Science.gov

Sample records for actor-partner interdependence modeling

  1. The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model: A Model of Bidirectional Effects in Developmental Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, William L.; Kenny, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) is a model of dyadic relationships that integrates a conceptual view of interdependence with the appropriate statistical techniques for measuring and testing it. In this article we present the APIM as a general, longitudinal model for measuring bidirectional effects in interpersonal relationships. We…

  2. Interdependence theory and the actor-partner interdependence model: where theory and method converge.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Robert E; Knee, C Raymond

    2012-11-01

    This work describes an application of the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) that allows researchers to test hypotheses in terms of interdependence theory (IT). The authors' goal is to move beyond the obvious similarities of these two frameworks by providing a detailed conceptual integration. This analysis demonstrates that aspects of APIM analysis reveal a useful perspective on interdependence not explicitly articulated by IT. They also expand on ideas presented by Kenny and Ledermann by exploring the relationship between their ratio parameter k and IT, and introducing two additional ratios (h and c) also suggested by IT. A complete worked example of APIM analysis from the perspective of IT, along with a SAS MACRO that produces confidence intervals for k, h, and c, is provided.

  3. Assessing Mediation in Dyadic Data Using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledermann, Thomas; Macho, Siegfried; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of mediation in dyadic data is an important issue if researchers are to test process models. Using an extended version of the actor-partner interdependence model the estimation and testing of mediation is complex, especially when dyad members are distinguishable (e.g., heterosexual couples). We show how the complexity of the model…

  4. Sharing, caring, and surveilling: an actor-partner interdependence model examination of Facebook relational maintenance strategies.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Bree

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Relational maintenance is connected to high quality friendships. Friendship maintenance behaviors may occur online via social networking sites. This study utilized an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to examine how Facebook maintenance and surveillance affect friendship quality. Bryant and Marmo's (2012) Facebook maintenance scale was evaluated, revealing two factors: sharing and caring. Facebook surveillance was also measured. For friendship satisfaction and liking, significant positive actor and partner effects emerged for caring; significant negative actor, partner, and interaction effects emerged for sharing; and significant positive actor effects emerged for surveillance. For friendship closeness, significant positive actor effects emerged for caring and surveillance.

  5. Ex-couples' unwanted pursuit behavior: an actor-partner interdependence model approach.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Olivia; Loeys, Tom; Buysse, Ann

    2013-04-01

    Unwanted pursuit behavior (UPB) refers to a wide range of repeated, unwanted, and privacy-violating intrusions that are inflicted to pursue an intimate or romantic relationship. These behaviors most often occur when partners end their romantic entanglements. Despite the fact that UPB is grounded in relationships, psychological explanations for post-breakup UPB perpetration have been restricted to actor effects assessed in samples of separated individuals. For that reason, the present study aimed to identify feasible partner effects that additionally explain UPB perpetration using a Flemish sample of 46 heterosexual divorced couples, beginning with the notion of interdependence. Using actor-partner interdependence models, we explored actor, partner, and gender main and interaction effects of anxious attachment, satisfaction, alternatives, investments, and conflict in the previous marriage on the perpetration of post-divorce UPBs. The significant Partner × Gender interactions of anxious attachment and satisfaction, Actor × Partner interactions of anxious attachment and quality of alternatives, and the marginally significant partner effect of relational conflict underline the important role of the dyad in studying UPB perpetration. These findings shed new light on the nature of UPB perpetration that go beyond the individual and support the use of a systemic approach in clinical practices.

  6. Detecting, measuring, and testing dyadic patterns in the actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Kenny, David A; Ledermann, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Family researchers have used the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) to study romantic couples, parent-child dyads, and siblings. We discuss a new method to detect, measure, and test different theoretically important patterns in the APIM: equal actor and partner effect (couple pattern); same size, but different signs of actor and partner effects (contrast pattern); and zero partner effects (actor-only pattern). To measure these different patterns, as well as others, we propose the estimation of the parameter k, which equals the partner effect divided by the actor effect. For both indistinguishable dyad members (e.g., twins) and distinguishable dyad members (e.g., heterosexual couples), we propose strategies for estimating and testing different models. We illustrate our new approach with four data sets.

  7. An actor-partner interdependence model of spousal criticism and depression.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kristina M; Smith, David A

    2010-08-01

    Although perceived criticism is relational, most theory and research concerns only relatives' criticism toward patients and not the converse. With a sample of 33 depressed patients and their spouses, we take a fully relational approach to criticism by testing an actor-partner interdependence model (Kenny, Kashy, & Cook, 2006). Patient intended criticism was especially strongly associated with depressive symptoms for wives, whereas patient perceived criticism was especially negatively related to depressive symptoms for husbands. Nondepressed partner intended criticism was positively related to patient depressive symptoms, but nondepressed wife perceived criticism was negatively related to husband depressive symptoms. The importance of including patient intended and partner perceived criticism as well as examining sex differences in models of criticism and depression are discussed.

  8. Testing crossover effects in an actor-partner interdependence model among Chinese dual-earner couples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Cheung, Fanny M

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the crossover effects from one partner's work-family interface (work-family conflict [WFC] and work-family enrichment [WFE]) to the other partner's four outcomes (psychological strain, life satisfaction, marital satisfaction and job satisfaction) in a sample of Chinese dual-earner couples. Married couples (N = 361) completed a battery of questionnaires, including the work-family interface scale, the psychological strain scale, the life, marital, as well as job satisfaction scale. Results from the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) analyses showed that wives' WFE was negatively associated with husbands' psychological strain, and positively associated with husbands' life, marital and job satisfaction. Furthermore, husbands' WFC was negatively related to wives' marital satisfaction, whereas husbands' WFE was positively related to wives' marital satisfaction. Theoretical and practical implications were discussed, and future research directions were provided.

  9. Graphic Methods for Interpreting Longitudinal Dyadic Patterns From Repeated-Measures Actor-Partner Interdependence Models.

    PubMed

    Perry, Nicholas S; Baucom, Katherine J W; Bourne, Stacia; Butner, Jonathan; Crenshaw, Alexander O; Hogan, Jasara N; Imel, Zac E; Wiltshire, Travis J; Baucom, Brian R W

    2017-02-27

    Researchers commonly use repeated-measures actor-partner interdependence models (RM-APIM) to understand how romantic partners change in relation to one another over time. However, traditional interpretations of the results of these models do not fully or correctly capture the dyadic temporal patterns estimated in RM-APIM. Interpretation of results from these models largely focuses on the meaning of single-parameter estimates in isolation from all the others. However, considering individual coefficients separately impedes the understanding of how these associations combine to produce an interdependent pattern that emerges over time. Additionally, positive within-person, or actor, effects are commonly misinterpreted as indicating growth from one time point to the next when they actually represent decline. We suggest that change-as-outcome RM-APIMs and vector field diagrams (VFDs) can be used to improve the understanding and presentation of dyadic patterns of association described by standard RM-APIMs. The current article briefly reviews the conceptual foundations of RM-APIMs, demonstrates how change-as-outcome RM-APIMs and VFDs can aid interpretation of standard RM-APIMs, and provides a tutorial in making VFDs using multilevel modeling. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Parental Self-Efficacy and Positive Contributions Regarding Autism Spectrum Condition: An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-López, Cristina; Sarriá, Encarnación; Pozo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Couples affect each other cognitively, emotionally and behaviorally. The goal of this study is to test the benefits and potential use of the actor-partner interdependence model in examining how parental self-efficacy and positive contributions of fathers and mothers of children with Autism Spectrum Condition influence each other's psychological…

  11. Reciprocal Associations Among Maternal and Child Characteristics of At-Risk Families: A Longitudinal Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    PubMed

    Claridge, Amy M; Wojciak, Armeda S; Lettenberger-Klein, Cassandra G; Pettigrew, Haley V; McWey, Lenore M; Chaviano, Casey L

    2015-07-01

    Researchers have found linear associations among maternal and child characteristics. However, family systems theorists suggest that relationships are more complex and family members are interdependent. We used actor-partner interdependence modeling to unravel associations among maternal and child characteristics to predict outcomes in adolescence. We used data from 361 mother-child dyads from the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect and found both actor and partner effects. Maternal depression and history of victimization were associated with children's later reports of lower mother-adolescent relationship quality. Children's perceptions of relationship quality were also associated with mothers' later depressive symptoms and perceptions of relationship quality. Overall, results highlighted interdependence among mothers and their children over time. We discuss implications for marriage and family therapists.

  12. Dyadic effects of marital satisfaction on coparenting in Chinese families: Based on the actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wu, Xin-Chun

    2016-04-18

    Based on the actor-partner interdependence model, this study explored the spillover and crossover effects of marital satisfaction on coparenting in Chinese nuclear and extended families. Spillover and crossover effects refer to the transfer of experiences, affects or behaviors, focusing on the intra-personal and inter-personal transfer of a marital subsystem to a coparenting subsystem. The participants comprised 279 couples with children ranging in age from 3 to 7 years old. The marital satisfaction and extent of coparenting of both the fathers and the mothers was tested to examine the dyadic interaction. Structural equation modeling results revealed significant intra-personal and inter-personal correlations between marital satisfaction and coparenting, indicating spillover and crossover effects in nuclear and extended families, and there were no differences between the two family structures. The results indicated that fathers' marital satisfaction influenced both fathers' and mothers' coparenting practices.

  13. Parental Self-Efficacy and Positive Contributions Regarding Autism Spectrum Condition: An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    PubMed

    García-López, Cristina; Sarriá, Encarnación; Pozo, Pilar

    2016-07-01

    Couples affect each other cognitively, emotionally and behaviorally. The goal of this study is to test the benefits and potential use of the actor-partner interdependence model in examining how parental self-efficacy and positive contributions of fathers and mothers of children with Autism Spectrum Condition influence each other's psychological adaptation. The sample includes 76 Spanish couples who completed validated questionnaires measuring predictors, i.e., self-efficacy and positive contributions, and adaptation outcomes i.e., stress, anxiety, depression and psychological well-being. Multilevel analysis revealed many actor and some partner effects of parental self-efficacy and positive contributions to be important determinants of adaptation above and beyond child and sociodemographic factors, and as such, these effects should be targeted in clinical intervention programs.

  14. The role of intergenerational similarity and parenting in adolescent self-criticism: An actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Bleys, Dries; Soenens, Bart; Boone, Liesbet; Claes, Stephan; Vliegen, Nicole; Luyten, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Research investigating the development of adolescent self-criticism has typically focused on the role of either parental self-criticism or parenting. This study used an actor-partner interdependence model to examine an integrated theoretical model in which achievement-oriented psychological control has an intervening role in the relation between parental and adolescent self-criticism. Additionally, the relative contribution of both parents and the moderating role of adolescent gender were examined. Participants were 284 adolescents (M = 14 years, range = 12-16 years) and their parents (M = 46 years, range = 32-63 years). Results showed that only maternal self-criticism was directly related to adolescent self-criticism. However, both parents' achievement-oriented psychological control had an intervening role in the relation between parent and adolescent self-criticism in both boys and girls. Moreover, one parent's achievement-oriented psychological control was not predicted by the self-criticism of the other parent.

  15. Client and therapist therapeutic alliance, session evaluation, and client reliable change: a moderated actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, Dennis M; Marmarosh, Cheri L; Hilsenroth, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 2000) was used to study the early therapeutic alliance in 74 clients being treated by 29 therapists to explore the relationship between the alliance and treatment progress, while prioritizing the dyadic nature of the alliance. The APIM examines collaboration/influence by modeling the impact of one dyad member's alliance ratings on the other member's session impact rating (partner effects). In terms of the alliance, the results revealed significant client-actor effects for client ratings of session depth and positivity as well as significant therapist-actor effects for therapist ratings of session smoothness and positivity. For client-rated alliance, there were also significant client-partner effects for therapist ratings of session depth. For clients who made a reliable change in treatment, an increase in client-reported alliance was related to therapist reporting more arousal in the 3rd session. For clients who did not make a reliable change in treatment, client-reported alliance was not related to therapist arousal. Limitations of the study and implications of the findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Working alliance, real relationship, session quality, and client improvement in psychodynamic psychotherapy: A longitudinal actor partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, Dennis M; Hill, Clara E; Gelso, Charles J; Baumann, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    We used the Actor Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 2000) to examine the dyadic associations of 74 clients and 23 therapists in their evaluations of working alliance, real relationship, session quality, and client improvement over time in ongoing psychodynamic or interpersonal psychotherapy. There were significant actor effects for both therapists and clients, with the participant's own ratings of working alliance and real relationship independently predicting their own evaluations of session quality. There were significant client partner effects, with clients' working alliance and real relationship independently predicting their therapists' evaluations of session quality. The client partner real relationship effect was stronger in later sessions than in earlier sessions. Therapists' real relationship ratings (partner effect) were a stronger predictor of clients' session quality ratings in later sessions than in earlier sessions. Therapists' working alliance ratings (partner effect) were a stronger predictor of clients' session quality ratings when clients made greater improvement than when clients made lesser improvement. For clients' session outcome ratings, there were complex three-way interactions, such that both Client real relationship and working alliance interacted with client improvement and time in treatment to predict clients' session quality. These findings strongly suggest both individual and partner effects when clients and therapists evaluate psychotherapy process and outcome. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  17. Remarriage Beliefs as Predictors of Marital Quality and Positive Interaction in Stepcouples: An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Chelsea L; Higginbotham, Brian; Adler-Baeder, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Using an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model, we examined remarriage beliefs as predictors of marital quality and positive interaction in a sample of 179 stepcouples. Three beliefs were measured using subscales from the Remarriage Belief Inventory (RMBI) including success is slim, children are the priority, and finances should be pooled. Several significant actor and partner effects were found for both wives' and husbands' beliefs. Wives' marital quality was positively associated with their own beliefs that finances should be pooled and negatively associated with their own beliefs that success is slim. Wives' reports of their own and spouses' positive interaction were both positively associated with their beliefs that finances should be pooled. Their reports of spouses' positive interaction were also negatively associated with husbands' beliefs that success is slim. Husbands' marital quality was positively associated with wives' beliefs that children are the priority, positively associated with their own beliefs that finances should be pooled, and negatively with success is slim. Positive interaction for husbands was positively associated with wives' beliefs that finances should be pooled and negatively associated with their own beliefs that success is slim. Finally, husbands' reports of positive interaction for their spouses were positively associated with wives' beliefs that finances should be pooled. Implications for future research utilizing dyadic data analysis with stepcouples are addressed.

  18. Contribution of marital conflict to marital quality in short and long-term marriages: An actor-partner interdependence model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Rezazade, Majid; Saadat, Hassan; Kimiaei, Seyed Ali; Zade, Nima Hoseyn

    2015-01-01

    Aims: In the field of family research, previous studies have made great strides toward understanding the relationship between marital conflict and quality. However, they have only studied couples in short-term marriages. Therefore, much remains to be unraveled with regard to long-term marriages. We aimed investigate the comparative contribution of aspects of marital conflict to marital quality in short-and long-term marriages in Iranian families. Materials and Methods: Using random clustered sampling, 400 dyads in intact first marriages were surveyed across eight provinces of Iran. Complete surveys for both husbands and wives were returned for 162 households (couple's response rate: 40.5%). Survey measures included demographics questionnaire, Barati and Sanai's Marital Conflict Questionnaire and Blum and Mehrabian's Comprehensive Marital Satisfaction Scale. Structural equation modeling was used to test the actor-partner interdependence model of marital conflict-marital quality. Results: Generalized additive models were incorporated to define what constitutes short-and long-term marriages. Based on the models regressed, duration ≤ 10 years was defined as short-term, whereas duration ≥ 25 years was labeled long-term. In short-term marriages (n = 44), decreased sexual relations, increased daily hassles and sidedness in relations with parents were negatively associated with marital quality in both actor and actor-to-partner paths. In long-term married couples (n = 46), only increased daily hassles (P < 0.001) and disagreement over financial affairs (P = 0.005) contributed to actor paths and only sidedness in relationships with parents showed significant negative association to marital quality in actor-to-partner paths. Conclusions: Different themes of conflict contribute to the diminished level of marital quality in early and late stages of the marriage. Conflicts over sex, relationship with extended family and daily hassles are emphasized in the early years of

  19. Associations of Emotional Distress and Perceived Health in Persons With Atrial Fibrillation and Their Partners Using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    PubMed

    Dalteg, Tomas; Benzein, Eva; Sandgren, Anna; Malm, Dan; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2016-08-01

    Individual behavior affects and is affected by other people. The aim of this study was to examine if emotional distress in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and their spouses was associated with their own and their partner's perceived health. Participants included 91 dyads of patients and their spouses. Emotional distress was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and perceived health was measured with the Short Form 36 Health Survey. The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model was used for dyad-level analyses of associations, using structural equation modeling. Higher levels of anxiety and depression were associated with lower levels of perceived health in patients and spouses. Higher levels of depression in patients were associated with lower levels of vitality in spouses and vice versa. As AF patients and their spouses influence each other, health-care interventions should consider the dyad to address dyadic dynamics. This may benefit the health of the individual patient and of the couple.

  20. A guide for the estimation of gender and sexual orientation effects in dyadic data: an actor-partner interdependence model approach.

    PubMed

    West, Tessa V; Popp, Danielle; Kenny, David A

    2008-03-01

    The study of gender differences is a pervasive topic in relationship science. However, there are several neglected issues in this area that require special care and attention. First, there is not just one gender effect but rather three gender effects: gender of the respondent, gender of the partner, and the gender of respondent by gender of the partner interaction. To separate these three effects, the dyadic research design should ideally have three different types of dyads: male-female, male-male, and female-female. Second, the analysis of gender differences in relational studies could benefit from the application of recent advances in the analysis of dyadic data, most notably the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Third, relationship researchers need to consider the confounding, mediating, and moderating effects of demographic variables. We use the American Couples (Blumstein & Schwartz, 1983) data set to illustrate these points.

  1. Effects of self-care on quality of life in adults with heart failure and their spousal caregivers: testing dyadic dynamics using the actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Vellone, Ercole; Chung, Misook L; Cocchieri, Antonello; Rocco, Gennaro; Alvaro, Rosaria; Riegel, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    Emotions are contagious in couples. The purpose of this study was to analyze the manner in which adults with chronic heart failure (HF) and their informal caregivers influence each other's self-care behavior and quality of life (QOL). A sample of 138 HF patients and spouses was enrolled from ambulatory centers across Italy. The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM) was used to analyze dyadic data obtained with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index (SCHFI), the Caregivers Contribution to the SCHFI, and the Short Form 12. Both actor and partner effects were found. Higher self-care was related to lower physical QOL in patients and caregivers. Higher self-care maintenance in patients was associated with better mental QOL in caregivers. In caregivers, confidence in the ability to support patients in self-care was associated with improved caregivers' mental QOL, but worsened physical QOL in patients. Interventions that build the caregivers' confidence are needed.

  2. Attachment Anxiety and Avoidance and Perceptions of Group Climate: An Actor-Partner Interdependence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivlighan, Dennis M.; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Gullo, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of research examining group members' attachment styles and group climate perceptions in the context of the attachment styles and group climate perceptions of the other group members. In the current study, the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) was used to examine the relationships among (a) a group member's attachment…

  3. Actor-Partner Interdependence Model Analysis of Sexual Communication and Relationship/Family Planning Factors Among Immigrant Latino Couples in the United States.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yui

    2017-05-01

    The Latino population in the United States is quickly growing, and its unintended pregnancy rate is increasing. To decrease unintended pregnancies, couples must mutually agree on family planning. Communication between partners is one key factor identified in successful family planning for couples. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine sexual communication and its associations with sexual relationship power, general communication, and views on family planning. The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model was used to analyze dyadic influences of the chosen variables. Forty immigrant Latino couples were recruited from prenatal care clinics. The study results were grouped according to the three types of power structures: exhibition of men's traditional machismo values, exhibition of women's increased power in their relationships, and exhibition of men's and women's own empowerment with sexual communication. There was a negative association between men's views on family planning and women's sexual communication (exhibition of machismo values); a negative association between women's sexual relationship power and their partners' sexual communication (exhibition of women's increased power); and positive associations between men's and women's general communication and sexual communication (exhibition of men's and women's own empowerment). Dyadic influences of sexual communication and associated variables need to be incorporated into interventions to facilitate family planning for couples.

  4. Sense making and benefit finding in couples who have a child with Asperger syndrome: an application of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    PubMed

    Samios, Christina; Pakenham, Kenneth I; Sofronoff, Kate

    2012-05-01

    Parents of children with Asperger syndrome face many challenges that may lead them to search for meaning by developing explanations for (sense making) and finding benefits (benefit finding) in having a child with special needs. Although family theorists have proposed that finding meaning occurs interpersonally, there is a dearth of empirical research that has examined finding meaning at the couple level. This study examined sense making and benefit finding in 84 couples who have a child with Asperger syndrome by using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (Kenny et al., 2006) to examine actor effects (i.e. the extent to which an individual's score on the predictor variable impacts his or her own level of adjustment) and partner effects (i.e. the extent to which an individual's score on the predictor variable has an impact on his or her partner's level of adjustment) of sense making and benefit finding on parental adjustment. Results demonstrated that parents' benefit finding related to greater anxiety and parents' sense making related to not only their own adjustment but also their partner's adjustment. Results highlight the importance of adopting an interpersonal perspective on finding meaning and adjustment. Limitations, future research and clinical implications are also discussed.

  5. The effects of depressive symptoms and anxiety on quality of life in patients with heart failure and their spouses: Testing dyadic dynamics using Actor-Partner Interdependence Model

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Misook L.; Moser, Debra K.; Lennie, Terry A.; Rayens, Mary Kay

    2009-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms and anxiety are common in heart failure patients as well as their spousal caregivers. However, it is not known whether their emotional distress contributes to their partner's quality of life (QoL). This study examined the effect of patients' and partners' depressive symptoms and anxiety on quality of life in patient-spouse dyads using an innovative dyadic analysis technique, the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM). Method A total of 58 dyads (patient: 43% in males, mean age 62 years, mean ejection fraction 34% ± 11, 43% in NYHA III-IV) participated in the study. Depressive symptoms and anxiety were assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory. QoL was assessed using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. Dyadic data were analyzed using the APIM with distinguishable dyad regression model. In APIM, actor effect is the impact of a person's emotional distress on his/her own QoL. Partner effect is the impact of a person's emotional distress on his/her partner's QoL. Result Depressive symptoms exhibited actor effect of both patients (p <.001) and spouses (p < .001) and only partner effect of patients (p < .05) on QoL. Patients and spouses with higher depressive symptoms had poorer quality of life. Patients whose spouses had higher depressive symptoms were more likely to indicate their own quality of life was poorer. Anxiety has similar actor and partner effects on QoL as depressive symptoms. Conclusion Interventions to reduce depression and anxiety and to improve patients' quality of life should include both patients and spouses. PMID:19539816

  6. Exploring Actor-Partner Interdependence in Family Therapy: Whose View (Parent or Adolescent) Best Predicts Treatment Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Shaffer, Katharine S.

    2012-01-01

    Predictions of family therapy outcome consistently vary depending on which client rates the alliance. We used the actor-partner interdependence model (Kenny, Kashy, & Cook, 2006) to test the interdependence of parents' and adolescents' ratings of alliance, session depth/value, and improvement-so-far after Sessions 3, 6, and 9. Initial analyses…

  7. Dyadic conflict, drinking to cope, and alcohol-related problems: A psychometric study and longitudinal actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Lambe, Laura; Mackinnon, Sean P; Stewart, Sherry H

    2015-10-01

    The motivational model of alcohol use posits that individuals may consume alcohol to cope with negative affect. Conflict with others is a strong predictor of coping motives, which in turn predict alcohol-related problems. Two studies examined links between conflict, coping motives, and alcohol-related problems in emerging adult romantic dyads. It was hypothesized that the association between conflict and alcohol-related problems would be mediated by coping-depression and coping-anxiety motives. It was also hypothesized that this would be true for actor (i.e., how individual factors influence individual behaviors) and partner effects (i.e., how partner factors influence individual behaviors) and at the between- (i.e., does not vary over the study period) and within-subjects (i.e., varies over the study period) levels. Both studies examined participants currently in a romantic relationship who consumed ≥12 alcoholic drinks in the past year. Study 1 was cross-sectional using university students (N = 130 students; 86.9% female; M = 21.02 years old, SD = 3.43). Study 2 used a 4-wave, 4-week longitudinal design with romantic dyads (N = 100 dyads; 89% heterosexual; M = 22.13 years old, SD = 5.67). In Study 2, coping-depression motives emerged as the strongest mediator of the conflict-alcohol-related problems association, and findings held for actor effects but not partner effects. Supplemental analyses revealed that this mediational pathway only held among women. Within any given week, alcohol-related problems changed systematically in the same direction between romantic partners. Interventions may wish to target coping-depression drinking motives within couples in response to conflict to reduce alcohol-related problems.

  8. The effects of perceived social support on quality of life in patients awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting and their partners: testing dyadic dynamics using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Patricia; Molloy, Gerard J; Chung, Misook L

    2012-01-01

    Patients awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) need support from their partners or family caregivers to manage their self care successfully and to maximise quality of life. Partners need social support to help overcome the stressful tasks of an unexpected caregiving role. It is not known whether the individual's perceived social support contributes to their own, as well as their partner's quality of life. The aims of this study were to assess differences in social support and quality of life in patients and partners awaiting CABG, and to examine whether patients' and partners' perceived social support predicted their own, as well as their partner's quality of life before CABG. This cross-sectional study recruited 84 dyads (patients 84% males, aged 64.5 years and partners 94% females, aged 61.05 years). Perceived social support was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support survey, with sub-scales for informational/emotional support, affectionate support, tangible support and positive social interaction. Quality of life was assessed using the Short-Form 12 Health Survey. Dyadic data were analysed using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model, with distinguishable dyad regression. Results revealed the patients' informational/emotional support exhibited an actor effect on their own mental health (ß = 0.19, p = 0.001); indicating those with low informational/emotional support had poorer mental health. There was a partner effect of the patients' informational/emotional support on their partner's mental health (ß = 0.14, p = 0.024), indicating the patients' informational/emotional support was associated with the partner's mental health. None of the other types of social support exhibited an actor effect or a partner effect on the patient's or the partner's mental or physical health. More research into the relationship between social support and mental health is needed to help inform the design of interventions that target the dyad.

  9. An actor-partner interdependence analysis of associations between affect and parenting behavior among couples.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Kyle W; Lovejoy, M Christine; Oddi, Kate B

    2014-03-01

    Prior studies evaluating associations between parental affect and parenting behavior have typically focused on either mothers or fathers despite evidence suggesting that affect and parenting behavior may be interdependent among couples. This study addressed this gap in the literature by evaluating associations between self-reported affect and parenting behavior using an actor-partner interdependence analysis among a sample of 53 mother-father dyads of 3- to 5-year-old children. Results suggested that mothers' and fathers' negative affect, as well as mothers' and fathers' positive affect, were positively associated. Both mothers' and fathers' negative affect were negatively associated with fathers' positive affect. Mothers' and fathers' harsh/negative parenting behavior, and supportive/engaged parenting behavior, were positively associated. Furthermore, mothers' negative affect was positively associated with mothers' and fathers' harsh/negative parenting behavior while mothers' positive affect was negatively associated with mothers' harsh/negative behavior and positively associated with mothers' supportive/engaged behavior. Fathers' negative affect was positively associated with fathers' supportive/engaged parenting behavior, while fathers' positive affect was positively associated with mothers' and fathers' supportive/engaged behavior. Results highlight the importance of conceptualizing and measuring characteristics of both mothers and fathers, if applicable, when researching the dynamics of interpersonal relationships within families.

  10. Financial stress, parent functioning and adolescent problem behavior: an actor-partner interdependence approach to family stress processes in low-, middle-, and high-income families.

    PubMed

    Ponnet, Koen

    2014-10-01

    The family stress model proposes that financial stress experienced by parents is associated with problem behavior in adolescents. The present study applied an actor-partner interdependence approach to the family stress model and focused on low-, middle-, and high-income families to broaden our understanding of the pathways by which the financial stress of mothers and fathers are related to adolescent outcomes. The study uses dyadic data (N = 798 heterosexual couples) from the Relationship between Mothers, Fathers and Children study in which two-parent families with an adolescent between 11 and 17 years of age participated. Path-analytic results indicated that in each of the families the association between parents' financial stress and problem behavior in adolescents is mediated through parents' depressive symptoms, interparental conflict, and positive parenting. Family stress processes also appear to operate in different ways for low-, middle-, and high-income families. In addition to a higher absolute level of financial stress in low-income families, financial stress experienced by mothers and fathers in these families had significant direct and indirect effects on problem behavior in adolescents, while in middle- and high-income families only significant indirect effects were found. The financial stress of a low-income mother also had a more detrimental impact on her level of depressive feelings than it had on mothers in middle-income families. Furthermore, the study revealed gender differences in the pathways of mothers and fathers. Implications for research, clinical practice, and policy are also discussed.

  11. Perceptions of Coach-Athlete Relationship Are More Important to Coaches than Athletes in Predicting Dyadic Coping and Stress Appraisals: An Actor-Partner Independence Mediation Model.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Adam R; Perry, John L

    2016-01-01

    Most attempts to manage stress involve at least one other person, yet coping studies in sport tend to report an athlete's individual coping strategies. There is a limited understanding of coping involving other people, particularly within sport, despite athletes potentially spending a lot of time with other people, such as their coach. Guided by the systemic-transactional model of stress and coping among couples (Bodenmann, 1995), from relationship psychology, we assessed dyadic coping, perceptions of relationship quality, and primary stress appraisals of challenge and threat among 158 coach-athlete dyads (n = 277 participants). The athletes competed at amateur (n = 123), semi-professional (n = 31), or professional levels (n = 4). Coaches and athletes from the same dyad completed a measure of dyadic coping, coach-athlete relationship, and stress appraisals. We tested an Actor-Partner Interdependence Mediation Model to account for the non-independence of dyadic data. These actor-partner analyses revealed differences between athletes and coaches. Although the actor effects were relatively large compared to partner effects, perceptions of relationship quality demonstrated little impact on athletes. The mediating role of relationship quality was broadly as important as dyadic coping for coaches. These findings provide an insight in to how coach-athlete dyads interact to manage stress and indicate that relationship quality is of particular importance for coaches, but less important for athletes. In order to improve perceptions of relationship quality among coaches and athletes, interventions could be developed to foster positive dyadic coping among both coaches and athletes, which may also impact upon stress appraisals of challenge and threat.

  12. If You Get Better, Will I? An Actor-Partner Analysis of the Mutual Influence of Group Therapy Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquin, Jill D.; Kivlighan, D. Martin, III; Drogosz, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of group psychotherapy has been empirically studied and supported over several decades; however, there remains much to understand regarding the specific factors contributing to effective group psychotherapy. The current study uses Kashy and Kenny's (2000) actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) to examine the relationship…

  13. Extending the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to Include Cross-Informant Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.; Goncy, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper illustrates an extension of the APIM technique within a path analysis framework by using cross-informant data on the outcome variable. Data for the current study were derived from a sample of young adult heterosexual couples who had been in a romantic relationship for at least four months (N = 115 couples). The findings from the current…

  14. Role Balance and Marital Satisfaction in Taiwanese Couples: An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Lung Hung; Li, Tsui-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Role balance theory proposed that a well-organized self-system, rather than a salient hierarchy role, contributes to individual psychological well-being. However, research on role balance focuses only on the intrapersonal process without regard for the interpersonal process on the spouse's well-being. Furthermore, previous studies were all…

  15. Dyadic Dynamics in Young Couples Reporting Dating Violence: An Actor-Partner interdependence model

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Alison; Hébert, Martine; Fernet, Mylène

    2016-01-01

    This study uses a combination of observational methods and dyadic data analysis to understand how boyfriends’ and girlfriends’ perpetration of dating violence may shape their own and their partners’ problem-solving communication behaviors. A sample of 39 young heterosexual couples aged between 15 and 20 years (mean age 17.8 years) completed a set of questionnaires and were observed during a 45 minute dyadic interaction, which was coded using the Interactional Dimension Coding System (IDCS). Results suggest that, neither boyfriends nor girlfriends own perpetration of dating violence was related to their display of positive and negative communication behaviors. However, estimates revealed significant partner effects, suggesting that negative communication behaviors displayed by girls and boys and positive communication behavior displayed by girls were associated to their partner’s dating violence but not to their own. Such results confirm the need to shift our focus from an individual perspective to examining dyadic influences and processes involved in the couple system and the bi-directionality of violent relationships. PMID:25969443

  16. Extending the actor-partner interdependence model to include cross-informant data.

    PubMed

    van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Goncy, Elizabeth A

    2010-12-01

    This paper illustrates an extension of the APIM technique within a path analysis framework by using cross-informant data on the outcome variable. Data for the current study were derived from a sample of young adult heterosexual couples who had been in a romantic relationship for at least four months (N = 115 couples). The findings from the current study indicate that romantic relationship satisfaction is associated with externalizing behavior problems among both females and males, but that both dyadic data and cross-informant reports are needed to understand this association. Not considering dyadic or cross-informant data may lead to different, and potentially misleading, claims. The findings from the current study provide clear evidence that incorporating cross-informant data in dyadic data analyses provides important new insights into understanding the association between romantic relationship functioning and individual outcomes.

  17. Between-client and within-client engagement and outcome in a residential wilderness treatment group: An actor partner interdependence analysis.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Harold L Lee; Kivlighan, Dennis M; Russell, Keith C

    2016-12-01

    We examine aspects of engagement (MacKenzie, 1983) as predictors of longitudinal change in Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 scores (Lambert, Kahler, Harmon, Burlingame, & Shimokawa, 2011) for 68, 18-24-year-old male residents in a 10-bed, open enrollment 90-day residential, substance use treatment program. Engagement was partitioned into within-member, between-member, within-other members, and between-other members' effects. Within-member engagement represented how a group member's score for a week deviated from that member's average engagement score (across all weeks), whereas between-member engagement was the member's average engagement score. Similarly, within-other member engagement represented how the other group members' scores for a week deviated from the other group members' average engagement score (across all weeks), whereas between-other member engagement was the other group members' average engagement score. A 2-level hierarchical linear model showed the interaction of between-member engagement and between-other member engagement was related to decreasing OQ-45 scores. When other group members generally saw the group as more engaged, higher group member average engagement ratings were related to improvement. There was a significant interaction between within-member engagement and between-member engagement in predicting OQ-45 scores. When clients generally saw the group as more engaged, weeks with relatively more member engagement, compared with other weeks, were associated with improvement in OQ-45 scores. However, when clients generally saw the group as less engaged, weeks with relatively more group member engagement, compared with other weeks, were associated with greater deterioration in OQ scores. We recommend tracking week-to-week changes in member and other member engagement to identify group members who are not getting optimal program benefits. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Whose perceptions matter more: mine or my group's? An actor-partner interdependence analysis disaggregating between-person and between-session effects of group climate perceptions on intimate behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, Dennis M; Paquin, Jill D

    2014-07-01

    Group climate refers to the atmosphere that is both created and experienced by a group of people. Theoretically, the "climate" of a group should therefore be related to the behaviors of its members during group sessions; however, this has not been empirically tested. A longitudinal design was used to examine the relationship between group member perceptions of engagement and conflict and group member intimate behaviors during the group session. Data came from 73 incarcerated women participating in 6 manualized (Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model) therapy groups. At each session, group members completed measures of their perceptions of the group's engagement and conflict (the Group Climate Questionnaire), and the group leader completed a behavioral count of each member's intimate behaviors. Group climate was examined both for the group member (actor) and aggregated across the other group members, excluding the actor (partner). In addition, these actor and partner scores were decomposed into between-member and within-member components. None of the between-member differences in engaged or conflict perceptions were significantly related to intimate behaviors. There was a significant positive relationship between actor's and partner's engagement ratings and partner's conflict ratings in a session and the actor's intimate behaviors in that session. Study results highlight the importance of examining changes that may be occurring from session to session in group climate perceptions and the need to examine partner's perceptions in order to best understand how an individual group member will behave.

  19. Actor-partner effects of demographic and relationship factors associated with HIV risk within gay male couples.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jason W; Champeau, Donna; Harvey, S Marie

    2013-10-01

    Recent research has investigated the association of relationship factors and dynamics with sexual behaviors and HIV risk among gay male couples. However, few studies with gay male couples have used the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model framework to examine whether factors influence an individual and his partner's sexual risk behaviors. None of these studies analyzed whether relationship factors had influenced the sexual risk behaviors of both partners within the couple. Our cross-sectional study used dyadic data from 142 gay male couples to assess actor-partner effects of relationship commitment, trust, and investment in one's sexual agreement for HIV risk. Multilevel modeling was used to examine which actor-partner effects of these factors were predictive of individuals and their partners having had UAI within and outside the relationship. Results indicated that participants' likelihood of having had UAI within and outside of the relationship significantly decreased with: (1) actor effects of value in and commitment to a sexual agreement, and quality of alternatives to the relationship and (2) partner effects of participant's age, dependability of trust, quality of alternatives to the relationship, and investment of relationship commitment. No significant actor-partner effects were detected for having had UAI within the relationship. Our findings suggest that future HIV prevention strategies should take into account how relationship factors influence an individual and his main partners' sexual risk behaviors and in turn, the couple's risk for HIV. However, more research is needed to examine how actor-partner effects of relationship factors influence a variety of sexual risk behaviors within gay male couples.

  20. Actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of sarcasm.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, P

    2000-10-01

    This study compared actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of the amount of sarcasm used by participants (n = 80) in videotaped conversations. Significant differences were found among perceptions of actors, partners, and observers. Of the three perspectives, actors perceived themselves as using the greatest amount of sarcasm, followed by partners' perceptions of actors. Observers perceived actors as using the least amount of sarcasm. Correlations conducted to assess whether partners and observers recognized actors' individual attempts at sarcasm during the conversations were generally low.

  1. Rejection sensitivity and depressive symptoms: Longitudinal actor-partner effects in adolescent romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Norona, Jerika C; Roberson, Patricia N E; Welsh, Deborah P

    2016-08-01

    The present study utilizes the actor-partner interdependence model to examine the longitudinal relationship between rejection sensitivity and one's own and one's partner's depressive symptoms. The sample included adolescent romantic couples from the U.S. (N = 198 adolescents; 50% girls; 90.2% Caucasian) whose rejection sensitivity at Time 1 and depressive symptoms approximately one year later (Time 2) were assessed. Additionally, aggressive behaviors and maintenance behaviors that commonly associated with rejection sensitivity (e.g., self-silencing) are explored as mediators. Results indicate that boyfriends' rejection sensitivity at Time 1 predicted girlfriends' depressive symptoms at Time 2. Additionally, girls' rejection sensitivity predicted their own and their boyfriends' self-silencing. Developmental and clinical implications are discussed.

  2. Sense Making and Benefit Finding in Couples Who Have a Child with Asperger Syndrome: An Application of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samios, Christina; Pakenham, Kenneth I.; Sofronoff, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Parents of children with Asperger syndrome face many challenges that may lead them to search for meaning by developing explanations for (sense making) and finding benefits (benefit finding) in having a child with special needs. Although family theorists have proposed that finding meaning occurs interpersonally, there is a dearth of empirical…

  3. Actor-partner effects associated with experiencing intimate partner violence or coercion among male couples enrolled in an HIV prevention trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) and coercion have been associated with negative health outcomes, including increased HIV risk behaviors, among men who have sex with men (MSM). This is the first study to describe the prevalence and factors associated with experiencing IPV or coercion among US MSM dyads using the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM), an analytic framework to describe interdependent outcomes within dyads. Methods Among MSM couples enrolled as dyads in an HIV prevention randomized controlled trial (RCT), two outcomes are examined in this cross-sectional analysis: 1) the actor experiencing physical or sexual IPV from the study partner in the past 3-months and 2) the actor feeling coerced to participate in the RCT by the study partner. Two multilevel APIM logistic regression models evaluated the association between each outcome and actor, partner, and dyad-level factors. Results Of 190 individuals (95 MSM couples), 14 reported experiencing physical or sexual IPV from their study partner in the past 3 months (7.3%) and 12 reported feeling coerced to participate in the RCT by their study partner (6.3%). Results of multivariate APIM analyses indicated that reporting experienced IPV was associated (p < 0.1) with non-Black/African American actor race, lower actor education, and lower partner education. Reporting experienced coercion was associated (p < 0.1) with younger actor age and lower partner education. Conclusions These findings from an HIV prevention RCT for MSM show considerable levels of IPV experienced in the past 3-months and coercion to participate in the research study, indicating the need for screening tools and support services for these behaviors. The identification of factors associated with IPV and coercion demonstrate the importance of considering actor and partner effects, as well as dyadic-level effects, to improve development of screening tools and support services for these outcomes. PMID:24580732

  4. Reliable Communication Models in Interdependent Critical Infrastructure Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangkeun; Chinthavali, Supriya; Shankar, Mallikarjun

    2016-01-01

    Modern critical infrastructure networks are becoming increasingly interdependent where the failures in one network may cascade to other dependent networks, causing severe widespread national-scale failures. A number of previous efforts have been made to analyze the resiliency and robustness of interdependent networks based on different models. However, communication network, which plays an important role in today's infrastructures to detect and handle failures, has attracted little attention in the interdependency studies, and no previous models have captured enough practical features in the critical infrastructure networks. In this paper, we study the interdependencies between communication network and other kinds of critical infrastructure networks with an aim to identify vulnerable components and design resilient communication networks. We propose several interdependency models that systematically capture various features and dynamics of failures spreading in critical infrastructure networks. We also discuss several research challenges in building reliable communication solutions to handle failures in these models.

  5. Earthquake interdependence and insurance loss modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir Wood, R.

    2005-12-01

    Probabilistic Catastrophe loss modeling generally assumes that earthquakes are independent events and occur far enough apart in time that damage from one event is fully restituted before another earthquake occurs. While time dependence and cascade fault rupturing are today standard elements of the earthquake hazard engine, in the next generation of Catastrophe loss models one can expect to find a more comprehensive range of earthquake interdependence represented in a full simulation modeling environment. Such behavior includes the incorporation of the ways in which earthquakes relate one to another in both space and time (including foreshock, aftershock and triggered mainshock distinctions) and the damage that can be predicted from overlapping damage fields as related to the length of time for reconstruction that has elapsed between events. For insurance purposes losses are framed by the 168 hour clause for classifying losses as falling within the same `event' for reinsurance recoveries as well as the annual insurance contract. The understanding of the ways in which stress changes associated with fault rupture affect the probabilities of earthquakes on surrounding faults has also expanded the predictability of potential earthquake sequences as well as highlighted the potential to identify locations where, for some time window, risk can be discounted. While it can be illuminating to explore the loss and insurance implications of the patterns of historical earthquake occurrence seen historically along the Nankaido subduction zone of Southern Japan, in New Madrid from 1811-1812, or Nevada in 1954, the sequences to be expected in the future are unlikely to have historical precedent in the region in which they form.

  6. Direct and indirect effects of commitment on interdependence and satisfaction in married couples.

    PubMed

    Givertz, Michelle; Segrin, Chris; Woszidlo, Alesia

    2016-03-01

    This study tested the prediction that an individual's marital commitment would be positively associated with their own and their partner's marital satisfaction, and that one's own marital interdependence would be associated with one's own marital satisfaction. It also tested the prediction that there would be an indirect effect of marital commitment on marital satisfaction through higher marital interdependence for both the individual and the partner. Predictions were tested on 628 married couples. Overall, results were consistent with predictions. Tests of actor-partner interdependence mediation models revealed direct effects of marital commitment on marital satisfaction for both husbands and wives. Wives' commitment was also directly associated with husbands' marital interdependence and marital satisfaction, but husbands' commitment was not significantly associated with wives' interdependence or satisfaction. For both husbands and wives, their own marital interdependence was significantly associated with their own marital satisfaction. These same tests revealed indirect effects of marital commitment on marital satisfaction through higher marital interdependence for both husbands and wives individually. There was also an indirect effect of wives' commitment on husbands' marital satisfaction through wives' higher marital interdependence. These results are consistent with interdependence theory and the investment model of commitment.

  7. Cascading load model in interdependent networks with coupled strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yun; Zheng, Qiaofang

    2015-07-01

    Considering the coupled strength between interdependent networks, we introduce a new method to define the initial load on an edge and propose a cascading load model in interdependent networks. We explore the robustness of the interdependent networks against cascading failures by two measures, i.e., the critical threshold βc quantifying the whole robustness of the interdependent networks to avoid the emergence of cascading failure, and the new proposed smallest capacity threshold βc,s quantifying the degree of the worst damage of the interdependent networks. We numerically find that the AL (high-degree nodes in network A connect high-degree ones in network B) link between two networks can greatly enhance the robust level of the interdependent networks against cascading failures. Especially we observe that the values of βc in the interdependent networks with both the DL (high-degree nodes in network A connect low-degree ones in network B) link and the RL (nodes in network A randomly connect ones in network B) link increase monotonically with the coupled strength, while the values of βc,s in the interdependent networks with three types of link patterns almost monotonically decreases with the coupled strength. In the interdependent networks with the AL, the value of βc first decreases and then increases with the coupled strength. We further explain this interesting phenomenon by a simple graph. In addition, we study the influence of the coupled strength on the efficiency of two attacks to destroy the interdependent networks. We find that, when the coupled strength between two networks is weaker, attacking the edges with the lower load is more easier to trigger the cascading propagation than attacking the nodes with the higher load, however, when the coupled strength in two networks is stronger, the case is on the contrary. Finally, we give reasonable explanations from the local perspective of the total capacity of all neighboring edges of a failed edge.

  8. Attachment, mastery, and interdependence: a model of parenting processes.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Martha E

    2002-01-01

    A democratic nation needs an interdependent citizenry who are not only competent but who also can live together cooperatively with an eye toward what will benefit the whole as well as the self. In this article, the concept of interdependence is adopted as the central goal of parenting. The Parenting Processes Model is then presented, specifying how caregivers help children develop this interdependence. This work draws upon and integrates the work of a number of theoreticians, researchers, and clinicians, with the central focus on the work of John Bowlby, Alfred Adler, and Lev Vygotsky.

  9. CIMS: A FRAMEWORK FOR INFRASTRUCTURE INTERDEPENDENCY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Milos Manic

    2006-12-01

    Today’s society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, utilities, telecommunication, and even financial networks. While modeling and simulation tools have provided insight into the behavior of individual infrastructure networks, a far less understood area is that of the interrelationships among multiple infrastructure networks including the potential cascading effects that may result due to these interdependencies. This paper first describes infrastructure interdependencies as well as presenting a formalization of interdependency types. Next the paper describes a modeling and simulation framework called CIMS© and the work that is being conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to model and simulate infrastructure interdependencies and the complex behaviors that can result.

  10. Assessing site-interdependent phylogenetic models of sequence evolution.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2006-09-01

    In recent works, methods have been proposed for applying phylogenetic models that allow for a general interdependence between the amino acid positions of a protein. As of yet, such models have focused on site interdependencies resulting from sequence-structure compatibility constraints, using simplified structural representations in combination with a set of statistical potentials. This structural compatibility criterion is meant as a proxy for sequence fitness, and the methods developed thus far can incorporate different site-interdependent fitness proxies based on other measurements. However, no methods have been proposed for comparing and evaluating the adequacy of alternative fitness proxies in this context, or for more general comparisons with canonical models of protein evolution. In the present work, we apply Bayesian methods of model selection-based on numerical calculations of marginal likelihoods and posterior predictive checks-to evaluate models encompassing the site-interdependent framework. Our application of these methods indicates that considering site-interdependencies, as done here, leads to an improved model fit for all data sets studied. Yet, we find that the use of pairwise contact potentials alone does not suitably account for across-site rate heterogeneity or amino acid exchange propensities; for such complexities, site-independent treatments are still called for. The most favored models combine the use of statistical potentials with a suitably rich site-independent model. Altogether, the methodology employed here should allow for a more rigorous and systematic exploration of different ways of modeling explicit structural constraints, or any other site-interdependent criterion, while best exploiting the richness of previously proposed models.

  11. Exploring the interdependencies between parameters in a material model.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Fermen-Coker, Muge

    2014-01-01

    A method is investigated to reduce the number of numerical parameters in a material model for a solid. The basis of the method is to detect interdependencies between parameters within a class of materials of interest. The method is demonstrated for a set of material property data for iron and steel using the Johnson-Cook plasticity model.

  12. Attack robustness of cascading load model in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Wu, Yuedan; Li, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Considering the weight of a node and the coupled strength of two interdependent nodes in the different networks, we propose a method to assign the initial load of a node and construct a new cascading load model in the interdependent networks. Assuming that a node in one network will fail if its degree is 0 or its dependent node in the other network is removed from the network or the load on it exceeds its capacity, we study the influences of the assortative link (AL) and the disassortative link (DL) patterns between two networks on the robustness of the interdependent networks against cascading failures. For better evaluating the network robustness, from the local perspective of a node we present a new measure to qualify the network resiliency after targeted attacks. We show that the AL patterns between two networks can improve the robust level of the entire interdependent networks. Moreover, we obtain how to efficiently allocate the initial load and select some nodes to be protected so as to maximize the network robustness against cascading failures. In addition, we find that some nodes with the lower load are more likely to trigger the cascading propagation when the distribution of the load is more even, and also give the reasonable explanation. Our findings can help to design the robust interdependent networks and give the reasonable suggestion to optimize the allocation of the protection resources.

  13. Analysis of Family Research Designs: A Model of Interdependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashy, Deborah A.; Kenny, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Presents both a conceptual model (which partitions family data into individual, dyadic, and family effects and permits examination of several types of interdependence between family members) and an analytical method (confirmatory factor analysis) that can be used in the evaluation of round-robin family research data. (SR)

  14. Stochastic Coloured Petrinet Based Healthcare Infrastructure Interdependency Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukavarapu, Nivedita; Durbha, Surya

    2016-06-01

    The Healthcare Critical Infrastructure (HCI) protects all sectors of the society from hazards such as terrorism, infectious disease outbreaks, and natural disasters. HCI plays a significant role in response and recovery across all other sectors in the event of a natural or manmade disaster. However, for its continuity of operations and service delivery HCI is dependent on other interdependent Critical Infrastructures (CI) such as Communications, Electric Supply, Emergency Services, Transportation Systems, and Water Supply System. During a mass casualty due to disasters such as floods, a major challenge that arises for the HCI is to respond to the crisis in a timely manner in an uncertain and variable environment. To address this issue the HCI should be disaster prepared, by fully understanding the complexities and interdependencies that exist in a hospital, emergency department or emergency response event. Modelling and simulation of a disaster scenario with these complexities would help in training and providing an opportunity for all the stakeholders to work together in a coordinated response to a disaster. The paper would present interdependencies related to HCI based on Stochastic Coloured Petri Nets (SCPN) modelling and simulation approach, given a flood scenario as the disaster which would disrupt the infrastructure nodes. The entire model would be integrated with Geographic information based decision support system to visualize the dynamic behaviour of the interdependency of the Healthcare and related CI network in a geographically based environment.

  15. An integrated model of human-wildlife interdependence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, Kun H.; Walsh, Richard G.; Johnson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper attempts to integrate wildlife-related ecologic and economic variables into an econometric model. The model reveals empirical evidence of the presumed interdependence of human-wildlife and the holistic nature of humanity's relationship to the ecosystem. Human use of biologic resources varies not only with income, education, and population, but also with sustainability of humankind's action relative to the quality and quantity of the supporting ecological base.

  16. Actor-Partner Effects of Male Couples Substance Use with Sex and Engagement in Condomless Anal Sex.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jason W; Pan, Yue; Feaster, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have examined actor-partner effects about male couples' substance use with sex. Dyadic data from 361 male couples were used to examine these effects regarding engagement in condomless anal sex (CAS) by type of partner and substance. Couples with one or both partners reported using marijuana, amyl nitrates, party drugs, and/or stimulants with sex in their relationship was positively associated with them having had CAS. Actor-partner effects for stimulant use with sex with the main partner were associated with CAS with a casual MSM partner. Only an actor effect for stimulant use with sex with a casual MSM partner was associated with CAS with that partner type, and an actor effect for marijuana use with sex for both partner types was associated with CAS with both partner types. These findings illuminate the need for further inquiry about male couples' substance use with sex for HIV prevention.

  17. Solving Operational Models of Interdependent Infrastructure Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    resilience, getting the biggest “reduction in bang ” for their buck. The most important part of those modeling efforts is the formulation of a mathematical...than just another big project. I found a true interest and excitement working with you both and consider you both the highest caliber faculty I have...improving resilience, getting the biggest “reduction in bang ” for their buck. This type of research has been successfully applied to many different

  18. Modeling interdependencies between business and communication processes in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brigl, Birgit; Wendt, Thomas; Winter, Alfred

    2003-01-01

    The optimization and redesign of business processes in hospitals is an important challenge for the hospital information management who has to design and implement a suitable HIS architecture. Nevertheless, there are no tools available specializing in modeling information-driven business processes and the consequences on the communication between information processing, tools. Therefore, we will present an approach which facilitates the representation and analysis of business processes and resulting communication processes between application components and their interdependencies. This approach aims not only to visualize those processes, but to also to evaluate if there are weaknesses concerning the information processing infrastructure which hinder the smooth implementation of the business processes.

  19. Modeling flood induced interdependencies among hydroelectricity generating infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Sultana, S; Chen, Z

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a new kind of integrated modeling method for simulating the vulnerability of a critical infrastructure for a hazard and the subsequent interdependencies among the interconnected infrastructures. The developed method has been applied to a case study of a network of hydroelectricity generating infrastructures, e.g., water storage concrete gravity dam, penstock, power plant and transformer substation. The modeling approach is based on the fragility curves development with Monte Carlo simulation based structural-hydraulic modeling, flood frequency analysis, stochastic Petri net (SPN) modeling, and Markov Chain analysis. A certain flood level probability can be predicted from flood frequency analysis, and the most probable damage condition for this hazard can be simulated from the developed fragility curves of the dam. Consequently, the resulting interactions among the adjacent infrastructures can be quantified with SPN analysis; corresponding Markov Chain analysis simulates the long term probability matrix of infrastructure failures. The obtained results are quite convincing to prove the novel contribution of this research to the field of infrastructure interdependency analysis which might serve as a decision making tool for flood related emergency response and management.

  20. Hierarchical Coloured Petrinet Based Healthcare Infrastructure Interdependency Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivedita, N.; Durbha, S.

    2014-11-01

    To ensure a resilient Healthcare Critical Infrastructure, understanding the vulnerabilities and analysing the interdependency on other critical infrastructures is important. To model this critical infrastructure and its dependencies, Hierarchal Coloured petri net modelling approach for simulating the vulnerability of Healthcare Critical infrastructure in a disaster situation is studied.. The model enables to analyse and understand various state changes, which occur when there is a disruption or damage to any of the Critical Infrastructure, and its cascading nature. It also enables to explore optimal paths for evacuation during the disaster. The simulation environment can be used to understand and highlight various vulnerabilities of Healthcare Critical Infrastructure during a flood disaster scenario; minimize consequences; and enable timely, efficient response.

  1. Interdependent regional lung emptying during forced expiration: a transistor model.

    PubMed

    Solway, J; Fredberg, J J; Ingram, R H; Pedersen, O F; Drazen, J M

    1987-05-01

    We recognized similarities between isovolume pressure-flow curves of the lung and emitter-collector voltage-current characteristics of bipolar transistors, and used this analogy to model expiratory flow limitation in a two-generation branching network with parallel nonhomogeneity. In this model, each of two bronchi empty parenchymal compliances through a common trachea, and each branch includes resistances upstream and downstream of a flow-limiting site. Properties of each airway are specified independently, allowing simulation of differences between the tracheal and bronchial generations and between the parallel bronchial paths. Simulations of four types of parallel asymmetry were performed: unilateral peripheral bronchoconstriction; unilateral central bronchoconstriction; asymmetric redistribution of parenchymal compliance; and unilateral alteration of the bronchial area-transmural pressure characteristic. Our results indicate that multiple axial choke points can exist simultaneously in a symmetric lung when large airway opening-pleural pressure gradients exist; despite severe nonhomogeneity of regional lung emptying, flow interdependence among parallel branches tends to maintain a near normal configuration of the overall maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve throughout a large fraction of the vital capacity; and sudden changes of slope of the MEFV curve ("knees" or "bumps") may reflect choking in one branch in a nonuniform lung, but need not be obvious even when severe heterogeneity of lung emptying exists.

  2. A cognitive model of dynamic cooperation with varied interdependency information.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Cleotilde; Ben-Asher, Noam; Martin, Jolie M; Dutt, Varun

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the dynamics of repeated interaction of two players in the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) under various levels of interdependency information and propose an instance-based learning cognitive model (IBL-PD) to explain how cooperation emerges over time. Six hypotheses are tested regarding how a player accounts for an opponent's outcomes: the selfish hypothesis suggests ignoring information about the opponent and utilizing only the player's own outcomes; the extreme fairness hypothesis weighs the player's own and the opponent's outcomes equally; the moderate fairness hypothesis weighs the opponent's outcomes less than the player's own outcomes to various extents; the linear increasing hypothesis increasingly weighs the opponent's outcomes at a constant rate with repeated interactions; the hyperbolic discounting hypothesis increasingly and nonlinearly weighs the opponent's outcomes over time; and the dynamic expectations hypothesis dynamically adjusts the weight a player gives to the opponent's outcomes, according to the gap between the expected and the actual outcomes in each interaction. When players lack explicit feedback about their opponent's choices and outcomes, results are consistent with the selfish hypothesis; however, when this information is made explicit, the best predictions result from the dynamic expectations hypothesis.

  3. Spirituality and psychological well-being: testing a theory of family interdependence among family caregivers and their elders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk-Sun; Reed, Pamela G; Hayward, R David; Kang, Youngmi; Koenig, Harold G

    2011-04-01

    The family spirituality-psychological well-being model was developed and tested to explore how spirituality influences psychological well-being among elders and caregivers in the context of Korean family caregiving. The sample consisted of 157 Korean elder-family caregiver dyads in Seoul, Korea. The intraclass correlation coefficient and the actor-partner interdependence statistical model were used to analyze the data. There were significant correlations between elders' and caregivers' spirituality and between elders' and caregivers' psychological well-being. Elders' and caregivers' spirituality significantly influenced their own psychological well-being. The caregiver's spirituality significantly influenced the elder's psychological well-being, but the elder's spirituality did not significantly influence the caregiver's psychological well-being. Findings suggest that elders' and caregivers' spirituality should be assessed within the family to provide holistic nursing interventions.

  4. Modeling region-based interconnection for interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangrong; Kooij, Robert E.; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2016-10-01

    Various real-world networks interact with and depend on each other. The design of the interconnection between interacting networks is one of the main challenges to achieve a robust interdependent network. Due to cost considerations, network providers are inclined to interconnect nodes that are geographically close. Accordingly, we propose two topologies, the random geographic graph and the relative neighborhood graph, for the design of interconnection in interdependent networks that incorporates the geographic location of nodes. Differing from the one-to-one interconnection studied in the literature, one node in one network can depend on an arbitrary number of nodes in the other network. We derive the average number of interdependent links for the two topologies, which enables their comparison. For the two topologies, we evaluate the impact of the interconnection structure on the robustness of interdependent networks against cascading failures. The two topologies are assessed on the real-world coupled Italian Internet and the electric transmission network. Finally, we propose the derivative of the largest mutually connected component with respect to the fraction of failed nodes as a robustness metric. This robustness metric quantifies the damage of the network introduced by a small fraction of initial failures well before the critical fraction of failures at which the whole network collapses.

  5. Model Programs: Childhood Education. Interdependent Learner Model of a Follow Through Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Silver Spring, MD.

    In order to insure maximum success of the school's Head Start program, parents and teachers associated with a public school in Harlem chose a program based on the Interdependent Learner Model Follow Through Program originated at New York University. The federally funded program was introduced into kindergarten and first-grade classrooms and…

  6. Cascades of failures in various models of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, Sergey; Kadish, Benjamin; Shere, Nathaniel; Aharon, Mitchel; Cwilich, Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    Complex networks appear in almost every aspect of science and technology. Recently an analytical framework for studying the percolation properties of interacting networks has been developed [1]. These studies however have several limitations. The real networks do are not randomly connected. They are often embedded into two dimensional space. The dependency links are not connecting nodes at random but have tendency to connect nodes with similar degrees, or nodes which are close to each other in Euclidian space. Moreover, the network failures may occur not only to the loss of connectivity but also due to overload of nodes with high betweennes. We have study these situations analytically and by computer simulations and found the conditions at which networks collapse in an abrupt first order like transition when the entire network becomes non-functional or fail gradually like in a second order transition as a greater fraction of nodes is removed in the initial attack or failure. [4pt] [1] S. V. Buldyrev, R. Parshani, G. Paul, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Catastrophic cascade of failures in interdependent networks,'' Nature 464, 1025-1028 (2010)

  7. Interdependence of Depressive Symptoms, School Involvement, and Academic Performance between Adolescent Friends: A Dyadic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Chong Man; Tan, Cin Cin; Buhrmester, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Background Friendships play an important role in the development of school involvement and academic performance during adolescence. This study examined the interdependence of depressive symptoms, school involvement, and academic performance between adolescent same-sex friends. Aims Using cross-sectional data, we examined whether the link between depressive symptoms and academic performance would be mediated by school involvement at the intrapersonal (actor) and interpersonal (partner) levels. Sample Data came from 155 pairs of same-sex adolescent friends (80 boys; Mage = 16.17, SD = .44). The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM) was used to examine the dyadic data and mediation hypotheses. Results Mediated actor effects showed that adolescents who had more depressive symptoms reported lower academic performance, and such an association was mediated by their own and their friend’s lower school involvement. Mediated partner effects showed that adolescents who had more depressive symptoms also had a friend with lower academic performance, and such an association was mediated by both individuals’ lower school involvement. Conclusions This study provided evidence to support the broader interpersonal framework for understanding school involvement and academic performance. The current findings also have potential practical implications, especially for programs targeted at addressing adolescents’ school problems. PMID:25858014

  8. Contextualizing Community Violence and Its Effects: An Ecological Model of Parent-Child Interdependent Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aisenberg, Eugene; Ell, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an integrated conceptual framework that contextualizes exposure to community violence and the interpersonal and interdependent processes of parent and child response to community violence. This model posits that parental distress, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, is a significant mediator of…

  9. Modelling the effect of perceived interdependence among mental healthcare professionals on their work role performance.

    PubMed

    Markon, Marie-Pierre; Chiocchio, François; Fleury, Marie-Josée

    2017-04-13

    The purpose of mental healthcare system reform was to enhance service efficiency by strengthening primary mental healthcare and increasing service integration in communities. Reinforcing interprofessional teamwork also intended to address the extensive and multidimensional needs of patients with mental disorders by bringing together a broader array of expertise. In this context, mental healthcare professionals (MHCPs) from various health and social care professions are more interdependent in many aspects of their work (tasks, resources, and goals). We wanted to examine the effect of perceived interdependence among MHCPs on their work role performance in the context of mental healthcare. For this purpose, we developed and tested a model coherent with the Input-Mediator-Outcome-Input (IMOI) framework of team effectiveness. Data from questionnaires administered to 315 MHCPs from four local health service networks in Quebec, Canada were analysed through structural equation modelling and mediation analysis. The structural equation model provided a good fit for the data and explained 51% of the variance of work role performance. Perceived collaboration, confidence in the advantages of interprofessional collaboration, involvement in the decision process, knowledge sharing, and satisfaction with the nature of the work partially mediated the effect of perceived interdependence among team members on work role performance. Therefore, perceived interdependence among team members had a positive impact on the work role performance of MHCPs mostly through its effect on favourable team functioning features. This implies, in practice, that increased interdependence of MHCPs would be more likely to truly enhance work role performance if team-based interventions to promote collaborative work and interprofessional teaching and training programs to support work within interprofessional teams were jointly implemented. Participation in the decision process and knowledge sharing should

  10. A general model of resource production and exchange in systems of interdependent specialists.

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Finley, Patrick D.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brown, Theresa Jean; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Breen, Peter; Kuypers, Marshall; Norton, Matthew David; Quach, Tu-Thach; Antognoli, Matthew; Mitchell, Michael David

    2011-11-01

    Infrastructures are networks of dynamically interacting systems designed for the flow of information, energy, and materials. Under certain circumstances, disturbances from a targeted attack or natural disasters can cause cascading failures within and between infrastructures that result in significant service losses and long recovery times. Reliable interdependency models that can capture such multi-network cascading do not exist. The research reported here has extended Sandia's infrastructure modeling capabilities by: (1) addressing interdependencies among networks, (2) incorporating adaptive behavioral models into the network models, and (3) providing mechanisms for evaluating vulnerability to targeted attack and unforeseen disruptions. We have applied these capabilities to evaluate the robustness of various systems, and to identify factors that control the scale and duration of disruption. This capability lays the foundation for developing advanced system security solutions that encompass both external shocks and internal dynamics.

  11. A modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures in multi-hazard environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Gearhart, Jared Lee; Jones, Dean A.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Prince, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Currently, much of protection planning is conducted separately for each infrastructure and hazard. Limited funding requires a balance of expenditures between terrorism and natural hazards based on potential impacts. This report documents the results of a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project that created a modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures focused on multiple hazards, including terrorism. To develop this framework, three modeling elements were integrated: natural hazards, terrorism, and interdependent infrastructures. For natural hazards, a methodology was created for specifying events consistent with regional hazards. For terrorism, we modeled the terrorists actions based on assumptions regarding their knowledge, goals, and target identification strategy. For infrastructures, we focused on predicting post-event performance due to specific terrorist attacks and natural hazard events, tempered by appropriate infrastructure investments. We demonstrate the utility of this framework with various examples, including protection of electric power, roadway, and hospital networks.

  12. Network Interdependency Modeling for Risk Assessment on Built Infrastructure Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    inoperability model (IIM) in the analysis of built infrastructure systems . Previous applications of the IIM characterized infrastructure at the national...infrastructure systems and facilities. .............. 86 Figure 15. Analysis results using a common centrality measure. .................................... 90

  13. Modeling structure-function interdependence of pulmonary gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Ewald R

    2008-01-01

    Modeling functional processes, such as gas exchange, that occur deep in the lung far from where one can directly observe, depends on knowledge about the precise and quantitative design of the structure of the gas exchanger. This is the case as well for the actual arrangement of alveoli and blood capillaries at the gas exchange surface as for the disposition of gas exchange units with respect to the airway and vascular trees. The serial arrangement of alveoli and their perfusion as parallel units have important consequences for gas exchange.

  14. Peering Strategic Game Models for Interdependent ISPs in Content Centric Internet

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jianfeng; Xu, Changqiao; Su, Wei; Zhang, Hongke

    2013-01-01

    Emergent content-oriented networks prompt Internet service providers (ISPs) to evolve and take major responsibility for content delivery. Numerous content items and varying content popularities motivate interdependence between peering ISPs to elaborate their content caching and sharing strategies. In this paper, we propose the concept of peering for content exchange between interdependent ISPs in content centric Internet to minimize content delivery cost by a proper peering strategy. We model four peering strategic games to formulate four types of peering relationships between ISPs who are characterized by varying degrees of cooperative willingness from egoism to altruism and interconnected as profit-individuals or profit-coalition. Simulation results show the price of anarchy (PoA) and communication cost in the four games to validate that ISPs should decide their peering strategies by balancing intradomain content demand and interdomain peering relations for an optimal cost of content delivery. PMID:24381517

  15. Critical Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling: A Survey of U.S. and International Research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-08-01

    The Nation’s health, wealth, and security rely on the production and distribution of certain goods and services. The array of physical assets, processes, and organizations across which these goods and services move are called "critical infrastructures".1 This statement is as true in the U.S. as in any country in the world. Recent world events such as the 9-11 terrorist attacks, London bombings, and gulf coast hurricanes have highlighted the importance of stable electric, gas and oil, water, transportation, banking and finance, and control and communication infrastructure systems. Be it through direct connectivity, policies and procedures, or geospatial proximity, most critical infrastructure systems interact. These interactions often create complex relationships, dependencies, and interdependencies that cross infrastructure boundaries. The modeling and analysis of interdependencies between critical infrastructure elements is a relatively new and very important field of study. The U.S. Technical Support Working Group (TSWG) has sponsored this survey to identify and describe this current area of research including the current activities in this field being conducted both in the U.S. and internationally. The main objective of this study is to develop a single source reference of critical infrastructure interdependency modeling tools (CIIMT) that could be applied to allow users to objectively assess the capabilities of CIIMT. This information will provide guidance for directing research and development to address the gaps in development. The results will inform researchers of the TSWG Infrastructure Protection Subgroup of research and development efforts and allow a more focused approach to addressing the needs of CIIMT end-user needs. This report first presents the field of infrastructure interdependency analysis, describes the survey methodology, and presents the leading research efforts in both a cumulative table and through individual datasheets. Data was

  16. Does Mother Know Best? An Actor-Partner Model of College-Age Women's Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Janice L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Katz, Mira L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the associations of perceived threat, perceived efficacy, and parent-child communication with the extent to which college-age women received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Daughters and their mothers completed a survey about the HPV vaccine (N = 182 dyads). The results showed that mothers' perceived self-efficacy to…

  17. Protein (multi-)location prediction: utilizing interdependencies via a generative model

    PubMed Central

    Shatkay, Hagit

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Proteins are responsible for a multitude of vital tasks in all living organisms. Given that a protein’s function and role are strongly related to its subcellular location, protein location prediction is an important research area. While proteins move from one location to another and can localize to multiple locations, most existing location prediction systems assign only a single location per protein. A few recent systems attempt to predict multiple locations for proteins, however, their performance leaves much room for improvement. Moreover, such systems do not capture dependencies among locations and usually consider locations as independent. We hypothesize that a multi-location predictor that captures location inter-dependencies can improve location predictions for proteins. Results: We introduce a probabilistic generative model for protein localization, and develop a system based on it—which we call MDLoc—that utilizes inter-dependencies among locations to predict multiple locations for proteins. The model captures location inter-dependencies using Bayesian networks and represents dependency between features and locations using a mixture model. We use iterative processes for learning model parameters and for estimating protein locations. We evaluate our classifier MDLoc, on a dataset of single- and multi-localized proteins derived from the DBMLoc dataset, which is the most comprehensive protein multi-localization dataset currently available. Our results, obtained by using MDLoc, significantly improve upon results obtained by an initial simpler classifier, as well as on results reported by other top systems. Availability and implementation: MDLoc is available at: http://www.eecis.udel.edu/∼compbio/mdloc. Contact: shatkay@udel.edu. PMID:26072505

  18. Interdependent Multi-Layer Networks: Modeling and Survivability Analysis with Applications to Space-Based Networks

    PubMed Central

    Castet, Jean-Francois; Saleh, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    This article develops a novel approach and algorithmic tools for the modeling and survivability analysis of networks with heterogeneous nodes, and examines their application to space-based networks. Space-based networks (SBNs) allow the sharing of spacecraft on-orbit resources, such as data storage, processing, and downlink. Each spacecraft in the network can have different subsystem composition and functionality, thus resulting in node heterogeneity. Most traditional survivability analyses of networks assume node homogeneity and as a result, are not suited for the analysis of SBNs. This work proposes that heterogeneous networks can be modeled as interdependent multi-layer networks, which enables their survivability analysis. The multi-layer aspect captures the breakdown of the network according to common functionalities across the different nodes, and it allows the emergence of homogeneous sub-networks, while the interdependency aspect constrains the network to capture the physical characteristics of each node. Definitions of primitives of failure propagation are devised. Formal characterization of interdependent multi-layer networks, as well as algorithmic tools for the analysis of failure propagation across the network are developed and illustrated with space applications. The SBN applications considered consist of several networked spacecraft that can tap into each other's Command and Data Handling subsystem, in case of failure of its own, including the Telemetry, Tracking and Command, the Control Processor, and the Data Handling sub-subsystems. Various design insights are derived and discussed, and the capability to perform trade-space analysis with the proposed approach for various network characteristics is indicated. The select results here shown quantify the incremental survivability gains (with respect to a particular class of threats) of the SBN over the traditional monolith spacecraft. Failure of the connectivity between nodes is also examined, and the

  19. Multi-Model Framework for Investigating Potential Climate Change Impacts on Interdependent Critical Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, L.; Allen, M. R.; Wilbanks, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Built infrastructure consists of a series of interconnected networks with many coupled interdependencies. Traditionally, risk and vulnerability assessments are conducted one infrastructure at a time, considering only direct impacts on built and planned assets. However, extreme events caused by climate change affect local communities in different respects and stress vital interconnected infrastructures in complex ways that cannot be captured with traditional risk assessment methodologies. We employ a combination of high-performance computing, geographical information science, and imaging methods to examine the impacts of climate change on infrastructure for cities in two different climate regions: Chicago, Illinois in the Midwest and Portland, Maine (and Casco Bay area) in the Northeast. In Illinois, we evaluate effects of changes in regional temperature and precipitation, informed by an extreme climate change projection, population growth and migration, water supply, and technological development, on electricity generation and consumption. In Maine, we determine the aggregate effects of sea level rise, changing precipitation patterns, and population shifts on the depth of the freshwater-saltwater interface in coastal aquifers and the implications of these changes for water supply in general. The purpose of these efforts is to develop a multi-model framework for investigating potential climate change impacts on interdependent critical infrastructure assessing both vulnerabilities and alternative adaptive measures.

  20. Cascading failures coupled model of interdependent double layered public transit network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Fu, Bai-Bai; Li, Shu-Bin

    2016-06-01

    Taking urban public transit network as research perspective, this work introduces the influences of adjacent stations on definition of station initial load, the connected edge transit capacity, and the coupled capacity to modify traditional load-capacity cascading failures (CFs) model. Furthermore, we consider the coupled effect of lower layered public transit network on the CFs of upper layered public transit network, and construct CFs coupled model of double layered public transit network with “interdependent relationship”. Finally, taking Jinan city’s public transit network as example, we give the dynamics simulation analysis of CFs under different control parameters based on measurement indicator of station cascading failures ratio (abbreviated as CF) and the scale of time-step cascading failures (abbreviated as TCFl), get the influencing characteristics of various control parameters, and verify the feasibility of CFs coupled model of double layered public transit network.

  1. A framework for linking cybersecurity metrics to the modeling of macroeconomic interdependencies.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; Haimes, Yacov Y; Lian, Chenyang

    2007-10-01

    Hierarchical decision making is a multidimensional process involving management of multiple objectives (with associated metrics and tradeoffs in terms of costs, benefits, and risks), which span various levels of a large-scale system. The nation is a hierarchical system as it consists multiple classes of decisionmakers and stakeholders ranging from national policymakers to operators of specific critical infrastructure subsystems. Critical infrastructures (e.g., transportation, telecommunications, power, banking, etc.) are highly complex and interconnected. These interconnections take the form of flows of information, shared security, and physical flows of commodities, among others. In recent years, economic and infrastructure sectors have become increasingly dependent on networked information systems for efficient operations and timely delivery of products and services. In order to ensure the stability, sustainability, and operability of our critical economic and infrastructure sectors, it is imperative to understand their inherent physical and economic linkages, in addition to their cyber interdependencies. An interdependency model based on a transformation of the Leontief input-output (I-O) model can be used for modeling: (1) the steady-state economic effects triggered by a consumption shift in a given sector (or set of sectors); and (2) the resulting ripple effects to other sectors. The inoperability metric is calculated for each sector; this is achieved by converting the economic impact (typically in monetary units) into a percentage value relative to the size of the sector. Disruptive events such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and large-scale accidents have historically shown cascading effects on both consumption and production. Hence, a dynamic model extension is necessary to demonstrate the interplay between combined demand and supply effects. The result is a foundational framework for modeling cybersecurity scenarios for the oil and gas sector. A

  2. Contextualizing community violence and its effects: an ecological model of parent-child interdependent coping.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, Eugene; Ell, Kathleen

    2005-07-01

    This article presents an integrated conceptual framework that contextualizes exposure to community violence and the interpersonal and interdependent processes of parent and child response to community violence. This model posits that parental distress, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, is a significant mediator of child distress symptomatology and behavior problems. The model advances understanding of the impact of community violence in the lives of parents and children through various mechanisms, including social capital. This article underscores the need for a fundamental shift in the study of community violence, in the delivery of mental health services, and in prevention efforts from focusing on the individual child to concentrating on the parent, family, and community-level factors and processes. This article highlights important areas to address in future research, including investigation and specification of the mechanisms and processes by which neighborhoods affect and influence human development outcomes.

  3. A basket two-part model to analyze medical expenditure on interdependent multiple sectors.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Shinya; Wu, Tianyi; Yamanishi, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a novel statistical methodology to analyze expenditure on multiple medical sectors using consumer data. Conventionally, medical expenditure has been analyzed by two-part models, which separately consider purchase decision and amount of expenditure. We extend the traditional two-part models by adding the step of basket analysis for dimension reduction. This new step enables us to analyze complicated interdependence between multiple sectors without an identification problem. As an empirical application for the proposed method, we analyze data of 13 medical sectors from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. In comparison with the results of previous studies that analyzed the multiple sector independently, our method provides more detailed implications of the impacts of individual socioeconomic status on the composition of joint purchases from multiple medical sectors; our method has a better prediction performance.

  4. "Does It Count?" and "Who Can Speak?": An Interdependent Model of Knowledge-Production in Public and Traditional Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobman, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a model of public scholarship in which the knowledge-generation binary in traditional and public scholarship can and does blur, even dissolve, through interdependent partnerships. The author analyzes the overlapping issues of authority and voice between the scholarship of community-engaged research and the discipline of…

  5. Analyzing Dyadic Data With Multilevel Modeling Versus Structural Equation Modeling: A Tale of Two Methods.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Thomas; Kenny, David A

    2017-02-06

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) and structural equation modeling (SEM) are the dominant methods for the analysis of dyadic data. Both methods are extensively reviewed for the widely used actor-partner interdependence model and the dyadic growth curve model, as well as other less frequently adopted models, including the common fate model and the mutual influence model. For each method, we discuss the analysis of distinguishable and indistinguishable members, the treatment of missing data, the standardization of effects, and tests of mediation. Even though there has been some blending of the 2 methods, each method has its own advantages and disadvantages, thus both should be in the toolbox of dyadic researchers. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. The common fate model for dyadic data: variations of a theoretically important but underutilized model.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Thomas; Kenny, David A

    2012-02-01

    Studying dyads, very often there is a theoretical construct that has an effect on both members, such as relationship harmony or shared environment. To model such influences, the common fate model (CFM) is often the most appropriate approach. In this article, we address conceptual and statistical issues in the use of the standard CFM and present a series of variations, all of which are estimated by structural equation modeling (SEM). For indistinguishable dyad members (e.g., gay couples), we describe the use of a multilevel SEM method. Throughout the paper, we draw connections to the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM). We also discuss the analysis of hybrid models that combines both the CFM and the APIM. The models are illustrated using data from heterosexual couples.

  7. Approaches to improve the robustness on interdependent networks against cascading failures with load-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhengcheng; Fang, Yanjun; Tian, Meng; Zhang, Rong

    2015-11-01

    With load-based model, considering the loss of capacity on nodes, we investigate how the coupling strength (many-to-many coupled pattern) and link patterns (one-to-one coupled pattern) can affect the robustness of interdependent networks. In one-to-one coupled pattern, we take into account the properties of degree and betweenness, and adopt four kinds of inter-similarity link patterns and random link pattern. In many-to-many coupled pattern, we propose a novel method to build new networks via adding inter-links (coupled links) on the existing one-to-one coupled networks. For a full investigation on the effects, we conduct two types of attack strategies, i.e. RO-attack (randomly remove only one node) and RF-attack (randomly remove a fraction of nodes). We numerically find that inter-similarity link patterns and bigger coupling strength can effectively improve the robustness under RO-attacks and RF-attacks in some cases. Therefore, the inter-similarity link patterns can be applied during the initial period of network construction. Once the networks are completed, the robustness level can be improved via adding inter-links appropriately without changing the existing inter-links and topologies of networks. We also find that BA-BA topology is a better choice and that it is not useful to infinitely increase the capacity which is defined as the cost of networks.

  8. Interdependence in Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partners: An Interindividual Model of Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorros, Sam M.; Card, Noel A.; Segrin, Chris; Badger, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to test whether interdependence in dyads living with breast cancer could account for person-partner crossover effects in distress outcomes. Method: The sample consisted of 95 dyads with early-stage breast cancer. By using reciprocal dyadic data from women with breast cancer and their partners, we fit a…

  9. Leveraging Structural Characteristics of Interdependent Networks to Model Non-Linear Cascading Risks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Brian Yoshimoto, J. Robert Wirthlin, and John Colombi, The Air Force Institute of Technology Software Acquisition Patterns of Failure and How to...interdependent programs (Flowe, Brown, & Hardin , 2009; Flowe, Kasunic, & Brown, 2010; Lewin, 1999). Also, the acquisition paradigm established in statute

  10. Redundant Design in Interdependent Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Yin, Yongfeng; Zhang, Zenghu; Malaiya, Yashwant K

    2016-01-01

    Modern infrastructure networks are often coupled together and thus could be modeled as interdependent networks. Overload and interdependent effect make interdependent networks more fragile when suffering from attacks. Existing research has primarily concentrated on the cascading failure process of interdependent networks without load, or the robustness of isolated network with load. Only limited research has been done on the cascading failure process caused by overload in interdependent networks. Redundant design is a primary approach to enhance the reliability and robustness of the system. In this paper, we propose two redundant methods, node back-up and dependency redundancy, and the experiment results indicate that two measures are effective and costless. Two detailed models about redundant design are introduced based on the non-linear load-capacity model. Based on the attributes and historical failure distribution of nodes, we introduce three static selecting strategies-Random-based, Degree-based, Initial load-based and a dynamic strategy-HFD (historical failure distribution) to identify which nodes could have a back-up with priority. In addition, we consider the cost and efficiency of different redundant proportions to determine the best proportion with maximal enhancement and minimal cost. Experiments on interdependent networks demonstrate that the combination of HFD and dependency redundancy is an effective and preferred measure to implement redundant design on interdependent networks. The results suggest that the redundant design proposed in this paper can permit construction of highly robust interactive networked systems.

  11. Redundant Design in Interdependent Networks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Modern infrastructure networks are often coupled together and thus could be modeled as interdependent networks. Overload and interdependent effect make interdependent networks more fragile when suffering from attacks. Existing research has primarily concentrated on the cascading failure process of interdependent networks without load, or the robustness of isolated network with load. Only limited research has been done on the cascading failure process caused by overload in interdependent networks. Redundant design is a primary approach to enhance the reliability and robustness of the system. In this paper, we propose two redundant methods, node back-up and dependency redundancy, and the experiment results indicate that two measures are effective and costless. Two detailed models about redundant design are introduced based on the non-linear load-capacity model. Based on the attributes and historical failure distribution of nodes, we introduce three static selecting strategies-Random-based, Degree-based, Initial load-based and a dynamic strategy-HFD (historical failure distribution) to identify which nodes could have a back-up with priority. In addition, we consider the cost and efficiency of different redundant proportions to determine the best proportion with maximal enhancement and minimal cost. Experiments on interdependent networks demonstrate that the combination of HFD and dependency redundancy is an effective and preferred measure to implement redundant design on interdependent networks. The results suggest that the redundant design proposed in this paper can permit construction of highly robust interactive networked systems. PMID:27764174

  12. Interdependence between Army Conventional Forces and Special Operations Forces: Changing Institutional Mental Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-23

    and joint activities between U.S. Army CF and SOF, a lack of interdependence dilutes outcomes of theatre security campaign plans. If the forcing...organizational learning, then the risk to successful theatre security cooperation increases due to a waning shared understanding between CF and SOF. 1...operational environment. Every geographic combatant command, or GCC, designs theatre security campaign plans, setting the stage for consistent CF

  13. Post-disaster supply chain interdependent critical infrastructure system restoration: A review of data necessary and available for modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramachandran, Varun; Long, Suzanna K.; Shoberg, Thomas G.; Corns, Steven; Carlo, Hector J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of restoration strategies in the wake of large-scale disasters have focused on short-term emergency response solutions. Few consider medium- to long-term restoration strategies to reconnect urban areas to national supply chain interdependent critical infrastructure systems (SCICI). These SCICI promote the effective flow of goods, services, and information vital to the economic vitality of an urban environment. To re-establish the connectivity that has been broken during a disaster between the different SCICI, relationships between these systems must be identified, formulated, and added to a common framework to form a system-level restoration plan. To accomplish this goal, a considerable collection of SCICI data is necessary. The aim of this paper is to review what data are required for model construction, the accessibility of these data, and their integration with each other. While a review of publically available data reveals a dearth of real-time data to assist modeling long-term recovery following an extreme event, a significant amount of static data does exist and these data can be used to model the complex interdependencies needed. For the sake of illustration, a particular SCICI (transportation) is used to highlight the challenges of determining the interdependencies and creating models capable of describing the complexity of an urban environment with the data publically available. Integration of such data as is derived from public domain sources is readily achieved in a geospatial environment, after all geospatial infrastructure data are the most abundant data source and while significant quantities of data can be acquired through public sources, a significant effort is still required to gather, develop, and integrate these data from multiple sources to build a complete model. Therefore, while continued availability of high quality, public information is essential for modeling efforts in academic as well as government communities, a more

  14. Can the linguistic interdependence theory support a bilingual-bicultural model of literacy education for deaf students?

    PubMed

    Mayer, C; Wells, G

    1996-01-01

    Drawing on Cummins' (1989) linguistic interdependence model, proponents of bilingual-bicultural models of literacy education for deaf students claim that, if ASL is well established as the L1, then literacy in English (L2) can be achieved by means of reading and writing without exposure to English through either speech or English-based sign. In our opinion, this claim is based on a false analogy: the situation of the deaf learner of English literacy does not match the conditions assumed by the linguistic interdependence model. We draw on the work of Vygotsky and Halliday to develop a conceptualization of the processes involved in becoming literate, examining the particular and unique challenges that deaf students face as they strive to become members of the linguistic community of users of written English. We argue that becoming literate involves mastering three modes of lanuage use: 'social speech,' 'inner speech,' and written text. In some respects the educational context for deaf students is analogous to that of other bilingual learners; in some crucial aspects, it is very different.

  15. Cooperation of German Airports in Europe: Comparison of Different Types by Means of an Interdependence-Profile-Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meincke, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    The limited growth possibilities in the home markets - not the least of which, based on capacity and expansion problems - force the large airport operators to enter into, via partnerships, cooperations and alliances. The German airports already cooperate among one another in different forms. The purpose of the paper is to examine the structures and possibilities of cooperation among airports in Europe (e.g. Airport Systems, Airport Networks). The experience of German airports with different cooperations and alliances will be also considered. Finally the forms of cooperations among airports are analysed by means of interdependence-profile-models with different features (mutual dependence, coordination volume, complexity, cooperation profit, value, degree of formalization and temporal frame), in order to find out how high the cooperative attachment of cooperation is to be evaluated.

  16. Actor Interdependence in Collaborative Telelearning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasson, Barbara; Bourdeau, Jacqueline

    This paper presents a model of collaborative telelearning and describes how coordination theory has provided a framework for the analysis of actor (inter)dependencies in this scenario. The model is intended to inform the instructional design of learning scenarios, the technological design of the telelearning environment, and the design of…

  17. Embracing Complexity: Using Technology to Develop a Life-Long Learning Model for Non-Working Time in the Interdependent Homes for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, I-Tsun; Chen, Mei-Li

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to employ complexity theory as a theoretical framework and technology to facilitate the development of a life-long learning model for non-working time in the interdependent homes for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). A "Shining Star Sustainable Action Project" of the ROC Foundation for Autistic…

  18. The Group's Absence Norm and Commitment to the Group as Predictors of Group Member Absence in the Next Session: An Actor-Partner Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Kivlighan, D. Martin, III; Cole, Odessa Dorian

    2012-01-01

    The group's absence norm, a construct from the applied psychology literature, was used to examine session absences in personal growth groups. Rather than examining the absence norm statically, we modeled it dynamically as a time-varying covariate (Tasca et al., 2010). We also examined moderation by modeling the interaction of the absence norm and…

  19. Globalization, Interdependence and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Deane

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary globalization is marked by rapidly and dramatically increasing interdependence, which operates both within and among countries. Increasing global interdependence has profound influence on education at all levels, such as how to deal with a world with more permeable boundaries in which people are on the move more frequently (migration)…

  20. INTERdependence Curriculum Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Affairs Council of Philadelphia, PA.

    Stressing global interdependence, this guide suggests resources, materials, and activities related to major world problems. Global interdependence is interpreted as connections between and among nations in areas of war and peace, human rights, environmental use, economics, and international law. The major objective is to help students understand…

  1. Beyond Dyadic Interdependence: Actor-Oriented Models for Co-Evolving Social Networks and Individual Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burk, William J.; Steglich, Christian E. G.; Snijders, Tom A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Actor-oriented models are described as a longitudinal strategy for examining the co-evolution of social networks and individual behaviors. We argue that these models provide advantages over conventional approaches due to their ability to account for inherent dependencies between individuals embedded in a social network (i.e., reciprocity,…

  2. Interdependency and hierarchy of exact and approximate epidemic models on networks.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Timothy J; Kiss, Istvan Z

    2014-07-01

    Over the years numerous models of S I S (susceptible --> infected --> susceptible) disease dynamics unfolding on networks have been proposed. Here, we discuss the links between many of these models and how they can be viewed as more general motif-based models. We illustrate how the different models can be derived from one another and, where this is not possible, discuss extensions to established models that enables this derivation. We also derive a general result for the exact differential equations for the expected number of an arbitrary motif directly from the Kolmogorov/master equations and conclude with a comparison of the performance of the different closed systems of equations on networks of varying structure.

  3. Cascade of failures in interdependent networks with different average degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zunshui; Cao, Jinde; Hayat, Tasawar

    2014-12-01

    Most of modern systems are coupled by two sub-networks and therefore should be modeled as interdependent networks. The study towards robustness of interdependent networks becomes interesting and significant. In this paper, mainly by numerical simulations, the robustness of interdependent Erdös-Rényi (ER) networks and interdependent scale-Free (SF) networks coupled by two sub-networks with different average degree are investigated. First, we study the robustness of interdependent networks under random attack. Second, we study the robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack on high or low degree nodes, and find that interdependent networks with different average degree are significantly different from those interdependent networks with equal average degree.

  4. Critical Infrastructure Modeling: An Approach to Characterizing Interdependencies of Complex Networks & Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Walsh; Shane Cherry; Lyle Roybal

    2009-05-01

    Critical infrastructure control systems face many challenges entering the 21st century, including natural disasters, cyber attacks, and terrorist attacks. Revolutionary change is required to solve many existing issues, including gaining greater situational awareness and resiliency through embedding modeling and advanced control algorithms in smart sensors and control devices instead of in a central controller. To support design, testing, and component analysis, a flexible simulation and modeling capability is needed. Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are developing and evaluating such a capability through their CIPRsim modeling and simulation framework.

  5. Genetic Algorithms for Agent-Based Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    May Permann

    2007-03-01

    Today’s society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, electric power, telecommunication, and financial networks. This paper describes initial research combining agent-based infrastructure modeling software and genetic algorithms (GAs) to help optimize infrastructure protection and restoration decisions. This research proposes to apply GAs to the problem of infrastructure modeling and analysis in order to determine the optimum assets to restore or protect from attack or other disaster. This research is just commencing and therefore the focus of this paper is the integration of a GA optimization method with a simulation through the simulation’s agents.

  6. INTERDEPENDENCIES OF MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL SIMULATIONS IN AN AIR QUALITY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work, we use the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to examine the effect of several control strategies on simultaneous concentrations of ozone, PM2.5, and three important HAPs: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and benzene.

  7. A mathematical model to explore the interdependence between the serotonin and orexin/hypocretin systems.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Alok; Wong-Lin, KongFatt; McGinnity, T Martin; Prasad, Girijesh

    2011-01-01

    Among their multitude of physiological and behavioral effects, the neurochemicals serotonin (5-HT) and orexin (Ox) have been closely linked to major depressive disorders (MDD) and sleep alterations. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and the lateral hypothalamus area (LHA) are brain regions that are sources of 5-HT and Ox, and there is evidence that suggests a reciprocal interaction between them. This lends support to the hypothesis of a close relationship between MDD and sleep disorders. Based on various experimental data, and appropriate assumptions, we construct a mathematical model of the coupled DRN-LHA neural circuit. Our model relates the dynamics of four important variables that can be experimentally measured: (i) the firing rate of 5-HT-containing neurons in DRN, (ii) the firing rate of Ox-containing neurons in the LHA, (iii) 5-HT concentration level in LHA, and (iv) Ox concentration level in DRN. Simulations show that our model supports the co-existence of baseline activities and concentration levels as observed in various separate experiments. It also allows circuit-level exploration of various parameters not yet identified experimentally, e.g. the rise and decay of Ox concentration levels due to Ox neural activity, and the exact dependence of Ox neural activity on 5-HT level. Finally we have made some model predictions regarding the effects of the 5-HT antagonist on the circuit. Our model, which can be subjected to verification and refinement as new experimental data accumulates, provides unified quantitative relationships and predictions between two important connected brain regions strongly tied to MDD and sleep disorders.

  8. Inter-dependent tissue growth and Turing patterning in a model for long bone development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Simon; Iber, Dagmar

    2013-10-01

    The development of long bones requires a sophisticated spatial organization of cellular signalling, proliferation, and differentiation programs. How such spatial organization emerges on the growing long bone domain is still unresolved. Based on the reported biochemical interactions we developed a regulatory model for the core signalling factors IHH, PTCH1, and PTHrP and included two cell types, proliferating/resting chondrocytes and (pre-)hypertrophic chondrocytes. We show that the reported IHH-PTCH1 interaction gives rise to a Schnakenberg-type Turing kinetics, and that inclusion of PTHrP is important to achieve robust patterning when coupling patterning and tissue dynamics. The model reproduces relevant spatiotemporal gene expression patterns, as well as a number of relevant mutant phenotypes. In summary, we propose that a ligand-receptor based Turing mechanism may control the emergence of patterns during long bone development, with PTHrP as an important mediator to confer patterning robustness when the sensitive Turing system is coupled to the dynamics of a growing and differentiating tissue. We have previously shown that ligand-receptor based Turing mechanisms can also result from BMP-receptor, SHH-receptor, and GDNF-receptor interactions, and that these reproduce the wildtype and mutant patterns during digit formation in limbs and branching morphogenesis in lung and kidneys. Receptor-ligand interactions may thus constitute a general mechanism to generate Turing patterns in nature.

  9. Modeling the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. states.

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.

    2010-12-01

    Decisions made to address climate change must start with an understanding of the risk of an uncertain future to human systems, which in turn means understanding both the consequence as well as the probability of a climate induced impact occurring. In other words, addressing climate change is an exercise in risk-informed policy making, which implies that there is no single correct answer or even a way to be certain about a single answer; the uncertainty in future climate conditions will always be present and must be taken as a working-condition for decision making. In order to better understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions, this study estimates the impacts from responses to climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity by employing a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. Using the results from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) as a proxy for climate uncertainty, changes in hydrology over the next 40 years were mapped and then modeled to determine the physical consequences on economic activity and to perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of the economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. The analysis determines industry-level effects, employment impacts at the state level, interstate population migration, consequences to personal income, and ramifications for the U.S. trade balance. The conclusions show that the average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs. Further analysis shows that an increase in uncertainty raises this risk. This paper will present the methodology behind the approach, a summary of the underlying models, as well as the path forward for improving the approach.

  10. Robustness of Interdependent Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-03-01

    In interdependent networks, when nodes in one network fail, they cause dependent nodes in other networks to also fail. This may happen recursively and can lead to a cascade of failures. In fact, a failure of a very small fraction of nodes in one network may lead to the complete fragmentation of a system of many interdependent networks. We will present a framework for understanding the robustness of interacting networks subject to such cascading failures and provide a basic analytic approach that may be useful in future studies. We present exact analytical solutions for the critical fraction of nodes that upon removal will lead to a failure cascade and to a complete fragmentation of two interdependent networks in a first order transition. Surprisingly, analyzing complex systems as a set of interdependent networks may alter a basic assumption that network theory has relied on: while for a single network a broader degree distribution of the network nodes results in the network being more robust to random failures, for interdependent networks, the broader the distribution is, the more vulnerable the networks become to random failure. We also show that reducing the coupling between the networks leads to a change from a first order percolation phase transition to a second order percolation transition at a critical point. These findings pose a significant challenge to the future design of robust networks that need to consider the unique properties of interdependent networks.

  11. Cascading failure analysis and restoration strategy in an interdependent network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sheng; Lv, Chuan; Zhao, Tingdi; Wang, Baoqing; Wang, Jianghui; Zhu, Juxing

    2016-05-01

    In modern society, many infrastructures are interdependent owing to functional and logical relations among components in different systems. These networked infrastructures can be modeled as interdependent networks. In the real world, different networks carry different traffic loads whose values are dynamic and stem from the load redistribution in the same network and disturbance from the interdependent network. Interdependency makes interdependent networks so fragile that even a slight initial disturbance may lead to a cascading failure of the entire systems. In this paper, interdependencies among networks are modeled and a failure cascade process is studied considering their effects on failure propagation. Meanwhile, an in-process restoration strategy after the initial failure is investigated. The restoration effects depend strongly on the trigger timing, restoration probability and priority of the restoration actions along with the additional disturbances. Our findings highlight the necessity to decrease the large-scale cascading failure by structuring and managing an interdependent network reasonably.

  12. Assortativity decreases the robustness of interdependent networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Di; Stanley, H Eugene; D'Agostino, Gregorio; Scala, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    It was recently recognized that interdependencies among different networks can play a crucial role in triggering cascading failures and, hence, systemwide disasters. A recent model shows how pairs of interdependent networks can exhibit an abrupt percolation transition as failures accumulate. We report on the effects of topology on failure propagation for a model system consisting of two interdependent networks. We find that the internal node correlations in each of the two interdependent networks significantly changes the critical density of failures that triggers the total disruption of the two-network system. Specifically, we find that the assortativity (i.e., the likelihood of nodes with similar degree to be connected) within a single network decreases the robustness of the entire system. The results of this study on the influence of assortativity may provide insights into ways of improving the robustness of network architecture and, thus, enhance the level of protection of critical infrastructures.

  13. Assortativity decreases the robustness of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Di; Stanley, H. Eugene; D'Agostino, Gregorio; Scala, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    It was recently recognized that interdependencies among different networks can play a crucial role in triggering cascading failures and, hence, systemwide disasters. A recent model shows how pairs of interdependent networks can exhibit an abrupt percolation transition as failures accumulate. We report on the effects of topology on failure propagation for a model system consisting of two interdependent networks. We find that the internal node correlations in each of the two interdependent networks significantly changes the critical density of failures that triggers the total disruption of the two-network system. Specifically, we find that the assortativity (i.e., the likelihood of nodes with similar degree to be connected) within a single network decreases the robustness of the entire system. The results of this study on the influence of assortativity may provide insights into ways of improving the robustness of network architecture and, thus, enhance the level of protection of critical infrastructures.

  14. Catastrophic cascade of failures in interdependent networks.

    PubMed

    Buldyrev, Sergey V; Parshani, Roni; Paul, Gerald; Stanley, H Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-04-15

    Complex networks have been studied intensively for a decade, but research still focuses on the limited case of a single, non-interacting network. Modern systems are coupled together and therefore should be modelled as interdependent networks. A fundamental property of interdependent networks is that failure of nodes in one network may lead to failure of dependent nodes in other networks. This may happen recursively and can lead to a cascade of failures. In fact, a failure of a very small fraction of nodes in one network may lead to the complete fragmentation of a system of several interdependent networks. A dramatic real-world example of a cascade of failures ('concurrent malfunction') is the electrical blackout that affected much of Italy on 28 September 2003: the shutdown of power stations directly led to the failure of nodes in the Internet communication network, which in turn caused further breakdown of power stations. Here we develop a framework for understanding the robustness of interacting networks subject to such cascading failures. We present exact analytical solutions for the critical fraction of nodes that, on removal, will lead to a failure cascade and to a complete fragmentation of two interdependent networks. Surprisingly, a broader degree distribution increases the vulnerability of interdependent networks to random failure, which is opposite to how a single network behaves. Our findings highlight the need to consider interdependent network properties in designing robust networks.

  15. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Interdependent Networked Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qing; Wang, Lin; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Wang, Zhen

    2014-02-01

    Spatial evolution game has traditionally assumed that players interact with direct neighbors on a single network, which is isolated and not influenced by other systems. However, this is not fully consistent with recent research identification that interactions between networks play a crucial rule for the outcome of evolutionary games taking place on them. In this work, we introduce the simple game model into the interdependent networks composed of two networks. By means of imitation dynamics, we display that when the interdependent factor α is smaller than a threshold value αC, the symmetry of cooperation can be guaranteed. Interestingly, as interdependent factor exceeds αC, spontaneous symmetry breaking of fraction of cooperators presents itself between different networks. With respect to the breakage of symmetry, it is induced by asynchronous expansion between heterogeneous strategy couples of both networks, which further enriches the content of spatial reciprocity. Moreover, our results can be well predicted by the strategy-couple pair approximation method.

  16. Recovery of Interdependent Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Muro, M. A.; La Rocca, C. E.; Stanley, H. E.; Havlin, S.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    Recent network research has focused on the cascading failures in a system of interdependent networks and the necessary preconditions for system collapse. An important question that has not been addressed is how to repair a failing system before it suffers total breakdown. Here we introduce a recovery strategy for nodes and develop an analytic and numerical framework for studying the concurrent failure and recovery of a system of interdependent networks based on an efficient and practically reasonable strategy. Our strategy consists of repairing a fraction of failed nodes, with probability of recovery γ, that are neighbors of the largest connected component of each constituent network. We find that, for a given initial failure of a fraction 1 ‑ p of nodes, there is a critical probability of recovery above which the cascade is halted and the system fully restores to its initial state and below which the system abruptly collapses. As a consequence we find in the plane γ ‑ p of the phase diagram three distinct phases. A phase in which the system never collapses without being restored, another phase in which the recovery strategy avoids the breakdown, and a phase in which even the repairing process cannot prevent system collapse.

  17. Recovery of Interdependent Networks.

    PubMed

    Di Muro, M A; La Rocca, C E; Stanley, H E; Havlin, S; Braunstein, L A

    2016-03-09

    Recent network research has focused on the cascading failures in a system of interdependent networks and the necessary preconditions for system collapse. An important question that has not been addressed is how to repair a failing system before it suffers total breakdown. Here we introduce a recovery strategy for nodes and develop an analytic and numerical framework for studying the concurrent failure and recovery of a system of interdependent networks based on an efficient and practically reasonable strategy. Our strategy consists of repairing a fraction of failed nodes, with probability of recovery γ, that are neighbors of the largest connected component of each constituent network. We find that, for a given initial failure of a fraction 1 - p of nodes, there is a critical probability of recovery above which the cascade is halted and the system fully restores to its initial state and below which the system abruptly collapses. As a consequence we find in the plane γ - p of the phase diagram three distinct phases. A phase in which the system never collapses without being restored, another phase in which the recovery strategy avoids the breakdown, and a phase in which even the repairing process cannot prevent system collapse.

  18. Recovery of Interdependent Networks

    PubMed Central

    Di Muro, M. A.; La Rocca, C. E.; Stanley, H. E.; Havlin, S.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent network research has focused on the cascading failures in a system of interdependent networks and the necessary preconditions for system collapse. An important question that has not been addressed is how to repair a failing system before it suffers total breakdown. Here we introduce a recovery strategy for nodes and develop an analytic and numerical framework for studying the concurrent failure and recovery of a system of interdependent networks based on an efficient and practically reasonable strategy. Our strategy consists of repairing a fraction of failed nodes, with probability of recovery γ, that are neighbors of the largest connected component of each constituent network. We find that, for a given initial failure of a fraction 1 − p of nodes, there is a critical probability of recovery above which the cascade is halted and the system fully restores to its initial state and below which the system abruptly collapses. As a consequence we find in the plane γ − p of the phase diagram three distinct phases. A phase in which the system never collapses without being restored, another phase in which the recovery strategy avoids the breakdown, and a phase in which even the repairing process cannot prevent system collapse. PMID:26956773

  19. The Investigation of Relationship among Relational-Interdependent Self-Construal, Cyberbullying, and Psychological Disharmony in Adolescents: An Investigation of Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Bayram; Eroglu, Yuksel; Peker, Adem; Akbaba, Sirri; Pepsoy, Sevim

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of relational-interdependent self-construal on cyberbullying and the effect of cyberbullying on psychological disharmony. Participants were 258 high school students. In this study, the Relational-Interdependent Self-Construal Scale, the Revised Cyberbullying Inventory, and the Depression, Anxiety,…

  20. Shaping Science for Increasing Interdependence and Specialization.

    PubMed

    Utzerath, Christian; Fernández, Guillén

    2017-03-01

    Like art, science affords an individualistic career. However, increasingly, complexity necessitates increased interdependency and specialization. Despite this change, many institutions, funding agencies, and publishers insist on an exclusively individualistic model of science. This hinders scientific progress by imposing a range of inefficiencies in the planning and execution of research plans.

  1. Independence and Interdependence in Early Childhood Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitington, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    It is through culture that children make sense of their worlds (Trevarthen, 1998). Cross- cultural models show that families are likely to primarily foster either independence or interdependence in their children (Gonzalez-Mena, 1997; Greenfield, 1994). Young children are likely to pay the "price of acculturation" when they enter early…

  2. Guide to the Concept: Interdependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C.

    This draft outline presents and organizes for teachers one of the fundamental concepts in war/peace studies: interdependence. As the definitional statement makes clear, interdependence involves learning to look at the world as a single system, and to identify and analyze its various subsystems. Part of the rationale for considering interdependence…

  3. Education for an Interdependent Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodbelt, Samuel

    1979-01-01

    Calls for social studies teachers to emphasize future studies and the implications of growing global interdependence. Students should learn about alternative futures, the possible decline of nationalism, overpopulation and food resources, the ecological system and natural resources, and ways of achieving interdependence. (AV)

  4. Cascades in interdependent flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Antonio; De Sanctis Lucentini, Pier Giorgio; Caldarelli, Guido; D'Agostino, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    In this manuscript, we investigate the abrupt breakdown behavior of coupled distribution grids under load growth. This scenario mimics the ever-increasing customer demand and the foreseen introduction of energy hubs interconnecting the different energy vectors. We extend an analytical model of cascading behavior due to line overloads to the case of interdependent networks and find evidence of first order transitions due to the long-range nature of the flows. Our results indicate that the foreseen increase in the couplings between the grids has two competing effects: on the one hand, it increases the safety region where grids can operate without withstanding systemic failures; on the other hand, it increases the possibility of a joint systems' failure.

  5. Impact of Degree Heterogeneity on Attack Vulnerability of Interdependent Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiwen; Wu, Yafang; Ma, Yilin; Wang, Li; Gao, Zhongke; Xia, Chengyi

    2016-09-01

    The study of interdependent networks has become a new research focus in recent years. We focus on one fundamental property of interdependent networks: vulnerability. Previous studies mainly focused on the impact of topological properties upon interdependent networks under random attacks, the effect of degree heterogeneity on structural vulnerability of interdependent networks under intentional attacks, however, is still unexplored. In order to deeply understand the role of degree distribution and in particular degree heterogeneity, we construct an interdependent system model which consists of two networks whose extent of degree heterogeneity can be controlled simultaneously by a tuning parameter. Meanwhile, a new quantity, which can better measure the performance of interdependent networks after attack, is proposed. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that degree heterogeneity can significantly increase the vulnerability of both single and interdependent networks. Moreover, it is found that interdependent links between two networks make the entire system much more fragile to attacks. Enhancing coupling strength between networks can greatly increase the fragility of both networks against targeted attacks, which is most evident under the case of max-max assortative coupling. Current results can help to deepen the understanding of structural complexity of complex real-world systems.

  6. Impact of Degree Heterogeneity on Attack Vulnerability of Interdependent Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiwen; Wu, Yafang; Ma, Yilin; Wang, Li; Gao, Zhongke; Xia, Chengyi

    2016-01-01

    The study of interdependent networks has become a new research focus in recent years. We focus on one fundamental property of interdependent networks: vulnerability. Previous studies mainly focused on the impact of topological properties upon interdependent networks under random attacks, the effect of degree heterogeneity on structural vulnerability of interdependent networks under intentional attacks, however, is still unexplored. In order to deeply understand the role of degree distribution and in particular degree heterogeneity, we construct an interdependent system model which consists of two networks whose extent of degree heterogeneity can be controlled simultaneously by a tuning parameter. Meanwhile, a new quantity, which can better measure the performance of interdependent networks after attack, is proposed. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that degree heterogeneity can significantly increase the vulnerability of both single and interdependent networks. Moreover, it is found that interdependent links between two networks make the entire system much more fragile to attacks. Enhancing coupling strength between networks can greatly increase the fragility of both networks against targeted attacks, which is most evident under the case of max-max assortative coupling. Current results can help to deepen the understanding of structural complexity of complex real-world systems. PMID:27609483

  7. Social contagions on interdependent lattice networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Panpan; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Pengcheng; Wang, Wei; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2017-03-01

    Although an increasing amount of research is being done on the dynamical processes on interdependent spatial networks, knowledge of how interdependent spatial networks influence the dynamics of social contagion in them is sparse. Here we present a novel non-Markovian social contagion model on interdependent spatial networks composed of two identical two-dimensional lattices. We compare the dynamics of social contagion on networks with different fractions of dependency links and find that the density of final recovered nodes increases as the number of dependency links is increased. We use a finite-size analysis method to identify the type of phase transition in the giant connected components (GCC) of the final adopted nodes and find that as we increase the fraction of dependency links, the phase transition switches from second-order to first-order. In strong interdependent spatial networks with abundant dependency links, increasing the fraction of initial adopted nodes can induce the switch from a first-order to second-order phase transition associated with social contagion dynamics. In networks with a small number of dependency links, the phase transition remains second-order. In addition, both the second-order and first-order phase transition points can be decreased by increasing the fraction of dependency links or the number of initially-adopted nodes.

  8. Social contagions on interdependent lattice networks.

    PubMed

    Shu, Panpan; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Pengcheng; Wang, Wei; Stanley, H Eugene

    2017-03-16

    Although an increasing amount of research is being done on the dynamical processes on interdependent spatial networks, knowledge of how interdependent spatial networks influence the dynamics of social contagion in them is sparse. Here we present a novel non-Markovian social contagion model on interdependent spatial networks composed of two identical two-dimensional lattices. We compare the dynamics of social contagion on networks with different fractions of dependency links and find that the density of final recovered nodes increases as the number of dependency links is increased. We use a finite-size analysis method to identify the type of phase transition in the giant connected components (GCC) of the final adopted nodes and find that as we increase the fraction of dependency links, the phase transition switches from second-order to first-order. In strong interdependent spatial networks with abundant dependency links, increasing the fraction of initial adopted nodes can induce the switch from a first-order to second-order phase transition associated with social contagion dynamics. In networks with a small number of dependency links, the phase transition remains second-order. In addition, both the second-order and first-order phase transition points can be decreased by increasing the fraction of dependency links or the number of initially-adopted nodes.

  9. Identifying, understanding, and analyzing critical infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, S. M.; Peerenboom, J. P.; Kelly, T. K.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2001-12-01

    The notion that our nation's critical infrastructures are highly interconnected and mutually dependent in complex ways, both physically and through a host of information and communications technologies (so-called 'cyberbased systems'), is more than an abstract, theoretical concept. As shown by the 1998 failure of the Galaxy 4 telecommunications satellite, the prolonged power crisis in California, and many other recent infrastructure disruptions, what happens to one infrastructure can directly and indirectly affect other infrastructures, impact large geographic regions and send ripples throughout the national a global economy. This article presents a conceptual framework for addressing infrastructure interdependencies that could serve as the basis for further understanding and scholarship in this important area. We use this framework to explore the challenges and complexities of interdependency. We set the stage for this discussion by explicitly defining the terms infrastructure, infrastructure dependencies, and infrastructure interdependencies and introducing the fundamental concept of infrastructures as complex adaptive systems. We then focus on the interrelated factors and system conditions that collectively define the six dimensions. Finally, we discuss some of the research challenges involved in developing, applying, and validating modeling and simulation methodologies and tools for infrastructure interdependency analysis.

  10. Social contagions on interdependent lattice networks

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Panpan; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Pengcheng; Wang, Wei; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2017-01-01

    Although an increasing amount of research is being done on the dynamical processes on interdependent spatial networks, knowledge of how interdependent spatial networks influence the dynamics of social contagion in them is sparse. Here we present a novel non-Markovian social contagion model on interdependent spatial networks composed of two identical two-dimensional lattices. We compare the dynamics of social contagion on networks with different fractions of dependency links and find that the density of final recovered nodes increases as the number of dependency links is increased. We use a finite-size analysis method to identify the type of phase transition in the giant connected components (GCC) of the final adopted nodes and find that as we increase the fraction of dependency links, the phase transition switches from second-order to first-order. In strong interdependent spatial networks with abundant dependency links, increasing the fraction of initial adopted nodes can induce the switch from a first-order to second-order phase transition associated with social contagion dynamics. In networks with a small number of dependency links, the phase transition remains second-order. In addition, both the second-order and first-order phase transition points can be decreased by increasing the fraction of dependency links or the number of initially-adopted nodes. PMID:28300198

  11. Catastrophic cascade of failures in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Havlin, Shlomo; Parshani, Roni; Paul, Gerald; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-03-01

    Many complex systems are coupled together and therefore should be modeled by multiple interdependent networks. For example, a power network in which the nodes are power stations and a communication network in which the nodes are computers, are interdependent. In interdependent networks, failure of nodes in one network, cause failure of dependent nodes in another network. This may happen recursively and can lead to a cascade of failures: a failure of a very small fraction of nodes in one network may lead to the complete fragmentation of a system. We provide a framework for understanding the robustness of interacting networks subject to such cascading failures and provide a basic analytic approach that may be useful in future work. We present exact analytical solutions for the critical fraction of nodes that upon removal will lead to a failure cascade and to a complete fragmentation of two randomly connected interdependent networks in terms of the generating functions of their degree distributions. Surprisingly, networks with broad degree distributions are more vulnerable to random failures than networks with narrow degree distributions.

  12. Toward a multidimensional model of athletes' commitment to coach-athlete relationships and interdependent sport teams: a substantive-methodological synergy.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Ben; Gucciardi, Daniel F; Dimmock, James A

    2014-02-01

    Drawing from a three-factor model of organizational commitment, we sought to provide validity evidence for a multidimensional conceptualization designed to capture adolescent athletes' commitment to their coach-athlete relationship or their team. In Study 1, 335 individual-sport athletes (Mage = 17.32, SD = 1.38) completed instruments assessing affective, normative, and continuance commitment to their relationship with their coach, and in Study 2, contextually modified instruments were administered to assess interdependent-sport athletes' (N = 286, Mage = 16.31, SD = 1.33) commitment to their team. Bayesian structural equation modeling revealed support for a three-factor (in comparison with a single-factor) model, along with relations between commitment dimensions and relevant correlates (e.g., satisfaction, return intentions, cohesion) that were largely consistent with theory. Guided by recent advancements in Bayesian modeling, these studies provide a new commitment instrument with the potential for use and refinement in team- and relationship-based settings and offer preliminary support for a conceptual framework that may help advance our understanding of the factors underpinning individuals' engagement in sport.

  13. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H. Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős–Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis. PMID:26787907

  14. Forecasting International Interdependence and Conflict.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-30

    market by the likes of multinational corporations , and, in some cases, by the state itself. This opposing school would argue that while the importance...and the phenomenon-interdependence, are related. The openness of interdependent nations to comunications and many other transmitters of culture, as...vulnerabilities that go with par- ticipation. Also ignored are multinational corporations and their effects on home and host country economies, international

  15. Structural interdependence in teams: An integrative framework and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Courtright, Stephen H; Thurgood, Gary R; Stewart, Greg L; Pierotti, Abigail J

    2015-11-01

    Although interdependence is a central aspect of team design, there has been a lack of clarity regarding the meaning and impact of different forms of interdependence. To provide theoretical clarity and to advance research on team interdependence, we develop an organizing, conceptual framework of interdependence in teams and test it using meta-analysis. We first review and tie together different conceptualizations of interdependence in the literature and illustrate how they converge around 2 major constructs: task interdependence and outcome interdependence. After providing integrative definitions of these forms of interdependence, as well as subdimensions, we then explore the relative effects of task and outcome interdependence on team functioning and performance. Specifically, we propose a pattern of differential effects in which task interdependence is primarily associated with team performance through its effects on task-focused team functioning (i.e., transition/action processes, collective efficacy), whereas outcome interdependence is primarily associated with team performance through its effects on relational team functioning (i.e., interpersonal processes, cohesion). We test these differential effects using a meta-analytic database of 107 independent samples and 7,563 teams. The meta-analytic path model provides strong support for our hypotheses. Implications and future directions for the study of interdependence in work teams are discussed.

  16. Robust-yet-fragile nature of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fei; Xia, Yongxiang; Wei, Zhi

    2015-05-01

    Interdependent networks have been shown to be extremely vulnerable based on the percolation model. Parshani et al. [Europhys. Lett. 92, 68002 (2010), 10.1209/0295-5075/92/68002] further indicated that the more intersimilar networks are, the more robust they are to random failures. When traffic load is considered, how do the coupling patterns impact cascading failures in interdependent networks? This question has been largely unexplored until now. In this paper, we address this question by investigating the robustness of interdependent Erdös-Rényi random graphs and Barabási-Albert scale-free networks under either random failures or intentional attacks. It is found that interdependent Erdös-Rényi random graphs are robust yet fragile under either random failures or intentional attacks. Interdependent Barabási-Albert scale-free networks, however, are only robust yet fragile under random failures but fragile under intentional attacks. We further analyze the interdependent communication network and power grid and achieve similar results. These results advance our understanding of how interdependency shapes network robustness.

  17. Emotional Interdependence and Well-Being in Close Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Sels, Laura; Ceulemans, Eva; Bulteel, Kirsten; Kuppens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Emotional interdependence—here defined as partners’ emotions being linked to each other across time—is often considered a key characteristic of healthy romantic relationships. But is this actually the case? We conducted an experience-sampling study with 50 couples indicating their feelings 10 times a day for 7 days and modeled emotional interdependence for each couple separately taking a dyadographic approach. The majority of couples (64%) did not demonstrate strong signs of emotional interdependence, and couples that did, showed great inter-dyad differences in their specific patterns. Individuals from emotionally more interdependent couples reported higher individual well-being than individuals from more independent couples in terms of life satisfaction but not depression. Relational well-being was not (relationship satisfaction) or even negatively (empathic concern) related to the degree of emotional interdependence. Especially driving the emotions of the partner (i.e., sender effects) accounted for these associations, opposed to following the emotions of the partner (i.e., receiver effects). Additionally, assessing emotional interdependence for positive and negative emotions separately elucidated that primarily emotional interdependence for positive emotions predicted more self-reported life satisfaction and less empathic concern. These findings highlight the existence of large inter-dyad differences, explore relationships between emotional interdependence and key well-being variables, and demonstrate differential correlates for sending and receiving emotions. PMID:27014114

  18. Interdependence of chronic hydraulic dysfunction and canopy processes can improve integrated models of tree response to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. Scott; Roberts, David E.; Ewers, Brent E.; Sperry, John S.; McDowell, Nathan G.; Pockman, William T.

    2015-08-01

    Hydraulic systems of plants have evolved in the context of carbon allocation and fitness trade-offs of maximizing carbon gain and water transport in the face of short and long-term fluctuations in environmental conditions. The resulting diversity of traits include a continuum of isohydry-anisohydry or high to low relative stomatal closure during drought, shedding of canopy foliage or disconnecting roots from soil to survive drought, and adjusting root areas to efficiently manage canopy water costs associated with photosynthesis. These traits are examined within TREES, an integrated model that explicitly couples photosynthesis and carbon allocation to soil-plant hydraulics and canopy processes. Key advances of the model are its ability to account for differences in soil and xylem cavitation, transience of hydraulic impairment associated with delayed or no refilling of xylem, and carbon allocation to plant structures based on photosynthetic uptake of carbon and hydraulic limitations to water transport. The model was used to examine hydraulic traits of cooccurring isohydric (piñon pine) and anisohydric (one-seed juniper) trees from a field-based experimental drought. Model predictions of both transpiration and leaf water potential were improved when there was no refilling of xylem over simulations where xylem was able refill in response to soil water recharge. Model experiments with alternative root-to-leaf area ratios (RR/L) showed the RR/L that supports maximum cumulative water use is not beneficial for supporting maximum carbon gain during extended drought, illustrating how a process model reveals trade-offs in plant traits.

  19. Interdependent networks: the fragility of control

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Richard G.; Barthelemy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Recent work in the area of interdependent networks has focused on interactions between two systems of the same type. However, an important and ubiquitous class of systems are those involving monitoring and control, an example of interdependence between processes that are very different. In this Article, we introduce a framework for modelling ‘distributed supervisory control' in the guise of an electrical network supervised by a distributed system of control devices. The system is characterised by degrees of freedom salient to real-world systems— namely, the number of control devices, their inherent reliability, and the topology of the control network. Surprisingly, the behavior of the system depends crucially on the reliability of control devices. When devices are completely reliable, cascade sizes are percolation controlled; the number of devices being the relevant parameter. For unreliable devices, the topology of the control network is important and can dramatically reduce the resilience of the system. PMID:24067404

  20. The interdependent contributions of gravitational and structural features to perfusion distribution in a multiscale model of the pulmonary circulation

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, M. H.; Hoffman, E. A.; Burrowes, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and imaging studies suggest that the influence of gravity on the measured distribution of blood flow in the lung is largely through deformation of the parenchymal tissue. To study the contribution of hydrostatic effects to regional perfusion in the presence of tissue deformation, we have developed an anatomically structured computational model of the pulmonary circulation (arteries, capillaries, veins), coupled to a continuum model of tissue deformation, and including scale-appropriate fluid dynamics for blood flow in each vessel type. The model demonstrates that both structural and the multiple effects of gravity on the pulmonary circulation make a distinct contribution to the distribution of blood. It shows that postural differences in perfusion gradients can be explained by the combined effect of tissue deformation and extra-acinar blood vessel resistance to flow in the dependent tissue. However, gravitational perfusion gradients persist when the effect of tissue deformation is eliminated, highlighting the importance of the hydrostatic effects of gravity on blood distribution in the pulmonary circulation. Coupling of large- and small-scale models reveals variation in microcirculatory driving pressures within isogravitational planes due to extra-acinar vessel resistance. Variation in driving pressures is due to heterogeneous large-vessel resistance as a consequence of geometric asymmetry in the vascular trees and is amplified by the complex balance of pressures, distension, and flow at the microcirculatory level. PMID:21292845

  1. The Interdependence of the Factors Influencing the Perceived Quality of the Online Learning Experience: A Causal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Schibrowsky, John A.; Drago, William

    2007-01-01

    A structural model of the drivers of online education is proposed and tested. The findings help to identify the interrelated nature of the lectures delivered via technology outside of the traditional classroom, the importance of mentoring, the need to develop course structure, the changing roles for instructors and students, and the importance of…

  2. Modeling risk for child abuse and harsh parenting in families with depressed and substance-abusing parents.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Lawrence, Hannah R; Milletich, Robert J; Hollis, Brittany F; Henson, James M

    2015-05-01

    Children with substance abusing parents are at considerable risk for child maltreatment. The current study applied an actor-partner interdependence model to examine how father only (n=52) and dual couple (n=33) substance use disorder, as well as their depressive symptomology influenced parents' own (actor effects) and the partner's (partner effects) overreactivity in disciplinary interactions with their children, as well as their risk for child maltreatment. Parents completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; Radloff, 1977), the overreactivity subscale from the Parenting Scale (Arnold, O'Leary, Wolff, & Acker, 1993), and the Brief Child Abuse Potential Inventory (Ondersma, Chaffin, Mullins, & LeBreton, 2005). Results of multigroup structural equation models revealed that a parent's own report of depressive symptoms predicted their risk for child maltreatment in both father SUD and dual SUD couples. Similarly, a parent's report of their own depressive symptoms predicted their overreactivity in disciplinary encounters both in father SUD and dual SUD couples. In all models, partners' depressive symptoms did not predict their partner's risk for child maltreatment or overreactivity. Findings underscore the importance of a parent's own level of depressive symptoms in their risk for child maltreatment and for engaging in overreactivity during disciplinary episodes.

  3. E pluribus unum: using group model building with many interdependent organizations to create integrated health-care networks.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Angèle; Akkermans, Henk; Franx, Arie

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reports on an action research case study of integrated obstetric care in the Netherlands. Efficient and patient-friendly patient flows through integrated care networks are of major societal importance. How to design and develop such interorganizational patient flows is still a nascent research area, especially when dealing with a large number (n>3) of stakeholders. We have shown that a modification of an existing method to support interorganizational collaboration by system dynamics-based group model building (GMB) (the Renga method, Akkermans, 2001) may be effective in achieving such collaboration.

  4. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Interdependent Networked Game

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qing; Wang, Lin; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Wang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Spatial evolution game has traditionally assumed that players interact with direct neighbors on a single network, which is isolated and not influenced by other systems. However, this is not fully consistent with recent research identification that interactions between networks play a crucial rule for the outcome of evolutionary games taking place on them. In this work, we introduce the simple game model into the interdependent networks composed of two networks. By means of imitation dynamics, we display that when the interdependent factor α is smaller than a threshold value αC, the symmetry of cooperation can be guaranteed. Interestingly, as interdependent factor exceeds αC, spontaneous symmetry breaking of fraction of cooperators presents itself between different networks. With respect to the breakage of symmetry, it is induced by asynchronous expansion between heterogeneous strategy couples of both networks, which further enriches the content of spatial reciprocity. Moreover, our results can be well predicted by the strategy-couple pair approximation method. PMID:24526076

  5. Improving interdependent networks robustness by adding connectivity links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xingpei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Dichen; Chen, Guo; Tang, Fei; Wei, Daqian; Tu, Lian

    2016-02-01

    Compared with a single and isolated network, interdependent networks have two types of links: connectivity link and dependency link. This paper aims to improve the robustness of interdependent networks by adding connectivity links. Firstly, interdependent networks failure model and four frequently used link addition strategies are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, by defining inter degree-degree difference, two novel link addition strategies are proposed. Finally, we verify the effectiveness of our proposed link addition strategies by comparing with the current link addition strategies in three different network models. The simulation results show that, given the number of added links, link allocation strategies have great effects on the robustness of interdependent networks, i.e., the double-network link allocation strategy is superior to single-network link allocation strategy. Link addition strategies proposed in this paper excel the current strategies, especially for BA interdependent networks. Moreover, our work can provide guidance on how to allocate limited resources to an existing interdependent networks system and optimize its topology to avoid the potential cascade failures.

  6. Attachment, Sexual Assertiveness, and Sexual Outcomes in Women with Provoked Vestibulodynia and Their Partners: A Mediation Model.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Bianca; Bergeron, Sophie; Brassard, Audrey; Bélanger, Claude; Steben, Marc; Lambert, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a prevalent women's sexual pain disorder, which is associated with sexual function difficulties. Attachment theory has been used to understand adult sexual outcomes, providing a useful framework for examining sexual adaptation in couples confronted with PVD. Research to date indicates that anxious and avoidant attachment dimensions correlate with worse sexual outcomes in community and clinical samples. The present study examined the association between attachment, pain, sexual function, and sexual satisfaction in a sample of 101 couples in which the women presented with PVD. The actor-partner interdependence model was used in order to investigate both actor and partner effects. This study also examined the role of sexual assertiveness as a mediator of these associations via structural equation modeling. Women completed measures of pain intensity and both members of the couple completed measures of romantic attachment, sexual assertiveness, sexual function, and satisfaction. Results indicated that attachment dimensions did not predict pain intensity. Both anxious and avoidant attachment were associated with lower sexual satisfaction. Only attachment avoidance predicted lower sexual function in women. Partner effects indicated that higher sexual assertiveness in women predicted higher sexual satisfaction in men. Finally, women's sexual assertiveness was found to be a significant mediator of the relationship between their attachment dimensions, sexual function, and satisfaction. Findings highlight the importance of examining how anxious and avoidant attachment may lead to difficulties in sexual assertiveness and to less satisfying sexual interactions in couples where women suffer from PVD.

  7. Interdependent networks: vulnerability analysis and strategies to limit cascading failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Gaihua; Dawson, Richard; Khoury, Mehdi; Bullock, Seth

    2014-07-01

    Network theory is increasingly employed to study the structure and behaviour of social, physical and technological systems — including civil infrastructure. Many of these systems are interconnected and the interdependencies between them allow disruptive events to propagate across networks, enabling damage to spread far beyond the immediate footprint of disturbance. In this research we experiment with a model to characterise the configuration of interdependencies in terms of direction, redundancy, and extent, and we analyse the performance of interdependent systems with a wide range of possible coupling modes. We demonstrate that networks with directed dependencies are less robust than those with undirected dependencies, and that the degree of redundancy in inter-network dependencies can have a differential effect on robustness depending on the directionality of the dependencies. As interdependencies between many real-world systems exhibit these characteristics, it is likely that many such systems operate near their critical thresholds. The vulnerability of an interdependent network is shown to be reducible in a cost effective way, either by optimising inter-network connections, or by hardening high degree nodes. The results improve understanding of the influence of interdependencies on system performance and provide insight into how to mitigate associated risks.

  8. Rice in an interdependent world.

    PubMed

    Falck, V T

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcome of the increasing need and dependence on rice as an essential food, and the potential hazards of this trajectory in an interdependent world, and to propose the need for a supranational system to guide decisions made in areas of mutual dependency among nations. All rice producing countries of the world should be responsible for assuring sufficient quantities and qualities of rice for the world's population. However, there are hazards related to emphasis on rice yields associated with the neglect of overall nutritional needs and also the potential for environmental impact given the need for sustainable development. Scientific measurement and data analyses of interdependent supranational variables are needed to guide policies and practices to insure conditions for life will be favorable for people everywhere.

  9. Spatial-Temporal Quantification of Interdependencies Across Infrastructure Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Christopher; Dueñas-Osorio, Leonardo

    As infrastructure networks become more complex and intertwined, the relevance of network interdependency research is increasingly evident. Interconnected networks bring about efficiencies during normal operations but also come with risks of cascading failures with disaster events. An adequate understanding of network interdependencies and realistic multi-system modeling capabilities enable the exploration of practical operation strategies and mitigation efforts applicable to existing or future coupled networked systems. This chapter examines recent efforts in quantifying infrastructure network interdependencies through spatial and time-series analyses to reveal the heterogeneity and complexity in their coupling. Furthermore, a combined spatial-temporal methodology is recommended for the future calibration and validation of theoretical and computational models of interdependent networks of networks. An example case study is demonstrated using data derived from the 2010 Chilean Earthquake in the Talcahuano-Concepción region, which highlights the richness in coupling strengths across infrastructure systems, both as a function of time and geographical extent. Insights for design and control of coupled networks are also derivable from joint spatial-temporal analyses of infrastructure interdependence and its evolution.

  10. Interdependent Lattice Networks in High Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowinger, Steven; Cwilich, Gabriel; Buldyrev, Sergey

    We study the mutual percolation of two interdependent lattice networks following the procedure outlined by Buldyrev et al 1 . We studied lattices of dimensions 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. We imposed that the length of interdependent links connecting the nodes from one lattice to the other be less than a certain value, r. We find that for each dimension, D <6, there is a value of r =rI >1 such that for r >=rI, the cascading failures occur as a discontinuous first order transition, while for r model become identical to those of RR graphs. We found that in all dimensions the maximal vulnerability of the networks, as a function of r , is achieved at a distance of r =rmax >rI, but forr >rmax the vulnerability starts to decrease as r --> ∞ . However, the decrease becomes less significant as the dimension increases and becomes negligible for D = 6. Results on how the parameters of the transition scale with the size of the system will be presented. [1] Catastrophic cascade of failures in interdependent networks, Buldyrev, Parshani, Paul, Stanley& Havlin, Nature, 464, 1025-1028 (15 April 2010)

  11. The extreme vulnerability of interdependent spatially embedded networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashan, Amir; Berezin, Yehiel; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies show that in interdependent networks a very small failure in one network may lead to catastrophic consequences. Above a critical fraction of interdependent nodes, even a single node failure can invoke cascading failures that may abruptly fragment the system, whereas below this critical dependency a failure of a few nodes leads only to a small amount of damage to the system. So far, research has focused on interdependent random networks without space limitations. However, many real systems, such as power grids and the Internet, are not random but are spatially embedded. Here we analytically and numerically study the stability of interdependent spatially embedded networks modelled as lattice networks. Surprisingly, we find that in lattice systems, in contrast to non-embedded systems, there is no critical dependency and any small fraction of interdependent nodes leads to an abrupt collapse. We show that this extreme vulnerability of very weakly coupled lattices is a consequence of the critical exponent describing the percolation transition of a single lattice.

  12. Failure cascade in interdependent network with traffic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sheng; Wang, Baoqing; Ma, Xiaomin; Wang, Jianghui; Zhao, Tingdi

    2015-12-01

    Complex networks have been widely studied recent years, but most researches focus on the single, non-interacting networks. With the development of modern systems, many infrastructure networks are coupled together and therefore should be modeled as interdependent networks. For interdependent networks, failure of nodes in one network may lead to failure of dependent nodes in the other networks. This may happen recursively and lead to a failure cascade. In the real world, different networks carry different traffic loads. Overload and load redistribution may lead to more nodes’ failure. Considering the dependency between the interdependent networks and the traffic load, a small fraction of fault nodes may lead to complete fragmentation of a system. Based on the robust analysis of interdependent networks, we propose a costless defense strategy to suppress the failure cascade. Our findings highlight the need to consider the load and coupling preference when designing robust interdependent networks. And it is necessary to take actions in the early stage of the failure cascade to decrease the losses caused by the large-scale breakdown of infrastructure networks.

  13. Redundant Interdependencies Boost the Robustness of Multiplex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2017-01-01

    In the analysis of the robustness of multiplex networks, it is commonly assumed that a node is functioning only if its interdependent nodes are simultaneously functioning. According to this model, a multiplex network becomes more and more fragile as the number of layers increases. In this respect, the addition of a new layer of interdependent nodes to a preexisting multiplex network will never improve its robustness. Whereas such a model seems appropriate to understand the effect of interdependencies in the simplest scenario of a network composed of only two layers, it may seem unsuitable to characterize the robustness of real systems formed by multiple network layers. In fact, it seems unrealistic that a real system evolved, through the development of multiple layers of interactions, towards a fragile structure. In this paper, we introduce a model of percolation where the condition that makes a node functional is that the node is functioning in at least two of the layers of the network. The model reduces to the commonly adopted percolation model for multiplex networks when the number of layers equals two. a larger number of layers, however, the model describes a scenario where the addition of new layers boosts the robustness of the system by creating redundant interdependencies among layers. We prove this fact thanks to the development of a message-passing theory that is able to characterize the model in both synthetic and real-world multiplex graphs.

  14. Triple point in correlated interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, L. D.; Macri, P. A.; Stanley, H. E.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2013-11-01

    Many real-world networks depend on other networks, often in nontrivial ways, to maintain their functionality. These interdependent “networks of networks” are often extremely fragile. When a fraction 1-p of nodes in one network randomly fails, the damage propagates to nodes in networks that are interdependent and a dynamic failure cascade occurs that affects the entire system. We present dynamic equations for two interdependent networks that allow us to reproduce the failure cascade for an arbitrary pattern of interdependency. We study the “rich club” effect found in many real interdependent network systems in which the high-degree nodes are extremely interdependent, correlating a fraction α of the higher-degree nodes on each network. We find a rich phase diagram in the plane p-α, with a triple point reminiscent of the triple point of liquids that separates a nonfunctional phase from two functional phases.

  15. The robustness of interdependent clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuqing; Shao, Shuai; Wang, Huijuan; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    It was recently found that cascading failures can cause the abrupt breakdown of a system of interdependent networks. Using the percolation method developed for single clustered networks by Newman (Phys. Rev. Lett., 103 (2009) 058701), we develop an analytical method for studying how clustering within the networks of a system of interdependent networks affects the system's robustness. We find that clustering significantly increases the vulnerability of the system, which is represented by the increased value of the percolation threshold pc in interdependent networks.

  16. Enhancing resilience of interdependent networks by healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stippinger, Marcell; Kertész, János

    2014-12-01

    Interdependent networks are characterized by two kinds of interactions: The usual connectivity links within each network and the dependency links coupling nodes of different networks. Due to the latter links such networks are known to suffer from cascading failures and catastrophic breakdowns. When modeling these phenomena, usually one assumes that a fraction of nodes gets damaged in one of the networks, which is followed possibly by a cascade of failures. In real life the initiating failures do not occur at once and effort is made to replace the ties eliminated due to the failing nodes. Here we study a dynamic extension of the model of interdependent networks and introduce the possibility of link formation with a probability w, called healing, to bridge non-functioning nodes and enhance network resilience. A single random node is removed, which may initiate an avalanche. After each removal step healing starts resulting in a new topology. Then a new node fails and the process continues until the giant component disappears either in a catastrophic breakdown or in a smooth transition. Simulation results are presented for square lattices as starting networks under random attacks of constant intensity. We find that the shift in the position of the breakdown has a power-law scaling as a function of the healing probability with an exponent close to 1. Below a critical healing probability, catastrophic cascades form and the average degree of surviving nodes decreases monotonically, while above this value there are no macroscopic cascades and the average degree has first an increasing character and decreases only at the very late stage of the process. These findings facilitate to plan intervention in case of crisis situation by describing the efficiency of healing efforts needed to suppress cascading failures.

  17. Robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuqing; Gao, Jianxi; Buldyrev, Sergey; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-02-01

    When an initial failure of nodes occurs in interdependent networks, a cascade of failure between the networks occurs. Earlier studies focused on random initial failures. Here we study the robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack on high or low degree nodes. We introduce a general technique which maps the targeted-attack problem in interdependent networks to the random-attack problem in a transformed pair of interdependent networks. We find that when the highly connected nodes are protected and have lower probability to fail, in contrast to single scale-free (SF) networks where the percolation threshold pc=0, coupled SF networks are significantly more vulnerable with pc significantly larger than zero. The result implies that interdependent networks are difficult to defend by strategies such as protecting the high degree nodes that have been found useful to significantly improve robustness of single networks.

  18. Robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuqing; Gao, Jianxi; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-06-01

    When an initial failure of nodes occurs in interdependent networks, a cascade of failure between the networks occurs. Earlier studies focused on random initial failures. Here we study the robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack on high or low degree nodes. We introduce a general technique which maps the targeted-attack problem in interdependent networks to the random-attack problem in a transformed pair of interdependent networks. We find that when the highly connected nodes are protected and have lower probability to fail, in contrast to single scale-free (SF) networks where the percolation threshold pc=0, coupled SF networks are significantly more vulnerable with pc significantly larger than zero. The result implies that interdependent networks are difficult to defend by strategies such as protecting the high degree nodes that have been found useful to significantly improve robustness of single networks.

  19. Regional interdependence and migration in Asia.

    PubMed

    Kim, W B

    1995-01-01

    "The 1980s witnessed increasing regional interdependence in Asia through trade and investment. Increasing flows of labor within the region, however, raise questions about three important issues: (1) the assumption that trade, investment and aid will eventually mitigate migration pressure in source countries and the effectiveness of migration policies based on that assumption; (2) whether increasing regional interdependence stimulates or deters migration; [and] (3) the effect of rising interdependence on the political and international relations aspects of migration. As a partial attempt to address these questions, this article examines the regional pattern of economic interdependence by utilizing information concerning trade, investment and migration flows. The concept of interdependence/dependence is discussed within a political context, focusing on migration and policy responses to it. Observations are made on the implications for regional stability and development."

  20. Will electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks undergo first-order transition under random attacks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xingpei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Dichen; Dong, Zhaoyang; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Zhenshan; Zhu, Xuedong; Wang, Xunting

    2016-10-01

    Whether the realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks will undergo first-order transition under random failures still remains a question. To reflect the reality of Chinese electrical cyber-physical system, the "partial one-to-one correspondence" interdependent networks model is proposed and the connectivity vulnerabilities of three realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks are analyzed. The simulation results show that due to the service demands of power system the topologies of power grid and its cyber network are highly inter-similar which can effectively avoid the first-order transition. By comparing the vulnerability curves between electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks and its single-layer network, we find that complex network theory is still useful in the vulnerability analysis of electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks.

  1. The interpersonal process model of demand/withdraw behavior.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Brian R; Dickenson, Janna A; Atkins, David C; Baucom, Donald H; Fischer, Melanie S; Weusthoff, Sarah; Hahlweg, Kurt; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    The demand/withdraw interaction pattern is a destructive cycle of relationship communication behavior that is associated with negative individual and relationship outcomes. Demand/withdraw behavior is thought to be strongly linked to partners' emotional reactions, but current theories are inconsistent with empirical findings. The current study proposes the interpersonal process model of demand/withdraw behavior, which includes linkages between each partners' emotional reactions and the interpersonal behavior of demanding and withdrawing. Data come from problem solving discussions of 55 German couples with observationally coded demand/withdraw behavior and fundamental frequency (f₀) to measure vocally encoded emotional arousal. Actor-partner interdependence models (Kenny, Kashy, & Cook, 2006) were used to examine associations among demand/withdraw behavior and f₀ in the overall discussion and 5-min segments. Significant cross-partner associations emerged for demanding and withdrawing behavior across the whole conversation as well as within 5-min segments, and these associations are partially accounted for by each individual's f₀. When behaviorally coded demanders expressed more vocal arousal, they demanded more and withdrew less while their partners withdrew more. In contrast, when behaviorally coded withdrawers expressed more vocal arousal, their partners demanded less and withdrew more. Findings demonstrate that demand/withdraw behavior varies between couples (i.e., some couples engage in a stronger demand/withdraw cycle than others) and between segments (i.e., when 1 partner increases demanding, the other increases withdrawing). Findings support key elements of the interpersonal process model, showing intra- and interpersonal pathways linking demand/withdraw behavior and emotion and demonstrate the importance of partners' behavioral roles in these linkages.

  2. Early Social Fear in Relation to Play with an Unfamiliar Peer: Actor and Partner Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Olga L.; Degnan, Kathryn A.; Fox, Nathan A.; Henderson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between maternal reports of social fear at 24 months and social behaviors with an unfamiliar peer during play at 36 months, using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 1999). The APIM model was used to not only replicate previous findings of direct effects of…

  3. Marital Relationship Quality and Couples' Cognitive Stimulation Practices toward Their Infants: Actor and Partner Effects of White and Hispanic Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotomayor-Peterson, Marcela; Wilhelm, Mari S.; Card, Noel A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores actor and partner effects on mothers' and fathers' cognitive stimulation within an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM). This model allows us to evaluate whether mothers' and fathers' practices are impacted not only by their own experiences but also by their partners' experiences. The APIM treats the couple as the…

  4. INTERDEPENDENT SUPERIORITY AND INFERIORITY FEELINGS

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Harrington V.

    1949-01-01

    It is postulated that in neurotic persons who have unrealistic feelings of superiority and inferiority the two are interdependent. This is a departure from the concept of previous observers that either one or the other is primary and its opposite is overcompensation. The author postulates considerable parallelism, with equal importance for each. He submits that the neurotic person forms two logic-resistant compartments for the two opposed self-estimates and that treatment which makes inroads of logic upon one compartment, simultaneously does so upon the other. Two examples are briefly reported. The neurotic benefits sought in exaggeration of capability are the same as those sought in insistence upon inferiority: Presumption of superiority at once bids for approbation and delivers the subject from the need to prove himself worthy of it in dreaded competition; exaggeration of incapability baits sympathy and makes competition unnecessary because failure is conceded. Some of the characteristics of abnormal self-estimates that distinguish them from normal are: Preoccupation with self, resistance to logical explanation of personality problems, inconsistency in reasons for beliefs in adequacy on the one hand and inadequacy on the other, unreality, rationalization of faults, and difficulty and vacillation in the selection of adequate goals. PMID:15390573

  5. Cascading Failures Due to Multiple Causes in Interdependent Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornbluth, Yosef; Buldyrev, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, several models of network failure have been introduced. Some of these models are based on overload, in which increased traffic destroys nodes, while others are based on partial isolation, in which a node needs several functional neighbors to survive. In these systems, failure of a small fraction of nodes can cause a cascade of failures which may completely destroy the network. The majority of these models are studied in single networks. However, many real-world systems are comprised of multiple interdependent networks. Recent studies based on the concept of mutual percolation show that these systems are much more vulnerable than a single network. We numerically and analytically investigate how multiple causes of failure simultaneously acting in a system of interdependent networks affect their vulnerability.

  6. The Power of Positivity: Predictors of Relationship Satisfaction for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekas, Naomi V.; Timmons, Lisa; Pruitt, Megan; Ghilain, Christine; Alessandri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The current study uses the actor-partner interdependence model to examine the predictors of relationship satisfaction for mothers and fathers of children with autism spectrum disorder. Sixty-seven couples completed measures of optimism, benefit finding, coping strategies, social support, and relationship satisfaction. Results indicated that…

  7. The Mediating Role of Interpersonal Competence between Adolescents' Empathy and Friendship Quality: A Dyadic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Chong Man; Ruhl, Holly; Buhrmester, Duane

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of empathy on friendship quality in the context of dyadic same-sex friendships, and how such an effect might be mediated by interpersonal competence. A special version of the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) was used to examine this hypothesis in 146 same-sex friend dyads in 10th grade. Results…

  8. Diabetes Distress and Depressive Symptoms: A Dyadic Investigation of Older Patients and Their Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Melissa M.; Lucas, Todd; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Rook, Karen S.; Gonzalez, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this dyadic study, we examined diabetes distress experienced by male and female patients and their spouses (N = 185 couples), and its association with depressive symptoms using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Diabetes-related distress reported by both patients and spouses was associated with each partner's own depressive symptoms…

  9. Together in Pain: Attachment-Related Dyadic Processes and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ein-Dor, Tsachi; Doron, Guy; Solomon, Zahava; Mikulincer, Mario; Shaver, Phillip R.

    2010-01-01

    We used actor-partner interdependence modeling to explore associations among attachment-related dyadic processes, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in war veterans, and secondary traumatic stress (STS) in their wives. A sample of 157 Israeli couples (85 former prisoners of war and their wives and a comparison group of 72 veterans not held…

  10. Rapport in Negotiation: The Contribution of the Verbal Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Ilan; Nelson, Noa; Livnat, Zohar; Ben-Ari, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of verbal behavior to the creation of rapport in negotiation, while methodologically addressing the issue of dependence between dyadic measures, which is inherent to the concept of rapport, with the Actor-Partner Interdependence model. The approach adopted is substantially different from that of past research,…

  11. Interdependent network reciprocity in evolutionary games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    Besides the structure of interactions within networks, also the interactions between networks are of the outmost importance. We therefore study the outcome of the public goods game on two interdependent networks that are connected by means of a utility function, which determines how payoffs on both networks jointly influence the success of players in each individual network. We show that an unbiased coupling allows the spontaneous emergence of interdependent network reciprocity, which is capable to maintain healthy levels of public cooperation even in extremely adverse conditions. The mechanism, however, requires simultaneous formation of correlated cooperator clusters on both networks. If this does not emerge or if the coordination process is disturbed, network reciprocity fails, resulting in the total collapse of cooperation. Network interdependence can thus be exploited effectively to promote cooperation past the limits imposed by isolated networks, but only if the coordination between the interdependent networks is not disturbed.

  12. Cascading failures in interdependent networks with finite functional components.

    PubMed

    Di Muro, M A; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Braunstein, L A

    2016-10-01

    We present a cascading failure model of two interdependent networks in which functional nodes belong to components of size greater than or equal to s. We find theoretically and via simulation that in complex networks with random dependency links the transition is first order for s≥3 and continuous for s=2. We also study interdependent lattices with a distance constraint r in the dependency links and find that increasing r moves the system from a regime without a phase transition to one with a second-order transition. As r continues to increase, the system collapses in a first-order transition. Each regime is associated with a different structure of domain formation of functional nodes.

  13. Cascading failures in interdependent networks with finite functional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Muro, M. A.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Stanley, H. E.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a cascading failure model of two interdependent networks in which functional nodes belong to components of size greater than or equal to s . We find theoretically and via simulation that in complex networks with random dependency links the transition is first order for s ≥3 and continuous for s =2 . We also study interdependent lattices with a distance constraint r in the dependency links and find that increasing r moves the system from a regime without a phase transition to one with a second-order transition. As r continues to increase, the system collapses in a first-order transition. Each regime is associated with a different structure of domain formation of functional nodes.

  14. Project Scheduling Tool for Maintaining Capability Interdependencies and Defence Program Investment: A User’s Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Project Scheduling Tool for Maintaining Capability Interdependencies and Defence Program Investment: A User’s Guide M.-T. Nguyen Joint...product, the Project Scheduling Tool (version 1.4). The tool implements various mathematical Integer Linear Programming models, as well as an approach that...Scheduling Tool for Maintaining Capability Interdependencies and Defence Program Investment: A User’s Guide Executive Summary Defence decision-makers are faced

  15. The robustness of interdependent networks under the interplay between cascading failures and virus propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dawei; Wang, Zhen; Xiao, Gaoxi; Gao, Bo; Wang, Lianhai

    2016-09-01

    Cascading failures and epidemic dynamics, as two successful application realms of network science, are usually investigated separately. How do they affect each other is still an open, interesting problem. In this letter, we couple both processes and put them into the framework of interdependent networks, where each network only supports one dynamical process. Of particular interest, they spontaneously form a feedback loop: virus propagation triggers cascading failures of systems while cascading failures suppress virus propagation (i.e., the interplay between cascading failures and virus propagation, also named CF-VP model). Under this novel model, the interdependent networks will collapse completely if virus transmissibility exceeds a crucial threshold. In addition, only when the network sustaining the epidemic dynamics has a larger average degree, will the interdependent networks become more vulnerable, which is opposite to the observation of traditional cascading models in interdependent networks. To protect interdependent networks we also propose control measures based on the identification capability: a stronger identification capability leads to more robust interdependent networks.

  16. Cascading failures in interdependent networks due to insufficient received support capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Pengshuai; Zhu, Peidong; Shao, Chengcheng; Xun, Peng

    2017-03-01

    We propose a capability based dependency model of interdependent network that takes two node dependency properties into account. One is support capability and the other is required capability. The redundancy degree of an interdependent network is also defined, whose value is the ratio of its total support capability and total required capability. Through the numerical simulations, we found that: (1) Interdependent networks without redundant support-dependence links are extremely vulnerable, even the failure of one node could cause the collapse of whole network; (2) Increasing support-dependence links and redistributing the nodes' dependency properties can enhance the robustness of network without changing its redundancy degree; (3) Improving the redundancy degree could enhance network robustness without adding support-dependence links. These conclusions enlighten the design of interdependent networks: when network's redundancy degree is fixed, we can take strategy from results (2), and when network structure is settled, we can apply strategy from results (3).

  17. Analysis of Critical Infrastructure Dependencies and Interdependencies

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Frederic; Verner, Duane; Brannegan, David; Buehring, William; Dickinson, David; Guziel, Karen; Haffenden, Rebecca; Phillips, Julia; Peerenboom, James

    2015-06-01

    The report begins by defining dependencies and interdependencies and exploring basic concepts of dependencies in order to facilitate a common understanding and consistent analytical approaches. Key concepts covered include; Characteristics of dependencies: upstream dependencies, internal dependencies, and downstream dependencies; Classes of dependencies: physical, cyber, geographic, and logical; and Dimensions of dependencies: operating environment, coupling and response behavior, type of failure, infrastructure characteristics, and state of operations From there, the report proposes a multi-phase roadmap to support dependency and interdependency assessment activities nationwide, identifying a range of data inputs, analysis activities, and potential products for each phase, as well as key steps needed to progress from one phase to the next. The report concludes by outlining a comprehensive, iterative, and scalable framework for analyzing dependencies and interdependencies that stakeholders can integrate into existing risk and resilience assessment efforts.

  18. Positive social interdependence and classroom climate.

    PubMed

    Abrami, P C; Chambers, B; Poulsen, C; Kouros, C; Farrell, M; D'Apollonia, S

    1994-08-01

    We explored the relationship between student perceptions of social interdependence and social support. Attitudinal responses to the Classroom Life Instrument (Johnson & Johnson, 1983; Johnson, Johnson, & Anderson, 1983; Johnson, Johnson, Buckman, & Richards, 1985) were gathered in Canada from four classes totaling 123 eighth-grade students learning geometry in cooperative groups. We extended previous findings by examining the relationships among the classroom climate variables, causal attributions, and achievement, and explored the consistency among the four classroom climate studies using statistical methods for meta-analysis to determine overall effect magnitudes and the degree of study-to-study variability. Social support from the teacher and fellow students was moderately related to perceptions of positive interdependence, but social interdependence factors were less important predictors of student learning than was student self-esteem.

  19. A Model to Exhibit the Interdependence of the Cognitive and Affective Domains of Objectives for Use in Science and Technical Teacher Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormerod, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Proposes a diagrammatic model connecting the cognitive and affective domains of educational objectives, abandoning Krathwohl's hierarchy of affective objectives for one based solely on arousal of interest as a positive dimension. A negative dimension for the hierarchy is also suggested and research evidence supporting the model is given.…

  20. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksys, N.; Xu, C.; Beaulieu, L.; Thomson, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  1. Navy Perspective on Joint Force Interdependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    for the mar- itime Services. The Navy–Marine Corps team has operated interdependently for over two centuries. Symbiotic since their inceptions...required. We must view all new information systems as part of a larger family of systems. As such, we should press hard to ensure convergence

  2. Toward Liberating Interdependence: Exploring an Intercultural Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Boyung

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a postcolonial intercultural pedagogy, one that can create Liberating Interdependence among communities and across boundaries. First, the author examines conflicting ways that the Exodus is told in different communities: as a story of the God of the oppressed and as a story about an unjust God. Second, after analyzing the…

  3. Percolation of interdependent networks with intersimilarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Rui; Han, Zhangang; Rozenblat, Céline; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-11-01

    Real data show that interdependent networks usually involve intersimilarity. Intersimilarity means that a pair of interdependent nodes have neighbors in both networks that are also interdependent [Parshani Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/92/68002 92, 68002 (2010)]. For example, the coupled worldwide port network and the global airport network are intersimilar since many pairs of linked nodes (neighboring cities), by direct flights and direct shipping lines, exist in both networks. Nodes in both networks in the same city are regarded as interdependent. If two neighboring nodes in one network depend on neighboring nodes in the other network, we call these links common links. The fraction of common links in the system is a measure of intersimilarity. Previous simulation results of Parshani suggest that intersimilarity has considerable effects on reducing the cascading failures; however, a theoretical understanding of this effect on the cascading process is currently missing. Here we map the cascading process with intersimilarity to a percolation of networks composed of components of common links and noncommon links. This transforms the percolation of intersimilar system to a regular percolation on a series of subnetworks, which can be solved analytically. We apply our analysis to the case where the network of common links is an Erdős-Rényi (ER) network with the average degree K, and the two networks of noncommon links are also ER networks. We show for a fully coupled pair of ER networks, that for any K⩾0, although the cascade is reduced with increasing K, the phase transition is still discontinuous. Our analysis can be generalized to any kind of interdependent random network systems.

  4. Claudin-4 forms a paracellular barrier, revealing the interdependence of claudin expression in the loose epithelial cell culture model opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Borovac, Jelena; Barker, Reid S; Rievaj, Juraj; Rasmussen, Andrew; Pan, Wanling; Wevrick, Rachel; Alexander, R Todd

    2012-12-15

    The effect of claudins on paracellular fluxes has been predominantly studied in either Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) or LLCPK cells. Neither model system has a very low transepithelial resistance (TER) as observed in leaky epithelia. Moreover, results from one model system are not always consistent with another. Opossum kidney (OK) cells form tight junctions yet have a very low TER. We therefore set out to characterize the paracellular transport properties of this cell culture model. Ussing chamber dilution potential measurements revealed that OK cells exhibit a very low TER (11.7 ± 1.4 Ω·cm(2)), slight cation selectivity (P(Na)/P(Cl) = 1.10 ± 0.01), and the Eisenman permeability sequence IV; the permeability of monovalent cations ranking K(+) > Cs(+) > Rb(+) > Na(+) > Li(+). Quantitative real-time PCR studies found that OK cells endogenously express claudin-4 > -1 > -6 > -20 > -9 > -12 > -11 > -15. Overexpression of claudin-4 significantly increased TER, decreased Na(+) and Cl(-) permeability, and increased levels of claudin-1, -6, and -9 mRNA. Knockdown of claudin-4 in the overexpressing cells significantly decreased TER without altering claudin expression; thus claudin-4 forms a barrier in OK cells. Knockdown of endogenous claudin-4 decreased claudin-1, -9, and -12 expression without altering TER. Claudin-2 overexpression decreased TER, significantly increased Na(+) and Cl(-) permeability, and decreased claudin-12 and -6 expression. Together these results demonstrate that claudin expression is tightly coupled in OK cells.

  5. Whole Life Program. The Acculturation Model of Interdependent Apartment Living for Adults with Disabilities. Interfacing Individual Rights with the Responsibilities of Community Living. Continuing Education Courses through College for Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jan L.; Roelofs, Alice R.

    This book is a resource for human service professionals with detailed information necessary to start, maintain, monitor, assess, and reevaluate a program targeting independence. It describes the Whole Life Program, an interdependent apartment program combined with continuing education for adults with developmental, physical, and emotional…

  6. Reducing Cascading Failure Risk by Increasing Infrastructure Network Interdependence

    DOE PAGES

    Korkali, Mert; Veneman, Jason G.; Tivnan, Brian F.; ...

    2017-03-20

    Increased coupling between critical infrastructure networks, such as power and communication systems, has important implications for the reliability and security of these systems. To understand the effects of power-communication coupling, several researchers have studied models of interdependent networks and reported that increased coupling can increase vulnerability. However, these conclusions come largely from models that have substantially different mechanisms of cascading failure, relative to those found in actual power and communication networks, and that do not capture the benefits of connecting systems with complementary capabilities. In order to understand the importance of these details, this paper compares network vulnerability in simplemore » topological models and in models that more accurately capture the dynamics of cascading in power systems. First, we compare a simple model of topological contagion to a model of cascading in power systems and find that the power grid model shows a higher level of vulnerability, relative to the contagion model. Second, we compare a percolation model of topological cascading in coupled networks to three different models of power networks coupled to communication systems. Again, the more accurate models suggest very different conclusions than the percolation model. In all but the most extreme case, the physics-based power grid models indicate that increased power-communication coupling decreases vulnerability. This is opposite from what one would conclude from the percolation model, in which zero coupling is optimal. Only in an extreme case, in which communication failures immediately cause grid failures, did we find that increased coupling can be harmful. Together, these results suggest design strategies for reducing the risk of cascades in interdependent infrastructure systems.« less

  7. Technology Interdependency Roadmaps for Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1995-01-01

    The requirements for Space Technology are outlined in terms of NASA Strategic Plan. The national emphasis on economic revitalization is described along with the environmental changes needed for the new direction. Space Technology Interdependency (STI) is elaborated in terms of its impact on national priority on science, education, and economy. Some suggested approaches to strengthening STI are outlined. Finally, examples of Technology Roadmaps for Space Operations area are included to illustrate the value of STI for national cohesiveness and economic revitalization.

  8. Anger Suppression, Interdependent Self-Construal, and Depression among Asian American and European American College Students

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Rebecca Y. M.; Park, Irene J. K.

    2010-01-01

    The present study tested a theoretical model of emotion regulation (Yap, Sheeber, & Allen, 2007) in a sample of Asian American and European American college students (N = 365). Specifically, the mediating role of anger suppression in the effect of temperament and family processes on depressive symptoms was tested across race and levels of interdependent self-construal (a culturally based self orientation emphasizing connectedness with others). Next, the moderation of the suppression—depression relation was tested by race and interdependent self-construal. Results indicated that the hypothesized model fit well across Asian American and European American students as well as those with high vs. low levels of interdependent self-construal. Anger suppression was a significant mediator of the hypothesized indirect effects on depressive symptoms. Moreover, race and interdependent self-construal moderated the suppression—depression link, such that Asian American status and a stronger interdependent self-construal attenuated the relation between anger suppression and depressive symptoms. Understanding both universal and culture-specific aspects of emotion regulation in the development of depressive symptoms will be essential for sound theory, future research, and effective prevention and intervention efforts across diverse populations. PMID:21058815

  9. Thresholds and Complex Dynamics of Interdependent Cascading Infrastructure Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, B. A.; Newman, D. E.; Dobson, I.; Lynch, V. E.; Gradney, Paul

    Critical infrastructures have a number of the characteristic properties of complex systems. Among these are infrequent large failures through cascading events. These events, though infrequent, often obey a power law distribution in their probability versus size which suggests that conventional risk analysis does not apply to these systems. Real infrastructure systems typically have an additional layer of complexity, namely the heterogeneous coupling to other infrastructure systems that can allow a failure in one system to propagate to the other system. Here, we model the infrastructure systems through a network with complex system dynamics. We use both mean field theory to get analytic results and a numerical complex systems model, Demon, for computational results. An isolated system has bifurcated fixed points and a cascading threshold which is the same as the bifurcation point. When systems are coupled, this is no longer true and the cascading threshold is different from the bifurcation point of the fixed point solutions. This change in the cascading threshold caused by the interdependence of the system can have an impact on the "safe operation" of interdependent infrastructure systems by changing the critical point and even the power law exponent.

  10. The Fragility of Interdependency: Coupled Networks Switching Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-03-01

    Recent disasters ranging from abrupt financial ``flash crashes'' and large-scale power outages to sudden death among the elderly dramatically exemplify the fact that the most dangerous vulnerability is hiding in the many interdependencies among different networks. In the past year, we have quantified failures in model of interconnected networks, and demonstrated the need to consider mutually dependent network properties in designing resilient systems. Specifically, we have uncovered new laws governing the nature of switching phenomena in coupled networks, and found that phenomena that are continuous ``second order'' phase transitions in isolated networks become discontinuous abrupt ``first order'' transitions in interdependent networks [S. V. Buldyrev, R. Parshani, G. Paul, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Catastrophic Cascade of Failures in Interdependent Networks,'' Nature 464, 1025 (2010); J. Gao, S. V. Buldyrev, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Novel Behavior of Networks Formed from Interdependent Networks,'' Nature Physics 8, 40 (2012). We conclude by discussing the network basis for understanding sudden death in the elderly, and the possibility that financial ``flash crashes'' are not unlike the catastrophic first-order failure incidents occurring in coupled networks. Specifically, we study the coupled networks that are responsible for financial fluctuations. It appears that ``trend switching phenomena'' that we uncover are remarkably independent of the scale over which they are analyzed. For example, we find that the same laws governing the formation and bursting of the largest financial bubbles also govern the tiniest finance bubbles, over a factor of 1,000,000,000 in time scale [T. Preis, J. Schneider, and H. E. Stanley, ``Switching Processes in Financial Markets,'' Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 7674 (2011); T. Preis and H. E. Stanley, ``Bubble Trouble: Can a Law Describe Bubbles and Crashes in Financial Markets?'' Physics World 24, No. 5, 29 (May 2011

  11. Interdependent lattice networks in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowinger, Steven; Cwilich, Gabriel A.; Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    2016-11-01

    We study the mutual percolation of two interdependent lattice networks ranging from two to seven dimensions, denoted as D . We impose that the length (measured as chemical distance) of interdependency links connecting nodes in the two lattices be less than or equal to a certain value, r . For each value of D and r , we find the mutual percolation threshold, pc[D ,r ] , below which the system completely collapses through a cascade of failures following an initial destruction of a fraction (1 -p ) of the nodes in one of the lattices. We find that for each dimension, D <6 , there is a value of r =rI>1 such that for r ≥rI the cascading failures occur as a discontinuous first-order transition, while for r interdependent lattices reach maximal vulnerability (maximal pc[D ,r ] ) at a distance r =rmax>rI , and for r >rmax the vulnerability starts to decrease as r →∞ . However, the decrease becomes less significant as D increases, and pc[D ,rmax] -pc[D ,∞ ] decreases exponentially with D . We also investigate the dependence of pc[D ,r ] on the system size as well as how the nature of the transition changes as the number of lattice sites, N →∞ .

  12. Geospatial decision support framework for critical infrastructure interdependency assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chung Yan

    Critical infrastructures, such as telecommunications, energy, banking and finance, transportation, water systems and emergency services are the foundations of modern society. There is a heavy dependence on critical infrastructures at multiple levels within the supply chain of any good or service. Any disruptions in the supply chain may cause profound cascading effect to other critical infrastructures. A 1997 report by the President's Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection states that a serious interruption in freight rail service would bring the coal mining industry to a halt within approximately two weeks and the availability of electric power could be reduced in a matter of one to two months. Therefore, this research aimed at representing and assessing the interdependencies between coal supply, transportation and energy production. A proposed geospatial decision support framework was established and applied to analyze interdependency related disruption impact. By utilizing the data warehousing approach, geospatial and non-geospatial data were retrieved, integrated and analyzed based on the transportation model and geospatial disruption analysis developed in the research. The results showed that by utilizing this framework, disruption impacts can be estimated at various levels (e.g., power plant, county, state, etc.) for preventative or emergency response efforts. The information derived from the framework can be used for data mining analysis (e.g., assessing transportation mode usages; finding alternative coal suppliers, etc.).

  13. Optimizing interconnections to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huashan; Zhao, Xiuyan; Liu, Feng; Xu, Shouhuai; Lu, Wenlian

    2017-03-01

    The spectral radius (i.e., the largest eigenvalue) of the adjacency matrices of complex networks is an important quantity that governs the behavior of many dynamic processes on the networks, such as synchronization and epidemics. Studies in the literature focused on bounding this quantity. In this paper, we investigate how to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks by optimally linking k internetwork connections (or interconnections for short). We derive formulas for the estimation of the spectral radius of interdependent networks and employ these results to develop a suite of algorithms that are applicable to different parameter regimes. In particular, a simple algorithm is to link the k nodes with the largest k eigenvector centralities in one network to the node in the other network with a certain property related to both networks. We demonstrate the applicability of our algorithms via extensive simulations. We discuss the physical implications of the results, including how the optimal interconnections can more effectively decrease the threshold of epidemic spreading in the susceptible-infected-susceptible model and the threshold of synchronization of coupled Kuramoto oscillators.

  14. Interdependency of tropical marine ecosystems in response to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Megan I.; Leon, Javier X.; Callaghan, David P.; Roelfsema, Chris M.; Hamylton, Sarah; Brown, Christopher J.; Baldock, Tom; Golshani, Aliasghar; Phinn, Stuart R.; Lovelock, Catherine E.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Woodroffe, Colin D.; Mumby, Peter J.

    2014-08-01

    Ecosystems are linked within landscapes by the physical and biological processes they mediate. In such connected landscapes, the response of one ecosystem to climate change could have profound consequences for neighbouring systems. Here, we report the first quantitative predictions of interdependencies between ecosystems in response to climate change. In shallow tropical marine ecosystems, coral reefs shelter lagoons from incoming waves, allowing seagrass meadows to thrive. Deepening water over coral reefs from sea-level rise results in larger, more energetic waves traversing the reef into the lagoon, potentially generating hostile conditions for seagrass. However, growth of coral reef such that the relative water depth is maintained could mitigate negative effects of sea-level rise on seagrass. Parameterizing physical and biological models for Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia, we find negative effects of sea-level rise on seagrass before the middle of this century given reasonable rates of reef growth. Rates of vertical carbonate accretion typical of modern reef flats (up to 3 mm yr-1) will probably be insufficient to maintain suitable conditions for reef lagoon seagrass under moderate to high greenhouse gas emissions scenarios by 2100. Accounting for interdependencies in ecosystem responses to climate change is challenging, but failure to do so results in inaccurate predictions of habitat extent in the future.

  15. Interdependence, Human Rights and Global Health Law.

    PubMed

    Viens, A M

    2015-12-01

    The connection between health and human rights continues to play a prominent role within global health law. In particular, a number of theorists rely on the claim that there is a relation of interdependence between health and human rights. The nature and extent of this relation, however, is rarely defined, developed or defended in a conceptually robust way. This paper seeks to explore the source, scope and strength of this putative relation and what role it might play in developing a global health law framework.

  16. Reducing Cascading Failure Risk by Increasing Infrastructure Network Interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Korkali, Mert; Veneman, Jason G.; Tivnan, Brian F.; Bagrow, James P.; Hines, Paul D. H.

    2017-01-01

    Increased interconnection between critical infrastructure networks, such as electric power and communications systems, has important implications for infrastructure reliability and security. Others have shown that increased coupling between networks that are vulnerable to internetwork cascading failures can increase vulnerability. However, the mechanisms of cascading in these models differ from those in real systems and such models disregard new functions enabled by coupling, such as intelligent control during a cascade. This paper compares the robustness of simple topological network models to models that more accurately reflect the dynamics of cascading in a particular case of coupled infrastructures. First, we compare a topological contagion model to a power grid model. Second, we compare a percolation model of internetwork cascading to three models of interdependent power-communication systems. In both comparisons, the more detailed models suggest substantially different conclusions, relative to the simpler topological models. In all but the most extreme case, our model of a “smart” power network coupled to a communication system suggests that increased power-communication coupling decreases vulnerability, in contrast to the percolation model. Together, these results suggest that robustness can be enhanced by interconnecting networks with complementary capabilities if modes of internetwork failure propagation are constrained. PMID:28317835

  17. Reducing Cascading Failure Risk by Increasing Infrastructure Network Interdependence.

    PubMed

    Korkali, Mert; Veneman, Jason G; Tivnan, Brian F; Bagrow, James P; Hines, Paul D H

    2017-03-20

    Increased interconnection between critical infrastructure networks, such as electric power and communications systems, has important implications for infrastructure reliability and security. Others have shown that increased coupling between networks that are vulnerable to internetwork cascading failures can increase vulnerability. However, the mechanisms of cascading in these models differ from those in real systems and such models disregard new functions enabled by coupling, such as intelligent control during a cascade. This paper compares the robustness of simple topological network models to models that more accurately reflect the dynamics of cascading in a particular case of coupled infrastructures. First, we compare a topological contagion model to a power grid model. Second, we compare a percolation model of internetwork cascading to three models of interdependent power-communication systems. In both comparisons, the more detailed models suggest substantially different conclusions, relative to the simpler topological models. In all but the most extreme case, our model of a "smart" power network coupled to a communication system suggests that increased power-communication coupling decreases vulnerability, in contrast to the percolation model. Together, these results suggest that robustness can be enhanced by interconnecting networks with complementary capabilities if modes of internetwork failure propagation are constrained.

  18. Reducing Cascading Failure Risk by Increasing Infrastructure Network Interdependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkali, Mert; Veneman, Jason G.; Tivnan, Brian F.; Bagrow, James P.; Hines, Paul D. H.

    2017-03-01

    Increased interconnection between critical infrastructure networks, such as electric power and communications systems, has important implications for infrastructure reliability and security. Others have shown that increased coupling between networks that are vulnerable to internetwork cascading failures can increase vulnerability. However, the mechanisms of cascading in these models differ from those in real systems and such models disregard new functions enabled by coupling, such as intelligent control during a cascade. This paper compares the robustness of simple topological network models to models that more accurately reflect the dynamics of cascading in a particular case of coupled infrastructures. First, we compare a topological contagion model to a power grid model. Second, we compare a percolation model of internetwork cascading to three models of interdependent power-communication systems. In both comparisons, the more detailed models suggest substantially different conclusions, relative to the simpler topological models. In all but the most extreme case, our model of a “smart” power network coupled to a communication system suggests that increased power-communication coupling decreases vulnerability, in contrast to the percolation model. Together, these results suggest that robustness can be enhanced by interconnecting networks with complementary capabilities if modes of internetwork failure propagation are constrained.

  19. Resource Interdependence, Student Interactions and Performance in Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchs, Celine; Butera, Fabrizio; Mugny, Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    Two studies were carried out during university workshops, and analyzed the effects of resource interdependence on student-student interactions, and the impact of these interactions on performance. Students worked cooperatively, either on complementary information (positive resource interdependence) or on identical information (resource…

  20. In the land of the free, interdependent action undermines motivation.

    PubMed

    Hamedani, Maryam G; Markus, Hazel Rose; Fu, Alyssa S

    2013-02-01

    Today's most pressing social challenges require people to recognize their shared fate and work together--to think and act interdependently. In the three studies reported here, we found that appeals for increased interdependence may undermine the very motivation they seek to inspire. We examined the hypothesis that invoking interdependent action undermines motivation for chronically independent European Americans but not for bicultural Asian Americans who are both chronically independent and chronically interdependent. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated that priming interdependent rather than independent action undermined European Americans' motivation to perform challenging mental and physical tasks. Study 3 showed that framing an appeal for environmental sustainability in terms of interdependent rather than independent action led to decreased motivation and resource allocation among European Americans. Motivation was not undermined for Asian Americans, which reveals how behavior is divergently shaped, in the land of the free, by foundational sociocultural schemas of independence and interdependence. This research has the novel implication that it may be necessary to invoke independent behaviors in order to successfully motivate interdependence.

  1. The Relationship between Library Anxiety and Social Interdependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Qun G.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    This study examined the relationship between library anxiety and social interdependence. Participants were 115 graduate students from various disciplines who were administered the Library Anxiety Scale (LAS) and the Social Interdependence Scale (SIS). The LAS assesses levels of library anxiety. This instrument has the following five subscales:…

  2. Indonesian Mothers and Their Young Children: Towards an Interdependent Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zevalkink, Jolien

    Considering the mother-child relationship as the first in which culturally-related interdependence or independence is learned, this study examined whether the interdependency hypothesis holds for the mother-child relationship in Indonesia. The study focused on the quality of the mother-child relationship, children's daily social interactions, and…

  3. Interdependent networks - Topological percolation research and application in finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Di

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my Ph.D. research: i) developing a theoretical framework of complex networks and applying simulation and numerical methods to study the robustness of the network system, and ii) applying statistical physics concepts and methods to quantitatively analyze complex systems and applying the theoretical framework to study real-world systems. In part I, we focus on developing theories of interdependent networks as well as building computer simulation models, which includes three parts: 1) We report on the effects of topology on failure propagation for a model system consisting of two interdependent networks. We find that the internal node correlations in each of the networks significantly changes the critical density of failures, which can trigger the total disruption of the two-network system. Specifically, we find that the assortativity within a single network decreases the robustness of the entire system. 2) We study the percolation behavior of two interdependent scale-free (SF) networks under random failure of 1-p fraction of nodes. We find that as the coupling strength q between the two networks reduces from 1 (fully coupled) to 0 (no coupling), there exist two critical coupling strengths q1 and q2 , which separate the behaviors of the giant component as a function of p into three different regions, and for q2 < q < q 1 , we observe a hybrid order phase transition phenomenon. 3) We study the robustness of n interdependent networks with partially support-dependent relationship both analytically and numerically. We study a starlike network of n Erdos-Renyi (ER), SF networks and a looplike network of n ER networks, and we find for starlike networks, their phase transition regions change with n, but for looplike networks the phase regions change with average degree k . In part II, we apply concepts and methods developed in statistical physics to study economic systems. We analyze stock market indices and foreign exchange

  4. Biased imitation in coupled evolutionary games in interdependent networks

    PubMed Central

    Santos, M. D.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the evolutionary dynamics of two games—the Prisoner's Dilemma and the Snowdrift Game—played within distinct networks (layers) of interdependent networks. In these networks imitation and interaction between individuals of opposite layers is established through interlinks. We explore an update rule in which revision of strategies is a biased imitation process: individuals imitate neighbors from the same layer with probability p, and neighbors from the second layer with complementary probability 1 − p. We demonstrate that a small decrease of p from p = 1 (which corresponds to forbidding strategy transfer between layers) is sufficient to promote cooperation in the Prisoner's Dilemma subpopulation. This, on the other hand, is detrimental for cooperation in the Snowdrift Game subpopulation. We provide results of extensive computer simulations for the case in which layers are modelled as regular random networks, and support this study with analytical results for coupled well-mixed populations. PMID:24658580

  5. The Interdependence of Deformational and Thermal Processes in Mountain Belts

    PubMed

    Huerta; Royden; Hodges

    1996-08-02

    Crustal temperatures within collisional orogens are anomalously high compared with temperatures at comparable depths in stable continents, which is evidence of thermal processes that are fundamental to orogenesis. These temperatures can be explained by the redistribution of crust enriched in heat-producing elements through the accretion of crust from the down-going plate to the upper plate and surface erosion. With the use of geologically reasonable rates, the model results predict high temperatures (over 600°C) and inverted upper-plate geotherms (about 100°C over 20 kilometers) at shallow depths (20 to 40 kilometers) by 25 to 35 million years after collision. This study emphasizes the interdependence of deformational, surficial, and thermal processes.

  6. French security policy: From independence to interdependence

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The book features the first-time translation of some of the most significant recent papers by leading French analysts of security affairs. Beginning with a look at continuity and change in French policy since de Gaulle, this books presents the evolution of French security policy in the 1970s and 1980s. Dr. Laird pays special attention to the French nuclear modernization process and to the trend in the last two decades toward greater emphasis on security interdependence within the Western Alliance at the expense of the classic Gaullist stance of independence. He examines the major dimensions of French security policy, particularly French nuclear employment policy and doctrine, the Franco-German relationship, and France's role in Europe and in East-West relations.

  7. On the interdependence of cognition and emotion

    PubMed Central

    Storbeck, Justin; Clore, Gerald L.

    2008-01-01

    Affect and cognition have long been treated as independent entities, but in the current review we suggest that affect and cognition are in fact highly interdependent. We open the article by discussing three classic views for the independence of affect. These are (i) the affective independence hypothesis, that emotion is processed independently from cognition, (ii) the affective primacy hypothesis, that evaluative processing precedes semantic processing, and (iii) the affective automaticity hypothesis, that affectively potent stimuli commandeer attention and evaluation is automatic. We argue that affect is not independent from cognition, that affect is not primary to cognition, nor is affect automatically elicited. The second half of the paper discusses several instances of how affect influences cognition. We review experiments showing affective involvement in perception, semantic activation, and attitude activation. We conclude that one function of affect is to regulate cognitive processing. PMID:18458789

  8. Spreading of cooperative behaviour across interdependent groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luo-Luo; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-08-01

    Recent empirical research has shown that links between groups reinforce individuals within groups to adopt cooperative behaviour. Moreover, links between networks may induce cascading failures, competitive percolation, or contribute to efficient transportation. Here we show that there in fact exists an intermediate fraction of links between groups that is optimal for the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game. We consider individual groups with regular, random, and scale-free topology, and study their different combinations to reveal that an intermediate interdependence optimally facilitates the spreading of cooperative behaviour between groups. Excessive between-group links simply unify the two groups and make them act as one, while too rare between-group links preclude a useful information flow between the two groups. Interestingly, we find that between-group links are more likely to connect two cooperators than in-group links, thus supporting the conclusion that they are of paramount importance.

  9. Spreading of cooperative behaviour across interdependent groups

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luo-Luo; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    Recent empirical research has shown that links between groups reinforce individuals within groups to adopt cooperative behaviour. Moreover, links between networks may induce cascading failures, competitive percolation, or contribute to efficient transportation. Here we show that there in fact exists an intermediate fraction of links between groups that is optimal for the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game. We consider individual groups with regular, random, and scale-free topology, and study their different combinations to reveal that an intermediate interdependence optimally facilitates the spreading of cooperative behaviour between groups. Excessive between-group links simply unify the two groups and make them act as one, while too rare between-group links preclude a useful information flow between the two groups. Interestingly, we find that between-group links are more likely to connect two cooperators than in-group links, thus supporting the conclusion that they are of paramount importance. PMID:23963495

  10. The LOCI-method: Collaboration Building in Complex Endeavors Based on Analysis of Interdependencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Interdependence Theory According to Kurt Lewin (1948), the essence of a group is the interdependence among its members. Interdependence...multidimensional framework for conceptualizing human services integration initiatives. New Directions for Program Evaluation, 69, 5-19. Lewin , K. (1948

  11. Cascade of failures in interdependent networks coupled by different type networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zunshui; Cao, Jinde

    2015-07-01

    Modern systems are mostly coupled together. Therefore, they should be modeled as interdependent networks. In this paper, the robustness of interdependent networks coupled with different type networks is studied in detail under both targeted and random attack. The critical fraction of nodes leading to a complete fragmentation of two interdependent networks is analyzed. Some findings are summarized as: (i) For random attack problem, the existence criteria for the giant component in interdependent networks coupled by two different type networks are quite different from those coupled by the same type networks. Different type coupled networks are more vulnerable than the same type coupled-networks. (ii) For targeted attack problem, if the highly connected nodes are protected and only the lowly connected nodes failed, the system leads to a first order percolation phase transition for different type coupled-networks, and a second transition for same type coupled-networks as well. The available result implies that different type coupled-networks are difficult to defend by strategies such as protecting the high degree nodes that can be useful to significantly improve robustness of the same type coupled-networks. (iii) For targeted attack problem, when the lowly connected nodes are protected and only the highly connected nodes failed, coupled scale free networks become more vulnerable than the others.

  12. Robustness of interdependent networks with different link patterns against cascading failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Jiang, Chen; Qian, Jianfei

    2014-01-01

    Taking into account the load, the load redistribution, and the node capacity, we study the robustness of two interdependent networks A and B against cascading failures, where each node in network A depends on one node in network B, and vice versa. We adopt three kinds of link patterns between two interdependent networks, i.e., the assortative link (AL), the disassortative link (DL), the random link (RL), where the RA refers to connect randomly two nodes in networks A and B, the AL refers to that high-degree (low-degree) nodes in A network link high-degree (low-degree) nodes in B network, while the DL refers to the fact that high-degree nodes in A network link low-degree nodes in B network. We investigate the robustness of the interdependent networks constructed by two artificial networks and the power grid, taking into account two stages of the cascading propagation. We numerically find that both the different link patterns and the parameters in the cascading model have important effects on dramatically improving the robustness of the interdependent networks against cascading failures. In addition, we obtain the better link pattern and the matching network structure to effectively avoid the cascading propagation.

  13. Measuring Interdependency among Industrial Chains with Financial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingchun; Fang, Ye; Luo, Jing

    Industrial chains exhibit strong interdependency within a large-scale resource-based enterprise group. When analyzing the independency effect in industrial chains, the interdependency of financial index is often ignored. In this paper, we will mainly focus on measuring the long-term interdependency effect by historical simulation and cointegration tests with financial data. A large-scale coal-mining group is studied empirically as a case to explain the framework of independency analysis among the industrial chains. The results show that high degree of independency appears in production costs and marketing costs, and low degree appears in revenues and profits.

  14. Designing and implementing an interdependent resilience culture.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Henry Patrick

    Once an emergency occurs, companies find themselves competing for diminishing resources. Companies mired in confusion and debate often fail to obtain the resources necessary for a speedy recovery and fail to meet the expectations of their various interested parties. Unfortunately, it is during these emergencies that the firm is judged. Unfavourable evaluations of a company by customers, the government and/or the general public result in lost future revenue through contracts that are either not renewed or cancelled, as well as disqualification from tenders and lost bids. This paper discusses how an oil field services company implemented an interdependent resilience culture. Development of this culture included paring down complex concepts and theories into simple rules that are continually introduced and reinforced to the company's leadership. After years of effort, employees from the well head to the corporate boardroom are aligned and aware of everyone's roles when an incident occurs. In short, because each person can count on the others, the company quickly adapts and overcomes significant issues, adding to its competitiveness. As a reader, you will understand that the results of implementing this new culture come down to a single metric: speed. Responses become faster, decisions faster, communication and the transfer of knowledge faster. Emergencies are dynamic and ever-changing. Information quickly becomes stale and outdated. Installing this culture creates a more nimble company which reacts in a manner that allows for extra time, so all the unplanned delays, pitfalls and breakdowns can occur with little to no meaningful impact.

  15. Cascading dynamics with local weighted flow redistribution in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuzhuo

    2013-07-01

    We study load cascading dynamics in a system composed of coupled interdependent networks while adopting a local weighted flow redistribution rule. We find that when the intra- or inter-connectivity increases, robustness against the cascade of load failures in the symmetrically coupled interdependent networks increases. In addition, when a failed link has to first split its flow asymmetrically to its neighbouring link groups according to the link types, even though there exists an optimal split, the robustness is lowered in contrast with the non-split situation. Furthermore, the optimal weighting mechanism in an isolated network no longer holds in interdependent networks. Finally, robustness against the cascade of load failures is not guaranteed to increase by making the distribution of the degree of intra-connectivity broader. We confirm these phenomena by theoretical analysis based on mean-field theory. Our findings might have great implications for preventing load-failure-induced local cascades in symmetrically coupled interdependent networks.

  16. Complex interdependent supply chain networks: Cascading failure and robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liang; Jing, Ke; He, Jie; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-02-01

    A supply chain network is a typical interdependent network composed of an undirected cyber-layer network and a directed physical-layer network. To analyze the robustness of this complex interdependent supply chain network when it suffers from disruption events that can cause nodes to fail, we use a cascading failure process that focuses on load propagation. We consider load propagation via connectivity links as node failure spreads through one layer of an interdependent network, and we develop a priority redistribution strategy for failed loads subject to flow constraint. Using a giant component function and a one-to-one directed interdependence relation between nodes in a cyber-layer network and physical-layer network, we construct time-varied functional equations to quantify the dynamic process of failed loads propagation in an interdependent network. Finally, we conduct a numerical simulation for two cases, i.e., single node removal and multiple node removal at the initial disruption. The simulation results show that when we increase the number of removed nodes in an interdependent supply chain network its robustness undergoes a first-order discontinuous phase transition, and that even removing a small number of nodes will cause it to crash.

  17. Interdependency enriches the spatial reciprocity in prisoner's dilemma game on weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaokun; Sun, Shiwen; Li, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Li; Xia, Chengyi; Sun, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    To model the evolution of cooperation under the realistic scenarios, we propose an interdependent network-based game model which simultaneously considers the difference of individual roles in the spatial prisoner's dilemma game. In our model, the system is composed of two lattices on which an agent designated as a cooperator or defector will be allocated, meanwhile each agent will be endowed as a specific weight taking from three typical distributions on one lattice (i.e., weighted lattice), and set to be 1.0 on the other one (i.e., un-weighted or standard lattice). In addition, the interdependency will be built through the utility coupling between point-to-point partners. Extensive simulations indicate that the cooperation will be continuously elevated for the weighted lattice as the utility coupling strength (α) increases; while the cooperation will take on a nontrivial evolution on the standard lattice as α varies, and will be still greatly promoted when compared to the case of α = 0. At the same time, the full T - K phase diagrams are also explored to illustrate the evolutionary behaviors, and it is powerfully shown that the interdependency drives the defectors to survive within the narrower range, but individual weighting of utility will further broaden the coexistence space of cooperators and defectors, which renders the nontrivial evolution of cooperation in our model. Altogether, the current consequences about the evolution of cooperation will be helpful for us to provide the insights into the prevalent cooperation phenomenon within many real-world systems.

  18. Interdependency Assessment of Coupled Natural Gas and Power Systems in Energy Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongzhao; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Sanhua; Lai, Mingyong; Dong, Zhao Yang

    2015-12-01

    Owing to the technological development of natural gas exploration and the increasing penetration of gas-fired power generation, gas and power systems inevitably interact with each other from both physical and economic points of view. In order to effectively assess the two systems' interdependency, this paper proposes a systematic modeling framework and constructs simulation platforms for coupled gas and power systems in an energy market environment. By applying the proposed approach to the Australian national electricity market (NEM) and gas market, the impacts of six types of market and system factors are quantitatively analyzed, including power transmission limits, gas pipeline contingencies, gas pipeline flow constraints, carbon emission constraints, power load variations, and non-electric gas load variations. The important interdependency and infrastructure weakness for the two systems are well studied and identified. Our work provides a quantitative basis for grid operators and policy makers to support and guide operation and investment decisions for electric power and natural gas industries.

  19. Toward a Relationship Perspective on Aggression among Schoolchildren: Integrating Social Cognitive and Interdependence Theories

    PubMed Central

    Card, Noel A.

    2011-01-01

    The traditional psychological approach of studying aggression among schoolchildren in terms of individual differences in aggression and in victimization has been valuable in identifying prevalence rates, risk, and consequences of involvement in aggression. However, it is argued that a focus on aggressor-victim relationships is warranted based on both conceptual and empirical grounds. Such a shift in focus requires modification and integration of existing theories of aggression, and this paper integrates social cognitive theory and interdependence theory to suggest a new, interdependent social cognitive theory of aggression. Specifically, this paper identifies points of overlap and different foci between these theories, and it illustrates their integration through a proposed model of the emergence of aggressor-victim interactions and relationships. The paper concludes that expanding consideration to include aggressor-victim relationships among schoolchildren offers considerable theoretical, empirical, and intervention opportunities. PMID:26985397

  20. Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene–Catalyst Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the graphene–catalyst interaction during chemical vapor deposition are investigated using in situ, time- and depth-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and complementary grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations coupled to a tight-binding model. We thereby reveal the interdependency of the distribution of carbon close to the catalyst surface and the strength of the graphene–catalyst interaction. The strong interaction of epitaxial graphene with Ni(111) causes a depletion of dissolved carbon close to the catalyst surface, which prevents additional layer formation leading to a self-limiting graphene growth behavior for low exposure pressures (10–6–10–3 mbar). A further hydrocarbon pressure increase (to ∼10–1 mbar) leads to weakening of the graphene–Ni(111) interaction accompanied by additional graphene layer formation, mediated by an increased concentration of near-surface dissolved carbon. We show that growth of more weakly adhered, rotated graphene on Ni(111) is linked to an initially higher level of near-surface carbon compared to the case of epitaxial graphene growth. The key implications of these results for graphene growth control and their relevance to carbon nanotube growth are highlighted in the context of existing literature. PMID:25188018

  1. Reading people's minds from emotion expressions in interdependent decision making.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Celso M; Carnevale, Peter J; Read, Stephen J; Gratch, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    How do people make inferences about other people's minds from their emotion displays? The ability to infer others' beliefs, desires, and intentions from their facial expressions should be especially important in interdependent decision making when people make decisions from beliefs about the others' intention to cooperate. Five experiments tested the general proposition that people follow principles of appraisal when making inferences from emotion displays, in context. Experiment 1 revealed that the same emotion display produced opposite effects depending on context: When the other was competitive, a smile on the other's face evoked a more negative response than when the other was cooperative. Experiment 2 revealed that the essential information from emotion displays was derived from appraisals (e.g., Is the current state of affairs conducive to my goals? Who is to blame for it?); facial displays of emotion had the same impact on people's decision making as textual expressions of the corresponding appraisals. Experiments 3, 4, and 5 used multiple mediation analyses and a causal-chain design: Results supported the proposition that beliefs about others' appraisals mediate the effects of emotion displays on expectations about others' intentions. We suggest a model based on appraisal theories of emotion that posits an inferential mechanism whereby people retrieve, from emotion expressions, information about others' appraisals, which then lead to inferences about others' mental states. This work has implications for the design of algorithms that drive agent behavior in human-agent strategic interaction, an emerging domain at the interface of computer science and social psychology.

  2. Trait hostility is associated with systemic inflammation in married couples: an actor-partner analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy W; Uchino, Bert N; Bosch, Jos A; Kent, Robert G

    2014-10-01

    Trait anger and hostility predict the development of coronary heart disease, and systemic inflammation may partly mediate this association. In a sample of 94 middle-aged and older married couples, we replicate research showing a within individuals (i.e., actor effect) association of trait hostility with high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). As a novel extension of that research, the present study also examined the association of individuals' trait hostility with their partners' hsCRP (i.e., partner effect). Controlling for potential confounds, trait hostility, measured with the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, was significantly associated with both participants' own hsCRP, b=.0528 (SE=.0196), p=.008 and their partners' levels b=.0473 (SE=.0194), p=.016. Hence, the inflammatory correlates of trait hostility occur not only within individuals but between them, as well. The effects of unhealthy personality traits may extend to intimate partners and possibly other social network members.

  3. Economic pressure and health and weight management behaviors in African American couples: A family stress perspective.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Catherine W; Arnold, Amy Laura; Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Wickrama, K A S; Bryant, Chalandra M

    2015-05-01

    This study extends the family stress model by examining the influence of economic pressure on health and weight management behaviors mediated by depressive symptoms and spousal support among 506 African American married couples. The actor-partner interdependence model accounted for the interdependent nature of relationships. Findings support the family stress model; yet pathways differed slightly for husbands and wives. Economic pressure directly influenced depressive symptoms and spousal support. Spousal support was a buffer against poor health and weight management behaviors for husbands, while depressive symptoms exacerbated poor health and weight management behaviors for wives. These mechanisms have implications for practitioners who promote African American couples' well-being.

  4. Water supply planning under interdependence of actions: Theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, S.; Hipel, K. W.; Kilgour, D. M.

    1999-07-01

    An ongoing water supply planning problem in the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, is studied to select the best water supply combination, within a multiple-objective framework, when actions are interdependent. The interdependencies in the problem are described and shown to be essential features. The problem is formulated as a multiple-criteria integer program with interdependent actions. Because of the large number of potential actions and the nonconvexity of the decision space, it is quite difficult to find nondominated subsets of actions. Instead, a modified goal programming technique is suggested to identify promising subsets. The appropriateness of this technique is explained, and the lessons learned in applying it to the Waterloo water supply planning problem are described.

  5. Optimal interdependence between networks for the evolution of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has identified interactions between networks as crucial for the outcome of evolutionary games taking place on them. While the consensus is that interdependence does promote cooperation by means of organizational complexity and enhanced reciprocity that is out of reach on isolated networks, we here address the question just how much interdependence there should be. Intuitively, one might assume the more the better. However, we show that in fact only an intermediate density of sufficiently strong interactions between networks warrants an optimal resolution of social dilemmas. This is due to an intricate interplay between the heterogeneity that causes an asymmetric strategy flow because of the additional links between the networks, and the independent formation of cooperative patterns on each individual network. Presented results are robust to variations of the strategy updating rule, the topology of interdependent networks, and the governing social dilemma, thus suggesting a high degree of universality.

  6. Random Regular Networks with Distance-limited Interdependent Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowinger, Steven; Kornbluth, Yosef; Cwilich, Gabriel; Buldyrev, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    We study the mutual percolation of a system composed of two interdependent random regular networks. We introduce a notion of distance, d, to explore the effects of the proximity of interdependent nodes on the cascade of failures after an initial attack. The nature of the transition through which the networks disintegrate depends on the parameters of the system, which are the degree of the nodes and the maximum distance between interdependent nodes. As the distance and degree increase, the collapse at the critical threshold changes from a second-order transition to a first-order one. The critical threshold monotonically increases with distance. We find a transitional case, in which a novel type of phase transition appears. The case d = 1 can be completely solved analytically and it maps into a discrete version of the Rényi parking problem.

  7. State of the art in risk analysis of workforce criticality influencing disaster preparedness for interdependent systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; Herrera, Lucia Castro; Yu, Krista Danielle S; Pagsuyoin, Sheree Ann T; Tan, Raymond R

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss a needed paradigm shift in disaster risk analysis to emphasize the role of the workforce in managing the recovery of interdependent infrastructure and economic systems. Much of the work that has been done on disaster risk analysis has focused primarily on preparedness and recovery strategies for disrupted infrastructure systems. The reliability of systems such as transportation, electric power, and telecommunications is crucial in sustaining business processes, supply chains, and regional livelihoods, as well as ensuring the availability of vital services in the aftermath of disasters. There has been a growing momentum in recognizing workforce criticality in the aftermath of disasters; nevertheless, significant gaps still remain in modeling, assessing, and managing workforce disruptions and their associated ripple effects to other interdependent systems. The workforce plays a pivotal role in ensuring that a disrupted region continues to function and subsequently recover from the adverse effects of disasters. With this in mind, this article presents a review of recent studies that have underscored the criticality of workforce sectors in formulating synergistic preparedness and recovery policies for interdependent infrastructure and regional economic systems.

  8. Percolation theory on interdependent networks based on epidemic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Seung-Woo; Bizhani, Golnoosh; Christensen, Claire; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2012-01-01

    We consider percolation on interdependent locally treelike networks, recently introduced by Buldyrev S. V. et al., Nature, 464 (2010) 1025, and demonstrate that the problem can be simplified conceptually by deleting all references to cascades of failures. Such cascades do exist, but their explicit treatment just complicates the theory —which is a straightforward extension of the usual epidemic spreading theory on a single network. Our method has the added benefits that it is directly formulated in terms of an order parameter and its modular structure can be easily extended to other problems, e.g. to any number of interdependent networks, or to networks with dependency links.

  9. Science and Technology, Autonomous and More Interdependent Every Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santilli, Haydee

    2012-01-01

    In a School of Engineering scientific and technological knowledge live together. Science teachers usually try to understand the role that scientific disciplines have over the engineer training. In this paper are descript three historical case studies that could help teachers and students for better understanding the interdependence between science…

  10. Joint Force Interdependence for a Fiscally Constrained Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Army 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Dr. Richard Meinhart ...Joint Force Interdependence For A Fiscally Constrained Future by Colonel Daniel P. Ray United States Army ...United States Army War College Class of 2013 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: A Approved for Public Release Distribution is Unlimited

  11. The Study of Geography in an Interdependent World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saueressig-Schreuder, Yda

    The importance of restructuring the discipline of geography and enhancing its role in the precollege curriculum as part of a global approach to education is emphasized in this paper. International education is seen as an essential part of high school and college education in an increasingly interdependent world. The oil crisis, the world economic…

  12. Hong Kong in Transition: A Look at Economic Interdependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Selena

    Economic interdependence has played an important role in Hong Kong's history, from its earliest days as a British colony to its current status as a center of international trade and finance. Hong Kong occupies a unique place in history because of its unprecedented transfer of power in 1997 from Britain to the People's Republic of China. The future…

  13. Robust face representation using hybrid spatial feature interdependence matrix.

    PubMed

    Yao, Anbang; Yu, Shan

    2013-08-01

    A key issue in face recognition is to seek an effective descriptor for representing face appearance. In the context of considering the face image as a set of small facial regions, this paper presents a new face representation approach coined spatial feature interdependence matrix (SFIM). Unlike classical face descriptors which usually use a hierarchically organized or a sequentially concatenated structure to describe the spatial layout features extracted from local regions, SFIM is attributed to the exploitation of the underlying feature interdependences regarding local region pairs inside a class specific face. According to SFIM, the face image is projected onto an undirected connected graph in a manner that explicitly encodes feature interdependence-based relationships between local regions. We calculate the pair-wise interdependence strength as the weighted discrepancy between two feature sets extracted in a hybrid feature space fusing histograms of intensity, local binary pattern and oriented gradients. To achieve the goal of face recognition, our SFIM-based face descriptor is embedded in three different recognition frameworks, namely nearest neighbor search, subspace-based classification, and linear optimization-based classification. Extensive experimental results on four well-known face databases and comprehensive comparisons with the state-of-the-art results are provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed SFIM-based descriptor.

  14. Teaching About Interdependence in a Peaceful World. No. 5418.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY. United States Committee.

    Designed for elementary-grade students, these resource materials provide activities which relate the global concepts of peace and interdependence to the direct experience of the child. Subunits on world food supply, world health, and the world mail system use simulation and role-playing activities to help learners see how the things that they…

  15. Shared impression formation in the cognitively interdependent dyad.

    PubMed

    Ruscher, Janet B; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost

    2003-09-01

    We examined the role of cognitive interdependence in determining how close friends form shared impressions of another person. Cognitive interdependence should provide a processing advantage, such that close friends are more efficient in forming shared impressions and are more successful at doing so. Under normal circumstances, the conversations of close friends should be marked by little necessity to make explicit requests for information, mutual recognition of who currently is controlling the flow of conversation, and willingness to express differences in opinion. Given these advantages, close friends also should be able to form complex shared impressions that go beyond mere one-sided stereotypic judgments and that instead resolve apparent discrepancies in the target's personality. However, if the cognitive interdependence system is disrupted by mutual distraction, these advantages should attenuate or even reverse. Dyads of varying degrees of closeness were mutually distracted or not while discussing their impressions of another female college student. Results supported predictions and are discussed with reference to how cognitive interdependence may help close dyads function within their mutual social networks.

  16. Investment Planning of Interdependent Waterway Improvement Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    functional expression (or metamodel) for S/I was developed through an experiment involving a microsimulation model for waterway traffic. The...is divided into two phases. The first phase is the development of evaluation functions that may act as a substitute for a microsimulation model for

  17. Interdependence--Spirit of 1976: A Special Bicentennial Edition of "Teaching about Interdependence in a Peaceful World."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Donald

    Methods and resource materials are suggested for teaching elementary level students about the concept of interdependence in terms of the Bicentennial. The rationale lies with a belief in human interrelatedness and the universality of human rights for which the signers of the Declaration of Independence struggled. Students are encouraged to explore…

  18. Interdependence and Conventional and Special Operations Forces: A Decade of Tactical, Operational, and Strategic Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-14

    presents a dichotomy of tactical, operational, and strategic successes and failures . It represented the first instance of interdependence in US Army... INTERDEPENDENCE AND CONVENTIONAL AND SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES: A DECADE OF TACTICAL, OPERATIONAL, AND STRATEGIC EFFECTS A Monograph by LTC...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Interdependence and Conventional and Special Operations Forces: 5b. GRANT NUMBER A Decade of Tactical, Operational, and

  19. Learning Microbiology Through Cooperation: Designing Cooperative Learning Activities that Promote Interdependence, Interaction, and Accountability

    PubMed Central

    TREMPY, JANINE E.; SKINNER, MONICA M.; SIEBOLD, WILLIAM A.

    2002-01-01

    A microbiology course and its corresponding learning activities have been structured according to the Cooperative Learning Model. This course, The World According to Microbes, integrates science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET) majors and non-SMET majors into teams of students charged with problem solving activities that are microbial in origin. In this study we describe development of learning activities that utilize key components of Cooperative Learning—positive interdependence, promotive interaction, individual accountability, teamwork skills, and group processing. Assessments and evaluations over an 8-year period demonstrate high retention of key concepts in microbiology and high student satisfaction with the course. PMID:23653547

  20. Current Capabilities, Requirements and a Proposed Strategy for Interdependency Analysis in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Robin; Chozos, Nick; Salako, Kizito

    The UK government recently commissioned a research study to identify the state-of-the-art in Critical Infrastructure modelling and analysis, and the government/industry requirements for such tools and services. This study (Cetifs) concluded with a strategy aiming to bridge the gaps between the capabilities and requirements, which would establish interdependency analysis as a commercially viable service in the near future. This paper presents the findings of this study that was carried out by CSR, City University London, Adelard LLP, a safety/security consultancy and Cranfield University, defense academy of the UK.

  1. Reworking the science curriculum: A case study in the interdependence between introductory biology and multiculturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persell, Roger

    1994-12-01

    Multiculturalism has emerged as the major influence in revising science curricula and teaching, yet misunderstanding about the history and theoretical underpinnings of multiculturalism has made the separation of political and education reform contentious and difficult. Within the context of a new college-wide pluralism and diversity requirement, a large introductory biology course at Hunter College of the City University of New York is now the testing ground for an interdependent model of multicultural education. The implications for multiculturalism, science pedagogy, and the pivotal role of introductory courses are discussed.

  2. Satisfaction guaranteed? How individual, partner, and relationship factors impact sexual satisfaction within partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Within committed relationships, a wide range of factors may challenge or facilitate sexual satisfaction. The aim of this study was to clarify which individual, partner-, and partnership-related aspects of a sexual relationship are crucial for the prediction of sexual satisfaction. The study included data of a representative sample of 964 couples from the general population. The actor-partner interdependence model was used to estimate actor and partner effects. Overall, predictors explained 57% of outcome variance. Actor effects were found for sexual function, sexual distress, frequency of sexual activity, desire discrepancy, sexual initiative, sexual communication, sociosexual orientation, masturbation, and life satisfaction. Gender-specific partner effects were found for sexual function and sexual distress. Neither age, nor relationship duration were significant predictors. To deepen our understanding of sexual satisfaction, it is necessary to take quantitative and qualitative aspects of sexual relationships into account and to consider actor-, partner-, and relationship-related predictors. PMID:28231314

  3. Associations Between Family of Origin Climate, Relationship Self-Regulation, and Marital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Nathan R; Soloski, Kristy L; Ratcliffe, G Cole; Anderson, Jared R; Willoughby, Brian J

    2015-10-01

    Using dyadic data from 961 married couples from the Relationship Evaluation Questionnaire project, the current study explored the direct association between family of origin climate and marital outcomes and the indirect association via relationship self-regulation (RSR). Results from the actor-partner interdependence model analysis indicated that family of origin climate was positively associated with marital stability directly and indirectly via the effects of RSR and marital satisfaction for both men and women. Results suggest that the experience one has in their family of origin is associated with their marital outcomes through their RSR. Actor-partner direct and indirect effects indicate that spouses' RSR may have important consequences for both partner's evaluation of the marriage. Implications for intervention and future research are discussed.

  4. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  5. Interdependent Mechanisms for Processing Gender and Emotion: The Special Status of Angry Male Faces

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Daniel A.; Ciaramitaro, Vivian M.

    2016-01-01

    While some models of how various attributes of a face are processed have posited that face features, invariant physical cues such as gender or ethnicity as well as variant social cues such as emotion, may be processed independently (e.g., Bruce and Young, 1986), other models suggest a more distributed representation and interdependent processing (e.g., Haxby et al., 2000). Here, we use a contingent adaptation paradigm to investigate if mechanisms for processing the gender and emotion of a face are interdependent and symmetric across the happy–angry emotional continuum and regardless of the gender of the face. We simultaneously adapted participants to angry female faces and happy male faces (Experiment 1) or to happy female faces and angry male faces (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, we found evidence for contingent adaptation, with simultaneous aftereffects in opposite directions: male faces were biased toward angry while female faces were biased toward happy. Interestingly, in the complementary Experiment 2, we did not find evidence for contingent adaptation, with both male and female faces biased toward angry. Our results highlight that evidence for contingent adaptation and the underlying interdependent face processing mechanisms that would allow for contingent adaptation may only be evident for certain combinations of face features. Such limits may be especially important in the case of social cues given how maladaptive it may be to stop responding to threatening information, with male angry faces considered to be the most threatening. The underlying neuronal mechanisms that could account for such asymmetric effects in contingent adaptation remain to be elucidated. PMID:27471482

  6. Phenology of two interdependent traits in migratory birds in response to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Nadiah Pardede; Johansson, Jacob; Ripa, Jörgen; Jonzén, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    In migratory birds, arrival date and hatching date are two key phenological markers that have responded to global warming. A body of knowledge exists relating these traits to evolutionary pressures. In this study, we formalize this knowledge into general mathematical assumptions, and use them in an ecoevolutionary model. In contrast to previous models, this study novelty accounts for both traits—arrival date and hatching date—and the interdependence between them, revealing when one, the other or both will respond to climate. For all models sharing the assumptions, the following phenological responses will occur. First, if the nestling-prey peak is late enough, hatching is synchronous with, and arrival date evolves independently of, prey phenology. Second, when resource availability constrains the length of the pre-laying period, hatching is adaptively asynchronous with prey phenology. Predictions for both traits compare well with empirical observations. In response to advancing prey phenology, arrival date may advance, remain unchanged, or even become delayed; the latter occurring when egg-laying resources are only available relatively late in the season. The model shows that asynchronous hatching and unresponsive arrival date are not sufficient evidence that phenological adaptation is constrained. The work provides a framework for exploring microevolution of interdependent phenological traits. PMID:25904668

  7. Phenology of two interdependent traits in migratory birds in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Nadiah Pardede; Johansson, Jacob; Ripa, Jörgen; Jonzén, Niclas

    2015-05-22

    In migratory birds, arrival date and hatching date are two key phenological markers that have responded to global warming. A body of knowledge exists relating these traits to evolutionary pressures. In this study, we formalize this knowledge into general mathematical assumptions, and use them in an ecoevolutionary model. In contrast to previous models, this study novelty accounts for both traits-arrival date and hatching date-and the interdependence between them, revealing when one, the other or both will respond to climate. For all models sharing the assumptions, the following phenological responses will occur. First, if the nestling-prey peak is late enough, hatching is synchronous with, and arrival date evolves independently of, prey phenology. Second, when resource availability constrains the length of the pre-laying period, hatching is adaptively asynchronous with prey phenology. Predictions for both traits compare well with empirical observations. In response to advancing prey phenology, arrival date may advance, remain unchanged, or even become delayed; the latter occurring when egg-laying resources are only available relatively late in the season. The model shows that asynchronous hatching and unresponsive arrival date are not sufficient evidence that phenological adaptation is constrained. The work provides a framework for exploring microevolution of interdependent phenological traits.

  8. Integrated Seismicity Model to Detect Pairs of Possible Interdependent Earthquakes and Its Application to Aftershocks of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake and Sequence of the 2014 Kermadec and Rat Islands Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, M.; Tamura, R.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce an integrated seismicity model to stochastically evaluate the time intervals of consecutive earthquakes at global scales, making it possible to detect a pair of earthquakes that are remotely located and possibly related to each other. The model includes seismicity in non-overlapping areas and comprehensively explains the seismicity on the basis of point process models, which include the stationary Poisson model, the aftershock decay model following Omori-Utsu's law, and/or the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model. By use of this model, we examine the possibility of remote triggering of the 2011 M6.4 eastern Shizuoka earthquake in the vicinity of Mt. Fuji that occurred 4 days after the Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and 4 minutes after the M6.2 off-Fukushima earthquake that located about 400 km away, and that of the 2014 Mw7.9 Rat Islands earthquake that occurred within one hour after the Mw6.7 Kermadec earthquake that located about 9,000 km away and followed two large (Mw6.9, 6.5) earthquakes in the region. Both target earthquakes occurred during the passage of surface waves propagating from the previous large events. We estimated probability that the time interval is shorter than that between consecutive events and obtained dynamic stress changes on the faults. The results indicate that the M6.4 eastern Shizuoka event may be rather triggered by the static stress changes from the Tohoku-Oki earthquake and that the Mw7.9 Rat Islands event may have been remotely triggered by the Kermadec events possibly via cyclic fatigue.

  9. Codifference as a practical tool to measure interdependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Chechkin, Aleksei; Gajda, Janusz; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2015-03-01

    Correlation and spectral analysis represent the standard tools to study interdependence in statistical data. However, for the stochastic processes with heavy-tailed distributions such that the variance diverges, these tools are inadequate. The heavy-tailed processes are ubiquitous in nature and finance. We here discuss codifference as a convenient measure to study statistical interdependence, and we aim to give a short introductory review of its properties. By taking different known stochastic processes as generic examples, we present explicit formulas for their codifferences. We show that for the Gaussian processes codifference is equivalent to covariance. For processes with finite variance these two measures behave similarly with time. For the processes with infinite variance the covariance does not exist, however, the codifference is relevant. We demonstrate the practical importance of the codifference by extracting this function from simulated as well as real data taken from turbulent plasma of fusion device and financial market. We conclude that the codifference serves as a convenient practical tool to study interdependence for stochastic processes with both infinite and finite variances as well.

  10. Moderate Intra-Group Bias Maximizes Cooperation on Interdependent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Changbing; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary game theory on spatial structures has received increasing attention during the past decades. However, the majority of these achievements focuses on single and static population structures, which is not fully consistent with the fact that real structures are composed of many interactive groups. These groups are interdependent on each other and present dynamical features, in which individuals mimic the strategy of neighbors and switch their partnerships continually. It is however unclear how the dynamical and interdependent interactions among groups affect the evolution of collective behaviors. In this work, we employ the prisoner's dilemma game to investigate how the dynamics of structure influences cooperation on interdependent populations, where populations are represented by group structures. It is found that the more robust the links between cooperators (or the more fragile the links between cooperators and defectors), the more prevalent of cooperation. Furthermore, theoretical analysis shows that the intra-group bias can favor cooperation, which is only possible when individuals are likely to attach neighbors within the same group. Yet, interestingly, cooperation can be even inhibited for large intra-group bias, allowing the moderate intra-group bias maximizes the cooperation level. PMID:24533084

  11. Cascading failures of interdependent modular small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guowei; Wang, Xianpei; Tian, Meng; Dai, Dangdang; Long, Jiachuan; Zhang, Qilin

    2016-07-01

    Much empirical evidence shows that many real-world networks fall into the broad class of small-world networks and have a modular structure. The modularity has been revealed to have an important effect on cascading failure in isolated networks. However, the corresponding results for interdependent modular small-world networks remain missing. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between cascading failures and the intra-modular rewiring probabilities and inter-modular connections under different coupling preferences, i.e. random coupling with modules (RCWM), assortative coupling in modules (ACIM) and assortative coupling with modules (ACWM). The size of the largest connected component is used to evaluate the robustness from global and local perspectives. Numerical results indicate that increasing intra-modular rewiring probabilities and inter-modular connections can improve the robustness of interdependent modular small-world networks under intra-attacks and inter-attacks. Meanwhile, experiments on three coupling strategies demonstrate that ACIM has a better effect on preventing the cascading failures compared with RCWM and ACWM. These results can be helpful to allocate and optimize the topological structure of interdependent modular small-world networks to improve the robustness of such networks.

  12. Cascading failures with local load redistribution in interdependent Watts-Strogatz networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Du, Wen-Bo; Sallan, Jose Maria; Lordan, Oriol

    2016-05-01

    Cascading failures of loads in isolated networks have been studied extensively over the last decade. Since 2010, such research has extended to interdependent networks. In this paper, we study cascading failures with local load redistribution in interdependent Watts-Strogatz (WS) networks. The effects of rewiring probability and coupling strength on the resilience of interdependent WS networks have been extensively investigated. It has been found that, for small values of the tolerance parameter, interdependent networks are more vulnerable as rewiring probability increases. For larger values of the tolerance parameter, the robustness of interdependent networks firstly decreases and then increases as rewiring probability increases. Coupling strength has a different impact on robustness. For low values of coupling strength, the resilience of interdependent networks decreases with the increment of the coupling strength until it reaches a certain threshold value. For values of coupling strength above this threshold, the opposite effect is observed. Our results are helpful to understand and design resilient interdependent networks.

  13. Percolation of interdependent networks with degree-correlated inter-connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Akito; Kuse, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    In interdependent networks, failures of nodes in one constituent network lead nodes in another network to fail. This happens recursively and leads to a cascade of failures. It is known that the interdependent networks with random inter-connections have weaker robustness than the individual networks. However, if the interdependent networks have degree correlations between the networks constructing them as in the actual cases, the robustness of the interdependent networks may be changed. In this paper, we perform numerical simulations on interdependent networks and obtain the giant cluster sizes after the cascade of failures in order to evaluate the robustness. We show that when a interdependent network has a positive degree inter-correlation, it has the stronger robustness than that for the networks with no degree correlation. We show not only the numerical simulation results but theoretical ones for the robustness of the interdependent networks.

  14. Earth's interdependent thermal, structural, and chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The popular view that 30-55% of Earth's global power is primordial, with deep layers emanating significant power, rests on misunderstandings and models that omit magmatism and outgassing. These processes link Earth's chemical and thermal evolution, while creating layers, mainly because magmas transport latent heat and radioactive isotopes rapidly upwards. We link chemistry to heat flow, measured and theoretical, to understand the interior layering and workings. Quasi-steady state conditions describe most of Earth's history: (1) Accretion was cold and was not a source of deep heat. (2) Friction during core formation cannot have greatly heated the interior (thermodynamics plus buoyancy). (3) Conduction is the governing microscopic mechanism in the deep Earth. (4) Using well-constrained values of thermal conductivity (k), we find that homogeneously distributed radionuclides provide extremely high internal temperature (T) under radial symmetry. Moreover, for any given global power, sequestering heat producing elements into the upper mantle reduces Earth's central temperature by a factor of 10 from a homogeneous distribution. Hence, (5) core formation was a major cooling event. From modern determinations of k(T) we provide a reference conductive geotherm. Present-day global power of 30 TW from heat flux measurements and sequestering of heat producing elements in the upper mantle and transition zone, produces nearly isothermal T = 5300 K below 670 km, which equals experimentally determined freezing of pure Fe0 at the inner core boundary. Core freezing buffers the interior temperatures, while the Sun constrains the surface temperature, providing steady state conditions: Earth's deep interior is isothermal due to these constraints, low flux and high k. Our geotherms point to a stagnant lower mantle and convection above 670 km. Rotational flattening cracks the brittle lithosphere, providing paths for buoyant magmas to ascend. Release of latent heat augments the conductive

  15. Interdependencies and Causalities in Coupled Financial Networks.

    PubMed

    Vodenska, Irena; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Arai, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    We explore the foreign exchange and stock market networks for 48 countries from 1999 to 2012 and propose a model, based on complex Hilbert principal component analysis, for extracting significant lead-lag relationships between these markets. The global set of countries, including large and small countries in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and the Middle East, is contrasted with the limited scopes of targets, e.g., G5, G7 or the emerging Asian countries, adopted by previous works. We construct a coupled synchronization network, perform community analysis, and identify formation of four distinct network communities that are relatively stable over time. In addition to investigating the entire period, we divide the time period into into "mild crisis," (1999-2002), "calm," (2003-2006) and "severe crisis" (2007-2012) sub-periods and find that the severe crisis period behavior dominates the dynamics in the foreign exchange-equity synchronization network. We observe that in general the foreign exchange market has predictive power for the global stock market performances. In addition, the United States, German and Mexican markets have forecasting power for the performances of other global equity markets.

  16. Interdependencies and Causalities in Coupled Financial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Vodenska, Irena; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Arai, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    We explore the foreign exchange and stock market networks for 48 countries from 1999 to 2012 and propose a model, based on complex Hilbert principal component analysis, for extracting significant lead-lag relationships between these markets. The global set of countries, including large and small countries in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and the Middle East, is contrasted with the limited scopes of targets, e.g., G5, G7 or the emerging Asian countries, adopted by previous works. We construct a coupled synchronization network, perform community analysis, and identify formation of four distinct network communities that are relatively stable over time. In addition to investigating the entire period, we divide the time period into into “mild crisis,” (1999–2002), “calm,” (2003–2006) and “severe crisis” (2007–2012) sub-periods and find that the severe crisis period behavior dominates the dynamics in the foreign exchange-equity synchronization network. We observe that in general the foreign exchange market has predictive power for the global stock market performances. In addition, the United States, German and Mexican markets have forecasting power for the performances of other global equity markets. PMID:26977806

  17. Interconnectedness and interdependencies of critical infrastructures in the US economy: Implications for resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Shauhrat S.; Khanna, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    Natural disasters in 2011 yielded close to 55 billion in economic damages alone in the United States (US), which highlights the need to reduce impacts of such disasters or other deliberate attacks. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) identifies a list of 16 Critical Infrastructure Sectors (CIS) whose incapacity due to disruptions would have a debilitating impact on the nation's economy. The goal of this work is to understand the implications of interdependencies among CIS on the resilience of the US economic system as a whole. We develop a framework that combines the empirical economic input-output (EIO) model with graph theory based techniques for understanding interdependencies, interconnectedness and resilience in the US economic system. By representing the US economy as a network, we are able to analyze its topology by separately looking at its unweighted and weighted forms. Topological analysis of the US EIO network suggests that it exhibits small world properties for the unweighted case, and in the weighted case, the throughput of industry sectors follows a power-law with an exponential cutoff. Implications of these topological properties are discussed in the paper. We also simulate hypothetical disruptions on CIS in order to identify industrial sectors that experience the largest economic impacts, and to quantify systemic vulnerability in economic terms. In addition, insights from community detection and hypothetical disruption scenarios help assess vulnerability of individual industrial communities to disruptions on individual CIS. These methodologies also provide insights regarding the extent of coupling between each CIS in the US EIO network. Based on our analysis, we observe that excessive interconnectedness and interdependencies of CIS results in high systemic vulnerability. This information can guide policymakers to design policies that improve resilience of economic networks, and evaluate policies that might indirectly increase coupling

  18. Abstract concepts require concrete models: why cognitive scientists have not yet embraced nonlinearly coupled, dynamical, self-organized critical, synergistic, scale-free, exquisitely context-sensitive, interaction-dominant, multifractal, interdependent brain-body-niche systems.

    PubMed

    Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; van der Maas, Han L J; Farrell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    After more than 15 years of study, the 1/f noise or complex-systems approach to cognitive science has delivered promises of progress, colorful verbiage, and statistical analyses of phenomena whose relevance for cognition remains unclear. What the complex-systems approach has arguably failed to deliver are concrete insights about how people perceive, think, decide, and act. Without formal models that implement the proposed abstract concepts, the complex-systems approach to cognitive science runs the danger of becoming a philosophical exercise in futility. The complex-systems approach can be informative and innovative, but only if it is implemented as a formal model that allows concrete prediction, falsification, and comparison against more traditional approaches.

  19. Analysis of the phase locking index for measuring of interdependency of cortical signals recorded in the EEG.

    PubMed

    Sazonov, Andrei V; Ho, Chin Keong; Bergmans, Jan W M; Arends, Johan B A M; Griep, Paul A M; Verbitskiy, Evgeny A; Cluitmans, Pierre J M; Boon, Paul A J M

    2007-01-01

    The phase locking index (PLI) was introduced to quantify in a statistical sense the phase synchronization of two signals. It has been commonly used to process biosignals. In this paper, we analyze the PLI for measuring the interdependency of cortical source signals (CSSs) recorded in the Electroencephalogram (EEG). The main focus of the analysis is the probability density function, which describes the sensitivity of the PLI to the joint noise ensemble in the CSSs. Since this function is mathematically intractable, we derive approximations and analyze them for a simple analytical model of the CSS mixture in the EEG. The accuracies of the approximate probability density functions (APDFs) are evaluated using simulations for the model. The APDFs are found sufficiently accurate and thus are applicable for practical intents and purposes. They can hence be used to determine the confidence intervals and significance levels for detection methods for interdependencies, e.g., between cortical signals recorded in the EEG.

  20. Game among interdependent networks: The impact of rationality on system robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuhang; Cao, Gongze; He, Shibo; Chen, Jiming; Sun, Youxian

    2016-12-01

    Many real-world systems are composed of interdependent networks that rely on one another. Such networks are typically designed and operated by different entities, who aim at maximizing their own payoffs. There exists a game among these entities when designing their own networks. In this paper, we study the game investigating how the rational behaviors of entities impact the system robustness. We first introduce a mathematical model to quantify the interacting payoffs among varying entities. Then we study the Nash equilibrium of the game and compare it with the optimal social welfare. We reveal that the cooperation among different entities can be reached to maximize the social welfare in continuous game only when the average degree of each network is constant. Therefore, the huge gap between Nash equilibrium and optimal social welfare generally exists. The rationality of entities makes the system inherently deficient and even renders it extremely vulnerable in some cases. We analyze our model for two concrete systems with continuous strategy space and discrete strategy space, respectively. Furthermore, we uncover some factors (such as weakening coupled strength of interdependent networks, designing a suitable topology dependence of the system) that help reduce the gap and the system vulnerability.

  1. Data management for geospatial vulnerability assessment of interdependencies in US power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, C.Y.; Scown, C.D.; Soibelman, L.; Matthews, H.S.; Garrett, J.H.; Dodrill, K.; McSurdy, S.

    2009-09-15

    Critical infrastructures maintain our society's stability, security, and quality of life. These systems are also interdependent, which means that the disruption of one infrastructure system can significantly impact the operation of other systems. Because of the heavy reliance on electricity production, it is important to assess possible vulnerabilities. Determining the source of these vulnerabilities can provide insight for risk management and emergency response efforts. This research uses data warehousing and visualization techniques to explore the interdependencies between coal mines, rail transportation, and electric power plants. By merging geospatial and nonspatial data, we are able to model the potential impacts of a disruption to one or more mines, rail lines, or power plants, and visually display the results using a geographical information system. A scenario involving a severe earthquake in the New Madrid Seismic Zone is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the model when given input in the form of a potentially impacted area. This type of interactive analysis can help decision makers to understand the vulnerabilities of the coal distribution network and the potential impact it can have on electricity production.

  2. The conservation nexus: valuing interdependent water and energy savings in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Bartos, Matthew D; Chester, Mikhail V

    2014-02-18

    Water and energy resources are intrinsically linked, yet they are managed separately--even in the water-scarce American southwest. This study develops a spatially explicit model of water-energy interdependencies in Arizona and assesses the potential for cobeneficial conservation programs. The interdependent benefits of investments in eight conservation strategies are assessed within the context of legislated renewable energy portfolio and energy efficiency standards. The cobenefits of conservation are found to be significant. Water conservation policies have the potential to reduce statewide electricity demand by 0.82-3.1%, satisfying 4.1-16% of the state's mandated energy-efficiency standard. Adoption of energy-efficiency measures and renewable generation portfolios can reduce nonagricultural water demand by 1.9-15%. These conservation cobenefits are typically not included in conservation plans or benefit-cost analyses. Many cobenefits offer negative costs of saved water and energy, indicating that these measures provide water and energy savings at no net cost. Because ranges of costs and savings for water-energy conservation measures are somewhat uncertain, future studies should investigate the cobenefits of individual conservation strategies in detail. Although this study focuses on Arizona, the analysis can be extended elsewhere as renewable portfolio and energy efficiency standards become more common nationally and internationally.

  3. Cascading failures in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Run-Ran; Li, Ming; Jia, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-05-01

    We study the percolation in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links, where the inner- and inter-dependency links represent the dependencies between nodes in the same or different networks, respectively. We find that when most of dependency links are inner- or inter-ones, the coupled networks system is fragile and makes a discontinuous percolation transition. However, when the numbers of two types of dependency links are close to each other, the system is robust and makes a continuous percolation transition. This indicates that the high density of dependency links could not always lead to a discontinuous percolation transition as the previous studies. More interestingly, although the robustness of the system can be optimized by adjusting the ratio of the two types of dependency links, there exists a critical average degree of the networks for coupled random networks, below which the crossover of the two types of percolation transitions disappears, and the system will always demonstrate a discontinuous percolation transition. We also develop an approach to analyze this model, which is agreement with the simulation results well.

  4. Cascading failures in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Run-Ran; Li, Ming; Jia, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We study the percolation in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links, where the inner- and inter-dependency links represent the dependencies between nodes in the same or different networks, respectively. We find that when most of dependency links are inner- or inter-ones, the coupled networks system is fragile and makes a discontinuous percolation transition. However, when the numbers of two types of dependency links are close to each other, the system is robust and makes a continuous percolation transition. This indicates that the high density of dependency links could not always lead to a discontinuous percolation transition as the previous studies. More interestingly, although the robustness of the system can be optimized by adjusting the ratio of the two types of dependency links, there exists a critical average degree of the networks for coupled random networks, below which the crossover of the two types of percolation transitions disappears, and the system will always demonstrate a discontinuous percolation transition. We also develop an approach to analyze this model, which is agreement with the simulation results well. PMID:27142883

  5. Cascading failures in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links.

    PubMed

    Liu, Run-Ran; Li, Ming; Jia, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-05-04

    We study the percolation in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links, where the inner- and inter-dependency links represent the dependencies between nodes in the same or different networks, respectively. We find that when most of dependency links are inner- or inter-ones, the coupled networks system is fragile and makes a discontinuous percolation transition. However, when the numbers of two types of dependency links are close to each other, the system is robust and makes a continuous percolation transition. This indicates that the high density of dependency links could not always lead to a discontinuous percolation transition as the previous studies. More interestingly, although the robustness of the system can be optimized by adjusting the ratio of the two types of dependency links, there exists a critical average degree of the networks for coupled random networks, below which the crossover of the two types of percolation transitions disappears, and the system will always demonstrate a discontinuous percolation transition. We also develop an approach to analyze this model, which is agreement with the simulation results well.

  6. The Conservation Nexus: Valuing Interdependent Water and Energy Savings in Phoenix, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, M.; Bartos, M.

    2013-12-01

    Energy and water resources are intrinsically linked, yet they are managed separately--even in the water-scarce American southwest. This study develops a spatially-explicit model of water-energy interdependencies in Arizona, and assesses the potential for co-beneficial conservation programs. Arizona consumes 2.8% of its water demand for thermoelectric power and 8% of its electricity demand for water infrastructure--roughly twice the national average. The interdependent benefits of investments in 7 conservation strategies are assessed. Deployment of irrigation retrofits and new reclaimed water facilities dominate potential water savings, while residential and commercial HVAC improvements dominate energy savings. Water conservation policies have the potential to reduce statewide electricity demand by 1.0-2.9%, satisfying 5-14% of mandated energy-efficiency goals. Likewise, adoption of energy-efficiency measures and renewable generation portfolios can reduce non-agricultural water demand by 2.0-2.6%. These co-benefits of conservation investments are typically not included in conservation plans or benefit-cost analyses. Residential water conservation measures produce significant water and energy savings, but are generally not cost-effective at current water prices. An evaluation of the true cost of water in Arizona would allow future water and energy savings to be compared objectively, and would help policymakers allocate scarce resources to the highest-value conservation measures. Water Transfers between Water Cycle Components in Arizona in 2008 Cumulative embedded energy in water cycle components in Arizona in 2008

  7. Effect of self-organized interdependence between populations on the evolution of cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    In this article, based on interdependent networks, the effect of self-organized interdependence on the evolution of cooperation is studied. Different from the previous works, the interdependent strength, which can effectively improve the fitness of players, is taken as a kind of limited resources and co-evolves with players' strategy. We show that the self-organization of interdependent strength would spontaneously lead to power law distribution at the stationary state, where the level of cooperation in system can be significantly promoted. Furthermore, when intermediate quantity of interdependence resources existing in system, the power law distribution is most evident with the power β ≈ 1.72, meanwhile the level of cooperation also reaches the maximum value. We discuss the related microscopic system properties which are responsible for the observed results and also demonstrate that the power law distribution of interdependence resources is an elementary property which is robust against the governing repeated games and the initial resources allocation patterns.

  8. Security and Interdependency in a Public Cloud: A Game Theoretic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-29

    appropriate parts of our paper.) However, it will be seen that interdependency underpins all these causes and influences network security in general...16 MAY 2014. 3 regular security issues any network would have is that public clouds exhibit a unique type of interdependency because of the...we will look at the interdependent nature of the critical infrastructure network in the United States and its connection to cyberspace. In

  9. Modeling Uncertainty and Its Implications in Complex Interdependent Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    Networks Anita Raja, Professor, The Cooper Union Mohammad Rashedul Hasan, Assistant Professor of Practice, UNL Robert Flowe, Office of Acquisition...êÅÜ=mêçÖê~ãW= `êÉ~íáåÖ=póåÉêÖó=Ñçê=fåÑçêãÉÇ=`Ü~åÖÉ= - 86 - Panel 13. Setting Requirements and Managing Risk in Complex, Networked Projects Thursday...Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology Acquisition in a World of Joint Capabilities: Methods for Understanding Cross-Organizational Network

  10. Network of Interdependent Networks: Overview of Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Gao, Jianxi; Huang, Xuqing; Shao, Shuai; Vodenska, Irena; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Paul, Gerald; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    Complex networks appear in almost every aspect of science and technology. Previous work in network theory has focused primarily on analyzing single networks that do not interact with other networks, despite the fact that many real-world networks interact with and depend on each other. Very recently an analytical framework for studying the percolation properties of interacting networks has been introduced. Here we review the analytical framework and the results for percolation laws for a network of networks (NON) formed by n interdependent random networks. The percolation properties of a network of networks differ greatly from those of single isolated networks. In particular, although networks with broad degree distributions, e.g., scale-free networks, are robust when analyzed as single networks, they become vulnerable in a NON. Moreover, because the constituent networks of a NON are connected by node dependencies, a NON is subject to cascading failure. When there is strong interdependent coupling between networks, the percolation transition is discontinuous (is a first-order transition), unlike the well-known continuous second-order transition in single isolated networks. We also review some possible real-world applications of NON theory.

  11. Commitment-Insurance: Compensating for the Autonomy Costs of Interdependence in Close Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sandra L.; Holmes, John G.; Aloni, Maya; Pinkus, Rebecca T.; Derrick, Jaye L.; Leder, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    A model of the commitment-insurance system is proposed to examine how low and high self-esteem people cope with the costs interdependence imposes on autonomous goal pursuits. In this system, autonomy costs automatically activate compensatory cognitive processes that attach greater value to the partner. Greater partner-valuing compels greater responsiveness to the partner’s needs. Two experiments and a daily diary study of newlyweds supported the model. Autonomy costs automatically activate more positive implicit evaluations of the partner. On explicit measures of positive illusions, high self-esteem people continue to compensate for costs. However, cost-primed low self-esteem people correct and override their positive implicit sentiments when they have the opportunity to do so. Such corrections put the marriages of low self-esteem people at risk: Failing to compensate for costs predicted declines in satisfaction over a one year period. PMID:19634974

  12. Commitment insurance: compensating for the autonomy costs of interdependence in close relationships.

    PubMed

    Murray, Sandra L; Holmes, John G; Aloni, Maya; Pinkus, Rebecca T; Derrick, Jaye L; Leder, Sadie

    2009-08-01

    A model of the commitment-insurance system is proposed to examine how low and high self-esteem people cope with the costs interdependence imposes on autonomous goal pursuits. In this system, autonomy costs automatically activate compensatory cognitive processes that attach greater value to the partner. Greater partner valuing compels greater responsiveness to the partner's needs. Two experiments and a daily diary study of newlyweds supported the model. Autonomy costs automatically activate more positive implicit evaluations of the partner. On explicit measures of positive illusions, high self-esteem people continue to compensate for costs. However, cost-primed low self-esteem people correct and override their positive implicit sentiments when they have the opportunity to do so. Such corrections put the marriages of low self-esteem people at risk: Failing to compensate for costs predicted declines in satisfaction over a 1-year period.

  13. Pressure to cooperate: is positive reward interdependence really needed in cooperative learning?

    PubMed

    Buchs, Céline; Gilles, Ingrid; Dutrévis, Marion; Butera, Fabrizio

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND. Despite extensive research on cooperative learning, the debate regarding whether or not its effectiveness depends on positive reward interdependence has not yet found clear evidence. AIMS. We tested the hypothesis that positive reward interdependence, as compared to reward independence, enhances cooperative learning only if learners work on a 'routine task'; if the learners work on a 'true group task', positive reward interdependence induces the same level of learning as reward independence. SAMPLE. The study involved 62 psychology students during regular workshops. METHOD. Students worked on two psychology texts in cooperative dyads for three sessions. The type of task was manipulated through resource interdependence: students worked on either identical (routine task) or complementary (true group task) information. Students expected to be assessed with a Multiple Choice Test (MCT) on the two texts. The MCT assessment type was introduced according to two reward interdependence conditions, either individual (reward independence) or common (positive reward interdependence). A follow-up individual test took place 4 weeks after the third session of dyadic work to examine individual learning. RESULTS. The predicted interaction between the two types of interdependence was significant, indicating that students learned more with positive reward interdependence than with reward independence when they worked on identical information (routine task), whereas students who worked on complementary information (group task) learned the same with or without reward interdependence. CONCLUSIONS. This experiment sheds light on the conditions under which positive reward interdependence enhances cooperative learning, and suggests that creating a real group task allows to avoid the need for positive reward interdependence.

  14. Couple interdependence impacts HIV-related health behaviours among pregnant couples in southwestern Kenya: a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Anna Joy; Achiro, Lillian; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Hatcher, Abigail M; Kwena, Zachary; Musoke, Pamela L; Turan, Janet M; Weke, Elly; Darbes, Lynae A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is frequently transmitted within stable couple partnerships. In order to prevent HIV acquisition in HIV-negative couples, as well as improve coping in couples with an HIV-positive diagnosis, it has been suggested that interventions be aimed at strengthening couple relationships, in addition to addressing individual behaviours. However, little is known about factors that influence relationships to impact joint decision-making related to HIV. Methods We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 40 pregnant women and 40 male partners in southwestern Kenya, an area of high HIV prevalence. Drawing from the interdependence model of communal coping and health behaviour change, we employed thematic analysis methods to analyze interview transcripts in Dedoose software with the aim of identifying key relationship factors that could contribute to the development of a couples-based intervention to improve health outcomes for pregnant women and their male partners. Results In accordance with the interdependence model, we found that couples with greater relationship-centred motivations described jointly engaging in more health-enhancing behaviours, such as couples HIV testing, disclosure of HIV status, and cooperation to improve medication and clinic appointment adherence. These couples often had predisposing factors such as stronger communication skills and shared children, and were less likely to face potential challenges such as polygamous marriages, wife inheritance, living separately, or financial difficulties. For HIV-negative couples, joint decision-making helped them face the health threat of acquiring HIV together. For couples with an HIV-positive diagnosis, communal coping helped reduce risk of interspousal transmission and improve long-term health prospects. Conversely, participants felt that self-centred motivations led to more concurrent sexual partnerships, reduced relationship satisfaction, and mistrust. Couples who lacked

  15. Dimensions of Library Anxiety and Social Interdependence: Implications for Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Qun G.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study of graduate students that examined the relationship between library anxiety and social interdependence. Discusses use of the Library Anxiety Scale and Social Interdependence Scale; and considers the effects of barriers with staff, comfort with the library, knowledge of the library, individual attitudes, affective barriers, and…

  16. The Interdependence Continuum: A Perspective on the Nature of Spanish-English Bilingual Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, C. Patrick; August, Diane; Snow, Catherine; Barr, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to elaborate on the statistical nature of the linguistic interdependence hypothesis (Cummins, 1979). It is argued that reading skills across the languages of bilingual learners are differentially robust to interdependence, falling along a continuum mediated by the commonalities between Spanish and English.…

  17. Walls, Sovereignty, and Nature: Ecological Security in an Interdependent World. Teaching Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focseneanu, Veronica

    1993-01-01

    Presents two classroom lessons about global political interdependence and the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Uses the Great Wall of China as a metaphor for discussing the irrelevance of national sovereignty and the emergence of an interdependent world. (CFR)

  18. When interdependence shapes social perception: cooperation and competition moderate implicit gender stereotyping.

    PubMed

    de Lemus, Soledad; Bukowski, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influence of interdependence goals on the accessibility of implicit gender stereotypical associations. Participants were asked to cooperate with or compete against a woman on a mathematical abilities task and subsequently the relative activation of positive and negative warmth and competence traits was measured using a primed categorization task. Results showed that female primes (vs. male primes) facilitated the activation of low warmth and high competence in the competition condition, whereas high warmth was activated in the cooperation condition and no differences were found for competence traits. These results are discussed referring to the stereotype content model and the compensation effect in person perception. The goal dependent nature of implicit gender stereotypes is emphasized.

  19. Cognitive interdependence and convergent expectations in transactive memory.

    PubMed

    Hollingshead, A B

    2001-12-01

    A laboratory experiment investigated the processes that underlie the development of transactive memory structures--the organizing schemes that connect knowledge held by individuals to knowledge held by others (D. M. Wegner, T. Guiliano, & P. T. Hertel, 1985). The design was a 2 x 4 factorial that controlled expectations about the partner's knowledge (similar or different from the participant's) and cognitive interdependence, the degree to which participants' outcomes depended on whether they recalled the same or different information as their partner (defined by 4 incentives). Transactive memory was most differentiated when individuals had different expertise and incentives to remember different information and most integrated when individuals had similar expertise and incentives to remember the same information. These findings may help to explain the impact of previous experience and relationships on the development of transactive memory.

  20. The organization and control of an evolving interdependent population

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Dervis C.; Isakov, Alexander; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    Starting with Darwin, biologists have asked how populations evolve from a low fitness state that is evolutionarily stable to a high fitness state that is not. Specifically of interest is the emergence of cooperation and multicellularity where the fitness of individuals often appears in conflict with that of the population. Theories of social evolution and evolutionary game theory have produced a number of fruitful results employing two-state two-body frameworks. In this study, we depart from this tradition and instead consider a multi-player, multi-state evolutionary game, in which the fitness of an agent is determined by its relationship to an arbitrary number of other agents. We show that populations organize themselves in one of four distinct phases of interdependence depending on one parameter, selection strength. Some of these phases involve the formation of specialized large-scale structures. We then describe how the evolution of independence can be manipulated through various external perturbations. PMID:26040593

  1. [Job performance in work organizations: the effects of management by group goals and job interdependence].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Hisataka

    2015-04-01

    cThis study examined the interactive effect of management by group goals and job interdependence on employee's activities in terms of task and contextual performance. A survey was conducted among 140 Japanese employees. Results indicated that management by group goals was related only to contextual performance. Job interdependence, however, had a direct effect on both task and contextual performance. Moreover, moderated regression analyses revealed that for work groups requiring higher interdependence among employees, management by group goals had a positive relation to contextual performance but not to task performance. When interdependence was not necessarily required, however, management by group goals had no relation to contextual performance and even negatively impacted task performance, respectively. These results show that management by group goals affects task and contextual performance, and that this effect is moderated by job interdependence. This provides a theoretical extension as well as a practical application to the setting and management of group goals.

  2. Death Attitudes and Changes in Existential Outlook in Parents of Vulnerable Newborns.

    PubMed

    Barr, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study is an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model analysis of the relation of death attitudes with changes in outlook in 59 parent couples of neonatal intensive care newborns. Death attitudes effects with changes in outlook were mostly intrapersonal and they mainly occurred in fathers, though between gender differences were not usually significant. Death avoidance and neutral death acquiescence were positive predictors of positive changes in outlook, and fear of death and neutral death acquiescence were respective positive and inverse predictors of negative changes. Multidimensional measures of death attitudes and personal change should be used when studying these domains of psychological functioning.

  3. Collective goals and shared tasks: interdependence structure and perceptions of individual sport team environments.

    PubMed

    Evans, M B; Eys, M A

    2015-02-01

    Across two studies, we tested the proposition that interdependence structures (i.e., task interaction among teammates during competition, competition against teammates, presence of a collective outcome) influence interdependence perceptions among teammates as well as perceptions of group cohesion, competitiveness, and satisfaction. Study 1 was a paper-and-pencil survey completed by 210 individual sport athletes from 12 university- and college-level teams. Multiple mediation analyses demonstrated that participants who had to work alongside teammates during competition reported increased interdependence perceptions that were, in turn, associated with increased cohesion and satisfaction as well as decreased competitiveness. There were no differences according to whether participants competed in the same event as all of their teammates or not. Study 2 involved a weekly e-mail survey with 17 university-level individual sport athletes who reported interdependence perceptions on a continual basis over the course of their competitive season. Interdependence perceptions were higher during weeks that were close in time to competitions with a collective group outcome. These studies reveal how interdependence structures shape the group environment and support applied efforts that consider ways to structure teammate interdependencies in ways to optimize group functioning and promote member satisfaction.

  4. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize Talk: Catastrophic cascade of failures in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-03-01

    We study interdependent networks, where nodes fail in one network, cause dependent nodes in another network to also fail. We provide a framework for understanding the robustness of such interacting networks. We calculate the critical fraction of nodes that upon removal will lead to a failure cascade and to a complete fragmentation of two interdependent networks. Surprisingly, while for a single network a broader degree distribution results in the network being more robust to random failures, for interdependent networks, the broader the distribution is, the more vulnerable the networks become to random failures.

  5. Bribery games on inter-dependent regular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Prateek; Nandi, Anjan K.; Sengupta, Supratim

    2017-02-01

    We examine a scenario of social conflict that is manifest during an interaction between government servants providing a service and citizens who are legally entitled to the service, using evolutionary game-theory in structured populations characterized by an inter-dependent network. Bribe-demands by government servants during such transactions, called harassment bribes, constitute a widespread form of corruption in many countries. We investigate the effect of varying bribe demand made by corrupt officials and the cost of complaining incurred by harassed citizens, on the proliferation of corrupt strategies in the population. We also examine how the connectivity of the various constituent networks affects the spread of corrupt officials in the population. We find that incidents of bribery can be considerably reduced in a network-structured populations compared to mixed populations. Interestingly, we also find that an optimal range for the connectivity of nodes in the citizen’s network (signifying the degree of influence a citizen has in affecting the strategy of other citizens in the network) as well as the interaction network aids in the fixation of honest officers. Our results reveal the important role of network structure and connectivity in asymmetric games.

  6. Bribery games on inter-dependent regular networks

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Prateek; Nandi, Anjan K.; Sengupta, Supratim

    2017-01-01

    We examine a scenario of social conflict that is manifest during an interaction between government servants providing a service and citizens who are legally entitled to the service, using evolutionary game-theory in structured populations characterized by an inter-dependent network. Bribe-demands by government servants during such transactions, called harassment bribes, constitute a widespread form of corruption in many countries. We investigate the effect of varying bribe demand made by corrupt officials and the cost of complaining incurred by harassed citizens, on the proliferation of corrupt strategies in the population. We also examine how the connectivity of the various constituent networks affects the spread of corrupt officials in the population. We find that incidents of bribery can be considerably reduced in a network-structured populations compared to mixed populations. Interestingly, we also find that an optimal range for the connectivity of nodes in the citizen’s network (signifying the degree of influence a citizen has in affecting the strategy of other citizens in the network) as well as the interaction network aids in the fixation of honest officers. Our results reveal the important role of network structure and connectivity in asymmetric games. PMID:28205644

  7. Microtubules and the endoplasmic reticulum are highly interdependent structures

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The interrelationships of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), microtubules, and intermediate filaments were studied in the peripheral regions of thin, spread fibroblasts, epithelial, and vascular endothelial cells in culture. We combined a fluorescent dye staining technique to localize the ER with immunofluorescence to localize microtubules or intermediate filaments in the same cell. Microtubules and the ER are sparse in the lamellipodia, but intermediate filaments are usually completely absent. These relationships indicate that microtubules and the ER advance into the lamellipodia before intermediate filaments. We observed that microtubules and tubules of the ER have nearly identical distributions in lamellipodia, where new extensions of both are taking place. We perturbed microtubules by nocodazole, cold temperature, or hypotonic shock, and observed the effects on the ER distribution. On the basis of our observations in untreated cells and our experiments with microtubule perturbation, we conclude that microtubules and the ER are highly interdependent in two ways: (a) polymerization of individual microtubules and extension of individual ER tubules occur together at the level of resolution of the fluorescence microscope, and (b) depolymerization of microtubules does not disrupt the ER network in the short term (15 min), but prolonged absence of microtubules (2 h) leads to a slow retraction of the ER network towards the cell center, indicating that over longer periods of time, the extended state of the entire ER network requires the microtubule system. PMID:3533956

  8. Extreme events in multilayer, interdependent complex networks and control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Eisenberg, Daniel; Seager, Thomas P.; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of extreme events in interdependent networks. We introduce an inter-layer traffic resource competing mechanism to account for the limited capacity associated with distinct network layers. A striking finding is that, when the number of network layers and/or the overlap among the layers are increased, extreme events can emerge in a cascading manner on a global scale. Asymptotically, there are two stable absorption states: a state free of extreme events and a state of full of extreme events, and the transition between them is abrupt. Our results indicate that internal interactions in the multiplex system can yield qualitatively distinct phenomena associated with extreme events that do not occur for independent network layers. An implication is that, e.g., public resource competitions among different service providers can lead to a higher resource requirement than naively expected. We derive an analytical theory to understand the emergence of global-scale extreme events based on the concept of effective betweenness. We also articulate a cost-effective control scheme through increasing the capacity of very few hubs to suppress the cascading process of extreme events so as to protect the entire multi-layer infrastructure against global-scale breakdown. PMID:26612009

  9. Metabolic and physiological interdependencies in the Bathymodiolus azoricus symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ponnudurai, Ruby; Kleiner, Manuel; Sayavedra, Lizbeth; Petersen, Jillian M; Moche, Martin; Otto, Andreas; Becher, Dörte; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Satoh, Noriyuki; Dubilier, Nicole; Schweder, Thomas; Markert, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in an intimate symbiosis with two types of chemosynthetic Gammaproteobacteria in its gills: a sulfur oxidizer and a methane oxidizer. Despite numerous investigations over the last decades, the degree of interdependence between the three symbiotic partners, their individual metabolic contributions, as well as the mechanism of carbon transfer from the symbionts to the host are poorly understood. We used a combination of proteomics and genomics to investigate the physiology and metabolism of the individual symbiotic partners. Our study revealed that key metabolic functions are most likely accomplished jointly by B. azoricus and its symbionts: (1) CO2 is pre-concentrated by the host for carbon fixation by the sulfur-oxidizing symbiont, and (2) the host replenishes essential biosynthetic TCA cycle intermediates for the sulfur-oxidizing symbiont. In return (3), the sulfur oxidizer may compensate for the host's putative deficiency in amino acid and cofactor biosynthesis. We also identified numerous ‘symbiosis-specific' host proteins by comparing symbiont-containing and symbiont-free host tissues and symbiont fractions. These proteins included a large complement of host digestive enzymes in the gill that are likely involved in symbiont digestion and carbon transfer from the symbionts to the host. PMID:27801908

  10. A Framework for Analysis of Energy-Water Interdependency Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Jeffers; Jacob J. Jacobson

    2011-08-01

    The overall objective of this work is to improve the holistic value of energy development strategies by integrating management criteria for water availability, water quality, and ecosystem health into the energy system planning process. The Snake River Basin (SRB) in southern Idaho is used as a case study to show options for improving full economic utilization of aquatic resources given multiple scenarios such as changing climate, additional regulations, and increasing population. Through the incorporation of multiple management criteria, potential crosscutting solutions to energy and water issues in the SRB can be developed. The final result of this work will be a multi-criteria decision support tool - usable by policy makers and researchers alike - that will give insight into the behavior of the management criteria over time and will allow the user to experiment with a range of potential solutions. Because several basins in the arid west are dealing with similar water, energy, and ecosystem issues, the tool and conclusions will be transferable to a wide range of locations and applications. This is a very large, multi-year project to be completed in phases. This paper deals with interactions between the hydrologic system and water use at a basin level. Future work will include the interdependency between energy use and water use in these systems.

  11. Inter-ethics: towards an interactive and interdependent bioethics.

    PubMed

    Abma, Tineke A; Baur, Vivianne E; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2010-06-01

    Since its origin bioethics has been a specialized, academic discipline, focussing on moral issues, using a vast set of globalized principles and rational techniques to evaluate and guide healthcare practices. With the emergence of a plural society, the loss of faith in experts and authorities and the decline of overarching grand narratives and shared moralities, a new approach to bioethics is needed. This approach implies a shift from an external critique of practices towards embedded ethics and interactive practice improvement, and from a legal defence of rights towards fostering interdependent practices of responsibility. This article describes these transitions within bioethics in relation to the broader societal and cultural dynamics within Western societies, and traces the implications for the methodologies and changing roles of the bioethicist. The bioethicist we foresee is not just a clever expert but also a relationally sensitive person who engages stakeholders in reciprocal dialogues about their practice of responsibility and helps to integrate various sorts of knowledge (embodied, experiential, visual, and cognitive-scientific). In order to illustrate this new approach, we present a case study. It concerns a project focusing on an innovation in elderly care, based on the participation of various stakeholders, especially older people themselves.

  12. A Framework for Analysis of Energy-Water Interdependency Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jeffers; Jacob J. Jacobson; Kristyn Scott

    2011-07-01

    The overall objective of this work is to improve the holistic value of energy development strategies by integrating management criteria for water availability, water quality, and ecosystem health into the energy system planning process. The Snake River Basin (SRB) in southern Idaho is used as a case study to show options for improving full economic utilization of aquatic resources given multiple scenarios such as changing climate, additional regulations, and increasing population. Through the incorporation of multiple management criteria, potential crosscutting solutions to energy and water issues in the SRB can be developed. The final result of this work will be a multi-criteria decision support tool - usable by policy makers and researchers alike - that will give insight into the behavior of the management criteria over time and will allow the user to experiment with a range of potential solutions. Because several basins in the arid west are dealing with similar water, energy, and ecosystem issues, the tool and conclusions will be transferrable to a wide range of locations and applications. This is a very large project to be completed in phases. This paper deals with interactions between the hydrologic system and water use at a basin level. Future work will include the interdependency between energy use and water use in these systems.

  13. Deeper into divorce: using actor-partner analyses to explore systemic differences in coparenting conflict following custody dispute resolution.

    PubMed

    Sbarra, David A; Emery, Robert E

    2008-02-01

    Divorce is an inherently interpersonal experience, yet too often adults' reactions to marital dissolution are investigated as intrapersonal experiences that unfold outside of the relational context in which they exist. This article examines systemic patterns of interpersonal influence between divorced parents who were randomly assigned to either mediate or litigate a child custody dispute in the mid-1980s. Reports of coparenting conflict and nonacceptance of the divorce were assessed 5 weeks after the dispute settlement, 13 months after the settlement, and then again 12 years later. One hundred nine (N = 109) parents provided data over this 12-year period. Fathers reported the highest initial levels of conflict when their ex-partners were more accepting of the divorce. Mediation parents reported decreases in coparenting conflict in the year after dispute settlement, whereas litigation parents reported increases in conflict. Litigation parents evidenced the greatest long-term increases and decreases in coparenting conflict. Mediation is a potent force for reducing postdivorce conflict, and this article highlights the usefulness of adopting a systemic lens for understanding the long-term correlates of marital dissolution.

  14. [Effects of task interdependence and communication technologies synchrony on performance in virtual teams].

    PubMed

    Rico, Ramón; Cohen, Susan G; Gil, Francisco

    2006-11-01

    Effects of task interdependence and communication technologies synchrony on performance in virtual teams. Survey results of 197 employees from 41 work groups in a large multinational software firm were used to investigate the effects of within-group task interdependence and the degree of communication synchrony on performance in virtual teams (VTs). The analyses revealed a moderating effect of task interdependence on the relationship between the degree of communications synchrony and performance in VT. We found that superior VTs performance is contingent on the fit between the nature of the task (i.e., task interdependence) and the choice of communications modality. This study complements previous research providing additional evidence of how task-technology interaction affects VTs performance, and extends previous findings obtained with ad-hoc groups in laboratory settings to natural, organizational teams.

  15. Physiological description of multivariate interdependencies between process parameters, morphology and physiology during fed-batch penicillin production.

    PubMed

    Posch, Andreas E; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of productivity and economics of industrial bioprocesses requires characterization of interdependencies between process parameters and process performance. In the case of penicillin production, as in other processes, process performance is often closely interlinked with the physiology and morphology of the organism used for production. This study presents a systematic approach to efficiently characterize the physiological effects of multivariate interdependencies between bioprocess design parameters (spore inoculum concentration, pO2 control level and substrate feed rate), morphology, and physiology. Method development and application was performed using the industrial model process of penicillin production. Applying traditional, statistical bioprocess analysis, multivariate correlations of raw bioprocess design parameters (high spore inoculum concentration, low pO2 control as well as reduced glucose feeding) and pellet morphology were identified. A major drawback of raw design parameter correlation models; however, is the lack of transferability across different process scales and regimes. In this context, morphological and physiological bioprocess modeling based on scalable physiological parameters is introduced. In this study, raw parameter effects on pellet morphology were efficiently summarized by the physiological parameter of the biomass yield per substrate. Finally, for the first time to our knowledge, the specific growth rate per spore was described as time-independent determinant for switching from pellet to disperse growth during penicillin production and thus introduced as a novel, scalable key process parameter for pellet morphology and process performance.

  16. Interdependence, Interoperability, and Integration: Joint Force Analysis at the Operational Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Services, 1. 23 Robert 0. Keohane and JosephS. Nye , Power and Interdependence, third edition, New York: Longman Press, 2001, 4. 24 Chuck Harrison. "How...Assistance in Military Operations: The Least-Worst Option to Fill the U.S. Capacity Gap, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania: August 2010 Keohane ...Robert 0. and Nye , JosephS., Power and Interdependence, third edition, New York, New York: Longman Press, 2001 Krause, Michael D. and Phillips, R. Cody

  17. Cascading failures in interdependent lattice networks: from first order to second order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Bashan, Amir; Buldyrev, Sergey; Stanley, Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2012-02-01

    We study a system composed of two interdependent lattice networks A and B, where nodes in network A depend on a node within a certain shuffling distance r of its corresponding counterpart in network B and vice versa. We find, using numerical simulation that percolation in the two interdependent lattice networks system shows that for small r the phase transition is second order while for larger r it is a first order.

  18. Interdependence between Greece and other European stock markets: A comparison of wavelet and VMD copula, and the portfolio implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain; Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh; Ali, Sajid; Ameer, Saba

    2016-09-01

    The interdependence of Greece and other European stock markets and the subsequent portfolio implications are examined in wavelet and variational mode decomposition domain. In applying the decomposition techniques, we analyze the structural properties of data and distinguish between short and long term dynamics of stock market returns. First, the GARCH-type models are fitted to obtain the standardized residuals. Next, different copula functions are evaluated, and based on the conventional information criteria and time varying parameter, Joe-Clayton copula is chosen to model the tail dependence between the stock markets. The short-run lower tail dependence time paths show a sudden increase in comovement during the global financial crises. The results of the long-run dependence suggest that European stock markets have higher interdependence with Greece stock market. Individual country's Value at Risk (VaR) separates the countries into two distinct groups. Finally, the two-asset portfolio VaR measures provide potential markets for Greece stock market investment diversification.

  19. Cascading of Fluctuations in Interdependent Energy Infrastructures. Gas-Grid Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Lebedev, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2014-09-05

    The revolution of hydraulic fracturing has dramatically increased the supply and lowered the cost of natural gas in the United States driving an expansion of natural gas-fired generation capacity in many electrical grids. Unrelated to the natural gas expansion, lower capital costs and renewable portfolio standards are driving an expansion of intermittent renewable generation capacity such as wind and photovoltaic generation. These two changes may potentially combine to create new threats to the reliability of these interdependent energy infrastructures. Natural gas-fired generators are often used to balance the fluctuating output of wind generation. However, the time-varying output of these generators results in time-varying natural gas burn rates that impact the pressure in interstate transmission pipelines. Fluctuating pressure impacts the reliability of natural gas deliveries to those same generators and the safety of pipeline operations. We adopt a partial differential equation model of natural gas pipelines and use this model to explore the effect of intermittent wind generation on the fluctuations of pressure in natural gas pipelines. The mean square pressure fluctuations are found to grow linearly in time with points of maximum deviation occurring at the locations of flow reversals.

  20. Organ of Corti and Stria Vascularis: Is there an Interdependence for Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huizhan; Li, Yi; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Ning; Nichols, David H.; Zhang, Weiping J.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells and the stria vascularis are critical for normal hearing. Hair cells transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical signals, whereas the stria is responsible for generating the endocochlear potential (EP), which is the driving force for hair cell mechanotransduction. We questioned whether hair cells and the stria interdepend for survival by using two mouse models. Atoh1 conditional knockout mice, which lose all hair cells within four weeks after birth, were used to determine whether the absence of hair cells would affect function and survival of stria. We showed that stria morphology and EP remained normal for long time despite a complete loss of all hair cells. We then used a mouse model that has an abnormal stria morphology and function due to mutation of the Mitf gene to determine whether hair cells are able to survive and transduce sound signals without a normal electrochemical environment in the endolymph. A strial defect, reflected by missing intermediate cells in the stria and by reduction of EP, led to systematic outer hair cell death from the base to the apex after postnatal day 18. However, an 18-mV EP was sufficient for outer hair cell survival. Surprisingly, inner hair cell survival was less vulnerable to reduction of the EP. Our studies show that normal function of the stria is essential for adult outer hair cell survival, while the survival and normal function of the stria vascularis do not depend on functional hair cells. PMID:28030585

  1. Spatio-temporal dynamics of security investments in an interdependent risk environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, Kamran; Bender, Axel; Zhong, Weicai; Abbass, Hussein A.

    2012-10-01

    In a globalised world where risks spread through contagion, the decision of an entity to invest in securing its premises from stochastic risks no longer depends solely on its own actions but also on the actions of other interacting entities in the system. This phenomenon is commonly seen in many domains including airline, logistics and computer security and is referred to as Interdependent Security (IDS). An IDS game models this decision problem from a game-theoretic perspective and deals with the behavioural dynamics of risk-reduction investments in such settings. This paper enhances this model and investigates the spatio-temporal aspects of the IDS games. The spatio-temporal dynamics are studied using simple replicator dynamics on a variety of network structures and for various security cost tradeoffs that lead to different Nash equilibria in an IDS game. The simulation results show that the neighbourhood configuration has a greater effect on the IDS game dynamics than network structure. An in-depth empirical analysis of game dynamics is carried out on regular graphs, which leads to the articulation of necessary and sufficient conditions for dominance in IDS games under spatial constraints.

  2. Interdependence of spatial and temporal coding in the auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Koch, U; Grothe, B

    2000-04-01

    from revealed that inhibitory inputs were at least partially responsible for the observed changes in SFM filtering. In 25% of the neurons, drug application abolished those changes. Experiments using electronically introduced interaural time differences showed that the strength of ipsilaterally evoked inhibition increased with increasing modulation frequencies in one third of the cells tested. Thus glycinergic and GABAergic inhibition is at least one source responsible for the observed interdependence of temporal structure of a sound and spatial cues.

  3. Gender role attitudes across the transition to adolescent motherhood in Mexican-origin families.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Russell B; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Jahromi, Laudan B

    2015-06-01

    Using longitudinal data collected at four time points from 191 dyads of Mexican-origin adolescent first-time mothers and their mother figures, we examined changes in and socialization of traditional gender role attitudes across the transition to parenthood using latent growth curve modeling and actor-partner interdependence modeling. Longitudinal growth models indicated that, regardless of nativity status, adolescent mothers' and their foreign-born mother figures' gender role attitudes became more egalitarian across adolescents' transition to parenthood, spanning from the 3rd trimester of pregnancy to 36 months postpartum. Furthermore, actor-partner interdependence modeling suggested that adolescents' and their mother figures' gender role attitudes during adolescents' third trimester of pregnancy equally contributed to subsequent increases in one another's gender role attitudes at 10 months postpartum. Importantly, this reciprocal socialization process was not moderated by adolescent mothers' nor by their mother figures' nativity status. Findings suggest that it is important to understand the cultural and intergenerational family processes that contribute to the development of gender role attitudes during the transition to parenthood for adolescent mothers and their mother figures in Mexican-origin families.

  4. Latin American students and language learning in Catalonia: what does the linguistic interdependence hypothesis show us?

    PubMed

    Huguet, Ángel

    2014-01-01

    The massive arrival in Spain of students of immigrant origin has visibly altered the traditional configuration of schools, where ethnic, cultural and linguistic diversity is becoming increasingly manifest. This situation is worth being mentioned insofar as it affects all the different autonomous communities in the country, even more clearly Catalonia, where the educational system is organized under the parameters of bilingual education. One of the theoretical constructs supporting this educational model is the Linguistic Interdependence Hypothesis, developed by Jim Cummins at the beginning of the 1980s. According to the author, whenever the instruction in a given language (Lx) takes place under certain conditions, competence acquired in this language can be transferred onto another (Ly). Bearing this theoretical construct in mind, our study focuses on a sample of 237 Spanish-speaking subjects (123 native and 114 immigrant students) who completed a series of parallel tests evaluating their skills in Catalan and Spanish. Drawing on the data analyzed we can conclude that the Hypothesis accounts for the results in both native and immigrant students with the same L1.

  5. SAS-6 engineering reveals interdependence between cartwheel and microtubules in determining centriole architecture.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Manuel; Noga, Akira; Frey, Daniel; Hamel, Virginie; Guichard, Paul; Kraatz, Sebastian H W; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Hosner, Sarah; Flückiger, Isabelle; Jaussi, Rolf; Wieser, Mara M; Thieltges, Katherine M; Deupi, Xavier; Müller, Daniel J; Kammerer, Richard A; Gönczy, Pierre; Hirono, Masafumi; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-04-01

    Centrioles are critical for the formation of centrosomes, cilia and flagella in eukaryotes. They are thought to assemble around a nine-fold symmetric cartwheel structure established by SAS-6 proteins. Here, we have engineered Chlamydomonas reinhardtii SAS-6-based oligomers with symmetries ranging from five- to ten-fold. Expression of a SAS-6 mutant that forms six-fold symmetric cartwheel structures in vitro resulted in cartwheels and centrioles with eight- or nine-fold symmetries in vivo. In combination with Bld10 mutants that weaken cartwheel-microtubule interactions, this SAS-6 mutant produced six- to eight-fold symmetric cartwheels. Concurrently, the microtubule wall maintained eight- and nine-fold symmetries. Expressing SAS-6 with analogous mutations in human cells resulted in nine-fold symmetric centrioles that exhibited impaired length and organization. Together, our data suggest that the self-assembly properties of SAS-6 instruct cartwheel symmetry, and lead us to propose a model in which the cartwheel and the microtubule wall assemble in an interdependent manner to establish the native architecture of centrioles.

  6. Overcoming heterologous protein interdependency to optimize P450-mediated Taxol precursor synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Bradley Walters; Lim, Chin Giaw; Sagliani, Kristen; Shankar, Smriti; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have demonstrated the potential to exploit biological chemistry for the synthesis of complex molecules. Much of the progress to date has leveraged increasingly precise genetic tools to control the transcription and translation of enzymes for superior biosynthetic pathway performance. However, applying these approaches and principles to the synthesis of more complex natural products will require a new set of tools for enabling various classes of metabolic chemistries (i.e., cyclization, oxygenation, glycosylation, and halogenation) in vivo. Of these diverse chemistries, oxygenation is one of the most challenging and pivotal for the synthesis of complex natural products. Here, using Taxol as a model system, we use nature’s favored oxygenase, the cytochrome P450, to perform high-level oxygenation chemistry in Escherichia coli. An unexpected coupling of P450 expression and the expression of upstream pathway enzymes was discovered and identified as a key obstacle for functional oxidative chemistry. By optimizing P450 expression, reductase partner interactions, and N-terminal modifications, we achieved the highest reported titer of oxygenated taxanes (∼570 ± 45 mg/L) in E. coli. Altogether, this study establishes E. coli as a tractable host for P450 chemistry, highlights the potential magnitude of protein interdependency in the context of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, and points to a promising future for the microbial synthesis of complex chemical entities. PMID:26951651

  7. Cooperation in memory-based prisoner's dilemma game on interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Liu, Hong; Shao, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Memory or so-called experience normally plays the important role to guide the human behaviors in real world, that is essential for rational decisions made by individuals. Hence, when the evolutionary behaviors of players with bounded rationality are investigated, it is reasonable to make an assumption that players in system are with limited memory. Besides, in order to unravel the intricate variability of complex systems in real world and make a highly integrative understanding of their dynamics, in recent years, interdependent networks as a comprehensive network structure have obtained more attention in this community. In this article, the evolution of cooperation in memory-based prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) on interdependent networks composed by two coupled square lattices is studied. Herein, all or part of players are endowed with finite memory ability, and we focus on the mutual influence of memory effect and interdependent network reciprocity on cooperation of spatial PDG. We show that the density of cooperation can be significantly promoted within an optimal region of memory length and interdependent strength. Furthermore, distinguished by whether having memory ability/external links or not, each kind of players on networks would have distinct evolutionary behaviors. Our work could be helpful to understand the emergence and maintenance of cooperation under the evolution of memory-based players on interdependent networks.

  8. Expressed emotion and interdependence in White and Latino/Hispanic family members of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Weisman d Mamani, Amy G.; Kymalainen, Jennifer A.; Rosales, Grace A.; Armesto, Jorge C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined associations among ethnicity, expressed emotion (EE) and interdependence in a sample of 41 Latino/Hispanic and White family members of patients with schizophrenia. EE was assessed using both the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI) and the Five Minute Speech sample (FMSS). These measures were found to be highly concordant for rating EE. However, the CFI appears to identify high EE more often than does the FMSS. Whites were designated as high EE significantly more often than were Latinos/Hispanics, regardless of assessment method. Using the interdependence subscale of the Self Construal Scale, we found a strong trend for Latino/Hispanics to report a more interdependent self-construal than did Whites. However, contrary to expectations, interdependence was not found to mediate the relationship between ethnicity and EE. EE and interdependence may both play a role in the better course of illness observed for patients from traditional cultures. However, these two constructs may relate to patient functioning through different mechanisms. PMID:17391775

  9. Attitudes and experience of youth and their parents with psychiatric medication and relationship to self-reported adherence.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Megan; Crickard, Elizabeth; Lee, Jaehoon; Holmes, Cheryl

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have directly examined the interrelationship of teen and parent attitudes toward psychiatric medication and how this relates to medication adherence. In the current study, survey data from 19 parent-child dyads were analyzed to investigate the relationship of parent and teen attitudes toward medication, decision self-efficacy, and current involvement in decisions about psychiatric medication with self-reported adherence. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to fit actor-partner interdependence models to examine bidirectional effects of the dyadic relationships. Teens and parents had similarly positive attitudes toward medication, high levels of self-efficacy and self-reported adherence. Current involvement in decisions about medications was significantly lower for teens compared to their parents. The actor-partner interdependence models revealed that parent levels of decision self-efficacy were related to youth self-reported adherence (partner effect). Youth attitudes toward medications were related to youth self-reported adherence (actor effect). Parent and teen actor effects of decisional self-efficacy were significantly associated with current involvement. Providers need to be aware of the importance of engaging both teens and parents in decisions about psychiatric medication and recognize the need to explicitly elicit questions and concerns from young patients.

  10. [Independent and interdependent construal of the self: the cultural influence and the relations to personality traits].

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, A

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the independent and interdependent construal of the self in relation to the cultural difference and personality traits. A scale developed by Kiuchi (1995) to measure the person on the dimension of independent versus interdependent, the SII was administered to three groups of students. They were: (1) 81 college students who once lived in Europe or America, (2) 99 students of a college of music, and (3) 296 undergraduates of other majors and backgrounds. Mean SII scores clearly showed that the first group gave the highest priority to independent construal of the self, the second music college group follows them, and the last group of regular undergraduates gave the highest priority to interdependent construal of the self. In addition, SII scores were shown to have significant correlations with social anxiety, self-monitoring, sex identity, and self-esteem. Implication of these results are discussed.

  11. The dynamic interdependence of international financial markets: An empirical study on twenty-seven stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingwei; Zheng, Xiaolong; Zeng, Daniel Dajun

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we aim to investigate the dynamic interdependence of international financial markets. Based on the data regarding daily returns of each market during the period 2006-2015 from Yahoo finance, we mainly focus on examining 27 markets from three continents, including Asia, America and Europe. By checking the dynamic interdependence between those markets, we find that markets from different continents have strong correlation at specific time shift. We also obtain that markets from different continents not only have a strong linkage with others at same day, but at a delay of one day, especially between Asia, Europe and Asia, America. In addition, we further analyze the time-varying influence strength between each two continents and observe that this value has abnormal changes during the financial crisis. These findings can provide us significant insights to understand the underlying dynamic interdependency of international financial markets and further help us make corresponding reasonable decisions.

  12. The pleasures and pains of distinct self-construals: the role of interdependence in regulatory focus.

    PubMed

    Lee, A Y; Aaker, J L; Gardner, W L

    2000-06-01

    Regulatory focus theory distinguishes between self-regulatory processes that focus on promotion and prevention strategies for goal pursuit. Five studies provide support for the hypothesis that these strategies differ for individuals with distinct self-construals. Specifically, individuals with a dominant independent self-construal were predicted to place more emphasis on promotion-focused information, and those with a dominant interdependent self-construal on prevention-focused information. Support for this hypothesis was obtained for participants who scored high versus low on the Self-Construal Scale, participants who were presented with an independent versus interdependent situation, and participants from a Western versus Eastern culture. The influence of interdependence on regulatory focus was observed in both importance ratings of information and affective responses consistent with promotion or prevention focus.

  13. Heterogeneous Coupling between Interdependent Lattices Promotes the Cooperation in the Prisoner's Dilemma Game.

    PubMed

    Xia, Cheng-Yi; Meng, Xiao-Kun; Wang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    In the research realm of game theory, interdependent networks have extended the content of spatial reciprocity, which needs the suitable coupling between networks. However, thus far, the vast majority of existing works just assume that the coupling strength between networks is symmetric. This hypothesis, to some extent, seems inconsistent with the ubiquitous observation of heterogeneity. Here, we study how the heterogeneous coupling strength, which characterizes the interdependency of utility between corresponding players of both networks, affects the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game with two types of coupling schemes (symmetric and asymmetric ones). Compared with the traditional case, we show that heterogeneous coupling greatly promotes the collective cooperation. The symmetric scheme seems much better than the asymmetric case. Moreover, the role of varying amplitude of coupling strength is also studied on these two interdependent ways. Current findings are helpful for us to understand the evolution of cooperation within many real-world systems, in particular for the interconnected and interrelated systems.

  14. Toward a Systems Approach to Enteric Pathogen Transmission: From Individual Independence to Community Interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.; Trostle, James; Sorensen, Reed J.D.; Shields, Katherine F.

    2012-01-01

    Diarrheal disease is still a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide; thus a large body of research has been produced describing its risks. We review more than four decades of literature on diarrheal disease epidemiology. These studies detail a progression in the conceptual understanding of transmission of enteric pathogens and demonstrate that diarrheal disease is caused by many interdependent pathways. However, arguments by diarrheal disease researchers in favor of attending to interaction and interdependencies have only recently yielded more formal systems-level approaches. Therefore, interdependence has not yet been highlighted in significant new research initiatives or policy decisions. We argue for a systems-level framework that will contextualize transmission and inform prevention and control efforts so that they can integrate transmission pathways. These systems approaches should be employed to account for community effects (i.e., interactions among individuals and/or households). PMID:22224881

  15. Interdependent self-construal and neural representations of self and mother.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rebecca D; Shelton, Amy L; Hollon, Nick G; Matsumoto, David; Frankel, Carl B; Gross, James J; Gabrieli, John D E

    2010-06-01

    Representations of self are thought to be dynamically influenced by one's surroundings, including the culture one lives in. However, neuroimaging studies of self-representations have either ignored cultural influences or operationalized culture as country of origin. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural correlates of individual differences in interdependent self-construal. Participants rated whether trait adjectives applied to themselves or their mothers, or judged their valence or font. Findings indicated that individual differences in interdependent self-construal correlated positively with increased activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulated cortex when making judgments about one-self vs making judgments about one's mother. This suggests that those with greater interdependent self-construals may rely more upon episodic memory, reflected appraisals, or theory of mind to incorporate social information to make judgments about themselves.

  16. Vorticity is a marker of diastolic ventricular interdependency in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Browning, James; Schroeder, Joyce D.; Shandas, Robin; Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Buckner, J. Kern; Hunter, Kendall S.; Hertzberg, Jean R.; Fenster, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to determine whether left ventricular (LV) vorticity (ω), the local spinning motion of a fluid element, correlated with markers of ventricular interdependency in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Maladaptive ventricular interdependency is associated with interventricular septal shift, impaired LV performance, and poor outcomes in PH patients, yet the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying fluid-structure interactions in ventricular interdependency are incompletely understood. Because conformational changes in chamber geometry affect blood flow formations and dynamics, LV ω may be a marker of LV-RV (right ventricular) interactions in PH. Echocardiography was performed for 13 PH patients and 10 controls for assessment of interdependency markers, including eccentricity index (EI), and biventricular diastolic dysfunction, including mitral valve (MV) and tricuspid valve (TV) early and late velocities (E and A, respectively) as well as MV septal and lateral early tissue Doppler velocities (e′). Same-day 4-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance was performed for LV E (early)-wave ω measurement. LV E-wave ω was significantly decreased in PH patients (P = 0.008) and correlated with diastolic EI (Rho = −0.53, P = 0.009) as well as with markers of LV diastolic dysfunction, including MV E(Rho = 0.53, P = 0.011), E/A (Rho = 0.56, P = 0.007), septal e′ (Rho = 0.63, P = 0.001), and lateral e′ (Rho = 0.57, P = 0.007). Furthermore, LV E-wave ω was associated with indices of RV diastolic dysfunction, including TV e′ (Rho = 0.52, P = 0.012) and TV E/A (Rho = 0.53, P = 0.009). LV E-wave ω is decreased in PH and correlated with multiple echocardiographic markers of ventricular interdependency. LV ω may be a novel marker for fluid-tissue biomechanical interactions in LV-RV interdependency. PMID:27162613

  17. Vorticity is a marker of diastolic ventricular interdependency in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Browning, James; Schroeder, Joyce D; Shandas, Robin; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Buckner, J Kern; Hunter, Kendall S; Hertzberg, Jean R; Fenster, Brett E

    2016-03-01

    Our objective was to determine whether left ventricular (LV) vorticity (ω), the local spinning motion of a fluid element, correlated with markers of ventricular interdependency in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Maladaptive ventricular interdependency is associated with interventricular septal shift, impaired LV performance, and poor outcomes in PH patients, yet the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying fluid-structure interactions in ventricular interdependency are incompletely understood. Because conformational changes in chamber geometry affect blood flow formations and dynamics, LV ω may be a marker of LV-RV (right ventricular) interactions in PH. Echocardiography was performed for 13 PH patients and 10 controls for assessment of interdependency markers, including eccentricity index (EI), and biventricular diastolic dysfunction, including mitral valve (MV) and tricuspid valve (TV) early and late velocities (E and A, respectively) as well as MV septal and lateral early tissue Doppler velocities (e'). Same-day 4-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance was performed for LV E (early)-wave ω measurement. LV E-wave ω was significantly decreased in PH patients (P = 0.008) and correlated with diastolic EI (Rho = -0.53, P = 0.009) as well as with markers of LV diastolic dysfunction, including MV E(Rho = 0.53, P = 0.011), E/A (Rho = 0.56, P = 0.007), septal e' (Rho = 0.63, P = 0.001), and lateral e' (Rho = 0.57, P = 0.007). Furthermore, LV E-wave ω was associated with indices of RV diastolic dysfunction, including TV e' (Rho = 0.52, P = 0.012) and TV E/A (Rho = 0.53, P = 0.009). LV E-wave ω is decreased in PH and correlated with multiple echocardiographic markers of ventricular interdependency. LV ω may be a novel marker for fluid-tissue biomechanical interactions in LV-RV interdependency.

  18. Managing Conflict in School Teams: The Impact of Task and Goal Interdependence on Conflict Management and Team Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although conflict has traditionally been considered destructive, recent studies have indicated that conflict management can contribute to effective teamwork. The present study explores conflict management as a team phenomenon in schools. The author examined how the contextual variables (task interdependence, goal interdependence) are…

  19. Performance of Cooperative Learning Groups in a Postgraduate Education Research Methodology Course: The Role of Social Interdependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Jiao, Qun G.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the degree that social interdependence predicted the achievement of 26 cooperative learning groups. Social interdependence was assessed in terms of postgraduate students' individual orientation (that is, cooperative, competitive, and individualistic). Participants were 84 postgraduate students enrolled in an…

  20. A Context-Dependent View on the Linguistic Interdependence Hypothesis: Language Use and SES as Potential Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevoo, Mariëlle J. L.; Malda, Maike; Emmen, Rosanneke A. G.; Yeniad, Nihal; Mesman, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The linguistic interdependence hypothesis states that the development of skills in a second language (L2) partly depends on the skill level in the first language (L1). It has been suggested that the theory lacked attention for differential interdependence. In this study we test what we call the hypothesis of context-dependent linguistic…

  1. A tip-high, Ca(2+) -interdependent, reactive oxygen species gradient is associated with polarized growth in Fucus serratus zygotes.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Susana M B; Brownlee, Colin; Bothwell, John H F

    2008-04-01

    We report the existence of a tip-high reactive oxygen species (ROS) gradient in growing Fucus serratus zygotes, using both 5-(and 6-) chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein and nitroblue tetrazolium staining to report ROS generation. Suppression of the ROS gradient inhibits polarized zygotic growth; conversely, exogenous ROS generation can redirect zygotic polarization following inhibition of endogenous ROS. Confocal imaging of fluo-4 dextran distributions suggests that the ROS gradient is interdependent on the tip-high [Ca(2+)](cyt) gradient which is known to be associated with polarized growth. Our data support a model in which localized production of ROS at the rhizoid tip stimulates formation of a localized tip-high [Ca(2+)](cyt) gradient. Such modulation of intracellular [Ca(2+)](cyt) signals by ROS is a common motif in many plant and algal systems and this study extends this mechanism to embryogenesis.

  2. Optimal weighting scheme and the role of coupling strength against load failures in degree-based weighted interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuzhuo

    2013-04-01

    The optimal weighting scheme and the role of coupling strength against load failures on symmetrically and asymmetrically coupled interdependent networks were investigated. The degree-based weighting scheme was extended to interdependent networks, with the flow dynamics dominated by global redistribution based on weighted betweenness centrality. Through contingency analysis of one-node removal, we demonstrated that there still exists an optimal weighting parameter on interdependent networks, but it might shift as compared to the case in isolated networks because of the break of symmetry. And it will be easier for the symmetrically and asymmetrically coupled interdependent networks to achieve robustness and better cost configuration against the one-node-removal-induced cascade of load failures when coupling strength was weaker. Our findings might have great generality for characterizing load-failure-induced cascading dynamics in real-world degree-based weighted interdependent networks.

  3. All about Plant & Animal Interdependency. Plant Life for Children[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Plants provide oxygen, food, shelter, medicine and more for all animals, including humans. In fact, people depend on plants for their very survival just as plants rely on animals! In All About Plant & Animal Interdependency, join aspiring botanists as they discover how plants and animals interrelate. Learn about the constant exchange of gases…

  4. Effectiveness of a Universal, Interdependent Group Contingency Program on Children's Academic Achievement: A Countywide Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Robert; Osborne, Karen J.; Dean, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a universal prevention program designed to increase academic engagement and to decrease disruptive behavior in elementary school-age children. Teachers and other school personnel use interdependent group contingencies to improve students' behavior in the classroom. Previous research indicates the GBG is efficacious…

  5. Is a Partner's Competence Threatening during Dyadic Cooperative Work? It Depends on Resource Interdependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchs, Celine; Butera, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies with university students have shown that resource interdependence during cooperative dyadic work on texts produces two different dynamics in student interaction and learning. Working on complementary information produces positive interactions, but a good quality of information transmission is needed to foster student learning.…

  6. Collaborative Partnerships between Educational Organizations: Extent of Independence-Interdependence and Satisfaction with Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Wiersma, William; Riffle, M. Joy S.

    Collaboration between and among educational organizations is much discussed and often required by funding agencies, but measuring such collaboration is discussed much less. Collaboration has been characterized as a continuum of interdependence between partners that ranges from cooperation to coordination to collaboration. Seven features have been…

  7. The Mission of the University--Addressing Issues of Universality, Diversity and Interdependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBiaggio, John

    Rapid changes in science, technology, economics, and politics present great opportunities and even larger responsibilities to leaders in higher education. The concepts of universality, diversity, and interdependence are components of the mission of American universities. Many American universities are universal in two senses, in that they offer an…

  8. Interdependence of Depressive Symptoms, School Involvement, and Academic Performance between Adolescent Friends: A Dyadic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Chong Man; Tan, Cin Cin; Buhrmester, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Friendships play an important role in the development of school involvement and academic performance during adolescence. This study examined the interdependence of depressive symptoms, school involvement, and academic performance between adolescent same-sex friends. Aims: Using cross-sectional data, we examined whether the link between…

  9. Parental Beliefs about Young Children's Socialization across US Ethnic Groups: Coexistence of Independence and Interdependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suizzo, Marie-Anne; Chen, Wan-Chen; Cheng, Chi-Chia; Liang, Angel S.; Contreras, Helen; Zanger, Dinorah; Robinson, Courtney

    2008-01-01

    This study compared dimensions of independence and interdependence in parents' beliefs about daily child-rearing practices across four ethnic groups. Two questionnaires were completed by 310 parents of preschool-age children, and three belief constructs were identified. "Conformity" was least valued by European Americans. "Autonomy" was equally…

  10. Plant & Animal Interdependency. Plant Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    In every ecosystem, organisms rely on each other in unique relationships that ensure each other's survival. In Plant & Animal Interdependency, find out how plants and animals interact, cooperate and compete. All living things have basic needs and depend on other living things to meet those needs. Discover why the constant exchange of nutrients and…

  11. Career Happiness among Asian Americans: The Interplay between Individualism and Interdependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Sheila J.; Chan, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Career happiness is reexamined for relevance to non-Western cultures. Joseph Campbell's (1968, 1972, 1988) interpretations of myth are reviewed for individualistic vs. interdependent themes and critiqued in light of Asian American vocational concerns, with examples from Chinese culture. Counselors are encouraged to reflect cultural sensitivity and…

  12. Interdependent Catalysts for Transforming Learning Environments ... and the Faculty Who Teach in Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solheim, Catherine; Longo, Bernadette; Cohen, Bradley A.; Dikkers, Amy Garrett

    2010-01-01

    Designers of new, technology-rich, interactive learning environments need to consider the interdependent factors of physical and virtual spaces, faculty, students, and institutional infrastructure to create an effective setting for teaching and learning in higher education settings. At the University of Minnesota, a small group of faculty, staff,…

  13. Interdependent Risk and Cyber Security: An Analysis of Security Investment and Cyber Insurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Woohyun

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of firms rely on highly interconnected information networks. In such environments, defense against cyber attacks is complicated by residual risks caused by the interdependence of information security decisions of firms. IT security is affected not only by a firm's own management strategies but also by those of others. This…

  14. Human Needs and Human Interdependence. Social Studies Interim Grade Guide for Grade One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Curriculum Development Branch.

    The social studies curriculum for grade 1 in Manitoba, Canada is presented. The focus of this guide is human needs and human interdependence. Some objectives are to explore: (1) distinctions between needs and wants; (2) various groupings and relationships, such as families, friendships, and communities; (3) ways people are dependent upon their…

  15. Global Interdependence and the Need for Social Stewardship. Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Laurie Ann; Sechler, Susan E.

    On October 7-8, 1996, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund joined with the World Bank to host a gathering of foundation executives, leaders of major humanitarian and environmental nongovernmental organizations, and officers of large multilateral institutions. The meeting was entitled "Building a Constituency for Global Interdependence," and its…

  16. Global Citizenship and Global Universities. The Age of Global Interdependence and Cosmopolitanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of global universities and globalisations in an age of global interdependence and cosmopolitanism. Competing agendas that result from actions and reactions to multiple globalisations are considered in relation to global citizenship education. These agendas are crucial in understanding dilemmas of the local and the…

  17. Cascading failures of interdependent modular scale-free networks with different coupling preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Meng; Wang, Xianpei; Dong, Zhengcheng; Zhu, Guowei; Long, Jiachuang; Dai, Dangdang; Zhang, Qilin

    2015-07-01

    As one of the most important mesoscopic properties of networks, the community structure plays an important role in cascading failures on isolated networks. However, the study for understanding the influences of the community structure on the cascading failures on interdependent scale-free networks remains missing. In this paper, we investigate cascading failures on interdependent modular scale-free networks under inner attacks and hub attacks from the global and local perspective. We mainly analyse the inter-community connections and coupling preferences, i.e. random coupling in communities (RCIC), assortative coupling in communities (ACIC) and assortative coupling with communities (ACWC). We find that increasing inter-community connections can enhance the robustness of interdependent modular scale-free networks for both inner attacks and hub attacks. Furthermore, we also find that the ACIC is more beneficial to resisting cascading failures compared with RCIC or ACWC. For ACIC, the cascading failures propagate mainly in a local community where the initial failure occurs. It is meaningful to control the cascading failures on interdependent modular scale-free networks by constructing ACIC.

  18. Measuring Longevity Achievements under Welfare Interdependencies: A Case for Joint Life Expectancy Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponthiere, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Whereas period life expectancy constitutes an intuitive indicator of the survival conditions prevailing at a particular period, this paper argues that, given the existence of welfare interdependencies, that widespread indicator is nonetheless an incomplete measure of the longevity achievements relevant for human well-being. The central importance…

  19. Differential Effectiveness of Interdependent and Dependent Group Contingencies in Reducing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Kelsey; Gresham, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Disruptive behavior in the classroom negatively affects all students' academic engagement, achievement, and behavior. Group contingencies have been proven effective in reducing disruptive behavior as part of behavior interventions in the classroom. The Good Behavior Game is a Tier 1 classwide intervention that utilizes an interdependent group…

  20. The Roots of Social Dominance: Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social Interdependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jiyoung; Johnson, David W.; Johnson, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the nature of dominant students in Grades 3-5 in a midwestern school system in the United States. Previous research has indicated 2 ways a student may gain dominance--through bullying and prosocial behaviors. A cluster analysis for dominant children was conducted using social interdependence attitude scores, children's…

  1. Open-Space Schools: Anticipation of Peer Interaction and Development of Cooperative Interdependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Leslie L.; Bothwell, Kenneth H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Prisoner's Dilemma Game and locus of control measures were administered to eighth graders enrolled in an open or closed space school. Open-space students developed cooperative interdependence and made seating choices indicative of anticipated peer interaction most frequently. Interactions involving sex and race were obtained for cooperation…

  2. Rehabilitation of a Female Dancer with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Applying Concepts of Regional Interdependence in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Caitlyn; Podschun, Laura; Kolber, Morey J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to complex movements and high physical demands, dance is often associated with a multitude of impairments including pain of the low back, pelvis, leg, knee, and foot. This case report provides an exercise progression, emphasizing enhancement of strength and neuromuscular performance using the concept of regional interdependence in a 17 year old female dancer with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:21589665

  3. The Communications Satellite - Vehicle for a New Kind of Reciprocal Interdependence in International Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedemeyer, Charles A.

    1971-01-01

    Adult education by means of communication satellites is stressed as a key to reciprocal interdependence. The author states that technological advances such as communications satellites can be used effectively to diffuse knowledge and offer options for choice in evolving societies. (RR)

  4. When does incivility lead to counterproductive work behavior? Roles of job involvement, task interdependence, and gender.

    PubMed

    Welbourne, Jennifer L; Sariol, Ana M

    2017-04-01

    This research investigated the conditions under which exposure to incivility at work was associated with engaging in counterproductive work behavior (CWB). Drawing from stressor-strain and coping frameworks, we predicted that experienced incivility would be associated with engaging in production deviance and withdrawal behavior, and that these relationships would be strongest for employees who had high levels of job involvement and worked under task interdependent conditions. Gender differences in these effects were also investigated. A sample of 250 United States full-time employees from various occupations completed 2 waves (timed 6 weeks apart) of an online survey. Results indicate that employees with high job involvement were more likely to engage in production deviance and withdrawal behavior following exposure to incivility than were employees with low job involvement. The moderating effect of task interdependence varied by gender, such that the relationship between incivility and CWB was strengthened under high task interdependence for female employees, but weakened under high task interdependence for male employees. These findings highlight that certain work conditions can increase employees' susceptibility to the impacts of incivility, leading to harmful outcomes for organizations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. The interdependence of family functioning and problematic internet use in a representative quota sample of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wartberg, Lutz; Kammerl, Rudolf; Rosenkranz, Moritz; Hirschhäuser, Lena; Hein, Sandra; Schwinge, Christiane; Petersen, Kay-Uwe; Rainer, Thomasius

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have been carried out investigating the interdependence of family structures or interactions and excessive adolescent Internet use. In this study, we surveyed a representative German quota sample of 1,744 adolescents aged between 14 and 17 years with standardized questionnaires. Adolescents assessed their perceived own functioning in the family with the Self-Rating Scale (FB-S) of the German version of the Family Assessment Measure III, and reported on problematic Internet use with the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS). To predict problematic Internet use (CIUS summary score), we conducted a multiple stepwise linear regression analysis with the seven FB-S scales, the FB-S overall index, and gender and age as explanatory variables. For the full sample, a model with only one predictor (FB-S overall index) that summarizes the quality of family functioning produced a corrected coefficient of determination of 0.239 and explained variance of nearly 24%. t Test results for unpaired samples showed significant differences in the mean values of the FB-S scales and the FB-S overall index for comparisons of both sexes, as well as of a lower age group and higher age group. The prediction of problematic Internet use between both sexes and both age groups showed comparable findings (males: corrected coefficient of determination=0.288; females: corrected coefficient of determination=0.183; lower age group: corrected coefficient of determination=0.231; higher age group: corrected coefficient of determination=0.251), each with a single predictor (FB-S overall index). The results emphasize the importance of family functioning for the occurrence of problematic Internet use in adolescents.

  6. Risk-Based Input-Output Analysis of Influenza Epidemic Consequences on Interdependent Workforce Sectors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joost R.; May, Larissa; Haimar, Amine El

    2013-01-01

    Outbreaks of contagious diseases underscore the ever-looming threat of new epidemics. Compared to other disasters that inflict physical damage to infrastructure systems, epidemics can have more devastating and prolonged impacts on the population. This paper investigates the interdependent economic and productivity risks resulting from epidemic-induced workforce absenteeism. In particular, we develop a dynamic input-output model capable of generating sector-disaggregated economic losses based on different magnitudes of workforce disruptions. An ex post analysis of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in the National Capital Region (NCR) reveals the distribution of consequences across different economic sectors. Consequences are categorized into two metrics: (i) economic loss, which measures the magnitude of monetary losses incurred in each sector, and (ii) inoperability, which measures the normalized monetary losses incurred in each sector relative to the total economic output of that sector. For a simulated mild pandemic scenario in NCR, two distinct rankings are generated using the economic loss and inoperability metrics. Results indicate that the majority of the critical sectors ranked according to the economic loss metric comprise of sectors that contribute the most to the NCR's gross domestic product (e.g., federal government enterprises). In contrast, the majority of the critical sectors generated by the inoperability metric include sectors that are involved with epidemic management (e.g., hospitals). Hence, prioritizing sectors for recovery necessitates consideration of the balance between economic loss, inoperability, and other objectives. Although applied specifically to the NCR region, the proposed methodology can be customized for other regions. PMID:23278756

  7. The influence of the depth of k-core layers on the robustness of interdependent networks against cascading failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhengcheng; Fang, Yanjun; Tian, Meng; Kong, Zhengmin

    The hierarchical structure, k-core, is common in various complex networks, and the actual network always has successive layers from 1-core layer (the peripheral layer) to km-core layer (the core layer). The nodes within the core layer have been proved to be the most influential spreaders, but there is few work about how the depth of k-core layers (the value of km) can affect the robustness against cascading failures, rather than the interdependent networks. First, following the preferential attachment, a novel method is proposed to generate the scale-free network with successive k-core layers (KCBA network), and the KCBA network is validated more realistic than the traditional BA network. Then, with KCBA interdependent networks, the effect of the depth of k-core layers is investigated. Considering the load-based model, the loss of capacity on nodes is adopted to quantify the robustness instead of the number of functional nodes in the end. We conduct two attacking strategies, i.e. the RO-attack (Randomly remove only one node) and the RF-attack (Randomly remove a fraction of nodes). Results show that the robustness of KCBA networks not only depends on the depth of k-core layers, but also is slightly influenced by the initial load. With RO-attack, the networks with less k-core layers are more robust when the initial load is small. With RF-attack, the robustness improves with small km, but the improvement is getting weaker with the increment of the initial load. In a word, the lower the depth is, the more robust the networks will be.

  8. Estimating interdependences in networks of weakly coupled deterministic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Feo, Oscar; Carmeli, Cristian

    2008-02-01

    The extraction of information from measured data about the interactions taking place in a network of systems is a key topic in modern applied sciences. This topic has been traditionally addressed by considering bivariate time series, providing methods which are sometimes difficult to extend to multivariate data, the limiting factor being the computational complexity. Here, we present a computationally viable method based on black-box modeling which, while theoretically applicable only when a deterministic hypothesis about the processes behind the recordings is plausible, proves to work also when this assumption is severely affected. Conceptually, the method is very simple and is composed of three independent steps: in the first step a state-space reconstruction is performed separately on each measured signal; in the second step, a local model, i.e., a nonlinear dynamical system, is fitted separately on each (reconstructed) measured signal; afterward, a linear model of the dynamical interactions is obtained by cross-relating the (reconstructed) measured variables to the dynamics unexplained by the local models. The method is successfully validated on numerically generated data. An assessment of its sensitivity to data length and modeling and measurement noise intensity, and of its applicability to large-scale systems, is also provided.

  9. Coupled catastrophes: sudden shifts cascade and hop among interdependent systems

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, George; D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge in several disciplines is to understand how sudden changes can propagate among coupled systems. Examples include the synchronization of business cycles, population collapse in patchy ecosystems, markets shifting to a new technology platform, collapses in prices and in confidence in financial markets, and protests erupting in multiple countries. A number of mathematical models of these phenomena have multiple equilibria separated by saddle-node bifurcations. We study this behaviour in its normal form as fast–slow ordinary differential equations. In our model, a system consists of multiple subsystems, such as countries in the global economy or patches of an ecosystem. Each subsystem is described by a scalar quantity, such as economic output or population, that undergoes sudden changes via saddle-node bifurcations. The subsystems are coupled via their scalar quantity (e.g. trade couples economic output; diffusion couples populations); that coupling moves the locations of their bifurcations. The model demonstrates two ways in which sudden changes can propagate: they can cascade (one causing the next), or they can hop over subsystems. The latter is absent from classic models of cascades. For an application, we study the Arab Spring protests. After connecting the model to sociological theories that have bistability, we use socioeconomic data to estimate relative proximities to tipping points and Facebook data to estimate couplings among countries. We find that although protests tend to spread locally, they also seem to ‘hop' over countries, like in the stylized model; this result highlights a new class of temporal motifs in longitudinal network datasets. PMID:26559684

  10. Analyzing Global Interdependence. Volume III. Methodological Perspectives and Research Implications,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    cybernetics and Habermas ’ Marxian writings on communicative competence. They may make possible respecifications of mixed interest choice situations in ways...Deutsch, The Nerves of Government: Models of Political Communication and Control (New York: The Free Press of Glencoe, 1963); and JUrgen Habermas

  11. Recovery processes and dynamics in single and interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdandzic, Antonio

    Systems composed of dynamical networks --- such as the human body with its biological networks or the global economic network consisting of regional clusters --- often exhibit complicated collective dynamics. Three fundamental processes that are typically present are failure, damage spread, and recovery. Here we develop a model for such systems and find phase diagrams for single and interacting networks. By investigating networks with a small number of nodes, where finite-size effects are pronounced, we describe the spontaneous recovery phenomenon present in these systems. In the case of interacting networks the phase diagram is very rich and becomes increasingly more complex as the number of interacting networks increases. In the simplest example of two interacting networks we find two critical points, four triple points, ten allowed transitions, and two forbidden transitions, as well as complex hysteresis loops. Remarkably, we find that triple points play the dominant role in constructing the optimal repairing strategy in damaged interacting systems. To test our model, we analyze an example of real interacting financial networks and find evidence of rapid dynamical transitions between well-defined states, in agreement with the predictions of our model.

  12. a Perspective on Sustainability and Resilience in Interdependent Water-Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, U.; Devineni, N.

    2015-12-01

    Since the World Economic Forum highlighted the Water-Energy-Food-Climate nexus of issues, with examples that distinguised between the developing and developed country manifestations, there has been a tremendous interest in exploring related topics by academics, the media, industry, the public sector and leading politicians. It is clear that there is interdependence across these systems and exigencies in one can lead to impacts in the other. By and large, we have seen case studies exposing attributes of the nexus, and broad generalizations of the potential inersections. Some have proposed network models, others have spoken to the fact that the fragmentation of these issues across many institutions restricts the ability to manage these as an integrated control system. Given that hydroclimatic systems are globally connected dynamical systems that influence social systems that manage the production and consumption of water, food and energy, and are in turn influenced by them, one direction that needs to emerge is an understanding of the multiscale and bidirectional links between climate and the managed earth systems. However, a challenge in this regard is that our managed systems are not explicitly managed. We have market processes for food and energy, but with regulatory intervention and subsidies and incentives that often distort market outcomes. For water, we typically have disjunctive public sector managementof resources, with very limited market like approaches. How then can one understand the interlinked functioning of these systems, seek predictabiliy and develop rules that allow adaptive management across the nexus while developing a regulated market structure that stimulates innovation and cost reduction/efficiency improvements. This may be one of the more significant challenges facing those who wish to be earth system managers and postulate future scenarios, regulate emissions and foster life cycle thinking as part of green engineering. In this talk, I will

  13. Detecting dynamical interdependence and generalized synchrony through mutual prediction in a neural ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven J.; So, Paul; Chang, Taeun; Burke, Robert E.; Sauer, Tim

    1996-12-01

    A method to characterize dynamical interdependence among nonlinear systems is derived based on mutual nonlinear prediction. Systems with nonlinear correlation will show mutual nonlinear prediction when standard analysis with linear cross correlation might fail. Mutual nonlinear prediction also provides information on the directionality of the coupling between systems. Furthermore, the existence of bidirectional mutual nonlinear prediction in unidirectionally coupled systems implies generalized synchrony. Numerical examples studied include three classes of unidirectionally coupled systems: systems with identical parameters, nonidentical parameters, and stochastic driving of a nonlinear system. This technique is then applied to the activity of motoneurons within a spinal cord motoneuron pool. The interrelationships examined include single neuron unit firing, the total number of neurons discharging at one time as measured by the integrated monosynaptic reflex, and intracellular measurements of integrated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP's). Dynamical interdependence, perhaps generalized synchrony, was identified in this neuronal network between simultaneous single unit firings, between units and the population, and between units and intracellular EPSP's.

  14. Interdependent Psychological Quality of Life in Dyads Adjusting to Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Segrin, Chris; Badger, Terry A.; Harrington, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Objective Prostate cancer negatively influences quality of life (QOL) in survivors and the people with whom they are close. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the degree of dyadic interdependence in psychological QOL in dyads adjusting to prostate cancer and its treatment. Method Participants were 70 prostate cancer survivors and their partners, most of whom were spouses. Assessments of psychological QOL (i.e., depression, anxiety, fatigue, and positive affect) were made at three points in time, each separated by 8 weeks. Results Survivors’ prostate specific function was associated with both their own and their partners’ psychological QOL. There was evidence of longitudinal dyadic interdependence for psychological QOL, particularly from partners to survivors between the T2 and T3 assessments. Conclusions Prostate cancer survivors’ psychological QOL is affected substantially by their partners’ psychological QOL, consistent with theories of emotional contagion. PMID:21895374

  15. [Gender relations and interdependence: reflections on changes in the hospital configuration].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Audrey Vidal; Rotenberg, Lúcia; Oliveira, Simone Santos

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes changes that have occurred in hospitals over the years, with a focus on the dynamics of gender relations as experienced by healthcare workers. We use the notions of configuration and interdependence, taken from Norbert Elias' theory of the civilizing process, along with discussions of gender relations at work; drawing from Michel Foucault, we also reference the disciplinary practices employed down through hospital history. This linkage of discussions on gender issues and on interdependent relations opens up to a reflection on conflicts of interests, power struggles, and the balance of tensions, which in turn makes it possible to problematize gender inequalities with the ultimate aim of achieving an interdisciplinary effort that will promote health care of an integral nature.

  16. The Emerging Interdependence of the Electric Power Grid & Information and Communication Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the implications of emerging interdependencies between the electric power grid and Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Over the past two decades, electricity and ICT infrastructure have become increasingly interdependent, driven by a combination of factors including advances in sensor, network and software technologies and progress in their deployment, the need to provide increasing levels of wide-area situational awareness regarding grid conditions, and the promise of enhanced operational efficiencies. Grid operators’ ability to utilize new and closer-to-real-time data generated by sensors throughout the system is providing early returns, particularly with respect to management of the transmission system for purposes of reliability, coordination, congestion management, and integration of variable electricity resources such as wind generation.

  17. A triple point induced by targeted autonomization on interdependent scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, L. D.; Macri, P. A.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that in interdependent networks an initial failure of a fraction 1 - p of nodes in one network, exposes the system to a cascade of failures. Therefore it is important to develop efficient strategies to avoid their collapse. Here, we provide an exact theoretical approach to study the evolution of the cascade of failures on interdependent networks when a fraction α of the nodes with higher connectivity are autonomous. We found, for a pair of heterogeneous networks, two critical percolation thresholds that depend on α, separating three regimes with very different networks’ final sizes that converge into a triple point in the plane p - α. Our findings suggest that the heterogeneity of the networks represented by high degree nodes are responsible for the rich phase diagrams found in this and other investigations.

  18. Using the base-of-the-pyramid perspective to catalyze interdependence-based collaborations

    PubMed Central

    London, Ted; Anupindi, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Improving food security and nutrition in the developing world remains among society's most intractable challenges and continues despite a wide variety of investments. Both donor- and enterprise-led initiatives, for example, have explored including smallholder farmers in their value chains. However, these efforts have had only modest success, partly because the private and development sectors prefer to maintain their independence. Research from the base-of-the-pyramid domain offers new insights into how collaborative interdependence between sectors can enhance the connection between profits and the alleviation of poverty. In this article, we identify the strengths and weaknesses of donor-led and enterprise-led value chain initiatives. We then explore how insights from the base-of-the-pyramid domain yield a set of interdependence-based collaboration strategies that can achieve more sustainable and scalable outcomes. PMID:21482752

  19. Culture and Healthy Eating: The Role of Independence and Interdependence in the United States and Japan.

    PubMed

    Levine, Cynthia S; Miyamoto, Yuri; Markus, Hazel Rose; Rigotti, Attilio; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Karasawa, Mayumi; Kawakami, Norito; Coe, Christopher L; Love, Gayle D; Ryff, Carol D

    2016-10-01

    Healthy eating is important for physical health. Using large probability samples of middle-aged adults in the United States and Japan, we show that fitting with the culturally normative way of being predicts healthy eating. In the United States, a culture that prioritizes and emphasizes independence, being independent predicts eating a healthy diet (an index of fish, protein, fruit, vegetables, reverse-coded sugared beverages, and reverse-coded high fat meat consumption; Study 1) and not using nonmeat food as a way to cope with stress (Study 2a). In Japan, a culture that prioritizes and emphasizes interdependence, being interdependent predicts eating a healthy diet (Studies 1 and 2b). Furthermore, reflecting the types of agency that are prevalent in each context, these relationships are mediated by autonomy in the United States and positive relations with others in Japan. These findings highlight the importance of understanding cultural differences in shaping healthy behavior and have implications for designing health-promoting interventions.

  20. Using the base-of-the-pyramid perspective to catalyze interdependence-based collaborations.

    PubMed

    London, Ted; Anupindi, Ravi

    2012-07-31

    Improving food security and nutrition in the developing world remains among society's most intractable challenges and continues despite a wide variety of investments. Both donor- and enterprise-led initiatives, for example, have explored including smallholder farmers in their value chains. However, these efforts have had only modest success, partly because the private and development sectors prefer to maintain their independence. Research from the base-of-the-pyramid domain offers new insights into how collaborative interdependence between sectors can enhance the connection between profits and the alleviation of poverty. In this article, we identify the strengths and weaknesses of donor-led and enterprise-led value chain initiatives. We then explore how insights from the base-of-the-pyramid domain yield a set of interdependence-based collaboration strategies that can achieve more sustainable and scalable outcomes.

  1. Independence and Interdependence Predict Health and Wellbeing: Divergent Patterns in the United States and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Shinobu; Karasawa, Mayumi; Curhan, Katherine B.; Ryff, Carol D.; Markus, Hazel Rose

    2010-01-01

    A cross-cultural survey was used to examine two hypotheses designed to link culture to wellbeing and health. The first hypothesis states that people are motivated toward prevalent cultural mandates of either independence (personal control) in the United States or interdependence (relational harmony) in Japan. As predicted, Americans with compromised personal control and Japanese with strained relationships reported high perceived constraint. The second hypothesis holds that people achieve wellbeing and health through actualizing the respective cultural mandates in their modes of being. As predicted, the strongest predictor of wellbeing and health was personal control in the United States, but the absence of relational strain in Japan. All analyses controlled for age, gender, educational attainment, and personality traits. The overall pattern of findings underscores culturally distinct pathways (independent versus interdependent) in achieving the positive life outcomes. PMID:21833228

  2. Measuring ensemble interdependence in a string quartet through analysis of multidimensional performance data

    PubMed Central

    Papiotis, Panos; Marchini, Marco; Perez-Carrillo, Alfonso; Maestre, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    In a musical ensemble such as a string quartet, the musicians interact and influence each other's actions in several aspects of the performance simultaneously in order to achieve a common aesthetic goal. In this article, we present and evaluate a computational approach for measuring the degree to which these interactions exist in a given performance. We recorded a number of string quartet exercises under two experimental conditions (solo and ensemble), acquiring both audio and bowing motion data. Numerical features in the form of time series were extracted from the data as performance descriptors representative of four distinct dimensions of the performance: Intonation, Dynamics, Timbre, and Tempo. Four different interdependence estimation methods (two linear and two nonlinear) were applied to the extracted features in order to assess the overall level of interdependence between the four musicians. The obtained results suggest that it is possible to correctly discriminate between the two experimental conditions by quantifying interdependence between the musicians in each of the studied performance dimensions; the nonlinear methods appear to perform best for most of the numerical features tested. Moreover, by using the solo recordings as a reference to which the ensemble recordings are contrasted, it is feasible to compare the amount of interdependence that is established between the musicians in a given performance dimension across all exercises, and relate the results to the underlying goal of the exercise. We discuss our findings in the context of ensemble performance research, the current limitations of our approach, and the ways in which it can be expanded and consolidated. PMID:25228894

  3. A Method for Measuring Programmatic Dependency and Interdependency Between DoD Acquisition Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of...up to the discretion of the program manager. It is important to account for higher -level funding interdependencies; however, dependency strength...developing something new that is needed for our program? Technological dependencies arise when a program requires an item, process, or technology which is

  4. Interdependent selves show face-induced facilitation of error processing: cultural neuroscience of self-threat

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    The fundamentally social nature of humans is revealed in their exquisitely high sensitivity to potentially negative evaluations held by others. At present, however, little is known about neurocortical correlates of the response to such social-evaluative threat. Here, we addressed this issue by showing that mere exposure to an image of a watching face is sufficient to automatically evoke a social-evaluative threat for those who are relatively high in interdependent self-construal. Both European American and Asian participants performed a flanker task while primed with a face (vs control) image. The relative increase of the error-related negativity (ERN) in the face (vs control) priming condition became more pronounced as a function of interdependent (vs independent) self-construal. Relative to European Americans, Asians were more interdependent and, as predicted, they showed a reliably stronger ERN in the face (vs control) priming condition. Our findings suggest that the ERN can serve as a robust empirical marker of self-threat that is closely modulated by socio-cultural variables. PMID:23160814

  5. Power blackouts, sudden death, and flash crashes: The physics of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Recent disasters ranging from abrupt financial ``flash crashes'' and large-scale power outages to sudden death among the elderly dramatically exemplify the fact that the most dangerous vulnerability is hiding in the many interdependencies among different networks. This talk reports recent work quantifying failure mechanisms in interconnected networks, and demonstrates the need to consider mutually dependent network properties in designing resilient systems. Specifically, we have uncovered new laws governing the nature of switching phenomena in coupled networks, and found that phenomena that are continuous ``second order'' phase transitions in isolated networks become discontinuous abrupt ``first order'' transitions in interdependent networks [J. Gao, S. V. Buldyrev, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Novel Behavior of Networks Formed from Interdependent Networks,'' Nature Physics 8, 40 (2012)]. We also report parallel efforts to understand the phenomenon of spontaneous recovery in dynamical networks as occurs, e.g., immediately after a flash crash [A. Majdandzic, B. Podobnik, S. V. Buldyrev, D. Y. Kenett, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, ``Spontaneous Recovery in Dynamic Networks,'' Nature Physics 9, No. 1 (2014)].

  6. The effect of randomness for dependency map on the robustness of interdependent lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Li, Lixiang; Peng, Haipeng; Kurths, Jürgen; Xiao, Jinghua; Yang, Yixian

    2016-01-01

    The percolation for interdependent networks with identical dependency map follows a second-order phase transition which is exactly the same with percolation on a single network, while percolation for random dependency follows a first-order phase transition. In real networks, the dependency relations between networks are neither identical nor completely random. Thus in this paper, we study the influence of randomness for dependency maps on the robustness of interdependent lattice networks. We introduce approximate entropy(ApEn) as the measure of randomness of the dependency maps. We find that there is critical ApEnc below which the percolation is continuous, but for larger ApEn, it is a first-order transition. With the increment of ApEn, the pc increases until ApEn reaching A p E nc' and then remains almost constant. The time scale of the system shows rich properties as ApEn increases. Our results uncover that randomness is one of the important factors that lead to cascading failures of spatially interdependent networks.

  7. Cascading Failures in Interdependent Lattice Networks: The Critical Role of the Length of Dependency Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Bashan, Amir; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2012-06-01

    We study the cascading failures in a system composed of two interdependent square lattice networks A and B placed on the same Cartesian plane, where each node in network A depends on a node in network B randomly chosen within a certain distance r from the corresponding node in network A and vice versa. Our results suggest that percolation for small r below rmax⁡≈8 (lattice units) is a second-order transition, and for larger r is a first-order transition. For rinterdependent infrastructures embedded in Euclidean space become most vulnerable when the distance between interdependent nodes is in the intermediate range, which is much smaller than the size of the system.

  8. Heterogeneous Coupling between Interdependent Lattices Promotes the Cooperation in the Prisoner’s Dilemma Game

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Cheng-Yi; Meng, Xiao-Kun; Wang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    In the research realm of game theory, interdependent networks have extended the content of spatial reciprocity, which needs the suitable coupling between networks. However, thus far, the vast majority of existing works just assume that the coupling strength between networks is symmetric. This hypothesis, to some extent, seems inconsistent with the ubiquitous observation of heterogeneity. Here, we study how the heterogeneous coupling strength, which characterizes the interdependency of utility between corresponding players of both networks, affects the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner’s dilemma game with two types of coupling schemes (symmetric and asymmetric ones). Compared with the traditional case, we show that heterogeneous coupling greatly promotes the collective cooperation. The symmetric scheme seems much better than the asymmetric case. Moreover, the role of varying amplitude of coupling strength is also studied on these two interdependent ways. Current findings are helpful for us to understand the evolution of cooperation within many real-world systems, in particular for the interconnected and interrelated systems. PMID:26102082

  9. Tolerating dissimilar other when primed with death: neural evidence of self-control engaged by interdependent people in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Kuniaki; Kashima, Emiko S; Moriya, Hiroki; Masui, Keita; Furutani, Kaichiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ura, Mitsuhiro; Nomura, Michio

    2017-02-17

    Mortality salience (MS) has been shown to lead to derogation of others with dissimilar worldviews, yet recent research has shown that Asian-Americans who presumably adopt an interdependent self-construal (SC) tend to reveal greater tolerance after MS induction. In the present study, we demonstrated that Japanese individuals who are high on interdependent SC indeed show greater tolerance toward worldview-threatening other in the MS (vs control) condition, thus replicating the prior research. Extending this research, we also found that interdependent people's tolerance toward worldview-threatening other was mediated by increased activity in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in the MS condition. These data suggested that when exposed to death-related stimuli, highly interdependent individuals may spontaneously activate their neural self-control system which may serve to increase tolerance toward others.

  10. Competition of simple and complex adoption on interdependent networks.

    PubMed

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Toral, Raul; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-12-01

    We consider the competition of two mechanisms for adoption processes: a so-called complex threshold dynamics and a simple susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model. Separately, these mechanisms lead, respectively, to first-order and continuous transitions between nonadoption and adoption phases. We consider two interconnected layers. While all nodes on the first layer follow the complex adoption process, all nodes on the second layer follow the simple adoption process. Coupling between the two adoption processes occurs as a result of the inclusion of some additional interconnections between layers. We find that the transition points and also the nature of the transitions are modified in the coupled dynamics. In the complex adoption layer, the critical threshold required for extension of adoption increases with interlayer connectivity whereas in the case of an isolated single network it would decrease with average connectivity. In addition, the transition can become continuous depending on the detailed interlayer and intralayer connectivities. In the SIS layer, any interlayer connectivity leads to the extension of the adopter phase. Besides, a new transition appears as a sudden drop of the fraction of adopters in the SIS layer. The main numerical findings are described by a mean-field type analytical approach appropriately developed for the threshold-SIS coupled system.

  11. Competition of simple and complex adoption on interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Toral, Raul; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-12-01

    We consider the competition of two mechanisms for adoption processes: a so-called complex threshold dynamics and a simple susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model. Separately, these mechanisms lead, respectively, to first-order and continuous transitions between nonadoption and adoption phases. We consider two interconnected layers. While all nodes on the first layer follow the complex adoption process, all nodes on the second layer follow the simple adoption process. Coupling between the two adoption processes occurs as a result of the inclusion of some additional interconnections between layers. We find that the transition points and also the nature of the transitions are modified in the coupled dynamics. In the complex adoption layer, the critical threshold required for extension of adoption increases with interlayer connectivity whereas in the case of an isolated single network it would decrease with average connectivity. In addition, the transition can become continuous depending on the detailed interlayer and intralayer connectivities. In the SIS layer, any interlayer connectivity leads to the extension of the adopter phase. Besides, a new transition appears as a sudden drop of the fraction of adopters in the SIS layer. The main numerical findings are described by a mean-field type analytical approach appropriately developed for the threshold-SIS coupled system.

  12. Interdependence of the rad50 hook and globular domain functions.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Marcel; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Krężel, Artur; Petrini, John H J

    2015-02-05

    Rad50 contains a conserved Zn(2+) coordination domain (the Rad50 hook) that functions as a homodimerization interface. Hook ablation phenocopies Rad50 deficiency in all respects. Here, we focused on rad50 mutations flanking the Zn(2+)-coordinating hook cysteines. These mutants impaired hook-mediated dimerization, but recombination between sister chromatids was largely unaffected. This may reflect that cohesin-mediated sister chromatid interactions are sufficient for double-strand break repair. However, Mre11 complex functions specified by the globular domain, including Tel1 (ATM) activation, nonhomologous end joining, and DNA double-strand break end resection were affected, suggesting that dimerization exerts a broad influence on Mre11 complex function. These phenotypes were suppressed by mutations within the coiled-coil and globular ATPase domains, suggesting a model in which conformational changes in the hook and globular domains are transmitted via the extended coils of Rad50. We propose that transmission of spatial information in this manner underlies the regulation of Mre11 complex functions.

  13. Interdependence of the Rad50 hook and globular domain functions

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Marcel; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Krężel, Artur; Petrini, John H J

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Rad50 contains a conserved Zn2+ coordination domain (the Rad50 hook) that functions as a homodimerization interface. Hook ablation phenocopies Rad50 deficiency in all respects. Here we focused on rad50 mutations flanking the Zn2+-coordinating hook cysteines. These mutants impaired hook-mediated dimerization, but recombination between sister chromatids was largely unaffected. This may reflect that cohesin-mediated sister chromatid interactions are sufficient for double strand break repair. However, Mre11 complex functions specified by the globular domain, including Tel1 (ATM) activation, nonhomologous end-joining, and DNA double strand break end resection were affected, suggesting that dimerization exerts a broad influence on Mre11 complex function. These phenotypes were suppressed by mutations within the coiled coil and globular ATPase domain, suggesting a model in which conformational changes in the hook and globular domains are transmitted via the extended coils of Rad50. We propose that transmission of spatial information in this manner underlies the regulation of Mre11 complex functions. PMID:25601756

  14. Agent-based modeling of complex infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructures and infrastructure interdependencies. The CAS model agents within the Spot Market Agent Research Tool (SMART) and Flexible Agent Simulation Toolkit (FAST) allow investigation of the electric power infrastructure, the natural gas infrastructure and their interdependencies.

  15. Linear and non-linear interdependence of EEG and HRV frequency bands in human sleep.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Vargas, Ramiro; Dissanayaka, P Chamila; Patti, Chanakya Reddy; Schilling, Claudia; Schredl, Michael; Cvetkovic, Dean

    2014-01-01

    The characterisation of functional interdependencies of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) stands an evergrowing interest to unveil electroencephalographic (EEG) and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) interactions. This paper presents a biosignal processing approach as a supportive computational resource in the estimation of sleep dynamics. The application of linear, non-linear methods and statistical tests upon 10 overnight polysomnographic (PSG) recordings, allowed the computation of wavelet coherence and phase locking values, in order to identify discerning features amongst the clinical healthy subjects. Our findings showed that neuronal oscillations θ, α and σ interact with cardiac power bands at mid-to-high rank of coherence and phase locking, particularly during NREM sleep stages.

  16. An Ab Initio Solution Of Interdependence: Social Organization With First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawless, W. F.; Rifkin, Stan; Sofge, D. A.

    2011-03-01

    A special issue of Science, the National Academy of Sciences, the military, and economists have called for a new theory of interdependence, ι. Constructed around the notion of bistable social reality (i.e., complementarity between conjugate or Fourier pairs), we have developed a social physics of ι for organizations and systems of humans, machines and robots that has shown some validity. But because of the loss of meaning associated with understanding ι states or interactions between social Fourier pairs, we consider it high-risk research.

  17. The interdependence of African American men's definitions of manhood and health

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Derek M; Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Bruce, Marino A; Thorpe, Roland J; Metzl, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore themes that cut across how 24-77 year old African American men define manhood and health. Utilizing a thematic approach, we analyzed data from nine focus groups (N=73). We found that manhood and health were relational constructs that are interrelated in men's minds and experiences. Manhood and health were defined by the characteristics men embody, the behaviors men engage in and the goals and values men had to positively influence their families and communities. Thus, manhood and health are interdependent constructs and their interrelationship should be considered in efforts to promote African American men's health. PMID:26291189

  18. Monetary policy games and international migration of labor in interdependent economies.

    PubMed

    Agiomirgianakis, G M

    1998-01-01

    "In this paper we incorporate the possibility of international migration into a monetary policy game played by governments in unionized interdependent economies. We show that contrary to usual presumptions, established by earlier studies that ignore the possibility of international migration, inter-government cooperation in the monetary field may well turn out to be advantageous. This has important implications for the European economies, since it suggests that measures taken towards encouraging international migration within EU [the European Union] will not only harmonize the European labor markets but will also make monetary policy cooperation within Europe, as required by the Maastrict Treaty, more advantageous."

  19. Brief communication "An auto-diagnosis tool to highlight interdependencies between urban technical networks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toubin, M.; Serre, D.; Diab, Y.; Laganier, R.

    2012-07-01

    Natural hazards threaten the urban system and its components that are likely to fail. With their high degree of interdependency, urban networks and services are critical issues for the resilience of a city. And yet, network managers are scarcely aware of their flaws and dependencies and they are reluctant to take them into account. In order to develop an operational tool to improve urban resilience, we propose here an auto-diagnosis method to be completed by network managers. The subsequent confrontation of all diagnoses is the basis of collaborative research for problem identification and solution design. The tool is experimented with the Parisian urban transport society.

  20. Educating for the 21st-Century Health Care System: An Interdependent Framework of Basic, Clinical, and Systems Sciences.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Haidet, Paul; Papp, Klara K; Wolpaw, Daniel R; Moser, Eileen; Wittenstein, Robin D; Wolpaw, Terry

    2017-01-01

    In the face of a fragmented and poorly performing health care delivery system, medical education in the United States is poised for disruption. Despite broad-based recommendations to better align physician training with societal needs, adaptive change has been slow. Traditionally, medical education has focused on the basic and clinical sciences, largely removed from the newer systems sciences such as population health, policy, financing, health care delivery, and teamwork. In this article, authors examine the current state of medical education with respect to systems sciences and propose a new framework for educating physicians in adapting to and practicing in systems-based environments. Specifically, the authors propose an educational shift from a two-pillar framework to a three-pillar framework where basic, clinical, and systems sciences are interdependent. In this new three-pillar framework, students not only learn the interconnectivity in the basic, clinical, and systems sciences but also uncover relevance and meaning in their education through authentic, value-added, and patient-centered roles as navigators within the health care system. Authors describe the Systems Navigation Curriculum, currently implemented for all students at the Penn State College of Medicine, as an example of this three-pillar educational model. Simple adjustments, such as including occasional systems topics in medical curriculum, will not foster graduates prepared to practice in the 21st-century health care system. Adequate preparation requires an explicit focus on the systems sciences as a vital and equal component of physician education.

  1. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michelle W; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H; Wong, Gerard C L

    2014-09-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration-dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova.

  2. Absent but Not Gone: Interdependence in Couples' Quality of Life Persists After a Partner's Death.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Kyle J; Knowles, Lindsey M; Sbarra, David A; O'Connor, Mary-Frances

    2016-02-01

    Spouses influence each other's psychological functioning and quality of life. To explore whether this interdependence continues after a person becomes widowed, we tested whether deceased spouses' characteristics were associated with their widowed partners' later quality of life using couples drawn from a multinational sample of aging adults. Independent subsamples (ns = 221 and 325) were assessed before and after a spouse's death. Regressions revealed that deceased partners' quality of life prior to their death positively predicted their spouses' quality of life after the partners' death, even when we controlled for spouses' prior quality of life to account for environmental factors shared within couples. Further, widowed participants' quality of life was lower than nonwidowed couples' 2 years before and after their partners' death, but was equivalent 4 years prior. Finally, the strength of the association between partners' earlier quality of life and participants' later quality of life did not differ between widowed and nonwidowed participants. These findings suggest that interdependence in quality of life continues after one's partner has passed away.

  3. Concurrent phenomena of science and history in the 17th century and their essential interdependence.

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, H.

    1992-01-01

    The explanation for the explosion of science in the 17th century lies in history and medical historiography. Without this approach, it becomes fantasy, accidents, or success stories. Sigerist grasped the essential interdependence of science and history, and had no need for devised reasons or speculation. He realized that once the dark night of the Middle Ages was over, the sciences arose with undreamt of force and accelerated development. The advances in astronomy, mathematics, mechanics, and experimental science benefitted a society developing in seafaring, manufacture, and trade in the 17th century. Sigerist's views make the scientific explosion understandable in human and social terms. He did not overlook the capabilities of some extraordinary individuals, such as Paracelsus (1493-1541), to shape the course of medicine, nor the importance of the mechanistic philosophy in the 17th century. Man makes history and science; hence, we find concurrent phenomena of history and science essentially interdependent. The spirit of experimental science of 17th century England was inspired by the new needs of commercial enterprise for more means of transportation and communication. Likewise, the interest in the mechanics of the pump for waterworks and for the drainage of swamps led Harvey to think of the heart as a pump, and to explain the circulation of the blood in terms of its functioning. PMID:1608066

  4. Drug use and sexual arrangements among gay couples: frequency, interdependence, and associations with sexual risk.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jeffrey T; Starks, Tyrel J

    2014-01-01

    Rates of drug use among gay men are higher than their heterosexual counterparts and drug use is a prominent risk factor for HIV transmission. Studies using heterosexual samples have found that being partnered reduces the risk of drug use and individuals in a relationship tend to have similar use patterns. Studies among gay men suggest that sexual agreements may be an important predictor of drug use. Data from 322 partnered gay men were collected and the 161 matched couples were categorized as monogamous (52.8 %), monogamish (14.9 %), open (13.0 %), and discrepant (19.3 %). Patterns of significance and significant trends suggested that monogamous men reported lower rates of marijuana and other drug use compared to open and monogamish men. Men in discrepant relationships did not differ from any other group. Partners' marijuana and other drug use was significantly interdependent in the overall sample; however, substantial variation in the magnitude and significance of interdependence was observed across sexual arrangement categories. Sexual arrangement and the use of drugs during sex both contributed to the prediction of UAI with casual partners among non-monogamous men. Implications for substance use treatment and HIV prevention are discussed.

  5. A review of climate-driven mismatches between interdependent phenophases in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Alison; Caffarra, Amelia; O'Neill, Bridget F

    2011-11-01

    Mismatches in phenology between mutually dependent species, resulting from climate change, can have far-reaching consequences throughout an ecosystem at both higher and lower trophic levels. Rising temperatures, due to climate warming, have resulted in advances in development and changes in behaviour of many organisms around the world. However, not all species or phenophases are responding to this increase in temperature at the same rate, thus creating a disruption to previously synchronised interdependent key life-cycle stages. Mismatches have been reported between plants and pollinators, predators and prey, and pests and hosts. Here, we review mismatches between interdependent phenophases at different trophic levels resulting from climate change. We categorized the studies into (1) terrestrial (natural and agricultural) ecosystems, and (2) aquatic (freshwater and marine) ecosystems. As expected, we found reports of 'winners' and 'losers' in each system, such as earlier emergence of prey enabling partial avoidance of predators, potential reductions in crop yield if herbivore pests emerge before their predators and possible declines in marine biodiversity due to disruption in plankton-fish phenologies. Furthermore, in the marine environment rising temperatures have resulted in synchrony in a previously mismatched prey and predator system, resulting in an abrupt population decline in the prey species. The examples reviewed suggest that more research into the complex interactions between species in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is necessary to make conclusive predictions of how climate warming may impact the fragile balances within ecosystems in future.

  6. Multiple effect of social influence on cooperation in interdependent network games.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Luo-Luo; Li, Wen-Jing; Wang, Zhen

    2015-10-01

    The social influence exists widely in the human society, where individual decision-making process (from congressional election to electronic commerce) may be affected by the attitude and behavior of others belonging to different social networks. Here, we couple the snowdrift (SD) game and the prisoner's dilemma (PD) game on two interdependent networks, where strategies in both games are associated by social influence to mimick the majority rule. More accurately, individuals' strategies updating refers to social learning (based on payoff difference) and above-mentioned social influence (related with environment of interdependent group), which is controlled by social influence strength s. Setting s = 0 decouples the networks and returns the traditional network game; while its increase involves the interactions between networks. By means of numerous Monte Carlo simulations, we find that such a mechanism brings multiple influence to the evolution of cooperation. Small s leads to unequal cooperation level in both games, because social learning is still the main updating rule for most players. Though intermediate and large s guarantees the synchronized evolution of strategy pairs, cooperation finally dies out and reaches a completely dominance in both cases. Interestingly, these observations are attributed to the expansion of cooperation clusters. Our work may provide a new understanding to the emergence of cooperation in intercorrelated social systems.

  7. Multiple effect of social influence on cooperation in interdependent network games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luo-Luo; Li, Wen-Jing; Wang, Zhen

    2015-10-01

    The social influence exists widely in the human society, where individual decision-making process (from congressional election to electronic commerce) may be affected by the attitude and behavior of others belonging to different social networks. Here, we couple the snowdrift (SD) game and the prisoner’s dilemma (PD) game on two interdependent networks, where strategies in both games are associated by social influence to mimick the majority rule. More accurately, individuals’ strategies updating refers to social learning (based on payoff difference) and above-mentioned social influence (related with environment of interdependent group), which is controlled by social influence strength s. Setting s = 0 decouples the networks and returns the traditional network game; while its increase involves the interactions between networks. By means of numerous Monte Carlo simulations, we find that such a mechanism brings multiple influence to the evolution of cooperation. Small s leads to unequal cooperation level in both games, because social learning is still the main updating rule for most players. Though intermediate and large s guarantees the synchronized evolution of strategy pairs, cooperation finally dies out and reaches a completely dominance in both cases. Interestingly, these observations are attributed to the expansion of cooperation clusters. Our work may provide a new understanding to the emergence of cooperation in intercorrelated social systems.

  8. Multiple effect of social influence on cooperation in interdependent network games

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luo-Luo; Li, Wen-Jing; Wang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The social influence exists widely in the human society, where individual decision-making process (from congressional election to electronic commerce) may be affected by the attitude and behavior of others belonging to different social networks. Here, we couple the snowdrift (SD) game and the prisoner’s dilemma (PD) game on two interdependent networks, where strategies in both games are associated by social influence to mimick the majority rule. More accurately, individuals’ strategies updating refers to social learning (based on payoff difference) and above-mentioned social influence (related with environment of interdependent group), which is controlled by social influence strength s. Setting s = 0 decouples the networks and returns the traditional network game; while its increase involves the interactions between networks. By means of numerous Monte Carlo simulations, we find that such a mechanism brings multiple influence to the evolution of cooperation. Small s leads to unequal cooperation level in both games, because social learning is still the main updating rule for most players. Though intermediate and large s guarantees the synchronized evolution of strategy pairs, cooperation finally dies out and reaches a completely dominance in both cases. Interestingly, these observations are attributed to the expansion of cooperation clusters. Our work may provide a new understanding to the emergence of cooperation in intercorrelated social systems. PMID:26423024

  9. Removing the Interdependency between Horizontal and Vertical Eye-Movement Components in Electrooculograms

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Won-Du; Cha, Ho-Seung; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a method to remove the unwanted interdependency between vertical and horizontal eye-movement components in electrooculograms (EOGs). EOGs have been widely used to estimate eye movements without a camera in a variety of human-computer interaction (HCI) applications using pairs of electrodes generally attached either above and below the eye (vertical EOG) or to the left and right of the eyes (horizontal EOG). It has been well documented that the vertical EOG component has less stability than the horizontal EOG one, making accurate estimation of the vertical location of the eyes difficult. To address this issue, an experiment was designed in which ten subjects participated. Visual inspection of the recorded EOG signals showed that the vertical EOG component is highly influenced by horizontal eye movements, whereas the horizontal EOG is rarely affected by vertical eye movements. Moreover, the results showed that this interdependency could be effectively removed by introducing an individual constant value. It is therefore expected that the proposed method can enhance the overall performance of practical EOG-based eye-tracking systems. PMID:26907271

  10. When holding back helps: suppressing negative emotions during sacrifice feels authentic and is beneficial for highly interdependent people.

    PubMed

    Le Bonnie, M; Impett, Emily A

    2013-09-01

    Is the suppression of negative emotions ever associated with beneficial outcomes in relationships? The study reported here drew on research and theory on emotion regulation, self-construal, and sacrifice to test the hypothesis that individual differences in interdependent self-construal moderate the association between negative-emotion suppression and the personal and interpersonal outcomes of sacrifice. In a 14-day daily-experience study of people in romantic relationships, people with higher levels of interdependence experienced boosts in personal well-being and relationship quality if they suppressed their negative emotions during sacrifice, whereas those who construed the self in less interdependent terms experienced lower well-being and relationship quality if they suppressed their negative emotions during sacrifice. Feelings of authenticity for the sacrifice mediated these associations. These findings identify a critical condition under which the suppression of negative emotions may be personally and interpersonally beneficial.

  11. Investigating the Evolution of Ingroup Favoritism Using a Minimal Group Interaction Paradigm: The Effects of Inter- and Intragroup Interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Quayle, Michael; Tredoux, Colin G.; Titlestad, Kim; Tooke, Larry

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of structural interdependencies between groups (especially inequality), and interdependencies between individuals on ingroup favoritism in minimal group situations. Previous research has attempted to determine whether ingroup favoritism is produced by categorization or intragroup interdependencies (reciprocation expectations), but recent literature suggests that it is not possible to tease these influences apart. We report two studies that investigate how ingroup favoritism evolves over time in social interaction. The levels of ingroup favoritism were affected by categorization and inequality, and the level of ingroup favoritism changed over time, increasing or decreasing depending on the nature of the initial intergroup structure. We conclude by providing two explanations for this change: emergent norms, and changes to the intergroup situation produced by interaction. Our experiments confirm the value of studying the evolution of minimal group behavior, especially for explaining why low status groups act to preserve intergroup inequalities. PMID:27851791

  12. The dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) moderates cultural difference in independent versus interdependent social orientation.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Shinobu; King, Anthony; Yoon, Carolyn; Tompson, Steve; Huff, Sarah; Liberzon, Israel

    2014-06-01

    Prior research suggests that cultural groups vary on an overarching dimension of independent versus interdependent social orientation, with European Americans being more independent, or less interdependent, than Asians. Drawing on recent evidence suggesting that the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) plays a role in modulating cultural learning, we predicted that carriers of DRD4 polymorphisms linked to increased dopamine signaling (7- or 2-repeat alleles) would show higher levels of culturally dominant social orientations, compared with noncarriers. European Americans and Asian-born Asians (total N = 398) reported their social orientation on multiple scales. They were also genotyped for DRD4. As in earlier work, European Americans were more independent, and Asian-born Asians more interdependent. This cultural difference was significantly more pronounced for carriers of the 7- or 2-repeat alleles than for noncarriers. Indeed, no cultural difference was apparent among the noncarriers. Implications for potential coevolution of genes and culture are discussed.

  13. Priming interdependence affects processing of context information in causal inference--but not how you might think.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Kelly M; Grimm, Lisa R; Markman, Arthur B; Spellman, Barbara A

    2014-02-01

    Cultural mindset is related to performance on a variety of cognitive tasks. In particular, studies of both chronic and situationally-primed mindsets show that individuals with a relatively interdependent mindset (i.e., an emphasis on relationships and connections among individuals) are more sensitive to background contextual information than individuals with a more independent mindset. Two experiments tested whether priming cultural mindset would affect sensitivity to background causes in a contingency learning and causal inference task. Participants were primed (either independent or interdependent), and then saw complete contingency information on each of 12 trials for two cover stories in Experiment 1 (hiking causing skin rashes, severed brakes causing wrecked cars) and two additional cover stories in Experiment 2 (school deadlines causing stress, fertilizers causing plant growth). We expected that relative to independent-primed participants, those interdependent-primed would give more weight to the explicitly-presented data indicative of hidden alternative background causes, but they did not do so. In Experiment 1, interdependents gave less weight to the data indicative of hidden background causes for the car accident cover story and showed a decreased sensitivity to the contingencies for that story. In Experiment 2, interdependents placed less weight on the observable data for cover stories that supported more extra-experimental causes, while independents' sensitivity did not vary with these extra-experimental causes. Thus, interdependents were more sensitive to background causes not explicitly presented in the experiment, but this sensitivity hurt rather than improved their acquisition of the explicitly-presented contingency information.

  14. Let it be: expatriate couples' adjustment and the upside of avoiding conflicts.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Kim J P M; Giebels, Ellen; van der Zee, Karen I; van Duijn, Marijtje A J

    2011-10-01

    This research examines the moderating effect of conflict avoidance on the relationship between conflict and psychological adjustment among 45 expatriate couples at two points in time. We propose a model based on the actor-partner interdependence model, which assumes both intrapersonal and interpersonal effects, to address simultaneously the effects of one's own and the other's avoidance behavior. We found substantial support for our model, especially for expatriate spouses. As expected, and only for expatriate spouses, avoidance moderated the conflict-adjustment relationship such that both one's own and one's counterpart's avoidance behavior diminished the negative effect of conflicts. Because these effects were observed only at T2 and psychological adjustment decreased from T1 to T2, our research suggests that the impact of expatriation-associated interaction particularly manifests itself in the long run.

  15. Facing HIV as a family: predicting depressive symptoms with correlated responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Ding, Ying Ying; Ji, Guoping

    2011-04-01

    This study makes an effort to go beyond traditional analytical models to explore the complex and interactive nature of family processes. A total of 79 families affected by HIV in China participated in the study (79 persons living with HIV [PLH] and 79 seronegative family members), with in-person interviews conducted in 2009. A higher level of depressive symptoms was reported by PLH participants than their family members. Negative associations between depressive symptoms and social support and family relations were observed for both PLH and their family members. Results from actor-partner interdependence models indicate that the depressive symptoms of PLH and their family members were positively correlated when either the family relations measure or the social support measure was included in the model. Results highlight the link between family experience and individual well-being, with implications for designing and implementing interventions for families impacted by HIV.

  16. Facing HIV as a Family: Predicting Depressive Symptoms with Correlated Responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Ding, Ying Ying; Ji, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    This study makes an effort to go beyond traditional analytical models to explore the complex and interactive nature of family processes. A total of 79 families affected by HIV in China participated in the study (79 persons living with HIV [PLH] and 79 seronegative family members), with in-person interviews conducted in 2009. A higher level of depressive symptoms was reported by PLH participants than their family members. Negative associations between depressive symptoms and 1) social support and 2) family relations were observed for both PLH and their family members. Results from Actor-Partner Interdependence models indicate that the depressive symptoms of PLH and their family members were positively correlated when either the family relations measure or the social support measure was included in the model. Results highlight the link between family experience and individual well-being, with implications for designing and implementing interventions for families impacted by HIV. PMID:21480700

  17. Predicting marital satisfaction from self, partner, and couple characteristics: is it me, you, or us?

    PubMed

    Luo, Shanhong; Chen, Hao; Yue, Guoan; Zhang, Guangjian; Zhaoyang, Ruixue; Xu, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Past research on the link between personal characteristics and marital satisfaction has taken either an individual or a dyadic approach. The individual approach examines how self and/or partner characteristics are associated with satisfaction, whereas the dyadic approach focuses on couple characteristics such as couple similarity. The current research was designed to integrate both approaches. A modified Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (Kashy & Kenny, 2000) was proposed to test simultaneously the contributions of self characteristics, partner characteristics, and two types of couple similarity (level similarity measured by the absolute difference score and shape similarity measured by the profile correlation) in predicting husbands' and wives' marital satisfaction. This model was tested by structural equation modeling in two large, nationally representative, urban samples (N=536 and 537 couples) from China. The results were largely replicated across four personality domains and two value domains, suggesting that all predictors tended to make independent contributions to satisfaction except the absolute difference score.

  18. Enhancing acceptability and use of sexual barrier products among HIV concordant and discordant couples.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah; Kashy, Deborah; Villar-Loubet, Olga; Weiss, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Strategies to prevent HIV transmission may benefit from addressing both individual and dyadic factors. This study compared the impact of group and individual interventions on the acceptability of sexual barrier products among HIV sero-concordant and discordant couples, and evaluated the contribution of couple members' perceived product acceptability to their sexual barrier use. Participants (n = 216 couples) were multicultural couples in Miami, Florida. Longitudinal multilevel modeling and the actor-partner interdependence model were used for analyses. Product acceptability increased more among female group participants, and acceptability of male condoms increased more among sero-discordant couples in the group. Additionally, acceptability of products associated with prevention of STDS/HIV and pregnancy increased more among sero-concordant couples in the group condition. Both actor and partner product acceptability predicted use. Results support the use of group interventions targeting both partners in relationships in prevention programs designed to enhance sexual barrier use.

  19. “Amar te Duele” (“Love Hurts”): Sexual relationship power, intimate partner violence, depression symptoms and HIV risk among female sex workers who use drugs and their non-commercial, steady partners in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ulibarri, Monica D.; Roesch, Scott; Rangel, M. Gudelia; Staines, Hugo; Amaro, Hortensia; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2014-01-01

    A significant body of research among female sex workers (FSWs) has focused on individual-level HIV risk factors. Comparatively little is known about their non-commercial, steady partners who may heavily influence their behavior and HIV risk. This cross-sectional study of 214 FSWs who use drugs and their male steady partners aged ≥18 in two Mexico-U.S. border cities utilized a path-analytic model for dyadic data based upon the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to examine relationships between sexual relationship power, intimate partner violence (IPV), depression symptoms, and unprotected sex. FSWs’ relationship power, IPV perpetration and victimization were significantly associated with unprotected sex within the relationship. Male partners’ depression symptoms were significantly associated with unprotected sex within the relationship. Future HIV prevention interventions for FSWs and their male partners should address issues of sexual relationship power, IPV, and mental health both individually and in the context of their relationship. PMID:24743959

  20. "Amar te Duele" ("love hurts"): sexual relationship power, intimate partner violence, depression symptoms and HIV risk among female sex workers who use drugs and their non-commercial, steady partners in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ulibarri, Monica D; Roesch, Scott; Rangel, M Gudelia; Staines, Hugo; Amaro, Hortensia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2015-01-01

    A significant body of research among female sex workers (FSWs) has focused on individual-level HIV risk factors. Comparatively little is known about their non-commercial, steady partners who may heavily influence their behavior and HIV risk. This cross-sectional study of 214 FSWs who use drugs and their male steady partners aged ≥18 in two Mexico-U.S. border cities utilized a path-analytic model for dyadic data based upon the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to examine relationships between sexual relationship power, intimate partner violence (IPV), depression symptoms, and unprotected sex. FSWs' relationship power, IPV perpetration and victimization were significantly associated with unprotected sex within the relationship. Male partners' depression symptoms were significantly associated with unprotected sex within the relationship. Future HIV prevention interventions for FSWs and their male partners should address issues of sexual relationship power, IPV, and mental health both individually and in the context of their relationship.

  1. Design of a component-based integrated environmental modeling framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated environmental modeling (IEM) includes interdependent science-based components (e.g., models, databases, viewers, assessment protocols) that comprise an appropriate software modeling system. The science-based components are responsible for consuming and producing inform...

  2. Acquisition Risks in a World of Joint Capabilities: A Study of Interdependency Complexity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    bäÉîÉåíÜ=^ååì~ä=^Åèìáëáíáçå= oÉëÉ~êÅÜ=póãéçëáìã= qÜìêëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=ff= = Acquisition Risks in a World of Joint Capabilities: A Study of...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Acquisition Risks in a World of Joint Capabilities: A Study of Interdependency Complexity 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...systems???that are capable of enabling joint operations in the battlefield. This research examines DoD acquisition from the context of a network of

  3. Percolation in interdependent and interconnected networks: Abrupt change from second- to first-order transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Ksherim, Baruch; Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-12-01

    Robustness of two coupled networks systems has been studied separately only for dependency coupling [Buldyrev , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08932 464, 1025 (2010)] and only for connectivity coupling [Leicht and D’Souza, e-print arXiv:0907.0894]. Here we study, using a percolation approach, a more realistic coupled networks system where both interdependent and interconnected links exist. We find rich and unusual phase-transition phenomena including hybrid transition of mixed first and second order, i.e., discontinuities like in a first-order transition of the giant component followed by a continuous decrease to zero like in a second-order transition. Moreover, we find unusual discontinuous changes from second-order to first-order transition as a function of the dependency coupling between the two networks.

  4. Mutual information detects a decreased interdependence between RR and SAP in orthostatic intolerance after microgravity condition.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, G; Chillemi, S; Michelassi, C; Di Garbo, A; Varanini, M; Legramante, J; Balocchi, R

    2002-07-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is the most serious symptom of cardiovascular deconditioning induced by microgravity. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these alterations have not been completely clarified. Several methods for studying the time series of systolic arterial pressure and RR interval have been proposed both in the time and in the frequency domain. However, these methods did not produce definitive results. In fact heart rate and arterial pressure show a complex pattern of global variability which is likely due to non linear feedback which involves the autonomic nervous system and to "stochastic" influences. Aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of interdependence between the mechanisms responsible for the variability of SAP and RR signals in subjects exposed to head down (HD). This quantification was achieved by using Mutual Information (MI).

  5. Minority language education in unbalanced bilingual situations: a case for the linguistic interdependence hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Huguet, A; Vila, I; Llurda, E

    2000-05-01

    This paper is placed in the linguistic and sociocultural context of Eastern Aragon, a region of Spain where two contact languages (Spanish and Catalan) coexist in an unbalanced situation favoring Spanish. The research was prompted by the regulation for the teaching of Catalan in that area, by means of the Cooperation Agreement signed by the Spanish Educational Ministry (MEC) and the local autonomous Cultural and Educational Department of the Diputación General de Aragon in November 1986. A comparative analysis is made between Eastern Aragon students' linguistic competence in Catalan and Spanish; a further comparison is established between these students and others living in bilingual Catalonia and in monolingual Aragon. We conclude by pointing out that the Linguistic Interdependence Hypothesis accounts for the results obtained in the study.

  6. A 3-D Generalization of the Budyko Framework Captures the Mutual Interdependence Between Long-Term Mean Annual Precipitation, Actual and Potential Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.

    2012-12-01

    We study the behavior of the 3-D parameter space defined by Φ =PET/P (so-called Aridity Index), Ψ =AET/P, and Ω =AET/PET, where P denotes mean annual precipitation, and PET and AET denote mean annual potential and actual evapotranspiration, respectively. Using information from the CLIMWAT 2.0 database (www.fao.org/nr/water/infores_databases_climwat.html) for P and PET, we estimate AET using both Budyko's and Turc's equations. Our results indicate that the well-known Budyko function that relates Φ vs.Ψ corresponds to a particular bi-dimensional cross-section of a broader coupling existing between Φ, Ψ and Ω (Figure 1a), and in turn of the mutual interdependence between P, PET and AET. The behavior of the three bi-dimensional projections are clearly parameterized by the remaining ortogonal parameter, such that: (i) the relation Φ vs. Ψ is defined by physically consistent varying values of Ω (Figure 1b); (ii) the relation Ω vs. Ψ is defined by physically consistent varying values of the Aridity Index,Φ (Figure 1c), and (iii) the relation Ω vs. Φ is defined by physically consistent varying values of Ψ (Figure 1d). Interestingly, we show that Φ and Ω are related by a power law, Φ~Ω-θ, with scaling exponent θ=1.15 (R2=0.91, n=3420) for the whole world (Figure 1d). Mathematical functions that model the three bi-dimensional projections and the surface defining the interdependence between Φ, Ψ and Ω will be presented. Our results provide a new framework to understand the coupling between the long-term mean annual water and energy balances in river basins, and the hydrological effects brought about by climate change, while taking into account the mutual interdependence between the three non-dimensional parameters Φ, Ψ and Ω, and in turn between P, PET and AET. Figure 1. (a) Three-dimensional rendering of sample values of Φ =PET/P (so-called Aridity Index), Ψ =AET/P, and Ω=AET/PET. Bi-dimensional projections of: (b) relation Φ vs.

  7. Promoting VET Teachers' Innovative Behaviour: Exploring the Roles of Task Interdependence, Learning Goal Orientation and Occupational Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runhaar, Piety; Bednall, Timothy; Sanders, Karin; Yang, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Changing employer demands, new technological and pedagogical insights are examples of developments which urge Vocational Education and Training (VET) institutes to continually renew and innovate their educational programmes. This, in turn, requires teachers to show innovative behaviour. Our study focuses on the effects of task interdependence on…

  8. In-Migration, Entrepreneurship and Rural-Urban Interdependencies: The Case of East Cleveland, North East England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalantaridis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    In-migration is a key influence in the process of rural economic development in England, Continental Europe and the US. New arrivals are often viewed in the literature as contributors in new venture creation, as well as catalysts in enhancing rural-urban interdependencies in the countryside. This paper sets out to explore the validity of this view…

  9. Inter-Dependence and Controversial Issues: Environmental Education and Economic and Industrial Understanding as Cross-Curricular Themes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, John; Garratt, Dean

    1994-01-01

    This paper argues that to some extent the interdependence between environmental education and economic and industrial understanding supported by cross-curricular themes in the National Curriculum is one of unequal relationship. The author concludes that environmental education is negatively affected and discusses how this can be used in classroom…

  10. Learning Interdependence: A Case Study of the International/intercultural Education of First-Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachner, David J.; Malone, Laurence J.; Snider, Mary C.

    2001-01-01

    This volume argues that international/intercultural experiences are powerful vehicles for first-year college students to learn the perspectives and skills necessary to function interdependently in a rapidly changing, increasingly complicated world. The authors develop this thesis through an in-depth case study of efforts to provide such learning…

  11. An Investigation of the Relationship between Forms of Positive Interdependence, Social Support, and Selected Aspects of Classroom Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaith, Ghazi M.; Shaaban, Kassim A.; Harkous, Samar A.

    2007-01-01

    Studies on the effect of cooperative learning have demonstrated its efficacy in improving the cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes of schooling. However, it remains unclear what forms of cooperation are especially effective in multilingual contexts. This research examines the connection between positive goal interdependence and positive resource…

  12. Combining Self-Monitoring and an Interdependent Group Contingency to Improve the Behavior of Sixth Graders with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denune, Hilary; Hawkins, Renee; Donovan, Lauren; Mccoy, Dacia; Hall, Lyndsie; Moeder, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    A withdrawal design was used to examine the influence of a self-monitoring procedure on the overall effectiveness of an interdependent group contingency intervention implemented in a sixth-grade classroom in an alternative school serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Dependent variables included student on-task, off-task,…

  13. Global Interdependence. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Global Awareness Society International (New York, New York, July 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Global Awareness Society International.

    Thirty-two articles examine the theme of global interdependence from a variety of professional and personal angles. These papers exhibit a commitment to global issues and provide perspectives on education, government, and culture. Some of the articles are: (1) "The Network Revolution and Global Awareness" (Robert Abbott; Charles Hoppel);…

  14. Effects of a Classwide Interdependent Group Contingency Designed to Improve the Behavior of an At-Risk Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Stacy; Hawkins, Renee O.; Weber, Denise

    2011-01-01

    When students display disruptive behaviors, it interferes with their own, and other students' learning and with the teacher's ability to instruct during academic activities. This study investigated the effects of a classwide interdependent group contingency on the on/off-task behaviors of an at-risk student in a first-grade classroom in a private…

  15. Utility Evaluation Based on One-To-N Mapping in the Prisoner’s Dilemma Game for Interdependent Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Lu, Wenwen; Liu, Lina; Li, Li; Xia, Chengyi

    2016-01-01

    In the field of evolutionary game theory, network reciprocity has become an important means to promote the level of promotion within the population system. Recently, the interdependency provides a novel perspective to understand the widespread cooperation behavior in many real-world systems. In previous works, interdependency is often built from the direct or indirect connections between two networks through the one-to-one mapping mode. However, under many realistic scenarios, players may need much more information from many neighboring agents so as to make a more rational decision. Thus, beyond the one-to-one mapping mode, we investigate the cooperation behavior on two interdependent lattices, in which the utility evaluation of a focal player on one lattice may not only concern himself, but also integrate the payoff information of several corresponding players on the other lattice. Large quantities of simulations indicate that the cooperation can be substantially promoted when compared to the traditionally spatial lattices. The cluster formation and phase transition are also analyzed in order to explore the role of interdependent utility coupling in the collective cooperation. Current results are beneficial to deeply understand various mechanisms to foster the cooperation exhibited inside natural, social and engineering systems. PMID:27907024

  16. Interdependency between Risk Assessments for Self and Other in the Field of Comparative Optimism: The Contribution of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzenstetter, Florence; Schimchowitsch, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    By introducing a response-time measure in the field of comparative optimism, this study was designed to explore how people estimate risk to self and others depending on the evaluation order (self/other or other/self). Our results show the interdependency between self and other answers. Indeed, while response time for risk assessment for the self…

  17. Utility Evaluation Based on One-To-N Mapping in the Prisoner's Dilemma Game for Interdependent Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Lu, Wenwen; Liu, Lina; Li, Li; Xia, Chengyi

    2016-01-01

    In the field of evolutionary game theory, network reciprocity has become an important means to promote the level of promotion within the population system. Recently, the interdependency provides a novel perspective to understand the widespread cooperation behavior in many real-world systems. In previous works, interdependency is often built from the direct or indirect connections between two networks through the one-to-one mapping mode. However, under many realistic scenarios, players may need much more information from many neighboring agents so as to make a more rational decision. Thus, beyond the one-to-one mapping mode, we investigate the cooperation behavior on two interdependent lattices, in which the utility evaluation of a focal player on one lattice may not only concern himself, but also integrate the payoff information of several corresponding players on the other lattice. Large quantities of simulations indicate that the cooperation can be substantially promoted when compared to the traditionally spatial lattices. The cluster formation and phase transition are also analyzed in order to explore the role of interdependent utility coupling in the collective cooperation. Current results are beneficial to deeply understand various mechanisms to foster the cooperation exhibited inside natural, social and engineering systems.

  18. Effects on Homework Completion and Accuracy of Varied and Constant Reinforcement within an Interdependent Group Contingency System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Newman-Eig, Lynne M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the efficacy of an interdependent group contingency program on increasing homework completion and accuracy rates in fourth grade students in an elementary school. In addition, the present study attempted to determine whether randomized reinforcement was more effective than constant reinforcement. Overall, the…

  19. Suggestions for Curriculum Development [And] Handbook Primary Grades, Part A, K-3. Environmental Education Interdependence: A Concept Approach. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C.; De La Sota, Ann

    Two booklets, a guide and handbook, comprise the K-3 component of a series of guides for incorporating environmental education into the existing curriculum. The materials emphasize a multidisciplinary approach, use the concept of interdependence as an organizing theme, and offer suggestions for using the local community as a resource. The guide…

  20. Suggestions for Curriculum Development [And] Handbook, Part C, 7-9. Environmental Education Interdependence: A Concept Approach. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C.; Stillman, Peter R.

    Two booklets, a guide and a handbook, comprise the grades 7-9 component of a series of guides for incorporating environmental education into the existing curriculum. The materials emphasize a multidisciplinary approach, use the concept of interdependence as an organizing theme, and offer suggestions for using the local community as a resource.…

  1. Interdependence, Garbage Dumping, and Feral Dogs: Exploring Three Lifeworld Resources of Young Children in a Rural School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amy Suzanne; Baker, Allison; Bruer, Laura

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we concentrate upon the lifeworld resources that comprise the funds of knowledge for children living in a rural community in the southeastern United States. Through interview conversations with a group of third grade children, we identified three lifeworld resources--interdependence, garbage dumping, and feral dogs--that rural…

  2. Investigating the Impact of Positive Resource Interdependence and Individual Accountability on Students' Academic Performance in Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarfo, Frederick Kwaku; Elen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This study addresses two major issues with respect to cooperative learning. The study aims at experimentally investigating the function of positive resource interdependence and individual accountability on academic performance of individuals in cooperative learning. Method: To achieve the purpose a two by two randomized post-test…

  3. The Relative Effects of Positive Interdependence and Group Processing on Student Achievement and Attitude in Online Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Chang Woo; Zellner, Ronald D.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of positive interdependence and group processing on student achievement and attitude in online learning. Students in three university courses received initial instruction about teamwork skills and cooperative learning and were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups in each course. The "positive…

  4. Sexual transformations and intimate behaviors in romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Burke, Tricia J; Young, Valerie J

    2012-01-01

    To understand the association between sexual transformations (i.e., changes in sexual behavior for the partner), intimate behaviors, and relationship quality among couples in romantic relationships, this study used Actor Partner Interdependence Models to examine frequency of sexual transformations, feelings about sexual transformations, and intimate behaviors as predictors of relationship satisfaction among 96 couples (N = 192). Sexual transformations were also examined as a moderator of the association between intimate behavior and relationship satisfaction. Results indicated that relationship satisfaction was positively associated with partners' frequent sexual transformations, actors' positive feelings about sexual transformations, and intimate behavior from the partner. Further, in less intimate relationships, relationship satisfaction was greater when partners reported making more sexual transformations.

  5. The broader autism phenotype and friendships in non-clinical dyads.

    PubMed

    Wainer, Allison L; Block, Nicole; Donnellan, M Brent; Ingersoll, Brooke

    2013-10-01

    The broader autism phenotype (BAP) is a set of subclinical traits qualitatively similar to those observed in autism spectrum disorders. The current study sought to elucidate the association between self- and informant-reports of the BAP and friendships, in a non-clinical sample of college student dyads. Self-informant agreement of the BAP and friendship similarity was evaluated, and the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model was used to test how both friends' BAP characteristics jointly and uniquely contribute to the experiences of friendships. Results suggest self-informant agreement about the BAP, friendship closeness, quality, and conflict. Actor effects were observed for the BAP and friendship values, quality, conflict, and loneliness. Findings suggest that the BAP relates in meaningful ways to self-perceptions of friendship variables in the general population.

  6. Stable Same-Sex Friendships with Higher Achieving Partners Promote Mathematical Reasoning in Lower Achieving Primary School Children

    PubMed Central

    DeLay, Dawn; Laursen, Brett; Kiuru, Noona; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate friend influence over mathematical reasoning in a sample of 374 children in 187 same-sex friend dyads (184 girls in 92 friendships; 190 boys in 95 friendships). Participants completed surveys that measured mathematical reasoning in the 3rd grade (approximately 9 years old) and one year later in the 4th grade (approximately 10 years old). Analyses designed for dyadic data (i.e., longitudinal Actor-Partner Interdependence Models) indicated that higher achieving friends influenced the mathematical reasoning of lower achieving friends, but not the reverse. Specifically, greater initial levels of mathematical reasoning among higher achieving partners in the 3rd grade predicted greater increases in mathematical reasoning from 3rd grade to 4th grade among lower achieving partners. These effects held after controlling for peer acceptance and rejection, task avoidance, interest in mathematics, maternal support for homework, parental education, length of the friendship, and friendship group norms on mathematical reasoning. PMID:26402901

  7. How large are actor and partner effects of personality on relationship satisfaction? The importance of controlling for shared method variance.

    PubMed

    Orth, Ulrich

    2013-10-01

    Previous research suggests that the personality of a relationship partner predicts not only the individual's own satisfaction with the relationship but also the partner's satisfaction. Based on the actor-partner interdependence model, the present research tested whether actor and partner effects of personality are biased when the same method (e.g., self-report) is used for the assessment of personality and relationship satisfaction and, consequently, shared method variance is not controlled for. Data came from 186 couples, of whom both partners provided self- and partner reports on the Big Five personality traits. Depending on the research design, actor effects were larger than partner effects (when using only self-reports), smaller than partner effects (when using only partner reports), or of about the same size as partner effects (when using self- and partner reports). The findings attest to the importance of controlling for shared method variance in dyadic data analysis.

  8. Compassionate love as a mechanism linking sacred qualities of marriage to older couples' marital satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sabey, Allen K; Rauer, Amy J; Jensen, Jakob F

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has underscored the robust links between sanctification of marriage and marital outcomes, and recent developments in the literature suggest that compassionate love, which is important for intimate relationships, may act as a mediator of that relationship. Accordingly, the current study used actor-partner interdependence models to examine the relationship between a spiritual cognition (i.e., perceived sacred qualities of marriage) and marital satisfaction, and to determine whether that relationship is mediated by compassionate love, in a sample of older married couples (N = 64). Results revealed that wives' greater sacred qualities of marriage were significantly and positively linked to marital satisfaction on the part of both spouses, and that these links were partially mediated by couples' reports of compassionate love. These findings highlight the importance of moving beyond simply establishing the existence of the link between global markers of involvement of religion and marriage to understanding how specific spiritual cognitions may foster better relationship quality, especially among older couples.

  9. Supportive Dyadic Coping and Psychological Adaptation in Couples Parenting Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Relationship Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    García-López, Cristina; Sarriá, Encarnación; Pozo, Pilar; Recio, Patricia

    2016-11-01

    In couples parenting children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the partner becomes a primary source of support for addressing the additional parenting demands. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between supportive dyadic coping and parental adaptation, and to assess the mediating role of relationship satisfaction between them. Seventy-six couples parenting children with ASD participated. Data were gathered through self-report questionnaires and an Actor-Partner Interdependence Mediation Model was used. Mothers' and fathers' supportive dyadic coping was related to both their own and partner's relationship satisfaction and parental adaptation. Findings also revealed the mediation role of relationship satisfaction, in the association between supportive dyadic coping and parental adaptation. The implications for research and clinical practice are discussed.

  10. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms impact the emotional experience of intimacy during couple discussions.

    PubMed

    Leifker, Feea R; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Blandon, Alysia Y; Marshall, Amy D

    2015-01-01

    We examined the impact of PTSD symptom severity on emotional reactions to one's own and one's partner's intimacy behaviors. Heterosexual, community couples in which at least one partner reported elevated symptoms of PTSD were video-recorded discussing a relationship problem and self-reported their emotions immediately before and after the discussion. Each partner's intimacy behaviors were coded. Actor-Partner Interdependence Models indicate that, among those with greater PTSD symptom severity, partners' caring, understanding, and validation were associated with increased negative emotions, particularly fear. Among those with greater PTSD severity, provision of caring was associated with decreased anger, guilt, and sadness. Therefore, the receipt of intimacy was associated with increased negative emotions among individuals with elevated PTSD symptoms while provision of intimacy was associated with decreased negative emotions. Existing treatments for PTSD should consider the emotional context of provision and receipt of intimacy to more fully address relationship problems among couples dealing with PTSD.

  11. Secure base processes in couples: daily associations between support experiences and attachment security.

    PubMed

    Davila, Joanne; Kashy, Deborah A

    2009-02-01

    The authors examined secure base functioning in couples by studying the association between daily social support experiences and attachment security in a 14-day daily experiences study of 114 heterosexual dating couples. Both members of each couple reported on daily relationship-specific attachment security and support sought, provided, and received, as well as felt support. Within- and cross-partner associations were examined, as were reciprocal associations between support and security. Results of over-time Actor-Partner Interdependence Model analyses indicated that security (in the form of high comfort with intimacy and low anxiety about abandonment) was associated with the most adaptive support experiences, whereas high anxiety about abandonment was associated with the least, and particularly with a lack of sensitive caregiving. Implications for understanding secure base dynamics in couples are discussed and guidelines for where to intervene as well as what to target in relationship distress prevention programs are provided.

  12. Does spousal support moderate the association between perceived racial discrimination and depressive symptoms among African American couples?

    PubMed

    McNeil, Sharde' N; Fincham, Frank D; Beach, Steven R H

    2014-03-01

    Social stress theory proposes that stress resulting from one's social position in society leads to fewer coping resources, and subsequently causes an increase in mental health problems. Guided by this framework, we investigated whether the relationship between perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms was moderated by spousal social support in a sample of 487 African American heterosexual couples. Using the actor-partner interdependence model, findings suggested that female partner's perceived racial discrimination was predictive of her depressive symptomology irrespective of spousal support and male partner's perceived racial discrimination was predictive of depressive symptomology only among men with low levels of spousal support. No partner effects were present. The results demonstrate the need to examine variability in social stress and mental health outcomes for those in close relationships.

  13. When Low Self-Esteem Encourages Behaviors that Risk Rejection to Increase Interdependence: The Role of Relational Self-Control

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Levi R.; McNulty, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing interdependence in an intimate relationship requires engaging in behaviors that risk rejection, such as expressing affection and asking for support. Who takes such risks and who avoids them? Although several theoretical perspectives suggest that self-esteem plays a crucial role in shaping such behaviors, they can be used to make competing predictions regarding the direction of this effect. Six studies reconcile these contrasting predictions by demonstrating that the effects of self-esteem on behaviors that risk rejection to increase interdependence depend on relational self-construal— i.e., the extent to which people define themselves by their close relationships. In Studies 1 and 2, participants were given the opportunity to disclose negative personal information (Study 1) and feelings of intimacy (Study 2) to their dating partners. In Study 3, married couples reported the extent to which they confided in one another. In Study 4, we manipulated self-esteem and relational self-construal and participants reported their willingness to engage in behaviors that increase interdependence. In Studies 5 and 6, we manipulated the salience of interpersonal risk and participants reported their willingness to engage in behaviors that risk rejection to increase interdependence. In all six studies, self-esteem was positively associated with behaviors that can increase interdependence among people low in relational self-construal but negatively associated with those behaviors among people high in relational self-construal. Accordingly, theoretical descriptions of the role of self-esteem in relationships will be most complete to the extent that they consider the degree to which people define themselves by their close relationships. PMID:23586411

  14. Game Theoretic Modeling of Security and Interdependency in a Public Cloud

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    information without up-front or long-term commitment of resources. Moreover, a cloud user can dynamically grow and shrink the resources provisioned to an...up-front or long-term commitment of resources. Moreover, a cloud user can dynamically grow and shrink the resources provisioned to an application on...infrastructure and have easy access to their information without up-front or long-term commitment of resources. Moreover, a cloud user can dynamically grow

  15. Effective Middle School Teacher Teams: A Ternary Model of Interdependency Rather than a Catch Phrase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of middle schooling in Australia has brought about changes to the working conditions of many teachers including finding themselves in teacher teams. The formation of such teams has been identified as critical to Australian middle school reform with teacher teams underpinning several of the fundamental components of a middle school…

  16. Interdependent Relationship Theory: A Model for Reducing Discipline Issues with Latino/Hispanic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Lorraine S.

    2011-01-01

    Studies continue to reveal major concerns with discipline issues, such as referrals, detentions, and suspensions, involving Latino/Hispanic students. This problem particularly affects immigrant students in urban neighborhoods that may be characterized by high poverty and crime rates. The purpose of this study was to explore the intersection of…

  17. Research on a Denial of Service (DoS) Detection System Based on Global Interdependent Behaviors in a Sensor Network Environment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-gu; Jung, Sungmo; Kim, Jong Hyun; Seo, Dong Il; Kim, Seoksoo

    2010-01-01

    This research suggests a Denial of Service (DoS) detection method based on the collection of interdependent behavior data in a sensor network environment. In order to collect the interdependent behavior data, we use a base station to analyze traffic and behaviors among nodes and introduce methods of detecting changes in the environment with precursor symptoms. The study presents a DoS Detection System based on Global Interdependent Behaviors and shows the result of detecting a sensor carrying out DoS attacks through the test-bed. PMID:22163475

  18. Mapping interpersonal communication between pediatricians and mothers: understandings, interdependencies and gaps.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Devalina

    2013-12-01

    Interpersonal communication between pediatricians and mothers is both complex and interdependent. The mother is dependent on the pediatrician for her child's wellbeing and care along expertise-related dimensions for which she cannot provide. The pediatrician is dependent on the mother's ability to provide accurate information about the child's health and habits, so that the doctor, who has limited time with the child, is able to make continuing accurate diagnoses. This paper seeks to provide a basic understanding of interpersonal mis-/communication between mothers and pediatricians, a complex area which has not heretofore been mapped in the contemporary Indian context. Therefore, the paper presents a small-scale exploratory qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with both doctors and mothers in the city of Kolkata (Calcutta), India. It focuses on providing an understanding of the factors that may enable or disenable instrumental or relational communication in the mother-pediatrician situation. Four major themes emerge from the data: first, the shifting borders of information between pediatricians and parents; second, the respective roles of verbal and non-verbal communication in the consultation; third, a tension between the traditional and the modern; and fourth, understandings of professional and interpersonal relationship in the context of responsibility for a child.

  19. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  20. Critical clusters in interdependent economic sectors. A data-driven spectral clustering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Gabriele; Setola, Roberto; Panzieri, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we develop a data-driven hierarchical clustering methodology to group the economic sectors of a country in order to highlight strongly coupled groups that are weakly coupled with other groups. Specifically, we consider an input-output representation of the coupling among the sectors and we interpret the relation among sectors as a directed graph; then we recursively apply the spectral clustering methodology over the graph, without a priori information on the number of groups that have to be obtained. In order to do this, we resort to the eigengap criterion, where a suitable number of groups is selected automatically based on the intensity and structure of the coupling among the sectors. We validate the proposed methodology considering a case study for Italy, inspecting how the coupling among clusters and sectors changes from the year 1995 to 2011, showing that in the years the Italian structure underwent deep changes, becoming more and more interdependent, i.e., a large part of the economy has become tightly coupled.

  1. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andrea W U; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms.

  2. Does the Interdependence between Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Explain the Antioxidant Paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Subrata Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in many chronic diseases. However, antioxidant trials are so far largely unsuccessful as a preventive or curative measure. Chronic low-grade inflammatory process, on the other hand, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of a number of chronic diseases. Oxidative stress and inflammation are closely related pathophysiological processes, one of which can be easily induced by another. Thus, both processes are simultaneously found in many pathological conditions. Therefore, the failure of antioxidant trials might result from failure to select appropriate agents that specifically target both inflammation and oxidative stress or failure to use both antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents simultaneously or use of nonselective agents that block some of the oxidative and/or inflammatory pathways but exaggerate the others. To examine whether the interdependence between oxidative stress and inflammation can explain the antioxidant paradox we discussed in the present review the basic aspects of oxidative stress and inflammation and their relationship and dependence. PMID:26881031

  3. Interdependent Adrenergic Receptor Regulation of Arc and ZIf268 mRNA in Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Essali, Norah; Sanders, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter that signals by stimulating the α1, α2 and β adrenergic receptor (AR). We determined the role of these receptors in regulating the immediate early genes, Activity Regulated Cytoskeleton Associated Protein (Arc) and Zif268 in the rat cerebral cortex. RX821002, an α2 -AR antagonist, produced Arc and Zif268 elevations across cortical layers. Next we examined the effects of delivering RX821002 with an α1- -AR antagonist, prazosin, and a β -AR antagonist, propranolol. RX821002 given with a prazosin and propranolol cocktail, or with each of these antagonists individually, decreased Arc and Zif268 to saline-treated control levels in most cortical layers. Arc and Zif268 levels were also similar to saline-treated control levels when rats were given a prazosin and propranolol cocktail alone, or when each of these antagonists were delivered individually. Taken together, these data reveal that α2 –AR uniquely exert a tonic inibitory regulation of both Arc and Zif268 compared to α1 and β-AR. However, the ability of RX821002 to increase Arc and Zif268 is interdependent with α1 and β –AR signaling. PMID:26655475

  4. Nonlinear analyses of interictal EEG map the brain interdependences in human focal epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quyen, Michel Le Van; Martinerie, Jacques; Adam, Claude; Varela, Francisco J.

    1999-03-01

    The degree of interdependence between intracranial electroencephalographic (EEG) channels was investigated in epileptic patients with temporal lobe seizures during interictal (between seizures) periods. With a novel method to characterize nonlinear cross-predictability, that is, the predictability of one channel using another channel as data base, we demonstrated here a possibility to extract information on the spatio-temporal organization of interactions between multichannel recording sites. This method determines whether two channels contain common activity, and often, whether one channel contains activity induced by the activity of the other channel. In particular, the technique and the comparison with surrogate data demonstrated that transient large-scale nonlinear entrainments by the epileptogenic region can be identified, this with or without epileptic activity. Furthermore, these recurrent activities related with the epileptic foci occurred in well-defined spatio-temporal patterns. This suggests that the epileptogenic region can exhibit very subtle influences on other brain regions during an interictal period and raises the possibility that the cross-predictability analysis of interictal data may be used as a significant aid in locating epileptogenic foci.

  5. Simultaneous first- and second-order percolation transitions in interdependent networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Bashan, Amir; Cohen, Reuven; Berezin, Yehiel; Shnerb, Nadav; Havlin, Shlomo

    2014-07-01

    In a system of interdependent networks, an initial failure of nodes invokes a cascade of iterative failures that may lead to a total collapse of the whole system in the form of an abrupt first-order transition. When the fraction of initial failed nodes 1-p reaches criticality p = p(c), the abrupt collapse occurs by spontaneous cascading failures. At this stage, the giant component decreases slowly in a plateau form and the number of iterations in the cascade τ diverges. The origin of this plateau and its increasing with the size of the system have been unclear. Here we find that, simultaneously with the abrupt first-order transition, a spontaneous second-order percolation occurs during the cascade of iterative failures. This sheds light on the origin of the plateau and how its length scales with the size of the system. Understanding the critical nature of the dynamical process of cascading failures may be useful for designing strategies for preventing and mitigating catastrophic collapses.

  6. Simultaneous first- and second-order percolation transitions in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong; Bashan, Amir; Cohen, Reuven; Berezin, Yehiel; Shnerb, Nadav; Havlin, Shlomo

    2014-07-01

    In a system of interdependent networks, an initial failure of nodes invokes a cascade of iterative failures that may lead to a total collapse of the whole system in the form of an abrupt first-order transition. When the fraction of initial failed nodes 1-p reaches criticality p =pc, the abrupt collapse occurs by spontaneous cascading failures. At this stage, the giant component decreases slowly in a plateau form and the number of iterations in the cascade τ diverges. The origin of this plateau and its increasing with the size of the system have been unclear. Here we find that, simultaneously with the abrupt first-order transition, a spontaneous second-order percolation occurs during the cascade of iterative failures. This sheds light on the origin of the plateau and how its length scales with the size of the system. Understanding the critical nature of the dynamical process of cascading failures may be useful for designing strategies for preventing and mitigating catastrophic collapses.

  7. Insights into the Role and Interdependence of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Hong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The crucial roles of oxidative stress and inflammation in the development of hepatic diseases have been unraveled and emphasized for decades. From steatosis to fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer, hepatic oxidative stress, and inflammation are sustained and participated in this pathological progressive process. Notably, increasing evidences showed that oxidative stress and inflammation are tightly related, which are regarded as essential partners that present simultaneously and interact with each other in various pathological conditions, creating a vicious cycle to aggravate the hepatic diseases. Clarifying the interaction of oxidative stress and inflammation is of great importance to provide new directions and targets for developing therapeutic intervention. Herein, this review is concerned with the regulation and interdependence of oxidative stress and inflammation in a variety of liver diseases. In addition to classical mediators and signaling, particular emphasis is placed upon immune suppression, a potential linkage of oxidative stress and inflammation, to provide new inspiration for the treatment of liver diseases. Furthermore, since antioxidation and anti-inflammation have been extensively attempted as the strategies for treatment of liver diseases, the application of herbal medicines and their derived compounds that protect liver from injury via regulating oxidative stress and inflammation collectively were reviewed and discussed. PMID:28070230

  8. [Analysis of interdependence of temperament, neuroendocrine control and psychophysiological status during dry immersion].

    PubMed

    Nichiporuk, I A

    2008-01-01

    Interdependence of temperament, hormonal and psychophysiological status was investigated in 8 young volunteers for 7-d dry immersion (DI). Blood levels of insulin, sex, steroid, thyroid hormones and psychomotor parameters were determined on DI days 3 and 7, and on day 7 of recovery. Before DI, the volunteers filled in the Kettelle personality questionnaire. During DI, anxious subjects spent less time to compare visual patterns demonstrating high and stable speed of reactions but made a bit more errors. Extraverts showed high speed of reactions and stability of psychomotor parameters and did not increase the number of errors. Easy-tempered and introvert subjects preserved inherently high insulin concentrations in DI. Support deprivation was attended by drop of the levels of triiodothyronine and cortisol and rise of prolactin and thyroxin. Results of multiple correlation analysis led to the conclusion that DI accentuates the role of original extra-introversion and dampens origin anxiety. Successfulness can be attained by adequate alteration of the levels of steroid and thyroid hormones with effectively balanced vagoinsulin-sympathoadrenal neuroendocrine control and monoaminergic CNV activity.

  9. A cross-linguistic and bilingual evaluation of the interdependence between lexical and grammatical domains

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Cereijido, Gabriela; Gutiérrez-Clellen, Vera F.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine within and across language relationships between lexical and grammatical domains by focusing on measures of lexical diversity and grammatical complexity in Spanish and English. One hundred and ninety-six preschool and school-aged Latino children with different levels of English and Spanish proficiencies and different language abilities produced narratives in Spanish, English, or both. Analyses revealed strong associations between lexical (number of different words and number of different verbs) and grammatical measures (mean length of utterances in words and use of ditransitive predicates), supporting the domain interdependence hypothesis within a language. Cross-linguistic comparisons indicate a greater diversity of verbs and ditransitive predicates in Spanish compared to English for this population. In the language samples of children who produced narratives in the two languages, there was no relationship between the two domains across languages. The lack of cross-language correlations may be related to other variables influencing lexical and semantic development in bilingual learners. Methodological issues to be considered in future studies with bilingual speakers are discussed. PMID:19444336

  10. Parental bereavement and the loss of purpose in life as a function of interdependent self-construal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyung; Hicks, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    Children are often inextricably linked to their parents' hopes and dreams. As such, the loss of a child often represents one of the most traumatic experiences possible. The current research explores how this specific loss relates to one's sense of purpose in life. We further explore whether the loss of a child is particularly detrimental to one's sense of purpose for highly interdependent parents. Analyses of parents from the Midlife in the United States data set revealed, as expected, that the loss of child negatively predicts one's sense of purpose in life, and that this effect is most pronounced for parents high in interdependent self-construal. Potential mechanisms and implications of the present findings are discussed.

  11. Interdependence and contagion among industry-level US credit markets: An application of wavelet and VMD based copula approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain; Nor, Safwan Mohd; Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh; Mensi, Walid

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the interdependence and contagion among US industry-level credit markets. We use daily data of 11 industries from 17 December 2007 to 31 December 2014 for the time-frequency, namely, wavelet squared coherence analysis. The empirical analysis reveals that Basic Materials (Utilities) industry credit market has the highest (lowest) interdependence with other industries. Basic Materials credit market passes cyclical effect to all other industries. The little "shift-contagion" as defined by Forbes and Rigobon (2002) is examined using elliptical and Archimedean copulas on the short-run decomposed series obtained through Variational Mode Decomposition (VMD). The contagion effects between US industry-level credit markets mainly occurred during the global financial crisis of 2007-08.

  12. The Interdependence of Long- and Short-Term Components in Unmasked Repetition Priming: An Indication of Shared Resources.

    PubMed

    Merema, Matt R; Speelman, Craig P

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that unmasked repetition priming is composed of distinct long-and short-term priming components. The current study sought to clarify the relationship between these components by examining the relationship between them. A total of 60 people (45 females, 15 males) participated in a computer-based lexical decision task designed to measure levels of short-term priming across different levels of long-term priming. The results revealed an interdependent relationship between the two components, whereby an increase in long-term priming prompted a decrease in short-term priming. Both long-term and short-term priming were accurately captured by a single power function over seven minutes post repetition, suggesting the two components may draw on the same resources. This interdependence between long- and short-term priming may serve to improve fluency in reading.

  13. The too-much-talent effect: team interdependence determines when more talent is too much or not enough.

    PubMed

    Swaab, Roderick I; Schaerer, Michael; Anicich, Eric M; Ronay, Richard; Galinsky, Adam D

    2014-08-01

    Five studies examined the relationship between talent and team performance. Two survey studies found that people believe there is a linear and nearly monotonic relationship between talent and performance: Participants expected that more talent improves performance and that this relationship never turns negative. However, building off research on status conflicts, we predicted that talent facilitates performance-but only up to a point, after which the benefits of more talent decrease and eventually become detrimental as intrateam coordination suffers. We also predicted that the level of task interdependence is a key determinant of when more talent is detrimental rather than beneficial. Three archival studies revealed that the too-much-talent effect emerged when team members were interdependent (football and basketball) but not independent (baseball). Our basketball analysis also established the mediating role of team coordination. When teams need to come together, more talent can tear them apart.

  14. Theories linguistiques, modeles informatiques, experimentation psycholinguistique (Linguistic Theories, Information-Processing Models, Psycholinguistic Experimentation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubois, Daniele

    1975-01-01

    Delineates and elaborates upon the underlying psychological postulates in linguistic and information-processing models, and shows the interdependence of psycholinguistics and linguistic analysis. (Text is in French.) (DB)

  15. The Mathematics of Aggregation, Interdependence, Organizations and Systems of Nash Equilibria (NE): A Replacement for Game Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    quorum sensing, a decentralized decision-making process used by bacteria and social insects to coordinate group behavior and to perform collective...distributions. In the future, a starting point would be to compare a team of two random walkers against two interdependent walkers with one coin for...consensus decisions and against another team of two walkers with an entangled coin . Conclusions. Traditional social science research has been

  16. Regionally Aligned Forces: The Critical Role of Military Engagement and Interdependence Between Conventional and Special Operations Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    to provide the president with creative options.42 With events like these in mind , the Army’s implementation of the RAF concept can be seen as an...47 Operations Associated with the RAF Concept Keeping in mind the circumstances surrounding the development of the RAF concept as well as the...operations in mind , this section analyzes the effects of engagement and interdependence between CF and SOF on mission effectiveness under

  17. Interdependence and dynamics of essential services in an extensive risk context: a case study in Montserrat, West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sword-Daniels, V. L.; Rossetto, T.; Wilson, T. M.; Sargeant, S.

    2015-05-01

    The essential services that support urban living are complex and interdependent, and their disruption in disasters directly affects society. Yet there are few empirical studies to inform our understanding of the vulnerabilities and resilience of complex infrastructure systems in disasters. This research takes a systems thinking approach to explore the dynamic behaviour of a network of essential services, in the presence and absence of volcanic ashfall hazards in Montserrat, West Indies. Adopting a case study methodology and qualitative methods to gather empirical data, we centre the study on the healthcare system and its interconnected network of essential services. We identify different types of relationship between sectors and develop a new interdependence classification system for analysis. Relationships are further categorised by hazard conditions, for use in extensive risk contexts. During heightened volcanic activity, relationships between systems transform in both number and type: connections increase across the network by 41%, and adapt to increase cooperation and information sharing. Interconnections add capacities to the network, increasing the resilience of prioritised sectors. This in-depth and context-specific approach provides a new methodology for studying the dynamics of infrastructure interdependence in an extensive risk context, and can be adapted for use in other hazard contexts.

  18. Interdependence and dynamics of essential services in an extensive risk context: a case study in Montserrat, West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sword-Daniels, V. L.; Rossetto, T.; Wilson, T. M.; Sargeant, S.

    2015-02-01

    The essential services that support urban living are complex and interdependent, and their disruption in disasters directly affects society. Yet there are few empirical studies to inform our understanding of the vulnerabilities and resilience of complex infrastructure systems in disasters. This research takes a systems thinking approach to explore the dynamic behaviour of a network of essential services, in the presence and absence of volcanic ashfall hazards in Montserrat, West Indies. Adopting a case study methodology and qualitative methods to gather empirical data we centre the study on the healthcare system and its interconnected network of essential services. We identify different types of relationship between sectors and develop a new interdependence classification system for analysis. Relationships are further categorised by hazard condition, for use in extensive risk contexts. During heightened volcanic activity, relationships between systems transform in both number and type: connections increase across the network by 41%, and adapt to increase cooperation and information sharing. Interconnections add capacities to the network, increasing the resilience of prioritised sectors. This in-depth and context-specific approach provides a new methodology for studying the dynamics of infrastructure interdependence in an extensive risk context, and can be adapted for use in other hazard contexts.

  19. Polyprotein-Driven Formation of Two Interdependent Sets of Complexes Supporting Hepatitis C Virus Genome Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Rafael G. B.; Isken, Olaf; Tautz, Norbert; McLauchlan, John

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires proteins from the NS3-NS5B polyprotein to create a replicase unit for replication of its genome. The replicase proteins form membranous compartments in cells to facilitate replication, but little is known about their functional organization within these structures. We recently reported on intragenomic replicons, bicistronic viral transcripts expressing an authentic replicase from open reading frame 2 (ORF2) and a second duplicate nonstructural (NS) polyprotein from ORF1. Using these constructs and other methods, we have assessed the polyprotein requirements for rescue of different lethal point mutations across NS3-5B. Mutations readily tractable to rescue broadly fell into two groupings: those requiring expression of a minimum NS3-5A and those requiring expression of a minimum NS3-5B polyprotein. A cis-acting mutation that blocked NS3 helicase activity, T1299A, was tolerated when introduced into either ORF within the intragenomic replicon, but unlike many other mutations required the other ORF to express a functional NS3-5B. Three mutations were identified as more refractile to rescue: one that blocked cleavage of the NS4B5A boundary (S1977P), another in the NS3 helicase (K1240N), and a third in NS4A (V1665G). Introduced into ORF1, these exhibited a dominant negative phenotype, but with K1240N inhibiting replication as a minimum NS3-5A polyprotein whereas V1665G and S1977P only impaired replication as a NS3-5B polyprotein. Furthermore, an S1977P-mutated NS3-5A polyprotein complemented other defects shown to be dependent on NS3-5A for rescue. Overall, our findings suggest the existence of two interdependent sets of protein complexes supporting RNA replication, distinguishable by the minimum polyprotein requirement needed for their formation. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses reshape the intracellular membranes of cells to form a compartment within which to replicate their genome, but little is known about the functional

  20. Subunits of the Snf1 kinase heterotrimer show interdependence for association and activity.

    PubMed

    Elbing, Karin; Rubenstein, Eric M; McCartney, Rhonda R; Schmidt, Martin C

    2006-09-08

    The Snf1 kinase and its mammalian orthologue, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), function as heterotrimers composed of a catalytic alpha-subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma. The beta-subunit is thought to hold the complex together and control subcellular localization whereas the gamma-subunit plays a regulatory role by binding to and blocking the function of an auto-inhibitory domain (AID) present in the alpha-subunit. In addition, catalytic activity requires phosphorylation by a distinct upstream kinase. In yeast, any one of three Snf1-activating kinases, Sak1, Tos3, or Elm1, can fulfill this role. We have previously shown that Sak1 is the only Snf1-activating kinase that forms a stable complex with Snf1. Here we show that the formation of the Sak1.Snf1 complex requires the beta- and gamma-subunits in vivo. However, formation of the Sak1.Snf1 complex is not necessary for glucose-regulated phosphorylation of the Snf1 activation loop. Snf1 kinase purified from cells lacking the beta-subunits do not contain any gamma-subunit, indicating that the Snf1 kinase does not form a stable alphagamma dimer in vivo. In vitro kinase assays using purified full-length and truncated Snf1 proteins demonstrate that the kinase domain, which lacks the AID, is significantly more active than the full-length Snf1 protein. Addition of purified beta- and gamma-subunits could stimulate the kinase activity of the full-length alpha-subunit but only when all three subunits were present, suggesting an interdependence of all three subunits for assembly of a functional complex.

  1. Tendon material properties vary and are interdependent among turkey hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Matson, Andrew; Konow, Nicolai; Miller, Samuel; Konow, Pernille P; Roberts, Thomas J

    2012-10-15

    The material properties of a tendon affect its ability to store and return elastic energy, resist damage, provide mechanical feedback and amplify or attenuate muscle power. While the structural properties of a tendon are known to respond to a variety of stimuli, the extent to which material properties vary among individual muscles remains unclear. We studied the tendons of six different muscles in the hindlimb of Eastern wild turkeys to determine whether there was variation in elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and resilience. A hydraulic testing machine was used to measure tendon force during quasi-static lengthening, and a stress-strain curve was constructed. There was substantial variation in tendon material properties among different muscles. Average elastic modulus differed significantly between some tendons, and values for the six different tendons varied nearly twofold, from 829±140 to 1479±106 MPa. Tendons were stretched to failure, and the stress at failure, or ultimate tensile stress, was taken as a lower-limit estimate of tendon strength. Breaking tests for four of the tendons revealed significant variation in ultimate tensile stress, ranging from 66.83±14.34 to 112.37±9.39 MPa. Resilience, or the fraction of energy returned in cyclic length changes was generally high, and one of the four tendons tested was significantly different in resilience from the other tendons (range: 90.65±0.83 to 94.02±0.71%). An analysis of correlation between material properties revealed a positive relationship between ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus (r(2)=0.79). Specifically, stiffer tendons were stronger, and we suggest that this correlation results from a constrained value of breaking strain, which did not vary significantly among tendons. This finding suggests an interdependence of material properties that may have a structural basis and may explain some adaptive responses observed in studies of tendon plasticity.

  2. Interdependence of Bad and Puma during ionizing-radiation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Toruno, Cristhian; Carbonneau, Seth; Stewart, Rodney A; Jette, Cicely

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks trigger an extensive cellular signaling response that involves the coordination of hundreds of proteins to regulate DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptotic pathways. The cellular outcome often depends on the level of DNA damage as well as the particular cell type. Proliferating zebrafish embryonic neurons are highly sensitive to IR-induced apoptosis, and both p53 and its transcriptional target puma are essential mediators of the response. The BH3-only protein Puma has previously been reported to activate mitochondrial apoptosis through direct interaction with the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak, thus constituting the role of an "activator" BH3-only protein. This distinguishes it from BH3-only proteins like Bad that are thought to indirectly promote apoptosis through binding to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, thereby preventing the sequestration of activator BH3-only proteins and allowing them to directly interact with and activate Bax and Bak. We have shown previously that overexpression of the BH3-only protein Bad in zebrafish embryos supports normal embryonic development but greatly sensitizes developing neurons to IR-induced apoptosis. While Bad has previously been shown to play only a minor role in promoting IR-induced apoptosis of T cells in mice, we demonstrate that Bad is essential for robust IR-induced apoptosis in zebrafish embryonic neural tissue. Moreover, we found that both p53 and Puma are required for Bad-mediated radiosensitization in vivo. Our findings show the existence of a hierarchical interdependence between Bad and Puma whereby Bad functions as an essential sensitizer and Puma as an essential activator of IR-induced mitochondrial apoptosis specifically in embryonic neural tissue.

  3. The Linguistic Interdependence Hypothesis and the language development of Yucatec Maya-Spanish bilingual children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrooman, Michael D.

    2000-11-01

    The Linguistic Interdependence Hypothesis as developed by Cummins (1978) argues that certain first language (L1) knowledge can be positively transferred during the process of second language (L2) acquisition. The L1 linguistic knowledge and skills that a child possesses can be extremely instrumental to the development of corresponding abilities in the L2. An integral component of these facilitative aspects of language influence is that the L1 be sufficiently developed prior to the extensive exposure to the L2 as would be found, for example, in an educational environment. An additional theoretical framework that has motivated this study incorporates principles of Universal Grammar, namely, that there are innate properties of language shared by the human species, and that language acquisition is the result of the interaction between these biologically determined aspects of language with the learner's linguistic environment. The principal goal of this dissertation is to examine children's knowledge of one area of Yucatec Maya L1 syntax, specifically, the word order of simple transitive sentences. By means of an experiment conducted with 28 Mayan children of 4 and 5 years of age, data were gathered and analyzed. Overall, the findings suggest that the subjects of the study are still in the process of acquiring the syntactic structure under investigation, that their L1 is still developing. Very few of the subjects demonstrated mastery of the structure under investigation. With regards to pedagogical concerns within the context of minority language education, the potentiality for these findings to enhance or inhibit the subsequent acquisition of Spanish as an L2 is examined.

  4. Coordinated Observations of Space Debris as Optimisation Problem of Inter-Dependent Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciotti, M.; Charlish, A.

    2013-08-01

    Optimal allocation of sensor resources is addressed in this paper in the frame of space surveillance application. Inspiration is taken from the optimal management of multi-functional sensors and netted surveillance sensors, for which the Sensor Management problem is often addressed as a Markov Decision Process. This approach allows determining the optimal decision at each discrete time instant by quantifying the expected payoff coming from the selected action. An action might be the assignment of the i -th surveillance task to the m -th sensor in the network ('tasking'), the selection of the i -th task at the k -th time slot ('scheduling'), or the activation of a specific sensor configuration for the completion of the i -th task ('resource allocation'). The common objective is the maximization of the global reward coming from the selected sequence of actions over a finite or infinite time horizon. This leads to a sequence of coordinated observations carried out by the sensor(s), which are determined statically or dynamically by the Sensor Manager. In this paper, the allocation of space surveillance resources is analysed as a management problem for sensor(s) with finite resources. The proposed allocation is driven by the operational requirements for space objects cataloguing, such as the object population coverage and the track accuracy. A sequential resource allocation strategy is formulated in order to cope with such inter-dependent, concurring performance metrics. The approach can be also extended to multiple sensors with different performance or nature. Promising results are demonstrated over a phased array radar case study.

  5. Creation and evolution of North America's gas and electricity regime: A dynamic example of interdependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukert, Joseph M.

    Growing interdependence of Canada, the United States, and Mexico in production, trade, and consumption of natural gas and electricity during the 1990s produced a new North American functional entity---partly governmental, partly non-governmental, and partly intergovernmental. Cooperation among three dissimilar, jealously sovereign countries has surmounted several shocks (California's flawed energy "deregulation" experiments, Enron's scandal, disagreements over the Kyoto Protocol and the Iraq invasion, soaring energy prices, and economic downturns). Explaining this as an international regime (a system of principles, norms, rules, and decision-making procedures around which actor expectations converge in a given issue area), this work explains the timing of its emergence...and how its self-adjusting nature portends increasing significance. Extensive interviews are augmented by newly obtained U.S. government documents about U.S.-Mexican gas negotiations in the late 1970s---when a regime seemed logical, but when necessary and sufficient conditions were lacking. The North American Free Trade Agreement had to be accompanied by regulatory reforms and some market effects, while the gas and electricity industries converged and electronic developments facilitated exchanges of current and future supplies of gas and/or electricity. Now, mutually beneficial pipeline and powerline connections spur expansion, while backsliding from regime acceptance becomes ever more costly---especially for some regions. This is a "virtual" regime---sensed by those involved with no formal charter beyond NAFTA's vague treatment of energy. It is "metanational"---grounded both within and beyond these nation-states. Operating in accord with varied modes of governance, but also through such modest institutions as the North American Energy Working Group and the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation, the regime supports differing national energy policy goals for the three countries and

  6. Interdependence of muscle atrophy and bone loss induced by mechanical unloading.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shane A; Lang, Charles H; Zhang, Yue; Paul, Emmanuel M; Laufenberg, Lacee J; Lewis, Gregory S; Donahue, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical unloading induces muscle atrophy and bone loss; however, the time course and interdependence of these effects is not well defined. We subjected 4-month-old C57BL/6J mice to hindlimb suspension (HLS) for 3 weeks, euthanizing 12 to 16 mice on day (D) 0, 7, 14, and 21. Lean mass was 7% to 9% lower for HLS versus control from D7-21. Absolute mass of the gastrocnemius (gastroc) decreased 8% by D7, and was maximally decreased 16% by D14 of HLS. mRNA levels of Atrogin-1 in the gastroc and quadriceps (quad) were increased 99% and 122%, respectively, at D7 of HLS. Similar increases in MuRF1 mRNA levels occurred at D7. Both atrogenes returned to baseline by D14. Protein synthesis in gastroc and quad was reduced 30% from D7-14 of HLS, returning to baseline by D21. HLS decreased phosphorylation of SK61, a substrate of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), on D7-21, whereas 4E-BP1 was not lower until D21. Cortical thickness of the femur and tibia did not decrease until D14 of HLS. Cortical bone of controls did not change over time. HLS mice had lower distal femur bone volume fraction (-22%) by D14; however, the effects of HLS were eliminated by D21 because of the decline of trabecular bone mass of controls. Femur strength was decreased approximately 13% by D14 of HLS, with no change in tibia mechanical properties at any time point. This investigation reveals that muscle atrophy precedes bone loss during unloading and may contribute to subsequent skeletal deficits. Countermeasures that preserve muscle may reduce bone loss induced by mechanical unloading or prolonged disuse. Trabecular bone loss with age, similar to that which occurs in mature astronauts, is superimposed on unloading. Preservation of muscle mass, cortical structure, and bone strength during the experiment suggests muscle may have a greater effect on cortical than trabecular bone.

  7. The Identification of Filters and Interdependencies for Effective Resource Allocation: Coupling the Mitigation of Natural Hazards to Economic Development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agar, S. M.; Kunreuther, H.

    2005-12-01

    Policy formulation for the mitigation and management of risks posed by natural hazards requires that governments confront difficult decisions for resource allocation and be able to justify their spending. Governments also need to recognize when spending offers little improvement and the circumstances in which relatively small amounts of spending can make substantial differences. Because natural hazards can have detrimental impacts on local and regional economies, patterns of economic development can also be affected by spending decisions for disaster mitigation. This paper argues that by mapping interdependencies among physical, social and economic factors, governments can improve resource allocation to mitigate the risks of natural hazards while improving economic development on local and regional scales. Case studies of natural hazards in Turkey have been used to explore specific "filters" that act to modify short- and long-term outcomes. Pre-event filters can prevent an event from becoming a natural disaster or change a routine event into a disaster. Post-event filters affect both short and long-term recovery and development. Some filters cannot be easily modified by spending (e.g., rural-urban migration) but others (e.g., land-use practices) provide realistic spending targets. Net social benefits derived from spending, however, will also depend on the ways by which filters are linked, or so-called "interdependencies". A single weak link in an interdependent system, such as a power grid, can trigger a cascade of failures. Similarly, weak links in social and commercial networks can send waves of disruption through communities. Conversely, by understanding the positive impacts of interdependencies, spending can be targeted to maximize net social benefits while mitigating risks and improving economic development. Detailed information on public spending was not available for this study but case studies illustrate how networks of interdependent filters can modify

  8. Effects of an Interdependent Group Contingency on the Transition Behavior of Middle School Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Renee O; Haydon, Todd; McCoy, Dacia; Howard, Andrea

    2017-04-06

    An ABAB design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of an interdependent group contingency with randomized components to improve the transition behavior of middle school students identified with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBDs) served in an alternative educational setting. The intervention was implemented by one teacher with three classes of students, and the dependent variable was the percentage of students ready to begin class at the appropriate time. Data revealed significant improvements in student behavior, providing support for implementation of group contingencies for students with EBDs in alternative educational settings and an example of feasible procedures and data collection methods. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides ☆

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle W.; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H.; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. PMID:24743021

  10. Interdependent IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T-cell controls tumour eradication by combined α-CTLA-4+α-PD-1 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Fu, Tihui; Guan, Baoxiang; Chen, Jianfeng; Blando, Jorge M.; Allison, James P.; Xiong, Liangwen; Subudhi, Sumit K.; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 has shown significant clinical responses in different types of cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, combining detailed analysis of human tumour samples with preclinical tumour models, we report that concomitant blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 improves anti-tumour immune responses and synergistically eradicates tumour. Mechanistically, combination therapy relies on the interdependence between IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T cells, as lack of either pathway abrogates the immune-boosting and therapeutic effects of combination therapy. Combination treatment increases IL-7Rα expression on tumour-infiltrating T cells in an IFN-γ/IFN-γR signalling-dependent manner, which may serve as a potential biomarker for clinical trials with immune checkpoint blockade. Our data suggest that combining immune checkpoint blockade with IL-7 signalling could be an effective modality to improve immunotherapeutic efficacy. Taken together, we conclude that combination therapy potently reverses immunosuppression and eradicates tumours via an intricate interplay between IFN-γ/IFN-γR and IL-7/IL-7R pathways. PMID:27498556

  11. Examining the efficiency and interdependence of US credit and stock markets through MF-DFA and MF-DXA approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain; Nor, Safwan Mohd; Mensi, Walid; Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the power law properties of 11 US credit and stock markets at the industry level. We use multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DXA) to first investigate the relative efficiency of credit and stock markets and then evaluate the mutual interdependence between CDS-equity market pairs. The scaling exponents of the MF-DFA approach suggest that CDS markets are relatively more inefficient than their equity counterparts. However, Banks and Financial credit markets are relatively more efficient. Basic Materials (both CDS and equity indices) is the most inefficient sector of the US economy. The cross-correlation exponents obtained through MF-DXA also suggest that the relationship of the CDS and equity sectors within and across markets is multifractal for all pairs. Within the CDS market, Basic Materials is the most dependent sector, whereas equity market sectors can be divided into two distinct groups based on interdependence. The pair-wise dependence between Basic Materials sector CDSs and the equity index is also the highest. The degree of cross-correlation shows that the sectoral pairs of CDS and equity markets belong to a persistent cross-correlated series within selected time intervals.

  12. A meta-analysis of team-efficacy, potency, and performance: interdependence and level of analysis as moderators of observed relationships.

    PubMed

    Gully, Stanley M; Incalcaterra, Kara A; Joshi, Aparna; Beauien, J Matthew

    2002-10-01

    Meta-analytic techniques were used to examine level of analysis and interdependence as moderators of observed relationships between task-specific team-efficacy, generalized potency, and performance. Sixty-seven empirical studies yielding 256 effect sizes were identified and meta-analyzed. Results demonstrated that relationships are moderated by level of analysis. Effect sizes were stronger at the team level (p = .39) than at the individual level (p = .20). At the team level, both team-efficacy and potency had positive relationships with performance (ps = .41 and .37, respectively). Interdependence significantly moderated the relationship between team-efficacy and performance, but not between potency and performance. The relationship between team-efficacy and performance was stronger when interdependence was high (p = .45) than when it was low (p = .34).

  13. Robustness of a network formed by n interdependent networks with a one-to-one correspondence of dependent nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jianxi; Buldyrev, S. V.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.

    2012-06-01

    Many real-world networks interact with and depend upon other networks. We develop an analytical framework for studying a network formed by n fully interdependent randomly connected networks, each composed of the same number of nodes N. The dependency links connecting nodes from different networks establish a unique one-to-one correspondence between the nodes of one network and the nodes of the other network. We study the dynamics of the cascades of failures in such a network of networks (NON) caused by a random initial attack on one of the networks, after which a fraction p of its nodes survives. We find for the fully interdependent loopless NON that the final state of the NON does not depend on the dynamics of the cascades but is determined by a uniquely defined mutual giant component of the NON, which generalizes both the giant component of regular percolation of a single network (n=1) and the recently studied case of the mutual giant component of two interdependent networks (n=2). We also find that the mutual giant component does not depend on the topology of the NON and express it in terms of generating functions of the degree distributions of the network. Our results show that, for any n⩾2 there exists a critical p=pc>0 below which the mutual giant component abruptly collapses from a finite nonzero value for p⩾pc to zero for p

  14. Interdependent Networks: Reducing the Coupling Strength Leads to a Change from a First to Second Order Percolation Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshani, Roni; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-07-01

    We study a system composed from two interdependent networks A and B, where a fraction of the nodes in network A depends on nodes of network B and a fraction of the nodes in network B depends on nodes of network A. Because of the coupling between the networks, when nodes in one network fail they cause dependent nodes in the other network to also fail. This invokes an iterative cascade of failures in both networks. When a critical fraction of nodes fail, the iterative process results in a percolation phase transition that completely fragments both networks. We show both analytically and numerically that reducing the coupling between the networks leads to a change from a first order percolation phase transition to a second order percolation transition at a critical point. The scaling of the percolation order parameter near the critical point is characterized by the critical exponent β=1.

  15. Multi-agent social and organizational modeling of the electric power and natural gas markets.

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2001-12-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate large-scale socio-cognitive-technical systems. Viewing such systems from a multi-agent social and organizational perspective allows innovative computational policy analysis. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has taken such a perspective to produce an integrated model of the electric power and natural gas markets. This model focuses on the organizational interdependencies between these markets. These organizational interdependencies are being strained by fundamental market transformations.

  16. Science K-12, Interdependency of Living Things and Living Things With Their Environment. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utica City School District, NY.

    Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, physical science), and grade level. Choices of environmental topics such as weather, conservation of natural resources, and the interdependence of organisms and environment dominate objectives written for grades…

  17. Total Class Peer Tutoring and Interdependent Group Oriented Contingency: Improving the Academic and Task Related Behaviors of Fourth-Grade Urban Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo,Ya-yu; Cartledge, Gwendolyn

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Total Class Peer Tutoring (TCPT) and an interdependent group oriented contingency (GOC) on the social studies performances and off-task behaviors of eight general education fourth-grade students in an urban elementary school. An A-B-BC-B-BC design was implemented to evaluate the differential effects of TCPT…

  18. Patterns for Teaching Interdependence; Part A, K-3 [And] Part B, 4-6. Global Perspectives: A Humanistic Influence on the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C., Ed.; Long, Cathryn J., Ed.

    Ideas for creating lessons to introduce global perspectives on interdependence into the elementary social studies curriculum are presented. The booklet is intended as a companion to a series of guides for teaching selected universal concepts to K-12 students. Section I introduces five lessons for use in grades K-3. Lessons stress the…

  19. Suggestions for Curriculum Development [And] Handbook High School Grades, Part D, 10-12. Environmental Education Interdependence: A Concept Approach. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C.; Wood, Jayne Millar

    Two booklets comprise the grades 10-12 component of a series of guides for incorporating environmental education into the existing curriculum. The guide and handbook emphasize a multidisciplinary approach, use the concept of interdependence as an organizing theme, and offer suggestions for using the local community as a resource. The guide…

  20. Interdependence of Living Things: A Teacher's Manual for General Level Program Development--Grades 7 and 8. Science and Society Teaching Units. Informal Series/61.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Douglas A.; And Others

    An episodic and activity oriented approach is employed in this unit that illustrates the theme of interdependence of living things. Concepts related to dependence, competition, community, and ecosystems are developed through a case study of a raccoon problem. Various means of solving the raccoon problem are explored within a societal context. Five…

  1. Suggestions for Curriculum Development [And] Handbook Upper Elementary Grades, Part B, 4-6. Environmental Education Interdependence: A Concept Approach. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C.; Long, Cathryn J.

    Two booklets comprise the grades 4-6 component of a series of guides for incorporating environmental education into the existing curriculum. Both the guide and handbook emphasize a multidisciplinary approach, use the concept of interdependence as an organizing theme, and offer suggestions for using the local community as a resource to study the…

  2. Parasocial interaction with my avatar: effects of interdependent self-construal and the mediating role of self-presence in an avatar-based console game, Wii.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seung-A Annie; Park, Namkee

    2009-12-01

    The "self" concept has grown increasingly important in interactive media environments. This study investigated self-related processes in an avatar-based game console, Wii. A key feature of the Wii is its motion-sensing capability that empowers players to manipulate and interact with items on-screen via movement. The present study examined the effects of video game players' self-construal on parasocial interaction with their avatars and feelings of self-presence. In this study, parasocial interaction was operationally defined as the extent of game players' interpersonal involvement with their avatar and the extent to which game players perceive themselves as interacting with the avatar. Self-presence was defined as the degree to which video game players feel as if their avatar on the screen were their real self. Based on an experiment, the study discovered that game players with high interdependent self-construal showed closer parasocial interaction and higher level of self-presence than those with low interdependent self-construal. Results also showed that self-presence mediated the effects of interdependent self-construal on the parasocial relationship with game players' avatars. Thus, the study discovered an important individual difference factor, interdependent self-construal, affecting the degree to which people form a parasocial relationship with their virtual self that is visually manifested in the form of an avatar. In addition, the present study added empirical evidence about the mediating role played by self-presence in avatar-based video games.

  3. USING THE SELECTIVE FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT ASSESSMENT AND REGIONAL INTERDEPENDENCE THEORY TO GUIDE TREATMENT OF AN ATHLETE WITH BACK PAIN: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Despite the multidirectional quality of human movement, common measurement procedures used in physical therapy examination are often uni-planar and lack the ability to assess functional complexities involved in daily activities. Currently, there is no widely accepted, validated standard to assess movement quality. The Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) is one possible system to objectively assess complex functional movements. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate the application of the SFMA as a guide to the examination, evaluation, and management of a patient with non-specific low back pain (LBP). Case Description An adolescent male athlete with LBP was evaluated using the SFMA. It was determined that the patient had mobility limitations remote to the site of pain (thoracic spine and hips) which therapists hypothesized were leading to compensatory hypermobility at the lumbar spine. Guided by the SFMA, initial interventions focused on local (lumbar) symptom management, progressing to remote mobility deficits, and then addressing the local stability deficit. Outcomes All movement patterns became functional/non-painful except the right upper extremity medial rotation-extension pattern. At discharge, the patient demonstrated increased soft tissue extensibility of hip musculature and joint mobility of the thoracic spine along with normalization of lumbopelvic motor control. Improvements in pain exceeded minimal clinically important differences, from 2-7/10 on a verbal analog scale at initial exam to 0-2/10 at discharge. Discussion Developing and progressing a plan of care for an otherwise healthy and active adolescent with non-specific LBP can be challenging. Human movement is a collaborative effort of muscle groups that are interdependent; the use of a movement-based assessment model can help identify weak links affecting overall function. The SFMA helped guide therapists to dysfunctional movements not seen with more

  4. Interdependent TTF1 - ErbB4 interactions are critical for surfactant protein-B homeostasis in primary mouse lung alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Marten, Elger; Nielsen, Heber C; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2015-09-01

    ErbB4 receptor and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 are important modulators of fetal alveolar type II (ATII) cell development and injury. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1, promoting its expression in MLE-12 cells, an ATII cell line. Both proteins are known to promote surfactant protein-B gene (SftpB) and protein (SP-B) expression, but their feedback interactions on each other are not known. We hypothesized that TTF-1 expression has a feedback effect on ErbB4 expression in an in-vitro model of isolated mouse ATII cells. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of overexpressing HER4 and Nkx2.1, the genes of ErbB4 and TTF-1 on TTF-1 and ErbB4 protein expression, respectively, as well as SP-B protein expression in primary fetal mouse lung ATII cells. Transient ErbB4 protein overexpression upregulated TTF-1 protein expression in primary fetal ATII cells, similarly to results previously shown in MLE-12 cells. Transient TTF-1 protein overexpression down regulated ErbB4 protein expression in both cell types. TTF-1 protein was upregulated in primary transgenic ErbB4-depleted adult ATII cells, however SP-B protein expression in these adult transgenic ATII cells was not affected by the absence of ErbB4. The observation that TTF-1 is upregulated in fetal ATII cells by ErbB4 overexpression and also in ErbB4-deleted adult ATII cells suggests additional factors interact with ErbB4 to regulate TTF-1 levels. We conclude that the interdependency of TTF-1 and ErbB4 is important for surfactant protein levels. The interactive regulation of ErbB4 and TTF-1 needs further elucidation.

  5. Early social fear in relation to play with an unfamiliar peer: Actor and partner effects.

    PubMed

    Walker, Olga L; Degnan, Kathryn A; Fox, Nathan A; Henderson, Heather A

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between maternal reports of social fear at 24 months and social behaviors with an unfamiliar peer during play at 36 months, using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 1999). The APIM model was used to not only replicate previous findings of direct effects of early social fear on children's own social behavior (i.e., actor effects), but also to extend these findings by examining whether children's early social fear relates to an unfamiliar peer's behavior at 36 months (i.e., partner effects). Results revealed that social fear was associated with lower levels of children's own social engagement as well as less social engagement and dysregulated behavior in their play partners. These findings show that toddlers' social interactive behaviors are interdependent and reflect unique contributions of both the individual and their social partner's characteristics. In contrast, social fear was associated with children's own social wariness with the unfamiliar peer, but not their play partners' wariness. We discuss findings in terms of the influence of early social fear on young children's interpersonal environments and the potential role of these altered environments in supporting continuity of social fear and wariness over time.

  6. Models of dyadic social interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Dale; Gonzalez, Richard

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the logic of research designs for dyadic interaction and present statistical models with parameters that are tied to psychologically relevant constructs. Building on Karl Pearson's classic nineteenth-century statistical analysis of within-organism similarity, we describe several approaches to indexing dyadic interdependence and provide graphical methods for visualizing dyadic data. We also describe several statistical and conceptual solutions to the 'levels of analytic' problem in analysing dyadic data. These analytic strategies allow the researcher to examine and measure psychological questions of interdependence and social influence. We provide illustrative data from casually interacting and romantic dyads. PMID:12689382

  7. Interdependency of the maximum range of flexion-extension of hand metacarpophalangeal joints.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ibáñez, V; Vergara, M; Sancho-Bru, J-L

    2016-12-01

    Mobility of the fingers metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints depends on the posture of the adjacent ones. Current Biomechanical hand models consider fixed ranges of movement at joints, regardless of the posture, thus allowing for non-realistic postures, generating wrong results in reach studies and forward dynamic analyses. This study provides data for more realistic hand models. The maximum voluntary extension (MVE) and flexion (MVF) of different combinations of MCP joints were measured covering their range of motion. Dependency of the MVF and MVE on the posture of the adjacent MCP joints was confirmed and mathematical models obtained through regression analyses (RMSE 7.7°).

  8. Regulation Strategies Mediate Associations between Heavy Drinking and Relationship Outcomes in Married Couples

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Lindsey M.; DiBello, Angelo M.; Wickham, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Heavy drinking patterns during marriage can be problematic for both spouses and relationship. Moreover, spouses use different strategies in an attempt to change their partner’s drinking behavior, which can impact the relationship in different ways. The current research examined whether associations between heavy drinking and marital adjustment are mediated by partner regulation strategies (i.e., punishment and reward). Married couples (N=123 dyads) with at least one spouse who consumed alcohol regularly and at least one undergraduate spouse completed web-based assessments at baseline and three and six months later. Mediation hypotheses were tested using a repeated-measures version of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. As predicted, a significant partner effect emerged suggesting that heavy drinking was associated with greater use of punishment strategies, which were in turn associated with diminished satisfaction. Another significant partner effect revealed that heavy drinking also predicted greater use of reward strategies, which were positively associated with satisfaction. However, the magnitude of the indirect effects via punishment were more than twice as large as the mediated effect via reward. Results underscore the importance of an interdependent, dyadic perspective in understanding associations between heavy drinking and marital outcomes as well as differences between punishing and rewarding regulation strategies in these associations. PMID:26722992

  9. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  10. Beyond the 'east-west' dichotomy: Global variation in cultural models of selfhood.

    PubMed

    Vignoles, Vivian L; Owe, Ellinor; Becker, Maja; Smith, Peter B; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Brown, Rupert; González, Roberto; Didier, Nicolas; Carrasco, Diego; Cadena, Maria Paz; Lay, Siugmin; Schwartz, Seth J; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Villamar, Juan A; Gavreliuc, Alin; Zinkeng, Martina; Kreuzbauer, Robert; Baguma, Peter; Martin, Mariana; Tatarko, Alexander; Herman, Ginette; de Sauvage, Isabelle; Courtois, Marie; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B; Harb, Charles; Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Prieto Gil, Paula; Lorente Clemares, Raquel; Campara, Gabriella; Nizharadze, George; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J; Jalal, Baland; Bourguignon, David; Zhang, Jianxin; Lv, Shaobo; Chybicka, Aneta; Yuki, Masaki; Zhang, Xiao; Espinosa, Agustín; Valk, Aune; Abuhamdeh, Sami; Amponsah, Benjamin; Özgen, Emre; Güner, E Ülkü; Yamakoğlu, Nil; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit; Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin; Vargas Trujillo, Elvia; Balanta, Paola; Cendales Ayala, Boris; Koller, Silvia H; Jaafar, Jas Laile; Gausel, Nicolay; Fischer, Ronald; Milfont, Taciano L; Kusdil, Ersin; Çağlar, Selinay; Aldhafri, Said; Ferreira, M Cristina; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu; Wang, Qian; Fülöp, Márta; Torres, Ana; Camino, Leoncio; Lemos, Flávia Cristina Silveira; Fritsche, Immo; Möller, Bettina; Regalia, Camillo; Manzi, Claudia; Brambilla, Maria; Bond, Michael Harris

    2016-08-01

    Markus and Kitayama's (1991) theory of independent and interdependent self-construals had a major influence on social, personality, and developmental psychology by highlighting the role of culture in psychological processes. However, research has relied excessively on contrasts between North American and East Asian samples, and commonly used self-report measures of independence and interdependence frequently fail to show predicted cultural differences. We revisited the conceptualization and measurement of independent and interdependent self-construals in 2 large-scale multinational surveys, using improved methods for cross-cultural research. We developed (Study 1: N = 2924 students in 16 nations) and validated across cultures (Study 2: N = 7279 adults from 55 cultural groups in 33 nations) a new 7-dimensional model of self-reported ways of being independent or interdependent. Patterns of global variation support some of Markus and Kitayama's predictions, but a simple contrast between independence and interdependence does not adequately capture the diverse models of selfhood that prevail in different world regions. Cultural groups emphasize different ways of being both independent and interdependent, depending on individualism-collectivism, national socioeconomic development, and religious heritage. Our 7-dimensional model will allow future researchers to test more accurately the implications of cultural models of selfhood for psychological processes in diverse ecocultural contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. The Interdependent Family-Centric Career: Career Perspective of the Overseas Chinese in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekerti, Andre A.

    2008-01-01

    This theoretical article presents an interdisciplinary approach to extend the scope of current career theories and their application to the overseas Chinese (OC) in Indonesia. Using an ecological model to analyze culture and an emic perspective, the article discusses several factors that affect careers of OC Indonesians. Factors such as culture,…

  12. Youth Transitions and Interdependent Adult-Child Relations in Rural Bolivia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punch, Samantha

    2002-01-01

    Draws on ethnographic fieldwork in southern Bolivia to explore how rural Bolivian youth negotiate structural constraints on choices of work versus secondary education, including local versus urban location, economic resources, parental attitudes, gender, family characteristics, social networks and support, and peer role models. Suggests the notion…

  13. Energy in an Interdependent World: A Global Development Studies Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Anne B.

    Part of the Global Development Studies Institute series of model curricula, the teacher guide presents strategies for teaching about energy as a global issue. The unit, intended for students in grades 11-14, is designed for one semester. The overall objective is to promote awareness of and responsibility toward the global community through an…

  14. Competitive Interdependence & the News Report: The Chicago "Daily News," 1880 to 1910.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fico, Frederick

    Employing a "resource dependency" model from organizational theory, this paper explains the growth of newspaper cooperation out of publisher competition in Chicago (Illinois) journalism during the period 1880 to 1910. It suggests that publisher cooperation in business matters also resulted in a changed news coverage style and emphasis. It argues…

  15. The performance of primary health care organizations depends on interdependences with the local environment.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Paul; Maillet, Lara

    2016-09-19

    Purpose Improving the performance of health care organizations is now perceived as essential in order to better address the needs of the populations and respect their ability to pay for the services. There is no consensus on what is performance. It is increasingly considered as the optimal execution of four functions that every organization must achieve in order to survive and develop: reach goals; adapt to its environment; produce goods or services and maintain values; and a satisfying organizational climate. There is also no consensus on strategies to improve this performance. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach This paper intends to analyze the performance of primary health care organizations from the perspective of Kauffman's model. It mainly aims to understand the often contradictory, paradoxical and unexpected results that emerge from studies on this topic. Findings To do so, the first section briefly presents Kauffman's model and lays forward its principal components. The second section presents three studies on the performance of primary organizations and brings out the contradictory, paradoxical and unexpected results they obtained. The third section explains these results in the light of Kauffman's model. Originality/value Kauffman's model helps give meaning to the results of researches on performance of primary health care organizations that were qualified as paradoxical or unexpected. The performance of primary health care organizations then cannot be understood by only taking into account the characteristics of these organizations. The complexity of the environments in which they operate must simultaneously be taken into account. This paper brings original development of an integrated view of the performance of organizations, their own characteristics and those of the local environment in which they operated.

  16. Restoration and Humanitarian Aid Delivery on Interdependent Transportation and Communication Networks After an Extreme Event

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    seek to maximize the satisfaction of geographically distributed demands for relief items over time by scheduling work crews to selected restoration...extreme event, we seek to maximize the satisfaction of geographically distributed demands for relief items over time by scheduling work crews to selected...extreme event. Namely, in- dividuals at a demand point need some way of learning where to go to collect relief items. We model the satisfaction of this

  17. The Interdependence of Plate Coupling Processes, Subduction Rate, and Asthenospheric Pressure Drop across Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royden, L.; Holt, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    One advantage of analytical models, in which analytic expressions are used for the various components of the subduction system, is the efficient exploration of parameter space and identification of the physical mechanisms controlling a wide breadth of slab kinematics. We show that, despite subtle differences in how plate interfaces and boundary conditions are implemented, results for single subduction from a 3-D semi-analytical model for subduction FAST (Royden & Husson, 2006; Jagoutz et al., 2015) and from the numerical finite-element model CitcomCU (Moresi & Gurnis, 1996, Zhong et al., 2006) are in excellent agreement when plate coupling (via shear stress on the plate interface) takes place in the FAST without the development of topographic relief at the plate boundary. Results from the two models are consistent across a variety of geometries, with fixed upper plate, fixed lower plate, and stress-free plate ends. When the analytical model is modified to include the development of topography above the subduction boundary, subduction rates are greatly increased, indicating a strong sensitivity of subduction to the mode of plate coupling. Rates of subduction also correlate strongly with the asthenospheric pressure drop across the subducting slab, which drives toroidal flow of the asthenosphere around the slab. When the lower plate is fixed, subduction is relatively slow and the pressure drop from below to above the slab is large, inhibiting subduction and slab roll-back. When the upper plate is fixed and when the plate ends are stress-free, subduction rates are approximately 50% faster and the corresponding asthenospheric pressure drop from below to above the slab is small, facilitating rapid subduction. This qualitative correlation between plate coupling processes, asthenospheric pressure drop, and rates of subduction can be extended to systems with more than one subduction zone (Holt et al., 2015 AGU Fall Abstract). Jagoutz, O., Royden, L., Holt, A. & Becker, T. W

  18. Subnuclear positioning and interchromosomal clustering of the GAL1-10 locus are controlled by separable, interdependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Brickner, Donna Garvey; Sood, Varun; Tutucci, Evelina; Coukos, Robert; Viets, Kayla; Singer, Robert H.; Brickner, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    On activation, the GAL genes in yeast are targeted to the nuclear periphery through interaction with the nuclear pore complex. Here we identify two cis-acting “DNA zip codes” from the GAL1-10 promoter that are necessary and sufficient to induce repositioning to the nuclear periphery. One of these zip codes, GRS4, is also necessary and sufficient to promote clustering of GAL1-10 alleles. GRS4, and to a lesser extent GRS5, contribute to stronger expression of GAL1 and GAL10 by increasing the fraction of cells that respond to the inducer. The molecular mechanism controlling targeting to the NPC is distinct from the molecular mechanism controlling interchromosomal clustering. Targeting to the nuclear periphery and interaction with the nuclear pore complex are prerequisites for gene clustering. However, once formed, clustering can be maintained in the nucleoplasm, requires distinct nuclear pore proteins, and is regulated differently through the cell cycle. In addition, whereas targeting of genes to the NPC is independent of transcription, interchromosomal clustering requires transcription. These results argue that zip code–dependent gene positioning at the nuclear periphery and interchromosomal clustering represent interdependent phenomena with distinct molecular mechanisms. PMID:27489341

  19. GC-MS based metabolite profiling implies three interdependent ways of ammonium assimilation in Medicago truncatula root nodules.

    PubMed

    Barsch, Aiko; Carvalho, Helena G; Cullimore, Julie V; Niehaus, Karsten

    2006-12-15

    In symbiotic interaction with legume plants, bacteria termed Rhizobia can fix massive amounts of atmospheric nitrogen which is primarily provided in the form of ammonium to the host plants. Therefore, legume root nodules that house the symbiotic bacteria are ideally suited to study the process of primary ammonium assimilation. Here, we present a GC-MS based metabolite profiling analysis of Medicago truncatula root nodules (induced by the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti) before and after inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) by the chemical herbicide phosphinotricine. The primary role of GS in ammonium assimilation was revealed by drastically reduced levels of glutamine in phosphinotricine treated root nodules. In comparison to previous results of increased asparagine synthetase transcript and protein abundances in GS inhibited nodules the metabolic data revealed that decreased amounts of aspartate might preclude taking advantage of this elevated enzymatic activity. A potential role of glutamate dehydrogenase in ammonium assimilation was metabolically indicated 24 and 48 h after GS inhibition. Therefore, nodule ammonium assimilation might in principle involve three interdependent metabolic pathways which are adjusted to control basic nitrogen metabolism.

  20. Comparative morphology of the axial complex and interdependence of internal organ systems in sea urchins (Echinodermata: Echinoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Alexander; Faber, Cornelius; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background The axial complex of echinoderms (Echinodermata) is composed of various primary and secondary body cavities that interact with each other. In sea urchins (Echinoidea), structural differences of the axial complex in "regular" and irregular species have been observed, but the reasons underlying these differences are not fully understood. In addition, a better knowledge of axial complex diversity could not only be useful for phylogenetic inferences, but improve also an understanding of the function of this enigmatic structure. Results We therefore analyzed numerous species of almost all sea urchin orders by magnetic resonance imaging, dissection, histology, and transmission electron microscopy and compared the results with findings from published studies spanning almost two centuries. These combined analyses demonstrate that the axial complex is present in all sea urchin orders and has remained structurally conserved for a long time, at least in the "regular" species. Within the Irregularia, a considerable morphological variation of the axial complex can be observed with gradual changes in topography, size, and internal architecture. These modifications are related to the growing size of the gastric caecum as well as to the rearrangement of the morphology of the digestive tract as a whole. Conclusion The structurally most divergent axial complex can be observed in the highly derived Atelostomata in which the reorganization of the digestive tract is most pronounced. Our findings demonstrate a structural interdependence of various internal organs, including digestive tract, mesenteries, and the axial complex. PMID:19508706