle step, active straight leg raise, and rotary stability tasks of the Functional Movement Screen can be recommended as a functional assessment tools to identify functional deficits in chronic lower back pain patients.

  12. Vinardo: A Scoring Function Based on Autodock Vina Improves Scoring, Docking, and Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Rodrigo; Villarreal, Marcos A

    2016-01-01

    Autodock Vina is a very popular, and highly cited, open source docking program. Here we present a scoring function which we call Vinardo (Vina RaDii Optimized). Vinardo is based on Vina, and was trained through a novel approach, on state of the art datasets. We show that the traditional approach to train empirical scoring functions, using linear regression to optimize the correlation of predicted and experimental binding affinities, does not result in a function with optimal docking capabilities. On the other hand, a combination of scoring, minimization, and re-docking on carefully curated training datasets allowed us to develop a simplified scoring function with optimum docking performance. This article provides an overview of the development of the Vinardo scoring function, highlights its differences with Vina, and compares the performance of the two scoring functions in scoring, docking and virtual screening applications. Vinardo outperforms Vina in all tests performed, for all datasets analyzed. The Vinardo scoring function is available as an option within Smina, a fork of Vina, which is freely available under the GNU Public License v2.0 from http://smina.sf.net. Precompiled binaries, source code, documentation and a tutorial for using Smina to run the Vinardo scoring function are available at the same address.

  13. Vinardo: A Scoring Function Based on Autodock Vina Improves Scoring, Docking, and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Marcos A.

    2016-01-01

    Autodock Vina is a very popular, and highly cited, open source docking program. Here we present a scoring function which we call Vinardo (Vina RaDii Optimized). Vinardo is based on Vina, and was trained through a novel approach, on state of the art datasets. We show that the traditional approach to train empirical scoring functions, using linear regression to optimize the correlation of predicted and experimental binding affinities, does not result in a function with optimal docking capabilities. On the other hand, a combination of scoring, minimization, and re-docking on carefully curated training datasets allowed us to develop a simplified scoring function with optimum docking performance. This article provides an overview of the development of the Vinardo scoring function, highlights its differences with Vina, and compares the performance of the two scoring functions in scoring, docking and virtual screening applications. Vinardo outperforms Vina in all tests performed, for all datasets analyzed. The Vinardo scoring function is available as an option within Smina, a fork of Vina, which is freely available under the GNU Public License v2.0 from http://smina.sf.net. Precompiled binaries, source code, documentation and a tutorial for using Smina to run the Vinardo scoring function are available at the same address. PMID:27171006

  14. An Integrated Microfluidic Processor for DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Library Functional Screening.

    PubMed

    MacConnell, Andrew B; Price, Alexander K; Paegel, Brian M

    2017-03-13

    DNA-encoded synthesis is rekindling interest in combinatorial compound libraries for drug discovery and in technology for automated and quantitative library screening. Here, we disclose a microfluidic circuit that enables functional screens of DNA-encoded compound beads. The device carries out library bead distribution into picoliter-scale assay reagent droplets, photochemical cleavage of compound from the bead, assay incubation, laser-induced fluorescence-based assay detection, and fluorescence-activated droplet sorting to isolate hits. DNA-encoded compound beads (10-μm diameter) displaying a photocleavable positive control inhibitor pepstatin A were mixed (1920 beads, 729 encoding sequences) with negative control beads (58 000 beads, 1728 encoding sequences) and screened for cathepsin D inhibition using a biochemical enzyme activity assay. The circuit sorted 1518 hit droplets for collection following 18 min incubation over a 240 min analysis. Visual inspection of a subset of droplets (1188 droplets) yielded a 24% false discovery rate (1166 pepstatin A beads; 366 negative control beads). Using template barcoding strategies, it was possible to count hit collection beads (1863) using next-generation sequencing data. Bead-specific barcodes enabled replicate counting, and the false discovery rate was reduced to 2.6% by only considering hit-encoding sequences that were observed on >2 beads. This work represents a complete distributable small molecule discovery platform, from microfluidic miniaturized automation to ultrahigh-throughput hit deconvolution by sequencing.

  15. An Integrated Microfluidic Processor for DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Library Functional Screening

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    DNA-encoded synthesis is rekindling interest in combinatorial compound libraries for drug discovery and in technology for automated and quantitative library screening. Here, we disclose a microfluidic circuit that enables functional screens of DNA-encoded compound beads. The device carries out library bead distribution into picoliter-scale assay reagent droplets, photochemical cleavage of compound from the bead, assay incubation, laser-induced fluorescence-based assay detection, and fluorescence-activated droplet sorting to isolate hits. DNA-encoded compound beads (10-μm diameter) displaying a photocleavable positive control inhibitor pepstatin A were mixed (1920 beads, 729 encoding sequences) with negative control beads (58 000 beads, 1728 encoding sequences) and screened for cathepsin D inhibition using a biochemical enzyme activity assay. The circuit sorted 1518 hit droplets for collection following 18 min incubation over a 240 min analysis. Visual inspection of a subset of droplets (1188 droplets) yielded a 24% false discovery rate (1166 pepstatin A beads; 366 negative control beads). Using template barcoding strategies, it was possible to count hit collection beads (1863) using next-generation sequencing data. Bead-specific barcodes enabled replicate counting, and the false discovery rate was reduced to 2.6% by only considering hit-encoding sequences that were observed on >2 beads. This work represents a complete distributable small molecule discovery platform, from microfluidic miniaturized automation to ultrahigh-throughput hit deconvolution by sequencing. PMID:28199790

  16. Functional screening of intracardiac cell transplants using two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wen; Soonpaa, Mark H; Field, Loren J; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Firulli, Anthony B; Shou, Weinian; Rubart, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Although the adult mammalian myocardium exhibits a limited ability to undergo regenerative growth, its intrinsic renewal rate is insufficient to compensate for myocyte loss during cardiac disease. Transplantation of donor cardiomyocytes or cardiomyogenic stem cells is considered a promising strategy for reconstitution of cardiac mass, provided the engrafted cells functionally integrate with host myocardium and actively contribute to its contractile force. The authors previously developed a two-photon fluorescence microscopy-based assay that allows in situ screening of donor cell function after intracardiac delivery of the cells. This report reviews the techniques of two-photon fluorescence microscopy and summarizes its application for quantifying the extent to which a variety of donor cell types stably and functionally couple with the recipient myocardium.

  17. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    George, Amee J.; Purdue, Brooke W.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Thomas, Daniel W.; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A.; Morgan, Kylie A.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Thomas, Walter G.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R–EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R–EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R–EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR–EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  18. A new age in functional genomics using CRISPR/Cas9 in arrayed library screening

    PubMed Central

    Agrotis, Alexander; Ketteler, Robin

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR technology has rapidly changed the face of biological research, such that precise genome editing has now become routine for many labs within several years of its initial development. What makes CRISPR/Cas9 so revolutionary is the ability to target a protein (Cas9) to an exact genomic locus, through designing a specific short complementary nucleotide sequence, that together with a common scaffold sequence, constitute the guide RNA bridging the protein and the DNA. Wild-type Cas9 cleaves both DNA strands at its target sequence, but this protein can also be modified to exert many other functions. For instance, by attaching an activation domain to catalytically inactive Cas9 and targeting a promoter region, it is possible to stimulate the expression of a specific endogenous gene. In principle, any genomic region can be targeted, and recent efforts have successfully generated pooled guide RNA libraries for coding and regulatory regions of human, mouse and Drosophila genomes with high coverage, thus facilitating functional phenotypic screening. In this review, we will highlight recent developments in the area of CRISPR-based functional genomics and discuss potential future directions, with a special focus on mammalian cell systems and arrayed library screening. PMID:26442115

  19. Efficacy of functional movement screening for predicting injuries in coast guard cadets.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Cosio-Lima, Ludimila M; Reynolds, Katy L; Shumway, Richard S

    2015-05-01

    Functional movement screening (FMS) examines the ability of individuals to perform highly specific movements with the aim of identifying individuals who have functional limitations or asymmetries. It is assumed that individuals who can more effectively accomplish the required movements have a lower injury risk. This study determined the ability of FMS to predict injuries in the United States Coast Guard (USCG) cadets. Seven hundred seventy male and 275 female USCG freshman cadets were administered the 7 FMS tests before the physically intense 8-week Summer Warfare Annual Basic (SWAB) training. Physical training-related injuries were recorded during SWAB training. Cumulative injury incidence was calculated at various FMS cutpoint scores. The ability of the FMS total score to predict injuries was examined by calculating sensitivity and specificity. Determination of the FMS cutpoint that maximized specificity and sensitivity was determined from the Youden's index (sensitivity + specificity - 1). For men, FMS scores ≤ 12 were associated with higher injury risk than scores >12; for women, FMS scores ≤ 15 were associated with higher injury risk than scores >15. The Youden's Index indicated that the optimal FMS cutpoint was ≤ 11 for men (22% sensitivity, 87% specificity) and ≤ 14 for women (60% sensitivity, 61% specificity). Functional movement screening demonstrated moderate prognostic accuracy for determining injury risk among female Coast Guard cadets but relatively low accuracy among male cadets. Attempting to predict injury risk based on the FMS test seems to have some limited promise based on the present and past investigations.

  20. A new age in functional genomics using CRISPR/Cas9 in arrayed library screening.

    PubMed

    Agrotis, Alexander; Ketteler, Robin

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR technology has rapidly changed the face of biological research, such that precise genome editing has now become routine for many labs within several years of its initial development. What makes CRISPR/Cas9 so revolutionary is the ability to target a protein (Cas9) to an exact genomic locus, through designing a specific short complementary nucleotide sequence, that together with a common scaffold sequence, constitute the guide RNA bridging the protein and the DNA. Wild-type Cas9 cleaves both DNA strands at its target sequence, but this protein can also be modified to exert many other functions. For instance, by attaching an activation domain to catalytically inactive Cas9 and targeting a promoter region, it is possible to stimulate the expression of a specific endogenous gene. In principle, any genomic region can be targeted, and recent efforts have successfully generated pooled guide RNA libraries for coding and regulatory regions of human, mouse and Drosophila genomes with high coverage, thus facilitating functional phenotypic screening. In this review, we will highlight recent developments in the area of CRISPR-based functional genomics and discuss potential future directions, with a special focus on mammalian cell systems and arrayed library screening.

  1. A two-layered classifier based on the radial basis function for the screening of thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Masala, G L; Golosio, B; Cutzu, R; Pola, R

    2013-11-01

    The thalassaemias are blood disorders with hereditary transmission. Their distribution is global, with particular incidence in areas affected by malaria. Their diagnosis is mainly based on haematologic and genetic analyses. The aim of this study was to differentiate between persons with the thalassaemia trait and normal subjects by inspecting characteristics of haemochromocytometric data. The paper proposes an original method that is useful in screening activity for thalassaemia classification. A complete working system with a friendly graphical user interface is presented. A unique feature of the presented work is the adoption of a two-layered classification system based on Radial basis function, which improves the performance of the system.

  2. Discovering novel enzymes by functional screening of plurigenomic libraries from alga-associated Flavobacteriia and Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Martin, Marjolaine; Vandermies, Marie; Joyeux, Coline; Martin, Renée; Barbeyron, Tristan; Michel, Gurvan; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2016-01-01

    Alga-associated microorganisms, in the context of their numerous interactions with the host and the complexity of the marine environment, are known to produce diverse hydrolytic enzymes with original biochemistry. We recently isolated several macroalgal-polysaccharide-degrading bacteria from the surface of the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum. These active isolates belong to two classes: the Flavobacteriia and the Gammaproteobacteria. In the present study, we constructed two "plurigenomic" (with multiple bacterial genomes) libraries with the 5 most interesting isolates (regarding their phylogeny and their enzymatic activities) of each class (Fv and Gm libraries). Both libraries were screened for diverse hydrolytic activities. Five activities, out of the 48 previously identified in the natural polysaccharolytic isolates, were recovered by functional screening: a xylanase (GmXyl7), a beta-glucosidase (GmBg1), an esterase (GmEst7) and two iota-carrageenases (Fvi2.5 and Gmi1.3). We discuss here the potential role of the used host-cell, the average DNA insert-sizes and the used restriction enzymes on the divergent screening yields obtained for both libraries and get deeper inside the "great screen anomaly". Interestingly, the discovered esterase probably stands for a novel family of homoserine o-acetyltransferase-like-esterases, while the two iota-carrageenases represent new members of the poorly known GH82 family (containing only 19 proteins since its description in 2000). These original results demonstrate the efficiency of our uncommon "plurigenomic" library approach and the underexplored potential of alga-associated cultivable microbiota for the identification of novel and algal-specific enzymes.

  3. Functional genomic screen and network analysis reveal novel modifiers of tauopathy dissociated from tau phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S.; Jackson, George R.

    2011-01-01

    A functional genetic screen using loss-of-function and gain-of-function alleles was performed to identify modifiers of tau-induced neurotoxicity using the 2N/4R (full-length) isoform of wild-type human tau expressed in the fly retina. We previously reported eye pigment mutations, which create dysfunctional lysosomes, as potent modifiers; here, we report 37 additional genes identified from ∼1900 genes screened, including the kinases shaggy/GSK-3beta, par-1/MARK, CamKI and Mekk1. Tau acts synergistically with Mekk1 and p38 to down-regulate extracellular regulated kinase activity, with a corresponding decrease in AT8 immunoreactivity (pS202/T205), suggesting that tau can participate in signaling pathways to regulate its own kinases. Modifiers showed poor correlation with tau phosphorylation (using the AT8, 12E8 and AT270 epitopes); moreover, tested suppressors of wild-type tau were equally effective in suppressing toxicity of a phosphorylation-resistant S11A tau construct, demonstrating that changes in tau phosphorylation state are not required to suppress or enhance its toxicity. Genes related to autophagy, the cell cycle, RNA-associated proteins and chromatin-binding proteins constitute a large percentage of identified modifiers. Other functional categories identified include mitochondrial proteins, lipid trafficking, Golgi proteins, kinesins and dynein and the Hsp70/Hsp90-organizing protein (Hop). Network analysis uncovered several other genes highly associated with the functional modifiers, including genes related to the PI3K, Notch, BMP/TGF-β and Hedgehog pathways, and nuclear trafficking. Activity of GSK-3β is strongly upregulated due to TDP-43 expression, and reduced GSK-3β dosage is also a common suppressor of Aβ42 and TDP-43 toxicity. These findings suggest therapeutic targets other than mitigation of tau phosphorylation. PMID:21949350

  4. Functional Genomic Screening Approaches in Mechanistic Toxicology and Potential Future Applications of CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; McHale, Cliona M.; Smith, Martyn T; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing variability in the extent and nature of responses to environmental exposures is a critical aspect of human health risk assessment. Chemical toxicants act by many different mechanisms, however, and the genes involved in adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) and AOP networks are not yet characterized. Functional genomic approaches can reveal both toxicity pathways and susceptibility genes, through knockdown or knockout of all non-essential genes in a cell of interest, and identification of genes associated with a toxicity phenotype following toxicant exposure. Screening approaches in yeast and human near-haploid leukemic KBM7 cells, have identified roles for genes and pathways involved in response to many toxicants but are limited by partial homology among yeast and human genes and limited relevance to normal diploid cells. RNA interference (RNAi) suppresses mRNA expression level but is limited by off-target effects (OTEs) and incomplete knockdown. The recently developed gene editing approach called clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats-associated nuclease (CRISPR)-Cas9, can precisely knock-out most regions of the genome at the DNA level with fewer OTEs than RNAi, in multiple human cell types, thus overcoming the limitations of the other approaches. It has been used to identify genes involved in the response to chemical and microbial toxicants in several human cell types and could readily be extended to the systematic screening of large numbers of environmental chemicals. CRISPR-Cas9 can also repress and activate gene expression, including that of non-coding RNA, with near-saturation, thus offering the potential to more fully characterize AOPs and AOP networks. Finally, CRISPR-Cas9 can generate complex animal models in which to conduct preclinical toxicity testing at the level of individual genotypes or haplotypes. Therefore, CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful and flexible functional genomic screening approach that can be harnessed to provide

  5. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans. PMID:27784754

  6. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-12-07

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans.

  7. A large-scale functional screen identifies Nova1 and Ncoa3 as regulators of neuronal miRNA function.

    PubMed

    Störchel, Peter H; Thümmler, Juliane; Siegel, Gabriele; Aksoy-Aksel, Ayla; Zampa, Federico; Sumer, Simon; Schratt, Gerhard

    2015-09-02

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of neuronal development, network connectivity, and synaptic plasticity. While many neuronal miRNAs were previously shown to modulate neuronal morphogenesis, little is known regarding the regulation of miRNA function. In a large-scale functional screen, we identified two novel regulators of neuronal miRNA function, Nova1 and Ncoa3. Both proteins are expressed in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of developing hippocampal neurons. We found that Nova1 and Ncoa3 stimulate miRNA function by different mechanisms that converge on Argonaute (Ago) proteins, core components of the miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC). While Nova1 physically interacts with Ago proteins, Ncoa3 selectively promotes the expression of Ago2 at the transcriptional level. We further show that Ncoa3 regulates dendritic complexity and dendritic spine maturation of hippocampal neurons in a miRNA-dependent fashion. Importantly, both the loss of miRNA activity and increased dendrite complexity upon Ncoa3 knockdown were rescued by Ago2 overexpression. Together, we uncovered two novel factors that control neuronal miRISC function at the level of Ago proteins, with possible implications for the regulation of synapse development and plasticity.

  8. Validity of the lower extremity functional movement screen in patients with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of construct validity for the lower extremity functional movement screen (LE-FMS) based on hypothesis testing in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subjects] The subjects were 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients with CAI who had a history of ankle sprain with pain for more than 1 day. [Methods] All participants were measured using the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and evaluated with the LE-FMS. The screen included the deep squat, the hurdle step (HS) and the in-line lunge (ILL). The symmetry ratios (RS) were accurately measured during the deep squat trial. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in scores on the LE-FMS, HS, ILL, RS, FADI, and FADI-sport. The FADI was strongly correlated with both LE-FMS score (r=0.807) and ILL score (r=0.896). There was a strong relationship (r=0.818) between LE-FMS score and FADI-sport. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the LE-FMS may be used to detect deficits related to CAI. Additionally, this instrument is reliable in detecting functional limitations in patients with CAI. PMID:26180349

  9. Nickel-resistance determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM identified by genome-wide functional screening.

    PubMed

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Mirete, Salvador; Alcolea, Pedro J; Gomez, Manuel J; Amils, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Pastor, Jose E

    2014-01-01

    Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY). This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms.

  10. Functional screen identifies kinases driving prostate cancer visceral and bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Faltermeier, Claire M; Drake, Justin M; Clark, Peter M; Smith, Bryan A; Zong, Yang; Volpe, Carmen; Mathis, Colleen; Morrissey, Colm; Castor, Brandon; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-01-12

    Mutationally activated kinases play an important role in the progression and metastasis of many cancers. Despite numerous oncogenic alterations implicated in metastatic prostate cancer, mutations of kinases are rare. Several lines of evidence suggest that nonmutated kinases and their pathways are involved in prostate cancer progression, but few kinases have been mechanistically linked to metastasis. Using a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics dataset in concert with gene expression analysis, we selected over 100 kinases potentially implicated in human metastatic prostate cancer for functional evaluation. A primary in vivo screen based on overexpression of candidate kinases in murine prostate cells identified 20 wild-type kinases that promote metastasis. We queried these 20 kinases in a secondary in vivo screen using human prostate cells. Strikingly, all three RAF family members, MERTK, and NTRK2 drove the formation of bone and visceral metastasis confirmed by positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography imaging and histology. Immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays indicated that these kinases are highly expressed in human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer tissues. Our functional studies reveal the strong capability of select wild-type protein kinases to drive critical steps of the metastatic cascade, and implicate these kinases in possible therapeutic intervention.

  11. Loss-of-function screens of druggable targetome against cancer stem–like cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mee; Lee, Hani; Nam, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Euna; Kim, Somin; Hong, Yourae; Kim, Nayoung; Yim, Hwa Young; Yoo, Young-Ji; Kim, Jung Seok; Kim, Jin-Seok; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Mills, Gordon B.; Kim, Woo-Young; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem–like cells (CSLCs) contribute to the initiation and recurrence of tumors and to their resistance to conventional therapies. In this study, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based screening of ∼4800 druggable genes in 3-dimensional CSLC cultures in comparison to 2-dimensional bulk cultures of U87 glioma cells revealed 3 groups of genes essential for the following: survival of the CSLC population only, bulk-cultured population only, or both populations. While diverse biologic processes were associated with siRNAs reducing the bulk-cultured population, CSLC-eliminating siRNAs were enriched in a few functional categories, such as lipid metabolism, protein metabolism, and gene expression. Interestingly, siRNAs that selectively reduced CSLC only were found to target genes for cholesterol and unsaturated fatty acid synthesis. The lipidomic profile of CSLCs revealed increased levels of monounsaturated lipids. Pharmacologic blockage of these target pathways reduced CSLCs, and this effect was eliminated by addition of downstream metabolite products. The present CSLC-sensitive target categories provide a useful resource that can be exploited for the selective elimination of CSLCs.—Song, M., Lee, H., Nam, M.-H., Jeong, E., Kim, S., Hong, Y., Kim, N., Yim, H. Y., Yoo, Y.-J., Kim, J. S., Kim, J.-S., Cho, Y.-Y., Mills, G. B., Kim, W.-Y., Yoon, S. Loss-of-function screens of druggable targetome against cancer stem–like cells. PMID:27811063

  12. An analysis of differential item functioning by gender in the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ).

    PubMed

    Murray, Aja Louise; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen

    2015-04-01

    The Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ; McKenzie & Paxton, 2006) was developed as a brief screen for intellectual disability. Although several previous studies have evaluated the LDSQ with respect to its utility as a clinical and research tool, no studies have considered the fairness of the test across males and females. In the current study we, therefore, used a multi-group item response theory approach to assess differential item functioning across gender in a sample of 211 males and 132 females assessed in clinical and forensic settings. Although the test did not show evidence of differential item functioning by gender, it was necessary to exclude one item due to estimation problems and to combine two very highly related items (concerning reading and writing ability) into a single literacy item Thus, in addition to being generally supportive of the utility of the LDSQ, our results also highlight possible areas of weakness in the tool and suggest possible amendments that could be made to test content to improve the test in future revisions.

  13. Nickel-Resistance Determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM Identified by Genome-Wide Functional Screening

    PubMed Central

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Mirete, Salvador; Alcolea, Pedro J.; Gomez, Manuel J.; Amils, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Pastor, Jose E.

    2014-01-01

    Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY). This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms. PMID:24740277

  14. A CRISPR/Cas9 Functional Screen Identifies Rare Tumor Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Katigbak, Alexandra; Cencic, Regina; Robert, Francis; Sénécha, Patrick; Scuoppo, Claudio; Pelletier, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of tumor sequencing data has been generated through large scale sequencing efforts. The functional consequences of the majority of mutations identified by such projects remain an open, unexplored question. This problem is particularly complicated in the case of rare mutations where frequency of occurrence alone or prediction of functional consequences are insufficient to distinguish driver from passenger or bystander mutations. We combine genome editing technology with a powerful mouse cancer model to uncover previously unsuspected rare oncogenic mutations in Burkitt’s lymphoma. We identify two candidate tumor suppressors whose loss cooperate with MYC over-expression to accelerate lymphomagenesis. Our results highlight the utility of in vivo CRISPR/Cas9 screens combined with powerful mouse models to identify and validate rare oncogenic modifier events from tumor mutational data. PMID:27982060

  15. Screened exchange hybrid density functional for accurate and efficient structures and interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Caldeweyher, Eike; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-06-21

    We extend the recently introduced PBEh-3c global hybrid density functional [S. Grimme et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2015, 143, 054107] by a screened Fock exchange variant based on the Henderson-Janesko-Scuseria exchange hole model. While the excellent performance of the global hybrid is maintained for small covalently bound molecules, its performance for computed condensed phase mass densities is further improved. Most importantly, a speed up of 30 to 50% can be achieved and especially for small orbital energy gap cases, the method is numerically much more robust. The latter point is important for many applications, e.g., for metal-organic frameworks, organic semiconductors, or protein structures. This enables an accurate density functional based electronic structure calculation of a full DNA helix structure on a single core desktop computer which is presented as an example in addition to comprehensive benchmark results.

  16. Facilitating Structure-Function Studies of CFTR Modulator Sites with Efficiencies in Mutagenesis and Functional Screening.

    PubMed

    Molinski, Steven V; Ahmadi, Saumel; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2015-12-01

    There are nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene associated with cystic fibrosis disease, and to date, the only approved drug, Kalydeco, has been effective in rescuing the functional expression of a small subset of these mutant proteins with defects in channel activation. However, there is currently an urgent need to assess other mutations for possible rescue by Kalydeco, and further, definition of the binding site of such modulators on CFTR would enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of such therapeutics. Here, we describe a simple and rapid one-step PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis method to generate mutations in the CFTR gene. This method was used to generate CFTR mutants bearing deletions (p.Gln2_Trp846del, p.Ser700_Asp835del, p.Ile1234_Arg1239del) and truncation with polyhistidine tag insertion (p.Glu1172-3Gly-6-His*), which either recapitulate a disease phenotype or render tools for modulator binding site identification, with subsequent evaluation of drug responses using a high-throughput (384-well) membrane potential-sensitive fluorescence assay of CFTR channel activity within a 1 wk time frame. This proof-of-concept study shows that these methods enable rapid and quantitative comparison of multiple CFTR mutants to emerging drugs, facilitating future large-scale efforts to stratify mutants according to their "theratype" or most promising targeted therapy.

  17. Systematic exploration of cancer-associated microRNA through functional screening assays.

    PubMed

    Izumiya, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Naoto; Okamoto, Koji; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2011-09-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA), non-coding RNA of approximately 22 nucleotides, post-transcriptionally represses expression of its target genes. miRNA regulates a variety of biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell death, development, stemness and genomic stability, not only in physiological conditions but also in various pathological conditions such as cancers. More than 1000 mature miRNA have been experimentally identified in humans and mice, yet the functions of a vast majority of miRNA remain to be elucidated. Identification of novel cancer-associated miRNA seems promising considering their possible application in the development of novel cancer therapies and biomarkers. Currently, there are two major approaches to identify miRNA that are associated with cancer: expression profiling study and functional screening assay. The former approach is widely used, and a large number of studies have shown aberrant miRNA expression profiles in cancer tissues compared with their non-cancer counterparts. Although aberrantly expressed miRNA are potentially good biomarkers, in most cases a majority of them do not play causal roles in cancers when functional assays are performed. In contrast, the latter approach allows screening of 'driver' miRNA with cancer-associated phenotypes, such as cell proliferation and cell invasion. Thus, this approach might be suitable in finding crucial targets of novel cancer therapy. The combination of both types of approaches will contribute to further elucidation of the cancer pathophysiology and to the development of a novel class of cancer therapies and biomarkers.

  18. High-throughput screening of a CRISPR/Cas9 library for functional genomics in human cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuexin; Zhu, Shiyou; Cai, Changzu; Yuan, Pengfei; Li, Chunmei; Huang, Yanyi; Wei, Wensheng

    2014-05-22

    Targeted genome editing technologies are powerful tools for studying biology and disease, and have a broad range of research applications. In contrast to the rapid development of toolkits to manipulate individual genes, large-scale screening methods based on the complete loss of gene expression are only now beginning to be developed. Here we report the development of a focused CRISPR/Cas-based (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) lentiviral library in human cells and a method of gene identification based on functional screening and high-throughput sequencing analysis. Using knockout library screens, we successfully identified the host genes essential for the intoxication of cells by anthrax and diphtheria toxins, which were confirmed by functional validation. The broad application of this powerful genetic screening strategy will not only facilitate the rapid identification of genes important for bacterial toxicity but will also enable the discovery of genes that participate in other biological processes.

  19. Tissue matrix arrays for high throughput screening and systems analysis of cell function

    PubMed Central

    Beachley, Vince Z.; Wolf, Matthew T.; Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Manda, Srikanth S.; Jacobs, Heather; Blatchley, Michael; Bader, Joel S.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pardoll, Drew; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Cell and protein arrays have demonstrated remarkable utility in the high-throughput evaluation of biological responses; however, they lack the complexity of native tissue and organs. Here, we describe tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) arrays for screening biological outputs and systems analysis. We spotted processed tissue ECM particles as two-dimensional arrays or incorporated them with cells to generate three-dimensional cell-matrix microtissue arrays. We then investigated the response of human stem, cancer, and immune cells to tissue ECM arrays originating from 11 different tissues, and validated the 2D and 3D arrays as representative of the in vivo microenvironment through quantitative analysis of tissue-specific cellular responses, including matrix production, adhesion and proliferation, and morphological changes following culture. The biological outputs correlated with tissue proteomics, and network analysis identified several proteins linked to cell function. Our methodology enables broad screening of ECMs to connect tissue-specific composition with biological activity, providing a new resource for biomaterials research and translation. PMID:26480475

  20. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. PMID:26060398

  1. A Screening Questionnaire for Asperger Syndrome and Other High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders in School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlers, Stephan; Gillberg, Christopher; Wing, Lorna

    1999-01-01

    Presents data on the High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire, a 27-item checklist for completion by lay informants when assessing symptoms characteristic of Asperger syndrome and other high-functioning autism spectrum disorders in children and adolescents with normal intelligence or mild mental retardation. Reliability and…

  2. A functional genomic screen in planarians identifies novel regulators of germ cell development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuying; Stary, Joel M; Wilhelm, James E; Newmark, Phillip A

    2010-09-15

    Germ cells serve as intriguing examples of differentiated cells that retain the capacity to generate all cell types of an organism. Here we used functional genomic approaches in planarians to identify genes required for proper germ cell development. We conducted microarray analyses and in situ hybridization to discover and validate germ cell-enriched transcripts, and then used RNAi to screen for genes required for discrete stages of germ cell development. The majority of genes we identified encode conserved RNA-binding proteins, several of which have not been implicated previously in germ cell development. We also show that a germ cell-specific subunit of the conserved transcription factor CCAAT-binding protein/nuclear factor-Y is required for maintaining spermatogonial stem cells. Our results demonstrate that conserved transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms regulate germ cell development in planarians. These findings suggest that studies of planarians will inform our understanding of germ cell biology in higher organisms.

  3. Function-Based Metagenomic Library Screening and Heterologous Expression Strategy for Genes Encoding Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Genis A Castillo; Nacke, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphate from inorganic and organic phosphorus compounds can be mediated enzymatically. Phosphate-releasing enzymes, comprising acid and alkaline phosphatases, are recognized as useful biocatalysts in applications such as plant and animal nutrition, bioremediation and diagnostic analysis. Metagenomic approaches provide access to novel phosphatase-encoding genes. Here, we describe a function-based screening approach for rapid identification of genes conferring phosphatase activity from small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries derived from various environments. This approach bears the potential for discovery of entirely novel phosphatase families or subfamilies and members of known enzyme classes hydrolyzing phosphomonoester bonds such as phytases. In addition, we provide a strategy for efficient heterologous phosphatase gene expression.

  4. Factor structure of the functional movement screen in marine officer candidates.

    PubMed

    Kazman, Josh B; Galecki, Jeffrey M; Lisman, Peter; Deuster, Patricia A; OʼConnor, Francis G

    2014-03-01

    Functional movement screening (FMS) is a musculoskeletal assessment that is intended to fill a gap between preparticipation examinations and performance tests. Functional movement screening consists of 7 standardized movements involving multiple muscle groups that are rated 0-3 during performance; scores are combined into a final score, which is intended to predict injury risk. This use of a sum-score in this manner assumes that the items are unidimensional and scores are internally consistent, which are measures of internal reliability. Despite research into the FMS' predictive value and interrater reliability, research has not assessed its psychometric properties. The present study is a standard psychometric analysis of the FMS and is the first to assess the internal consistency and factor structure of the FMS, using Cronbach's alpha and exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Using a cohort of 877 male and 57 female Marine officer candidates who performed the FMS, EFA of polychoric correlations with varimax rotation was conducted to explore the structure of the FMS. Tests were repeated on the original scores, which integrated feelings of pain during movement (0-3), and then on scores discounting the pain instruction and based only on the performance (1-3), to determine whether pain ratings affected the factor structure. The average FMS score was 16.7 ± 1.8. Cronbach's alpha was 0.39. Exploratory factor analysis availed 2 components accounting for 21 and 17% and consisting of separate individual movements (shoulder mobility and deep squat, respectively). Analysis on scores discounting pain showed similar results. The factor structures were not interpretable, and the low Cronbach's alpha suggests a lack of internal consistency in FMS sum scores. Results do not offer support for validity of the FMS sum score as a unidimensional construct. In the absence of additional psychometric research, caution is warranted when using the FMS sum score.

  5. Machine-learning scoring functions to improve structure-based binding affinity prediction and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Ain, Qurrat Ul; Aleksandrova, Antoniya; Roessler, Florian D; Ballester, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    Docking tools to predict whether and how a small molecule binds to a target can be applied if a structural model of such target is available. The reliability of docking depends, however, on the accuracy of the adopted scoring function (SF). Despite intense research over the years, improving the accuracy of SFs for structure-based binding affinity prediction or virtual screening has proven to be a challenging task for any class of method. New SFs based on modern machine-learning regression models, which do not impose a predetermined functional form and thus are able to exploit effectively much larger amounts of experimental data, have recently been introduced. These machine-learning SFs have been shown to outperform a wide range of classical SFs at both binding affinity prediction and virtual screening. The emerging picture from these studies is that the classical approach of using linear regression with a small number of expert-selected structural features can be strongly improved by a machine-learning approach based on nonlinear regression allied with comprehensive data-driven feature selection. Furthermore, the performance of classical SFs does not grow with larger training datasets and hence this performance gap is expected to widen as more training data becomes available in the future. Other topics covered in this review include predicting the reliability of a SF on a particular target class, generating synthetic data to improve predictive performance and modeling guidelines for SF development. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:405-424. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1225 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. Loss of hippocampal function impairs pattern separation on a mouse touch-screen operant paradigm.

    PubMed

    Josey, Megan; Brigman, Jonathan L

    2015-11-01

    The hippocampus is heavily involved in the learning and memory processes necessary to successfully encode environmental stimuli and representations over time. Impairment of hippocampal function is associated with numerous neuropsychiatric diseases and can lead to detriments in the quality of life. In order to take full advantage of preclinical models of these disorders, there is a need for the development of more refined measures of clinically relevant hippocampal behaviors. While arena-based navigation tasks have provided fundamental information regarding the role of the hippocampus in spatial memory, the development of automated operant variants have had mixed results. Recently, an automated touch-screen paradigm has been shown to be highly sensitive to hippocampal function in the rat and eliminated mediating strategies that arose in previous tasks. Here we show that mice with lesions encompassing the entire ventral portion of the dorsal hippocampus are impaired on pattern separation behavior using a delayed nonmatching-to-location (TUNL) adapted for mice. Lesioned mice readily acquired the task at control rates when separations were maximal and delay periods were short while decreasing separations significantly impaired lesion mice. However, in contrast to previously reported results in the rat, consistently increasing delays did not significantly impair performance in the lesion group. Presentation of a variable delay within a session significantly impaired performance in lesion mice across delay periods. The current results demonstrate the utility of a touch-screen paradigm for measuring hippocampal-dependent pattern separation in the mouse and establish the paradigm as an important platform for future studies in disease models.

  7. Functional mutagenesis screens reveal the 'cap structure' formation in disulfide-bridge free TASK channels.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Matthias; Rinné, Susanne; Kiper, Aytug K; Ramírez, David; Netter, Michael F; Bustos, Daniel; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; González, Wendy; Decher, Niels

    2016-01-22

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels have a large extracellular cap structure formed by two M1-P1 linkers, containing a cysteine for dimerization. However, this cysteine is not present in the TASK-1/3/5 subfamily. The functional role of the cap is poorly understood and it remained unclear whether K2P channels assemble in the domain-swapped orientation or not. Functional alanine-mutagenesis screens of TASK-1 and TRAAK were used to build an in silico model of the TASK-1 cap. According to our data the cap structure of disulfide-bridge free TASK channels is similar to that of other K2P channels and is most likely assembled in the domain-swapped orientation. As the conserved cysteine is not essential for functional expression of all K2P channels tested, we propose that hydrophobic residues at the inner leaflets of the cap domains can interact with each other and that this way of stabilizing the cap is most likely conserved among K2P channels.

  8. Establishment of a functional secretory IgA transcytosis model system in vitro for functional food screening.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Feng, Xianqi; Zhang, Na; Xue, Changhu; Tang, Qing-Juan

    2015-07-01

    A characteristic mucosal immune response involves the production of antigen-specific secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) antibodies. In order to study transcytosis by mimicking the SIgA secretion and to screen for SIgA secretion-promoting substances, we developed a model system of a transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line that expresses the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). We thus isolated the human dIgA (dimeric IgA)/pIgA (polymeric IgA) complex as the binding ligands. In the present study, a recombinant vector encoding the human pIgR gene was constructed and infected into MDCK cells. Following reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence staining, we confirmed that pIgR was expressed in the transfectant MDCK-pIgR cells and was located at the basolateral side of the cell surface. We also confirmed the coexistence of the dIgA/pIgA complex in the IgA myeloma serum. The covalent dIgA/pIgA complex was then isolated from the serum of an IgA multiple myeloma patient using an ÄKTA purifier operation system with a HiPrep 16/60 Sephacryl S-300 HR column, in order to utilize the complex as transcytosis ligands for human pIgR. Finally, we confirmed the uptake of the isolated human dIgA/pIgA complex into MDCK-pIgR cells. We demonstrated that the human dIgA/pIgA complex was transcytosed into the apical side of the monolayer cells. Therefore, our MDCK-human pIgR cell transcytosis model is an operational system and can be used for screening functional food components that promote dIgA/pIgR transcytosis as well as SIgA secretion.

  9. Activity-Based Proteomic Profiling of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Salmonella-Infected Macrophages Leads to Identification of Putative Function of UCH-L5 in Inflammasome Regulation.

    PubMed

    Kummari, Evangel; Alugubelly, Navatha; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Dong, Brittany; Nanduri, Bindu; Edelmann, Mariola J

    2015-01-01

    Although protein ubiquitination has been shown to regulate multiple processes during host response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, specific functions of host deubiquitinating enzymes remain unknown in this bacterial infection. By using chemical proteomics approach, in which deubiquitinating enzymes were labeled by an active-site probe and analyzed by quantitative proteomics, we identified novel deubiquitinases in chicken macrophages based on their reactivity with the probe. Also, we detected down-regulation of UCH-L3, and USP4 as well as up-regulation of USP5 and UCH-L5 deubiquitinating enzymes in macrophages infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. We showed that decrease in either UCH-L5 activity, or in UCH-L5 protein amount in chicken and human macrophages infected or stimulated with LPS/nigericin, led to decreased IL-1β release. These data point towards a putative role of UCH-L5 in inflammasome regulation during Salmonella infection. Because inflammasome activation is important in innate resistance to these bacteria, one would expect that naturally occurring or therapeutically induced alteration in UCH-L5 activation would influence disease outcome and could represent a target for new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Activity-Based Proteomic Profiling of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Salmonella-Infected Macrophages Leads to Identification of Putative Function of UCH-L5 in Inflammasome Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kummari, Evangel; Alugubelly, Navatha; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Dong, Brittany; Nanduri, Bindu; Edelmann, Mariola J.

    2015-01-01

    Although protein ubiquitination has been shown to regulate multiple processes during host response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, specific functions of host deubiquitinating enzymes remain unknown in this bacterial infection. By using chemical proteomics approach, in which deubiquitinating enzymes were labeled by an active-site probe and analyzed by quantitative proteomics, we identified novel deubiquitinases in chicken macrophages based on their reactivity with the probe. Also, we detected down-regulation of UCH-L3, and USP4 as well as up-regulation of USP5 and UCH-L5 deubiquitinating enzymes in macrophages infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. We showed that decrease in either UCH-L5 activity, or in UCH-L5 protein amount in chicken and human macrophages infected or stimulated with LPS/nigericin, led to decreased IL-1β release. These data point towards a putative role of UCH-L5 in inflammasome regulation during Salmonella infection. Because inflammasome activation is important in innate resistance to these bacteria, one would expect that naturally occurring or therapeutically induced alteration in UCH-L5 activation would influence disease outcome and could represent a target for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26267804

  11. An Evolution-Based Screen for Genetic Differentiation between Anopheles Sister Taxa Enriches for Detection of Functional Immune Factors

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Eizo; Williams, Marni; Eiglmeier, Karin; Pain, Adrien; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M.; Gneme, Awa; Brito-Fravallo, Emma; Holm, Inge; Lavazec, Catherine; Sagnon, N’Fale; Baxter, Richard H.; Riehle, Michelle M.; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide variation patterns across species are shaped by the processes of natural selection, including exposure to environmental pathogens. We examined patterns of genetic variation in two sister species, Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii, both efficient natural vectors of human malaria in West Africa. We used the differentiation signature displayed by a known coordinate selective sweep of immune genes APL1 and TEP1 in A. coluzzii to design a population genetic screen trained on the sweep, classified a panel of 26 potential immune genes for concordance with the signature, and functionally tested their immune phenotypes. The screen results were strongly predictive for genes with protective immune phenotypes: genes meeting the screen criteria were significantly more likely to display a functional phenotype against malaria infection than genes not meeting the criteria (p = 0.0005). Thus, an evolution-based screen can efficiently prioritize candidate genes for labor-intensive downstream functional testing, and safely allow the elimination of genes not meeting the screen criteria. The suite of immune genes with characteristics similar to the APL1-TEP1 selective sweep appears to be more widespread in the A. coluzzii genome than previously recognized. The immune gene differentiation may be a consequence of adaptation of A. coluzzii to new pathogens encountered in its niche expansion during the separation from A. gambiae, although the role, if any of natural selection by Plasmodium is unknown. Application of the screen allowed identification of new functional immune factors, and assignment of new functions to known factors. We describe biochemical binding interactions between immune proteins that underlie functional activity for malaria infection, which highlights the interplay between pathogen specificity and the structure of immune complexes. We also find that most malaria-protective immune factors display phenotypes for either human or rodent malaria, with

  12. A screening questionnaire for Asperger syndrome and other high-functioning autism spectrum disorders in school age children.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, S; Gillberg, C; Wing, L

    1999-04-01

    The high-functioning Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) is a 27-item checklist for completion by lay informants when assessing symptoms characteristic of Asperger syndrome and other high-functioning autism spectrum disorders in children and adolescents with normal intelligence or mild mental retardation. Data for parent and teacher ratings in a clinical sample are presented along with various measures of reliability and validity. Optimal cutoff scores were estimated, using Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis. Findings indicate that the ASSQ is a useful brief screening device for the identification of autism spectrum disorders in clinical settings.

  13. Functional screening of antibiotic resistance genes from human gut microbiota reveals a novel gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Hu, Yongfei; Yin, Yeshi; Yang, Xi; Xiang, Chunsheng; Wang, Baohong; Chen, Yanfei; Yang, Fengling; Lei, Fang; Wu, Na; Lu, Na; Li, Jing; Chen, Quanze; Li, Lanjuan; Zhu, Baoli

    2012-11-01

    The human gut microbiota has a high density of bacteria that are considered a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, one fosmid metagenomic library generated from the gut microbiota of four healthy humans was used to screen for ARGs against seven antibiotics. Eight new ARGs were obtained: one against amoxicillin, six against d-cycloserine, and one against kanamycin. The new amoxicillin resistance gene encodes a protein with 53% identity to a class D β-lactamase from Riemerella anatipestifer RA-GD. The six new d-cycloserine resistance genes encode proteins with 73-81% identity to known d-alanine-d-alanine ligases. The new kanamycin resistance gene encodes a protein of 274 amino acids with an N-terminus (amino acids 1-189) that has 42% identity to the 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6')] from Enterococcus hirae and a C-terminus (amino acids 190-274) with 35% identity to a hypothetical protein from Clostridiales sp. SSC/2. A functional study on the novel kanamycin resistance gene showed that only the N-terminus conferred kanamycin resistance. Our results showed that functional metagenomics is a useful tool for the identification of new ARGs.

  14. Utilizing Functional Genomics Screening to Identify Potentially Novel Drug Targets in Cancer Cell Spheroid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eamonn; Wai, Patty; Leonidou, Andri; Bland, Philip; Khalique, Saira; Farnie, Gillian; Daley, Frances; Peck, Barrie; Natrajan, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    The identification of functional driver events in cancer is central to furthering our understanding of cancer biology and indispensable for the discovery of the next generation of novel drug targets. It is becoming apparent that more complex models of cancer are required to fully appreciate the contributing factors that drive tumorigenesis in vivo and increase the efficacy of novel therapies that make the transition from pre-clinical models to clinical trials. Here we present a methodology for generating uniform and reproducible tumor spheroids that can be subjected to siRNA functional screening. These spheroids display many characteristics that are found in solid tumors that are not present in traditional two-dimension culture. We show that several commonly used breast cancer cell lines are amenable to this protocol. Furthermore, we provide proof-of-principle data utilizing the breast cancer cell line BT474, confirming their dependency on amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor HER2 and mutation of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-biphosphate 3-kinase (PIK3CA) when grown as tumor spheroids. Finally, we are able to further investigate and confirm the spatial impact of these dependencies using immunohistochemistry. PMID:28060271

  15. A Large-Scale Functional Screen to Identify Epigenetic Repressors of Retrotransposon Expression.

    PubMed

    Ecco, Gabriela; Rowe, Helen M; Trono, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of epigenetic marks is an important layer of the transcriptional control of retrotransposons, especially during early embryogenesis. Krüppel-associated box domain zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) are one of the largest families of transcription factors, and collectively partake in this process by tethering to thousands of retroelement-containing genomic loci their cofactor KAP1, which acts as a scaffold for a heterochromatin-inducing machinery. However, while the sequence-specific DNA binding potential of the poly-zinc finger-containing KRAB-ZFPs is recognized, very few members of the family have been assigned specific targets. In this chapter, we describe a large-scale functional screen to identify the retroelements bound by individual murine KRAB-ZFPs. Our method is based on the automated transfection of a library of mouse KRAB-ZFP-containing vectors into 293T cells modified to express GFP from a PGK promoter harboring in its immediate vicinity a KAP1-recruiting retroelement-derived sequence. Analysis is then performed by plate reader and flow cytometry fluorescence readout. Such large-scale DNA-centered functional approach can not only help to identify the trans-acting factors responsible for silencing retrotransposons, but also serve as a model for dissecting the transcriptional networks influenced by retroelement-derived cis-acting sequences.

  16. Comparing neural-network scoring functions and the state of the art: applications to common library screening.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Jacob D; Friedman, Aaron J; Rogers, Kathleen E; McCammon, J Andrew

    2013-07-22

    We compare established docking programs, AutoDock Vina and Schrödinger's Glide, to the recently published NNScore scoring functions. As expected, the best protocol to use in a virtual-screening project is highly dependent on the target receptor being studied. However, the mean screening performance obtained when candidate ligands are docked with Vina and rescored with NNScore 1.0 is not statistically different than the mean performance obtained when docking and scoring with Glide. We further demonstrate that the Vina and NNScore docking scores both correlate with chemical properties like small-molecule size and polarizability. Compensating for these potential biases leads to improvements in virtual screen performance. Composite NNScore-based scoring functions suited to a specific receptor further improve performance. We are hopeful that the current study will prove useful for those interested in computer-aided drug design.

  17. Modifying the Functional Movement Screen Deep Squat Test: The Effect of Foot and Arm Positional Variations.

    PubMed

    McMillian, Danny J; Rynders, Zach G; Trudeau, Tyler R

    2016-04-01

    The functional movement screen (FMS) was developed as an evaluation tool for assessing the fundamental movement patterns believed to be prerequisites for functional activity. However, some of the FMS component movements, such as the deep overhead squat test (DST), likely represent novel motor challenges on which poor performance might reflect inexperience with the task rather than a movement impairment. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of positional variations on DST scores in a population of young, healthy adults. We hypothesized that self-selecting foot positioning, removal of an overhead component, or changing both aspects of the DST would result in improvement in FMS scores. Twenty healthy subjects completed 4 squatting conditions in a counterbalanced sequence to eliminate carry over effects: DST, modified squat with hands at chest level and feet in the DST position (DSTO), modified squat with arms in the DST position and self-selected foot placement (DSTF), and modified squat with hands at chest level and self-selected foot placement (DSTB). A Friedman's analysis of variance and Wilcoxon signed-ranks' post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between all squat conditions (p = 0.036), between DSTB-DST groups (p < 0.001), DSTO-DST groups (p = 0.004), and DSTO-DSTB groups (p = 0.046). Each modified squat condition had an average score higher than the DST. These findings suggest that the FMS DST might underestimate an individual's ability to squat during functional tasks that involve self-selected foot and arm placement.

  18. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... better nutrition, growth, and lung function. This screening test helps doctors identify children with CF before they ...

  19. Quantitative comparison of functional screening by measuring intracellular Ca2+ with radioligand binding at recombinant human dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kassack, Matthias U

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether screening at dopamine receptors performed with a recently described functional assay for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) provides data that correlate significantly with radioligand binding data in the literature, thus possibly allowing researchers to replace radioligand binding with nonradioactive functional screening. Human dopamine receptors hD1 and hD2L (representing Gs [hD1] or Gi [hD2L] coupled GPCRs) were recombinantly expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Cells were loaded with Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1/AM and evenly distributed in 384 well plates. Seventeen test compounds were screened for agonistic activity by injection into the cell suspension and monitoringH of intracellular Ca2+ with a fluorescence microplate reader. Then, standard agonists (100nM SKF38393 for hD1, 30nM quinpirole for hD2L) were injected into wells preincubated with test compounds (screening for antagonism). Injection of various agonists resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in fluorescence. Further, preincubation of antagonists with dopamine receptor expressing cells inhibits concentration-dependent the agonist-induced increase in fluorescence. Calculated apparent functional Ki values correlate with radioligand binding data in the literature (r2 = 0.7796 for D1, r2 = 0.7743 for D2). The correlation between apparent functional Ki values and radioligand binding data for the 17 tested compounds suggests that screening of test compounds at dopamine receptors with the functional Ca2+ assay can replace radioligand binding studies. Furthermore, besides apparent Ki values, information about agonistic or antagonistic properties of a test compound can be obtained with the functional Ca2+ assay.

  20. Validation of Synthetic CRISPR Reagents as a Tool for Arrayed Functional Genomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jenille; Martin, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    To date, lentiviral-based CRISPR-Cas9 screens have largely been conducted in pooled format. However, numerous assays are not amenable to pooled approaches, and lentiviral screening in arrayed format presents many challenges. We sought to examine synthetic CRISPR reagents in the context of arrayed screening. Experiments were performed using aberrant DNA replication as an assay. Using synthetic CRISPR RNAs targeting the known control gene GMNN in HCT-116 cells stably expressing Cas9, we observed statistically significant phenotype among the majority of transfected cells within 72 hours. Additional studies revealed near complete loss of GMNN protein and editing of GMNN DNA. We next conducted a screen of synthetic CRISPR RNAs directed against 640 ubiquitin-related genes. Screening identified known and novel DNA replication regulators that were also supported by siRNA gene knockdown. Notably, CRISPR screening identified more statistically significant hits than corresponding siRNA screens run in parallel. These results highlight the possibility of using synthetic CRISPR reagents as an arrayed screening tool. PMID:28030641

  1. Vertebrate embryos as tools for anti-angiogenic drug screening and function.

    PubMed

    Beedie, Shaunna L; Diamond, Alexandra J; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Figg, William D; Vargesson, Neil

    2016-11-22

    The development of new angiogenic inhibitors highlights a need for robust screening assays that adequately capture the complexity of vessel formation, and allow for the quantitative evaluation of the teratogenicity of new anti-angiogenic agents. This review discusses the use of screening assays in vertebrate embryos, specifically focusing upon chicken and zebrafish embryos, for the detection of anti-angiogenic agents.

  2. Tissue matrix arrays for high-throughput screening and systems analysis of cell function.

    PubMed

    Beachley, Vince Z; Wolf, Matthew T; Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Manda, Srikanth S; Jacobs, Heather; Blatchley, Michael R; Bader, Joel S; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pardoll, Drew; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2015-12-01

    Cell and protein arrays have demonstrated remarkable utility in the high-throughput evaluation of biological responses; however, they lack the complexity of native tissue and organs. Here we spotted tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) particles as two-dimensional (2D) arrays or incorporated them with cells to generate three-dimensional (3D) cell-matrix microtissue arrays. We then investigated the responses of human stem, cancer and immune cells to tissue ECM arrays originating from 11 different tissues. We validated the 2D and 3D arrays as representative of the in vivo microenvironment by means of quantitative analysis of tissue-specific cellular responses, including matrix production, adhesion and proliferation, and morphological changes after culture. The biological outputs correlated with tissue proteomics, and network analysis identified several proteins linked to cell function. Our methodology enables broad screening of ECMs to connect tissue-specific composition with biological activity, providing a new resource for biomaterials research and further understanding of regeneration and disease mechanisms.

  3. Screening SIRT1 Activators from Medicinal Plants as Bioactive Compounds against Oxidative Damage in Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Liang, Xinying; Chen, Yaqi; Zhao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1) belongs to the family of NAD+ dependent histone deacetylases and plays a critical role in cellular metabolism and response to oxidative stress. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), as an important part of natural products, have been reported to exert protective effect against oxidative stress in mitochondria. In this study, we screened SIRT1 activators from TCMs and investigated their activities against mitochondrial damage. 19 activators were found in total by in vitro SIRT1 activity assay. Among those active compounds, four compounds, ginsenoside Rb2, ginsenoside F1, ginsenoside Rc, and schisandrin A, were further studied to validate the SIRT1-activation effects by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and confirm their activities against oxidative damage in H9c2 cardiomyocytes exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). The results showed that those compounds enhanced the deacetylated activity of SIRT1, increased ATP content, and inhibited intracellular ROS formation as well as regulating the activity of Mn-SOD. These SIRT1 activators also showed moderate protective effects on mitochondrial function in t-BHP cells by recovering oxygen consumption and increasing mitochondrial DNA content. Our results suggested that those compounds from TCMs attenuated oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage in cardiomyocytes through activation of SIRT1. PMID:26981165

  4. A screened hybrid density functional study on energetic complexes: cobalt, nickel and copper carbohydrazide perchlorates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huisheng; Zhang, Tonglai; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Liqiong

    2010-07-15

    The molecular geometry, electronic structure, infrared spectra and thermochemical properties of cobalt and nickel tris(carbohydrazide) perchlorates (CoCP and NiCP) as well as copper bis(carbohydrazide) perchlorate (CuCP) were investigated using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) screened hybrid density functional. The results show that both perchlorate ions coordinate with the copper atom, and the interactions between copper and perchlorate are ionic, whereas all the metal-carbohydrazide interactions are covalent. Due to the delocalization from the sigma(N-H) bond orbital to the n*(M) antibond orbital, the amino stretching vibrations of these complexes show considerable red-shift compared with those of free carbohydrazide ligand. The calculated heats of reaction and formation indicate that the formations of these complexes are exothermic, and the order of their thermal stability is NiCP>CoCP>CuCP. These agree well with the experimental results. Finally, we find that there is a relationship between the energy gap and impact sensitivity.

  5. Functional marine metagenomic screening for anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm activity.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Karin; Golberg, Karina; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Marks, Robert; Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication process, entails the production of signaling molecules that enable synchronized gene expression in microbial communities to regulate myriad microbial functions, including biofilm formation. QS disruption may constitute an innovative approach to the design of novel antifouling and anti-biofilm agents. To identify novel quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI), 2,500 environmental bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from uncultured marine planktonic bacteria were screened for QSI activity using soft agar overlaid with wild type Chromobacterium violaceum as an indicator. Of the BAC library clones, 7% showed high QSI activity (>40%) against the indicator bacterium, suggesting that QSI is common in the marine environment. The most active compound, eluted from BAC clone 14-A5, disrupted QS signaling pathways and reduced biofilm formation in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. The mass spectra of the active BAC clone (14-A5) that had been visualized by thin layer chromatography was dominated by a m/z peak of 362.1.

  6. Functional genomic screening reveals asparagine dependence as a metabolic vulnerability in sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Hettmer, Simone; Schinzel, Anna C; Tchessalova, Daria; Schneider, Michaela; Parker, Christina L; Bronson, Roderick T; Richards, Nigel GJ; Hahn, William C; Wagers, Amy J

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for sarcomas are often inadequate. This study sought to identify actionable gene targets by selective targeting of the molecular networks that support sarcoma cell proliferation. Silencing of asparagine synthetase (ASNS), an amidotransferase that converts aspartate into asparagine, produced the strongest inhibitory effect on sarcoma growth in a functional genomic screen of mouse sarcomas generated by oncogenic Kras and disruption of Cdkn2a. ASNS silencing in mouse and human sarcoma cell lines reduced the percentage of S phase cells and impeded new polypeptide synthesis. These effects of ASNS silencing were reversed by exogenous supplementation with asparagine. Also, asparagine depletion via the ASNS inhibitor amino sulfoximine 5 (AS5) or asparaginase inhibited mouse and human sarcoma growth in vitro, and genetic silencing of ASNS in mouse sarcoma cells combined with depletion of plasma asparagine inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Asparagine reliance of sarcoma cells may represent a metabolic vulnerability with potential anti-sarcoma therapeutic value. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09436.001 PMID:26499495

  7. Associations Between Functional Movement Screening, the Y Balance Test, and Injuries in Coast Guard Training.

    PubMed

    Cosio-Lima, Ludmila; Knapik, Joseph J; Shumway, Richard; Reynolds, Katy; Lee, Youngil; Greska, Eric; Hampton, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Tests that have the ability to predict injuries in various military and athletic populations are important because of the role they could play in primary prevention. Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and Y Balance Tests (YBT) may provide this prognostic ability. This study examined the association between injuries and age, physical characteristics, FMS, and upper and lower body YBTs among Coast Guard Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT) candidates. Thirty-one male Coast Guard Maritime Security Response Team candidates were administered the 7 FMS tests and lower- and upper-body YBTs before their intense 2-month training course. Age, height, weight, and body mass index were also obtained. Physical training-related injuries were recorded during the course. Injury incidence was 41%. Older age and lower scores on either FMS or the upper-body YBT were associated with higher injury risk. Performance of the lower-body YBT was not associated with injury risk. This is the first investigation showing that lower scores on the upper-body YBT were associated with higher injury risk and is in consonance with previous investigations demonstrating associations between lower FMS scores and higher injury risk. Certain limitations need to be addressed. Future studies should determine if FMS and the YBTs have prognostic ability in other populations.

  8. Integration of the functional movement screen into the National Hockey League Combine.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Chip P; Kuropkat, Christiane; Gumieniak, Robert J; Gledhill, Norman; Jamnik, Veronica K

    2015-05-01

    The sport of ice hockey requires coordination of complex skills involving musculoskeletal and physiological abilities while simultaneously exposing players to a high risk for injury. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed to assess fundamental movement patterns that underlie both sport performance and injury risk. The top 111 elite junior hockey players from around the world took part in the 2013 National Hockey League Entry Draft Combine (NHL Combine). The FMS was integrated into the comprehensive medical and physiological fitness evaluations at the request of strength and conditioning coaches with affiliations to NHL teams. The inclusion of the FMS aimed to help develop strategies that could maximize its utility among elite hockey players and to encourage or inform further research in this field. This study evaluated the outcomes of integrating the FMS into the NHL Combine and identified any links to other medical plus physical and physiological fitness assessment outcomes. These potential associations may provide valuable information to identify elements of future training programs that are individualized to athletes' specific needs. The results of the FMS (total score and number of asymmetries identified) were significantly correlated to various body composition measures, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, leg power, timing of recent workouts, and the presence of lingering injury at the time of the NHL Combine. Although statistically significant correlations were observed, the implications of the FMS assessment outcomes remain difficult to quantify until ongoing assessment of FMS patterns, tracking of injuries, and hockey performance are available.

  9. Exploring functional roles of TRPV1 intracellular domains with unstructured peptide-insertion screening

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Yang, Fan; Vu, Simon; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a polymodal nociceptor for diverse physical and chemical stimuli that interact with different parts of the channel protein. Recent cryo-EM studies revealed detailed channel structures, opening the door for mapping structural elements mediating activation by each stimulus. Towards this goal, here we have combined unstructured peptide-insertion screening (UPS) with electrophysiological and fluorescence recordings to explore structural and functional roles of the intracellular regions of TRPV1 in mediating various activation stimuli. We found that most of the tightly packed protein regions did not tolerate structural perturbation by UPS when tested, indicating that structural integrity of the intracellular region is critical. In agreement with previous reports, Ca2+-dependent desensitization is strongly dependent on both intracellular N- and C-terminal domains; insertions of an unstructured peptide between these domains and the transmembrane core domain nearly eliminated Ca2+-dependent desensitization. In contrast, channel activations by capsaicin, low pH, divalent cations, and even heat are mostly intact in mutant channels containing the same insertions. These observations suggest that the transmembrane core domain of TRPV1, but not the intracellular domains, is responsible for sensing these stimuli. PMID:27666400

  10. In vitro functional screening as a means to identify new plasticizers devoid of reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Annie; Jones, Steven; Issop, Leeyah; Erythropel, Hanno C; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Culty, Martine

    2016-10-01

    Plasticizers are indispensable additives providing flexibility and malleability to plastics. Among them, several phthalates, including di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), have emerged as endocrine disruptors, leading to their restriction in consumer products and creating a need for new, safer plasticizers. The goal of this project was to use in vitro functional screening tools to select novel non-toxic plasticizers suitable for further in vivo evaluation. A panel of novel compounds with satisfactory plasticizer properties and biodegradability were tested, along with several commercial plasticizers, such as diisononyl-cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH®). MEHP, the monoester metabolite of DEHP was also included as reference compound. Because phthalates target mainly testicular function, including androgen production and spermatogenesis, we used the mouse MA-10 Leydig and C18-4 spermatogonial cell lines as surrogates to examine cell survival, proliferation, steroidogenesis and mitochondrial integrity. The most promising compounds were further assessed on organ cultures of rat fetal and neonatal testes, corresponding to sensitive developmental windows. Dose-response studies revealed the toxicity of most maleates and fumarates, while identifying several dibenzoate and succinate plasticizers as innocuous on Leydig and germ cells. Interestingly, DINCH®, a plasticizer marketed as a safe alternative to phthalates, exerted a biphasic effect on steroid production in MA-10 and fetal Leydig cells. MEHP was the only plasticizer inducing the formation of multinucleated germ cells (MNG) in organ culture. Overall, organ cultures corroborated the cell line data, identifying one dibenzoate and one succinate as the most promising candidates. The adoption of such collaborative approaches for developing new chemicals should help prevent the development of compounds potentially harmful to human health.

  11. Identification of Sinorhizobium meliloti early symbiotic genes by use of a positive functional screen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2006-04-01

    The soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti establishes nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with its leguminous host plant, alfalfa, following a series of continuous signal exchanges. The complexity of the changes of alfalfa root structures during symbiosis and the amount of S. meliloti genes with unknown functions raised the possibility that more S. meliloti genes may be required for early stages of the symbiosis. A positive functional screen of the entire S. meliloti genome for symbiotic genes was carried out using a modified in vivo expression technology. A group of genes and putative genes were found to be expressed in early stages of the symbiosis, and 23 of them were alfalfa root exudate inducible. These 23 genes were further separated into two groups based on their responses to apigenin, a known nodulation (nod) gene inducer. The group of six genes not inducible by apigenin included the lsrA gene, which is essential for the symbiosis, and the dgkA gene, which is involved in the synthesis of cyclic beta-1,2-glucan required for the S. meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis. In the group of 17 apigenin-inducible genes, most have not been previously characterized in S. meliloti, and none of them belongs to the nod gene family. The identification of this large group of alfalfa root exudate-inducible S. meliloti genes suggests that the interactions in the early stages of the S. meliloti and alfalfa symbiosis could be complex and that further characterization of these genes will lead to a better understanding of the symbiosis.

  12. A Rasch Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument: Identifying Race and Gender Differential Item Functioning among Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauffman, Elizabeth; MacIntosh, Randall

    2006-01-01

    The juvenile justice system needs a tool that can identify and assess mental health problems among youths quickly with validity and reliability. The goal of this article is to evaluate the racial/ethnic and gender differential item functioning (DIF) of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-Second Version (MAYSI-2) using the Rasch Model.…

  13. Screening of central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for sedative and hypnotic effects using chick models.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-05

    The chick has a practical advantage in the screening process in that chicks require only small quantities of drugs. The chick separation stress paradigm has traditionally been recognized as a valid form of anxiolytic screening. Further, chick behavior involving standing motionless with eyes closed or sitting motionless with head drooped is nearly always associated with electrophysiological sleep. When centrally administered, some DNA-encoded L-α-amino acids, as well as some DNA-non-encoded amino acids, such as metabolites of L-α-amino acids, D-amino acid and β-amino acid, have shown sedative and/or hypnotic effects in chicks. The effects of some of these amino acids have subsequently been confirmed in humans. In conclusion, the chick model is convenient and useful for screening central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for hypnosis and sedation.

  14. A Functional Screen Identifies miRs that Induce Radioresistance in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Moskwa, Patryk; Zinn, Pascal O.; Choi, Young Eun; Shukla, Sachet A; Fendler, Wojciech; Chen, Clark C; Lu, Jun; Golub, Todd R; Hjelmeland, Anita; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy in many tumor types is limited by normal tissue toxicity and by intrinsic or acquired radioresistance. Therefore, it is essential to understand the molecular network responsible for regulating radiosensitivity/resistance. Here, an unbiased functional screen identified four microRNAs (miR-1, miR-125a, miR-150, and miR-425) that induce radioresistance. Considering the clinical importance of radiotherapy for glioblastoma (GBM) patients, the impact of these miRNAs on GBM radioresistance was investigated. Overexpression of miR-1, miR-125a, miR-150 and/or miR-425 in GBM promotes radioresistance through upregulation of the cell cycle checkpoint response. Conversely, antagonizing with antagomiRs sensitizes GBM cells to irradiation, suggesting their potential as targets for inhibiting therapeutic resistance. Analysis of GBM datasets from TCGA revealed that these miRNAs are expressed in GBM patient specimens and correlate with Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β) signaling. Finally, it is demonstrated that expression of miR-1 and miR-125a can be induced by TGF-β and antagonized by a TGF-β receptor inhibitor. Together, these results identify and characterize a new role for miR-425, miR-1, miR-125, and miR-150 in promoting radioresistance in GBMs and provide insight into the therapeutic application of TGF-β inhibitors in radiotherapy. Systematic identification of miRs that cause radioresistance in gliomas is important for uncovering predictive markers for radiotherapy or targets for overcoming radioresistance. PMID:25256711

  15. A Novel Dual Expression Platform for High Throughput Functional Screening of Phage Libraries in Product like Format

    PubMed Central

    Mugabe, Sheila; Gao, Changshou; Tkaczyk, Christine; Mazor, Yariv; Pavlik, Peter; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William; Chowdhury, Partha Sarathi

    2015-01-01

    High throughput screenings of single chain Fv (scFv) antibody phage display libraries are currently done as soluble scFvs produced in E.coli. Due to endotoxin contaminations from bacterial cells these preparations cannot be reliably used in mammalian cell based assays. The monovalent nature and lack of Fc in soluble scFvs prevent functional assays that are dependent on target cross linking and/or Fc functions. A convenient approach is to convert scFvs into scFv.Fc fusion proteins and express them in mammalian cell lines for screening. This approach is low throughput and is only taken after primary screening of monovalent scFvs that are expressed in bacteria. There is no platform at present that combines the benefits of both bacterial and mammalian expression system for screening phage library output. We have, therefore, developed a novel dual expression vector, called pSplice, which can be used to express scFv.Fc fusion proteins both in E.coli and mammalian cell lines. The hallmark of the vector is an engineered intron which houses the bacterial promoter and signal peptide for expression and secretion of scFv.Fc in E.coli. When the vector is transfected into a mammalian cell line, the intron is efficiently spliced out resulting in a functional operon for expression and secretion of the scFv.Fc fusion protein into the culture medium. By applying basic knowledge of mammalian introns and splisosome, we designed this vector to enable screening of phage libraries in a product like format. Like IgG, the scFv.Fc fusion protein is bi-valent for the antigen and possesses Fc effector functions. Expression in E.coli maintains the speed of the bacterial expression platform and is used to triage clones based on binding and other assays that are not sensitive to endotoxin. Triaged clones are then expressed in a mammalian cell line without the need for any additional cloning steps. Conditioned media from the mammalian cell line containing the fusion proteins are then used for

  16. Injury History, Sex, and Performance on the Functional Movement Screen and Y Balance Test

    PubMed Central

    Chimera, Nicole J.; Smith, Craig A.; Warren, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    Context: Research is limited regarding the effects of injury or surgery history and sex on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and Y Balance Test (YBT). Objective: To determine if injury or surgery history or sex affected results on the FMS and YBT. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic training facilities. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 200 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I female (n = 92; age = 20.0 ± 1.4 years, body mass index = 22.8 ± 3.1 kg/m2) and male (n = 108; age = 20.0 ± 1.5 years, body mass index = 27.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2) athletes were screened; 170 completed the FMS, and 190 completed the YBT. Intervention(s): A self-reported questionnaire identified injury or surgery history and sex. The FMS assessed movement during the patterns of deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, impingement-clearing test, straight-leg raise, trunk stability push-up, press-up clearing test, rotary stability, and posterior-rocking clearing test. The YBT assessed balance while participants reached in anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions. Main Outcome Measure(s): The FMS composite score (CS; range, 0–21) and movement pattern score (range, 0–3), the YBT CS (% lower extremity length), and YBT anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral asymmetry (difference between limbs in centimeters). Independent-samples t tests established differences in mean FMS CS, YBT CS, and YBT asymmetry. The Mann-Whitney U test identified differences in FMS movement patterns. Results: We found lower overall FMS CSs for the following injuries or surgeries: hip (injured = 12.7 ± 3.1, uninjured = 14.4 ± 2.3; P = .005), elbow (injured = 12.1 ± 2.8, uninjured = 14.3 ± 2.4; P = .02), and hand (injured = 12.3 ± 2.9, uninjured = 14.3 ± 2.3; P = .006) injuries and shoulder surgery (surgery = 12.0 ± 1.0, no surgery = 14.3 ± 2.4; P < .001). We observed worse FMS movement pattern performance for knee surgery (rotary stability: P

  17. The Inter-rater Reliability of the Functional Movement Screen Within an Athletic Population Using Untrained Raters.

    PubMed

    Leeder, Jade E; Horsley, Ian G; Herrington, Lee C

    2016-09-01

    Elias JE. The inter-rater reliability of the functional movement screen within an athletic population using untrained raters. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2591-2599, 2016-The functional movement screen (FMS) is a commonly used screening tool designed to identify restrictions to movement patterns and increased injury risk using 7 predesigned tests. The purpose of this study was to analyze the inter-rater reliability of scoring of the FMS using a group of "untrained" subjects. Additionally, the study also examined if clinical experience level had any effect on reliability. Twenty fully qualified Physiotherapists working at the English Institute of Sport, with elite athletes, volunteered to participate in the study. The group comprised both level 2 and level 3 physiotherapists based on clinical experience levels. Five elite athletes, free from injury, were recruited and videoed completing 6 of the 7 FMS tests using a 3 camera system. The videos were scored by each Physiotherapist using the standardized scoring sheet, as developed by Cook et al. Each practitioner marked each athlete completing the 6 tests. The total scores were calculated for each athlete (maximum score of 18). The inter-rater reliability of the test was shown to be high, intraclass coefficient 0.906. An independent t test showed no significant differences between the level 2 and level 3 practitioners in the total scores (p = 0.502). The results of the test indicate that the FMS is a reliable screening tool when used by untrained practitioners in determining faulty movement patterns and that clinical experience level does not affect the reliability, therefore it may be a useful tool in the screening of athletic populations.

  18. Coupled high-throughput functional screening and next generation sequencing for identification of plant polymer decomposing enzymes in metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Tran, Huu M; Karaoz, Ulas; Weihe, Claudia; Hadi, Masood Z; Martiny, Jennifer B H; Martiny, Adam C; Brodie, Eoin L

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies generate new predictions and hypotheses about the functional roles of environmental microorganisms. Yet, until we can test these predictions at a scale that matches our ability to generate them, most of them will remain as hypotheses. Function-based mining of metagenomic libraries can provide direct linkages between genes, metabolic traits and microbial taxa and thus bridge this gap between sequence data generation and functional predictions. Here we developed high-throughput screening assays for function-based characterization of activities involved in plant polymer decomposition from environmental metagenomic libraries. The multiplexed assays use fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, combine automated liquid handling and use a genetically modified expression host to enable simultaneous screening of 12,160 clones for 14 activities in a total of 170,240 reactions. Using this platform we identified 374 (0.26%) cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, starch, phosphate and protein hydrolyzing clones from fosmid libraries prepared from decomposing leaf litter. Sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, followed by assembly and gene prediction of a subset of 95 fosmid clones, identified a broad range of bacterial phyla, including Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, multiple Proteobacteria sub-phyla in addition to some Fungi. Carbohydrate-active enzyme genes from 20 different glycoside hydrolase (GH) families were detected. Using tetranucleotide frequency (TNF) binning of fosmid sequences, multiple enzyme activities from distinct fosmids were linked, demonstrating how biochemically-confirmed functional traits in environmental metagenomes may be attributed to groups of specific organisms. Overall, our results demonstrate how functional screening of metagenomic libraries can be used to connect microbial functionality to community composition and, as a result, complement large-scale metagenomic sequencing efforts.

  19. Coupled high-throughput functional screening and next generation sequencing for identification of plant polymer decomposing enzymes in metagenomic libraries

    PubMed Central

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Tran, Huu M.; Karaoz, Ulas; Weihe, Claudia; Hadi, Masood Z.; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.; Martiny, Adam C.; Brodie, Eoin L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies generate new predictions and hypotheses about the functional roles of environmental microorganisms. Yet, until we can test these predictions at a scale that matches our ability to generate them, most of them will remain as hypotheses. Function-based mining of metagenomic libraries can provide direct linkages between genes, metabolic traits and microbial taxa and thus bridge this gap between sequence data generation and functional predictions. Here we developed high-throughput screening assays for function-based characterization of activities involved in plant polymer decomposition from environmental metagenomic libraries. The multiplexed assays use fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, combine automated liquid handling and use a genetically modified expression host to enable simultaneous screening of 12,160 clones for 14 activities in a total of 170,240 reactions. Using this platform we identified 374 (0.26%) cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, starch, phosphate and protein hydrolyzing clones from fosmid libraries prepared from decomposing leaf litter. Sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, followed by assembly and gene prediction of a subset of 95 fosmid clones, identified a broad range of bacterial phyla, including Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, multiple Proteobacteria sub-phyla in addition to some Fungi. Carbohydrate-active enzyme genes from 20 different glycoside hydrolase (GH) families were detected. Using tetranucleotide frequency (TNF) binning of fosmid sequences, multiple enzyme activities from distinct fosmids were linked, demonstrating how biochemically-confirmed functional traits in environmental metagenomes may be attributed to groups of specific organisms. Overall, our results demonstrate how functional screening of metagenomic libraries can be used to connect microbial functionality to community composition and, as a result, complement large-scale metagenomic sequencing efforts. PMID:24069019

  20. Identification of novel modulators of mitochondrial function by a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Shi, Xiaoying; Padmanabhan, Ranjani; Wang, Qiong; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.; Hild, Marc; Garza, Dan; Li, Hao

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many human diseases. There has not been a systematic genetic approach for identifying regulators of basal mitochondrial biogenesis and function in higher eukaryotes. We performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells using mitochondrial Citrate synthase (CS) activity as the primary readout. We screened 13,071 dsRNAs and identified 152 genes that modulate CS activity. These modulators are involved in a wide range of biological processes and pathways including mitochondrial-related functions, transcriptional and translational regulation, and signaling pathways. Selected hits among the 152 genes were further analyzed for their effect on mitochondrial CS activity in transgenic flies or fly mutants. We confirmed a number of gene hits including HDAC6, Rpd3(HDAC1), CG3249, vimar, Src42A, klumpfuss, barren, and smt3 which exert effects on mitochondrial CS activities in vivo, demonstrating the value of Drosophila genome-wide RNAi screens for identifying genes and pathways that modulate mitochondrial function. PMID:18042644

  1. A Functional Genome-Wide In Vivo Screen Identifies New Regulators of Signalling Pathways during Early Xenopus Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siwei; Li, Jingjing; Lea, Robert; Amaya, Enrique; Dorey, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development requires exquisite regulation of several essential processes, such as patterning of tissues and organs, cell fate decisions, and morphogenesis. Intriguingly, these diverse processes are controlled by only a handful of signalling pathways, and mis-regulation in one or more of these pathways may result in a variety of congenital defects and diseases. Consequently, investigating how these signalling pathways are regulated at the molecular level is essential to understanding the mechanisms underlying vertebrate embryogenesis, as well as developing treatments for human diseases. Here, we designed and performed a large-scale gain-of-function screen in Xenopus embryos aimed at identifying new regulators of MAPK/Erk, PI3K/Akt, BMP, and TGF-β/Nodal signalling pathways. Our gain-of-function screen is based on the identification of gene products that alter the phosphorylation state of key signalling molecules, which report the activation state of the pathways. In total, we have identified 20 new molecules that regulate the activity of one or more signalling pathways during early Xenopus development. This is the first time that such a functional screen has been performed, and the findings pave the way toward a more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of important signalling pathways under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24244509

  2. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    PubMed

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K; Cottle, Denny L; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E; Watt, Fiona M; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P; Sundberg, John P; White, Jacqueline K; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation.

  3. 49 CFR 1544.407 - Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform screening functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals... Qualifications When the Aircraft Operator Performs Screening § 1544.407 Training, testing, and knowledge of...) Citizenship. A screener must be a citizen or national of the United States. (d) Screener readiness...

  4. Functional Assays and Alternative Species: Using Larval Zebrafish in Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is developing and evaluating methods to screen and prioritize large numbers of chemicals for developmental toxicity. Towards this goal, we are exploring methods to detect developmental neurotoxicants in very young larval zebrafish. We have...

  5. Functional Assays and Alternative Species: Using Larval Zebrafish in Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening**

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating methods to screen and prioritize large numbers of chemicals for developmental toxicity. As such, we are exploring a behavioral testing paradigm, which can assess the effect of sublethal and subteratogenic concentrations of de...

  6. Pulmonary Function Screening of Submarine Personnel Prior to Pressurized Submarine Escape Training: Development of Lung Function Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-26

    Immersion Suit (SEIE) will commence. Before training, all candidates will undergo medical screening, including spirometry , to identify individuals... spirometry . The majority were non-smokers (64%), and the remainder were ex- or current smokers. Most of the students were white (80.7%), 8.1% were...underwent spirometry . The majority were non-smokers (64.4%), and the remainder were ex- or current smokers. Most of the students were white (80.7%), 8.1

  7. Loss-of-function screen in rhabdomyosarcoma identifies CRKL-YES as a critical signal for tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C L; Ngo, V N; Grohar, P J; Arnaldez, F I; Asante, A; Wan, X; Khan, J; Hewitt, S M; Khanna, C; Staudt, L M; Helman, L J

    2013-11-21

    To identify novel signaling pathways necessary for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) survival, we performed a loss-of-function screen using an inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) library in an alveolar and an embryonal RMS cell line. This screen identified CRKL expression as necessary for growth of alveolar RMS and embryonal RMS both in vitro and in vivo. We also found that CRKL was uniformly highly expressed in both RMS cell lines and tumor tissue. As CRKL is a member of the CRK adapter protein family that contains an SH2 and two SH3 domains and is involved in signal transduction from multiple tyrosine kinase receptors, we evaluated CRKL interaction with multiple tyrosine kinase receptor signaling pathways in RMS cells. While we saw no interaction of CRKL with IGFIR, MET or PI3KAKT/mTOR pathways, we determined that CRKL signaling was associated with SRC family kinase (SFK) signaling, specifically with YES kinase. Inhibition of SFK signaling with dasatinib or another SFK inhibitor, sarcatinib, suppressed RMS cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data identify CRKL as a novel critical component of RMS growth. This study also demonstrates the use of functional screening to identify a potentially novel therapeutic target and treatment approach for these highly aggressive pediatric cancers.

  8. Function-first’ Lead Discovery: Mode of Action Profiling of Natural Product Libraries Using Image-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christopher J.; Bray, Walter M.; Woerhmann, Marcos H.; Stuart, Joshua; Lokey, R. Scott; Linington, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cytological profiling is a high-content image-based screening technology that provides insight into the mode of action (MOA) for test compounds by directly measuring hundreds of phenotypic cellular features. We have extended this recently reported technology to the mechanistic characterization of unknown natural products libraries for the direct prediction of compound MOAs at the primary screening stage. By analyzing a training set of commercial compounds of known mechanism and comparing these profiles to those obtained from natural product library members, we have successfully annotated extracts based on mode of action, dereplicated known compounds based on biological similarity to the training set, and identified and predicted the MOA of a family of new iron siderophores. Coupled with traditional analytical techniques, cytological profiling provides a new avenue for the creation of ‘function-first’ platforms for natural products discovery. PMID:23438757

  9. Functional interplay of visual, sensitizing and screening pigments in the eyes of Drosophila and other red-eyed dipteran flies.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, D G; Wehling, M F; Belušič, G

    2017-03-10

    Several fly species have distinctly red-coloured eyes, meaning that the screening pigments that provide a restricted angular sensitivity of the photoreceptors may perform poorly in the longer wavelength range. The functional reasons for the red transparency and possible negative visual effects of the spectral properties of the eye-colouring screening pigments are discussed within the context of the photochemistry, arrestin binding, and turnover of the visual pigments located in the various photoreceptor types. A phylogenetic survey of the spectral properties of the main photoreceptors of the Diptera indicates that the transition of the brown eye colour of the Nematocera and lower Brachycera to a much redder eye colour of the higher Brachycera occurred around the emergence of the Tabanidae family. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Phonon spectral functions of photo-generated hot carrier plasmas: effects of carrier screening and plasmon-phonon coupling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2017-02-15

    We investigate spectral behavior of phonon spectral functions in an interacting multi-component hot carrier plasma. Spectral analysis of various phonon spectral functions is performed considering carrier-phonon channels of polar and nonpolar optical phonons, acoustic deformation-potential, and piezoelectric Coulomb couplings. Effects of phonon self-energy corrections are examined at finite temperature within a random phase approximation extended to include the effects of dynamic screening, plasmon-phonon coupling, and local-field corrections of the plasma species. We provide numerical data for the case of a photo-generated electron-hole plasma formed in a wurtzite GaN. Our result shows the clear significance of the multiplicity of the plasma species in the phonon spectral functions of a multi-component plasma giving rise to a variety of spectral behaviors of carrier-phonon coupled collective modes. A useful sum rule on the plasma-species-resolved dielectric functions is also found.

  11. Phonon spectral functions of photo-generated hot carrier plasmas: effects of carrier screening and plasmon-phonon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spectral behavior of phonon spectral functions in an interacting multi-component hot carrier plasma. Spectral analysis of various phonon spectral functions is performed considering carrier-phonon channels of polar and nonpolar optical phonons, acoustic deformation-potential, and piezoelectric Coulomb couplings. Effects of phonon self-energy corrections are examined at finite temperature within a random phase approximation extended to include the effects of dynamic screening, plasmon-phonon coupling, and local-field corrections of the plasma species. We provide numerical data for the case of a photo-generated electron-hole plasma formed in a wurtzite GaN. Our result shows the clear significance of the multiplicity of the plasma species in the phonon spectral functions of a multi-component plasma giving rise to a variety of spectral behaviors of carrier-phonon coupled collective modes. A useful sum rule on the plasma-species-resolved dielectric functions is also found.

  12. Functional Genetic Screen to Identify Interneurons Governing Behaviorally Distinct Aspects of Drosophila Larval Motor Programs

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Matt Q.; McCumsey, Stephanie J.; Lopez-Darwin, Sereno; Heckscher, Ellie S.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larval crawling is an attractive system to study rhythmic motor output at the level of animal behavior. Larval crawling consists of waves of muscle contractions generating forward or reverse locomotion. In addition, larvae undergo additional behaviors, including head casts, turning, and feeding. It is likely that some neurons (e.g., motor neurons) are used in all these behaviors, but the identity (or even existence) of neurons dedicated to specific aspects of behavior is unclear. To identify neurons that regulate specific aspects of larval locomotion, we performed a genetic screen to identify neurons that, when activated, could elicit distinct motor programs. We used 165 Janelia CRM-Gal4 lines—chosen for sparse neuronal expression—to ectopically express the warmth-inducible neuronal activator TrpA1, and screened for locomotor defects. The primary screen measured forward locomotion velocity, and we identified 63 lines that had locomotion velocities significantly slower than controls following TrpA1 activation (28°). A secondary screen was performed on these lines, revealing multiple discrete behavioral phenotypes, including slow forward locomotion, excessive reverse locomotion, excessive turning, excessive feeding, immobile, rigid paralysis, and delayed paralysis. While many of the Gal4 lines had motor, sensory, or muscle expression that may account for some or all of the phenotype, some lines showed specific expression in a sparse pattern of interneurons. Our results show that distinct motor programs utilize distinct subsets of interneurons, and provide an entry point for characterizing interneurons governing different elements of the larval motor program. PMID:27172197

  13. Effects of semicore d-electrons in screened-exchange density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2007-03-01

    We report a theoretical study on the role of shallow d states in the screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA) band structure of binary semiconductor systems. We found that the inaccurate pseudo-wavefunctions can lead to 1) an overestimation of the screened-exchange interaction between the localized d states and the delocalized higher energy s and p states and 2) an underestimation of the screened-exchange interaction between the d states. The resulting sX-LDA band structures have substantially smaller band gaps compared with experiments. We correct the pseudo-wavefunctions of d states by including the s and p states of the same shell in the valence states. The correction of pseudo-wavefunctions yields band gaps and the d state binding energy in good agreement with experiments. Compared with the quasi-particle GW method, our sX-LDA results shows not only similar quality band gaps but also much better d state binding energy. As an example, we present sX-LDA results of s-d coupling in zinc-blende semiconductors and compare them with LDA+U results. We also present an efficient method to correct the pseudo-wavefunction exchange-integral error by using projection of wavefunctions onto atomic orbitals.

  14. Functional genomics screening utilizing mutant mouse embryonic stem cells identifies novel radiation-response genes.

    PubMed

    Loesch, Kimberly; Galaviz, Stacy; Hamoui, Zaher; Clanton, Ryan; Akabani, Gamal; Deveau, Michael; DeJesus, Michael; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C; Wallis, Deeann

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic determinants of radiation response is crucial to optimizing and individualizing radiotherapy for cancer patients. In order to identify genes that are involved in enhanced sensitivity or resistance to radiation, a library of stable mutant murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), each with a defined mutation, was screened for cell viability and gene expression in response to radiation exposure. We focused on a cancer-relevant subset of over 500 mutant ESC lines. We identified 13 genes; 7 genes that have been previously implicated in radiation response and 6 other genes that have never been implicated in radiation response. After screening, proteomic analysis showed enrichment for genes involved in cellular component disassembly (e.g. Dstn and Pex14) and regulation of growth (e.g. Adnp2, Epc1, and Ing4). Overall, the best targets with the highest potential for sensitizing cancer cells to radiation were Dstn and Map2k6, and the best targets for enhancing resistance to radiation were Iqgap and Vcan. Hence, we provide compelling evidence that screening mutant ESCs is a powerful approach to identify genes that alter radiation response. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to define genetic variants or therapeutic targets that will enhance clinical therapy.

  15. The m/r SEBT: development of a functional screening tool for dance educators.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret; Batson, Glenna

    2014-12-01

    Dance screenings provide direct and indirect data bearing on a dancer's readiness to undertake rigorous physical training. Rarely, however, are dance teachers able to translate results from these screenings into practical technical knowledge. In this article, an example of a preseason assessment tool is presented that translates scientific findings into useful information for dance teachers conducting auditions. Designed as a baseline assessment of the dancer during auditioning, the m/r SEBT tool helps teachers stratify technical levels, identify injury risk, and consequently assist with immediate and appropriate recommendations for supplemental training and//or follow-up with a medical professional. The tool evolved out of more than 3 years of collaborative, multisite research utilizing the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) as a dynamic test of balance. Modifications were made to render the test more dance-specific and to increase balance challenges. Within the 3-year period, more than 100 dancers were tested in four sites, two in the United States and two in the United Kingdom. Despite the relatively large collective sample size, neither the original SEBT nor its modifications (m/r SEBT) held robust face or content validity as balance screens. What did emerge, however, were qualitative criteria that the authors organized into a feasible assessment tool for preseason auditions. While this tool awaits further validation, its current evolution helps serve as a bridge between dance teachers' clinical and practical knowledge.

  16. Functional screening with a live cell imaging-based random cell migration assay.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Zovko, Sandra; de Bont, Hans; van de Water, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration, essential in cancer progression, is a complex process comprising a number of spatiotemporally regulated and well-coordinated mechanisms. In order to study (random) cell migration in the context of responses to various external cues (such as growth factors) or intrinsic cell signaling, a number of different tools and approaches have been developed. In order to unravel the key pathways and players involved in the regulation of (cancer) cell migration, a systematical mapping of the players/pathways is required. For this purpose, we developed a cell migration assay based on automatic high-throughput microscopy screen. This approach allows for screening of hundreds of genes, e.g., those encoding various kinases and phosphatases but can also be used for screening of drugs libraries. Moreover, we have developed an automatic analysis pipeline comprising of (a) automatic data acquisition (movie) and (b) automatic analysis of the acquired movies of the migrating cells. Here, we describe various facets of this approach. Since cell migration is essential in progression of cancer metastasis, we describe two examples of experiments performed on highly motile (metastatic) cancer cells.

  17. Functional CRISPR screening identifies the ufmylation pathway as a regulator of SQSTM1/p62

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Rowena; Moretti, Francesca; McAllister, Gregory; Wang, Zuncai; Bergman, Phil; Liu, Shanming; Frias, Elizabeth; Alford, John; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Lindeman, Alicia; Kelliher, Jennifer; Russ, Carsten; Knehr, Judith; Carbone, Walter; Beibel, Martin; Roma, Guglielmo; Ng, Aylwin; Tallarico, John A; Porter, Jeffery A; Xavier, Ramnik J; Mickanin, Craig; Murphy, Leon O; Hoffman, Gregory R; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    SQSTM1 is an adaptor protein that integrates multiple cellular signaling pathways and whose expression is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level. Here, we describe a forward genetic screening paradigm exploiting CRISPR-mediated genome editing coupled to a cell selection step by FACS to identify regulators of SQSTM1. Through systematic comparison of pooled libraries, we show that CRISPR is superior to RNAi in identifying known SQSTM1 modulators. A genome-wide CRISPR screen exposed MTOR signalling and the entire macroautophagy machinery as key regulators of SQSTM1 and identified several novel modulators including HNRNPM, SLC39A14, SRRD, PGK1 and the ufmylation cascade. We show that ufmylation regulates SQSTM1 by eliciting a cell type-specific ER stress response which induces SQSTM1 expression and results in its accumulation in the cytosol. This study validates pooled CRISPR screening as a powerful method to map the repertoire of cellular pathways that regulate the fate of an individual target protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17290.001 PMID:27351204

  18. Novel immune-modulator identified by a rapid, functional screen of the parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus) genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The success of new sequencing technologies and informatic methods for identifying genes has made establishing gene product function a critical rate limiting step in progressing the molecular sciences. We present a method to functionally mine genomes for useful activities in vivo, using an unusual property of a member of the poxvirus family to demonstrate this screening approach. Results The genome of Parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus) was sequenced, annotated, and then used to PCR-amplify its open-reading-frames. Employing a cloning-independent protocol, a viral expression-library was rapidly built and arrayed into sub-library pools. These were directly delivered into mice as expressible cassettes and assayed for an immune-modulating activity associated with parapoxvirus infection. The product of the B2L gene, a homolog of vaccinia F13L, was identified as the factor eliciting immune cell accumulation at sites of skin inoculation. Administration of purified B2 protein also elicited immune cell accumulation activity, and additionally was found to serve as an adjuvant for antigen-specific responses. Co-delivery of the B2L gene with an influenza gene-vaccine significantly improved protection in mice. Furthermore, delivery of the B2L expression construct, without antigen, non-specifically reduced tumor growth in murine models of cancer. Conclusion A streamlined, functional approach to genome-wide screening of a biological activity in vivo is presented. Its application to screening in mice for an immune activity elicited by the pathogen genome of Parapoxvirus ovis yielded a novel immunomodulator. In this inverted discovery method, it was possible to identify the adjuvant responsible for a function of interest prior to a mechanistic study of the adjuvant. The non-specific immune activity of this modulator, B2, is similar to that associated with administration of inactivated particles to a host or to a live viral infection. Administration of B2 may provide the

  19. Experimental Strategies for Functional Annotation and Metabolism Discovery: Targeted Screening of Solute Binding Proteins and Unbiased Panning of Metabolomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rate at which genome sequencing data is accruing demands enhanced methods for functional annotation and metabolism discovery. Solute binding proteins (SBPs) facilitate the transport of the first reactant in a metabolic pathway, thereby constraining the regions of chemical space and the chemistries that must be considered for pathway reconstruction. We describe high-throughput protein production and differential scanning fluorimetry platforms, which enabled the screening of 158 SBPs against a 189 component library specifically tailored for this class of proteins. Like all screening efforts, this approach is limited by the practical constraints imposed by construction of the library, i.e., we can study only those metabolites that are known to exist and which can be made in sufficient quantities for experimentation. To move beyond these inherent limitations, we illustrate the promise of crystallographic- and mass spectrometric-based approaches for the unbiased use of entire metabolomes as screening libraries. Together, our approaches identified 40 new SBP ligands, generated experiment-based annotations for 2084 SBPs in 71 isofunctional clusters, and defined numerous metabolic pathways, including novel catabolic pathways for the utilization of ethanolamine as sole nitrogen source and the use of d-Ala-d-Ala as sole carbon source. These efforts begin to define an integrated strategy for realizing the full value of amassing genome sequence data. PMID:25540822

  20. A High-Throughput Functional Screen Identifies Small Molecule Regulators of Temperature- and Mechano-Sensitive K2P Channels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    K2P (KCNK) potassium channels generate “leak” potassium currents that strongly influence cellular excitability and contribute to pain, somatosensation, anesthesia, and mood. Despite their physiological importance, K2Ps lack specific pharmacology. Addressing this issue has been complicated by the challenges that the leak nature of K2P currents poses for electrophysiology-based high-throughput screening strategies. Here, we present a yeast-based high-throughput screening assay that avoids this problem. Using a simple growth-based functional readout, we screened a library of 106,281 small molecules and identified two new inhibitors and three new activators of the mammalian K2P channel K2P2.1 (KCNK2, TREK-1). By combining biophysical, structure–activity, and mechanistic analysis, we developed a dihydroacridine analogue, ML67-33, that acts as a low micromolar, selective activator of temperature- and mechano-sensitive K2P channels. Biophysical studies show that ML67-33 reversibly increases channel currents by activating the extracellular selectivity filter-based C-type gate that forms the core gating apparatus on which a variety of diverse modulatory inputs converge. The new K2P modulators presented here, together with the yeast-based assay, should enable both mechanistic and physiological studies of K2P activity and facilitate the discovery and development of other K2P small molecule modulators. PMID:23738709

  1. High throughput screening in duchenne muscular dystrophy: from drug discovery to functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Gintjee, Thomas J J; Magh, Alvin S H; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-11-14

    Centers for the screening of biologically active compounds and genomic libraries are becoming common in the academic setting and have enabled researchers devoted to developing strategies for the treatment of diseases or interested in studying a biological phenomenon to have unprecedented access to libraries that, until few years ago, were accessible only by pharmaceutical companies. As a result, new drugs and genetic targets have now been identified for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most prominent of the neuromuscular disorders affecting children. Although the work is still at an early stage, the results obtained to date are encouraging and demonstrate the importance that these centers may have in advancing therapeutic strategies for DMD as well as other diseases. This review will provide a summary of the status and progress made toward the development of a cure for this disorder and implementing high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies as the main source of discovery. As more academic institutions are gaining access to HTS as a valuable discovery tool, the identification of new biologically active molecules is likely to grow larger. In addition, the presence in the academic setting of experts in different aspects of the disease will offer the opportunity to develop novel assays capable of identifying new targets to be pursued as potential therapeutic options. These assays will represent an excellent source to be used by pharmaceutical companies for the screening of larger libraries providing the opportunity to establish strong collaborations between the private and academic sectors and maximizing the chances of bringing into the clinic new drugs for the treatment of DMD.

  2. An AICD-based functional screen to identify APP metabolism regulators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Can; Khandelwal, Preeti J; Chakraborty, Ranjita; Cuellar, Trinna L; Sarangi, Srikant; Patel, Shyam A; Cosentino, Christopher P; O'Connor, Michael; Lee, Jeremy C; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Saunders, Aleister J

    2007-01-01

    Background A central event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the regulated intramembraneous proteolysis of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), to generate the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide and the APP intracellular domain (AICD). Aβ is the major component of amyloid plaques and AICD displays transcriptional activation properties. We have taken advantage of AICD transactivation properties to develop a genetic screen to identify regulators of APP metabolism. This screen relies on an APP-Gal4 fusion protein, which upon normal proteolysis, produces AICD-Gal4. Production of AICD-Gal4 induces Gal4-UAS driven luciferase expression. Therefore, when regulators of APP metabolism are modulated, luciferase expression is altered. Results To validate this experimental approach we modulated α-, β-, and γ-secretase levels and activities. Changes in AICD-Gal4 levels as measured by Western blot analysis were strongly and significantly correlated to the observed changes in AICD-Gal4 mediated luciferase activity. To determine if a known regulator of APP trafficking/maturation and Presenilin1 endoproteolysis could be detected using the AICD-Gal4 mediated luciferase assay, we knocked-down Ubiquilin 1 and observed decreased luciferase activity. We confirmed that Ubiquilin 1 modulated AICD-Gal4 levels by Western blot analysis and also observed that Ubiquilin 1 modulated total APP levels, the ratio of mature to immature APP, as well as PS1 endoproteolysis. Conclusion Taken together, we have shown that this screen can identify known APP metabolism regulators that control proteolysis, intracellular trafficking, maturation and levels of APP and its proteolytic products. We demonstrate for the first time that Ubiquilin 1 regulates APP metabolism in the human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y. PMID:17718916

  3. High Throughput Screening in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Drug Discovery to Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gintjee, Thomas J.J.; Magh, Alvin S.H.; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Centers for the screening of biologically active compounds and genomic libraries are becoming common in the academic setting and have enabled researchers devoted to developing strategies for the treatment of diseases or interested in studying a biological phenomenon to have unprecedented access to libraries that, until few years ago, were accessible only by pharmaceutical companies. As a result, new drugs and genetic targets have now been identified for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most prominent of the neuromuscular disorders affecting children. Although the work is still at an early stage, the results obtained to date are encouraging and demonstrate the importance that these centers may have in advancing therapeutic strategies for DMD as well as other diseases. This review will provide a summary of the status and progress made toward the development of a cure for this disorder and implementing high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies as the main source of discovery. As more academic institutions are gaining access to HTS as a valuable discovery tool, the identification of new biologically active molecules is likely to grow larger. In addition, the presence in the academic setting of experts in different aspects of the disease will offer the opportunity to develop novel assays capable of identifying new targets to be pursued as potential therapeutic options. These assays will represent an excellent source to be used by pharmaceutical companies for the screening of larger libraries providing the opportunity to establish strong collaborations between the private and academic sectors and maximizing the chances of bringing into the clinic new drugs for the treatment of DMD. PMID:25405319

  4. A high throughput genetic screen identifies new early meiotic recombination functions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    De Muyt, Arnaud; Pereira, Lucie; Vezon, Daniel; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Gendrot, Ghislaine; Chambon, Aurélie; Lainé-Choinard, Sandrine; Pelletier, Georges; Mercier, Raphaël; Nogué, Fabien; Grelon, Mathilde

    2009-09-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by the formation of numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalysed by the widely conserved Spo11 protein. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Spo11 requires nine other proteins for meiotic DSB formation; however, unlike Spo11, few of these are conserved across kingdoms. In order to investigate this recombination step in higher eukaryotes, we took advantage of a high-throughput meiotic mutant screen carried out in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A collection of 55,000 mutant lines was screened, and spo11-like mutations, characterised by a drastic decrease in chiasma formation at metaphase I associated with an absence of synapsis at prophase, were selected. This screen led to the identification of two populations of mutants classified according to their recombination defects: mutants that repair meiotic DSBs using the sister chromatid such as Atdmc1 or mutants that are unable to make DSBs like Atspo11-1. We found that in Arabidopsis thaliana at least four proteins are necessary for driving meiotic DSB repair via the homologous chromosomes. These include the previously characterised DMC1 and the Hop1-related ASY1 proteins, but also the meiotic specific cyclin SDS as well as the Hop2 Arabidopsis homologue AHP2. Analysing the mutants defective in DSB formation, we identified the previously characterised AtSPO11-1, AtSPO11-2, and AtPRD1 as well as two new genes, AtPRD2 and AtPRD3. Our data thus increase the number of proteins necessary for DSB formation in Arabidopsis thaliana to five. Unlike SPO11 and (to a minor extent) PRD1, these two new proteins are poorly conserved among species, suggesting that the DSB formation mechanism, but not its regulation, is conserved among eukaryotes.

  5. A Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based genetic sensor for functional screening of vitamin D3 analogues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Analogues of vitamin D3 are extensively used in the treatment of various illnesses, such as osteoporosis, inflammatory skin diseases, and cancer. Functional testing of new vitamin D3 analogues and formulations for improved systemic and topical administration is supported by sensitive screening methods that allow a comparative evaluation of drug properties. As a new tool in functional screening of vitamin D3 analogues, we describe a genomically integratable sensor for sensitive drug detection. This system facilitates assessment of the pharmacokinetic and pharmadynamic properties of vitamin D3 analogues. The tri-cistronic genetic sensor encodes a drug-sensoring protein, a reporter protein expressed from an activated sensor-responsive promoter, and a resistance marker. Results The three expression cassettes, inserted in a head-to-tail orientation in a Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon vector, are efficiently inserted as a single genetic entity into the genome of cells of interest in a reaction catalyzed by the hyperactive SB100X transposase. The applicability of the sensor for screening purposes is demonstrated by the functional comparison of potent synthetic analogues of vitamin D3 designed for the treatment of psoriasis and cancer. In clones of human keratinocytes carrying from a single to numerous insertions of the vitamin D3 sensor, a sensitive sensor read-out is detected upon exposure to even low concentrations of vitamin D3 analogues. In comparative studies, the sensor unveils superior potency of new candidate drugs in comparison with analogues that are currently in clinical use. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate the use of the genetic sensor as a tool in first-line evaluation of new vitamin D3 analogues and pave the way for new types of drug delivery studies in sensor-transgenic animals. PMID:21473770

  6. Zebrafish eleutheroembryos as an alternative system for screening chemicals disrupting the mammalian thyroid gland morphogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Raldúa, Demetrio; Thienpont, Benedicte; Babin, Patrick J

    2012-04-01

    The importance and irreversibility of the effects of thyroid hormone deficiency on human brain development highlight the importance of identifying environmental agents that interfere with thyroid gland morphogenesis and function. Zebrafish eleutheroembryos are currently used by many pharmaceutical companies in drug discovery as a vertebrate model, not subjected to regulations for animal experiments, that provides an intermediate step between in vitro and rodent assay. The mechanisms of zebrafish thyroid development are generally comparable to those in humans, and moreover, molecular and functional studies of zebrafish thyroid follicles have demonstrated a high degree of conservation with upper vertebrates, opening up the possibility of designing alternative methods for screening individual chemicals and mixtures that impairing thyroid gland morphogenesis and/or function. Analysis of the intrafollicular thyroxine-content of zebrafish larvae exposed to potential disruptors has proved to be a reliable, physiologically relevant endpoint to estimate effects of chemicals on the mammalian thyroid gland.

  7. Determination of liquid's molecular interference function based on X-ray diffraction and dual-energy CT in security screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; YangDai, Tianyi

    2016-08-01

    A method for deriving the molecular interference function (MIF) of an unknown liquid for security screening is presented. Based on the effective atomic number reconstructed from dual-energy computed tomography (CT), equivalent molecular formula of the liquid is estimated. After a series of optimizations, the MIF and a new effective atomic number are finally obtained from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile. The proposed method generates more accurate results with less sensitivity to the noise and data deficiency of the XRD profile.

  8. Can selected functional movement screen assessments be used to identify movement deficiencies that could affect multidirectional speed and jump performance?

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Schultz, Adrian B; Jordan, Corrin A; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Luczo, Tawni M

    2015-01-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) includes lower-body focused tests (deep squat [DS], hurdle step, in-line lunge) that could assist in identifying movement deficiencies affecting multidirectional sprinting and jumping, which are important qualities for team sports. However, the hypothesized relationship with athletic performance lacks supportive research. This study investigated relationships between the lower-body focused screens and overall FMS performance and multidirectional speed and jumping capabilities in team sport athletes. Twenty-two healthy men were assessed in the FMS, and multidirectional speed (0- to 5-m, 0- to 10-m, 0- to 20-m sprint intervals; 505 and between-leg turn differences, modified T-test and differences between initial movement to the left or right); and bilateral and unilateral multidirectional jumping (vertical [VJ], standing long [SLJ], and lateral jump) tests. Pearson's correlations (r) were used to calculate relationships between screening scores and performance tests (p ≤ 0.05). After the determination of any screens relating to athletic performance, subjects were stratified into groups (3 = high-performing group; 2 = intermediate-performing group; 1 = low-performing group) to investigate movement compensations. A 1-way analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05) determined any between-group differences. There were few significant correlations. The DS did moderately correlate with between-leg 505 difference (r = -0.423), and bilateral VJ (r = -0.428) and SLJ (r = -0.457). When stratified into groups according to DS score, high performers had a 13% greater SLJ when compared with intermediate performers, which was the only significant result. The FMS seems to have minimal capabilities for identifying movement deficiencies that could affect multidirectional speed and jumping in male team sport athletes.

  9. Integration of high-content screening and untargeted metabolomics for comprehensive functional annotation of natural product libraries.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Kenji L; Glassey, Emerson; Linington, Roger G

    2015-09-29

    Traditional natural products discovery using a combination of live/dead screening followed by iterative bioassay-guided fractionation affords no information about compound structure or mode of action until late in the discovery process. This leads to high rates of rediscovery and low probabilities of finding compounds with unique biological and/or chemical properties. By integrating image-based phenotypic screening in HeLa cells with high-resolution untargeted metabolomics analysis, we have developed a new platform, termed Compound Activity Mapping, that is capable of directly predicting the identities and modes of action of bioactive constituents for any complex natural product extract library. This new tool can be used to rapidly identify novel bioactive constituents and provide predictions of compound modes of action directly from primary screening data. This approach inverts the natural products discovery process from the existing "grind and find" model to a targeted, hypothesis-driven discovery model where the chemical features and biological function of bioactive metabolites are known early in the screening workflow, and lead compounds can be rationally selected based on biological and/or chemical novelty. We demonstrate the utility of the Compound Activity Mapping platform by combining 10,977 mass spectral features and 58,032 biological measurements from a library of 234 natural products extracts and integrating these two datasets to identify 13 clusters of fractions containing 11 known compound families and four new compounds. Using Compound Activity Mapping we discovered the quinocinnolinomycins, a new family of natural products with a unique carbon skeleton that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  10. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Paul K.; Bowl, Michael R.; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E.; Simon, Michelle M.; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V.; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E.; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H.; Foster, Russell G.; Jackson, Ian J.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  11. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-05-30

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies.

  12. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-01-01

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06602.001 PMID:26026149

  13. Toward the discovery of functional transthyretin amyloid inhibitors: application of virtual screening methods.

    PubMed

    Simões, Carlos J V; Mukherjee, Trishna; Brito, Rui M M; Jackson, Richard M

    2010-10-25

    Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation by stabilization of the native form of the protein transthyretin (TTR) is a viable approach for the treatment of familial amyloid polyneuropathy that has been gaining momentum in the field of amyloid research. The TTR stabilizer molecules discovered to date have shown efficacy at inhibiting fibrilization in vitro but display impairing issues of solubility, affinity for TTR in the blood plasma and/or adverse effects. In this study we present a benchmark of four protein- and ligand-based virtual screening (VS) methods for identifying novel TTR stabilizers: (i) two-dimensional (2D) similarity searches with chemical hashed, pharmacophore, and UNITY fingerprints, (ii) 3D searches based on shape, chemical, and electrostatic similarity, (iii) LigMatch, a new ligand-based method which uses multiple templates and combines 3D geometric hashing with a 2D preselection process, and (iv) molecular docking to consensus X-ray crystal structures of TTR. We illustrate the potential of the best-performing VS protocols to retrieve promising new leads by ranking a tailored library of 2.3 million commercially available compounds. Our predictions show that the top-scoring molecules possess distinctive features from the known TTR binders, holding better solubility, fraction of halogen atoms, and binding affinity profiles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to rationalize the utilization of a large battery of in silico screening techniques toward the identification of a new generation of TTR amyloid inhibitors.

  14. Lung cancer: Morphological and functional approach to screening, staging and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Lonneux, Max; Geets, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Lung cancer is a major problem in public health and constitutes the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography is promising but needs to overcome many difficulties, such as the large number of incidentally discovered nodules, the radiation dose delivered to the patient during a whole screening program and its cost. The ultimate target point represented by the reduction of lung cancer-related mortality needs to be proved in large, well-designed, randomized, multicenter, prospective trials. Lung cancer staging by morphological tools seems to be limited owing to the presence of metastases in normal-sized lymph nodes. In this context, multidetector computed tomography cannot be used alone but is useful in conjunction with molecular imaging and MRI. Today, flurodeoxglucose PET-CT appears to be the most accurate method for lung cancer staging and may prevent unnecessary thoracotomies. For treatment planning, flurodeoxglucose PET-CT is playing an increasing role in radiotherapy planning at the target selection and definition steps.

  15. Screening of Biodegradable Function of Indigenous Ligno-degrading Mushroom Using Dyes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kab-Yeul; Cho, Soo-Muk; Seok, Soon-Ja; Kong, Won-Sik; Kim, Gyu-Hyun; Sung, Jae-Mo

    2009-03-01

    The process of biodegradation in lingo-cellulosic materials is critically relevant to biospheric carbon. The study of this natural process has largely involved laboratory investigations, focused primarily on the biodegradation and recycling of agricultural by-products, generally using basidiomycetes species. In order to collect super white rot fungi and evaluate its ability to degrade lingo-cellulosic material, 35 fungal strains, collected from forests, humus soil, livestock manure, and dead trees, were screened for enzyme activities and their potential to decolorize the commercially used Poly-R 478 dye. In the laccase enzymatic analysis chemical test, 33 white rot fungi and 2 brown rot fungi were identified. The degradation ability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) according to the utilized environmental conditions was higher in the mushrooms grown in dead trees and fallen leaves than in the mushrooms grown in humus soil and livestock manure. Using Poly-R 478 dye to assess the PAH-degradation activity of the identified strains, four strains, including Agrocybe pediades, were selected. The activities of laccase, MnP, and Lip of the four strains with PAH-degrading ability were highest in Pleurotus incarnates. 87 fungal strains, collected from forests, humus soil, livestock manure, and dead trees, were screened for enzyme activities and their potential to decolorize the commercially used Poly-R 478 dye on solid media. Using Poly-R 478 dye to assess the PAHdegrading activity of the identified strains, it was determined that MKACC 51632 and 52492 strains evidenced superior activity in static and shaken liquid cultures. Subsequent screening on plates containing the polymeric dye poly R-478, the decolorization of which is correlated with lignin degradation, resulted in the selection of a strain of Coriolus versicolor, MKACC52492, for further study, primarily due to its rapid growth rate and profound ability to decolorize poly R-478 on solid media. Considering

  16. New classes of orthopoxvirus vaccine candidates by functionally screening a synthetic library for protective antigens.

    PubMed

    Borovkov, Alexandre; Magee, D Mitch; Loskutov, Andrey; Cano, Jose A; Selinsky, Cheryl; Zsemlye, Jason; Lyons, C Rick; Sykes, Kathryn

    2009-12-05

    The licensed smallpox vaccine, comprised of infectious vaccinia, is no longer popular as it is associated with a variety of adverse events. Safer vaccines have been explored such as further attenuated viruses and component designs. However, these alternatives typically provide compromised breadth and strength of protection. We conducted a genome-level screening of cowpox, the ancestral poxvirus, in the broadly immune-presenting C57BL/6 mouse as an approach to discovering novel components with protective capacities. Cowpox coding sequences were synthetically built and directly assayed by genetic immunization for open-reading frames that protect against lethal pulmonary infection. Membrane and non-membrane antigens were identified that partially protect C57BL/6 mice against cowpox and vaccinia challenges without adjuvant or regimen optimization, whereas the 4-pox vaccine did not. New vaccines might be developed from productive combinations of these new and existing antigens to confer potent, broadly efficacious protection and be contraindicated for none.

  17. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-03-19

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation.

  18. Relationship between functional movement screening score and history of injury and identifying the predictive value of the FMS for injury.

    PubMed

    Shojaedin, Seyyed Sadredin; Letafatkar, Amir; Hadadnezhad, Malihe; Dehkhoda, Mohamad Reza

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to reveal the functional ability of functional movement screening (FMS) scores in determining an athlete's predisposition to injury. One hundred (50 females and 50 males) university level athletes, weight of 69.44 ± 5.84 kg, height of 172.69 ± 7.26 cm, age of 22.56 ± 2.99 years and Baecke score 21.66 ± 1.73, practised in football, handball and basketball sports (at least for 5 years), with no recent (<6 weeks) history of musculoskeletal injury were recruited. Of the 100 subjects, 35 of them suffered an acute, lower extremity (ankle = 20 and knee = 15 subjects) injury. An odds ratio was calculated at 4.70, meaning that an athlete has an approximately 4.7 times greater chance of suffering a lower extremity injury during a regular competitive season if they score less than 17 on the FMS. This study provides FMS reference values for university level athletes that will assist in the interpretation of individual scores when screening athletes for musculoskeletal injury and performance factors. More research is still necessary before implementing the FMS into a pre-participation physical examination for athletics, but due to the low cost and its simplicity to implement, it should be considered by clinicians and researchers in the future.

  19. Suppression of ABHD2, identified through a functional genomics screen, causes anoikis resistance, chemoresistance and poor prognosis in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamanoi, Koji; Matsumura, Noriomi; Murphy, Susan K.; Baba, Tsukasa; Abiko, Kaoru; Hamanishi, Junzo; Yamaguchi, Ken; Koshiyama, Masafumi; Konishi, Ikuo; Mandai, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Anoikis resistance is a hallmark of cancer, and relates to malignant phenotypes, including chemoresistance, cancer stem like phenotypes and dissemination. The aim of this study was to identify key factors contributing to anoikis resistance in ovarian cancer using a functional genomics screen. A library of 81 000 shRNAs targeting 15 000 genes was transduced into OVCA420 cells, followed by incubation in soft agar and colony selection. We found shRNAs directed to ABHD2, ELAC2 and CYB5R3 caused reproducible anoikis resistance. These three genes are deleted in many serous ovarian cancers according to The Cancer Genome Atlas data. Suppression of ABHD2 in OVCA420 cells increased phosphorylated p38 and ERK, platinum resistance, and side population cells (p<0.01, respectively). Conversely, overexpression of ABHD2 decreased resistance to anoikis (p<0.05) and the amount of phosphorylated p38 and ERK in OVCA420 and SKOV3 cells. In clinical serous ovarian cancer specimens, low expression of ABHD2 was associated with platinum resistance and poor prognosis (p<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, we found three novel genes relevant to anoikis resistance in ovarian cancer using a functional genomics screen. Suppression of ABHD2 may promote a malignant phenotype and poor prognosis for women with serous ovarian cancer. PMID:27323405

  20. High-throughput screening of chemicals as functional substitutes using structure-based classification models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying chemicals that provide a specific function within a product, yet have minimal impact on the human body or environment, is the goal of most formulation chemists and engineers practicing green chemistry. We present a methodology to identify potential chemical functional...

  1. Relationship between functional movement screen scores, core strength, posture, and body mass index in school children in Moldova.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Ulrike H; Johnson, A Wayne; Adamson, Brynn

    2015-05-01

    The assessment of functionality should include parameters that consider postural control, limb asymmetries, range of motion limitations, proprioceptive deficits, and pain. An increasingly popular battery of tests, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), is purported to assess the above named parameters. The purpose of our study was twofold: (a) to report differences in total FMS scores in children, provide preliminary normative reference values of each of the 7 individual FMS scores for both genders and report on asymmetries and (b) to evaluate the relationship between total FMS scores, age, body mass index (BMI), core strength/stability, and postural angles to explore the possibility of using the FMS in the assessment of children's functional fitness. Descriptive data on 77 children aged 8-11 years were collected. The children performed core strength/stability exercises. Photographs were taken from a lateral view for later calculation of postural angles. The children performed the FMS while being videotaped for later review. The average total FMS score (of 21) was 14.9 (+1.9), and BMI was 16.4 (+2.2). Static posture is not related to results of the FMS. Core strength was positively correlated to the total FMS score (r = 0.31; p = 0.006). Over 60% demonstrated at least 1 asymmetry. The individual test scores indicate that none of the test items is too difficult for the children. Based on the screen's correlation to core strength, and the fact that it identifies areas of asymmetry, we suggest to further investigate its possible use in the assessment of children's functional fitness.

  2. Assessing the recovery of functional diversity after sustained sediment screening at an aggregate dredging site in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio Froján, Christopher R. S.; Cooper, Keith M.; Bremner, Julie; Defew, Emma C.; Wan Hussin, Wan M. R.; Paterson, David M.

    2011-05-01

    The effects of dredging the seabed for aggregate on benthic functional diversity were assessed using a suite of suitable indices on a recovering macrofaunal assemblage. Recovery was assessed as the return of a dredged assemblage to a state found in neighbouring undisturbed (reference) sites. In situ sediment screening was permitted during dredging operations; a difference in the sedimentary profile of the seabed between dredged and undisturbed reference sites was also observed. At sites of relatively high and low dredging intensity the sediment appeared more homogenous than reference sites after the selective removal of the coarser component. Initial assessment of the macrofaunal assemblage using univariate analytical techniques suggested a recovery of functional diversity at the low dredging intensity site after two years (according to the Infaunal Trophic Index, Taxonomic Distinctness index and Rao's Quadratic Entropy coefficient). However, multivariate analyses of the same data and of all indices except Taxonomic Distinctness indicated that assemblages at both high and low dredging intensity sites remained statistically indistinguishable from each other yet markedly different to the assemblage present in the reference area during the four-year study. The study concluded that recovery of functional diversity to a level found in a neighbouring undredged habitat had not occurred at either dredged site five years after the cessation of dredging. It is thought that the damage by dredging to functional diversity and to the capacity of the macrofaunal assemblage to recover is immediate and not so dependent on dredging intensity. The cumulative and wider ranging effects of sediment screening cannot be ignored or dismissed as a contributing factor to the similarities observed. The wider significance of these findings on the regulation of dredging activities is discussed.

  3. Computational approaches for protein function prediction: a combined strategy from multiple sequence alignment to molecular docking-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Parisi, Giovanni; Porcelli, Vito

    2010-09-01

    The functional characterization of proteins represents a daily challenge for biochemical, medical and computational sciences. Although finally proved on the bench, the function of a protein can be successfully predicted by computational approaches that drive the further experimental assays. Current methods for comparative modeling allow the construction of accurate 3D models for proteins of unknown structure, provided that a crystal structure of a homologous protein is available. Binding regions can be proposed by using binding site predictors, data inferred from homologous crystal structures, and data provided from a careful interpretation of the multiple sequence alignment of the investigated protein and its homologs. Once the location of a binding site has been proposed, chemical ligands that have a high likelihood of binding can be identified by using ligand docking and structure-based virtual screening of chemical libraries. Most docking algorithms allow building a list sorted by energy of the lowest energy docking configuration for each ligand of the library. In this review the state-of-the-art of computational approaches in 3D protein comparative modeling and in the study of protein-ligand interactions is provided. Furthermore a possible combined/concerted multistep strategy for protein function prediction, based on multiple sequence alignment, comparative modeling, binding region prediction, and structure-based virtual screening of chemical libraries, is described by using suitable examples. As practical examples, Abl-kinase molecular modeling studies, HPV-E6 protein multiple sequence alignment analysis, and some other model docking-based characterization reports are briefly described to highlight the importance of computational approaches in protein function prediction.

  4. A novel useful tool of computerized touch panel-type screening test for evaluating cognitive function of chronic ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Kentaro; Kono, Syoichiro; Deguchi, Shoko; Morimoto, Nobutoshi; Kurata, Tomoko; Ikeda, Yoshio; Abe, Koji

    2013-10-01

    Cognitive and affective impairments are important non-motor features of ischemic stroke (IS) related to white-matter hyperintensity, including periventricular hyperintensity (PVH). To confirm the usefulness of a novel computerized touch panel-type screening test, we investigated cognitive and affective functioning among 142 IS patients and 105 age-and gender-matched normal control subjects. Assessment using the mini-mental state examination, Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised, and frontal assessment battery revealed reduced cognitive function in IS patients, with the most severe reduction exhibited by cardiogenic embolism patients, followed by lacunar infarction patients, and atherothrombotic infarction patients. Our novel touch panel screening test revealed a similar pattern of results. In addition, PVH grading, classified using Fazekas' magnetic resonance imaging method, was also correlated with cognitive decline and touch panel screening test performance. In contrast, affective function, assessed with the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, vitality index, and apathy scale, was not significantly decreased in IS, and did not correlate with touch panel screening test results or PVH, although the number of microbleeds was correlated with apathy scale results. The present findings revealed that IS and PVH grading were significantly correlated with decline in general cognitive status (mini-mental state examination and Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised) and frontal lobe function (frontal assessment battery). Performance on all touch panel screening tests was correlated with IS and PVH grading, but was largely independent of depression or apathy. Touch panel screening tests were easily understood and performed by almost all patients with mild cognitive and motor dysfunction, due to visually clear images and simple methods not involving detailed manual-handling tasks such as writing. Touch panel screening tests may provide a useful tool for the early screening of cognitive

  5. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  6. Use of organic functional group concentrations as a means of screening for energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.; Camaioni, D.M.; Hallen, R.T.; Lerner, B.D.; Scheele, R.D.

    1996-06-01

    One of the safety concerns associated with the waste tanks on the Hanford site is the presence of organics in a highly oxidizing environment that could potentially act as a fuel source to maintain a propagating reaction. To determine this risk, it is necessary to determine the amount of high enthalpy organics present in the tanks. Currently, the primary ways of obtaining this information are to either rely on tank-fill histories, which are often unreliable and do not account for waste-aging processes, or obtain samples from the tank and speciate the organics present through a series of analytical procedures. While organic speciation has been successful in providing very valuable information about organics present in the tanks and the waste aging processes that are occurring in general, it can be costly and time consuming analyzing a large number of waste tanks. Differential scanning calorimetry has previously been used to obtain heat of reaction measurements of Hanford tank waste samples. However, differential scanning calorimetry is shown here to inadequately measure calculated heats of reaction of simulant tank mixtures. Overall, the preliminary results presented here, suggest that indeed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy would be useful screening tools for determination of C-H and COO- organic content in tank waste samples analyzed in a hot cell environment. These techniques however, are not truly quantitative for this application and would be primarily used for identifying tanks of potential safety concern that would require further, more detailed confirmatory analysis by organic speciation techniques.

  7. A loss-of-function genetic screening identifies novel mediators of thyroid cancer cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Maria Carmela; Parascandolo, Alessia; Perälä, Merja; Allocca, Chiara; Fey, Vidal; Sahlberg, Niko; Merolla, Francesco; Basolo, Fulvio; Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Kallioniemi, Olli Pekka; Santoro, Massimo; Castellone, Maria Domenica

    2016-01-01

    RET, BRAF and other protein kinases have been identified as major molecular players in thyroid cancer. To identify novel kinases required for the viability of thyroid carcinoma cells, we performed a RNA interference screening in the RET/PTC1(CCDC6-RET)-positive papillary thyroid cancer cell line TPC1 using a library of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the human kinome and related proteins. We identified 14 hits whose silencing was able to significantly reduce the viability and the proliferation of TPC1 cells; most of them were active also in BRAF-mutant BCPAP (papillary thyroid cancer) and 8505C (anaplastic thyroid cancer) and in RAS-mutant CAL62 (anaplastic thyroid cancer) cells. These included members of EPH receptor tyrosine kinase family as well as SRC and MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) families. Importantly, silencing of the identified hits did not affect significantly the viability of Nthy-ori 3-1 (hereafter referred to as NTHY) cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, suggesting cancer cell specificity. The identified proteins are worth exploring as potential novel druggable thyroid cancer targets. PMID:27058903

  8. Functional Screening of Hydrolytic Activities Reveals an Extremely Thermostable Cellulase from a Deep-Sea Archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Leis, Benedikt; Heinze, Simon; Angelov, Angel; Pham, Vu Thuy Trang; Thürmer, Andrea; Jebbar, Mohamed; Golyshin, Peter N.; Streit, Wolfgang R.; Daniel, Rolf; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Extreme habitats serve as a source of enzymes that are active under extreme conditions and are candidates for industrial applications. In this work, six large-insert mixed genomic libraries were screened for hydrolase activities in a broad temperature range (8–70°C). Among a variety of hydrolytic activities, one fosmid clone, derived from a library of pooled isolates of hyperthermophilic archaea from deep sea vents, displayed hydrolytic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose substrate plates at 70°C but not at lower temperatures. Sequence analysis of the fosmid insert revealed a gene encoding a novel glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GHF12) endo-1,4-β-glucanase, termed Cel12E. The enzyme shares 45% sequence identity with a protein from the archaeon Thermococcus sp. AM4 and displays a unique multidomain architecture. Biochemical characterization of Cel12E revealed a remarkably thermostable protein, which appears to be of archaeal origin. The enzyme displayed maximum activity at 92°C and was active on a variety of linear 1,4-β-glucans like carboxymethyl cellulose, β-glucan, lichenan, and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose. The protein is able to bind to various insoluble β-glucans. Product pattern analysis indicated that Cel12E is an endo-cleaving β-glucanase. Cel12E expands the toolbox of hyperthermostable archaeal cellulases with biotechnological potential. PMID:26191525

  9. Rapid Discovery of Functional Small Molecule Ligands against Proteomic Targets through Library-Against-Library Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Yi; Wang, Don-Hong; Wang, Xiaobing; Dixon, Seth M; Meng, Liping; Ahadi, Sara; Enter, Daniel H; Chen, Chao-Yu; Kato, Jason; Leon, Leonardo J; Ramirez, Laura M; Maeda, Yoshiko; Reis, Carolina F; Ribeiro, Brianna; Weems, Brittany; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Lam, Kit S

    2016-06-13

    Identifying "druggable" targets and their corresponding therapeutic agents are two fundamental challenges in drug discovery research. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library method has been developed to discover peptides or small molecules that bind to a specific target protein or elicit a specific cellular response. The phage display cDNA expression proteome library method has been employed to identify target proteins that interact with specific compounds. Here, we combined these two high-throughput approaches, efficiently interrogated approximately 10(13) possible molecular interactions, and identified 91 small molecule compound beads that interacted strongly with the phage library. Of 19 compounds resynthesized, 4 were cytotoxic against cancer cells; one of these compounds was found to interact with EIF5B and inhibit protein translation. As more binding pairs are confirmed and evaluated, the "library-against-library" screening approach and the resulting small molecule-protein domain interaction database may serve as a valuable tool for basic research and drug development.

  10. Rapid Discovery of Functional Small Molecule Ligands against Proteomic Targets through Library-Against-Library Screening

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Identifying “druggable” targets and their corresponding therapeutic agents are two fundamental challenges in drug discovery research. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library method has been developed to discover peptides or small molecules that bind to a specific target protein or elicit a specific cellular response. The phage display cDNA expression proteome library method has been employed to identify target proteins that interact with specific compounds. Here, we combined these two high-throughput approaches, efficiently interrogated approximately 1013 possible molecular interactions, and identified 91 small molecule compound beads that interacted strongly with the phage library. Of 19 compounds resynthesized, 4 were cytotoxic against cancer cells; one of these compounds was found to interact with EIF5B and inhibit protein translation. As more binding pairs are confirmed and evaluated, the “library-against-library” screening approach and the resulting small molecule–protein domain interaction database may serve as a valuable tool for basic research and drug development. PMID:27053324

  11. Performance Comparison of Student-Athletes and General College Students on the Functional Movement Screen and the Y Balance Test.

    PubMed

    Engquist, Katherine D; Smith, Craig A; Chimera, Nicole J; Warren, Meghan

    2015-08-01

    Although various studies have assessed performance of athletes on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Y Balance Test (YBT), no study to date has directly evaluated a comparison of performance between athletes and members of the general population. Thus, to better understand the application of the FMS and the YBT to general college students, this study examined whether or not general college students performed similarly to student-athletes on the FMS (composite and movement pattern scores) and the YBT (composite and reach directions). This study evaluated 167 Division I student-athletes and 103 general college students from the same university on the FMS and the YBT. No difference was found in FMS composite scores between student-athletes and general college students. For FMS movement patterns, female student-athletes scored higher than general college students in the deep squat. No difference was found for men in any FMS movement pattern. Female student-athletes scored higher than female general college students in YBT composite scores; no difference was found for men in YBT composite scores. In analysis of YBT reach directions, female student-athletes scored higher than female general college students in all reach directions, whereas no difference was found in men. Existing research on the FMS composite score in athletic populations may apply to a general college population for the purposes of preparticipation screening, injury prediction, etc. Existing research on the YBT in male athletic populations is expected to apply equally to general college males for the purposes of preparticipation screening, injury prediction, etc.

  12. Comprehensive structural and functional characterization of the human kinome by protein structure modeling and ligand virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The growing interest in the identification of kinase inhibitors, promising therapeutics in the treatment of many diseases, has created a demand for the structural characterization of the entire human kinome. At the outset of the drug development process, the lead-finding stage, approaches that enrich the screening library with bioactive compounds are needed. Here, protein structure-based methods can play an important role, but despite structural genomics efforts, it is unlikely that the three-dimensional structures of the entire kinome will be available soon. Therefore, at the proteome level, structure-based approaches must rely on predicted models, with a key issue being their utility in virtual ligand screening. In this study, we employ the recently developed FINDSITE/Q-Dock Ligand Homology Modeling approach, which is well suited for proteome-scale applications using predicted structures, to provide extensive structural and functional characterization of the human kinome. Specifically, we construct structure models for the human kinome; these are subsequently subject to virtual screening against a library of more than 2 million compounds. To rank the compounds, we employ a hierarchical approach that combines ligand- and structure-based filters. Modeling accuracy is carefully validated using available experimental data with particularly encouraging results found for the ability to identify, without prior knowledge, specific kinase inhibitors. More generally, the modeling procedure results in a large number of predicted molecular interactions between kinases and small ligands that should be of practical use in the development of novel inhibitors. The dataset is freely available to the academic community a user-friendly web interface at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/kinomelhm/as well as the ZINC website (http://zinc.docking.org/applications/2010Apr/Brylinski-2010.tar.gz). PMID:20853887

  13. Discovery of a diaminoquinoxaline benzenesulfonamide antagonist of HIV-1 Nef function using a yeast-based phenotypic screen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 Nef is a viral accessory protein critical for AIDS progression. Nef lacks intrinsic catalytic activity and binds multiple host cell signaling proteins, including Hck and other Src-family tyrosine kinases. Nef binding induces constitutive Hck activation that may contribute to HIV pathogenesis by promoting viral infectivity, replication and downregulation of cell-surface MHC-I molecules. In this study, we developed a yeast-based phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit the Nef-Hck complex. Results Nef-Hck interaction was faithfully reconstituted in yeast cells, resulting in kinase activation and growth arrest. Yeast cells expressing the Nef-Hck complex were used to screen a library of small heterocyclic compounds for their ability to rescue growth inhibition. The screen identified a dihydrobenzo-1,4-dioxin-substituted analog of 2-quinoxalinyl-3-aminobenzene-sulfonamide (DQBS) as a potent inhibitor of Nef-dependent HIV-1 replication and MHC-I downregulation in T-cells. Docking studies predicted direct binding of DQBS to Nef which was confirmed in differential scanning fluorimetry assays with recombinant purified Nef protein. DQBS also potently inhibited the replication of HIV-1 NL4-3 chimeras expressing Nef alleles representative of all M-group HIV-1 clades. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate the utility of a yeast-based growth reversion assay for the identification of small molecule Nef antagonists. Inhibitors of Nef function discovered with this assay, such as DQBS, may complement the activity of current antiretroviral therapies by enabling immune recognition of HIV-infected cells through the rescue of cell surface MHC-I. PMID:24229420

  14. Modifiers of muscle and heart cell fate specification identified by gain-of-function screen in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Yannick; Jagla, Teresa; Da Ponte, Jean-Philippe; Dastugue, Bernard; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2003-09-01

    The homeobox genes ladybird in Drosophila and their vertebrate counterparts Lbx1 genes display restricted expression patterns in a subset of muscle precursors and are both implicated in diversification of muscle cell fates. In order to gain new insights into mechanisms controlling conserved aspects of cell fate specification, we have performed a gain-of-function (GOF) screen for modifiers of the mesodermal expression of ladybird genes using a collection of EP element carrying Drosophila lines. Amongst the identified genes, several have been previously implicated in cell fate specification processes, thus validating the strategy of our screen. Observed GOF phenotypes have led us to identification of an important number of candidate genes, whose myogenic and/or cardiogenic functions remain to be investigated. Amongst them, the EP insertions close to rhomboid, yan and rac2 suggest new roles for these genes in diversification of muscle and/or heart cell lineages. The analysis of loss and GOF of rhomboid and yan reveals their new roles in specification of ladybird-expressing precursors of adult muscles (LaPs) and ladybird/tinman-positive pericardial cells. Observed phenotypes strongly suggest that rhomboid and yan act at the level of progenitor and founder cells and contribute to the diversification of mesodermal fates. Our analysis of rac2 phenotypes clearly demonstrates that the altered mesodermal level of Rho-GTPase Rac2 can influence specification of a number of cardiac and muscular cell types including those expressing ladybird. Finding that in rac2 mutants ladybird and even skipped-positive muscle founders are overproduced, indicate a new early function for this gene during segregation of muscle progenitors and/or specification of founder cells. Intriguingly, rhomboid, yan and rac2 act as conserved components of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) signalling pathways, suggesting that RTK signalling constitutes a part of a conserved regulatory network governing

  15. Water-gas Shift Reaction on oxide/Cu(111): Rational Catalyst Screening from Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.

    2010-11-28

    Developing improved catalysts based on a fundamental understanding of reaction mechanism has become one of the grand challenges in catalysis. A theoretical understanding and screening the metal-oxide composite catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is presented here. Density functional theory was employed to identify the key step for the WGS reaction on the Au, Cu-oxide catalysts, where the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation correlates well with the experimental measured WGS activity. Accordingly, the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation was used as the scaling descriptor to screen the inverse model catalysts, oxide/Cu(111), for the better WGS activity. Our calculations predict that the WGS activity increases in a sequence: Cu(111), ZnO/Cu(111) < TiO{sub 2}/Cu(111), ZrO{sub 2}/Cu(111) < MoO{sub 3}/Cu(111). Our results imply that the high performances of Au, Cu-oxide nanocatalysts in the WGS reaction rely heavily on the direct participation of both oxide and metal sites. The degree that the oxide is reduced by Cu plays an important role in determining the WGS activity of oxide/Cu catalysts. The reducible oxide can be transformed from the fully oxidized form to the reduced form due to the interaction with Cu and, therefore, the transfer of electron density from Cu, which helps in releasing the bottleneck water dissociation and, therefore, facilitating the WGS reaction on copper.

  16. Large-scale functional RNAi screen in C. elegans identifies genes that regulate the dysfunction of mutant polyglutamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A central goal in Huntington's disease (HD) research is to identify and prioritize candidate targets for neuroprotective intervention, which requires genome-scale information on the modifiers of early-stage neuron injury in HD. Results Here, we performed a large-scale RNA interference screen in C. elegans strains that express N-terminal huntingtin (htt) in touch receptor neurons. These neurons control the response to light touch. Their function is strongly impaired by expanded polyglutamines (128Q) as shown by the nearly complete loss of touch response in adult animals, providing an in vivo model in which to manipulate the early phases of expanded-polyQ neurotoxicity. In total, 6034 genes were examined, revealing 662 gene inactivations that either reduce or aggravate defective touch response in 128Q animals. Several genes were previously implicated in HD or neurodegenerative disease, suggesting that this screen has effectively identified candidate targets for HD. Network-based analysis emphasized a subset of high-confidence modifier genes in pathways of interest in HD including metabolic, neurodevelopmental and pro-survival pathways. Finally, 49 modifiers of 128Q-neuron dysfunction that are dysregulated in the striatum of either R/2 or CHL2 HD mice, or both, were identified. Conclusions Collectively, these results highlight the relevance to HD pathogenesis, providing novel information on the potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in HD. PMID:22413862

  17. High-throughput functional screening reveals low frequency of antibiotic resistance genes in DNA recovered from the Upper Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we determined the frequency of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the Upper Mississippi River using a high-throughput, functional, metagenomic screening procedure. Fosmid libraries containing ∼10,000 clones were screened for resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. We hypothesized that nutrient concentrations, land cover type, and taxonomic community composition may select for ARGs. Resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, and kanamycin was low (<1.00%), and no resistance to tetracycline was detected. Ammonium and total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations were correlated with kanamycin and cephalothin resistances (r=0.617 and -0.449, P=0.002 and 0.036, respectively). Cephalothin resistance was also positively correlated with the percentage of forested land cover (r=0.444, P=0.039). Only the candidate division OD1, among 35 phyla identified, was correlated with ampicillin resistance (r=0.456, P=0.033), suggesting that minority members of the community may be responsible for dissemination of ARGs in this ecosystem. Results of this study suggest that ammonium and TDS may be involved in a complex selection process for ARGs. Furthermore, we suggest that minority species, potentially contributed in low numbers from sediment and biofilm reservoirs, may be the primary carriers of ARGs in this riverine system.

  18. Screening of CACNA1A and ATP1A2 genes in hemiplegic migraine: clinical, genetic, and functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Oriel; Corominas, Roser; Serra, Selma Angèlica; Sintas, Cèlia; Fernández-Castillo, Noèlia; Vila-Pueyo, Marta; Toma, Claudio; Gené, Gemma G; Pons, Roser; Llaneza, Miguel; Sobrido, María-Jesús; Grinberg, Daniel; Valverde, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Fernández, José Manuel; Macaya, Alfons; Cormand, Bru

    2013-01-01

    Hemiplegic migraine (HM) is a rare and severe subtype of autosomal dominant migraine, characterized by a complex aura including some degree of motor weakness. Mutations in four genes (CACNA1A, ATP1A2, SCN1A and PRRT2) have been detected in familial and in sporadic cases. This genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is often accompanied by permanent ataxia, epileptic seizures, mental retardation, and chronic progressive cerebellar atrophy. Here we report a mutation screening in the CACNA1A and ATP1A2 genes in 18 patients with HM. Furthermore, intragenic copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed in CACNA1A using quantitative approaches. We identified four previously described missense CACNA1A mutations (p.Ser218Leu, p.Thr501Met, p.Arg583Gln, and p.Thr666Met) and two missense changes in the ATP1A2 gene, the previously described p.Ala606Thr and the novel variant p.Glu825Lys. No structural variants were found. This genetic screening allowed the identification of more than 30% of the disease alleles, all present in a heterozygous state. Functional consequences of the CACNA1A-p.Thr501Met mutation, previously described only in association with episodic ataxia, and ATP1A2-p.Glu825Lys, were investigated by means of electrophysiological studies, cell viability assays or Western blot analysis. Our data suggest that both these variants are disease-causing. PMID:24498617

  19. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  20. Translational and functional oncogenomics. From cancer-oriented genomic screenings to new diagnostic tools and improved cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Medico, Enzo

    2008-01-01

    We present here an experimental pipeline for the systematic identification and functional characterization of genes with high potential diagnostic and therapeutic value in human cancer. Complementary competences and resources have been brought together in the TRANSFOG Consortium to reach the following integrated research objectives: 1) execution of cancer-oriented genomic screenings on tumor tissues and experimental models and merging of the results to generate a prioritized panel of candidate genes involved in cancer progression and metastasis; 2) setup of systems for high-throughput delivery of full-length cDNAs, for gain-of-function analysis of the prioritized candidate genes; 3) collection of vectors and oligonucleotides for systematic, RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of the candidate genes; 4) adaptation of existing cell-based and model organism assays to a systematic analysis of gain and loss of function of the candidate genes, for identification and preliminary validation of novel potential therapeutic targets; 5) proteomic analysis of signal transduction and protein-protein interaction for better dissection of aberrant cancer signaling pathways; 6) validation of the diagnostic potential of the identified cancer genes towards the clinical use of diagnostic molecular signatures; 7) generation of a shared informatics platform for data handling and gene functional annotation. The results of the first three years of activity of the TRANSFOG Consortium are also briefly presented and discussed.

  1. Using synthetic biology to screen for functional diversity of GH1 enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Sam; Datta, Supratim; Hamilton, Matthew; Friedland, Greg; D'Haeseleer, Patrik; Chen, Jan-Fang; Chivian, Dylan; Egan, Rob; Sale, Kenneth; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-05-31

    Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled single genomes as well as complex environmental samples (metagenomes) to be comprehensively sequenced on a routine basis. Bioinformatics analysis of the resulting sequencing data reveals a continually expanding catalogue of predicted proteins ( 14 million as of April 2011), 75 percent of which are associated with functional annotation (COG, Pfam, Enzyme, Kegg, etc). These predicted proteins cover the full spectrum of known pathways and functional activities, including many novel biocatalysts that are expected to significantly contribute to the development of clean technologies including biomass degradation, lipid transformation for biodiesel generation, intermediates for polymer production, carbon capture, and bioremediation.

  2. Anatase TiO2 nanowires functionalized by organic sensitizers for solar cells: A screened Coulomb hybrid density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Hatice; Gunceler, Deniz; Gülseren, Oǧuz; Ellialtioǧlu, Şinasi; Mete, Ersen

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of two different organic molecules cyanidin glucoside (C21O11H20) and TA-St-CA on anatase (101) and (001) nanowires has been investigated using the standard and the range separated hybrid density functional theory calculations. The electronic structures and optical spectra of resulting dye-nanowire combined systems show distinct features for these types of photochromophores. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the natural dye cyanidin glucoside is located below the conduction band of the semiconductor while, in the case of TA-St-CA, it resonates with the states inside the conduction band. The wide-bandgap anatase nanowires can be functionalized for solar cells through electron-hole generation and subsequent charge injection by these dye sensitizers. The intermolecular charge transfer character of Donor-π-Acceptor type dye TA-St-CA is substantially modified by its adsorption on TiO2 surfaces. Cyanidin glucoside exhibits relatively stronger anchoring on the nanowires through its hydroxyl groups. The atomic structures of dye-nanowire systems re-optimized with the inclusion of nonlinear solvation effects showed that the binding strengths of both dyes remain moderate even in ionic solutions.

  3. Generation of a fast maturating red fluorescent protein by a combined approach of elongation mutagenesis and functional salvage screening

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eun-Sil; Han, Sang-Soo; Cheong, Dea-Eun; Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that can be useful as indicators or reporters must have rapid maturation time, high quantum yield and photobleaching stability. A red fluorescent protein DsRed that has a high quantum yield and photostability has an innately slow maturation time when compared to other fluorescence proteins. In this study, we combined a functional salvage screen (FSS) and elongation mutagenesis to obtain a DsRed variant that maintained structural features closely linked with a high quantum yield and photostability and evolved to have a rapid maturation time. It is expected that the variant generated here, FmRed (fast maturating red fluorescent protein), will be widely used as an indicator or reporter because it maintained traits superior to that of the wild-type protein and also matured rapidly.

  4. Screening of Functional Rhizopus stolonifer for Alcohol Fermentation and Production of High Quality Korean Traditional Rice Wine.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2010-06-01

    Different strains of mold were screened for the production of high quality Korean traditional rice wine with anti-hypertension and good acceptability. We isolated 867 nuruk mold strains and selected 24 for further study based on measurement of amylase activity. Among them, mold No. 17 showed high ethanol production upon fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as anti-hypertensive properties. The No. 17 strain was therefore selected as the functional mold and later identified as Rhizopus stolonifer based on molecular biological characteristics. Optimal fermentation conditions for the brewing of anti-hypertensive traditional rice wine comprised the addition of R. stolonifer No. 17 koji at a concentration of 35 sp/g and a fermentation period of 10 days at 25℃ using S. cerevisiae.

  5. Screening of Functional Rhizopus stolonifer for Alcohol Fermentation and Production of High Quality Korean Traditional Rice Wine

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Hak

    2010-01-01

    Different strains of mold were screened for the production of high quality Korean traditional rice wine with anti-hypertension and good acceptability. We isolated 867 nuruk mold strains and selected 24 for further study based on measurement of amylase activity. Among them, mold No. 17 showed high ethanol production upon fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as anti-hypertensive properties. The No. 17 strain was therefore selected as the functional mold and later identified as Rhizopus stolonifer based on molecular biological characteristics. Optimal fermentation conditions for the brewing of anti-hypertensive traditional rice wine comprised the addition of R. stolonifer No. 17 koji at a concentration of 35 sp/g and a fermentation period of 10 days at 25℃ using S. cerevisiae. PMID:23956639

  6. Functional Genomic Screening Reveals Splicing of the EWS-FLI1 Fusion Transcript as a Vulnerability in Ewing Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Grohar, Patrick J; Kim, Suntae; Rangel Rivera, Guillermo O; Sen, Nirmalya; Haddock, Sara; Harlow, Matt L; Maloney, Nichole K; Zhu, Jack; O'Neill, Maura; Jones, Tamara L; Huppi, Konrad; Grandin, Magdalena; Gehlhaus, Kristen; Klumpp-Thomas, Carleen A; Buehler, Eugen; Helman, Lee J; Martin, Scott E; Caplen, Natasha J

    2016-01-26

    Ewing sarcoma cells depend on the EWS-FLI1 fusion transcription factor for cell survival. Using an assay of EWS-FLI1 activity and genome-wide RNAi screening, we have identified proteins required for the processing of the EWS-FLI1 pre-mRNA. We show that Ewing sarcoma cells harboring a genomic breakpoint that retains exon 8 of EWSR1 require the RNA-binding protein HNRNPH1 to express in-frame EWS-FLI1. We also demonstrate the sensitivity of EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts to the loss of function of the U2 snRNP component, SF3B1. Disrupted splicing of the EWS-FLI1 transcript alters EWS-FLI1 protein expression and EWS-FLI1-driven expression. Our results show that the processing of the EWS-FLI1 fusion RNA is a potentially targetable vulnerability in Ewing sarcoma cells.

  7. Functional Proteomics Screen Enables Enrichment of Distinct Cell Types from Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sharivkin, Revital; Walker, Michael D.; Soen, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+), glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9- /CD56+) and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9- /CD56-). This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples. PMID:25706282

  8. Discovery of a Dipeptide Epimerase Enzymatic Function Guided by Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanaraman, C.; Imker, H; Fedorov, A; Fedorov, E; Glasner, M; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Gerlt, J; Jacobson, M

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a computational approach to aid the assignment of enzymatic function for uncharacterized proteins that uses homology modeling to predict the structure of the binding site and in silico docking to identify potential substrates. We apply this method to proteins in the functionally diverse enolase superfamily that are homologous to the characterized L-Ala-D/L-Glu epimerase from Bacillus subtilis. In particular, a protein from Thermotoga martima was predicted to have different substrate specificity, which suggests that it has a different, but as yet unknown, biological function. This prediction was experimentally confirmed, resulting in the assignment of epimerase activity for L-Ala-D/L-Phe, L-Ala-D/L-Tyr, and L-Ala-D/L-His, whereas the enzyme is annotated incorrectly in GenBank as muconate cycloisomerase. Subsequently, crystal structures of the enzyme were determined in complex with three substrates, showing close agreement with the computational models and revealing the structural basis for the observed substrate selectivity.

  9. Using activity-based costing in surgery.

    PubMed

    Grandlich, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    ACTIVITY-BASED COSTING is an accounting technique that allows organizations to determine actual costs associated with their services based on the resources they consume. THIS TECHNIQUE can be used in a variety of ways, including targeting high-cost activities, forecasting financial baselines, and supporting resource allocation. FOUR STEPS should be followed when applying activity-based costing to surgical procedures. THIS ARTICLE explores how Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, used activity-based costing.

  10. CRISPR/Cas9: An inexpensive, efficient loss of function tool to screen human disease genes in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Dipankan; Marfo, Chris A; Li, Davis; Lane, Maura; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2015-12-15

    Congenital malformations are the major cause of infant mortality in the US and Europe. Due to rapid advances in human genomics, we can now efficiently identify sequence variants that may cause disease in these patients. However, establishing disease causality remains a challenge. Additionally, in the case of congenital heart disease, many of the identified candidate genes are either novel to embryonic development or have no known function. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop inexpensive and efficient technologies to screen these candidate genes for disease phenocopy in model systems and to perform functional studies to uncover their role in development. For this purpose, we sought to test F0 CRISPR based gene editing as a loss of function strategy for disease phenocopy in the frog model organism, Xenopus tropicalis. We demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can efficiently modify both alleles in the F0 generation within a few hours post fertilization, recapitulating even early disease phenotypes that are highly similar to knockdowns from morpholino oligos (MOs) in nearly all cases tested. We find that injecting Cas9 protein is dramatically more efficacious and less toxic than cas9 mRNA. We conclude that CRISPR based F0 gene modification in X. tropicalis is efficient and cost effective and readily recapitulates disease and MO phenotypes.

  11. Simplified Tai Chi Program Training versus Traditional Tai Chi on the Functional Movement Screening in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiru; Wei, Ankui; Lu, Yingzhi; Yu, Bo; Chen, Wenhua; Lu, Yang; Liu, Yang; Yu, Dinghai; Zou, Liye

    2016-01-01

    Background. The present study aimed to evaluate and compare the effect of two different types of Tai Chi programs on the Functional Movement Screening (FMS) in older adults. Methods. Ninety older adults (65.5 ± 4.6 years old) who met the eligibility criteria were randomized into three different groups based on a ratio of 1 : 1 : 1: a traditional Tai Chi exercise (TTC), a simplified Tai Chi exercise (TCRT), or a control group (routine activity). The FMS consisted of the deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg rise, trunk stability push-up, and rotatory stability, which was used to measure physical function before the present study and after six months of Tai Chi interventions. Results. Seventy-nine participants completed the present study (control = 27, TTC = 23, and TCRT = 29). Significant improvement on the FMS tests between the baseline and after the six-month intervention was observed in both Tai Chi programs, whereas no significant improvement was observed in the control group. In addition, participants in the TCRT group demonstrated greater improvement than those in the TTC group. Conclusions. The TCRT is more effective in improving the physical function in older adults when compared to the traditional Tai Chi modality, particularly for improving balance.

  12. Simplified Tai Chi Program Training versus Traditional Tai Chi on the Functional Movement Screening in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiru; Wei, Ankui; Lu, Yingzhi; Yu, Bo; Chen, Wenhua; Lu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. The present study aimed to evaluate and compare the effect of two different types of Tai Chi programs on the Functional Movement Screening (FMS) in older adults. Methods. Ninety older adults (65.5 ± 4.6 years old) who met the eligibility criteria were randomized into three different groups based on a ratio of 1 : 1 : 1: a traditional Tai Chi exercise (TTC), a simplified Tai Chi exercise (TCRT), or a control group (routine activity). The FMS consisted of the deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg rise, trunk stability push-up, and rotatory stability, which was used to measure physical function before the present study and after six months of Tai Chi interventions. Results. Seventy-nine participants completed the present study (control = 27, TTC = 23, and TCRT = 29). Significant improvement on the FMS tests between the baseline and after the six-month intervention was observed in both Tai Chi programs, whereas no significant improvement was observed in the control group. In addition, participants in the TCRT group demonstrated greater improvement than those in the TTC group. Conclusions. The TCRT is more effective in improving the physical function in older adults when compared to the traditional Tai Chi modality, particularly for improving balance. PMID:27956920

  13. Functional mutagenesis screens reveal the ‘cap structure’ formation in disulfide-bridge free TASK channels

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Matthias; Rinné, Susanne; Kiper, Aytug K.; Ramírez, David; Netter, Michael F.; Bustos, Daniel; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; González, Wendy; Decher, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels have a large extracellular cap structure formed by two M1-P1 linkers, containing a cysteine for dimerization. However, this cysteine is not present in the TASK-1/3/5 subfamily. The functional role of the cap is poorly understood and it remained unclear whether K2P channels assemble in the domain-swapped orientation or not. Functional alanine-mutagenesis screens of TASK-1 and TRAAK were used to build an in silico model of the TASK-1 cap. According to our data the cap structure of disulfide-bridge free TASK channels is similar to that of other K2P channels and is most likely assembled in the domain-swapped orientation. As the conserved cysteine is not essential for functional expression of all K2P channels tested, we propose that hydrophobic residues at the inner leaflets of the cap domains can interact with each other and that this way of stabilizing the cap is most likely conserved among K2P channels. PMID:26794006

  14. Axonal and dendritic synaptotagmin isoforms revealed by a pHluorin-syt functional screen.

    PubMed

    Dean, Camin; Dunning, F Mark; Liu, Huisheng; Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Martens, Henrik; Bharat, Vinita; Ahmed, Saheeb; Chapman, Edwin R

    2012-05-01

    The synaptotagmins (syts) are a family of molecules that regulate membrane fusion. There are 17 mammalian syt isoforms, most of which are expressed in the brain. However, little is known regarding the subcellular location and function of the majority of these syts in neurons, largely due to a lack of isoform-specific antibodies. Here we generated pHluorin-syt constructs harboring a luminal domain pH sensor, which reports localization, pH of organelles to which syts are targeted, and the kinetics and sites of exocytosis and endocytosis. Of interest, only syt-1 and 2 are targeted to synaptic vesicles, whereas other isoforms selectively recycle in dendrites (syt-3 and 11), axons (syt-5, 7, 10, and 17), or both axons and dendrites (syt-4, 6, 9, and 12), where they undergo exocytosis and endocytosis with distinctive kinetics. Hence most syt isoforms localize to distinct secretory organelles in both axons and dendrites and may regulate neuropeptide/neurotrophin release to modulate neuronal function.

  15. Screening of active metals for reactive adsorption desulfurization adsorbent using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Chunming; Wang, Yuxian; Gao, Jinsen

    2017-03-01

    To explore characteristics of active metals for reactive adsorption desulfurization (RADS) technology, the adsorption of thiophene on M (100) (M = Cr, Mo, Co, Ni, Cu, Au, and Ag) surfaces was systematically studied by density functional theory with vdW correction (DFT + D3). We found that, in all case, the most stable molecular adsorption site was the hollow site and adsorptive capabilities of thiophene followed the order: Cr > Mo > Co ≈ Ni > Cu > Au ≈ Ag. By analyzing the nature of binding between thiophene and corresponding metals and the electronic structure of metals, the excessive activities of Cr and Mo were found to have a negative regeneration, the passive activities of Au and Ag were found to have an inactive adsorption for RADS adsorbent alone, while Ni and Co have appropriate characteristics as the active metals for RADS, followed by Cu.

  16. Functional and structural analyses of mouse genomic regions screened by the morphological specific-locus test.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B

    1989-05-01

    Genetic analyses of certain classes of mutations recovered in the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) have characterized arrays of deletions, overlapping at the marked loci. Complementation maps, generated for several of the regions, have identified a number of functional units surrounding each marked locus and have ordered the mutations into complementation groups. Molecular entry to all but one of the marked regions has been achieved by (1) identifying proviral integrations in, or close to, the specific loci (d, se, a, c); (2) mapping random anonymous clones from appropriately enriched libraries to the longest deleted segments, then submapping to more limited segments on the basis of complementation and deletion-breakpoint maps (c, p); (3) similarly mapping known clones thought to be located in pertinent chromosomal regions (p, c, d); and (4) cloning specific genes that reside in regions corresponding to the deletions (b, c, p). The molecular analyses have confirmed that genetically-inferred deletions are structural deletions of DNA. The emerging physical maps are concordant with the complementation maps, and in several cases have discriminated among members of a complementation group with respect to breakpoint positions. Deletion-breakpoint-fusion fragments have prove to be highly useful for making large chromosomal jumps to facilitate physical mapping. The recent advances toward correlating physical and functional maps of specific regions of the mouse genome owe much to the existence of arrays of mutations involving loci marked in the SLT. In turn, the characterizations of these regions have made it possible to demonstrate qualitative differences among mutations resulting from different treatments. This new capability for qualitative analysis, which will increase as the molecular studies proceed, further enhances the value of the SLT, which has been extensively used for quantitative studies in germ-cell mutagenesis.

  17. Newborn Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Activities Importance of Newborn Screening Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch Pulse Oximetry Screening for CCHDs Sickle Cell Disease Laboratory SCID Quality Assurance Training and Resources ...

  18. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-03

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  19. A preliminary investigation into the relationship between functional movement screen scores and athletic physical performance in female team sport athletes

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, AB; Callaghan, SJ; Jordan, CA; Luczo, TM; Jeffriess, MD

    2014-01-01

    There is little research investigating relationships between the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and athletic performance in female athletes. This study analyzed the relationships between FMS (deep squat; hurdle step [HS]; in-line lunge [ILL]; shoulder mobility; active straight-leg raise [ASLR]; trunk stability push-up; rotary stability) scores, and performance tests (bilateral and unilateral sit-and-reach [flexibility]; 20-m sprint [linear speed]; 505 with turns from each leg; modified T-test with movement to left and right [change-of-direction speed]; bilateral and unilateral vertical and standing broad jumps; lateral jumps [leg power]). Nine healthy female recreational team sport athletes (age = 22.67 ± 5.12 years; height = 1.66 ± 0.05 m; body mass = 64.22 ± 4.44 kilograms) were screened in the FMS and completed the afore-mentioned tests. Percentage between-leg differences in unilateral sit-and-reach, 505 turns and the jumps, and difference between the T-test conditions, were also calculated. Spearman's correlations (p ≤ 0.05) examined relationships between the FMS and performance tests. Stepwise multiple regressions (p ≤ 0.05) were conducted for the performance tests to determine FMS predictors. Unilateral sit-and-reach positive correlated with the left-leg ASLR (r = 0.704-0.725). However, higher-scoring HS, ILL, and ASLR related to poorer 505 and T-test performance (r = 0.722-0.829). A higher-scored left-leg ASLR related to a poorer unilateral vertical and standing broad jump, which were the only significant relationships for jump performance. Predictive data tended to confirm the correlations. The results suggest limitations in using the FMS to identify movement deficiencies that could negatively impact athletic performance in female team sport athletes. PMID:25729149

  20. Functional Movement Screen for Predicting Running Injuries in 18- to 24-Year-Old Competitive Male Runners.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Takayuki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Adachi, Daiki; Morino, Saori; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the functional movement screen (FMS) could predict running injuries in competitive runners. Eighty-four competitive male runners (average age = 20.0 ± 1.1 years) participated. Each subject performed the FMS, which consisted of 7 movement tests (each score range: 0-3, total score range: 0-21), during the preseason. The incidence of running injuries (time lost because of injury ≤ 4 weeks) was investigated through a follow-up survey during the 6-month season. Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to investigate which movement tests were significantly associated with running injuries. The receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the cutoff. The mean FMS composite score was 14.1 ± 2.3. The ROC analysis determined the cutoff at 14/15 (sensitivity = 0.73, specificity = 0.54), suggesting that the composite score had a low predictability for running injuries. However, the total scores (0-6) from the deep squat (DS) and active straight leg raise (ASLR) tests (DS and ASLR), which were significant with the U-test, had relatively high predictability at the cutoff of 3/4 (sensitivity = 0.73, specificity = 0.74). Furthermore, the multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the DS and ASLR scores of ≤3 significantly influenced the incidence of running injuries after adjusting for subjects' characteristics (odds ratio = 9.7, 95% confidence interval = 2.1-44.4). Thus, the current study identified the DS and ASLR score as a more effective method than the composite score to screen the risk of running injuries in competitive male runners.

  1. A preliminary investigation into the relationship between functional movement screen scores and athletic physical performance in female team sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Rg; Schultz, Ab; Callaghan, Sj; Jordan, Ca; Luczo, Tm; Jeffriess, Md

    2015-03-01

    There is little research investigating relationships between the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and athletic performance in female athletes. This study analyzed the relationships between FMS (deep squat; hurdle step [HS]; in-line lunge [ILL]; shoulder mobility; active straight-leg raise [ASLR]; trunk stability push-up; rotary stability) scores, and performance tests (bilateral and unilateral sit-and-reach [flexibility]; 20-m sprint [linear speed]; 505 with turns from each leg; modified T-test with movement to left and right [change-of-direction speed]; bilateral and unilateral vertical and standing broad jumps; lateral jumps [leg power]). Nine healthy female recreational team sport athletes (age = 22.67 ± 5.12 years; height = 1.66 ± 0.05 m; body mass = 64.22 ± 4.44 kilograms) were screened in the FMS and completed the afore-mentioned tests. Percentage between-leg differences in unilateral sit-and-reach, 505 turns and the jumps, and difference between the T-test conditions, were also calculated. Spearman's correlations (p ≤ 0.05) examined relationships between the FMS and performance tests. Stepwise multiple regressions (p ≤ 0.05) were conducted for the performance tests to determine FMS predictors. Unilateral sit-and-reach positive correlated with the left-leg ASLR (r = 0.704-0.725). However, higher-scoring HS, ILL, and ASLR related to poorer 505 and T-test performance (r = 0.722-0.829). A higher-scored left-leg ASLR related to a poorer unilateral vertical and standing broad jump, which were the only significant relationships for jump performance. Predictive data tended to confirm the correlations. The results suggest limitations in using the FMS to identify movement deficiencies that could negatively impact athletic performance in female team sport athletes.

  2. Effects of 16-week functional movement screen training program on strength and flexibility of elite high school baseball players.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-Sun; Woo, Seung-Seok; So, Wi-Young; Kim, Kwang-Jun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Joo-Young

    2014-04-01

    Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a way to pretest functional movement. This study examined the effects of the FMS training program on the strength and flexibility of 62 elite male high school baseball players (31 in the training group, 31 in the control group). All players who received less than two points on each FMS test item had to join the 16-week, three times weekly FMS training program. To analyze results among the FMS participants, measures including intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and repeated measure ANOVA were utilized. The Kappa coefficient was 0.805 when the intraclass correlation coefficient of the three participants was inspected. Strength showed a significant interaction depending on time and group (hand grip strength: P=0.011, bench press and squat both for one-repetition maximum (1RM): P=0.001 and P=0.008, respectively). Back muscle strength did not show a significant difference (P=0.660). Trunk forward flexion showed no interaction depending on time and groups (P=0.983) but trunk extension backward showed significant differences depending on groups (P=0.004) and time (P=0.001). Splits showed a significant difference depending on time and groups (P=0.004). The FMS training program improved the strength and flexibility of elite high school baseball players.

  3. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  4. Systematic screening of human ABCC3 polymorphisms and their effects on MRP3 expression and function.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tomohiro; Hirota, Takeshi; Ryokai, Yuriko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kimura, Miyuki; Irie, Shin; Higuchi, Shun; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify genetic polymorphisms of multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3, gene name ABCC3), an ATP-binding cassette transporter that mediates the transport of substrates across the basolateral membrane into the blood, and to investigate their effects on ABCC3 expression and MRP3 function. We identified genetic polymorphisms of ABCC3 and evaluated the effects by (1) a luciferase reporter gene assay, (2) measuring mRNA levels, and (3) a human pharmacogenomics study with 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronide (4-MUG). Overall, 61 genetic variants were identified in three ethnic populations; of these variants 17 were novel (7 were non-synonymous: 61Arg>Cys, 132Gln>Stop, 221Trp>Stop, 270His>Gln, 548Leu>Gln, 600Lys>Arg, and 1324Arg>His). However, these mutations occurred at very low frequencies (max. 4.7%). The observed allele frequencies showed considerable inter-ethnic differences. The reporter gene assay indicated a significant reduction of transcriptional activity with the -1767G>A allele compared to the wild-type allele; however, a decreased expression of ABCC3 mRNA was not detected in human liver samples. A human pharmacokinetic study showed that the ABCC3 genotype in the promoter region was not associated with changes in the pharmacokinetics of 4-MUG, a substrate of MRP3. This is the first study to assess the effects of ABCC3 polymorphisms on human pharmacokinetics; however, further investigations are needed to complete the picture.

  5. Identification and functional screening of microRNAs highly deregulated in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Faltejskova, Petra; Svoboda, Marek; Srutova, Klara; Mlcochova, Jitka; Besse, Andrej; Nekvindova, Jana; Radova, Lenka; Fabian, Pavel; Slaba, Katerina; Kiss, Igor; Vyzula, Rostislav; Slaby, Ondrej

    2012-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a robust regulatory network with post-transcriptional regulatory efficiency for almost one half of human coding genes, including oncogenes and tumour suppressors. We determined the expression profile of 667 miRNAs in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and paired non-tumoural tissues and identified 42 differentially expressed miRNAs. We chose miR-215, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-135b for further validation on an independent cohort of 125 clinically characterized CRC patients and for in vitro analyses. MiR-215, miR-375, miR-378 and miR-422a were significantly decreased, whereas miR-135b was increased in CRC tumour tissues. Levels of miR-215 and miR-422a correlated with clinical stage. MiR-135b was associated with higher pre-operative serum levels of CEA and CA19-9. In vitro analyses showed that ectopic expression of miR-215 decreases viability and migration, increases apoptosis and promotes cell cycle arrest in DLD-1 and HCT-116 colon cancer cell lines. Similarly, overexpression of miR-375 and inhibition of miR-135b led to decreased viability. Finally, restoration of miR-378, miR-422a and miR-375 inhibited G1/S transition. These findings indicate that miR-378, miR-375, miR-422a and miR-215 play an important role in CRC as tumour suppressors, whereas miR-135b functions as an oncogene; both groups of miRNA contribute to CRC pathogenesis.

  6. Item analysis and differential item functioning of a brief conduct problem screen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Johnny; King, Kevin M; Witkiewitz, Katie; Racz, Sarah Jensen; McMahon, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    Research has shown that boys display higher levels of childhood conduct problems than girls, and Black children display higher levels than White children, but few studies have tested for scalar equivalence of conduct problems across gender and race. The authors conducted a 2-parameter item response theory (IRT) model to examine item characteristics of the Authority Acceptance scale from the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation-Revised (AA-TOCA-R; L. Larsson-Werthamer, S. G. Kellam, & L. Wheeler, 1991) in 8,820 kindergarten children and estimated the degree of differential item functioning (DIF) by gender and race/urban status. The mean level of latent conduct problems was best represented by behaviors such as being stubborn, breaking rules, and being disobedient, whereas breaking things and taking others' property best represented the construct at one standard deviation above the mean. DIF by gender was detected, such that at equivalent levels of latent conduct problems, males received more endorsements of overt behaviors from teachers, whereas females received more endorsements of nonphysical behaviors. Moreover, overt behaviors were better discriminators of latent conduct problems for males, and nonphysical behaviors were better discriminators of latent conduct problems for females. Differences across race/urban status were not found to be conceptually meaningful. The authors' analyses also suggest that the item scaling of the AA-TOCA-R may be best represented by 5e categories instead of 6. These findings provide support for the use of IRT modeling to examine item characteristics of conduct problem scales and DIF to test for scalar equivalence across diverse subpopulations.

  7. Functional Movement Screening Performance of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Athletes From Brazil: Differences Considering Practice Time and Combat Style.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Fabrício Boscolo; Gondim, Denis Foster; Arruda, Antonio Carlos Pereira

    2016-08-01

    Boscolo Del Vecchio, F, Foster, D, and Arruda, A. Functional movement screening performance of Brazilian jiu-jitsu athletes from Brazil: differences considering practice time and combat style. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2341-2347, 2016-Brazilian jiu-jitsu (BJJ) is a grappling combat sport that athletes, lying (guard fighter) or kneeling (pass fighter) on the mat, attempt to force their opponents to submit. Brazilian jiu-jitsu practices may result in muscular imbalances, which increase the risk of injury. Instead, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is an evaluation routine that could be related to injury incidence and seeks to detect muscular imbalance and movement dysfunction. Thus, the aim of the study was to investigate the injury profile and the FMS score and their relationship, with consideration for the BJJ fight style. Sports injuries were recorded in the last 12 months of 33 BJJ athletes, and the statistical analyses were applied to a routine evaluation FMS and a score of 14 points or less was considered low performance in FMS. We used a logistic regression; the effect size (ES) was calculated, and 5% was assumed as the statistical significance level. Pass fighters showed a higher percentage of injuries on the thorax (24.24%) than did guard fighters (6.67%, p = 0.01). Upper limbs were the most injured part of the body (χ = 36.7; p < 0.001), and they were 79% of the injuries that occurred in training sessions (χ = 14.53; p < 0.001). Despite the lack of statistical differences in the FMS performance between guard and pass fighters (t = 1.97; p = 0.05), its magnitude was considered medium (ES = 0.77). There was an association between FMS and presence of injury (χ = 4.95; p = 0.03). Considering the FMS score as a predictor and the presence or absence of injury as the dependent variable, the data met a Wald coefficient of 4.55, p = 0.03 and Exp (B) = 5.71. The study found that almost half of the sample had injuries in the upper limbs and a quarter had

  8. Transpo-mAb display: Transposition-mediated B cell display and functional screening of full-length IgG antibody libraries

    PubMed Central

    Waldmeier, Lorenz; Hellmann, Ina; Gutknecht, Chantal K.; Wolter, Fabian I.; Cook, Skylar C.; Reddy, Sai T.; Grawunder, Ulf; Beerli, Roger R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vitro antibody display and screening technologies geared toward the discovery and engineering of clinically applicable antibodies have evolved from screening artificial antibody formats, powered by microbial display technologies, to screening of natural, full-IgG molecules expressed in mammalian cells to readily yield lead antibodies with favorable properties in production and clinical applications. Here, we report the development and characterization of a novel, next-generation mammalian cell-based antibody display and screening platform called Transpo-mAb Display, offering straightforward and efficient generation of cellular libraries by using non-viral transposition technology to obtain stable antibody expression. Because Transpo-mAb Display uses DNA-transposable vectors with substantial cargo capacity, genomic antibody heavy chain expression constructs can be utilized that undergo the natural switch from membrane bound to secreted antibody expression in B cells by way of alternative splicing of Ig-heavy chain transcripts from the same genomic expression cassette. We demonstrate that stably transposed cells co-express transmembrane and secreted antibodies at levels comparable to those provided by dedicated constructs for secreted and membrane-associated IgGs. This unique feature expedites the screening and antibody characterization process by obviating the need for intermediate sequencing and re-cloning of individual antibody clones into separate expression vectors for functional screening purposes. In a series of proof-of-concept experiments, we demonstrate the seamless integration of antibody discovery with functional screening for various antibody properties, including binding affinity and suitability for preparation of antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:26986818

  9. Transpo-mAb display: Transposition-mediated B cell display and functional screening of full-length IgG antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Waldmeier, Lorenz; Hellmann, Ina; Gutknecht, Chantal K; Wolter, Fabian I; Cook, Skylar C; Reddy, Sai T; Grawunder, Ulf; Beerli, Roger R

    2016-01-01

    In vitro antibody display and screening technologies geared toward the discovery and engineering of clinically applicable antibodies have evolved from screening artificial antibody formats, powered by microbial display technologies, to screening of natural, full-IgG molecules expressed in mammalian cells to readily yield lead antibodies with favorable properties in production and clinical applications. Here, we report the development and characterization of a novel, next-generation mammalian cell-based antibody display and screening platform called Transpo-mAb Display, offering straightforward and efficient generation of cellular libraries by using non-viral transposition technology to obtain stable antibody expression. Because Transpo-mAb Display uses DNA-transposable vectors with substantial cargo capacity, genomic antibody heavy chain expression constructs can be utilized that undergo the natural switch from membrane bound to secreted antibody expression in B cells by way of alternative splicing of Ig-heavy chain transcripts from the same genomic expression cassette. We demonstrate that stably transposed cells co-express transmembrane and secreted antibodies at levels comparable to those provided by dedicated constructs for secreted and membrane-associated IgGs. This unique feature expedites the screening and antibody characterization process by obviating the need for intermediate sequencing and re-cloning of individual antibody clones into separate expression vectors for functional screening purposes. In a series of proof-of-concept experiments, we demonstrate the seamless integration of antibody discovery with functional screening for various antibody properties, including binding affinity and suitability for preparation of antibody-drug conjugates.

  10. Development of a Screening Scale for High-Functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders Using the Tokyo Child Development Schedule and Tokyo Autistic Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, Mayo; Tachimori, Hisateru; Saito, Mari; Koyama, Tomonori; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compile a screening scale for high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders (PDD), using the Tokyo Child Development Schedule (TCDS) and Tokyo Autistic Behavior Scale (TABS). The 72 participants (IQ greater than or equal to 70) were divided into 3 groups after IQ matching depending on their diagnoses: i.e., PDD,…

  11. Stable expression and characterisation of a human alpha 7 nicotinic subunit chimera: a tool for functional high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Craig, Peter J; Bose, Suchira; Zwart, Ruud; Beattie, Ruth E; Folly, Elizabeth A; Johnson, Laura R; Bell, Emma; Evans, Non M; Benedetti, Giovanni; Pearson, Kathy H; McPhie, Gordon I; Volsen, Stephen G; Millar, Neil S; Sher, Emanuele; Broad, Lisa M

    2004-10-11

    A chimera comprising the N-terminal region of the human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, fused to the transmembrane/C-terminal domains of the mouse serotonin 5-HT3 receptor, was constructed. Injection of the chimera cDNA into Xenopus oocytes, or transient transfection in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells, resulted in the expression of functional channels that were sensitive to nicotinic acetylcholine, but not serotonin receptor ligands. In both systems, the responses obtained from chimeric receptors inactivated more slowly than those recorded following activation of wild-type alpha7 receptors. A stable HEK-293 cell line expressing the human alpha7/mouse 5-HT3 chimera was established, which showed that the chimera displayed a similar pharmacological profile to wild-type alpha7 receptors. Use of this chimera in high-throughput screening may enable the identification of novel pharmacological agents that will help to define further the role of alpha7 nicotinic receptors in physiology and disease.

  12. Screened-exchange density functional approach to Auger recombination and impact ionization rates in InGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Silvia; Asahi, Ryoji; Geller, Clint; Freeman, Arthur

    2004-03-01

    We present an ab-initio modeling approach for Auger recombination and impact ionization in semiconductors directed at i) quantitative rate determinations and 2) elucidating trends with respect to alloy composition, carrier concentration and temperature. We present a fully first-principles formalism (S.Picozzi, R.Asahi, C.B. Geller and A.J.Freeman, Phys.Rev.Lett. 89, 197601 (2002); Phys.Rev.B 65, 113206 (2002).), based on accurate energy bands and wave functions within the screened exchange local density approximation and the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method (E.Wimmer, H.Krakauer, M.Weinert, A.J.Freeman, Phys.Rev.B 24, 864 (1981)). Results are presented for electron- and hole-initiated impact ionization processes and Auger recombinations for p-type and n-type InGaAs. Anisotropy and composition effects in the related rates are discussed in terms of the underlying band-structures. Calculated Auger lifetimes, in general agreement with experiments, are studied for different recombination mechanisms (i.e. CCCH, CHHL, CHHS, involving conduction electrons (C), heavy- (H) and light-hole (L), spin split-off (S) band) in order to understand the dominant mechanism.

  13. The Effect of Specific Sling Exercises on the Functional Movement Screen Score in Adolescent Volleyball Players: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Saulicz, Edward; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Wójtowicz, Monika; Wolny, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The existing data indicate that the result of the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) test influences the likelihood of subsequent injury in professional athletes. Therefore, exercises increasing test scores of the FMS may be useful at various stages of sports activity. This study evaluated the effects of the NEURAC sling exercises method on the FMS test score in teenage volleyball players. The study was conducted on 15 volleyball players aged 14 years. The FMS test was performed three times interspersed with a two-month interval. Between the first and the second assessment, neither additional treatment nor training was applied, while between the second and the third assessment, the participants performed stabilisation exercises based on the NEURAC method. Training was carried out twice a week, for eight weeks. The analysis showed that between the first and the second measurement, no significant differences occurred. The use of specific sling exercises caused a significant improvement in FMS results (p ≤ 0.01) between the first and the third, as well as the second and the third measurement. The applied stabilisation exercises based on the NEURAC method positively influenced the FMS test result in male subjects practicing volleyball. Performance of such exercises also resulted in more than 90% of the subjects having a total FMS test score ≥ 17, which may be important in the prevention of injuries. The preliminary results indicate that this type of exercise should be included in a teenage volleyball training routine. PMID:28031760

  14. A Functional Yeast Survival Screen of Tumor-Derived cDNA Libraries Designed to Identify Anti-Apoptotic Mammalian Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Inga Maria; Moser, Julia; Siele, Dagmar; Köhl, Ulrike; Rieker, Ralf Joachim; Wachter, David Lukas; Agaimy, Abbas; Herpel, Esther; Baumgarten, Peter; Mittelbronn, Michel; Rakel, Stefanie; Kögel, Donat; Böhm, Stefanie; Gutschner, Tony; Diederichs, Sven; Zörnig, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Yeast cells can be killed upon expression of pro-apoptotic mammalian proteins. We have established a functional yeast survival screen that was used to isolate novel human anti-apoptotic genes overexpressed in treatment-resistant tumors. The screening of three different cDNA libraries prepared from metastatic melanoma, glioblastomas and leukemic blasts allowed for the identification of many yeast cell death-repressing cDNAs, including 28% of genes that are already known to inhibit apoptosis, 35% of genes upregulated in at least one tumor entity and 16% of genes described as both anti-apoptotic in function and upregulated in tumors. These results confirm the great potential of this screening tool to identify novel anti-apoptotic and tumor-relevant molecules. Three of the isolated candidate genes were further analyzed regarding their anti-apoptotic function in cell culture and their potential as a therapeutic target for molecular therapy. PAICS, an enzyme required for de novo purine biosynthesis, the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 and the MAST2 kinase are overexpressed in certain tumor entities and capable of suppressing apoptosis in human cells. Using a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model, we also demonstrated that glioblastoma tumor growth requires MAST2 expression. An additional advantage of the yeast survival screen is its universal applicability. By using various inducible pro-apoptotic killer proteins and screening the appropriate cDNA library prepared from normal or pathologic tissue of interest, the survival screen can be used to identify apoptosis inhibitors in many different systems. PMID:23717670

  15. The postoperative cortisol stress response following transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: a potential screening method for assessing preserved pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Zada, Gabriel; Tirosh, Amir; Huang, Abel P; Laws, Edward R; Woodmansee, Whitney W

    2013-09-01

    The ability to reliably identify patients with new hypocortisolemia acutely following pituitary surgery is critical. We aimed to quantify the postoperative cortisol stress response following selective transsphenoidal adenomectomy, as a marker for postoperative preservation of functional pituitary gland. Records of 208 patients undergoing transsphenoidal operations for pituitary lesions were reviewed. Patients with Cushing's Disease, preoperative adrenal insufficiency, and those receiving intraoperative steroids were excluded. To quantify the postoperative stress response, the ∆ cortisol index was defined as the postoperative day (POD) 1 morning cortisol minus the preoperative morning cortisol level. The incidence of new hypocortisolemia requiring glucocorticoid replacement upon hospital discharge was also recorded. Fifty-two patients met inclusion criteria. The mean preoperative, POD1, and POD2 cortisol levels were 16.5, 29.2, and 21.8 μg/dL, respectively. Morning fasting cortisol levels on POD1 ranged from 4.2 to 73.0 μg/dL. The ∆ cortisol index ranged from -19.0 to +56.2 (mean +12.7 μg/dL). Five patients (9.6%) developed new hypocortisolemia on POD 1-3 requiring glucocorticoid replacement; only one required long-term replacement. The mean ∆ cortisol in patients requiring postoperative glucocorticoids was -2.8 μg/dL, compared with +14.4 μg/dL in patients without evidence of adrenal insufficiency (p = 0.005). Of the 32 patients (61.5%) with a ∆cortisol >25 μg/dL, none developed postoperative adrenal insufficiency. The postoperative cortisol stress response, as quantified by the ∆ cortisol index, holds potential as a novel and complimentary screening method to predict preservation of normal pituitary function and acute development of new ACTH deficiency following transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

  16. Screening the key microRNAs and transcription factors in prostate cancer based on microRNA functional synergistic relationships.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Wu, Jitao; Gao, Zhenli; Yu, Shengqiang; Cui, Yuanshan

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a common neoplasm, and metastatic PC remains incurable. The study aims to screen key microRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors (TFs) involved in PC.The miRNA expression profile dataset (GSE45604) was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 50 PC and 10 normal specimens. Differentially expressed miRNAs (DEmiRNAs) were identified through limma package in R, and DEmiRNA-DEmiRNA co-regulation network was constructed based on the number of co-regulated target genes. Functional enrichment analysis of co-regulated target genes was performed using clusterProfiler package in R, and miRNA interactions sharing at least 1 functional term were used to construct a DEmiRNA-DEmiRNA functional synergistic network (MFSN). Based on Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database, cancer-related TFs which were co-regulated by DEmiRNAs were utilized to construct a DEmiRNA-TF regulation network.A total of 66 DEmiRNAs were identified, including 7 up-regulated miRNAs with 18,642 target genes and 59 down-regulated miRNAs with 130,694 target genes. Then, the DEmiRNA-DEmiRNA co-regulation network was constructed, including 66 DEmiRNAs and 2024 co-regulation relationships. In MFSN, hsa-miR-1184, hsa-miR-1207-5p, and hsa-miR-24 had significant functional synergistic relationships. The DEmiRNA-TF network contained 6 up-regulated DEmiRNAs and 4 of them were highlighted, as hsa-miR-1184, hsa-miR-1207-5p, hsa-miR-182, and hsa-miR-183. In subnetwork of the 4 miRNAs, peroxisome proliferative activated receptor, alpha (PPARA) and cyclic AMP-responsive element modulator (CREM) were the critical regulated TFs.Four up-regulated miRNAs (hsa-miR-1207-5p, hsa-miR-1184, hsa-miR-182, and hsa-miR-183) and 2 TFs (PPARA and CREM) were identified as key regulators in PC progression. The above 4 miRNAs might participate in PC progression by targeting PPARA and CREM.

  17. Screening the key microRNAs and transcription factors in prostate cancer based on microRNA functional synergistic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Wu, Jitao; Gao, Zhenli; Yu, Shengqiang; Cui, Yuanshan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer (PC) is a common neoplasm, and metastatic PC remains incurable. The study aims to screen key microRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors (TFs) involved in PC. The miRNA expression profile dataset (GSE45604) was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 50 PC and 10 normal specimens. Differentially expressed miRNAs (DEmiRNAs) were identified through limma package in R, and DEmiRNA–DEmiRNA co-regulation network was constructed based on the number of co-regulated target genes. Functional enrichment analysis of co-regulated target genes was performed using clusterProfiler package in R, and miRNA interactions sharing at least 1 functional term were used to construct a DEmiRNA–DEmiRNA functional synergistic network (MFSN). Based on Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database, cancer-related TFs which were co-regulated by DEmiRNAs were utilized to construct a DEmiRNA–TF regulation network. A total of 66 DEmiRNAs were identified, including 7 up-regulated miRNAs with 18,642 target genes and 59 down-regulated miRNAs with 130,694 target genes. Then, the DEmiRNA–DEmiRNA co-regulation network was constructed, including 66 DEmiRNAs and 2024 co-regulation relationships. In MFSN, hsa-miR-1184, hsa-miR-1207-5p, and hsa-miR-24 had significant functional synergistic relationships. The DEmiRNA–TF network contained 6 up-regulated DEmiRNAs and 4 of them were highlighted, as hsa-miR-1184, hsa-miR-1207-5p, hsa-miR-182, and hsa-miR-183. In subnetwork of the 4 miRNAs, peroxisome proliferative activated receptor, alpha (PPARA) and cyclic AMP-responsive element modulator (CREM) were the critical regulated TFs. Four up-regulated miRNAs (hsa-miR-1207-5p, hsa-miR-1184, hsa-miR-182, and hsa-miR-183) and 2 TFs (PPARA and CREM) were identified as key regulators in PC progression. The above 4 miRNAs might participate in PC progression by targeting PPARA and CREM. PMID:28072703

  18. Accurate prediction of the electronic properties of low-dimensional graphene derivatives using a screened hybrid density functional.

    PubMed

    Barone, Veronica; Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2011-04-19

    Over the last several years, low-dimensional graphene derivatives, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, have played a central role in the pursuit of a plausible carbon-based nanotechnology. Their electronic properties can be either metallic or semiconducting depending purely on morphology, but predicting their electronic behavior has proven challenging. The combination of experimental efforts with modeling of these nanometer-scale structures has been instrumental in gaining insight into their physical and chemical properties and the processes involved at these scales. Particularly, approximations based on density functional theory have emerged as a successful computational tool for predicting the electronic structure of these materials. In this Account, we review our efforts in modeling graphitic nanostructures from first principles with hybrid density functionals, namely the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) screened exchange hybrid and the hybrid meta-generalized functional of Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria (TPSSh). These functionals provide a powerful tool for quantitatively studying structure-property relations and the effects of external perturbations such as chemical substitutions, electric and magnetic fields, and mechanical deformations on the electronic and magnetic properties of these low-dimensional carbon materials. We show how HSE and TPSSh successfully predict the electronic properties of these materials, providing a good description of their band structure and density of states, their work function, and their magnetic ordering in the cases in which magnetism arises. Moreover, these approximations are capable of successfully predicting optical transitions (first and higher order) in both metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes of various chiralities and diameters with impressive accuracy. This versatility includes the correct prediction of the trigonal warping splitting in metallic nanotubes. The results predicted

  19. Genetic variations of human neuropsin gene and psychiatric disorders: polymorphism screening and possible association with bipolar disorder and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Aiko; Iijima, Yoshimi; Noguchi, Hiroko; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Okada, Takeya; Hori, Hiroaki; Kato, Tadafumi; Tatsumi, Masahiko; Kosuga, Asako; Kamijima, Kunitoshi; Asada, Takashi; Arima, Kunimasa; Saitoh, Osamu; Shiosaka, Sadao; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Human neuropsin (NP) (hNP) has been implicated in the progressive change of cognitive abilities during primate evolution. The hNP gene maps to chromosome 19q13, a region reportedly linked to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Therefore, hNP is a functional and positional candidate gene for association with schizophrenia, mood disorders, and cognitive ability. Polymorphism screening was performed for the entire hNP gene. The core promoter region was determined and whether or not transcriptional activity alters in an allele-dependent manner was examined by using the dual-luciferase system. Allelic and genotypic distributions of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were compared between patients with schizophrenia (n=439), major depression (n=409), bipolar disorder (n=207), and controls (n=727). A possible association of the hNP genotype with memory index (assessed with Wechsler Memory Scale, revised, WMS-R) and intelligence quotient (IQ assessed with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, revised; WAIS-R) was examined in healthy controls (n=166). A total of 28 SNPs, including nine novel SNPs, were identified. No significant effects on transcriptional activity were observed for SNPs in the promoter region. A significant allelic association was found between several SNPs and bipolar disorder (for SNP23 at the 3' regulatory region; odds ratio 1.48, 95% confidential interval 1.16-1.88, P=0.0015). However, such an association was not detected for schizophrenia or depression. Significant differences were observed between SNP23 and attention/concentration sub-scale score of WMS-R (P=0.016) and verbal IQ (P<0.001). Genetic variation of the hNP gene may contribute to molecular mechanisms of bipolar disorder and some aspects of memory and intelligence.

  20. Genetic Screen in Drosophila Larvae Links ird1 Function to Toll Signaling in the Fat Body and Hemocyte Motility

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Martin R.; Anderl, Ines; Vo, Hoa T. M.; Valanne, Susanna; Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Rämet, Mika; Rusten, Tor Erik

    2016-01-01

    To understand how Toll signaling controls the activation of a cellular immune response in Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes), we carried out a genetic modifier screen, looking for deletions that suppress or enhance the mobilization of sessile hemocytes by the gain-of-function mutation Toll10b (Tl10b). Here we describe the results from chromosome arm 3R, where five regions strongly suppressed this phenotype. We identified the specific genes immune response deficient 1 (ird1), headcase (hdc) and possibly Rab23 as suppressors, and we studied the role of ird1 in more detail. An ird1 null mutant and a mutant that truncates the N-terminal kinase domain of the encoded Ird1 protein affected the Tl10b phenotype, unlike mutations that affect the C-terminal part of the protein. The ird1 null mutant suppressed mobilization of sessile hemocytes, but enhanced other Tl10b hemocyte phenotypes, like the formation of melanotic nodules and the increased number of circulating hemocytes. ird1 mutants also had blood cell phenotypes on their own. They lacked crystal cells and showed aberrant formation of lamellocytes. ird1 mutant plasmatocytes had a reduced ability to spread on an artificial substrate by forming protrusions, which may explain why they did not go into circulation in response to Toll signaling. The effect of the ird1 mutation depended mainly on ird1 expression in hemocytes, but ird1-dependent effects in other tissues may contribute. Specifically, the Toll receptor was translocated from the cell membrane to intracellular vesicles in the fat body of the ird1 mutant, and Toll signaling was activated in that tissue, partially explaining the Tl10b-like phenotype. As ird1 is otherwise known to control vesicular transport, we conclude that the vesicular transport system may be of particular importance during an immune response. PMID:27467079

  1. The effect of an intervention program on functional movement screen test scores in mixed martial arts athletes.

    PubMed

    Bodden, Jamie G; Needham, Robert A; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the basic fundamental movements of mixed martial arts (MMA) athletes using the functional movement screen (FMS) assessment and determined if an intervention program was successful at improving results. Participants were placed into 1 of the 2 groups: intervention and control groups. The intervention group was required to complete a corrective exercise program 4 times per week, and all participants were asked to continue their usual MMA training routine. A mid-intervention FMS test was included to examine if successful results were noticed sooner than the 8-week period. Results highlighted differences in FMS test scores between the control group and intervention group (p = 0.006). Post hoc testing revealed a significant increase in the FMS score of the intervention group between weeks 0 and 8 (p = 0.00) and weeks 0 and 4 (p = 0.00) and no significant increase between weeks 4 and 8 (p = 1.00). A χ analysis revealed that the intervention group participants were more likely to have an FMS score >14 than participants in the control group at week 4 (χ = 7.29, p < 0.01) and week 8 (χ = 5.2, p ≤ 0.05). Finally, a greater number of participants in the intervention group were free from asymmetry at week 4 and week 8 compared with the initial test period. The results of the study suggested that a 4-week intervention program was sufficient at improving FMS scores. Most if not all, the movements covered on the FMS relate to many aspects of MMA training. The knowledge that the FMS can identify movement dysfunctions and, furthermore, the fact that the issues can be improved through a standardized intervention program could be advantageous to MMA coaches, thus, providing the opportunity to adapt and implement new additions to training programs.

  2. Design and analysis of a piezoelectric material based touch screen with additional pressure and its acceleration measurement functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Cheng; Liu, Jia-Yi; Gao, Ren-Long; Chang, Jie; Li, Long-Tu

    2013-12-01

    Touch screens are becoming more and more prevalent in everyday environments due to their convenience and humanized operation. In this paper, a piezoelectric material based touch screen is developed and investigated. Piezoelectric ceramics arrayed under the touch panel at the edges or corners are used as tactile sensors to measure the touch positioning point similarly to conventional touch screens. However, additional touch pressure and its acceleration performance can also be obtained to obtain a higher-level human-machine interface. The piezoelectric ceramics can also be added to a traditional touch screen structure, or they can be used independently to construct a novel touch screen with a high light transmittance approach to a transparent glass. The piezoelectric ceramics were processed from PZT piezoelectric ceramic powder into a round or rectangular shape. According to the varied touch position and physical press strength of a finger, or even a gloved hand or fingernail, the piezoelectric tactile sensors will have different output voltage responses. By calculating the ratio of different piezoelectric tactile sensors’ responses and summing up all piezoelectric tactile sensors’ output voltages, the touch point position, touch pressure and touch force acceleration can be detected. A prototype of such a touch screen is manufactured and its position accuracy, touch pressure and response speed are measured in detail. The experimental results show that the prototype has many advantages such as high light transmittance, low energy cost and high durability.

  3. Transparent screens.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, R J

    1988-01-01

    There is a kind of transitional phenomenon found among certain borderline patients which is quite distinct from Winnicott's transitional object. These are patients who are preoccupied with maintaining proper physical distance from their objects, in order to regulate anxieties about isolation on the one hand, and identity-annihilating closeness on the other. Since they believe the activity of looking to be intrusive and devouring, hence dangerous, transparent screens are interposed between self and other, and serve as protective barriers. These screens function intrapsychically as well, to split off or hide those aspects of the self felt to be unacceptable. The analyst may witness the failure of the screen in several ways: it may create too great a distance, isolating the individual and keeping him from life; it may become contaminated by projections and turn into a persecutor, or trap the individual, a state of intolerable claustrophobia; most dramatically, it may suddenly shatter. The latter is associated with psychosis and death, and its appearance may be a harbinger of suicide.

  4. Use of focused ultrasonication in activity-based profiling of deubiquitinating enzymes in tissue.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Bindu; Shack, Leslie A; Rai, Aswathy N; Epperson, William B; Baumgartner, Wes; Schmidt, Ty B; Edelmann, Mariola J

    2016-12-15

    To develop a reproducible tissue lysis method that retains enzyme function for activity-based protein profiling, we compared four different methods to obtain protein extracts from bovine lung tissue: focused ultrasonication, standard sonication, mortar & pestle method, and homogenization combined with standard sonication. Focused ultrasonication and mortar & pestle methods were sufficiently effective for activity-based profiling of deubiquitinases in tissue, and focused ultrasonication also had the fastest processing time. We used focused-ultrasonicator for subsequent activity-based proteomic analysis of deubiquitinases to test the compatibility of this method in sample preparation for activity-based chemical proteomics.

  5. The Reliability of Functional Movement Screening and In-Season Changes in Physical Function and Performance Among Elite Rugby League Players.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Mark; Gray, Adrian; Worsfold, Paul; Twist, Craig

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (a) assess the reliability of the functional movement screening (FMS) protocol and (b) to establish changes in both FMS and tests of physical performance throughout a season. The reliability of the FMS components (12 in total) was assessed through a nonparametric statistical approach, based on 2 trials, separated by 1 week. Score on the FMS, strength (3 repetition maximum full squat, 1 repetition maximum [1 RM] bench press), running speed (10 and 40 m), and jump height of 12 elite male under-19 rugby league players was monitored at pre-, mid-, and late-season periods. There was no bias (p > 0.05) found between trials for the FMS, with the majority of components reaching 100% "perfect agreement," reflecting the good reliability of the FMS tool. There were no effects (p > 0.05) of season stage on any of the FMS components; however, an improvement (p ≤ 0.05) between the pre- and both mid- and late-season periods was apparent in every component of fitness, such as 1 RM bench press (112.92 ± 24.54 kg; 125.83 ± 21.41 kg; 125.98 ± 24.48 kg) and 40-m sprint time (5.69 ± 0.35 seconds; 5.62 ± 0.31 seconds; 5.64 ± 0.27 seconds). Our findings demonstrate that the FMS can be reliably administered to elite rugby league players but will not change in accordance with physical performance across a competitive season. Our findings should not necessarily deter practitioners from using the FMS but begin to question the specific qualities that are being assessed through its administration.

  6. Large-Scale Functional RNAi Screen in C. elegans Identifies TGF-β and Notch Signaling Pathways as Modifiers of CACNA1A

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Maria da Conceição; Morais, Sara; Sequeiros, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Variants in CACNA1A that encodes the pore-forming α1-subunit of human voltage-gated Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca2+ channels cause several autosomal-dominant neurologic disorders, including familial hemiplegic migraine type 1, episodic ataxia type 2, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. To identify modifiers of incoordination in movement disorders, we performed a large-scale functional RNAi screen, using the Caenorhabditis elegans strain CB55, which carries a truncating mutation in the unc-2 gene, the worm ortholog for the human CACNA1A. The screen was carried out by the feeding method in 96-well liquid culture format, using the ORFeome v1.1 feeding library, and time-lapse imaging of worms in liquid culture was used to assess changes in thrashing behavior. We looked for genes that, when silenced, either ameliorated the slow and uncoordinated phenotype of unc-2, or interacted to produce a more severe phenotype. Of the 350 putative hits from the primary screen, 37 genes consistently showed reproducible results. At least 75% of these are specifically expressed in the C. elegans neurons. Functional network analysis and gene ontology revealed overrepresentation of genes involved in development, growth, locomotion, signal transduction, and vesicle-mediated transport. We have expanded the functional network of genes involved in neurodegeneration leading to cerebellar ataxia related to unc-2/CACNA1A, further confirming the involvement of the transforming growth factor β pathway and adding a novel signaling cascade, the Notch pathway. PMID:27005779

  7. In vitro screening of metal oxide nanoparticles for effects on neural function using cortical networks on microelectrode arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanoparticles (NPs) may translocate to the brain following inhalation or oral exposures, yet higher throughput methods to screen NPs for potential neurotoxicity are lacking. The present study examined effects of 5 Ce02 (5- 1288 nm), and 4 Ti02 (6-142 nm) NPs and microparticles (M...

  8. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, Kimberly R. Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability. - Highlights: • 24 drugs were tested for cardiac liability using an in vitro multi-parameter screen. • Changes in beating activity were the most sensitive in predicting cardiac risk. • Structural effects add in

  9. Behavioral Screening for Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Screening for behavioral toxicity, or neurotoxicity, has been in use for decades; however, only in the past 20 years has this become a standard practice in toxicology. Current screening batteries, such as the functional observational battery (FOB), are derived from protocols use...

  10. Screening for cervical neoplasia: a community-based trial comparing Pap staining, human papilloma virus testing, and the new bi-functional Celldetect® stain.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Pavel; Kristt, Don; Schechter, Eduardo; Lew, Sylvia; Elkeles, Adi; Terkieltaub, Dov; Rivkin, Ilia; Bruchim, Ilan; Fishman, Ami

    2012-12-01

    Although cytological screening for cervical neoplasia has lowered mortality rates, current screening methods are plagued by sub-optimal sensitivity and/or specificity. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of the new CellDetect® staining technology as a potential screening tool. This initial, non-blinded study, utilized samples are taken at a community-based clinic. The diagnostic results using CellDetect® were compared with the performance of Pap staining and human papilloma virus (HPV) testing on the same material, as well as the follow-up biopsies. These data were statistically analyzed in terms of sensitivity, specificity, predictive value (N.P.V and P.P.V), and inter-observer agreement. Bi-functional CellDetect® staining revealed morphological details and tinctorial properties that permitted recognition of neoplasia even at low magnification. Performance-wise, CellDetect® demonstrated non-inferiority for all statistical parameters to both Pap and HPV tests. Importantly, superior sensitivity compared with Pap staining was observed, as well as higher specificity than HPV testing with near equivalent sensitivity. We conclude that CellDetect® is a promising approach to early detection of cervical cancer because of its bi-functional capabilities that afford high sensitivity and specificity. The data suggest that this new methodology warrants further and more extensive clinical evaluation.

  11. Identification of Spen as a Crucial Factor for Xist Function through Forward Genetic Screening in Haploid Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Monfort, Asun; Di Minin, Giulio; Postlmayr, Andreas; Freimann, Remo; Arieti, Fabiana; Thore, Stéphane; Wutz, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammals, the noncoding Xist RNA triggers transcriptional silencing of one of the two X chromosomes in female cells. Here, we report a genetic screen for silencing factors in X chromosome inactivation using haploid mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that carry an engineered selectable reporter system. This system was able to identify several candidate factors that are genetically required for chromosomal repression by Xist. Among the list of candidates, we identify the RNA-binding protein Spen, the homolog of split ends. Independent validation through gene deletion in ESCs confirms that Spen is required for gene repression by Xist. However, Spen is not required for Xist RNA localization and the recruitment of chromatin modifications, including Polycomb protein Ezh2. The identification of Spen opens avenues for further investigation into the gene-silencing pathway of Xist and shows the usefulness of haploid ESCs for genetic screening of epigenetic pathways. PMID:26190100

  12. Introducing Thermal Wave Transport Analysis (TWTA): A Thermal Technique for Dopamine Detection by Screen-Printed Electrodes Functionalized with Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP) Particles.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Marloes M; van Grinsven, Bart; Foster, Christopher W; Cleij, Thomas J; Banks, Craig E

    2016-04-26

    A novel procedure is developed for producing bulk modified Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP) screen-printed electrodes (SPEs), which involves the direct mixing of the polymer particles within the screen-printed ink. This allowed reduction of the sample preparation time from 45 min to 1 min, and resulted in higher reproducibility of the electrodes. The samples are measured with a novel detection method, namely, thermal wave transport analysis (TWTA), relying on the analysis of thermal waves through a functional interface. As a first proof-of-principle, MIPs for dopamine are developed and successfully incorporated within a bulk modified MIP SPE. The detection limits of dopamine within buffer solutions for the MIP SPEs are determined via three independent techniques. With cyclic voltammetry this was determined to be 4.7 × 10(-6) M, whereas by using the heat-transfer method (HTM) 0.35 × 10(-6) M was obtained, and with the novel TWTA concept 0.26 × 10(-6) M is possible. This TWTA technique is measured simultaneously with HTM and has the benefits of reducing measurement time to less than 5 min and increasing effect size by nearly a factor of two. The two thermal methods are able to enhance dopamine detection by one order of magnitude compared to the electrochemical method. In previous research, it was not possible to measure neurotransmitters in complex samples with HTM, but with the improved signal-to-noise of TWTA for the first time, spiked dopamine concentrations were determined in a relevant food sample. In summary, novel concepts are presented for both the sensor functionalization side by employing screen-printing technology, and on the sensing side, the novel TWTA thermal technique is reported. The developed bio-sensing platform is cost-effective and suitable for mass-production due to the nature of screen-printing technology, which makes it very interesting for neurotransmitter detection in clinical diagnostic applications.

  13. Functional genomic screening identifies dual leucine zipper kinase as a key mediator of retinal ganglion cell death

    PubMed Central

    Welsbie, Derek S.; Yang, Zhiyong; Ge, Yan; Mitchell, Katherine L.; Zhou, Xinrong; Martin, Scott E.; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Hackler, Laszlo; Fuller, John; Fu, Jie; Cao, Li-hui; Han, Bing; Auld, Douglas; Xue, Tian; Hirai, Syu-ichi; Germain, Lucie; Simard-Bisson, Caroline; Blouin, Richard; Nguyen, Judy V.; Davis, Chung-ha O.; Enke, Raymond A.; Boye, Sanford L.; Merbs, Shannath L.; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Hauswirth, William W.; DiAntonio, Aaron; Nickells, Robert W.; Inglese, James; Hanes, Justin; Yau, King-Wai; Quigley, Harry A.; Zack, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma, a major cause of blindness worldwide, is a neurodegenerative optic neuropathy in which vision loss is caused by loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). To better define the pathways mediating RGC death and identify targets for the development of neuroprotective drugs, we developed a high-throughput RNA interference screen with primary RGCs and used it to screen the full mouse kinome. The screen identified dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) as a key neuroprotective target in RGCs. In cultured RGCs, DLK signaling is both necessary and sufficient for cell death. DLK undergoes robust posttranscriptional up-regulation in response to axonal injury in vitro and in vivo. Using a conditional knockout approach, we confirmed that DLK is required for RGC JNK activation and cell death in a rodent model of optic neuropathy. In addition, tozasertib, a small molecule protein kinase inhibitor with activity against DLK, protects RGCs from cell death in rodent glaucoma and traumatic optic neuropathy models. Together, our results establish a previously undescribed drug/drug target combination in glaucoma, identify an early marker of RGC injury, and provide a starting point for the development of more specific neuroprotective DLK inhibitors for the treatment of glaucoma, nonglaucomatous forms of optic neuropathy, and perhaps other CNS neurodegenerations. PMID:23431148

  14. Health Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier ... Overweight and obesity Prostate cancer in men Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, ...

  15. Depression Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  16. Debye screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydges, David C.; Federbush, Paul

    1980-10-01

    The existence and exponential clustering of correlation functions for a classical coulomb system at low density or high temperature are proven using methods from constructive quantum field theory, the sine gordon transformation and the Glimm, Jaffe, Spencer expansion about mean field theory. This is a vindication of a belief of long standing among physicists, known as Debye screening. That is, because of special properties of the coulomb potential, the configurations of significant probability are those in which the long range parts of r -1 are mostly cancelled, leaving an effective exponentially decaying potential acting between charge clouds. This paper generalizes a previous paper of one of the authors in which these results were obtained for a special lattice system. The present treatment covers the continuous mechanics situation, with essentially arbitrary short range forces and charge species. Charge symmetry is not assumed.

  17. Development of a compact and general-purpose experimental apparatus with a touch-sensitive screen for use in evaluating cognitive functions in common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Atsushi; Izumi, Akihiro; Miwa, Miki; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2011-07-15

    Common marmosets have been used extensively in biomedical research and the recent advent of techniques to generate transgenic marmosets has accelerated the use of this model. New methods that efficiently assess the degree of cognitive function in common marmosets are needed in order to establish their suitability as non-human primate models of higher brain function disorders. Here, we have developed a new apparatus suitable for testing the cognitive functions of common marmosets. Utilizing a mini laptop PC with a touch-sensitive screen as the main component, the apparatus is small and lightweight and can be easily attached to the home cages. The ease of designing and testing new paradigms with the flexible software is another advantage of this system. We have tested visual discrimination and its reversal tasks using this apparatus and confirmed its efficacy.

  18. An siRNA screen for ATG protein depletion reveals the extent of the unconventional functions of the autophagy proteome in virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Mauthe, Mario; Langereis, Martijn; Jones, Alex; Omta, Wienand; Tooze, Sharon A.; Stork, Björn; Paludan, Søren Riis; Ahola, Tero; Egan, Dave; de Haan, Cornelis; van Kuppeveld, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process regulated by the orchestrated action of the autophagy-related (ATG) proteins. Recent work indicates that some of the ATG proteins also have autophagy-independent roles. Using an unbiased siRNA screen approach, we explored the extent of these unconventional functions of ATG proteins. We determined the effects of the depletion of each ATG proteome component on the replication of six different viruses. Our screen reveals that up to 36% of the ATG proteins significantly alter the replication of at least one virus in an unconventional fashion. Detailed analysis of two candidates revealed an undocumented role for ATG13 and FIP200 in picornavirus replication that is independent of their function in autophagy as part of the ULK complex. The high numbers of unveiled ATG gene-specific and pathogen-specific functions of the ATG proteins calls for caution in the interpretation of data, which rely solely on the depletion of a single ATG protein to specifically ablate autophagy. PMID:27573464

  19. An siRNA-based functional genomics screen for the identification of regulators of ciliogenesis and ciliopathy genes

    PubMed Central

    Racher, Hilary; Phelps, Ian G.; Toedt, Grischa; Kennedy, Julie; Wunderlich, Kirsten A.; Sorusch, Nasrin; Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Natarajan, Subaashini; Herridge, Warren; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Horn, Nicola; Boldt, Karsten; Parry, David A.; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Roosing, Susanne; Adams, Matthew; Bell, Sandra M.; Bond, Jacquelyn; Higgins, Julie; Morrison, Ewan E.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Slaats, Gisela G.; van Dam, Teunis J. P.; Huang, Lijia; Kessler, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Logan, Clare V.; Boyle, Evan A.; Shendure, Jay; Anazi, Shamsa; Aldahmesh, Mohammed; Al Hazzaa, Selwa; Hegele, Robert A.; Ober, Carole; Frosk, Patrick; Mhanni, Aizeddin A.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Chudley, Albert E.; Lamont, Ryan; Bernier, Francois P.; Beaulieu, Chandree L.; Gordon, Paul; Pon, Richard T.; Donahue, Clem; Barkovich, A. James; Wolf, Louis; Toomes, Carmel; Thiel, Christian T.; Boycott, Kym M.; McKibbin, Martin; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Stewart, Fiona; Omran, Heymut; Huynen, Martijn A.; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Innes, A Micheil; Willoughby, Colin E.; Giles, Rachel H.; Webster, Andrew R.; Ueffing, Marius; Blacque, Oliver; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Wolfrum, Uwe; Beales, Philip L.; Gibson, Toby

    2015-01-01

    Defects in primary cilium biogenesis underlie the ciliopathies, a growing group of genetic disorders. We describe a whole genome siRNA-based reverse genetics screen for defects in biogenesis and/or maintenance of the primary cilium, obtaining a global resource. We identify 112 candidate ciliogenesis and ciliopathy genes, including 44 components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, 12 G-protein-coupled receptors, and three pre-mRNA processing factors (PRPF6, PRPF8 and PRPF31) mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The PRPFs localise to the connecting cilium, and PRPF8- and PRPF31-mutated cells have ciliary defects. Combining the screen with exome sequencing data identified recessive mutations in PIBF1/CEP90 and C21orf2/LRRC76 as causes of the ciliopathies Joubert and Jeune syndromes. Biochemical approaches place C21orf2 within key ciliopathy-associated protein modules, offering an explanation for the skeletal and retinal involvement observed in individuals with C21orf2-variants. Our global, unbiased approaches provide insights into ciliogenesis complexity and identify roles for unanticipated pathways in human genetic disease. PMID:26167768

  20. Discovery of BVDU as a promising Drug for autoimmune diseases Therapy by Dendritic-cell-based functional screening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuai; Zhou, Jinfeng; Cai, Yingying; Zheng, Xinyuan; Xie, Sirong; Liao, Yuhan; Zhu, Yu; Qin, Chaoyan; Lai, Weiming; Yang, Cuixia; Xie, Xin; Du, Changsheng

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, and targeting DCs’ cytokines production is an important strategy for autoimmune diseases treatment. By establishing a high-throughput screening system, we analyzed LOPAC drug library to identify drugs that control the secretion of IL-6 by DCs, we selected the most likely candidate drug, BVDU, and found that it affected not only IL-6 production, but also that of IL-12, IL-1β during the DCs differentiation and maturation. The mechanism studies showed that BVDU treatment restricted the phosphorylation of MAP kinase, which played an important role in DC cytokine production. We further assessed the in vivo therapeutic potentials of BVDU on mouse models including EAE and STZ-induced T1D, and found that BVDU treated EAE mice exhibited significantly lower EAE clinical scores, decreased leukocyte infiltration in central nervous system lesions, and reduced demyelination. As in T1D mice, BVDU treatment also showed promising therapeutic effects based on both alleviated disease symptoms and tissue pathogenesis. More interestingly, the modulating effect of BVDU on IL-6 production was further verified in human primary DCs. The above data supported the promising application of our screen model, and also the potential of BVDU for autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:28272439

  1. Discovery of BVDU as a promising Drug for autoimmune diseases Therapy by Dendritic-cell-based functional screening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Zhou, Jinfeng; Cai, Yingying; Zheng, Xinyuan; Xie, Sirong; Liao, Yuhan; Zhu, Yu; Qin, Chaoyan; Lai, Weiming; Yang, Cuixia; Xie, Xin; Du, Changsheng

    2017-03-08

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, and targeting DCs' cytokines production is an important strategy for autoimmune diseases treatment. By establishing a high-throughput screening system, we analyzed LOPAC drug library to identify drugs that control the secretion of IL-6 by DCs, we selected the most likely candidate drug, BVDU, and found that it affected not only IL-6 production, but also that of IL-12, IL-1β during the DCs differentiation and maturation. The mechanism studies showed that BVDU treatment restricted the phosphorylation of MAP kinase, which played an important role in DC cytokine production. We further assessed the in vivo therapeutic potentials of BVDU on mouse models including EAE and STZ-induced T1D, and found that BVDU treated EAE mice exhibited significantly lower EAE clinical scores, decreased leukocyte infiltration in central nervous system lesions, and reduced demyelination. As in T1D mice, BVDU treatment also showed promising therapeutic effects based on both alleviated disease symptoms and tissue pathogenesis. More interestingly, the modulating effect of BVDU on IL-6 production was further verified in human primary DCs. The above data supported the promising application of our screen model, and also the potential of BVDU for autoimmune diseases therapy.

  2. Double screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gratia, Pierre; Hu, Wayne; Joyce, Austin; Ribeiro, Raquel H.

    2016-06-15

    Attempts to modify gravity in the infrared typically require a screening mechanism to ensure consistency with local tests of gravity. These screening mechanisms fit into three broad classes; we investigate theories which are capable of exhibiting more than one type of screening. Specifically, we focus on a simple model which exhibits both Vainshtein and kinetic screening. We point out that due to the two characteristic length scales in the problem, the type of screening that dominates depends on the mass of the sourcing object, allowing for different phenomenology at different scales. We consider embedding this double screening phenomenology in a broader cosmological scenario and show that the simplest examples that exhibit double screening are radiatively stable.

  3. Fine mapping of the sequence requirements for binding of β-lactamase inhibitory protein (BLIP) to TEM-1 β-lactamase using a genetic screen for BLIP function

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ji; Huang, Wanzhi; Chow, Dar-Chone; Palzkill, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    β-lactamase inhibitory protein (BLIP) binds and inhibits a diverse collection of class A β-lactamases with a wide range of affinities. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was previously performed to identify the amino acid sequence requirements of BLIP for binding the TEM-1, SME-1, SHV-1 and Bla1 β-lactamases. Twenty-three BLIP residues that contact TEM-1 β-lactamase in the structure of the complex were mutated to alanine and assayed for inhibition (Ki) of β-lactamase to identify two hotspots of binding energy. These studies have been extended by the development of a genetic screen for BLIP function in E. coli. The blaTEM-1 gene encoding TEM-1 β-lactamase was inserted into the E. coli pyrF chromosomal locus. Expression of wild-type BLIP from a plasmid in this strain resulted in a large decrease in ampicillin resistance while introduction of the same plasmid lacking BLIP had no effect on ampicillin resistance. In addition, it was found that when the BLIP alanine-scanning mutants were tested in the strain, the level of ampicillin resistance was proportional to the Ki of the BLIP mutant. These results indicate that BLIP function can be monitored by the level of ampicillin resistance of the genetic test strain. Each of the 23 BLIP positions examined by alanine-scanning was randomized to create libraries containing all possible substitutions at each position. The genetic screen for BLIP function was used to sort the libraries for active mutants and DNA sequence analysis of functional BLIP mutants identified the sequences required for binding TEM-1 β-lactamase. The results indicated the BLIP surface is tolerant of substitutions in that many contact positions can be substituted with other amino acid types and retain wild type levels of function. PMID:19389404

  4. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  5. Short hairpin RNA library-based functional screening identified ribosomal protein L31 that modulates prostate cancer cell growth via p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yojiro; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sato, Wataru; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Okamoto, Koji; Takeda, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor is a primary transcription factor involved in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Thus, hormone therapy using antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, is a first-line treatment for the disease. Although hormone therapy initially reduces the tumor burden, many patients eventually relapse, developing tumors with acquired endocrine resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying endocrine resistance is therefore a fundamental issue for the understanding and development of alternative therapeutics for advanced prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated functional screening to identify genes involved in bicalutamide-mediated effects on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Among such candidate genes selected by screening using volcano plot analysis, ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31) was found to be essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression in bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP (BicR) cells, based on small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown experiments. Of note, RPL31 mRNA is more abundantly expressed in BicR cells than in parental LNCaP cells, and clinical data from ONCOMINE and The Cancer Genome Altas showed that RPL31 is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas compared with benign prostate tissues. Intriguingly, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p53 and its targets, p21 and MDM2, were increased in LNCaP and BicR cells treated with RPL31 siRNA. We observed decreased degradation of p53 protein after RPL31 knockdown. Moreover, the suppression of growth and cell cycle upon RPL31 knockdown was partially recovered with p53 siRNA treatment. These results suggest that RPL31 is involved in bicalutamide-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells. The shRNA-mediated functional screen in this study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of advanced prostate cancer.

  6. A functional genome-wide genetic screening identifies new pathways controlling the G1/S transcriptional wave.

    PubMed

    Gaspa, Laura; González-Medina, Alberto; Hidalgo, Elena; Ayté, José

    2016-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe MBF complex activates the transcription of genes required for DNA synthesis and S phase. The MBF complex contains several proteins, including the core components Cdc10, Res1 and Res2, the co-repressor proteins Yox1 and Nrm1 and the co-activator Rep2. It has recently been shown how MBF is regulated when either the DNA damage or the DNA synthesis checkpoints are activated. However, how MBF is regulated in a normal unperturbed cell cycle is still not well understood. We have set up a genome-wide genomic screen searching for global regulators of MBF. We have crossed our knock-out collection library with a reporter strain that allows the measurement of MBF activity in live cells by flow cytometry. We confirm previously known regulators of MBF and show that COP9/signalosome and tRNA methyltransferases also regulate MBF activity.

  7. Lead expansion and virtual screening of Indinavir derivate HIV-1 protease inhibitors using pharmacophoric - shape similarity scoring function

    PubMed Central

    Shityakov, Sergey; Dandekar, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Indinavir (Crivaxan®) is a potent inhibitor of the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) protease. This enzyme has an important role in viral replication and is considered to be very attractive target for new antiretroviral drugs. However, it becomes less effective due to highly resistant new viral strains of HIV, which have multiple mutations in their proteases. For this reason, we used a lead expansion method to create a new set of compounds with a new mode of action to protease binding site. 1300 compounds chemically diverse from the initial hit were generated and screened to determine their ability to interact with protease and establish their QSAR properties. Further computational analyses revealed one unique compound with different protease binding ability from the initial hit and its role for possible new class of protease inhibitors is discussed in this report. PMID:20978602

  8. Formulation, High Throughput In Vitro Screening and In Vivo Functional Characterization of Nanoemulsion-Based Intranasal Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Pamela T.; Leroueil, Pascale R.; Smith, Douglas M.; Ciotti, Susan; Bielinska, Anna U.; Janczak, Katarzyna W.; Mullen, Catherine H.; Groom, Jeffrey V.; Taylor, Erin M.; Passmore, Crystal; Makidon, Paul E.; O’Konek, Jessica J.; Myc, Andrzej; Hamouda, Tarek; Baker, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants have been reported to induce both mucosal and systemic immunity when applied to mucosal surfaces and this dual response appears important for protection against certain pathogens. Despite the potential advantages, however, no mucosal adjuvants are currently approved for human use. Evaluating compounds as mucosal adjuvants is a slow and costly process due to the need for lengthy animal immunogenicity studies. We have constructed a library of 112 intranasal adjuvant candidate formulations consisting of oil-in-water nanoemulsions that contain various cationic and nonionic surfactants. To facilitate adjuvant development we first evaluated this library in a series of high-throughput, in vitro assays for activities associated with innate and adaptive immune activation in vivo. These in vitro assays screened for the ability of the adjuvant to bind to mucin, induce cytotoxicity, facilitate antigen uptake in epithelial and dendritic cells, and activate cellular pathways. We then sought to determine how these parameters related to adjuvant activity in vivo. While the in vitro assays alone were not enough to predict the in vivo adjuvant activity completely, several interesting relationships were found with immune responses in mice. Furthermore, by varying the physicochemical properties of the surfactant components (charge, surfactant polar head size and hydrophobicity) and the surfactant blend ratio of the formulations, the strength and type of the immune response generated (TH1, TH2, TH17) could be modulated. These findings suggest the possibility of using high-throughput screens to aid in the design of custom adjuvants with unique immunological profiles to match specific mucosal vaccine applications. PMID:25962136

  9. A Blind Spot? Screening for Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning in Admitted Psychiatric Patients: Prevalence and Associations with Coercive Measures

    PubMed Central

    Noorthoorn, Eric Onno; Nijman, Henk Llewellyn Inge; Naarding, Paul; Mulder, Cornelis Lambert

    2017-01-01

    Background Failure to detect psychiatric patients’ intellectual disabilities may lead to inappropriate treatment and greater use of coercive measures. Aims In this prospective dynamic cohort study we screened for intellectual disabilities in patients admitted to psychiatric wards, and investigated the use of coercive measures with these patients. Methods We used the Screener for Intelligence and Learning disabilities (SCIL) to screen patients admitted to two acute psychiatric wards, and assessed patient characteristics and coercive measures during their stay and over the last 5 years. Results Results on the SCIL suggested that 43.8% of the sample had Mild Intellectual Disability or Borderline Intellectual Functioning (MID/BIF). During their current stay and earlier stays in the previous 5 years, these patients had an increased risk of involuntary admission (OR 2.71; SD 1.28–5.70) and coercive measures (OR 3.95, SD 1.47–10.54). Conclusions This study suggests that functioning on the level of MID/BIF is very prevalent in admitted psychiatric patients and requires specific attention from mental health care staff. PMID:28151977

  10. A gain-of-function senescence bypass screen identifies the homeobox transcription factor DLX2 as a regulator of ATM–p53 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Xu, Qikai; Sack, Laura; Kang, Chanhee; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Senescence stimuli activate multiple tumor suppressor pathways to initiate cycle arrest and a differentiation program characteristic of senescent cells. We performed a two-stage, gain-of-function screen to select for the genes whose enhanced expression can bypass replicative senescence. We uncovered multiple genes known to be involved in p53 and Rb regulation and ATM regulation, two components of the CST (CTC1–STN1–TEN1) complex involved in preventing telomere erosion, and genes such as REST and FOXO4 that have been implicated in aging. Among the new genes now implicated in senescence, we identified DLX2, a homeobox transcription factor that has been shown to be required for tumor growth and metastasis and is associated with poor cancer prognosis. Growth analysis showed that DLX2 expression led to increased cellular replicative life span. Our data suggest that DLX2 expression reduces the protein components of the TTI1/TTI2/TEL2 complex, a key complex required for the proper folding and stabilization of ATM and other members of the PIKK (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase) family kinase, leading to reduced ATM–p53 signaling and senescence bypass. We also found that the overexpression of DLX2 exhibited a mutually exclusive relationship with p53 alterations in cancer patients. Our functional screen identified novel players that may promote tumorigenesis by regulating the ATM–p53 pathway and senescence. PMID:26833729

  11. Structural and electronic properties of UnOm (n=1-3,m=1-3n) clusters: A theoretical study using screened hybrid density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Ping

    2016-05-14

    The structural and electronic properties of small uranium oxide clusters UnOm (n=1-3, m=1-3n) are systematically studied within the screened hybrid density functional theory. It is found that the formation of U-O-U bondings and isolated U-O bonds are energetically more stable than U-U bondings. As a result, no uranium cores are observed. Through fragmentation studies, we find that the UnOm clusters with the m/n ratio between 2 and 2.5 are very stable, hinting that UO2+x hyperoxides are energetically stable. Electronically, we find that the O-2p states always distribute in the deep energy range, and the U-5f states always distribute at the two sides of the Fermi level. The U-6d states mainly hybridize with the U-5f states in U-rich clusters, while hybridizing with O-2p states in O-rich clusters. Our work is the first one on the screened hybrid density functional theory level studying the atomic and electronic properties of the actinide oxide clusters.

  12. Functionalized graphene quantum dots loaded with free radicals combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry to screen radical scavenging natural antioxidants from Licorice and Scutellariae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoying; Niu, XiuLi; Shi, Gaofeng; Chen, Xuefu; Yao, Ruixing; Chen, Fuwen

    2014-12-01

    A novel screening method was developed for the detection and identification of radical scavenging natural antioxidants based on a free radical reaction combined with liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Functionalized graphene quantum dots were prepared for loading free radicals in the complex screening system. The detection was performed with and without a preliminary exposure of the samples to specific free radicals on the functionalized graphene quantum dots, which can facilitate charge transfer between free radicals and antioxidants. The difference in chromatographic peak areas was used to identify potential antioxidants. This is a novel approach to simultaneously evaluate the antioxidant power of a component versus a free radical, and to identify it in a vegetal matrix. The structures of the antioxidants in the samples were identified using tandem mass spectrometry and comparison with standards. Fourteen compounds were found to possess potential antioxidant activity, and their free radical scavenging capacities were investigated. The order of scavenging capacity of 14 compounds was compared according to their free radical scavenging rate. 4',5,6,7-Tetrahydroxyflavone (radical scavenging rate: 0.05253 mL mg(-1) s(-1) ) showed the strongest capability for scavenging free radicals.

  13. In silico screening reveals structurally diverse, nanomolar inhibitors of NQO2 that are functionally active in cells and can modulate NFκB signalling

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Karen A.; Dunstan, Mark S.; Caraher, Mary C.; Scott, Katherine A.; Leys, David; Stratford, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    The NCI chemical database has been screened using in silico docking to identify novel nanomolar inhibitors of NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2). The inhibitors identified from the screen exhibit a diverse range of scaffolds and the structure of one of the inhibitors, NSC13000 co-crystalized with NQO2, has been solved. This has been used to aid the generation of a structure/activity relationship between the computationally derived binding affinity and experimentally measured enzyme inhibitory potency. Many of the compounds are functionally active as inhibitors of NQO2 in cells at non toxic concentrations. To demonstrate this, advantage was taken of the NQO2-mediated toxicity of the chemotherapeutic drug CB1954. The toxicity of this drug is substantially reduced when the function of NQO2 is inhibited and many of the compounds achieve this in cells at nanomolar concentrations. The NQO2 inhibitors also attenuated TNFα-mediated, NFκB-driven transcriptional activity. The link between NQO2 and the regulation of NFκB was confirmed by using siRNA to NQO2 and by the observation that NRH, the cofactor for NQO2 enzyme activity, could regulate NFκB activity in an NQO2 dependent manner. NFκB is a potential therapeutic target and this study reveals an underlying mechanism that may exploitable for developing new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:22090421

  14. Identification of Vitis vinifera (-)-alpha-terpineol synthase by in silico screening of full-length cDNA ESTs and functional characterization of recombinant terpene synthase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diane M; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-05-01

    The flavour and aroma of certain Vitis vinifera grape varieties is dominated by volatile terpenes and small volatile aldehydes. Monoterpenes contribute to the final grape and wine aroma and flavour in form of free volatiles and as glycoside conjugates of monoterpene alcohols. Typical monoterpenol components of the cultivar Gewürztraminer and other aroma-rich grape varieties are linalool, geraniol, nerol, citronellol, and alpha-terpineol. In a functional genomics effort to identify genes for the formation of monoterpene alcohols in V. vinifera, a database of full-length cDNA sequences was screened in silico and yielded two clones for putative monoterpene synthases. The gene products were functionally characterized by expression in Escherichia coli, in vitro enzyme assay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) product identification as multi-product (-)-alpha-terpineol synthases.

  15. Rodent model of activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Olaia; Fraga, Ángela; Pellón, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Emilio

    2014-04-10

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) consists of a procedure that involves the simultaneous exposure of animals to a restricted feeding schedule, while free access is allowed to an activity wheel. Under these conditions, animals show a progressive increase in wheel running, a reduced efficiency in food intake to compensate for their increased activity, and a severe progression of weight loss. Due to the parallelism with the clinical manifestations of anorexia nervosa including increased activity, reduced food intake and severe weight loss, the ABA procedure has been proposed as the best analog of human anorexia nervosa (AN). Thus, ABA research could both allow a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying AN and generate useful leads for treatment development in AN.

  16. A bacterial genetic screen identifies functional coding sequences of the insect mariner transposable element Famar1 amplified from the genome of the earwig, Forficula auricularia.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Elizabeth G; Witherspoon, David J; Lampe, David J

    2004-01-01

    Transposons of the mariner family are widespread in animal genomes and have apparently infected them by horizontal transfer. Most species carry only old defective copies of particular mariner transposons that have diverged greatly from their active horizontally transferred ancestor, while a few contain young, very similar, and active copies. We report here the use of a whole-genome screen in bacteria to isolate somewhat diverged Famar1 copies from the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, that encode functional transposases. Functional and nonfunctional coding sequences of Famar1 and nonfunctional copies of Ammar1 from the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, were sequenced to examine their molecular evolution. No selection for sequence conservation was detected in any clade of a tree derived from these sequences, not even on branches leading to functional copies. This agrees with the current model for mariner transposon evolution that expects neutral evolution within particular hosts, with selection for function occurring only upon horizontal transfer to a new host. Our results further suggest that mariners are not finely tuned genetic entities and that a greater amount of sequence diversification than had previously been appreciated can occur in functional copies in a single host lineage. Finally, this method of isolating active copies can be used to isolate other novel active transposons without resorting to reconstruction of ancestral sequences. PMID:15020471

  17. Drug screens based on the newly found role of dystroglycan proteolysis and restoration of dystroglycan function thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Muschler, John L.

    2010-02-23

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for the diagnosis and treatment of cells lacking normal growth arresting characteristic. The present invention demonstrates that many tumor cells lack normal cell surface .alpha.-dystroglycan and thereby lack dystroglycan function. Dystroglycan can be lost from the cell surface by proteolytic shedding of a fragment of .alpha.-dystroglycan into the surrounding medium. Upon restoration of dystroglycan function and over-expression of the dystroglycan gene, the once tumorigenic cells revert to non-tumorigenic cells which polarize and arrest cell growth in the presence of basement membrane proteins, demonstrating that dystroglycan functions as a tumor marker and suppressor.

  18. Functional screening for anti-CMV biologics identifies a broadly neutralizing epitope of an essential envelope protein

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Thomas J.; Stein, Kathryn R.; Duty, J. Andrew; Schwarz, Toni M.; Noriega, Vanessa M.; Kraus, Thomas; Moran, Thomas M.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The prototypic β-herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. The CMV envelope consists of various protein complexes that enable wide viral tropism. More specifically, the glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO (gH-trimer) is required for infection of all cell types, while the gH/gL/UL128/130/131a (gH-pentamer) complex imparts specificity in infecting epithelial, endothelial and myeloid cells. Here we utilize state-of-the-art robotics and a high-throughput neutralization assay to screen and identify monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting the gH glycoproteins that display broad-spectrum properties to inhibit virus infection and dissemination. Subsequent biochemical characterization reveals that the mAbs bind to gH-trimer and gH-pentamer complexes and identify the antibodies' epitope as an ‘antigenic hot spot' critical for virus entry. The mAbs inhibit CMV infection at a post-attachment step by interacting with a highly conserved central alpha helix-rich domain. The platform described here provides the framework for development of effective CMV biologics and vaccine design strategies. PMID:27966523

  19. Genome-wide gain-of-function screen for genes that induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Stevenson, Alexander J; Pinto, Cletus; Shah, Esha T; Daignault, Sheena M; Said, Nur Akmarina B M; Davis, Melissa; Haass, Nikolas K; Williams, Elizabeth D; Hollier, Brett G; Thompson, Erik W; Gabrielli, Brian; Gonda, Thomas J

    2016-09-20

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental program that has been implicated in progression, metastasis and therapeutic resistance of some carcinomas. To identify genes whose overexpression drives EMT, we screened a lentiviral expression library of 17000 human open reading frames (ORFs) using high-content imaging to quantitate cytoplasmic vimentin. Hits capable of increasing vimentin in the mammary carcinoma-derived cell line MDA-MB-468 were confirmed in the non-tumorigenic breast-epithelial cell line MCF10A. When overexpressed in this model, they increased the rate of cell invasion through Matrigel™, induced mesenchymal marker expression and reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. In gene-expression datasets derived from breast cancer patients, the expression of several novel genes correlated with expression of known EMT marker genes, indicating their in vivo relevance. As EMT-associated properties are thought to contribute in several ways to cancer progression, genes identified in this study may represent novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  20. A Phenotype-Driven ENU Mutagenesis Screen Identifies Novel Alleles With Functional Roles in Early Mouse Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Sandell, Lisa L.; Iulianella, Angelo; Melton, Kristin R.; Lynn, Megan; Walker, Macie; Inman, Kimberly E.; Bhatt, Shachi; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Crawford, Michelle; Jones, Natalie C.; Dennis, Jennifer F.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Proper craniofacial development begins during gastrulation and requires the coordinated integration of each germ layer tissue (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) and its derivatives in concert with the precise regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Neural crest cells, which are derived from ectoderm, are a migratory progenitor cell population that generates most of the cartilage, bone, and connective tissue of the head and face. Neural crest cell development is regulated by a combination of intrinsic cell autonomous signals acquired during their formation, balanced with extrinsic signals from tissues with which the neural crest cells interact during their migration and differentiation. Although craniofacial anomalies are typically attributed to defects in neural crest cell development, the cause may be intrinsic or extrinsic. Therefore, we performed a phenotype-driven ENU mutagenesis screen in mice with the aim of identifying novel alleles in an unbiased manner, that are critically required for early craniofacial development. Here we describe 10 new mutant lines, which exhibit phenotypes affecting frontonasal and pharyngeal arch patterning, neural and vascular development as well as sensory organ morphogenesis. Interestingly, our data imply that neural crest cells and endothelial cells may employ similar developmental programs and be interdependent during early embryogenesis, which collectively is critical for normal craniofacial morphogenesis. Furthermore our novel mutants that model human conditions such as exencephaly, craniorachischisis, DiGeorge, and Velocardiofacial sydnromes could be very useful in furthering our understanding of the complexities of specific human diseases. PMID:21305688

  1. Genome-wide gain-of-function screen for genes that induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Stevenson, Alexander J.; Pinto, Cletus; Shah, Esha T.; Daignault, Sheena M.; Said, Nur Akmarina B.M.; Davis, Melissa; Haass, Nikolas K.; Williams, Elizabeth D.; Hollier, Brett G.; Thompson, Erik W.; Gabrielli, Brian; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental program that has been implicated in progression, metastasis and therapeutic resistance of some carcinomas. To identify genes whose overexpression drives EMT, we screened a lentiviral expression library of 17000 human open reading frames (ORFs) using high-content imaging to quantitate cytoplasmic vimentin. Hits capable of increasing vimentin in the mammary carcinoma-derived cell line MDA-MB-468 were confirmed in the non-tumorigenic breast-epithelial cell line MCF10A. When overexpressed in this model, they increased the rate of cell invasion through Matrigel™, induced mesenchymal marker expression and reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. In gene-expression datasets derived from breast cancer patients, the expression of several novel genes correlated with expression of known EMT marker genes, indicating their in vivo relevance. As EMT-associated properties are thought to contribute in several ways to cancer progression, genes identified in this study may represent novel targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27876705

  2. Functional drug screening reveals anticonvulsants as enhancers of mTOR-independent autophagic killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis through inositol depletion.

    PubMed

    Schiebler, Mark; Brown, Karen; Hegyi, Krisztina; Newton, Sandra M; Renna, Maurizio; Hepburn, Lucy; Klapholz, Catherine; Coulter, Sarah; Obregón-Henao, Andres; Henao Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall; Kampmann, Beate; Henry, Katherine M; Burgon, Joseph; Renshaw, Stephen A; Fleming, Angeleen; Kay, Robert R; Anderson, Karen E; Hawkins, Phillip T; Ordway, Diane J; Rubinsztein, David C; Floto, Rodrigo Andres

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) remains a major challenge to global health made worse by the spread of multidrug resistance. We therefore examined whether stimulating intracellular killing of mycobacteria through pharmacological enhancement of macroautophagy might provide a novel therapeutic strategy. Despite the resistance of MTB to killing by basal autophagy, cell-based screening of FDA-approved drugs revealed two anticonvulsants, carbamazepine and valproic acid, that were able to stimulate autophagic killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis within primary human macrophages at concentrations achievable in humans. Using a zebrafish model, we show that carbamazepine can stimulate autophagy in vivo and enhance clearance of M. marinum, while in mice infected with a highly virulent multidrug-resistant MTB strain, carbamazepine treatment reduced bacterial burden, improved lung pathology and stimulated adaptive immunity. We show that carbamazepine induces antimicrobial autophagy through a novel, evolutionarily conserved, mTOR-independent pathway controlled by cellular depletion of myo-inositol. While strain-specific differences in susceptibility to in vivo carbamazepine treatment may exist, autophagy enhancement by repurposed drugs provides an easily implementable potential therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant mycobacterial infection.

  3. A functional RNAi screen links O-GlcNAc modification of ribosomal proteins to stress granule and processing body assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Takbum; Kedersha, Nancy; Hickman, Tyler; Tisdale, Sarah; Anderson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) and processing bodies (PBs) are microscopically visible ribonucleoprotein granules that cooperatively regulate the translation and decay of messenger RNA1–3. Using an RNA-mediated interference-based screen, we identify 101 human genes required for SG assembly, 39 genes required for PB assembly, and 31 genes required for coordinate SG and PB assembly. Although 51 genes encode proteins involved in mRNA translation, splicing and transcription, most are not obviously associated with RNA metabolism. We find that several components of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which reversibly modifies proteins with O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in response to stress, are required for SG and PB assembly. O-GlcNAc-modified proteins are prominent components of SGs but not PBs, and include RACK1 (receptor for activated C kinase 1), prohibitin-2, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and numerous ribosomal proteins. Our results suggest that O-GlcNAc modification of the translational machinery is required for aggregation of untranslated messenger ribonucleoproteins into SGs. The lack of enzymes of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway in budding yeast may contribute to differences between mammalian SGs and related yeast EGP (eIF4E, 4G and Pab1 containing) bodies. PMID:18794846

  4. A Sensitized Screen for Genes Promoting Invadopodia Function In Vivo: CDC-42 and Rab GDI-1 Direct Distinct Aspects of Invadopodia Formation.

    PubMed

    Lohmer, Lauren L; Clay, Matthew R; Naegeli, Kaleb M; Chi, Qiuyi; Ziel, Joshua W; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Park, Jieun E; Jayadev, Ranjay; Sherwood, David R

    2016-01-01

    Invadopodia are specialized membrane protrusions composed of F-actin, actin regulators, signaling proteins, and a dynamically trafficked invadopodial membrane that drive cell invasion through basement membrane (BM) barriers in development and cancer. Due to the challenges of studying invasion in vivo, mechanisms controlling invadopodia formation in their native environments remain poorly understood. We performed a sensitized genome-wide RNAi screen and identified 13 potential regulators of invadopodia during anchor cell (AC) invasion into the vulval epithelium in C. elegans. Confirming the specificity of this screen, we identified the Rho GTPase cdc-42, which mediates invadopodia formation in many cancer cell lines. Using live-cell imaging, we show that CDC-42 localizes to the AC-BM interface and is activated by an unidentified vulval signal(s) that induces invasion. CDC-42 is required for the invasive membrane localization of WSP-1 (N-WASP), a CDC-42 effector that promotes polymerization of F-actin. Loss of CDC-42 or WSP-1 resulted in fewer invadopodia and delayed BM breaching. We also characterized a novel invadopodia regulator, gdi-1 (Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor), which mediates membrane trafficking. We show that GDI-1 functions in the AC to promote invadopodia formation. In the absence of GDI-1, the specialized invadopodial membrane was no longer trafficked normally to the invasive membrane, and instead was distributed to plasma membrane throughout the cell. Surprisingly, the pro-invasive signal(s) from the vulval cells also controls GDI-1 activity and invadopodial membrane trafficking. These studies represent the first in vivo screen for genes regulating invadopodia and demonstrate that invadopodia formation requires the integration of distinct cellular processes that are coordinated by an extracellular cue.

  5. MicroRNA Library-Based Functional Screening Identified Androgen-Sensitive miR-216a as a Player in Bicalutamide Resistance in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Sato, Wataru; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Okamoto, Koji; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-10-21

    Prostate cancer is a major hormone-dependent tumor affecting men, and is often treated by hormone therapy at the primary stages. Despite its initial efficiency, the disease eventually acquires resistance, resulting in the recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Recent studies suggest that dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA) function is one of the mechanisms underlying hormone therapy resistance. Identification of critical miRNAs involved in endocrine resistance will therefore be important for developing therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed an miRNA library screening to identify anti-androgen bicalutamide resistance-related miRNAs in prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Cells were infected with a lentiviral miRNA library and subsequently maintained in media containing either bicalutamide or vehicle for a month. Microarray analysis determined the amounts of individual miRNA precursors and identified 2 retained miRNAs after one-month bicalutamide treatment. Of these, we further characterized miR-216a, because its function in prostate cancer remains unknown. miR-216a could be induced by dihydrotestosterone in LNCaP cells and ectopic expression of miR-216a inhibited bicalutamide-mediated growth suppression of LNCaP cells. Furthermore, a microarray dataset revealed that the expression levels of miR-216a were significantly higher in clinical prostate cancer than in benign samples. These results suggest that functional screening using an miRNA expression library could be useful for identifying novel miRNAs that contribute to bicalutamide resistance in prostate cancer.

  6. High-throughput FACS-based mutant screen identifies a gain-of-function allele of the Fusarium graminearum adenylyl cyclase causing deoxynivalenol over-production.

    PubMed

    Blum, Ailisa; Benfield, Aurélie H; Stiller, Jiri; Kazan, Kemal; Batley, Jacqueline; Gardiner, Donald M

    2016-05-01

    Fusarium head blight and crown rot, caused by the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum, impose a major threat to global wheat production. During the infection, plants are contaminated with mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON), which can be toxic for humans and animals. In addition, DON is a major virulence factor during wheat infection. However, it is not fully understood how DON production is regulated in F. graminearum. In order to identify regulators of DON production, a high-throughput mutant screen using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) of a mutagenised TRI5-GFP reporter strain was established and a mutant over-producing DON under repressive conditions identified. A gain-of-function mutation in the F. graminearum adenylyl cyclase (FAC1), which is a known positive regulator of DON production, was identified as the cause of this phenotype through genome sequencing and segregation analysis. Our results show that the high-throughput mutant screening procedure developed here can be applied for identification of fungal proteins involved in diverse processes.

  7. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    PubMed

    Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqueline K; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Michael R; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; Fertak, Lahcen El; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Edward; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Wattenhofer-Donze, Marie; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems.

  8. Kinome-wide functional screen identifies role of PLK1 in hormone-independent, ER-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhola, Neil E; Jansen, Valerie M; Bafna, Sangeeta; Giltnane, Jennifer M; Balko, Justin M; Estrada, Mónica V; Meszoely, Ingrid; Mayer, Ingrid; Abramson, Vandana; Ye, Fei; Sanders, Melinda; Dugger, Teresa C; Allen, Eliezer V; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-01-15

    Estrogen receptor (ER) α-positive breast cancers initially respond to antiestrogens but eventually become estrogen independent and recur. ER(+) breast cancer cells resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED) exhibit hormone-independent ER transcriptional activity and growth. A kinome-wide siRNA screen using a library targeting 720 kinases identified Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as one of the top genes whose downregulation resulted in inhibition of estrogen-independent ER transcriptional activity and growth of LTED cells. High PLK1 mRNA and protein correlated with a high Ki-67 score in primary ER(+) breast cancers after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PLK1 inhibited ER expression, estrogen-independent growth, and ER transcription in MCF7 and HCC1428 LTED cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of PLK1 with volasertib, a small-molecule ATP-competitive PLK1 inhibitor, decreased LTED cell growth, ER transcriptional activity, and ER expression. Volasertib in combination with the ER antagonist, fulvestrant, decreased MCF7 xenograft growth in ovariectomized mice more potently than each drug alone. JUNB, a component of the AP-1 complex, was expressed 16-fold higher in MCF7/LTED compared with parental MCF7 cells. Furthermore, JUNB and BCL2L1 (which encodes antiapoptotic BCL-xL) mRNA levels were markedly reduced upon volasertib treatment in MCF7/LTED cells, while they were increased in parental MCF7 cells. Finally, JUNB knockdown decreased ER expression and transcriptional activity in MCF7/LTED cells, suggesting that PLK1 drives ER expression and estrogen-independent growth via JUNB. These data support a critical role of PLK1 in acquired hormone-independent growth of ER(+) human breast cancer and is therefore a promising target in tumors that have escaped estrogen deprivation therapy.

  9. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics.

  10. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to

  11. Noise-driven diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots: Role of anisotropy, position-dependent effective mass and position-dependent dielectric screening function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Aindrila; Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-08-01

    We explore Diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. In view of this profiles of DMS have been pursued with variations of geometrical anisotropy and dopant location. We have invoked position-dependent effective mass (PDEM) and position-dependent dielectric screening function (PDDSF) of the system. Presence of noise sometimes suppresses and sometimes amplifies DMS from that of noise-free condition and the extent of suppression/amplification depends on mode of application of noise. It is important to mention that the said suppression/amplification exhibits subtle dependence on use of PDEM, PDDSF and geometrical anisotropy. The study reveals that DMS, or more fundamentally, the effective confinement of LDSS, can be tuned by appropriate mingling of geometrical anisotropy/effective mass/dielectric constant of the system with noise and also on the pathway of application of latter.

  12. A loss-of-function screen for phosphatases that regulate neurite outgrowth identifies PTPN12 as a negative regulator of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ambjørn, Malene; Dubreuil, Véronique; Miozzo, Federico; Nigon, Fabienne; Møller, Bente; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Berg, Jacob; Lees, Michael; Sap, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in function of the neurotrophin BDNF are associated with neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. BDNF promotes axonal outgrowth and branching, regulates dendritic tree morphology and is important for axonal regeneration after injury, responses that largely result from activation of its tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB. Although intracellular neurotrophin (NT) signaling presumably reflects the combined action of kinases and phosphatases, little is known about the contributions of the latter to TrkB regulation. The issue is complicated by the fact that phosphatases belong to multiple independently evolved families, which are rarely studied together. We undertook a loss-of-function RNA-interference-based screen of virtually all known (254) human phosphatases to understand their function in BDNF/TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. This approach identified phosphatases from diverse families, which either positively or negatively modulate BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth, and most of which have little or no previously established function related to NT signaling. "Classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) accounted for 13% of the candidate regulatory phosphatases. The top classical PTP identified as a negative regulator of BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth was PTPN12 (also called PTP-PEST). Validation and follow-up studies showed that endogenous PTPN12 antagonizes tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkB itself, and the downstream activation of ERK1/2. We also found PTPN12 to negatively regulate phosphorylation of p130cas and FAK, proteins with previously described functions related to cell motility and growth cone behavior. Our data provide the first comprehensive survey of phosphatase function in NT signaling and neurite outgrowth. They reveal the complexity of phosphatase control, with several evolutionarily unrelated phosphatase families cooperating to affect this biological response, and hence the

  13. Decline of Pulmonary Function Is Associated With the Presence of Rheumatoid Factor in Korean Health Screening Subjects Without Clinically Apparent Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jiwon; Song, Jae-Uk; Ahn, Joong Kyong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although higher-than-normal levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) are often observed in subjects without specific medical problems, little is known about the influence of RF on pulmonary function in health screening subjects. This study aimed to determine the association between the presence of RF and decreased pulmonary function in Korean health screening subjects without any history of joint disease or clinically apparent lung disease. A total of 115,641 study subjects (age range, 18–88 years) participated in the health checkup program. We excluded subjects who did not have pulmonary function test, as well as those with abnormal chest radiographs. Subjects with medical history of arthritis including rheumatoid arthritis, and lung disease based on the self-reported questionnaire. Final analysis was performed on 94,438 Koreans (41,261 women). RF-positive subjects had a lower forced vital capacity (FVC) predicted value and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) predicted value than RF-negative subjects (82.8 ± 11.5% vs 83.8 ± 11.4% for FVC% predicted and 83.5 ± 13.0% vs 85.1 ± 12.9% for FEV1% predicted, P < 0.001 for both). RF positivity was significantly associated with the decline of FEV1% predicted regardless of smoking history (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.289 [95% confidence interval [CI] 1.163–1.429], P < 0.001 for nonsmokers and adjusted OR = 1.138 [95% CI 1.004–1.289], P < 0.001 for smokers) while the decline of FVC% predicted only in nonsmokers (adjusted OR = 1.251 [95% CI 1.133–1.382], P < 0.001). Our results suggest that the presence of RF could impact pulmonary function in apparently healthy subjects. A follow-up study to investigate serial changes in pulmonary function may reveal the actual influence of raised RF titers. PMID:27175698

  14. Decline of Pulmonary Function Is Associated With the Presence of Rheumatoid Factor in Korean Health Screening Subjects Without Clinically Apparent Lung Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jiwon; Song, Jae-Uk; Ahn, Joong Kyong

    2016-05-01

    Although higher-than-normal levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) are often observed in subjects without specific medical problems, little is known about the influence of RF on pulmonary function in health screening subjects. This study aimed to determine the association between the presence of RF and decreased pulmonary function in Korean health screening subjects without any history of joint disease or clinically apparent lung disease.A total of 115,641 study subjects (age range, 18-88 years) participated in the health checkup program. We excluded subjects who did not have pulmonary function test, as well as those with abnormal chest radiographs. Subjects with medical history of arthritis including rheumatoid arthritis, and lung disease based on the self-reported questionnaire. Final analysis was performed on 94,438 Koreans (41,261 women).RF-positive subjects had a lower forced vital capacity (FVC) predicted value and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) predicted value than RF-negative subjects (82.8 ± 11.5% vs 83.8 ± 11.4% for FVC% predicted and 83.5 ± 13.0% vs 85.1 ± 12.9% for FEV1% predicted, P < 0.001 for both). RF positivity was significantly associated with the decline of FEV1% predicted regardless of smoking history (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.289 [95% confidence interval [CI] 1.163-1.429], P < 0.001 for nonsmokers and adjusted OR = 1.138 [95% CI 1.004-1.289], P < 0.001 for smokers) while the decline of FVC% predicted only in nonsmokers (adjusted OR = 1.251 [95% CI 1.133-1.382], P < 0.001). Our results suggest that the presence of RF could impact pulmonary function in apparently healthy subjects. A follow-up study to investigate serial changes in pulmonary function may reveal the actual influence of raised RF titers.

  15. Functional RNAi screen targeting cytokine and growth factor receptors reveals oncorequisite role for interleukin-2 gamma receptor in JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; MacKenzie, R J; Eide, C A; Davare, M A; Watanabe-Smith, K; Tognon, C E; Mongoue-Tchokote, S; Park, B; Braziel, R M; Tyner, J W; Druker, B J

    2015-06-04

    To understand the role of cytokine and growth factor receptor-mediated signaling in leukemia pathogenesis, we designed a functional RNA interference (RNAi) screen targeting 188 cytokine and growth factor receptors that we found highly expressed in primary leukemia specimens. Using this screen, we identified interleukin-2 gamma receptor (IL2Rγ) as a critical growth determinant for a JAK3(A572V) mutation-positive acute myeloid leukemia cell line. We observed that knockdown of IL2Rγ abrogates phosphorylation of JAK3 and downstream signaling molecules, JAK1, STAT5, MAPK and pS6 ribosomal protein. Overexpression of IL2Rγ in murine cells increased the transforming potential of activating JAK3 mutations, whereas absence of IL2Rγ completely abrogated the clonogenic potential of JAK3(A572V), as well as the transforming potential of additional JAK3-activating mutations such as JAK3(M511I). In addition, mutation at the IL2Rγ interaction site in the FERM domain of JAK3 (Y100C) completely abrogated JAK3-mediated leukemic transformation. Mechanistically, we found IL2Rγ contributes to constitutive JAK3 mutant signaling by increasing JAK3 expression and phosphorylation. Conversely, we found that mutant, but not wild-type JAK3, increased the expression of IL2Rγ, indicating IL2Rγ and JAK3 contribute to constitutive JAK/STAT signaling through their reciprocal regulation. Overall, we demonstrate a novel role for IL2Rγ in potentiating oncogenesis in the setting of JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia. In addition, our study highlights an RNAi-based functional assay that can be used to facilitate the identification of non-kinase cytokine and growth factor receptor targets for inhibiting leukemic cell growth.

  16. Prevalence of disability in a composite ≥75 year-old population in Spain: A screening survey based on the International Classification of Functioning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence and predictors of functional status and disability of elderly people have been studied in several European countries including Spain. However, there has been no population-based study incorporating the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework as the basis for assessing disability. The present study reports prevalence rates for mild, moderate, and severe/extreme disability by the domains of activities and participation of the ICF. Methods Nine populations surveyed in previous prevalence studies contributed probabilistic and geographically defined samples in June 2005. The study sample was composed of 503 subjects aged ≥75 years. We implemented a two-phase screening design using the MMSE and the World Health Organization-Disability Assessment Schedule 2nd edition (WHO-DAS II, 12 items) as cognitive and disability screening tools, respectively. Participants scoring within the positive range of the disability screening were administered the full WHO-DAS II (36 items; score range: 0-100) assessing the following areas: Understanding and communication, Getting along with people, Life activities, Getting around, Participation in society, and Self-care. Each disability area assessed by WHO-DAS II (36 items) was reported according to the ICF severity ranges (No problem, 0-4; Mild disability, 5-24; Moderate disability, 25-49; Severe/Extreme disability, 50-100). Results The age-adjusted disability prevalence figures were: 39.17 ± 2.18%, 15.31 ± 1.61%, and 10.14 ± 1.35% for mild, moderate, and severe/extreme disability, respectively. Severe and extreme disability prevalence in mobility and life activities was three times higher than the average, and highest among women. Sex variations were minimal, although life activities for women of 85 years and over had more severe/extreme disability as compared to men (OR = 5.15 95% CI 3.19-8.32). Conclusions Disability is highly prevalent among the Spanish elderly

  17. Including screening in van der Waals corrected density functional theory calculations: The case of atoms and small molecules physisorbed on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi; Ambrosetti, Alberto

    2014-03-28

    The Density Functional Theory (DFT)/van der Waals-Quantum Harmonic Oscillator-Wannier function (vdW-QHO-WF) method, recently developed to include the vdW interactions in approximated DFT by combining the quantum harmonic oscillator model with the maximally localized Wannier function technique, is applied to the cases of atoms and small molecules (X=Ar, CO, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O) weakly interacting with benzene and with the ideal planar graphene surface. Comparison is also presented with the results obtained by other DFT vdW-corrected schemes, including PBE+D, vdW-DF, vdW-DF2, rVV10, and by the simpler Local Density Approximation (LDA) and semilocal generalized gradient approximation approaches. While for the X-benzene systems all the considered vdW-corrected schemes perform reasonably well, it turns out that an accurate description of the X-graphene interaction requires a proper treatment of many-body contributions and of short-range screening effects, as demonstrated by adopting an improved version of the DFT/vdW-QHO-WF method. We also comment on the widespread attitude of relying on LDA to get a rough description of weakly interacting systems.

  18. Loss-of-function screening to identify miRNAs involved in senescence: tumor suppressor activity of miRNA-335 and its new target CARF

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Gao, Ran; Kaul, Zeenia; Li, Ling; Kato, Yoshio; Zhang, Zhenya; Groden, Joanna; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Significance of microRNAs (miRs), small non-coding molecules, has been implicated in a variety of biological processes. Here, we recruited retroviral insertional mutagenesis to obtain induction of an arbitrary noncoding RNAs, and coupled it with a cell based loss-of-function (5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5Aza-dC)-induced senescence bypass) screening system. Cells that escaped 5-Aza-dC-induced senescence were subjected to miR-microarray analysis with respect to the untreated control. We identified miR-335 as one of the upregulated miRs. In order to characterize the functional significance, we overexpressed miR-335 in human cancer cells and found that it caused growth suppression. We demonstrate that the latter accounted for inhibition of 5-Aza-dC incorporation into the cell genome, enabling them to escape from induction of senescence. We also report that CARF (Collaborator of ARF) is a new target of miR-335 that regulates its growth suppressor function by complex crosstalk with other proteins including p16INK4A, pRB, HDM2 and p21WAF1. PMID:27457128

  19. Time-driven activity-based costing.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Anderson, Steven R

    2004-11-01

    In the classroom, activity-based costing (ABC) looks like a great way to manage a company's limited resources. But executives who have tried to implement ABC in their organizations on any significant scale have often abandoned the attempt in the face of rising costs and employee irritation. They should try again, because a new approach sidesteps the difficulties associated with large-scale ABC implementation. In the revised model, managers estimate the resource demands imposed by each transaction, product, or customer, rather than relying on time-consuming and costly employee surveys. This method is simpler since it requires, for each group of resources, estimates of only two parameters: how much it costs per time unit to supply resources to the business's activities (the total overhead expenditure of a department divided by the total number of minutes of employee time available) and how much time it takes to carry out one unit of each kind of activity (as estimated or observed by the manager). This approach also overcomes a serious technical problem associated with employee surveys: the fact that, when asked to estimate time spent on activities, employees invariably report percentages that add up to 100. Under the new system, managers take into account time that is idle or unused. Armed with the data, managers then construct time equations, a new feature that enables the model to reflect the complexity of real-world operations by showing how specific order, customer, and activity characteristics cause processing times to vary. This Tool Kit uses concrete examples to demonstrate how managers can obtain meaningful cost and profitability information, quickly and inexpensively. Rather than endlessly updating and maintaining ABC data,they can now spend their time addressing the deficiencies the model reveals: inefficient processes, unprofitable products and customers, and excess capacity.

  20. Quadruple screen test

    MedlinePlus

    Quad screen; Multiple marker screening; AFP plus; Triple screen test; AFP maternal; MSAFP; 4-marker screen; Down syndrome - quadruple; Trisomy 21 - quadruple; Turner syndrome - quadruple; Spina bifida - ...

  1. MRSA Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising ... aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture All content on Lab Tests Online has been ...

  2. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  3. Developmental Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Learn More about Your Child’s Development: Developmental Monitoring and Screening Taking a first step, waving “bye-bye,” and pointing to something interesting are all developmental milestones, ...

  4. Get Screened

    MedlinePlus

    ... health. Depending on your age, sex, and medical history, you may need to be screened for things like: Certain types of cancer High blood pressure or high cholesterol Diabetes Osteoporosis (weak bones) ...

  5. An in silico functional annotation and screening of potential drug targets derived from Leishmania spp. hypothetical proteins identified by immunoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Schneider, Mônica S; Lage, Daniela P; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2017-05-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan of the Leishmania genus. While no human vaccine is available, drugs such as pentavalent antimonials, pentamidine and amphotericin B are used for treat the patients. However, the high toxicity of these pharmaceutics, the emergence of parasite resistance and/or their high cost have showed to the urgent need of identify new targets to be employed in the improvement of the treatment against leishmaniasis. In a recent immunoproteomics approach performed in the Leishmania infantum species, 104 antigenic proteins were recognized by antibodies in sera of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) dogs. Some of them were later showed to be effective diagnostic markers and/or vaccine candidates against the disease. Between these proteins, 24 considered as hypothetical were identified in the promastigote and amastigote-like extracts of the parasites. The present study aimed to use bioinformatics tools to select new drug targets between these hypothetical proteins. Their cellular localization was predicted to be seven membrane proteins, as well as eight cytoplasmic, three nuclear, one mitochondrial and five proteins remained unclassified. Their functions were predicted as being two transport proteins, as well as five with metabolic activity, three as cell signaling and fourteen proteins remained unclassified. Ten hypothetical proteins were well-annotated and compared to their homology regarding to human proteins. Two proteins, a calpain-like and clavaminate synthase-like proteins were selected by using Docking analysis as being possible drug targets. In this sense, the present study showed the employ of new strategies to select possible drug candidates, according their localization and biological function in Leishmania parasites, aiming to treat against VL.

  6. [HCC screening].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, T

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed tumour diseases throughout the world. In the vast majority of cases those affected are high-risk patients with chronic viral hepatitis and/or liver cirrhosis, which means there is a clearly identifiable target group for HCC screening. With resection, transplantation, and interventional procedures for local ablation, following early diagnosis curative treatment options are available with which 5-year survival rates of over 60% can be reached. Such early diagnosis is a reality only in a minority of patients, however, and in the majority of cases the disease is already in an advanced stage at diagnosis. One of the objects of HCC screening is diagnosis in an early stage when curative treatment is still possible. Precisely this is achieved by screening, so that the proportion of patients treated with curative intent is decisively higher. There is not yet any clear evidence as to whether this leads to a lowering of the mortality of HCC. As lower mortality is the decisive indicator of success for a screening programme the benefit of HCC screening has so far been neither documented nor refuted. Nonetheless, in large regions of the world it is the practice for high-risk patients to undergo HCC screening in the form of twice-yearly ultrasound examination and determination of AFP.

  7. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; Gearheart, Christy M; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C; Edgerton, Susan M; Lucia, M Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D; Porter, Christopher C; Lambert, James R

    2016-03-29

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells.

  8. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gari, Hamid H.; Gearheart, Christy M.; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D.; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C.; Edgerton, Susan M.; Lucia, M. Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D.; Porter, Christopher C.; Lambert, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells. PMID:26909599

  9. Complete blood counts, liver function tests, and chest x-rays as routine screening in early-stage breast cancer: value added or just cost?

    PubMed

    Louie, Raphael J; Tonneson, Jennifer E; Gowarty, Minda; Goodney, Philip P; Barth, Richard J; Rosenkranz, Kari M

    2015-11-01

    Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for breast cancer staging include pre-treatment complete blood count (CBC) and liver function tests (LFT) to screen for occult metastatic disease. To date, the relevance of these tests in detecting metastatic disease in asymptomatic women with early-stage breast cancer (Stage I/II) has not been demonstrated. Although chest x-rays are no longer recommended in the NCCN guidelines, many centers continue to include this imaging as part of their screening process. We aim to determine the clinical and financial impact of these labs and x-rays in the evaluation of early-stage breast cancer patients. A single institution IRB-approved retrospective chart review was conducted of patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer treated from January 1, 2005–December 31, 2009. We collected patient demographics, clinical and pathologic staging, chest x-ray, CBC, and LFT results at the time of referral. Patients were stratified according to radiographic stage at the time of diagnosis. We obtained Medicare reimbursement fees for cost analysis. From 2005 to 2009, 1609 patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were treated at our institution. Of the 1082 patients with radiographic stage I/II disease, 27.3 % of patients had abnormal CBCs. No additional testing was performed to evaluate these abnormalities. In the early-stage population, 24.7 % of patients had elevated LFTs, resulting in 84 additional imaging studies. No metastatic disease was detected. The cost of CBC, LFTs and chest x-rays was $110.20 per patient, totaling $106,410.99. Additional tests prompted by abnormal results cost $58,143.30 over the five-year period. We found that pre-treatment CBCs, LFTs, and chest x-rays did not improve detection of occult metastatic disease but resulted in additional financial costs. Avoiding routine ordering of these tests would save the US healthcare system $25.7 million annually.

  10. Screening and Functional Analysis of the Peroxiredoxin Specifically Expressed in Bursaphelenchus xylophilus—The Causative Agent of Pine Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Han-Yu; Ren, Jia-Hong; Huang, Lin; Li, Hao; Ye, Jian-Ren

    2014-01-01

    The pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is the causal agent of pine wilt disease. Accurately differentiating B. xylophilus from other nematodes species, especially its related species B. mucronatus, is important for pine wood nematode detection. Thus, we attempted to identify a specific protein in the pine wood nematode using proteomics technology. Here, we compared the proteomes of B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus using Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) technologies. In total, 15 highly expressed proteins were identified in B. xylophilus compared with B. mucronatus. Subsequently, the specificity of the proteins identified was confirmed by PCR using the genomic DNA of other nematode species. Finally, a gene encoding a specific protein (Bx-Prx) was obtained. This gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The in situ hybridisation pattern of Bx-Prx showed that it was expressed strongly in the tail of B. xylophilus. RNAi was used to assess the function of Bx-Prx, the results indicated that the gene was associated with the reproduction and pathogenicity of B. xylophilus. This discovery provides fundamental information for identifying B. xylophilus via a molecular approach. Moreover, the purified recombinant protein has potential as a candidate diagnostic antigen of pine wilt disease, which may lead to a new immunological detection method for the pine wood nematode. PMID:24918285

  11. Metabolic flux screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae single knockout strains on glucose and galactose supports elucidation of gene function.

    PubMed

    Velagapudi, Vidya R; Wittmann, Christoph; Schneider, Konstantin; Heinzle, Elmar

    2007-12-01

    New methods for an extended physiological characterization of yeast at a microtiter plate scale were applied to 27 deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated on glucose and galactose as sole carbon sources. In this way, specific growth rates, specific rates of glucose consumption and ethanol production were determined. Flux distribution, particularly concerning branching into the pentose phosphate pathway was determined using a new (13)C-labelling method using MALDI-ToF-mass spectrometry. On glucose, the growth was predominantly fermentative whereas on galactose respiration was more active with correspondingly lower ethanol production. Some deletion strains showed unexpected behavior providing very informative data about the function of the corresponding gene. Deletion of malic enzyme gene, MAE1, did not show any significant phenotype when grown on glucose but a drastically increased branching from glucose 6-phosphate into the pentose phosphate pathway when grown on galactose. This allows the conclusion that MAE1 is important for the supply of NADPH during aerobic growth on galactose.

  12. Screens for Extragenic Mutations That Fail to Complement Act1 Alleles Identify Genes That Are Important for Actin Function in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Welch, M. D.; Vinh, DBN.; Okamura, H. H.; Drubin, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Null mutations in SAC6 and ABP1, genes that encode actin-binding proteins, failed to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype caused by a mutation in the ACT1 gene. To identify novel genes whose protein products interact with actin, mutations that fail to complement act1-1 or act1-4, two temperature-sensitive alleles of ACT1, were isolated. A total of 14 extragenic noncomplementing mutations and 12 new alleles of ACT1 were identified in two independent screens. The 14 extragenic noncomplementing mutations represent alleles of at least four different genes, ANC1, ANC2, ANC3 and ANC4 (Actin NonComplementing). Mutations in the ANC1 gene were shown to cause osmosensitivity and defects in actin organization; phenotypes that are similar to those caused by act1 mutations. We conclude that the ANC1 gene product plays an important role in actin cytoskeletal function. The 12 new alleles of ACT1 will be useful for further elucidation of the functions of actin in yeast. PMID:8243992

  13. Intrinsic point defects in CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 as seen via screened-exchange hybrid density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Johan; Albe, Karsten

    2013-06-01

    A fully self-contained study of the thermodynamic and electronic properties of intrinsic point defects in the solar absorber materials CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 based on screened-exchange hybrid density functional theory is presented. The results are partly at odds with data obtained within local density functional theory in former studies. GaCu electron traps as well as CuIn and CuGa hole traps are found to be the dominant intrinsic recombination centers. In contrast to the accepted view, complex formation of antisites with copper vacancies is not decisive for explaining the favorable properties of CuInSe2, since InCu is already a shallow defect by itself. The localization of holes is observed on CuIn and CuGa as well as on VIn and VGa when supercells of 216 atoms are used. Furthermore, the results raise doubts about the relevance of selenium vacancies and DX centers for experimentally observed metastabilities. Finally, a guide to the optimal preparation conditions in terms of the point defect physics of CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 for their application as solar cell absorbers is provided.

  14. Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanowires functionalized by organic sensitizers for solar cells: A screened Coulomb hybrid density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Ünal, Hatice; Mete, Ersen; Gunceler, Deniz; Gülseren, Oğuz; Ellialtioğlu, Şinasi

    2015-11-21

    The adsorption of two different organic molecules cyanidin glucoside (C{sub 21}O{sub 11}H{sub 20}) and TA-St-CA on anatase (101) and (001) nanowires has been investigated using the standard and the range separated hybrid density functional theory calculations. The electronic structures and optical spectra of resulting dye–nanowire combined systems show distinct features for these types of photochromophores. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the natural dye cyanidin glucoside is located below the conduction band of the semiconductor while, in the case of TA-St-CA, it resonates with the states inside the conduction band. The wide-bandgap anatase nanowires can be functionalized for solar cells through electron-hole generation and subsequent charge injection by these dye sensitizers. The intermolecular charge transfer character of Donor-π-Acceptor type dye TA-St-CA is substantially modified by its adsorption on TiO{sub 2} surfaces. Cyanidin glucoside exhibits relatively stronger anchoring on the nanowires through its hydroxyl groups. The atomic structures of dye–nanowire systems re-optimized with the inclusion of nonlinear solvation effects showed that the binding strengths of both dyes remain moderate even in ionic solutions.

  15. HAD hydrolase function unveiled by substrate screening: enzymatic characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana subclass I phosphosugar phosphatase AtSgpp.

    PubMed

    Caparrós-Martín, José A; McCarthy-Suárez, Iva; Culiáñez-Macià, Francisco A

    2013-04-01

    This work presents the isolation and the biochemical characterization of the Arabidopsis thaliana gene AtSgpp. This gene shows homology with the Arabidopsis low molecular weight phosphatases AtGpp1 and AtGpp2 and the yeast counterpart GPP1 and GPP2, which have a high specificity for DL-glycerol-3-phosphate. In addition, it exhibits homology with DOG1 and DOG2 that dephosphorylate 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate. Using a comparative genomic approach, we identified the AtSgpp gene as a conceptual translated haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase HAD protein. AtSgpp (locus tag At2g38740), encodes a protein with a predicted Mw of 26.7 kDa and a pI of 4.6. Its sequence motifs and expected structure revealed that AtSgpp belongs to the HAD hydrolases subfamily I, with the C1-type cap domain. In the presence of Mg(2+) ions, the enzyme has a phosphatase activity over a wide range of phosphosugars substrates (pH optima at 7.0 and K m in the range of 3.6-7.7 mM). AtSgpp promiscuity is preferentially detectable on D-ribose-5-phosphate, 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate, 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate, D-mannose-6-phosphate, D-fructose-1-phosphate, D-glucose-6-phosphate, DL-glycerol-3-phosphate, and D-fructose-6-phosphate, as substrates. AtSgpp is ubiquitously expressed throughout development in most plant organs, mainly in sepal and guard cell. Interestingly, expression is affected by abiotic and biotic stresses, being the greatest under Pi starvation and cyclopentenone oxylipins induction. Based on both, substrate lax specificity and gene expression, the physiological function of AtSgpp in housekeeping detoxification, modulation of sugar-phosphate balance and Pi homeostasis, is provisionally assigned.

  16. Loading of free radicals on the functional graphene combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry screening method for the detection of radical-scavenging natural antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoying; Shi, Gaofeng; Chen, Xuefu; Chen, Fuwen; Yao, Ruixing; Wang, Zhenju

    2013-11-13

    A novel free radical reaction combined with liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (FRR-LC-PDA-ESI/APCI-MS/MS) screening method was developed for the detection and identification of radical-scavenging natural antioxidants. Functionalized graphene was prepared by chemical method for loading free radicals (superoxide radical, peroxyl radical and PAHs free radical). Separation was performed with and without a preliminary exposure of the sample to specific free radicals on the functionalized graphene, which can facilitate reaction kinetics (charge transfers) between free radicals and potential antioxidants. The difference in chromatographic peak areas is used to identify potential antioxidants. The structure of the antioxidants in one sample (Swertia chirayita) is identified using MS/MS and comparison with standards. Thirteen compounds were found to possess potential antioxidant activity, and their free radical-scavenging capacities were investigated. The thirteen compounds were identified as 1,3,5-trihydroxyxanthone-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PD1), norswertianin (PD2), 1,3,5,8-tetrahydroxyxanthone (PD3), 3, 3', 4', 5, 8-penta hydroxyflavone-6-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid-6'-pentopyranose-7-O-glucopyranoside (PD4), 1,5,8-trihydroxy-3-methoxyxanthone (PD5), swertiamarin (PS1), 2-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1,3,7-trihydroxylxanthone (PS2), 1,3,7-trihydroxylxanthone-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PL1), 1,3,8-trihydroxyl xanthone-5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PL2), 1,3,7-trihydroxy-8-methoxyxanthone (PL3), 1,2,3-trihydroxy-7,8-dimethoxyxanthone (PL4), 1,8-dihydroxy-2,6-dimethoxy xanthone (PL5) and 1,3,5,8-tetramethoxydecussatin (PL6). The reactivity and SC50 values of those compounds were investigated, respectively. PD4 showed the strongest capability for scavenging PAHs free radical; PL4 showed prominent scavenging capacities in the lipid peroxidation processes; it was found that all components in S. chirayita exhibited weak reactivity in the superoxide

  17. Health status and lung function in the Swedish alpha 1-antitrypsin deficient cohort, identified by neonatal screening, at the age of 37–40 years

    PubMed Central

    Piitulainen, Eeva; Mostafavi, Behrouz; Tanash, Hanan A

    2017-01-01

    Background Severe alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (genotype PiZZ) is a well-known risk factor for COPD. A cohort of PiZZ and PiSZ individuals was identified by the Swedish national neonatal AAT screening program in 1972–1974 and followed up regularly since birth. Our aim was to study the lung function, respiratory symptoms and health status at the age of 38 years in comparison with a random sample of control subjects selected from the population registry. Methods The study group included 120 PiZZ, 46 PiSZ and 164 control subjects (PiMM), who answered a questionnaire on smoking habits and symptoms and the Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) on quality of life. A total of 89 PiZZ, 33 PiSZ and 92 PiMM subjects underwent spirometry. Results Four percent of the PiZZ, 2% of the PiSZ and 12% of the control subjects were current smokers (P=0.008), and 17% of the PiZZ, 9% of the PiSZ and 21% of the control subjects had stopped smoking. The PiZZ current smokers had a significantly higher (ie, poorer) median activity score according to the SGRQ than the PiZZ never-smokers (P=0.032). The PiMM current smokers had significantly higher activity score (P<0.001), symptom score (P<0.001), and total score (P=0.001) according to the SGRQ than the PiMM never-smokers. The PiZZ current smokers had a significantly lower postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)% of predicted value (P=0.019) and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio (P=0.032) than the PiZZ never-smokers. The proportion of subjects with a FEV1/FVC ratio of <0.70, indicating COPD, was significantly higher in the PiZZ current smokers than in the PiZZ never-smokers (P=0.001). Among the PiSZ and PiMM subjects, the differences in lung function between the smoking subgroups were insignificant. Conclusion PiZZ current smokers were found to have signs of COPD before 40 years of age. Smoking is less common among the AAT-deficient subjects identified by neonatal screening than among their peers

  18. XPS and NRA investigations during the fabrication of gold nanostructured functionalized screen-printed sensors for the detection of metallic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmin, Jean-Philippe; Miserque, Frédéric; Dumas, Eddy; Vickridge, Ian; Ganem, Jean-Jacques; Cannizzo, Caroline; Chaussé, Annie

    2017-03-01

    An all covalent nanostructured lead sensor was built by the successive grafting of gold nanoparticles and carboxylic ligands at the surface of self-adhesive carbon screen-printed electrodes (SPEs). Surface analysis techniques were used in each step in order to investigate the structuration of this sensor. The self-adhesive surfaces were made from the electrochemical grafting of p-phenylenediamine at the surface of the SPEs via diazonium salts chemistry. The quantity of grafted aniline functions, estimated by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) performed with p-phenylenediamine labelled with 15N isotope, is in agreement with an almost complete coverage of the electrode surface. The subsequent diazotization of the aniline functions at the surface of the SPEs was performed; X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) allowed us to consider a quantitative conversion of the aniline functions into diazonium moieties. The spontaneous grafting of gold nanoparticles on the as-obtained reactive surfaces ensures the nanostructuration of the material, and XPS studies showed that the covalent bonding of the gold nanoparticles at the surface of the SPEs induces a change both in the Au-4f (gold nanoparticles) and Cl-2p (carbon ink) core level signals. These unusual observations are explained by an interaction between the carbon ink constituting the substrate and the gold nanoparticles. Heavy and toxic metals are considered of major environmental concern because of their non-biodegradability. In a final step, the grafting of the carboxylic ligands at the surface of the SPEs and an accumulation step in the presence of lead(II) cations allowed us to evidence the interest of nanostructured materials as metallic pollutants sensors.

  19. Physics in Screening Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Certik, Ondrej

    In the current study, we investigated atoms in screening environments like plasmas. It is common practice to extract physical data, such as temperature and electron densities, from plasma experiments. We present results that address inherent computational difficulties that arise when the screening approach is extended to include the interaction between the atomic electrons. We show that there may arise an ambiguity in the interpretation of physical properties, such as temperature and charge density, from experimental data due to the opposing effects of electron-nucleus screening and electron-electron screening. The focus of the work, however, is on the resolution of inherent computational challenges that appear in the computation of two-particle matrix elements. Those enter already at the Hartree-Fock level. Furthermore, as examples of post Hartree-Fock calculations, we show second-order Green's function results and many body perturbation theory results of second order. A self-contained derivation of all necessary equations has been included. The accuracy of the implementation of the method is established by comparing standard unscreened results for various atoms and molecules against literature for Hartree-Fock as well as Green's function and many body perturbation theory. The main results of the thesis are presented in the chapter called Screened Results, where the behavior of several atomic systems depending on electron-electron and electron-nucleus Debye screening was studied. The computer code that we have developed has been made available for anybody to use. Finally, we present and discuss results obtained for screened interactions. We also examine thoroughly the computational details of the calculations and particular implementations of the method.

  20. Asymptotic screened hydrogenic radial integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsgaard, D. A.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    The usefulness of the screened hydrogenic model for the transitions of the helium sequence is studied. The screened hydrogenic radial dipole integral for discrete-discrete transitions from the initial state to the final state is asymptotically expanded to the lowest order such that the final quantum number n approaches infinity. The analytical expression obtained is in terms of confluent hypergeometric functions.

  1. ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: PREPUBERTAL EXPOSURES AND EFFECTS ON SEXUAL MATURATION AND THYROID FUNCTION IN THE MALE RAT. A FOCUS ON THE EDSTAC RECOMMENDATIONS. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTER SCREENING AND TESTING ADVISORY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals: prepubertal exposures and effects on sexual maturation and thyroid function in the male rat. A focus on the EDSTAC recommendations. Endocrine Disrupter Screening and Testing Advisory Committee.

    Stoker TE, Parks LG, Gray LE, Cooper RL.

  2. A Simple Screening Approach To Prioritize Genes for Functional Analysis Identifies a Role for Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 in the Control of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Kaforou, Myrsini; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Ivanova, Maria; Huntley, Derek; Dorner, Marcus; Wright, Victoria J.; Levin, Michael; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Herberg, Jethro A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Greater understanding of the functions of host gene products in response to infection is required. While many of these genes enable pathogen clearance, some enhance pathogen growth or contribute to disease symptoms. Many studies have profiled transcriptomic and proteomic responses to infection, generating large data sets, but selecting targets for further study is challenging. Here we propose a novel data-mining approach combining multiple heterogeneous data sets to prioritize genes for further study by using respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection as a model pathogen with a significant health care impact. The assumption was that the more frequently a gene is detected across multiple studies, the more important its role is. A literature search was performed to find data sets of genes and proteins that change after RSV infection. The data sets were standardized, collated into a single database, and then panned to determine which genes occurred in multiple data sets, generating a candidate gene list. This candidate gene list was validated by using both a clinical cohort and in vitro screening. We identified several genes that were frequently expressed following RSV infection with no assigned function in RSV control, including IFI27, IFIT3, IFI44L, GBP1, OAS3, IFI44, and IRF7. Drilling down into the function of these genes, we demonstrate a role in disease for the gene for interferon regulatory factor 7, which was highly ranked on the list, but not for IRF1, which was not. Thus, we have developed and validated an approach for collating published data sets into a manageable list of candidates, identifying novel targets for future analysis. IMPORTANCE Making the most of “big data” is one of the core challenges of current biology. There is a large array of heterogeneous data sets of host gene responses to infection, but these data sets do not inform us about gene function and require specialized skill sets and training for their utilization. Here we

  3. Flow through very porous screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.; Muramoto, K. K.

    1985-01-01

    Flow through and around screens with small resistance coefficient were analyzed. Both steady and oscillatory flows are considered, however, the case of a screen normal to the flow is treated. At second order in the asymptotic expansion the steady flow normal to the screen is nonuniform along the screen, due to components induced by the wake and by tangential drag. The third order pressure drop is nonuniform and the wake contains distributed vorticity, in addition to the vortex sheet along its boundary. The unsteady drag coefficient is found as a function of frequency.

  4. Formation of solid thorium monoxide at near-ambient conditions as observed by neutron reflectometry and interpreted by screened hybrid functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Heming; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Allred, David D.; Wang, Peng; Wen, Xiaodong; Rector, Kirk D.

    2017-04-01

    Oxidation of a ∼1000 Å sputter-deposited thorium thin film at 150 °C in 100 ppm of flowing oxygen in argon produces the long-sought solid form of thorium monoxide. Changes in the scattering length density (SLD) distribution in the film over the 700-min experiment measured by in-situ, dynamic neutron reflectometry (NR) shows the densities, compositions and thickness of the various thorium oxides layers formed. Screened, hybrid density-functional theory calculations of potential thorium oxides aid interpretation, providing atomic-level picture and energetics for understanding oxygen migration. NR provided evidence of the formation of substoichiometric thorium oxide, ThOy (y < 1) at the interface between the unreacted thorium metal and its dioxide overcoat which grows inward, consuming the thorium at a rate of 2.1 Å/min while y increases until reaching 1:1 oxygen-to-thorium. Its presence indicates that kinetically-favored solid-phase ThO can be preferentially generated as a majority phase under the thermodynamically-favored ThO2 top layer at conditions close to ambient.

  5. Combined integrin phosphoproteomic analyses and small interfering RNA--based functional screening identify key regulators for cancer cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanling; Lu, Bingwen; Yang, Qingkai; Fearns, Colleen; Yates, John R; Lee, Jiing-Dwan

    2009-04-15

    Integrins interact with extracellular matrix (ECM) and deliver intracellular signaling for cell proliferation, survival, and motility. During tumor metastasis, integrin-mediated cell adhesion to and migration on the ECM proteins are required for cancer cell survival and adaptation to the new microenvironment. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-mass spectrometry, we profiled the phosphoproteomic changes induced by the interactions of cell integrins with type I collagen, the most common ECM substratum. Integrin-ECM interactions modulate phosphorylation of 517 serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues in 513 peptides, corresponding to 357 proteins. Among these proteins, 33 key signaling mediators with kinase or phosphatase activity were subjected to small interfering RNA-based functional screening. Three integrin-regulated kinases, DBF4, PAK2, and GRK6, were identified for their critical role in cell adhesion and migration possibly through their regulation of actin cytoskeleton arrangement. Altogether, we not only depict an integrin-modulated phosphorylation network during cell-ECM protein interactions but also reveal novel regulators for cell adhesion and migration.

  6. 3D pharmacophore-based virtual screening, docking and density functional theory approach towards the discovery of novel human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Baruah, Vishwa Jyoti; Chaliha, Amrita Kashyap; Kakoti, Bibhuti Bhushan; Sarma, Diganta; Buragohain, Alak Kumar

    2016-12-21

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the four members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family and is expressed to facilitate cellular proliferation across various tissue types. Therapies targeting HER2, which is a transmembrane glycoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity, offer promising prospects especially in breast and gastric/gastroesophageal cancer patients. Persistence of both primary and acquired resistance to various routine drugs/antibodies is a disappointing outcome in the treatment of many HER2 positive cancer patients and is a challenge that requires formulation of new and improved strategies to overcome the same. Identification of novel HER2 inhibitors with improved therapeutics index was performed with a highly correlating (r=0.975) ligand-based pharmacophore model (Hypo1) in this study. Hypo1 was generated from a training set of 22 compounds with HER2 inhibitory activity and this well-validated hypothesis was subsequently used as a 3D query to screen compounds in a total of four databases of which two were natural product databases. Further, these compounds were analyzed for compliance with Veber's drug-likeness rule and optimum ADMET parameters. The selected compounds were then subjected to molecular docking and Density Functional Theory (DFT) analysis to discern their molecular interactions at the active site of HER2. The findings thus presented would be an important starting point towards the development of novel HER2 inhibitors using well-validated computational techniques.

  7. Screening on the differentially expressed miRNAs in zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to trace β-diketone antibiotics and their related functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieyi; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Yuhuan; Wang, Xuedong; Li, Weijun; Zhang, Hongqin; Wang, Huili

    2016-09-01

    The toxicity of β-diketone antibiotics (DKAs) to larval and adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) was investigated by miRNA sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. In control and DKA-exposed groups, 215 differentially expressed miRNAs were screened, and 4076 differential target genes were predicted. Among 51 co-differentially expressed genes, 45 were annotated in KOG functional classification, and 34 in KEGG pathway analysis. The homology analysis of 20 miRNAs with human hsa-miRNAs demonstrated 17 high homologous sequences. The expression levels of 12 miRNAs by qRT-PCR were consistent with those by sRNA-seq. A regulatory network for 4 positive miRNA genes (dre-miR-10, -96, -92 and -184) was plotted, and the high-degree of connectivity between miRNA-gene pairs suggests that these miRNAs play critical roles during zebrafish development. The consistent expression of dre-miR-184 and dre-miR-96 was proved in 120-hpf zebrafish brain, gill, otoliths and lateral line neuromast by qRT-PCR, miRNA-seq, W-ISH and ISH. DKA-exposure led to vacuolation of interstitial cells, reduced number of neurons, glial cell proliferation and formation of glial scar, and the obvious abnormality of cell structure might result from abnormal expression of differentially expressed miRNAs. In general, chronic DKA-exposure resulted in comprehensively toxic effects on larval and adult zebrafish tissues, especially for nervous system.

  8. Can injury in major junior hockey players be predicted by a pre-season functional movement screen – a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Khaled; Cashman, Glenn; Howitt, Scott; West, Bill; Murray, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a tool that is commonly used to predict the occurrence of injury. Previous studies have shown that a score of 14 or less (with a maximum possible score of 21) successfully predicted future injury occurrence in athletes. No studies have looked at the use of the FMS to predict injuries in hockey players. Objective: To see if injury in major junior hockey players can be predicted by a preseason FMS. Methods: A convenience sample of 20 hockey players was scored on the FMS prior to the start of the hockey season. Injuries and number of man-games lost for each injury were documented over the course of the season. Results: The mean FMS score was 14.7+/−2.58. Those with an FMS score of ≤14 were not more likely to sustain an injury as determined by the Fisher’s exact test (one-tailed, P = 0.32). Conclusion: This study did not support the notion that lower FMS scores predict injury in major junior hockey players. PMID:25550667

  9. cDNA display: a novel screening method for functional disulfide-rich peptides by solid-phase synthesis and stabilization of mRNA–protein fusions

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Junichi; Naimuddin, Mohammed; Biyani, Manish; Sasaki, Toru; Machida, Masayuki; Kubo, Tai; Funatsu, Takashi; Husimi, Yuzuru; Nemoto, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    We report a robust display technology for the screening of disulfide-rich peptides, based on cDNA–protein fusions, by developing a novel and versatile puromycin-linker DNA. This linker comprises four major portions: a ‘ligation site’ for T4 RNA ligase, a ‘biotin site’ for solid-phase handling, a ‘reverse transcription primer site’ for the efficient and rapid conversion from an unstable mRNA–protein fusion (mRNA display) to a stable mRNA/cDNA–protein fusion (cDNA display) whose cDNA is covalently linked to its encoded protein and a ‘restriction enzyme site’ for the release of a complex from the solid support. This enables not only stabilizing mRNA–protein fusions but also promoting both protein folding and disulfide shuffling reactions. We evaluated the performance of cDNA display in different model systems and demonstrated an enrichment efficiency of 20-fold per selection round. Selection of a 32-residue random library against interleukin-6 receptor generated novel peptides containing multiple disulfide bonds with a unique linkage for its function. The peptides were found to bind with the target in the low nanomolar range. These results show the suitability of our method for in vitro selections of disulfide-rich proteins and other potential applications. PMID:19528071

  10. Screening the dopamine D{sub 1} receptor gene in 131 schizophrenics and eight alcoholics: Identification of polymorphisms but lack of functionally significant sequence changes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiang; Sommer, S.S.; Sobell, J.L.

    1995-04-24

    To determine whether mutations in the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor (D{sub 1}DR) gene are associated with schizophrenia, the coding sequence was examined in 106 Caucasian, 11 African-American, 8 Asian, and 6 Native American patients. Approximately 350 kb of genomic sequence was screened by dideoxy fingerprinting, a method related to single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis that detects virtually 100% of sequence changes. One polymorphism was identified in Asians and one in Caucasians, but neither altered 421 the amino acid sequence (Leu{sup 66}, and Ser{sup 421}, respectively). In addition, a previously reported polymorphism in the 5{prime} untranslated region of exon 2 at bp -48 was found to be common, with an allele frequency of approximately 40% in Caucasians of Western European descent. Based on the fact that no sequence changes of likely functional significance were identified, these data suggest that mutations affecting the structure of the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor protein are uncommon and are unlikely to contribute significantly to the genetic predisposition to schizophrenia. The D{sub 1}DR gene also was examined in eight alcoholics, including 3 African-Americans and 1 Native American, but no sequence changes were identified. 35 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. A strategy for screening active lead compounds and functional compound combinations from herbal medicines based on pharmacophore filtering and knockout/knockin chromatography.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui-Peng; Wu, Si-Qi; Qi, Lian-Wen; Long, Fang; Jiang, Li-Feng; Liu, Ke; Zeng, Hao; Xu, Zhi-Meng; Li, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2016-07-22

    Screening and deciphering active natural products of herbal medicines are of great importance for modern drug discovery. In this study, a novel strategy was proposed to rapidly filter ineffective compounds and target the most potential leads. The aim is to answer the key question of what components are responsible for the holistic bioactivity of an herbal product. To support the strategy, the pharmacophore-guided knockout/knockin chromatography was established for the first time. The greatest advantage of this method is that any interesting components could be automatically fished or knocked out. The method validation shows that the herbal extract was accurately reconstructed according to the experimental design. By combining with bioactivity assays, we demonstrated that "functional compound combination (FCC)", which is the core and indispensable effective part, could be discovered from an herbal medicine and suitable as marker compounds for quality control. The applicable objects of the strategy include single herbs, herbal formulas and commercially herbal preparations. As an illustrative case study, the strategy was successfully applied to simultaneously determine active leads and the FCC in Dan-Qi formula which shows excellent free radical scavenging activity. The potential mechanisms of compounds in Dan-Qi formula reacting with three different free radicals were systematically reported for the first time. This strategy was expected to unveil the mystery of herbal medicines and inspire a natural product-based drug discovery.

  12. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mameri, Samir; Dong, Jihu; Salomé, Christophe; Chen, Wanyin; El-Habr, Elias A.; Bousson, Fanny; Sy, Mohamadou; Obszynski, Julie; Boh, Alexandre; Villa, Pascal; Assad Kahn, Suzana; Didier, Bruno; Bagnard, Dominique; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM), the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication. PMID:26270679

  13. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeniou, Maria; Fève, Marie; Mameri, Samir; Dong, Jihu; Salomé, Christophe; Chen, Wanyin; El-Habr, Elias A; Bousson, Fanny; Sy, Mohamadou; Obszynski, Julie; Boh, Alexandre; Villa, Pascal; Assad Kahn, Suzana; Didier, Bruno; Bagnard, Dominique; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM), the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication.

  14. Activity Based Startup Plan for Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner

    SciTech Connect

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-08-31

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The restart of testing activities will require a review through an activity based startup process based upon Integrated Safety Management (ISM) principles to verify readiness. The Activity Based Startup Plan has been developed for this process.

  15. Hearing Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  16. Biomarker Case-Detection and Prediction with Potential for Functional Psychosis Screening: Development and Validation of a Model Related to Biochemistry, Sensory Neural Timing and End Organ Performance

    PubMed Central

    Fryar-Williams, Stephanie; Strobel, Jörg E.

    2016-01-01

    potential for case-detection, -screening, -monitoring, and -targeted personalized management. The findings unmask unmet needs within the functional psychosis condition and suggest new biological understandings of psychosis phenomenology. PMID:27148083

  17. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  18. A novel secreted form of immune suppressor factor with high homology to vacuolar ATPases identified by a forward genetic approach of functional screening based on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tulin, E E; Onoda, N; Maeda, M; Hasegawa, M; Nosaka, T; Nomura, H; Asano, S; Kitamura, T

    2001-07-20

    In the search for stromal-derived growth factors, we have identified a novel secreted short form of immune suppressor factor (ISF) using a combination of a genetic approach and retrovirus-mediated functional screening. This protein, which we termed ShIF, was isolated based on its ability to support proliferation of a mutant clone S21, which was established from Ba/F3 cells that are usually interleukin-3-dependent but became dependent on a stroma cell line ST2 after chemical mutagenesis. ISF, a membrane protein harboring six transmembrane domains, was reported to have immunosuppressive functions. The coding region of ShIF started from the third transmembrane domain of ISF. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that ShIF was expressed in both the secreted and membrane-bound forms of 27-kDa protein, which was supposed to have an internal ATG present in the third transmembrane domain of ISF as a start codon. In addition to the full-length form of ISF, a major protein with a molecular size of 27 kDa was also expressed through the proteolytic process of ISF. ShIF resembles this naturally occurring short form of ISF (sISF). Deletion analysis of the major domains of ISF cDNA revealed that ShIF is an active functional domain of ISF with a capability to support proliferation of S21 cells. Enforced expression of ShIF in MS10 cells, bone marrow stroma cells that do not express endogenous ShIF or ISF, conferred on the cells an ability to support the growth of S21 cells as well as bone marrow cells. Interestingly, ShIF shows a high sequence homology to the C-terminal part of a 95-kDa yeast vacuolar H (+)-ATPase subunit, Vph1p (39%), and a 116-kDa proton pump (VPP1) (54%) of the rat and bovine synaptic vesicle. Therefore, it is possible that ShIF also acts as a proton pump and somehow prevents the cells from undergoing apoptosis.

  19. Target identification with quantitative activity based protein profiling (ABPP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wong, Yin Kwan; Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Lee, Yew-Mun; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2017-02-01

    As many small bioactive molecules fulfill their functions through interacting with protein targets, the identification of such targets is crucial in understanding their mechanisms of action (MOA) and side effects. With technological advancements in target identification, it has become possible to accurately and comprehensively study the MOA and side effects of small molecules. While small molecules with therapeutic potential were derived solely from nature in the past, the remodeling and synthesis of such molecules have now been made possible. Presently, while some small molecules have seen successful application as drugs, the majority remain undeveloped, requiring further understanding of their MOA and side effects to fully tap into their potential. Given the typical promiscuity of many small molecules and the complexity of the cellular proteome, a high-flux and high-accuracy method is necessary. While affinity chromatography approaches combined with MS have had successes in target identification, limitations associated with nonspecific results remain. To overcome these complications, quantitative chemical proteomics approaches have been developed including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methods. These new approaches are adopted in conjunction with activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), allowing for a rapid process and accurate results. This review will briefly introduce the principles involved in ABPP, then summarize current advances in quantitative chemical proteomics approaches as well as illustrate with examples how ABPP coupled with quantitative chemical proteomics has been used to detect the targets of drugs and other bioactive small molecules including natural products.

  20. Using the Larval Zebrafish Locomotor Asssay in Functional Neurotoxicity Screening: Light Brightness and the Order of Stimulus Presentation Affect the Outcome

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are evaluating methods to screen/prioritize large numbers of chemicals using 6 day old zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an alternative model for detecting neurotoxic effects. Our behavioral testing paradigm simultaneously tests individual larval zebrafish under sequential light and...

  1. Identification of LIV1, a putative zinc transporter gene responsible for HDACi-induced apoptosis, using a functional gene screen approach.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoli; Ma, Quanfu; Liu, Jia; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Beibei; Taylor, Kathryn M; Wu, Peng; Wang, Daowen; Xu, Gang; Meng, Li; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2009-11-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) show promise as a novel class of antitumoral agents and have shown the ability to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. To gain a better understanding of the action of HDACi, we conducted a functional gene screen approach named suppression of mortality by antisense rescue technique to identify the key genes responsible for the tumor-selective killing trichostatin A. Over 20 genes associated with HDACi-induced mortality were identified. One of the confirmed positive hits is LIV1, a putative zinc transporter. LIV1 is significantly induced by treatment with HDACi in a number of tumor cells, but not in normal cells. Knockdown of LIV1 suppressed apoptosis induced by HDACi in tumor cells. Although HDACi induced a slight increase in the free intracellular zinc concentration, knockdown of LIV1 significantly enhanced the intracellular zinc level, which was associated with resistance to apoptosis. On the other hand, pretreatment of the cells with a specific zinc chelator TPEN reversed the apoptosis resistance conferred by knockdown of LIV1. However, the biological effects of TPEN were abolished by addition of physiologic concentrations of zinc. Taken together, the present study identifies LIV1 as a critical mediator responsible for HDACi-induced apoptosis. The effect of LIV1 is, at least in part, mediated by affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis, which may be related to alteration of the catalytic activity of the Caspase 3 and expression of some BCL-2 family genes. As such, these findings highlight a novel mechanism underlying the action of HDACi that could be potentially useful in the clinical setting.

  2. Identification of novel histone deacetylase 1 inhibitors by combined pharmacophore modeling, 3D-QSAR analysis, in silico screening and Density Functional Theory (DFT) approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sanjay K.; Mariadasse, Richard; Rajendran, Santhosh; Jeyaraman, Jeyakanthan

    2016-12-01

    Overexpression of HDAC1, a member of Class I histone deacetylase is reported to be implicated in breast cancer. Epigenetic alteration in carcinogenesis has been the thrust of research for few decades. Increased deacetylation leads to accelerated cell proliferation, cell migration, angiogenesis and invasion. HDAC1 is pronounced as the potential drug target towards the treatment of breast cancer. In this study, the biochemical potential of 6-aminonicotinamide derivatives was rationalized. Five point pharmacophore model with one hydrogen-bond acceptor (A3), two hydrogen-bond donors (D5, D6), one ring (R12) and one hydrophobic group (H8) was developed using 6-aminonicotinamide derivatives. The pharmacophore hypothesis yielded a 3D-QSAR model with correlation-coefficient (r2 = 0.977, q2 = 0.801) and it was externally validated with (r2pred = 0.929, r2cv = 0.850 and r2m = 0.856) which reveals the statistical significance of the model having high predictive power. The model was then employed as 3D search query for virtual screening against compound libraries (Zinc, Maybridge, Enamine, Asinex, Toslab, LifeChem and Specs) in order to identify novel scaffolds which can be experimentally validated to design future drug molecule. Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31G* level was employed to explore the electronic features of the ligands involved in charge transfer reaction during receptor ligand interaction. Binding free energy (ΔGbind) calculation was done using MM/GBSA which defines the affinity of ligands towards the receptor.

  3. Functional screening of willow alleles in Arabidopsis combined with QTL mapping in willow (Salix) identifies SxMAX4 as a coppicing response gene.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Jemma; Ward, Sally P; Hanley, Steven J; Leyser, Ottoline; Karp, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are important biomass crops due to their ability to grow rapidly with low fertilizer inputs and ease of cultivation in short-rotation coppice cycles. They are relatively undomesticated and highly diverse, but functional testing to identify useful allelic variation is time-consuming in trees and transformation is not yet possible in willow. Arabidopsis is heralded as a model plant from which knowledge can be transferred to advance the improvement of less tractable species. Here, knowledge and methodologies from Arabidopsis were successfully used to identify a gene influencing stem number in coppiced willows, a complex trait of key biological and industrial relevance. The strigolactone-related More AXillary growth (MAX) genes were considered candidates due to their role in shoot branching. We previously demonstrated that willow and Arabidopsis show similar response to strigolactone and that transformation rescue of Arabidopsis max mutants with willow genes could be used to detect allelic differences. Here, this approach was used to screen 45 SxMAX1, SxMAX2, SxMAX3 and SxMAX4 alleles cloned from 15 parents of 11 mapping populations varying in shoot-branching traits. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies were locus dependent, ranging from 29.2 to 74.3 polymorphic sites per kb. SxMAX alleles were 98%-99% conserved at the amino acid level, but different protein products varying in their ability to rescue Arabidopsis max mutants were identified. One poor rescuing allele, SxMAX4D, segregated in a willow mapping population where its presence was associated with increased shoot resprouting after coppicing and colocated with a QTL for this trait.

  4. Activity-Based Costing Systems for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dennis H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines traditional costing models utilized in higher education and pinpoints shortcomings related to proper identification of costs. Describes activity-based costing systems as a superior alternative for cost identification, measurement, and allocation. (MLF)

  5. Predicting Musculoskeletal Injury in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II Athletes From Asymmetries and Individual-Test Versus Composite Functional Movement Screen Scores

    PubMed Central

    Mokha, Monique; Sprague, Peter A.; Gatens, Dustin R.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Functional Movement Screen (FMS) scores of ≤14 have been used to predict injury in athletic populations. Movement asymmetries and poor-quality movement patterns in other functional tests have been shown to predict musculoskeletal injury (MSI). Therefore, movement asymmetry or poor-quality movement patterns on the FMS may have more utility in predicting MSI than the composite score. Objective:  To determine if an asymmetry or score of 1 on an individual FMS test would predict MSI in collegiate athletes. Design:  Cohort study. Setting:  National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II university athletic program. Patients or Other Participants:  A total of 84 Division II rowers, volleyball players, and soccer players (men: n = 20, age = 20.4 ± 1.3 years, height = 1.77 ± 0.04 m, mass = 73.5 ± 4.8 kg; women: n = 64, age = 19.1 ± 1.2 years, height = 1.69 ± 0.09 m, mass = 64.8 ± 9.4 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s):  The FMS was administered during preseason preparticipation examinations. Injury-incidence data were tracked for an academic year by each team's certified athletic trainer via computer software. An MSI was defined as physical damage to the body secondary to athletic activity or an event for which the athlete sought medical care, and resulted in modified training or required protective splitting or taping. Composite FMS scores were categorized as low (≤14) or high (>14). Pearson χ2 analyses were used to determine if MSI could be predicted by the composite FMS score or an asymmetry or score of 1 on an individual FMS test (P < .05). Results:  Athletes with FMS scores of ≤14 were not more likely to sustain an injury than those with higher scores (relative risk = 0.68, 95% confidence interval = 0.39, 1.19; P = .15). However, athletes with an asymmetry or individual score of 1 were 2.73 times more likely to sustain an injury than those without (relative risk = 2.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.36, 5.4; P = .001). Conclusions

  6. Sensitive high-throughput screening for the detection of reducing sugars.

    PubMed

    Mellitzer, Andrea; Glieder, Anton; Weis, Roland; Reisinger, Christoph; Flicker, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of renewable resources for the production of biofuels relies on efficient processes for the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. The development of enzymes and strains for these processes requires reliable and fast activity-based screening assays. Additionally, these assays are also required to operate on the microscale and on the high-throughput level. Herein, we report the development of a highly sensitive reducing-sugar assay in a 96-well microplate screening format. The assay is based on the formation of osazones from reducing sugars and para-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide. By using this sensitive assay, the enzyme loads and conversion times during lignocellulose hydrolysis can be reduced, thus allowing higher throughput. The assay is about five times more sensitive than the widely applied dinitrosalicylic acid based assay and can reliably detect reducing sugars down to 10 μM. The assay-specific variation over one microplate was determined for three different lignocellulolytic enzymes and ranges from 2 to 8%. Furthermore, the assay was combined with a microscale cultivation procedure for the activity-based screening of Pichia pastoris strains expressing functional Thermomyces lanuginosus xylanase A, Trichoderma reesei β-mannanase, or T. reesei cellobiohydrolase 2.

  7. Activity Based Startup Plan for Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner

    SciTech Connect

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-08-16

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The restart of testing activities will require a review through an activity based startup process based upon Integrated Safety Management (ISM) principles to verify readiness. The Activity Based Startup Plan for the Prototype vertical Denitration Calciner has been developed for this process.

  8. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  9. Activity-based restorative therapies: concepts and applications in spinal cord injury-related neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sadowsky, Cristina L; McDonald, John W

    2009-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation following spinal cord injury-related paralysis has traditionally focused on teaching compensatory techniques, thus enabling the individual to achieve day-to-day function despite significant neurological deficits. But the concept of an irreparable central nervous system (CNS) is slowly being replaced with evidence related to CNS plasticity, repair, and regeneration, all related to persistently maintaining appropriate levels of neurological activity both below and above the area where the damage occurred. It is now possible to envision functional repair of the nervous system by implementing rehabilitative interventions. Making the transition from "bench to bedside" requires careful analysis of existing basic science evidence, strategic focus of clinical research, and pragmatic implementation of new therapeutic tools. Activity, defined as both function specific motor task and exercise appears to be a necessity for optimization of functional, metabolic, and neurological status in chronic paralysis. Crafting a comprehensive rehabilitative intervention focused on functional improvement through neurological gains seems logical. The terms activity-based restorative therapies, activity-based therapies, and activity-based rehabilitation have been coined in the last 10 years to describe a new fundamental approach to deficits induced by neurological paralysis. The goal of this approach is to achieve activation of the neurological levels located both above and below the injury level using rehabilitation therapies. This article reviews basic and clinical science evidence pertaining to implementation of physical activity and exercise as a therapeutic tool in the management of chronic spinal cord-related neurological paralysis.

  10. The malarial drug target Plasmodium falciparum 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (PfDXR): development of a 3-D model for identification of novel, structural and functional features and for inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Goble, Jessica L; Adendorff, Matthew R; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Stephens, Linda L; Blatch, Gregory L

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the malarial drug target protein PfDXR was generated, and validated using structure-checking programs and protein docking studies. Structural and functional features unique to PfDXR were identified using the model and comparative sequence analyses with apicomplexan and non-apicomplexan DXR proteins. Furthermore, we have used the model to develop an efficient approach to screen for potential tool compounds for use in the rational design of novel DXR inhibitors.

  11. Early Dementia Screening.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, Peter K; Berry, Renee; Burchell, Jennifer

    2016-01-21

    As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination assaying Aβ1-42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history-hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia.

  12. Early Dementia Screening

    PubMed Central

    Panegyres, Peter K.; Berry, Renee; Burchell, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination assaying Aβ1–42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history—hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia. PMID:26838803

  13. Activity-based intervention in motor skill development.

    PubMed

    Apache, R R Goyakla

    2005-06-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of an activity-based intervention program and a direct instruction program for preschool children with disabilities. Two groups of preschool students (average age=4.1 yr.), classified as having developmental delays or at risk for such delays, were selected. They were provided 15 weeks of physical education through activity-based intervention and 15 weeks of physical education by direct instruction. Instruction was provided three times a week for 30-min. each session. In the fall semester the morning group received physical education through activity-based intervention, while the afternoon group received physical education through direct instruction. In the spring semester delivery of instruction was reversed for each group. The curriculum and activities provided to each group were identical with only the instructional delivery format altered. Two sets of pre- and post-tests using the Test of Gross Motor Development were administered before and after each 15-wk. instructional period. Group improvement in skills was compared between instructional methods. Significant improvement in both locomotor and object control skills through the activity-based intervention was found compared to direct instruction. Activity-based intervention was shown to be easily adapted to a naturalistic educational setting befitting that of preschool education.

  14. Application of Targeted Functional Assays to Assess a Putative Vascular Disruption Developmental Toxicity Pathway Informed By ToxCast High-Throughput Screening Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical perturbation of vascular development is a putative toxicity pathway which may result in developmental toxicity. EPA’s high-throughput screening (HTS) ToxCast program contains assays which measure cellular signals and biological processes critical for blood vessel develop...

  15. A Preliminary Investigation of the Reinforcement Function of Signal Detections in Simulated Baggage Screening: Further Support for the Vigilance Reinforcement Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Lindsey C.; Bell, Matthew; Olson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The vigilance reinforcement hypothesis (VRH) asserts that errors in signal detection tasks are partially explained by operant reinforcement and extinction processes. VRH predictions were tested with a computerized baggage screening task. Our experiment evaluated the effects of signal schedule (extinction vs. variable interval 6 min) and visual…

  16. Using the Larval Zebrafish Locomotor Assay in Functional Neurotoxicity Screening: Light Intensity and the Order of Stimulus Presentation Affect the Outcome

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating methods to screen and prioritize large numbers of chemicals using 6 day old zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an alternative test model for detecting neurotoxic chemicals. We use a behavioral testing paradigm that simultaneously tes...

  17. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    being developed in a collaborative effort between Langley Research Center and Kennedy Space Center. The screens typically consist of spiral shaped conductive traces patterned on high dielectric substrates (i.e. glass, quartz, polyimide film, etc.). Two broad categories of substrate materials are being investigated for the screens. One category consists of transparent substrates (i.e. glass, quartz, sapphire, etc.), and the other non-transparent sub-strates (Kapton, polyimide films, metals, etc.). The transparent screens utilize patterns made from indium tin oxide (ITO), a transparent conductive material, on clear substrates while the non-transparent screens use copper patterns on a transluscent or opaque substrates. Further, the screen is coated with a high dielectric polyimide cover layer to protect the screen pattern. One promising cover layer material that is currently being investigated is Langley Research Center-Soluble Imide (LaRC-SI), a NASA LaRC developed polyimide. Lastly, a top-coat of hard, inorganic material is evaporated onto the cover layer for protection from scratches due to abrasive nature of the dust. Of note, several top-coat materials are under investigation and include: aluminum oxide, silicon dioxide, titanium oxide, yttrium oxide, zirconium oxide, and zinc sulfide. The electrostatic dust mitigation screens function when a high voltage (700V or greater) is applied to the screen electrodes, thus creating an electromagnetic wave across the surface of the screen that repels the dust. Lunar dust typically contains a high positive charge; therefore, the screens are charged with a higher positive charge that effectively repels dust from the surface (i.e. like charges repel, unlike charges attract). It is anticipated that full development and maturation of this technology will enable humans to sustain a long term presence on the moon, and other planets where dust may have negative implications.

  18. Divided attention interferes with fulfilling activity-based intentions.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Gene A; Ball, B Hunter; Knight, Justin B; Dewitt, Michael R; Marsh, Richard L

    2011-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the effects of divided attention on activity-based prospective memory. After establishing a goal to fulfill an intention upon completion of an ongoing activity, successful completion of the intention generally suffered when attention was being devoted to an additional task (Experiment 1). Forming an implementation intention at encoding ameliorated the negative effects of divided attention (Experiment 2). The results from the present experiments demonstrate that activity-based prospective memory is susceptible to distraction and that implementing encoding strategies that enhance prospective memory performance can reduce this interference. The current work raises interesting questions about the similarities and differences between event- and activity-based prospective memories.

  19. A barcode-free combinatorial screening platform for matrix metalloproteinase screening.

    PubMed

    Rane, Tushar D; Zec, Helena C; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-02-03

    Application of droplet microfluidics to combinatorial screening applications remains elusive because of the need for composition-identifying unique barcodes. Here we propose a barcode-free continuous flow droplet microfluidic platform to suit the requirements of combinatorial screening applications. We demonstrate robust and repeatable functioning of this platform with matrix metalloproteinase activity screening as a sample application.

  20. A Barcode-Free Combinatorial Screening Platform for Matrix Metalloproteinase Screening

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Application of droplet microfluidics to combinatorial screening applications remains elusive because of the need for composition-identifying unique barcodes. Here we propose a barcode-free continuous flow droplet microfluidic platform to suit the requirements of combinatorial screening applications. We demonstrate robust and repeatable functioning of this platform with matrix metalloproteinase activity screening as a sample application. PMID:25543856

  1. Singularity screening in generic optical fields.

    PubMed

    Freund, Isaac; Kessler, David A; Vasyl'ev, Vasyl; Soskin, Marat S

    2015-10-15

    We revisit the widely studied subject of screening in optical fields by topological charges and show that screening does not depend on charge ordering. Instead, for an array of N charges, screening requires that the variance of the charge fluctuations be small compared to N. We show by means of explicit examples that, when this requirement is met, screening can be complete, even for a spatially random arrangement of charges. We derive a minimal screening constraint on the charge correlation function and show that it is this constraint that is met in practice, rather than the more stringent constraints previously assumed.

  2. Characterization and modeling of screen-printed metal insulator semiconductor tunnel junctions for integrated bypass functionality in crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaidigsmann, Benjamin; Lohmüller, Elmar; Fertig, Fabian; Clement, Florian; Wolf, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    This work investigates sintered, screen-printed silver contacts on lowly doped p-type silicon with different intermediate dielectric layer systems using scanning electron microscopy and dark current-voltage measurements. The data reveal electron tunneling through a thin insulating layer as the most probable transport mechanism. A model based on Fowler-Nordheim and direct tunneling is presented that allows for the description of reverse current-voltage characteristics and the extraction of effective contact properties. The investigated screen-printed metal insulator semiconductor structures are proposed as solar cell integrated bypass that reduces the risk of hot spot generation and power loss during partial shading of a module. Furthermore, the integrated bypass approach enables the fabrication of solar cells from silicon material that tends to show early breakdown of the p-n-junction.

  3. A combined array-based comparative genomic hybridization and functional library screening approach identifies mir-30d as an oncomir in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Kaur, Sippy; Greshock, Joel; Lassus, Heini; Zhong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yanling; Leminen, Arto; Shao, Zhongjun; Hu, Xiaowen; Liang, Shun; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Huang, Qihong; Bützow, Ralf; Weber, Barbara L; Coukos, George; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Oncomirs are microRNAs (miRNA) that acts as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Efficient identification of oncomirs remains a challenge. Here we report a novel, clinically guided genetic screening approach for the identification of oncomirs, identifying mir-30d through this strategy. mir-30d regulates tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and migration. The chromosomal locus harboring mir-30d was amplified in more than 30% of multiple types of human solid tumors (n = 1,283). Importantly, higher levels of mir-30d expression were associated significantly with poor clinical outcomes in ovarian cancer patients (n = 330, P = 0.0016). Mechanistic investigations suggested that mir-30d regulates a large number of cancer-associated genes, including the apoptotic caspase CASP3. The guided genetic screening approach validated by this study offers a powerful tool to identify oncomirs that may have utility as biomarkers or targets for drug development.

  4. A draft genome sequence and functional screen reveals the repertoire of type III secreted proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J; Ibanez, Selena Gimenez; MacLean, Daniel; Dangl, Jeffery L; Chang, Jeff H; Rathjen, John P

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial pathogen that causes disease on a broad range of economically important plant species. Pathogenicity of P. syringae strains is dependent on the type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of up to about thirty virulence 'effector' proteins into the host cytoplasm where they subvert the eukaryotic cell physiology and disrupt host defences. P. syringae pathovar tabaci naturally causes disease on wild tobacco, the model member of the Solanaceae, a family that includes many crop species as well as on soybean. Results We used the 'next-generation' Illumina sequencing platform and the Velvet short-read assembly program to generate a 145X deep 6,077,921 nucleotide draft genome sequence for P. syringae pathovar tabaci strain 11528. From our draft assembly, we predicted 5,300 potential genes encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids long, of which 303 (5.72%) had no significant sequence similarity to those encoded by the three previously fully sequenced P. syringae genomes. Of the core set of Hrp Outer Proteins that are conserved in three previously fully sequenced P. syringae strains, most were also conserved in strain 11528, including AvrE1, HopAH2, HopAJ2, HopAK1, HopAN1, HopI, HopJ1, HopX1, HrpK1 and HrpW1. However, the hrpZ1 gene is partially deleted and hopAF1 is completely absent in 11528. The draft genome of strain 11528 also encodes close homologues of HopO1, HopT1, HopAH1, HopR1, HopV1, HopAG1, HopAS1, HopAE1, HopAR1, HopF1, and HopW1 and a degenerate HopM1'. Using a functional screen, we confirmed that hopO1, hopT1, hopAH1, hopM1', hopAE1, hopAR1, and hopAI1' are part of the virulence-associated HrpL regulon, though the hopAI1' and hopM1' sequences were degenerate with premature stop codons. We also discovered two additional HrpL-regulated effector candidates and an HrpL-regulated distant homologue of avrPto1. Conclusion The draft genome sequence facilitates the continued development of P

  5. Editor’s Highlight: Screening ToxCast Prioritized Chemicals for PPARG Function in a Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Model of Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Briana; Doheny, Daniel L.; Black, Michael B.; Pendse, Salil N.; Wetmore, Barbara A.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Deisenroth, Chad

    2017-01-01

    The developmental origins of obesity hypothesis posits a multifaceted contribution of factors to the fetal origins of obesity and metabolic disease. Adipocyte hyperplasia in gestation and early childhood may result in predisposition for obesity later in life. Rodent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that some chemicals may directly affect adipose progenitor cell differentiation, but the human relevance of these findings is unclear. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) is the master regulator of adipogenesis. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) isolated from adipose tissue express endogenous isoforms of PPARG and represent a biologically relevant cell-type for evaluating activity of PPARG ligands. Here, a multi-endpoint approach based on a phenotypic adipogenesis assay was applied to screen a set of 60 chemical compounds identified in ToxCast Phase I as PPARG active (49) or inactive (11). Chemicals showing activity in the adipogenesis screen were further evaluated in a series of 4 orthogonal assays representing 7 different key events in PPARG-dependent adipogenesis, including gene transcription, protein expression, and adipokine secretion. An siRNA screen was also used to evaluate PPARG-dependence of the adipogenesis phenotype. A universal concentration-response design enabled inter-assay comparability and implementation of a weight-of-evidence approach for bioactivity classification. Collectively, a total of 14/49 (29%) prioritized chemicals were identified with moderate-to-strong activity for human adipogenesis. These results provide the first integrated screening approach of prioritized ToxCast chemicals in a human stem cell model of adipogenesis and provide insight into the capacity of PPARG-activating chemicals to modulate early life programming of adipose tissue. PMID:27664422

  6. Editor's Highlight: Screening ToxCast Prioritized Chemicals for PPARG Function in a Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Model of Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Briana; Doheny, Daniel L; Black, Michael B; Pendse, Salil N; Wetmore, Barbara A; Clewell, Rebecca A; Andersen, Melvin E; Deisenroth, Chad

    2017-01-01

    The developmental origins of obesity hypothesis posits a multifaceted contribution of factors to the fetal origins of obesity and metabolic disease. Adipocyte hyperplasia in gestation and early childhood may result in predisposition for obesity later in life. Rodent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that some chemicals may directly affect adipose progenitor cell differentiation, but the human relevance of these findings is unclear. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) is the master regulator of adipogenesis. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) isolated from adipose tissue express endogenous isoforms of PPARG and represent a biologically relevant cell-type for evaluating activity of PPARG ligands. Here, a multi-endpoint approach based on a phenotypic adipogenesis assay was applied to screen a set of 60 chemical compounds identified in ToxCast Phase I as PPARG active (49) or inactive (11). Chemicals showing activity in the adipogenesis screen were further evaluated in a series of 4 orthogonal assays representing 7 different key events in PPARG-dependent adipogenesis, including gene transcription, protein expression, and adipokine secretion. An siRNA screen was also used to evaluate PPARG-dependence of the adipogenesis phenotype. A universal concentration-response design enabled inter-assay comparability and implementation of a weight-of-evidence approach for bioactivity classification. Collectively, a total of 14/49 (29%) prioritized chemicals were identified with moderate-to-strong activity for human adipogenesis. These results provide the first integrated screening approach of prioritized ToxCast chemicals in a human stem cell model of adipogenesis and provide insight into the capacity of PPARG-activating chemicals to modulate early life programming of adipose tissue.

  7. Activity-Based Costing: A Cost Management Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    In college and university administration, overhead costs are often charged to programs indiscriminately, whereas the support activities that underlie those costs remain unanalyzed. It is time for institutions to decrease ineffective use of resources. Activity-based management attributes costs more accurately and can improve efficiency. (MSE)

  8. Activity Based Curriculum for Elementary Education. Additional Activities, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Public Schools, KS.

    This elementary curriculum is a vehicle to provide manipulative activities that reinforce academic skills through meaningful, relevant, activity-based awareness of modern society. The twenty-six activity plans included in the curriculum place a major emphasis upon realistic or concrete experiences that deal with the manipulation and exploration of…

  9. Combined Whole-Cell High-Throughput Functional Screening for Identification of New Nicotinamidases/Pyrazinamidases in Metagenomic/Polygenomic Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; García-Saura, Antonio G.; Jebbar, Mohamed; Golyshin, Peter N.; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamidases catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in nicotinamide (NAM) to produce ammonia and nicotinic acid (NA). These enzymes are an essential component of the NAD+ salvage pathway and are implicated in the viability of several pathogenic organisms. Its absence in humans makes them a promising drug target. In addition, although they are key analytical biocatalysts for screening modulators in relevant biomedical enzymes, such as sirtuins and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, no commercial sources are available. Surprisingly, the finding of an affordable source of nicotinamidase from metagenomic libraries is hindered by the absence of a suitable and fast screening method. In this manuscript, we describe the development of two new whole-cell methods using the chemical property of one of the products formed in the enzymatic reaction (pyrazinoic or NA) to form colored complexes with stable iron salts, such as ammonium ferrous sulfate or sodium nitroprusside (SNP). After optimization of the assay conditions, a fosmid polygenomic expression library obtained from deep-sea mesophilic bacteria was screened, discovering several positive clones with the ammonium ferrous sulfate method. Their quantitative rescreening with the SNP method allowed the finding of the first nicotinamidase with balanced catalytic efficiency toward NAM (nicotinamidase activity) and pyrazinamide (pyrazinamidase activity). Its biochemical characterization has also made possible the development of the first high-throughput whole-cell method for prescreening of new nicotinamidase inhibitors by the naked eye, saving time and costs in the design of future antimicrobial and antiparasitic agents. PMID:28018295

  10. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  11. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... confidential online depression screening Anxiety The Hamilton Anxiety Scale was authored by Max Hamilton. It is in ... mania screening Childhood Mania The Child Mania Rating Scale (CMRS) is a parent screening instrument for mania ...

  12. Health Screenings and Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... your primary doctor. Blood Tests – A Common Screening Method (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Click ... tests, see What Are Blood Tests? Other Screening Methods Doctors can't screen for all diseases and ...

  13. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for prostate cancer. It concluded that the expected harms of PSA screening are greater than the potential ... exam or other screening tests. Potential Benefits and Harms The main goal of a cancer screening test ...

  14. Alcohol Use Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers Mental Health Medical Library Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Instructions The following questions are a screening ... is also text-only version . Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  15. Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Screening Tests FAQ165, September 2016 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  16. Screening for Specific Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anxiety FAQs Screen Yourself ADAA Online Support Group Personal Stories of Triumph "Triumph" E-News Webinars Blog ... Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screening for Social Anxiety ... to fulfill responsibilities with work, school, or family? Yes No placed ...

  17. Development of bestatin-based activity-based probes for metallo-aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Harbut, Michael B; Velmourougane, Geetha; Reiss, Gilana; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh; Greenbaum, Doron C

    2008-11-15

    A novel set of activity-based probes (ABPs) for functionally profiling metallo-aminopeptidases was synthesized based on the bestatin inhibitor scaffold, the first synthesis of bestatin analogues using solid-phase techniques. These ABPs were shown to label metallo-aminopeptidases, using both a biotin and a fluorophore reporter, in an activity-dependent manner. This probe class was also shown to be amenable to 'click' chemistry labeling for possible use in live cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the ABPs are able to label an aminopeptidase in a complex proteome. Thus, these bestatin-based probes should have wide utility to functionally profile aminopeptidases in many biological systems.

  18. What Is Carrier Screening?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary care providers Specialists Getting covered Research Basic science research Research in people ... screening Diagnostic testing Direct-to-consumer genetic testing Newborn screening Pharmacogenomic testing ...

  19. The influence of psychiatric screening in healthy populations selection: a new study and meta-analysis of functional 5-HTTLPR and rs25531 polymorphisms and anxiety-related personality traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A genetic liability for anxiety-related personality traits in healthy subjects has been associated with the functional serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR), although the data are somewhat conflicting. Moreover, only one study has investigated the functional significance of the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 haplotypes in relation to anxiety traits in healthy subjects. We tested whether the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 haplotypes are linked to Harm Avoidance (HA) using an association study (STUDY I) and a meta-analytic approach (STUDY II). Methods STUDY I: A total of 287 unrelated Italian volunteers were screened for DSM-IV Axis I disorders and genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR and rs25531 (A/G) polymorphisms. Different functional haplotype combinations were also analyzed. STUDY II: A total of 44 studies were chosen for a meta-analysis of the putative association between 5-HTTLPR and anxiety-related personality traits. Results STUDY I: In the whole sample of 287 volunteers, we found that the SS genotype and S'S' haplotypes were associated with higher scores on HA. However, because the screening assessed by Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) showed the presence of 55 volunteers affected by depression or anxiety disorders, we analyzed the two groups ("disordered" and "healthy") separately. The data obtained did indeed confirm that in the "healthy" group, the significant effects of the SS genotype and S'S' haplotypes were lost, but they remained in the "disordered" group. STUDY II: The results of the 5-HTTLPR meta-analysis with anxiety-related traits in the whole sample confirmed the association of the SS genotype with higher anxiety-related traits scores in Caucasoids; however, when we analyzed only those studies that used structured psychiatric screening, no association was found. Conclusions This study demonstrates the relevance to perform analyses on personality traits only in DSM-IV axis I disorder-free subjects

  20. Screened-exchange density functional theory description of the electronic structure and phase stability of the chalcopyrite materials AgInSe2 and AuInSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namhoon; Martin, Pamela Peña; Rockett, Angus A.; Ertekin, Elif

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic assessment of the structural properties, the electronic density of states, the charge densities, and the phase stabilities of AgInSe2 and AuInSe2 using screened-exchange hybrid density functional theory, and compare their properties to those of CuInSe2. For AgInSe2, hybrid density functional theory properly captures several experimentally measured properties, including the increase in the band gap and the change in the direction of the lattice distortion parameter u in comparison to CuInSe2. While the electronic properties of AuInSe2 have not yet been experimentally characterized, we predict it to be a small gap (≈0.15 eV) semiconductor. We also present the phase stability of AgInSe2 and AuInSe2 according to screened-exchange density functional theory, and compare the results to predictions from conventional density functional theory, results tabulated from several online materials data repositories, and experiment (when available). In comparison to conventional density functional theory, the hybrid functional predicts phase stabilities of AgInSe2 in better agreement with experiment: discrepancies in the calculated formation enthalpies are reduced by approximately a factor of 3, from ≈0.20 eV/atom to ≈0.07 eV/atom, similar to the improvement observed for CuInSe2. We further predict that AuInSe2 is not a stable phase, and can only be present under nonequilibrium conditions.

  1. Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing in Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Yun, Brian J; Prabhakar, Anand M; Warsh, Jonathan; Kaplan, Robert; Brennan, John; Dempsey, Kyle E; Raja, Ali S

    2016-06-01

    Value in emergency medicine is determined by both patient-important outcomes and the costs associated with achieving them. However, measuring true costs is challenging. Without an understanding of costs, emergency department (ED) leaders will be unable to determine which interventions might improve value for their patients. Although ongoing research may determine which outcomes are meaningful, an accurate costing system is also needed. This article reviews current costing mechanisms in the ED and their pitfalls. It then describes how time-driven activity-based costing may be superior to these current costing systems. Time-driven activity-based costing, in addition to being a more accurate costing system, can be used for process improvements in the ED.

  2. Unbiased Cell-based Screening in a Neuronal Cell Model of Batten Disease Highlights an Interaction between Ca2+ Homeostasis, Autophagy, and CLN3 Protein Function*

    PubMed Central

    Chandrachud, Uma; Walker, Mathew W.; Simas, Alexandra M.; Heetveld, Sasja; Petcherski, Anton; Klein, Madeleine; Oh, Hyejin; Wolf, Pavlina; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Norton, Stephanie; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Cotman, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of undigested macromolecules, often disease-specific, is a major feature of lysosomal and neurodegenerative disease and is frequently attributed to defective autophagy. The mechanistic underpinnings of the autophagy defects are the subject of intense research, which is aided by genetic disease models. To gain an improved understanding of the pathways regulating defective autophagy specifically in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), a neurodegenerative disease of childhood, we developed and piloted a GFP-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) screening assay to identify, in an unbiased fashion, genotype-sensitive small molecule autophagy modifiers, employing a JNCL neuronal cell model bearing the most common disease mutation in CLN3. Thapsigargin, a sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) Ca2+ pump inhibitor, reproducibly displayed significantly more activity in the mouse JNCL cells, an effect that was also observed in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived JNCL neural progenitor cells. The mechanism of thapsigargin sensitivity was Ca2+-mediated, and autophagosome accumulation in JNCL cells could be reversed by Ca2+ chelation. Interrogation of intracellular Ca2+ handling highlighted alterations in endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial, and lysosomal Ca2+ pools and in store-operated Ca2+ uptake in JNCL cells. These results further support an important role for the CLN3 protein in intracellular Ca2+ handling and in autophagic pathway flux and establish a powerful new platform for therapeutic screening. PMID:25878248

  3. An siRNA-based functional genomics screen for the identification of regulators of ciliogenesis and ciliopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Wheway, Gabrielle; Schmidts, Miriam; Mans, Dorus A; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T; Racher, Hilary; Phelps, Ian G; Toedt, Grischa; Kennedy, Julie; Wunderlich, Kirsten A; Sorusch, Nasrin; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Natarajan, Subaashini; Herridge, Warren; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Horn, Nicola; Boldt, Karsten; Parry, David A; Letteboer, Stef J F; Roosing, Susanne; Adams, Matthew; Bell, Sandra M; Bond, Jacquelyn; Higgins, Julie; Morrison, Ewan E; Tomlinson, Darren C; Slaats, Gisela G; van Dam, Teunis J P; Huang, Lijia; Kessler, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Logan, Clare V; Boyle, Evan A; Shendure, Jay; Anazi, Shamsa; Aldahmesh, Mohammed; Al Hazzaa, Selwa; Hegele, Robert A; Ober, Carole; Frosk, Patrick; Mhanni, Aizeddin A; Chodirker, Bernard N; Chudley, Albert E; Lamont, Ryan; Bernier, Francois P; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Gordon, Paul; Pon, Richard T; Donahue, Clem; Barkovich, A James; Wolf, Louis; Toomes, Carmel; Thiel, Christian T; Boycott, Kym M; McKibbin, Martin; Inglehearn, Chris F; Stewart, Fiona; Omran, Heymut; Huynen, Martijn A; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Innes, A Micheil; Willoughby, Colin E; Giles, Rachel H; Webster, Andrew R; Ueffing, Marius; Blacque, Oliver; Gleeson, Joseph G; Wolfrum, Uwe; Beales, Philip L; Gibson, Toby; Doherty, Dan; Mitchison, Hannah M; Roepman, Ronald; Johnson, Colin A

    2015-08-01

    Defects in primary cilium biogenesis underlie the ciliopathies, a growing group of genetic disorders. We describe a whole-genome siRNA-based reverse genetics screen for defects in biogenesis and/or maintenance of the primary cilium, obtaining a global resource. We identify 112 candidate ciliogenesis and ciliopathy genes, including 44 components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, 12 G-protein-coupled receptors, and 3 pre-mRNA processing factors (PRPF6, PRPF8 and PRPF31) mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The PRPFs localize to the connecting cilium, and PRPF8- and PRPF31-mutated cells have ciliary defects. Combining the screen with exome sequencing data identified recessive mutations in PIBF1, also known as CEP90, and C21orf2, also known as LRRC76, as causes of the ciliopathies Joubert and Jeune syndromes. Biochemical approaches place C21orf2 within key ciliopathy-associated protein modules, offering an explanation for the skeletal and retinal involvement observed in individuals with C21orf2 variants. Our global, unbiased approaches provide insights into ciliogenesis complexity and identify roles for unanticipated pathways in human genetic disease.

  4. Identification of novel toluene monooxygenase genes in a hydrocarbon-polluted sediment using sequence- and function-based screening of metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Bouhajja, E; McGuire, M; Liles, M R; Bataille, G; Agathos, S N; George, I F

    2017-01-01

    The microbial potential for toluene degradation within sediments from a tar oil-contaminated site in Flingern, Germany, was assessed using a metagenomic approach. High molecular weight environmental DNA from contaminated sediments was extracted, purified, and cloned into fosmid and BAC vectors and transformed into Escherichia coli. The fosmid library was screened by hybridization with a PCR amplicon of the α-subunit of the toluene 4-monooxygenase gene to identify genes and pathways encoding toluene degradation. Fourteen clones were recovered from the fosmid library, among which 13 were highly divergent from known tmoA genes and several had the closest relatives among Acinetobacter species. The BAC library was transferred to the heterologous hosts Cupriavidus metallidurans (phylum Proteobacteria) and Edaphobacter aggregans (phylum Acidobacteria). The resulting libraries were screened for expression of toluene degradation in the non-degradative hosts. From expression in C. metallidurans, three novel toluene monooxygenase-encoding operons were identified that were located on IncP1 plasmids. The E. aggregans-hosted BAC library led to the isolation of a cloned genetic locus putatively derived from an Acidobacteria taxon that contained genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation. These data suggest the important role of plasmids in the spread of toluene degradative capacity and indicate putative novel tmoA genes present in this hydrocarbon-polluted environment.

  5. The utilization of activity-based cost accounting in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Dennis; Forget, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Healthcare costs are being examined on all fronts. Healthcare accounts for 11% of the gross national product and will continue to rise as the "babyboomers" reach retirement age. While ascertaining costs is important, most research shows that costing methods have not been implemented in hospitals. This study is concerned with the use of costing methods; particularly activity-based cost accounting. A mail survey of CFOs was undertaken to determine the type of cost accounting method they use. In addition, they were asked whether they were aware of activity-based cost accounting and whether they had implemented it or were planning to implement it. Only 71.8% were aware of it and only 4.7% had implemented it. In addition, only 52% of all hospitals report using any cost accounting systems. Education needs to ensure that all healthcare executives are cognizant of activity-based accounting and its importance in determining costs. Only by determining costs can hospitals strive to contain them.

  6. Electronic Equipment Screening and Debugging Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    causes such as poor parts, design errors and manufacturing errors among others, which are not readily detectable by the usual electrical tests of...screen; it being claimed that temperature cycling screens can detect part defects, workmanship defects and design errors. The three key variables (all...power screens are most effective in detecting the failure of an item to perform a function because of a design error rather than detecting bad parts or

  7. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Antibody Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content on Lab Tests Online has been reviewed and approved by our Editorial Review Board . At a ... screen is used to screen an individual's blood for antibodies directed against red blood cell (RBC) ...

  8. Fenfluramine treatment in female rats accelerates the weight loss associated with activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Atchley, Deann P D; Eckel, Lisa A

    2005-02-01

    Serotonin plays an important role in controlling food intake and regulating body weight. Thus, altered serotonergic function may be involved in the etiology of anorexia nervosa. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined whether activation of the serotonin system increases the severity of activity-based anorexia, an animal model of anorexia nervosa in which food-restricted rats are housed with access to running wheels. This paradigm promotes symptoms of anorexia nervosa, including hypophagia, hyperactivity, and weight loss. Food-restricted rats received injections of a serotonin agonist, fenfluramine, or saline 1.5 h prior to their daily 2-h period of food access. A third saline-injected group was pair-fed to the fenfluramine group. Drug treatment and food restriction were terminated following a 25% weight loss. During food restriction, each group developed symptoms of activity-based anorexia. Although similar reductions in food intake were observed in fenfluramine-treated and pair-fed rats, only fenfluramine-treated rats displayed an accelerated rate of weight loss, relative to saline-treated rats. Thus, some other nonanorexic aspect of fenfluramine, perhaps its influence on metabolism, must underlie the accelerated rate of weight loss in this group. Our results suggest that increased activation of the serotonin system exacerbates the weight loss associated with activity-based anorexia.

  9. Clinical and molecular spectra in galactosemic patients from neonatal screening in northeastern Italy: structural and functional characterization of new variations in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) gene.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, E; Marabotti, A; Burlina, A P; Cazzorla, C; D'Apice, M R; Giordano, L; Fasan, I; Novelli, G; Facchiano, A; Burlina, A B

    2015-04-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism due to mutations of the GALT gene leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. With the benefit of early diagnosis by neonatal screening and early therapy, the acute presentation of classical galactosemia can be prevented. However, despite early diagnosis and treatment, the long term outcome for these patients is still unpredictable because they may go on to develop cognitive disability, speech problems, neurological and/or movement disorders and, in females, ovarian dysfunction. The objectives of the current study were to report our experience with a group of galactosemic patients identified through the neonatal screening programs in northeastern Italy during the last 30years. No neonatal deaths due to galactosemia complications occurred after the introduction of the neonatal screening program. However, despite the early diagnosis and dietary treatment, the patients with classical galactosemia showed one or more long-term complications. A total of 18 different variations in the GALT gene were found in the patient cohort: 12 missense, 2 frameshift, 1 nonsense, 1 deletion, 1 silent variation, and 1 intronic. Six (p.R33P, p.G83V, p.P244S, p.L267R, p.L267V, p.E271D) were new variations. The most common variation was p.Q188R (12 alleles, 31.5%), followed by p.K285N (6 alleles, 15.7%) and p.N314D (6 alleles, 15.7%). The other variations comprised 1 or 2 alleles. In the patients carrying a new mutation, the biochemical analysis of GALT activity in erythrocytes showed an activity of <1%. In silico analysis (SIFT, PolyPhen-2 and the computational analysis on the static protein structure) showed potentially damaging effects of the six new variations on the GALT protein, thus expanding the genetic spectrum of GALT variations in Italy. The study emphasizes the difficulty in establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation in classical galactosemia and underlines the importance of

  10. Environmental Test Screening Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeidler, Janet

    2000-01-01

    This procedure describes the methods to be used for environmental stress screening (ESS) of the Lightning Mapper Sensor (LMS) lens assembly. Unless otherwise specified, the procedures shall be completed in the order listed, prior to performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP). The first unit, S/N 001, will be subjected to the Qualification Vibration Levels, while the remainder will be tested at the Operational Level. Prior to ESS, all units will undergo Pre-ESS Functional Testing that includes measuring the on-axis and plus or minus 0.95 full field Modulation Transfer Function and Back Focal Length. Next, all units will undergo ESS testing, and then Acceptance testing per PR 460.

  11. Noise Reduction in High-Throughput Gene Perturbation Screens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Motivation: Accurate interpretation of perturbation screens is essential for a successful functional investigation. However, the screened phenotypes are often distorted by noise, and their analysis requires specialized statistical analysis tools. The number and scope of statistical methods available...

  12. Functional Screening of the Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 Genome reveals a role for ProP (ESA_02131) in carnitine uptake.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Audrey; Sleator, Roy D

    2015-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a neonatal pathogen responsible for up to 80% of fatalities in infected infants. Low birth weight infants and neonates infected with C. sakazakii suffer necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteraemia and meningitis. The mode of transmission most often associated with infection is powdered infant formula (PIF) which, with an aw of ∼0.2, is too low to allow most microorganisms to persist. Survival of C. sakazakii in environments subject to extreme hyperosmotic stress has previously been attributed to the uptake of compatible solutes including proline and betaine. Herein, we report the construction and screening of a C. sakazakii genome bank and the identification of ProP (ESA_02131) as a carnitine uptake system.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase possesses two functional catalytic domains and is inhibited by a CDP-choline analog selected from a virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Contet, Alicia; Pihan, Emilie; Lavigne, Marina; Wengelnik, Kai; Maheshwari, Sweta; Vial, Henri; Douguet, Dominique; Cerdan, Rachel

    2015-04-13

    Phosphatidylcholine is the major lipid component of the malaria parasite membranes and is required for parasite multiplication in human erythrocytes. Plasmodium falciparum CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (PfCCT) is the rate-limiting enzyme of the phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis pathway and thus considered as a potential antimalarial target. In contrast to its mammalian orthologs, PfCCT contains a duplicated catalytic domain. Here, we show that both domains are catalytically active with similar kinetic parameters. A virtual screening strategy allowed the identification of a drug-size molecule competitively inhibiting the enzyme. This compound also prevented phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis in parasites and exerted an antimalarial effect. This study constitutes the first step towards a rationalized design of future new antimalarial agents targeting PfCCT.

  14. High-Content Functional Screening of AEG-1 and AKR1C2 for the Promotion of Metastasis in Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wu, Xia; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jia; Liu, Huawei; Hao, Ming; Wang, Junsong; Zhang, Honghai; Yang, Gengxia; Hao, Meijun; Sheng, Shoupeng; Sun, Yu; Long, Jiang; Li, Juan; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Hu, Caixia; Li, Li; Zheng, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most lethal cancer types in humans, but our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remains insufficient. Here, we conducted high-content screening of the potential genes involved in liver cancer metastasis, which we selected from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway database, based on the SAMcell method and RNA interference technology. We identified two powerful genes in the liver cancer metastasis process, AEG-1 and AKR1C2, both of which proved to be positive regulators in promoting metastasis in liver cancer. Further clinical results verified their roles in liver cancer. In summary, these findings could provide new insight into the liver cancer mechanism and potentially therapeutic novel targets for liver cancer therapies in the future.

  15. Functional Screening of the Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 Genome reveals a role for ProP (ESA_02131) in carnitine uptake

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Audrey; Sleator, Roy D

    2015-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a neonatal pathogen responsible for up to 80% of fatalities in infected infants. Low birth weight infants and neonates infected with C. sakazakii suffer necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteraemia and meningitis. The mode of transmission most often associated with infection is powdered infant formula (PIF) which, with an aw of ∼0.2, is too low to allow most microorganisms to persist. Survival of C. sakazakii in environments subject to extreme hyperosmotic stress has previously been attributed to the uptake of compatible solutes including proline and betaine. Herein, we report the construction and screening of a C. sakazakii genome bank and the identification of ProP (ESA_02131) as a carnitine uptake system. PMID:25915804

  16. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F.; Pak, Donald J.

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  17. Activity-based profiling of the proteasome pathway during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nasheri, Neda; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Yao, Shao; Goto, Natalie K; Pezacki, John Paul

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection often leads to chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of the HCV proteins is controlled by ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent proteasome pathways. Many viruses modulate proteasome function for their propagation. To examine the interrelationship between HCV and the proteasome pathways we employed a quantitative activity-based protein profiling method. Using this approach we were able to quantify the changes in the activity of several proteasome subunits and found that proteasome activity is drastically reduced by HCV replication. The results imply a link between the direct downregulation of the activity of this pathway and chronic HCV infection.

  18. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening.

  19. alpha-MSH enhances activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; Kas, Martien J H; Adan, Roger A H

    2005-10-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model of anorexia nervosa (AN). In ABA, scheduled feeding in combination with voluntary access to running wheels, results in hyperactivity, hypophagia, body weight loss and activation of the HPA axis. Since stimulation of the melanocortin (MC) system has similar effects, this system is a candidate system involved in ABA. Here it is shown that chronic alpha-MSH treatment enhances ABA by increasing running wheel activity (RWA), decreasing food intake and increasing HPA axis activation.

  20. RNAi Screening in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhanita; Singh, Gatikrushna; Sachdev, Bindiya; Kumar, Ajit; Malhotra, Pawan; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a potent and precise reverse genetic approach to carryout large-scale functional genomic studies in a given organism. During the past decade, RNAi has also emerged as an important investigative tool to understand the process of viral pathogenesis. Our laboratory has successfully generated transgenic reporter and RNAi sensor line of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf21) cells and developed a reversal of silencing assay via siRNA or shRNA guided screening to investigate RNAi factors or viral pathogenic factors with extraordinary fidelity. Here we describe empirical approaches and conceptual understanding to execute successful RNAi screening in Spodoptera frugiperda 21-cell line.

  1. Advancing understanding of microbial bioenergy conversion processes by activity-based protein profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Fredrickson, James K.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-09-25

    Here, the development of renewable biofuels is a global priority, but success will require novel technologies that greatly improve our understanding of microbial systems biology. An approach with great promise in enabling functional characterization of microbes is activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), which employs chemical probes to directly measure enzyme function in discrete enzyme classes in vivo and/or in vitro, thereby facilitating the rapid discovery of new biocatalysts and enabling much improved biofuel production platforms. We review general design strategies in ABPP, and highlight recent advances that are or could be pivotal to biofuels processes including applications of ABPP to cellulosic bioethanol, biodiesel, and phototrophic production of hydrocarbons. We also examine the key challenges and opportunities of ABPP in renewable biofuels research. The integration of ABPP with molecular and systems biology approaches will shed new insight on the catalytic and regulatory mechanisms of functional enzymes and their synergistic effects in the field of biofuels production.

  2. Effect Of The Axial Potential, Photoelectron Distribution, And Form Of Spot On The Screen Upon The Transfer Function Of A Time-Analyzer Image-Converter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulighin, V. S.; Galynker, E. I.; Drozhbin, Yu. A.; Karamin, v. G.; Stenanov, B. M.

    1983-03-01

    The transfer function of an ICT which analyzes the time structure of a high-speed process (1) and recognizes the signal delay in the photocathode and electron optical and scanning systems of the EOC is written in the form

  3. Functional screening of a cDNA library from the desiccation-tolerant plant Selaginella lepidophylla in yeast mutants identifies trehalose biosynthesis genes of plant and microbial origin.

    PubMed

    Pampurova, Suzana; Verschooten, Katrien; Avonce, Nelson; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide that accumulates to large quantities in microbial cells, but in plants it is generally present in very low, barely-detectible levels. A notable exception is the desiccation-tolerant plant Selaginella lepidophylla, which accumulates very high levels of trehalose in both the hydrated and dehydrated state. As trehalose is known to protect membranes, proteins, and whole cells against dehydration stress, we have been interested in the characterization of the trehalose biosynthesis enzymes of S. lepidophylla; they could assist in engineering crop plants towards better stress tolerance. We previously isolated and characterized trehalose-6-phosphate synthases from Arabidopsis thaliana (desiccation sensitive) and S. lepidophylla (desiccation tolerant) and found that they had similar enzymatic characteristics. In this paper, we describe the isolation and characterization of trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from S. lepidophylla and show that its catalytic activities are also similar to those of its homolog in A. thaliana. Screening of an S. lepidophylla cDNA library using yeast trehalose biosynthesis mutants resulted in the isolation of a large number of trehalose biosynthesis genes that were of microbial rather than plant origin. Thus, we suggest that the high trehalose levels observed in S. lepidophylla are not the product of the plant but that of endophytes, which are known to be present in this plant. Additionally, the high trehalose levels in S. lepidophylla are unlikely to account for its desiccation tolerance, because its drought-stress-sensitive relative, S. moellendorffii, also accumulated high levels of trehalose.

  4. Functional high-throughput screening identifies the miR-15 microRNA family as cellular restriction factors for Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Maudet, Claire; Mano, Miguel; Sunkavalli, Ushasree; Sharan, Malvika; Giacca, Mauro; Förstner, Konrad U; Eulalio, Ana

    2014-08-22

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for miRNAs in the molecular interplay between bacterial pathogens and host cells. Here we perform a fluorescence microscopy-based screen using a library of miRNA mimics and demonstrate that miRNAs modulate Salmonella infection. Several members of the miR-15 miRNA family were among the 17 miRNAs that more efficiently inhibit Salmonella infection. We discovered that these miRNAs are downregulated during Salmonella infection, through the inhibition of the transcription factor E2F1. Analysis of miR-15 family targets revealed that derepression of cyclin D1 and the consequent promotion of G1/S transition are crucial for Salmonella intracellular proliferation. In addition, Salmonella induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in infected cells, further promoting its replication. Overall, these findings uncover a mechanism whereby Salmonella renders host cells more susceptible to infection by controlling cell cycle progression through the active modulation of host cell miRNAs.

  5. A Functional Genetic Screen Identifies the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase Pathway as a Determinant of Resistance to Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors in FGFR Mutant Urothelial Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqin; Šuštić, Tonći; Leite de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Lieftink, Cor; Halonen, Pasi; van de Ven, Marieke; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; van den Heuvel, Michel M; Bernards, René; van der Heijden, Michiel S

    2017-01-17

    Activating mutations and translocations of the FGFR3 gene are commonly seen in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) of the bladder and urinary tract. Several fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors are currently in clinical development and response rates appear promising for advanced UCC. A common problem with targeted therapeutics is intrinsic or acquired resistance of the cancer cells. To find potential drug targets that can act synergistically with FGFR inhibition, we performed a synthetic lethality screen for the FGFR inhibitor AZD4547 using a short hairpin RNA library targeting the human kinome in the UCC cell line RT112 (FGFR3-TACC3 translocation). We identified multiple members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and found that inhibition of PIK3CA acts synergistically with FGFR inhibitors. The PI3K inhibitor BKM120 acted synergistically with inhibition of FGFR in multiple UCC and lung cancer cell lines having FGFR mutations. Consistently, we observed an elevated PI3K-protein kinase B pathway activity resulting from epidermal growth factor receptor or Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 3 reactivation caused by FGFR inhibition as the underlying molecular mechanism of the synergy. Our data show that feedback pathways activated by FGFR inhibition converge on the PI3K pathway. These findings provide a strong rationale to test FGFR inhibitors in combination with PI3K inhibitors in cancers harboring genetic activation of FGFR genes.

  6. Functional screening of mammalian mechanosensitive genes using Drosophila RNAi library– Smarcd3/Bap60 is a mechanosensitive pro-inflammatory gene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Jang, In-hwan; Kim, Chan Woo; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Won Jae; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed blood flow (d-flow) induces atherosclerosis by altering the expression of mechanosensitive genes in the arterial endothelium. Previously, we identified >580 mechanosensitive genes in the mouse arterial endothelium, but their role in endothelial inflammation is incompletely understood. From this set, we obtained 84 Drosophila RNAi lines that silences the target gene under the control of upstream activation sequence (UAS) promoter. These lines were crossed with C564-GAL4 flies expressing GFP under the control of drosomycin promoter, an NF-κB target gene and a marker of pathogen-induced inflammation. Silencing of psmd12 or ERN1 decreased infection-induced drosomycin expression, while Bap60 silencing significantly increased the drosomycin expression. Interestingly, knockdown of Bap60 in adult flies using temperature-inducible Bap60 RNAi (C564ts-GAL4-Bap60-RNAi) enhanced drosomycin expression upon Gram-positive bacterial challenge but the basal drosomycin expression remained unchanged compared to the control. In the mammalian system, smarcd3 (mammalian ortholog of Bap60) expression was reduced in the human- and mouse aortic endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear in vitro as well as in the d-flow regions of mouse arterial endothelium in vivo. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of smarcd3 induced endothelial inflammation. In summary, we developed an in vivo Drosophila RNAi screening method to identify flow-sensitive genes that regulate endothelial inflammation. PMID:27819340

  7. Functional, chemical genomic, and super-enhancer screening identify sensitivity to cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway inhibition in Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Brian; Cowley, Glenn; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A.; Tsherniak, Aviad; Parasuraman, Sudha; Kim, Sunkyu; Alexe, Gabriela; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive bone and soft tissue tumor in children and adolescents, with treatment remaining a clinical challenge. This disease is mediated by somatic chromosomal translocations of the EWS gene and a gene encoding an ETS transcription factor, most commonly, FLI1. While direct targeting of aberrant transcription factors remains a pharmacological challenge, identification of dependencies incurred by EWS/FLI1 expression would offer a new therapeutic avenue. We used a combination of super-enhancer profiling, near-whole genome shRNA-based and small-molecule screening to identify cyclin D1 and CDK4 as Ewing sarcoma-selective dependencies. We revealed that super-enhancers mark Ewing sarcoma specific expression signatures and EWS/FLI1 target genes in human Ewing sarcoma cell lines. Particularly, a super-enhancer regulates cyclin D1 and promotes its expression in Ewing sarcoma. We demonstrated that Ewing sarcoma cells require CDK4 and cyclin D1 for survival and anchorage-independent growth. Additionally, pharmacologic inhibition of CDK4 with selective CDK4/6 inhibitors led to cytostasis and cell death of Ewing sarcoma cell lines in vitro and growth delay in an in vivo Ewing sarcoma xenograft model. These results demonstrated a dependency in Ewing sarcoma on CDK4 and cyclin D1 and support exploration of CDK4/6 inhibitors as a therapeutic approach for patients with this disease. PMID:26337082

  8. Activity-based analyses lead to better decision making.

    PubMed

    Player, S

    1998-08-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) and activity-based management (ABM) are cost-management tools that are relatively new to the healthcare industry. ABC is used for strategic decision making. It assesses the costs associated with specific activities and resources and links those costs to specific internal and external customers of the healthcare enterprise (e.g., patients, service lines, and physician groups) to determine the costs associated with each customer. This cost information then can be adjusted to account for anticipated changes and to predict future costs. ABM, on the other hand, supports operations by focusing on the causes of costs and how costs can be reduced. It assesses cost drivers that directly affect the cost of a product or service, and uses performance measures to evaluate the financial or nonfinancial benefit an activity provides. By identifying each cost driver and assessing the value the element adds to the healthcare enterprise, ABM provides a basis for selecting areas that can be changed to reduce costs.

  9. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee (SRPC) Points to Consider*: Histopathology Evaluation of the Pubertal Development and Thyroid Function Assay (OPPTS 890.1450, OPPTS 890.1500) in Rats to Screen for Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Kevin A.; Parker, George A.; Regan, Karen S.; Picut, Catherine; Dixon, Darlene; Creasy, Dianne; Giri, Dipak; Hukkanen, Renee R.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) is a multitiered approach to determine the potential for environmental chemicals to alter the endocrine system. The Pubertal Development and Thyroid Function in Intact Juvenile/Peripubertal Female and Male Rats (OPPTS 890.1450, 890.1500) are 2 of the 9 EDSP tier 1 test Guidelines, which assess upstream mechanistic pathways along with downstream morphological end points including histological evaluation of the kidneys, thyroid, and select male/female reproductive tissues (ovaries, uterus, testes, and epididymides). These assays are part of a battery of in vivo and in vitro screens used for initial detection of test article endocrine activity. In this Points to Consider article, we describe tissue processing, evaluation, and nomenclature to aid in standardization of assay results across laboratories. Pubertal assay end points addressed include organ weights, estrous cyclicity, clinical pathology, hormonal assays, and histological evaluation. Potential treatment-related findings that may indicate endocrine disruption are reviewed. Additional tissues that may be useful in assessment of endocrine disruption (vagina, mammary glands, and liver) are discussed. This Points to Consider article is intended to provide information for evaluating peripubertal tissues within the context of individual assay end points, the overall pubertal assay, and tier I assays of the EDSP program. PMID:25948506

  10. Kinome-Wide Functional Genomics Screen Reveals a Novel Mechanism of TNFα-Induced Nuclear Accumulation of the HIF-1α Transcription Factor in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schoolmeesters, Angela; Brown, Daniel D.; Fedorov, Yuriy

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its most important subunit, HIF-1α, plays a central role in tumor progression by regulating genes involved in cancer cell survival, proliferation and metastasis. HIF-1α activity is associated with nuclear accumulation of the transcription factor and regulated by several mechanisms including modulation of protein stability and degradation. Among recent advances are the discoveries that inflammation-induced cytokines and growth factors affect protein accumulation of HIF-1α under normoxia conditions. TNFα, a major pro-inflammatory cytokine that promotes tumorigenesis is known as a stimulator of HIF-1α activity. To improve our understanding of TNFα-mediated regulation of HIF-1α nuclear accumulation we screened a kinase-specific siRNA library using a cell imaging–based HIF-1α-eGFP chimera reporter assay. Interestingly, this systematic analysis determined that depletion of kinases involved in conventional TNFα signaling (IKK/NFκB and JNK pathways) has no detrimental effect on HIF-1α accumulation. On the other hand, depletion of PRKAR2B, ADCK2, TRPM7, and TRIB2 significantly decreases the effect of TNFα on HIF-1α stability in osteosarcoma and prostate cancer cell lines. These newly discovered regulators conveyed their activity through a non-conventional RELB-depended NFκB signaling pathway and regulation of superoxide activity. Taken together our data allow us to conclude that TNFα uses a distinct and complex signaling mechanism to induce accumulation of HIF-1α in cancer cells. In summary, our results illuminate a novel mechanism through which cancer initiation and progression may be promoted by inflammatory cytokines, highlighting new potential avenues for fighting this disease. PMID:22355351

  11. Stretching Screens and Imaginations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Shelaugh

    1983-01-01

    Secondary students utilize a simplified technique to make silk screen prints, which can be printed onto T-shirts. The only materials needed from art suppliers are a few squeegees and a few yards of polyester screen mesh. (RM)

  12. Screening Tests and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Text size | Print | Screening Tests and Vaccines This information in Spanish ( en español ) Getting important screening tests and vaccines can save your life. Check this section of ...

  13. Cancer Screening Overview (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is important that you understand the benefits and harms of screening tests and make an informed choice ... provider . Every screening test has both benefits and harms. Your health care provider should talk to you ...

  14. Screening for VHL

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the most harmful consequences of this gene mutation. It is important to diagnose and begin screening ... to determine if a child has a VHL mutation and needs to follow the recommended screening. The ...

  15. Video Screen Capture Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  16. Lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Lynn T; Tanner, Nichole T; Gould, Michael K; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2015-01-01

    The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults of age 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and are currently smoking or have quit within the past 15 years. This recommendation is largely based on the findings of the National Lung Screening Trial. Both policy-level and clinical decision-making about LDCT screening must consider the potential benefits of screening (reduced mortality from lung cancer) and possible harms. Effective screening requires an appreciation that screening should be limited to individuals at high risk of death from lung cancer, and that the risk of harm related to false positive findings, overdiagnosis, and unnecessary invasive testing is real. A comprehensive understanding of these aspects of screening will inform appropriate implementation, with the objective that an evidence-based and systematic approach to screening will help to reduce the enormous mortality burden of lung cancer.

  17. Standard Printing Screen System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    area pattern screens. It also describes the creation of a 100-step continuous growth halftone scale for the purpose of specifying quality control tolerances of screen tints for the printed product. (Author)

  18. Newborn Screening Tests Approved

    MedlinePlus

    ... The screens are used to detect four rare metabolic disorders To use the sharing features on this page, ... of screening tests designed to detect four rare metabolic disorders in newborns has been approved by the U.S. ...

  19. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer is a ...

  20. Functional requirements specification and data modeling for a PDA-based decision support system for the screening and management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Ju; John, Ritamarie; Bakken, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the functional requirements of and to build the data model for a PDA-DSS. Through Use Case Analysis and UML modeling, seven Use Cases were documented, and Use Case Diagrams, Activity Diagrams, and Sequence Diagrams related to the management of were developed.

  1. Functional toxicogenomic assessment of triclosan in human HepG2 cells using genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of chemicals for which limited toxicological data are available are used and then detected in humans and the environment. Rapid and cost-effective approaches for assessing the toxicological properties of chemicals are needed. We used CRISPR-Cas9 functional genomic scree...

  2. Examining the Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorder-71 as an Assessment Tool for Anxiety in Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Deutschman, Amber A. C. G.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a questionnaire developed to assess symptoms of anxiety disorders (SCARED-71) were compared between two groups of children: children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and comorbid anxiety disorders (ASD-group; "n" = 115), and children with anxiety disorders (AD-group; "n" = 122).…

  3. Medicare Preventive and Screening Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... B (Medical Insurance) covers: Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening Alcohol misuse screenings & counseling Bone mass measurements (bone density) Cardiovascular disease screenings Cardiovascular disease (behavioral therapy) Cervical & ...

  4. Breast awareness and screening.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the UK. Breast awareness and screening, along with better treatment, can significantly improve outcomes, and more women than ever are now surviving the disease. This article discusses breast awareness and screening, symptoms and risk factors for breast cancer, and how nurses can raise breast awareness and screening uptake.

  5. Principles of Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Paul F

    2015-10-01

    Cancer screening has long been an important component of the struggle to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality from cancer. Notwithstanding this history, many aspects of cancer screening remain poorly understood. This article presents a summary of basic principles of cancer screening that are relevant for researchers, clinicians, and public health officials alike.

  6. Screen time and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity ) Screen time increases your child's risk of obesity because: Sitting and watching a screen is time that is not spent being physically active. TV commercials and other screen ads can lead to unhealthy food choices . Most of the time, the foods in ads ...

  7. Ratios of One-Carbon Metabolites Are Functional Markers of B-Vitamin Status in a Norwegian Coronary Angiography Screening Cohort.

    PubMed

    Ulvik, Arve; Hustad, Steinar; McCann, Adrian; Midttun, Øivind; Nygård, Ottar K; Ueland, Per M

    2017-04-05

    Background: Functional (metabolic) markers of B-vitamin status, including plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) for folate and plasma methylmalonic acid (MMA) for vitamin B-12, suffer from moderate sensitivity and poor specificity. Ratios of metabolites belonging to the same pathway may have better performance characteristics.Objective: We evaluated the ratios of tHcy to total cysteine (tCys; Hcy:Cys), tHcy to creatinine (Hcy:Cre), and tHcy to tCys to creatinine (Hcy:Cys:Cre) as functional markers of B-vitamin status represented by a summary score composed of folate, cobalamin, betaine, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), and riboflavin concentrations measured in plasma.Methods: Cross-sectional data were obtained from a cohort of patients with stable angina pectoris (2994 men and 1167 women) aged 21-88 y. The relative contribution of the B-vitamin score, age, sex, smoking, body mass index, and markers of renal function and inflammation to the variance of the functional B-vitamin markers was calculated by using multiple linear regression.Results: Compared with tHcy alone, Hcy:Cys, Hcy:Cre, and Hcy:Cys:Cre all showed improved sensitivity and specificity for detecting plasma B-vitamin status. Improvements in overall performance ranged from 4-fold for Hcy:Cys to ∼8-fold for Hcy:Cys:Cre and were particularly strong in subjects with the common 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677CC genotype.Conclusions: Ratios of tHcy to tCys and/or creatinine showed a severalfold improvement over tHcy alone as functional markers of B-vitamin status in Norwegian coronary angiography screenees. The biological rationale for these ratios is discussed in terms of known properties of enzymes involved in the catabolism of homocysteine and synthesis of creatine and creatinine.

  8. iScreen: Image-Based High-Content RNAi Screening Analysis Tools.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rui; Dong, Xiaonan; Levine, Beth; Xie, Yang; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screening has opened up a path to investigating functional genomics in a genome-wide pattern. However, such studies are often restricted to assays that have a single readout format. Recently, advanced image technologies have been coupled with high-throughput RNAi screening to develop high-content screening, in which one or more cell image(s), instead of a single readout, were generated from each well. This image-based high-content screening technology has led to genome-wide functional annotation in a wider spectrum of biological research studies, as well as in drug and target discovery, so that complex cellular phenotypes can be measured in a multiparametric format. Despite these advances, data analysis and visualization tools are still largely lacking for these types of experiments. Therefore, we developed iScreen (image-Based High-content RNAi Screening Analysis Tool), an R package for the statistical modeling and visualization of image-based high-content RNAi screening. Two case studies were used to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the iScreen package. iScreen is available for download on CRAN (http://cran.cnr.berkeley.edu/web/packages/iScreen/index.html). The user manual is also available as a supplementary document.

  9. Effect of auditory isolation on activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Ángela; De Pedro, Belén; Cerrato, María; Carrera, Olaia; Gutiérrez, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to study male and female rats exposed to Activity-Based Anorexia (ABA; simultaneous exposition to food restriction and free access to an activity wheel) under two conditions of sound attenuation, by means of different arrangements of wheels (standard versus isolation) in the laboratory room. Regardless of the sound attenuation condition, all but one male and one female with access to wheels had to be removed from the experiment, but extended ABA endurance was found in rats in the sound attenuation condition. Furthermore, significantly lower levels of running were observed in both males and females under the sound attenuation arrangement in the isolation condition. The results suggest that external stimulation plays a role in the activity displayed by rats exposed to ABA, and that the reduction of external stimulation diminishes running but does not protect rats from developing ABA.

  10. Making activity-based funding work for mental health.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Sebastian P; Hickie, Ian B

    2013-06-01

    The implementation of activity-based funding (ABF) in mental health from 1 July 2013 has significant risks and benefits. It is critical that the process of implementation is consistent with Australia's cherished goal of establishing a genuine and effective model of community-based mental health care. The infrastructure to support the application of ABF to mental health is currently weak and requires considerable development. States and territories are struggling to meet existing demand for largely hospital-based acute mental health care. There is a risk that valuable ABF-driven Commonwealth growth funds may be used to prop up these systems rather than drive the emergence of new models of community-based care. Some of these new models exist now and this article provides a short description. The aim is to help the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority better understand the landscape of mental health into which it now seeks to deploy ABF.

  11. Cancer Screening: How Do Screening Tests Become Standard Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer symptoms. There are different kinds of screening tests. Screening tests include the following: Physical exam and ... are linked to some types of cancer. Screening tests have risks. Not all screening tests are helpful ...

  12. Synthesis and SAR of novel, 4-(phenylsulfamoyl)phenylacetamide mGlu4 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) identified by functional high-throughput screening (HTS).

    PubMed

    Engers, Darren W; Gentry, Patrick R; Williams, Richard; Bolinger, Julie D; Weaver, C David; Menon, Usha N; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W; Niswender, Colleen M; Hopkins, Corey R

    2010-09-01

    Herein we disclose the synthesis and SAR of a series of 4-(phenylsulfamoyl)phenylacetamide compounds as mGlu(4) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that were identified via a functional HTS. An iterative parallel approach to these compounds culminated in the discovery of VU0364439 (11) which represents the most potent (19.8 nM) mGlu(4) PAM reported to date.

  13. Screening Hofmann Compounds as CO 2 Sorbents: Nontraditional Synthetic Route to Over 40 Different Pore-Functionalized and Flexible Pillared Cyanonickelates

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Jeffrey T.; Madden, Catherine; Kauffman, Kristi; Shi, Fan; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-04-15

    A simple reaction scheme based on the heterogeneous intercalation of pillaring ligands (HIPLs) provides a convenient method for systematically tuning pore size, pore functionality, and network flexibility in an extended series of pillared cyanonickelates (PICNICs), commonly referred to as Hofmann compounds. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated through the preparation of over 40 different PICNICs containing pillar ligands ranging from ~4 to ~15 Å in length and modified with a wide range of functional groups, including fluoro, aldehyde, alkylamine, alkyl, aryl, trifluoromethyl, ester, nitro, ether, and nonmetalated 4,4'-bipyrimidine. The HIPL method involves reaction of a suspension of preformed polymeric sheets of powdered anhydrous nickel cyanide with an appropriate pillar ligand in refluxing organic solvent, resulting in the conversion of the planar [Ni{sub 2}(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} networks into polycrystalline three-dimensional porous frameworks containing the organic pillar ligand. Preliminary investigations indicate that the HIPL reaction is also amenable to forming Co(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, and Fe(L)Pd(CN){sub 4} networks. The materials show variable adsorption behavior for CO{sub 2} depending on the pillar length and pillar functionalization. Several compounds show structurally flexible behavior during the adsorption and desorption of CO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the newly discovered flexible compounds include two flexible Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4} derivatives that are structurally related to previously reported porous spin-crossover compounds. The preparations of 20 pillar ligands based on ring-functionalized 4,4'-dipyridyls, 1,4-bis(4- pyridyl)benzenes, and N-(4-pyridyl)isonicotinamides are also described.

  14. Screening Hofmann Compounds as CO 2 Sorbents: Nontraditional Synthetic Route to Over 40 Different Pore-Functionalized and Flexible Pillared Cyanonickelates

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Jeffrey T.; Madden, Catherine; Kauffman, Kristi; Shi, Fan; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-04-15

    A simple reaction scheme based on the heterogeneous intercalation of pillaring ligands (HIPLs) provides a convenient method for systematically tuning pore size, pore functionality, and network flexibility in an extended series of pillared cyanonickelates (PICNICs), commonly referred to as Hofmann compounds. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated through the preparation of over 40 different PICNICs containing pillar ligands ranging from 4 to 15 Å in length and modified with a wide range of functional groups, including fluoro, aldehyde, alkylamine, alkyl, aryl, trifluoromethyl, ester, nitro, ether, and nonmetalated 4,4'-bipyrimidine. The HIPL method involves reaction of a suspension of preformed polymeric sheets of powdered anhydrous nickel cyanide with an appropriate pillar ligand in refluxing organic solvent, resulting in the conversion of the planar [Ni{sub 2}(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} networks into polycrystalline three-dimensional porous frameworks containing the organic pillar ligand. Preliminary investigations indicate that the HIPL reaction is also amenable to forming Co(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, and Fe(L)Pd(CN){sub 4} networks. The materials show variable adsorption behavior for CO{sub 2} depending on the pillar length and pillar functionalization. Several compounds show structurally flexible behavior during the adsorption and desorption of CO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the newly discovered flexible compounds include two flexible Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4} derivatives that are structurally related to previously reported porous spin-crossover compounds. The preparations of 20 pillar ligands based on ring-functionalized 4,4'-dipyridyls, 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)benzenes, and N-(4-pyridyl)isonicotinamides are also described.

  15. Insight into structure-function relationship in phenol-soluble modulins using an alanine screen of the phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) α3 peptide.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Gordon Y C; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Queck, Shu Y; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Wang, Rong; Duong, Anthony C; Nguyen, Thuan H; Bach, Thanh-Huy L; Porter, Adeline R; DeLeo, Frank R; Peschel, Andreas; Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are a family of peptides with multiple functions in staphylococcal pathogenesis. To gain insight into the structural features affecting PSM functions, we analyzed an alanine substitution library of PSMα3, a strongly cytolytic and proinflammatory PSM of Staphylococcus aureus with a significant contribution to S. aureus virulence. Lysine residues were essential for both receptor-dependent proinflammatory and receptor-independent cytolytic activities. Both phenotypes also required additional structural features, with the C terminus being crucial for receptor activation. Biofilm formation was affected mostly by hydrophobic amino acid positions, suggesting that the capacity to disrupt hydrophobic interactions is responsible for the effect of PSMs on biofilm structure. Antimicrobial activity, absent from natural PSMα3, could be created by the exchange of large hydrophobic side chains, indicating that PSMα3 has evolved to exhibit cytolytic rather than antimicrobial activity. In addition to gaining insight into the structure-function relationship in PSMs, our study identifies nontoxic PSMα3 derivatives for active vaccination strategies and lays the foundation for future efforts aimed to understand the biological role of PSM recognition by innate host defense.

  16. Analyzing the Hidden Curriculum of Screen Media Advertising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lance E.

    2015-01-01

    This media literacy article introduces a questioning framework for analyzing screen media with students and provides an example analysis of two contemporary commercials. Investigating screen conventions can help students understand the persuasive functions of commercials, as well as how the unique sensory experience of screen viewing affects how…

  17. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of malignancies showing the greatest benefit from preventive measures, especially screening or secondary prevention. Several screening strategies are available with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency. The most widely used are the faecal occult blood test in countries with population-based screening programmes, and colonoscopy in those conducting opportunistic screening. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal cancer screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Washington in 2015, with special emphasis on the medium-term results of faecal occult blood testing strategies and determining factors and on strategies to reduce the development of interval cancer after colonoscopy.

  18. Newborn screening: current status.

    PubMed

    Arn, Pamela H

    2007-01-01

    Newborn screening, which represents one of the major advances in child health of the past century, has been carried out in all fifty U.S. states since the 1970s. Newborn screening programs are state-run, and decisions are left to the individual states regarding the conditions to be screened for, the mechanism for confirmatory testing, follow-up care, and financing of the programs. Laboratory advances in tandem mass spectrometry make it possible to screen newborns for many rare inborn errors of metabolism. This raises many policy issues including screening's cost-effectiveness, ethics, quality, and oversight.

  19. Identification of seven genes essential for male fertility through a genome-wide association study of non-obstructive azoospermia and RNA interference-mediated large-scale functional screening in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Wu, Hao; Wen, Yang; Liu, Yujuan; Zhou, Tao; Ni, Bixian; Lin, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Zhou, Zuomin; Hu, Zhibin; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao; Tong, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is a complex and severe condition whose etiology remains largely unknown. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of NOA in Chinese men, few loci reached genome-wide significance, although this might be a result of genetic heterogeneity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) without genome-wide significance may also indicate genes that are essential for fertility, and multiple stage validation can lead to false-negative results. To perform large-scale functional screening of the genes surrounding these SNPs, we used in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) in Drosophila, which has a short maturation cycle and is suitable for high-throughput analysis. The analysis found that 7 (31.8%) of the 22 analyzed orthologous Drosophila genes were essential for male fertility. These genes corresponded to nine loci. Of these genes, leukocyte-antigen-related-like (Lar) is primarily required in germ cells to sustain spermatogenesis, whereas CG12404, doublesex-Mab-related 11E (dmrt11E), CG6769, estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and sulfateless (sfl) function in somatic cells. Interestingly, ERR and sfl are also required for testis morphogenesis. Our study thus demonstrates that SNPs without genome-wide significance in GWAS may also provide clues to disease-related genes and therefore warrant functional analysis.

  20. Pyrethroid Activity-Based Probes for Profiling Cytochrome P450 Activities Associated with Insecticide Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; O'Neill, Paul M.; Hong, David; Finn, Robert; Henderson, Colin; Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin; Hemingway, Janet; Paine, Mark J.

    2014-01-18

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used to control a diverse spectrum of diseases spread by arthropods. We have developed a suite of pyrethroid mimetic activity based probes (PyABPs) to selectively label and identify P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism. The probes were screened against pyrethroid metabolizing and non-metabolizing mosquito P450s, as well as rodent microsomes to measure labeling specificity, plus CPR and b5 knockout mouse livers to validate P450 activation and establish the role for b5 in probe activation. Using a deltamethrin mimetic PyABP we were able to profile active enzymes in rat liver microsomes and identify pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes in the target tissue. The most reactive enzyme was a P450, CYP2C11, which is known to metabolize deltamethrin. Furthermore, several other pyrethroid metabolizers were identified (CYPs 2C6, 3A4, 2C13 and 2D1) along with related detoxification enzymes, notably UDP-g’s 2B1 - 5, suggesting a network of associated pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes, or ‘pyrethrome’. Considering the central role that P450s play in metabolizing insecticides, we anticipate that PyABPs will aid the identification and profiling of P450s associated with insecticide pharmacology in a wide range of species, improving understanding of P450-insecticide interactions and aiding the development of new tools for disease control.

  1. Rigorous Ab Initio Quantum Embedding for Quantum Chemistry Using Green's Function Theory: Screened Interaction, Nonlocal Self-Energy Relaxation, Orbital Basis, and Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Lan, Tran; Kananenka, Alexei A; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-10-11

    We present a detailed discussion of the self-energy embedding theory (SEET), which is a quantum embedding scheme allowing us to describe a chosen subsystem very accurately while keeping the description of the environment at a lower level. We apply SEET to molecular examples where our chosen subsystem is made out of a set of strongly correlated orbitals while the weakly correlated orbitals constitute an environment. Consequently, a highly accurate method is used to calculate the self-energy for the system, while a lower-level method is employed to find the self-energy for the environment. Such a self-energy separation is very general, and to make the SEET procedure applicable to multiple systems, a detailed and practical procedure for the evaluation of the system and environment self-energy is necessary. We list all of the intricacies for one of the possible procedures while focusing our discussion on many practical implementation aspects such as the choice of best orbital basis, impurity solver, and many steps necessary to reach chemical accuracy. Finally, on a set of carefully chosen molecular examples, we demonstrate that SEET, which is a controlled, systematically improvable Green's function method, can be as accurate as established wave function quantum chemistry methods.

  2. Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant

    SciTech Connect

    Shelpuk, B; Walker, A

    1994-10-01

    The Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant is a software tool to be used by energy auditors to prioritize future studies of potentially cost-effective renewable energy applications at federal facilities. This paper describes the structure and function of the tool, gives an inventory of renewable energy technologies represented in the tool, and briefly describes the algorithms used to rank opportunities by the savings-to-investment ratio.

  3. ENGAGE: Guided Activity-Based Gaming in Neurorehabilitation after Stroke: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Reinthal, Ann; Szirony, Kathy; Clark, Cindy; Swiers, Jeffrey; Kellicker, Michelle; Linder, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke is a leading cause of disability in healthy adults. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and outcomes of a novel video gaming repetitive practice paradigm, (ENGAGE) enhanced neurorehabilitation: guided activity-based gaming exercise. Methods. Sixteen individuals at least three months after stroke served as participants. All participants received concurrent outpatient therapy or took part in a stroke exercise class and completed at least 500 minutes of gaming. Primary baseline and posttest outcome measures included the Wolf motor function test (WMFT) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA). ENGAGE uses a game selection algorithm providing focused, graded activity-based repetitive practice that is highly individualized and directed. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to determine statistical significance. Results. There were improvements in the WMFT (P = 0.003) and the FMA (P = 0.002) that exceeded established values of minimal clinically important difference. Conclusions. ENGAGE was feasible and an effective adjunct to concurrent therapy after stroke. PMID:22593835

  4. A Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose Degrading Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes, in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic microbial cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated with biofuel development. PMID:23176123

  5. Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-12-19

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated within biofuel development.

  6. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients.

  7. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  8. Cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the role of family physicians in screening for cancer of the cervix, to review the evidence for screening, in particular, frequency and technique for screening, and to review the reasons cervical cancer has not been prevented and the role of family physicians in addressing these failures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The value of screening has been established with level II evidence. Many of the unresolved issues are not supported either way by good evidence; level II and III evidence predominates. MAIN FINDINGS: In Canada, 1350 women were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix in 1996. Most of these women had not been screened. Minority, rural, low-income, and older women face important barriers to screening. Family physicians have a role in reaching out to these women to provide effective health care, including cancer screening. When cancer screening is performed, it should conform to recommended techniques with appropriate follow up of abnormal test results. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have an important role in preventing cancer of the cervix. Efforts should be concentrated on encouraging a greater proportion of eligible women to be screened. Criteria are suggested for effective screening. PMID:9721422

  9. Screening in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Paolo Del; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-01-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  10. Dynamics and observer dependence of holographic screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Moosa, Mudassir

    2017-02-01

    We study the evolution of holographic screens, both generally and in explicit examples, including cosmology and gravitational collapse. A screen H consists of a one-parameter sequence of maximal surfaces called leaves. Its causal structure is nonrelativistic. Each leaf can store all of the quantum information on a corresponding null slice holographically at no more than one bit per Planck area. Therefore, we expect the screen geometry to reflect certain coarse-grained quantities in the quantum gravity theory. In a given spacetime, there are many different screens, which are naturally associated with different observers. We find that this ambiguity corresponds precisely to the free choice of a single function on H . We also consider the background-free construction of H , where the spacetime is not given. The evolution equations then constrain aspects of the full spacetime and the screen's embedding in it.

  11. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better.

  12. Impact of an activities-based adult dementia care program

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Margaret; Koch, Kathleen; Hynan, Linda S; Carr, Sandra; Byrnes, Kathleen; Weiner, Myron F

    2005-01-01

    The investigators studied over one year the impact of a newly established once-a-week activity-based day care program for dementia patients combined with 17 educational sessions for caregivers held at the same facility. Outcome measures were patient and caregiver quality of life (QOL), patient behavioral disturbance, and use of community-based resources. Of the 37 enrollees, 3 chose not to start the program and 13 dropped out before the end of one year, largely due to health-related issues. Of the initial group, 21 attended for the entire year. The average patient Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) score at entry was 16, indicating a moderate level of dementia. Average score on the CERAD Behavior Rating Scale for Dementia (BRSD) was 30.1, indicating a mild level of behavioral disturbance. Attendance at day care was 91%; at the caregiver educational sessions, 74%. Patient and caregiver enthusiasm for the program was high and all wanted to continue attendance beyond the study period despite the fact that patients reported no change in QOL. Caregivers rated patients as having significantly less QOL, and rated their own QOL as unchanged. Symptomatic patient behaviors, as measured by the BRSD, increased significantly over the period of study. Caregivers reported greater use of community resources. PMID:18568062

  13. Activity-Based Costing in the After Press Services Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevasuthisilp, Suntichai; Punsathitwong, Kosum

    2009-10-01

    This research was conducted to apply activity-based costing (ABC) in an after press service company in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. The company produces all of its products by one-stop service (such as coating, stitching, binding, die cutting, and gluing). All products are made to order, and have different sizes and patterns. A strategy of low price is used to compete in the marketplace. After cost analysis, the study found that the company has high overhead (36.5% of total cost). The company's problem is its use of traditional cost accounting, which has low accuracy in assigning overhead costs. If management uses this information when pricing customer orders, losses may occur because real production costs may be higher than the selling price. Therefore, the application of ABC in cost analysis can help executives receive accurate cost information; establish a sound pricing strategy; and improve the manufacturing process by determining work activities which have excessively high production costs. According to this research, 6 out of 56 items had a production cost higher than the selling price, leading to losses of 123,923 baht per year. Methods used to solve this problem were: reducing production costs; establishing suitable prices; and creating a sales promotion with lower prices for customers whose orders include processes involving unused capacity. These actions will increase overall sales of the company, and allow more efficient use of its machinery.

  14. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  15. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-04-11

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template.

  16. Emerging roles for β-arrestin-1 in the control of the pancreatic β-cell function and mass: new therapeutic strategies and consequences for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Dalle, Stéphane; Ravier, Magalie A; Bertrand, Gyslaine

    2011-03-01

    Defective insulin secretion is a feature of type 2 diabetes that results from inadequate compensatory increase in β-cell mass, decreased β-cell survival and impaired glucose-dependent insulin release. Pancreatic β-cell proliferation, survival and secretion are thought to be regulated by signalling pathways linked to G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptors. β-arrestin-1 serves as a multifunctional adaptor protein that mediates receptor desensitization, receptor internalization, and links GPCRs to downstream pathways such as tyrosine kinase Src, ERK1/2 or Akt/PKB. Importantly, recent studies found that β-arrestin-1 mediates GLP-1 signalling to insulin secretion, GLP-1 antiapoptotic effect by phosphorylating the proapoptotic protein Bad through ERK1/2 activation, and PACAP potentiation of glucose-induced long-lasting ERK1/2 activation controlling IRS-2 expression. Together, these novel findings reveal an important functional role for β-arrestin-1 in the regulation of insulin secretion and β-cell survival by GPCRs.

  17. Turbulent flow through screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation has been carried out on the effects of different types of screens on turbulent flow, in particular turbulent boundary layers. The effect of a screen on a turbulent boundary layer is to give it a 'new lease of life'. The boundary layer turbulence is reorganized and the thickness reduced, thus making it less susceptible to separation. The aerodynamic properties of plastic screens are found to differ significantly from those of the conventional metal screens, evidently because of differences in the weaving properties. The 'overshoot' in mean velocity profile near the boudnary layer edge is shown to be a result of the effect of screen inclination on pressure drop coefficient. A more accurate formulation for the deflection coefficient of a screen is also proposed.

  18. Chlamydia Screening Decision Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    uncomplicated chlamydia infection can be treated with an inexpensive course of oral antibiotics taken on an outpatient basis, while pelvic inflammatory disease... contraception , I would screen for chlamydia . Chlamydia Screening 31 I would say intuition doesn’t play into my decision making because there are high risk...or inconsistent barrier contraception Chlamydia Screening 34 practice. This view was not supported by the data obtained from the review of patient

  19. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  20. Behavioral Screening for Toxicology | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Screening for behavioral toxicity, or neurotoxicity, has been in use for decades; however, only in the past 20 years has this become a standard practice in toxicology. Current screening batteries, such as the functional observational battery (FOB), are derived from protocols used in pharmacology, toxicology, and psychology. Although there is a range of protocols in use today, all focus on detailed observations and specific tests of reflexes and responses. Several neurological functions are typically assessed, including autonomic, neuromuscular, and sensory, as well as levels of activity and excitability. The tests have been shown to be valid in detecting expected effects of known neurotoxicants, and reliable and reproducible whn compared across laboratories. Regardless of the specific protocol used, proper conduct and statistical analyses of the data are critical. Interpretation is based on the information from individual end points as well as the profile, or pattern, of effects observed. As long as continual refinements are made, behavioral screening methods will continue to be important tools with which to protect human health in the future.autonomic function; behavior; behavioral phenotypes; behavioral toxicity; excitability; functional observational battery ; motor activity; mouse; neuromuscular function; positive controls; rat; screening battery ; sensory function Screening for behavioral toxicity, or neurotoxicity, has been in use for decades; how

  1. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Answers HPV and Cancer HPV Cancer Screening HPV Vaccines HPV Vaccine Safety For Clinicians Why is HPV Vaccine Important Clinician Factsheets Schedules & Recommendations Answering Parents Questions ...

  2. Colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pak Wo Webber; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should work in partnership to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening to reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. PMID:28111691

  3. Testicular Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  4. [Overdiagnosis in cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Cervera Deval, J; Sentís Crivillé, M; Zulueta, J J

    2015-01-01

    In screening programs, overdiagnosis is defined as the detection of a disease that would have gone undetected without screening when that disease would not have resulted in morbimortality and was treated unnecessarily. Overdiagnosis is a bias inherent in screening and an undesired effect of secondary prevention and improved sensitivity of diagnostic techniques. It is difficult to discriminate a priori between clinically relevant diagnoses and those in which treatment is unnecessary. To minimize the effects of overdiagnosis, screening should be done in patients at risk.

  5. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jack S

    2008-03-01

    Although there are several methods available for colon cancer screening, none is optimal. This article reviews methods for screening, including fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, and double contrast barium enema. A simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and relatively sensitive screening test is needed to identify people at risk for developing advanced adenomas or colorectal cancer who would benefit from colonoscopy. It is hoped that new markers will be identified that perform better. Until then we fortunately have a variety of screening strategies that do work.

  6. Screening key microRNAs for castration-resistant prostate cancer based on miRNA/mRNA functional synergistic network.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Wang, Sugui; Zhang, Wenyu; Qiu, Junyi; Shan, Yuxi; Yang, Dongrong; Shen, Bairong

    2015-12-22

    High-throughput methods have been used to explore the mechanisms by which androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (ASPC) develops into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, it is difficult to interpret cryptic results by routine experimental methods. In this study, we performed systematic and integrative analysis to detect key miRNAs that contribute to CRPC development. From three DNA microarray datasets, we retrieved 11 outlier microRNAs (miRNAs) that had expression discrepancies between ASPC and CRPC using a specific algorithm. Two of the miRNAs (miR-125b and miR-124) have previously been shown to be related to CRPC. Seven out of the other nine miRNAs were confirmed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analysis. MiR-210, miR-218, miR-346, miR-197, and miR-149 were found to be over-expressed, while miR-122, miR-145, and let-7b were under-expressed in CRPC cell lines. GO and KEGG pathway analyses revealed that miR-218, miR-197, miR-145, miR-122, and let-7b, along with their target genes, were found to be involved in the PI3K and AKT3 signaling network, which is known to contribute to CRPC development. We then chose five miRNAs to verify the accuracy of the analysis. The target genes of each miRNA were altered significantly upon transfection of specific miRNA mimics in the C4-2 CRPC cell line, which was consistent with our pathway analysis results. Finally, we hypothesized that miR-218, miR-145, miR-197, miR-149, miR-122, and let-7b may contribute to the development of CRPC through the influence of Ras, Rho proteins, and the SCF complex. Further investigation is needed to verify the functions of the identified novel pathways in CRPC development.

  7. Screening and functional identification of lncRNAs under β-diketone antibiotic exposure to zebrafish (Danio rerio) using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuedong; Lin, Jiebo; Li, Fanghui; Zhang, Cao; Li, Jieyi; Wang, Caihong; Dahlgren, Randy A; Zhang, Hongqin; Wang, Huili

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted considerable research interest, but so far no data are available on the roles of lncRNAs and their target genes under chronic β-diketone antibiotic (DKAs) exposure to zebrafish (Danio rerio). Herein, we identified 1.66, 3.07 and 3.36×10(4) unique lncRNAs from the 0, 6.25 and 12.5mg/L DKA treatment groups, respectively. In comparison with the control group, the 6.25 and 12.5mg/L treatments led to up-regulation of 2064 and 2479 lncRNAs, and down-regulation of 778 and 954 lncRNAs, respectively. Of these, 44 and 39 lncRNAs in the respective 6.25 and 12.5mg/L treatments displayed significant differential expression. Volcano and Venn diagrams of the differentially expressed lncRNAs were constructed on the basis of the differentially expressed lncRNAs. After analyzing 10 lncRNAs and potential target genes, a complex interaction network was constructed between them. The consistency of 7 target genes (tenm3, smarcc1b, myo9ab, ubr4, hoxb3a, mycbp2 and CR388046.3), co-regulated by 3 lncRNAs (TCONS_00129029, TCONS_00027240 and TCONS_00017790), was observed between their qRT-PCR and transcriptomic sequencing. By in situ hybridization (ISH), abnormal expression of 3 lncRNAs was observed in hepatic and spleen tissues, suggesting that they might be target organs for DKAs. A similar abnormal expression of two immune-related target genes (plk3 and syt10), co-regulated by the 3 identified lncRNAs, was observed in liver and spleen by ISH. Histopathological observations demonstrated hepatic parenchyma vacuolar degeneration and clot formation in hepatic tissues, and uneven distribution of brown metachromatic granules and larger nucleus in spleen tissues resulting from DKA exposure. Overall, DKA exposure led to abnormal expression of some lncRNAs and their potential target genes, and these genes might play a role in immune functions of zebrafish.

  8. 3T MRI investigation of cardiac left ventricular structure and function in a UK population: The tayside screening for the prevention of cardiac events (TASCFORCE) study

    PubMed Central

    Gandy, Stephen J.; Lambert, Matthew; Belch, Jill; Cavin, Ian; Crowe, Elena; Littleford, Roberta; MacFarlane, Jennifer A.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Nicholas, R. Stephen; Struthers, Allan; Sullivan, Frank; Waugh, Shelley A.; White, Richard D.; Weir‐McCall, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To scan a volunteer population using 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI of the left ventricular (LV) structure and function in healthy volunteers has been reported extensively at 1.5T. Materials and Methods A population of 1528 volunteers was scanned. A standardized approach was taken to acquire steady‐state free precession (SSFP) LV data in the short‐axis plane, and images were quantified using commercial software. Six observers undertook the segmentation analysis. Results Mean values (±standard deviation, SD) were: ejection fraction (EF) = 69 ± 6%, end diastolic volume index (EDVI) = 71 ± 13 ml/m2, end systolic volume index (ESVI) = 22 ± 7 ml/m2, stroke volume index (SVI) = 49 ± 8 ml/m2, and LV mass index (LVMI) = 55 ± 12 g/m2. The mean EF was slightly larger for females (69%) than for males (68%), but all other variables were smaller for females (EDVI 68v77 ml/m2, ESVI 21v25 ml/m2, SVI 46v52 ml/m2, LVMI 49v64 g/m2, all P < 0.05). The mean LV volume data mostly decreased with each age decade (EDVI males: –2.9 ± 1.3 ml/m2, females: –3.1 ± 0.8 ml/m2; ESVI males: –1.3 ± 0.7 ml/m2, females: –1.7 ± 0.5 ml/m2; SVI males: –1.7 ± 0.9 ml/m2, females: –1.4 ± 0.6 ml/m2; LVMI males: –1.6 ± 1.1 g/m2, females: –0.2 ± 0.6 g/m2) but the mean EF was virtually stable in males (0.6 ± 0.6%) and rose slightly in females (1.2 ± 0.5%) with age. Conclusion LV reference ranges are provided in this population‐based MR study at 3.0T. The variables are similar to those described at 1.5T, including variations with age and gender. These data may help to support future population‐based MR research studies that involve the use of 3.0T MRI scanners. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1186–1196. PMID:27143317

  9. A Genome-Wide mRNA Screen and Functional Analysis Reveal FOXO3 as a Candidate Gene for Chicken Growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Xu, Jiguo; He, Xiaomei; Xu, Haiping; Li, Guihuan; Du, Hongli; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    Chicken growth performance provides direct economic benefits to the poultry industry. However, the underlying genetic mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to identify candidate genes associated with chicken growth and investigate their potential mechanisms. We used RNA-Seq to study the breast muscle transcriptome in high and low tails of Recessive White Rock (WRRh, WRRl) and Xinghua chickens (XHh, XHl). A total of 60, 23, 153 and 359 differentially expressed genes were detected in WRRh vs. WRRl, XHh vs. XHl, WRRh vs. XHh and WRRl vs. XHl, respectively. GO, KEGG pathway and gene network analyses showed that CEBPB, FBXO32, FOXO3 and MYOD1 played key roles in growth. The functions of FBXO32 and FOXO3 were validated. FBXO32 was predominantly expressed in leg muscle, heart and breast muscle. After decreased FBXO32 expression, growth-related genes such as PDK4, IGF2R and IGF2BP3 were significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05). FBXO32 was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with carcass and meat quality traits, but not growth traits. FOXO3 was predominantly expressed in breast and leg muscle. In both of these tissues, the FOXO3 mRNA level in XH was significantly higher than that in WRR chickens with normal body weight (P < 0.05). In DF-1 cells, siRNA knockdown of FOXO3 significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited the MYOD expression and significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) the expression of growth-related genes including CEBPB, FBXO32, GH, GHR, IGF1R, IGF2R, IGF2BP1, IGF2BP3, INSR, PDK1 and PDK4. Moreover, 18 SNPs were identified in FOXO3. G66716193A was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with growth traits. The sites C66716002T, C66716195T and A66716179G were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with growth or carcass traits. These results demonstrated that FOXO3 is a candidate gene influencing chicken growth. Our observations provide new clues to understand the molecular basis of chicken growth.

  10. A Genome-Wide mRNA Screen and Functional Analysis Reveal FOXO3 as a Candidate Gene for Chicken Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Biao; Xu, Jiguo; He, Xiaomei; Xu, Haiping; Li, Guihuan; Du, Hongli; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    Chicken growth performance provides direct economic benefits to the poultry industry. However, the underlying genetic mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to identify candidate genes associated with chicken growth and investigate their potential mechanisms. We used RNA-Seq to study the breast muscle transcriptome in high and low tails of Recessive White Rock (WRRh, WRRl) and Xinghua chickens (XHh, XHl). A total of 60, 23, 153 and 359 differentially expressed genes were detected in WRRh vs. WRRl, XHh vs. XHl, WRRh vs. XHh and WRRl vs. XHl, respectively. GO, KEGG pathway and gene network analyses showed that CEBPB, FBXO32, FOXO3 and MYOD1 played key roles in growth. The functions of FBXO32 and FOXO3 were validated. FBXO32 was predominantly expressed in leg muscle, heart and breast muscle. After decreased FBXO32 expression, growth-related genes such as PDK4, IGF2R and IGF2BP3 were significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05). FBXO32 was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with carcass and meat quality traits, but not growth traits. FOXO3 was predominantly expressed in breast and leg muscle. In both of these tissues, the FOXO3 mRNA level in XH was significantly higher than that in WRR chickens with normal body weight (P < 0.05). In DF-1 cells, siRNA knockdown of FOXO3 significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited the MYOD expression and significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) the expression of growth-related genes including CEBPB, FBXO32, GH, GHR, IGF1R, IGF2R, IGF2BP1, IGF2BP3, INSR, PDK1 and PDK4. Moreover, 18 SNPs were identified in FOXO3. G66716193A was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with growth traits. The sites C66716002T, C66716195T and A66716179G were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with growth or carcass traits. These results demonstrated that FOXO3 is a candidate gene influencing chicken growth. Our observations provide new clues to understand the molecular basis of chicken growth. PMID:26366565

  11. Activities identification for activity-based cost/management applications of the diagnostics outpatient procedures.

    PubMed

    Alrashdan, Abdalla; Momani, Amer; Ababneh, Tamador

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems facing healthcare providers is to determine the actual cost for their procedures, which is important for internal accounting and price justification to insurers. The objective of this paper is to find suitable categories to identify the diagnostic outpatient medical procedures and translate them from functional orientation to process orientation. A hierarchal task tree is developed based on a classification schema of procedural activities. Each procedure is seen as a process consisting of a number of activities. This makes a powerful foundation for activity-based cost/management implementation and provides enough information to discover the value-added and non-value-added activities that assist in process improvement and eventually may lead to cost reduction. Work measurement techniques are used to identify the standard time of each activity at the lowest level of the task tree. A real case study at a private hospital is presented to demonstrate the proposed methodology.

  12. Development of Activity Based Probes For The Study of Legumain In Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, A.

    2010-12-01

    Proteases are enzymes, whose primary function is to cleave the peptide bonds of substrates. These enzymes are classified into five sub-families: cysteine, serine, threonine, metallo and aspartic. Legumain is a cysteine protease found primarily in lysosomes . It was initially identified in plants, but later found to play a role in antigen presentation in eukaryotic cells. Recent studies have shown that not only is legumain up-regulated in various human cancers, but also plays an important role in the growth and development of a tumor. Here we describe the development of an activity based probe, LE28, which will be a useful tool to aid in understanding how legumain contributes to tumorigenesis.

  13. Effect of Vibration on Retention Characteristics of Screen Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Park, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of the effect of vibration on the retention characteristics of screen acquisition systems was performed. The functioning of surface tension devices using fine-mesh screens requires that the pressure differential acting on the screen be less than its pressure retention capability. When exceeded, screen breakdown will occur and gas-free expulsion of propellant will no longer be possible. An analytical approach to predicting the effect of vibration was developed. This approach considers the transmission of the vibration to the screens of the device and the coupling of the liquid and the screen in establishing the screen response. A method of evaluating the transient response of the gas/liquid interface within the screen was also developed.

  14. Label-free monitoring of DNA polymerase activity based on a thrombin-binding aptamer G-quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Haisheng; Ma, Changbei; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Linxiu; Wu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a label-free assay for the detection of DNA polymerase activity based on a thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) G-quadruplex. In the presence of DNA polymerase, the 3'-OH termini of the hairpin substrate are immediately elongated to replace the TBA, which can be recognized quickly by the ThT dye and results in an increase of fluorescence. This method is highly sensitive with a detection limit of 0.1 U/mL. It is simple and cost-effective without any requirement of labeling with a fluorophore-quencher pair. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be applied to analyze the inhibition of DNA polymerase, which clearly indicates that the proposed method can be applied for screening of potential DNA polymerase inhibitors.

  15. Scoliosis Screening in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Pupil Personnel Services.

    The booklet outlines New York state school policy and procedures for screening students for scoliosis, lateral curvature of the spine. It is explained that screening is designed to discover spinal deformities early enough to prevent surgery. Planning aspects, including organizing a planning team for the school district, are discussed. Among…

  16. Screening: the legal view.

    PubMed

    Eaden, J; Mayberry, M K; Sherr, A; Mayberry, J F

    2001-05-01

    Screening has become central to the effective prevention of several diseases, but implementation suffers from difficulties with targeting and rates of compliance. Such issues are also complicated by the need to consider legal provisions regarding confidentiality of patients and other human rights issues. Screening has been an inexact science in relation to, e.g., faecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer, false positive and false negative tests for HIV, and there have been inadequate quality controls in breast cancer screening programmes. The public need to be made aware of what the screening programmes really offer, balanced against the expectations they may have. There needs to be a clearer understanding of the nature of the contractual and other legal rights of patients/consumers as against providers. A positive screening test may carry adverse consequences as well as benefits. It could alert an insurance company to a risk and lead to additional weighting or even outright rejection for life insurance policies. Job prospects may also be affected for employees. The method of informing patients in relation to screening and screening failure has already been considered by the courts. Realistic information about both screening and treatment efficiency needs to be offered to patients so that they can have a real understanding of what can and cannot be achieved by current science. The development of understanding of the human genome makes the need for clearer legislation in this are more urgent.

  17. Preconception Carrier Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can the results of a carrier screening test tell me? A genetic counselor or your health care provider will use the results to calculate the ... the publisher. Related FAQs Genetic Disorders (FAQ094) Screening Tests for Birth Defects ... Education & Events Annual Meeting CME Overview CREOG ...

  18. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An ocular screening system designed for safe, convenient screening of large groups was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, leading to the formation of Medical Sciences Corporation. The system identifies visual defects accurately and inexpensively, and includes a photorefractor telephoto lens and an electronic flash. Medical Sciences Corporation is using the device to test at schools, industrial plants, etc.

  19. Mechanical component screening for scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J. L.; Quinn, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The critical mechanical components of the scan mirror mechanism are described and their evaluation and screening procedures are discussed. A bumper/damper unit is used in the design to reverse motion of the mirror and effect scan and retrace cycles. A wear evaluation was conducted on the bumper impact surfaces that established nylon 6-10 as an acceptable material. The elastomeric dampers were subjected to thermal vacuum tests for condensables and outgassing as well as parametric life tests. The flexure pivots that support the mirror were tested to establish a curve of stress plotted as a function of cycles to failure for rotational operation. The pivots met the life requirement of 150,000,000 cycles at a + or - 2.9 deg amplitude during fatigue testing. Screening procedures were established for dampers and flexure pivots to obtain flight quality components.

  20. Psychological screening program overview.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathleen M; Huffman, Ann H; Adler, Amy B; Castro, Carl A

    2002-10-01

    This article reviews the literature on health surveillance conducted during military deployments, focusing on models for assessing the impact of operational deployments on peacekeepers. A discussion of the stressors and potential mental health consequences of peacekeeping operations follows with relevant examples of findings from U.S. and international military forces. Psychological screening in different peacekeeping operations conducted in U.S. Army-Europe is reviewed. The review begins with the redeployment screening of military personnel deployed to Bosnia mandated under the Joint Medical Surveillance Program, and continues through the present screening of units deployed to Kosovo. The detailed description of the screening program includes a discussion of procedures and measures and demonstrates the evolution of the program. A summary of key findings from the screening program and a discussion of future research directions are provided.

  1. Medical Logistics Functional Integration Management Activity Based Costing and Data Modeling Workshop. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-02

    e.g., mobile and cellular), radios, pagers, security systems, access codes, and personal identification machines . COMMUNICATION-OUTLET A subtype of...delivering mail. PREVENTIVE- MAINTANCE Systematic and/or prescribed maintenance intended to reduce the probability of failure. (JCS Publ) PROGRAM A planed

  2. Medical Logistics Functional Integration Management Activity Based Costing and Data Modeling Workshop. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-02

    Appendix wre Incuded to give the reader a cursory3 ~look at the IDEF data moideling techniques; ( IDEFIX ). Definition 3 ~documentation of data elements...and their relationships in the enerprise. The IDEFIX technique is the key to achieving integration. As a resut of applying the techniquie,3 ~unique data...definitions emerge, which describe the stable wacwe of an organizaion’s rwsable data. Components Activities I Th~e basic components of an IDEFIX

  3. Pooled CRISPR screening with single-cell transcriptome readout.

    PubMed

    Datlinger, Paul; Rendeiro, André F; Schmidl, Christian; Krausgruber, Thomas; Traxler, Peter; Klughammer, Johanna; Schuster, Linda C; Kuchler, Amelie; Alpar, Donat; Bock, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    CRISPR-based genetic screens are accelerating biological discovery, but current methods have inherent limitations. Widely used pooled screens are restricted to simple readouts including cell proliferation and sortable marker proteins. Arrayed screens allow for comprehensive molecular readouts such as transcriptome profiling, but at much lower throughput. Here we combine pooled CRISPR screening with single-cell RNA sequencing into a broadly applicable workflow, directly linking guide RNA expression to transcriptome responses in thousands of individual cells. Our method for CRISPR droplet sequencing (CROP-seq) enables pooled CRISPR screens with single-cell transcriptome resolution, which will facilitate high-throughput functional dissection of complex regulatory mechanisms and heterogeneous cell populations.

  4. Effect of Spin-Orbit Coupling on the Actinide Dioxides AnO2 (An=Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, and Am): A Screened Hybrid Density Functional Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiaodong; Martin, Richard L.; Roy, Lindsay E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Rudin, Sven P.; Batista, Enrique R.; McCleskey, Thomas M.; Scott, Brian L.; Bauer, Eve; Joyce, John J.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2012-10-21

    We present a systematic comparison of the lattice structures, electronic density of states, and band gaps of actinide dioxides, AnO₂ (An=Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, and Am) predicted by the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof screened hybrid density functional (HSE) with the self-consistent inclusion of spin-orbit coupling(SOC). The computed HSE lattice constants and band gaps of AnO₂ are in consistently good agreement with the available experimental data across the series, and differ little from earlier HSE results without SOC. ThO₂ is a simple band insulator (f⁰), while PaO₂, UO₂, and NpO₂ are predicted to be Mott insulators. The remainders (PuO₂ and AmO₂) show considerable O2p/An5f mixing and are classified as charge-transfer insulators. We also compare our results for UO₂, NpO₂, and PuO₂with the PBE+U, self interaction correction (SIC), and dynamic mean-field theory (DMFT) many-body approximations.

  5. Effect of spin-orbit coupling on the actinide dioxides AnO2 (An=Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, and Am): A screened hybrid density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Martin, Richard L.; Roy, Lindsay E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Rudin, Sven P.; Batista, Enrique R.; McCleskey, Thomas M.; Scott, Brian L.; Bauer, Eve; Joyce, John J.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2012-10-01

    We present a systematic comparison of the lattice structures, electronic density of states, and band gaps of actinide dioxides, AnO2 (An=Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, and Am) predicted by the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof screened hybrid density functional (HSE) with the self-consistent inclusion of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The computed HSE lattice constants and band gaps of AnO2 are in consistently good agreement with the available experimental data across the series, and differ little from earlier HSE results without SOC. ThO2 is a simple band insulator (f 0), while PaO2, UO2, and NpO2 are predicted to be Mott insulators. The remainders (PuO2 and AmO2) show considerable O2p/An5f mixing and are classified as charge-transfer insulators. We also compare our results for UO2, NpO2, and PuO2 with the PBE+U, self interaction correction (SIC), and dynamic mean-field theory (DMFT) many-body approximations.

  6. Application of endocrine disruptor screening program fish short-term reproduction assay: Reproduction and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to Bermuda pond sediment.

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Mathis, Michael; Fort, Chelsea E; Fort, Hayley M; Bacon, Jamie P

    2015-06-01

    A modified tier 1 Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) 21-d fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) was used to evaluate the effects of sediment exposure from freshwater and brackish ponds in Bermuda on reproductive fecundity and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Reproductively active male and female fish were exposed to control sediment and sediment from 2 freshwater ponds (fathead minnow) and 2 marine ponds (killifish) contaminated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons and metals via flow-through exposure for 21 d. Reproductive fecundity was monitored daily. At termination, the status of the reproductive endocrine system was assessed by the gonadosomatic index, gonadal histology, plasma steroids (estrogen [E2], testosterone [T], and 11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]), steroidogenic enzymes (aromatase and combined 3β/17β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [3β/17β-HSD]), and plasma vitellogenin (VTG). Decreased reproductive fecundity, lower male body weight, and altered endocrinological measures of reproductive status were observed in both species. Higher plasma T levels in female minnows and 11-KT levels in both male and female minnows and female killifish exposed to freshwater and brackish sediments, respectively. Decreased female E2 and VTG levels and gonadal cytochrome P19 (aromatase) activity were also found in sediment exposed females from both species. No effect on female 3β/17β-HSD activity was found in either species. The FSTRA provided a robust model capable of modification to evaluate reproductive effects of sediment exposure in fish.

  7. Barriers to cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Womeodu, R J; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Many barriers to cancer screening have been summarized and discussed. Barriers have been documented in all patient populations, but some groups such as ethnic minorities and the elderly face unique barriers. The barriers to cancer screening, are multifactorial, but much of the responsibility for change must lie with health care providers and the health care delivery industry. This is not to free the patient of all responsibility, but some significant barriers are beyond their direct control. Take, for example, socioeconomic status, disease knowledge, and culturally related perceptions and myths about cancer detection and treatment. The health care industry must do a better job identifying and overcoming these barriers. The significant effects of provider counseling and advice must not be underestimated. Patients must first be advised, and then further actions must be taken if they reject the screening advice. Did they refuse adherence to recommendations because they do not view themselves as susceptible, because of overwhelming personal barriers, or because of a fatalistic attitude toward cancer detection and treatment? If that is the case, physicians and health care institutions must attempt to change perceptions, educate, and personalize the message so that patients accept their disease susceptibility [table: see text]. Multiple patient and provider risk factors have been identified that can be used to target patients particularly at high risk for inadequate cancer screening and providers at high risk for performing inadequate screening. Research has clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of interventions to improve tracking of patient and physician compliance with screening recommendations. Further research is needed to show the impact of managed-care penetration and payer status on screening efforts, and incentive schemes need to be tested that reward institutions and third-party payers who develop uniform standards and procedures for cancer screening. The

  8. Advancing understanding of microbial bioenergy conversion processes by activity-based protein profiling

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yun; Fredrickson, James K.; Sadler, Natalie C.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Here, the development of renewable biofuels is a global priority, but success will require novel technologies that greatly improve our understanding of microbial systems biology. An approach with great promise in enabling functional characterization of microbes is activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), which employs chemical probes to directly measure enzyme function in discrete enzyme classes in vivo and/or in vitro, thereby facilitating the rapid discovery of new biocatalysts and enabling much improved biofuel production platforms. We review general design strategies in ABPP, and highlight recent advances that are or could be pivotal to biofuels processes including applications of ABPP to cellulosicmore » bioethanol, biodiesel, and phototrophic production of hydrocarbons. We also examine the key challenges and opportunities of ABPP in renewable biofuels research. The integration of ABPP with molecular and systems biology approaches will shed new insight on the catalytic and regulatory mechanisms of functional enzymes and their synergistic effects in the field of biofuels production.« less

  9. Preschool vision screening.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, S N; Tamhne, R C; Thompson, L; Francis, P M; Anderson, J; Colver, A F

    1991-01-01

    Although a good case for preschool screening for vision defects can be made there is very little evidence that existing programmes are effective in practice. A comparative trial of three different methods of preschool vision screening is described. Some 7000 children initially aged 5 months (younger cohorts) and 30 months (older cohorts) in three matched areas entered the trial during 1987. During 18 months of follow up new visual and ocular defects among these children were ascertained through ophthalmology outpatients and from optician records. Screening at 35 months by an orthoptist based in the community is superior to conventional health visitor surveillance at 30 months and to an agreed programme of primary care screening for squint at 30-36 months as judged by screening sensitivity (100% v 50% v 50%) and the incidence of treated target conditions (17 v 3 v 5 per 1000 person years). A notable feature in the area served by the orthoptist is that 13 children received treatment for straight eyed visual acuity loss from among 1000 children whereas there were no such cases among 2500 in the comparison areas. In the younger cohorts (that is, screening at age 5-9 months) all three programmes showed equally poor results, only one of the eight treated target conditions arising from all 3500 younger children being screen detected. PMID:2025002

  10. Rare key functional domain missense substitutions in MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN contribute to breast cancer susceptibility: results from a Breast Cancer Family Registry case-control mutation-screening study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The MRE11A-RAD50-Nibrin (MRN) complex plays several critical roles related to repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Inherited mutations in the three components predispose to genetic instability disorders and the MRN genes have been implicated in breast cancer susceptibility, but the underlying data are not entirely convincing. Here, we address two related questions: (1) are some rare MRN variants intermediate-risk breast cancer susceptibility alleles, and if so (2) do the MRN genes follow a BRCA1/BRCA2 pattern wherein most susceptibility alleles are protein-truncating variants, or do they follow an ATM/CHEK2 pattern wherein half or more of the susceptibility alleles are missense substitutions? Methods Using high-resolution melt curve analysis followed by Sanger sequencing, we mutation screened the coding exons and proximal splice junction regions of the MRN genes in 1,313 early-onset breast cancer cases and 1,123 population controls. Rare variants in the three genes were pooled using bioinformatics methods similar to those previously applied to ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2, and then assessed by logistic regression. Results Re-analysis of our ATM, BRCA1, and BRCA2 mutation screening data revealed that these genes do not harbor pathogenic alleles (other than modest-risk SNPs) with minor allele frequencies >0.1% in Caucasian Americans, African Americans, or East Asians. Limiting our MRN analyses to variants with allele frequencies of <0.1% and combining protein-truncating variants, likely spliceogenic variants, and key functional domain rare missense substitutions, we found significant evidence that the MRN genes are indeed intermediate-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes (odds ratio (OR) = 2.88, P = 0.0090). Key domain missense substitutions were more frequent than the truncating variants (24 versus 12 observations) and conferred a slightly higher OR (3.07 versus 2.61) with a lower P value (0.029 versus 0.14). Conclusions These data establish

  11. The Effect of Activity-Based Costing on Logistics Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    361 46. Current Cost Accounting System Can Trace Costs to Specific Vendors ..................... 362 47. Will Need to Accurately...elsewhere in the firm? a. What problems have the logistics functions encountered with their current cost accounting systems? 13 b. What benefits the...have already recognized problems within their current cost accounting systems. He claims the systems ". . .give managers incorrect product costing

  12. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-08

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation o