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Sample records for acts cell autonomously

  1. Is acting on delusions autonomous?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the question of autonomy in delusional disorders is investigated using a phenomenological approach. I refer to the distinction between freedom of intentional action, and freedom of the will, and develop phenomenological descriptions of lived autonomy, taking into account the distinction between a pre-reflective and a reflective type. Drawing on a case report, I deliver finely-grained phenomenological descriptions of lived autonomy and experienced self-determination when acting on delusions. This analysis seeks to demonstrate that a person with delusions can be described as responsible for her behaviour on a ‘framed’ level (level of freedom of intentional action), even though she is not autonomous on a higher (‘framing’) level (level of freedom of the will), if, and only if, the goods of agency for herself and others are respected. In these cases the person with delusions is very nearly comparable to people in love, who are also not free to choose their convictions, and who could also be rightly held responsible for the behaviour flowing from their convictions. PMID:24125114

  2. Cell Autonomous and Non-autonomous Effects of Senescent Cells in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre Yves; Campisi, Judith; Velarde, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse skin accumulate senescent cells in both the epidermis and dermis during aging. When chronically present, senescent cells are thought to enhance the age-dependent deterioration of the skin during extrinsic and intrinsic aging. However, when transiently present, senescent cells promote optimal wound healing. Here, we review recent studies on how senescent cells and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) contribute to different physiological and pathophysiological conditions in the skin with a focus on some of the cell autonomous and non-autonomous functions of senescent cells in the context of skin aging and wound healing. PMID:25855157

  3. Autonomous and non-autonomous roles of DNase II during cell death in C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiang; Lai, Huey-Jen; Lin, Tai-Wei; Lo, Szecheng J

    2015-04-27

    Generation of DNA fragments is a hallmark of cell apoptosis and is executed within the dying cells (autonomous) or in the engulfing cells (non-autonomous). The TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling) method is used as an in situ assay of apoptosis by labelling DNA fragments generated by caspase-associated DNase (CAD), but not those by the downstream DNase II. In the present study, we report a method of ToLFP (topoisomerase ligation fluorescence probes) for directly visualizing DNA fragments generated by DNase II in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. ToLFP analysis provided the first demonstration of a cell autonomous mode of DNase II activity in dying cells in ced-1 embryos, which are defective in engulfing apoptotic bodies. Compared with the number of ToLFP signals between ced-1 and wild-type (N2) embryos, a 30% increase in N2 embryos was found, suggesting that the ratio of non-autonomous and autonomous modes of DNase II was ~3-7. Among three DNase II mutant embryos (nuc-1, crn-6 and crn-7), nuc-1 embryos exhibited the least number of ToLFP. The ToLFP results confirmed the previous findings that NUC-1 is the major DNase II for degrading apoptotic DNA. To further elucidate NUC-1's mode of action, nuc-1-rescuing transgenic worms that ectopically express free or membrane-bound forms of NUC-1 fusion proteins were utilized. ToLFP analyses revealed that anteriorly expressed NUC-1 digests apoptotic DNA in posterior blastomeres in a non-autonomous and secretion-dependent manner. Collectively, we demonstrate that the ToLFP method can be used to differentiate the locations of blastomeres where DNase II acts autonomously or non-autonomously in degrading apoptotic DNA.

  4. Cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous toxicity in polyglutamine diseases.

    PubMed

    Sambataro, Fabio; Pennuto, Maria

    2012-05-01

    Polyglutamine diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of polyglutamine tracts in the coding regions of specific genes. One of the most important features of polyglutamine diseases is that, despite the widespread and in some cases ubiquitous expression of the polyglutamine proteins, specific populations of neurons degenerate in each disease. This finding has led to the idea that polyglutamine diseases are cell-autonomous diseases, in which selective neuronal dysfunction and death result from damage caused by the mutant protein within the targeted neuronal population itself. Development of animal models for conditional expression of polyglutamine proteins, along with new pharmacologic manipulation of polyglutamine protein expression and toxicity, has led to a remarkable change of the current view of polyglutamine diseases as cell-autonomous disorders. It is becoming evident that toxicity in the neighboring non-neuronal cells contributes to selective neuronal damage. This observation implies non-cell-autonomous mechanisms of neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. Here, we describe cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms of polyglutamine disease pathogenesis, including toxicity in neurons, skeletal muscle, glia, germinal cells, and other cell types.

  5. Do cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous effects drive the structure of tumor ecosystems?

    PubMed

    Tissot, Tazzio; Ujvari, Beata; Solary, Eric; Lassus, Patrice; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    By definition, a driver mutation confers a growth advantage to the cancer cell in which it occurs, while a passenger mutation does not: the former is usually considered as the engine of cancer progression, while the latter is not. Actually, the effects of a given mutation depend on the genetic background of the cell in which it appears, thus can differ in the subclones that form a tumor. In addition to cell-autonomous effects generated by the mutations, non-cell-autonomous effects shape the phenotype of a cancer cell. Here, we review the evidence that a network of biological interactions between subclones drives cancer cell adaptation and amplifies intra-tumor heterogeneity. Integrating the role of mutations in tumor ecosystems generates innovative strategies targeting the tumor ecosystem's weaknesses to improve cancer treatment.

  6. Cell Non-autonomous Function of Ceramidase in Photoreceptor Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Jairaj K.; Dasgupta, Ujjaini; Rawat, Satinder S.; Yuan, Changqing; Sanxaridis, Parthena D.; Yonamine, Ikuko; Karim, Pusha; Nagashima, Kunio; Brodsky, Michael H.; Tsunoda, Susan; Acharya, Usha

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutral Ceramidase, a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism, hydrolyzes ceramide to sphingosine. These sphingolipids are critical structural components of cell membranes and act as second messengers in diverse signal transduction cascades. Here, we have isolated and characterized functional null mutants of Drosophila Ceramidase. We show that secreted Ceramidase functions in a cell non-autonomous manner to maintain photoreceptor homeostasis. In the absence of Ceramidase, photoreceptors degenerate in a light-dependent manner, are defective in normal endocytic turnover of Rhodopsin, and do not respond to light stimulus. Consistent with a cell non-autonomous function, our studies show that over expression of Ceramidase in a tissue distant from the photoreceptors can suppress photoreceptor degeneration in an Arrestin mutant and facilitate membrane turnover in a Rhodopsin null mutant. Furthermore, our results show that secreted CDase is internalized and localizes to endosomes. Our findings are the first to establish a role for a secreted sphingolipid enzyme in the regulation of photoreceptor structure and function. PMID:18184565

  7. Cell Autonomous Shape Changes in Germband Retraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Holley; Kim, Elliott; Gish, Robert; Hutson, M. Shane

    2012-02-01

    Germband retraction involves the cohesive movement and regulated cellular mechanics of two tissues on the surface of fruit fly embryos, the germband and the amnioserosa. The germband initially forms a `U' shape, curling from the ventral surface, around the posterior of the embryo, and onto the dorsal surface; the amnioserosa lies between the arms of this `U'. Retraction straightens the germband and leaves it only on the ventral side. During retraction, the germband becomes clearly segmented with deep furrows between segments, and its cells elongate towards the amnioserosa, along what becomes the dorsal-ventral axis. To determine the importance of these changes for the overall movement of the tissues, we observed embryos that did not complete germband retraction due to targeted laser ablation of half the amnioserosa. Without the chemical and mechanical influence of the amnioserosa, germband furrows still formed and germband cells still elongated; however, this elongation was misaligned compared to unablated embryos. Thus, furrow formation and cell elongation in the germband are autonomous, but insufficient to drive proper tissue motion. These results suggest that part of the necessary role of the amnioserosa is proper orientation of germband cell elongation.

  8. Dual functions of cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous ADAM10 activity in granulopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Masaki; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Tohmonda, Takahide; Uchikawa, Shinichi; Koba, Takeshi; Takito, Jiro; Morioka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Morio; Link, Daniel C; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Okada, Yasunori; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Horiuchi, Keisuke

    2011-12-22

    Previous studies have revealed various extrinsic stimuli and factors involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Among these, Notch-mediated signaling has been suggested to be critically involved in this process. Herein, we show that conditional inactivation of ADAM10, a membrane-bound protease with a crucial role in Notch signaling (S2 cleavage), results in myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) highlighted by severe splenomegaly and increased populations of myeloid cells and hematopoietic stem cells. Reciprocal transfer of bone marrow cells between wild-type and ADAM10 mutant mice revealed that ADAM10 activity in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells is involved in the development of MPD. Notably, we found that MPD caused by lack of ADAM10 in nonhematopoietic cells was mediated by G-CSF, whereas MPD caused by ADAM10-deficient hematopoietic cells was not. Taken together, the present findings reveal previously undescribed nonredundant roles of cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous ADAM10 activity in the maintenance of hematopoiesis.

  9. Regulation of cell-non-autonomous proteostasis in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Daniel; van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija

    2016-01-01

    Cells have developed robust adaptation mechanisms to survive environmental conditions that challenge the integrity of their proteome and ensure cellular viability. These are stress signalling pathways that integrate extracellular signals with the ability to detect and efficiently respond to protein-folding perturbations within the cell. Within the context of an organism, the cell-autonomous effects of these signalling mechanisms are superimposed by cell-non-autonomous stress signalling pathways that allow co-ordination of stress responses across tissues. These transcellular stress signalling pathways orchestrate and maintain the cellular proteome at an organismal level. This article focuses on mechanisms in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that activate stress responses in a cell-non-autonomous manner. We discuss emerging insights and provide specific examples on how components of the cell-non-autonomous proteostasis network are used in cancer and protein-folding diseases to drive disease progression across tissues. PMID:27744329

  10. Regulation of cell-non-autonomous proteostasis in metazoans.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel; van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija

    2016-10-15

    Cells have developed robust adaptation mechanisms to survive environmental conditions that challenge the integrity of their proteome and ensure cellular viability. These are stress signalling pathways that integrate extracellular signals with the ability to detect and efficiently respond to protein-folding perturbations within the cell. Within the context of an organism, the cell-autonomous effects of these signalling mechanisms are superimposed by cell-non-autonomous stress signalling pathways that allow co-ordination of stress responses across tissues. These transcellular stress signalling pathways orchestrate and maintain the cellular proteome at an organismal level. This article focuses on mechanisms in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that activate stress responses in a cell-non-autonomous manner. We discuss emerging insights and provide specific examples on how components of the cell-non-autonomous proteostasis network are used in cancer and protein-folding diseases to drive disease progression across tissues.

  11. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  12. Salidroside accelerates fracture healing through cell-autonomous and non-autonomous effects on osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao Qin; Qi, Lin; Yang, Jing; Wang, Yue; Wang, Chuan; Li, Zong Min; Li, Ling; Qu, Ye; Wang, Dan; Han, Ze Min

    2017-02-01

    Salidroside (SAL), a major active component of Rhodiola rosea L., exhibits diverse pharmacological effects. However, the direct roles of SAL in fracture healing remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that SAL significantly promotes proliferation by altering the cell-cycle distribution of osteoblastic cells. SAL also greatly stimulates osteoblast differentiation and mineralization by inducing the expression of Runx2 and Osterix. In addition to its osteoblast-autonomous effects, SAL can activate the HIF-1α pathway coupling of angiogenesis and osteogenesis through cell-non-autonomous effects. Our in vitro results suggest that SAL significantly up-regulates HIF-1α expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity of HIF-1α and the HIF-responsive gene VEGF increase following SAL treatment. Our mechanistic study revealed that the regulation of osteoblastic proliferation and HIF-1α expression partly involves MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling. Our in vivo analysis also demonstrated that SAL can promote angiogenesis within the callus and accelerate fracture healing. Thus, SAL promotes skeletal regeneration in cell-autonomous and cell-non-autonomous ways and might be a potential therapy for accelerating fracture healing.

  13. Cell-autonomous requirements for Dlg-1 for lens epithelial cell structure and fiber cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Charlene; Yamben, Idella F; Shatadal, Shalini; Waldof, Malinda; Robinson, Michael L; Griep, Anne E

    2009-09-01

    Cell polarity and adhesion are thought to be key determinants in organismal development. In Drosophila, discs large (dlg) has emerged as an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation, adhesion, and polarity. Herein, we investigated the role of the mouse homolog of dlg (Dlg-1) in the development of the mouse ocular lens. Tissue-specific ablation of Dlg-1 throughout the lens early in lens development led to an expansion and disorganization of the epithelium that correlated with changes in the distribution of adhesion and polarity factors. In the fiber cells, differentiation defects were observed. These included alterations in cell structure and the disposition of cell adhesion/cytoskeletal factors, delay in denucleation, and reduced levels of alpha-catenin, pERK1/2, and MIP26. These fiber cell defects were recapitulated when Dlg-1 was disrupted only in fiber cells. These results suggest that Dlg-1 acts in a cell autonomous manner to regulate epithelial cell structure and fiber cell differentiation.

  14. Neuropeptide signals cell non-autonomous mitochondrial unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Li-Wa; Niu, Rong; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have a central role in the systemic coordination of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and the cell non-autonomous modulation of longevity. However, the mechanism by which the nervous system senses mitochondrial stress and communicates to the distal tissues to induce UPRmt remains unclear. Here we employ the tissue-specific CRISPR-Cas9 approach to disrupt mitochondrial function only in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans, and reveal a cell non-autonomous induction of UPRmt in peripheral cells. We further show that a neural sub-circuit composed of three types of sensory neurons, and one interneuron is required for sensing and transducing neuronal mitochondrial stress. In addition, neuropeptide FLP-2 functions in this neural sub-circuit to signal the non-autonomous UPRmt. Taken together, our results suggest a neuropeptide coordination of mitochondrial stress response in the nervous system. PMID:27767096

  15. Investigation of autonomous cell dynamics using holographic laser microsurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, Aroshan; Hutson, M. Shane

    2012-02-01

    Laser-microsurgery has emerged as a powerful technique for evaluating in vivo tissue mechanics. We extend this technique by using a spatial light modulator (SLM) to diffract a single UV laser pulse to simultaneously ablate multiple points in living tissue. Using this method, we can quickly and cleanly isolate a single cell by destroying all its nearest neighbors. The post-ablation dynamics of such an isolated cell are then largely dependent on autonomous intracellular forces. Here, we use this technique to investigate cell shape pulsations in amnioserosa cells in Drosophila embryos during dorsal closure -- specifically to address the degree to which these pulsations are cell autonomous or driven by the contractions of neighboring cells. When cells are isolated at different points in the pulsation cycle, we find that the post-isolation dynamics are strongly dependent on the pre-isolation pulsation phase: cells in a contractile phase collapse immediately, but cells in an expansionary phase continue to expand -- at least for 20-60 s before collapsing. These results are in conflict with previous pulsation models that place expanding cells under large extensional strain, and instead suggest that even the expansion phase has a significant cell autonomous component.

  16. Cell-autonomous stress responses in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Julien; Blander, J Magarian

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune response of phagocytes to microbes has long been known to depend on the core signaling cascades downstream of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which lead to expression and production of inflammatory cytokines that counteract infection and induce adaptive immunity. Cell-autonomous responses have recently emerged as important mechanisms of innate immunity. Either IFN-inducible or constitutive, these processes aim to guarantee cell homeostasis but have also been shown to modulate innate immune response to microbes and production of inflammatory cytokines. Among these constitutive cell-autonomous responses, autophagy is prominent and its role in innate immunity has been well characterized. Other stress responses, such as metabolic stress, the ER stress/unfolded protein response, mitochondrial stress, or the DNA damage response, seem to also be involved in innate immunity, although the precise mechanisms by which they regulate the innate immune response are not yet defined. Of importance, these distinct constitutive cell-autonomous responses appear to be interconnected and can also be modulated by microbes and PRRs, which add further complexity to the interplay between innate immune signaling and cell-autonomous responses in the mediation of an efficient innate immune response.

  17. vps25 mosaics display non-autonomous cell survival and overgrowth, and autonomous apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Chen, Zhihong; Scherr, Heather; Lackey, Melinda; Bolduc, Clare; Bergmann, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Appropriate cell-cell signaling is crucial for proper tissue homeostasis. Protein sorting of cell surface receptors at the early endosome is important for both the delivery of the signal and the inactivation of the receptor, and its alteration can cause malignancies including cancer. In a genetic screen for suppressors of the pro-apoptotic gene hid in Drosophila, we identified two alleles of vps25, a component of the ESCRT machinery required for protein sorting at the early endosome. Paradoxically, although vps25 mosaics were identified as suppressors of hid-induced apoptosis, vps25 mutant cells die. However, we provide evidence that a non-autonomous increase of Diap1 protein levels, an inhibitor of apoptosis, accounts for the suppression of hid. Furthermore, before they die, vps25 mutant clones trigger non-autonomous proliferation through a failure to downregulate Notch signaling, which activates the mitogenic JAK/STAT pathway. Hid and JNK contribute to apoptosis of vps25 mutant cells. Inhibition of cell death in vps25 clones causes dramatic overgrowth phenotypes. In addition, Hippo signaling is increased in vps25 clones, and hippo mutants block apoptosis in vps25 clones. In summary, the phenotypic analysis of vps25 mutants highlights the importance of receptor downregulation by endosomal protein sorting for appropriate tissue homeostasis, and may serve as a model for human cancer. PMID:16611691

  18. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Miller, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique “myogenic” transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  19. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique "myogenic" transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons.

  20. The Cell Non-Autonomous Nature of Electron Transport Chain-Mediated Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Durieux, Jenni; Wolff, Suzanne; Dillin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Summary The life span of C. elegans can be increased via reduced function of the mitochondria; however, the extent to which mitochondrial alteration in a single, distinct tissue may influence aging in the whole organism remains unknown. We addressed this question by asking whether manipulations to ETC function can modulate aging in a cell non-autonomous fashion. We report that the alteration of mitochondrial function in key tissues is essential for establishing and maintaining a pro-longevity cue. We find that regulators of mitochondrial stress responses are essential and specific genetic requirements for the electron transport chain (ETC) longevity pathway. Strikingly, we find that mitochondrial perturbation in one tissue is perceived and acted upon by the mitochondrial stress response pathway in a distal tissue. These results suggest that mitochondria may establish and perpetuate the rate of aging for the whole organism independent of cell-autonomous functions. PMID:21215371

  1. Non-cell autonomous and non-catalytic activities of ATX in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Greenman, Raanan; Gorelik, Anna; Sapir, Tamar; Baumgart, Jan; Zamor, Vanessa; Segal-Salto, Michal; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Aidinis, Vassilis; Aoki, Junken; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Reiner, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The intricate formation of the cerebral cortex requires a well-coordinated series of events, which are regulated at the level of cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Whereas cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate cortical development are well-studied, the non-cell autonomous mechanisms remain poorly understood. A non-biased screen allowed us to identify Autotaxin (ATX) as a non-cell autonomous regulator of neural stem cells. ATX (also known as ENPP2) is best known to catalyze lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) production. Our results demonstrate that ATX affects the localization and adhesion of neuronal progenitors in a cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous manner, and strikingly, this activity is independent from its catalytic activity in producing LPA.

  2. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Roles for Irf6 during Development of the Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Goudy, Steven; Angel, Peggi; Jacobs, Britni; Hill, Cynthia; Mainini, Veronica; Smith, Arianna L.; Kousa, Youssef A.; Caprioli, Richard; Prince, Lawrence S.; Baldwin, Scott; Schutte, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) encodes a highly conserved helix-turn-helix DNA binding protein and is a member of the interferon regulatory family of DNA transcription factors. Mutations in IRF6 lead to isolated and syndromic forms of cleft lip and palate, most notably Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) and Popliteal Ptyerigium Syndrome (PPS). Mice lacking both copies of Irf6 have severe limb, skin, palatal and esophageal abnormalities, due to significantly altered and delayed epithelial development. However, a recent report showed that MCS9.7, an enhancer near Irf6, is active in the tongue, suggesting that Irf6 may also be expressed in the tongue. Indeed, we detected Irf6 staining in the mesoderm-derived muscle during development of the tongue. Dual labeling experiments demonstrated that Irf6 was expressed only in the Myf5+ cell lineage, which originates from the segmental paraxial mesoderm and gives rise to the muscles of the tongue. Fate mapping of the segmental paraxial mesoderm cells revealed a cell-autonomous Irf6 function with reduced and poorly organized Myf5+ cell lineage in the tongue. Molecular analyses showed that the Irf6−/− embryos had aberrant cytoskeletal formation of the segmental paraxial mesoderm in the tongue. Fate mapping of the cranial neural crest cells revealed non-cell-autonomous Irf6 function with the loss of the inter-molar eminence. Loss of Irf6 function altered Bmp2, Bmp4, Shh, and Fgf10 signaling suggesting that these genes are involved in Irf6 signaling. Based on these data, Irf6 plays important cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous roles in muscular differentiation and cytoskeletal formation in the tongue. PMID:23451037

  3. Cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous roles for IRF6 during development of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Goudy, Steven; Angel, Peggi; Jacobs, Britni; Hill, Cynthia; Mainini, Veronica; Smith, Arianna L; Kousa, Youssef A; Caprioli, Richard; Prince, Lawrence S; Baldwin, Scott; Schutte, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) encodes a highly conserved helix-turn-helix DNA binding protein and is a member of the interferon regulatory family of DNA transcription factors. Mutations in IRF6 lead to isolated and syndromic forms of cleft lip and palate, most notably Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) and Popliteal Ptyerigium Syndrome (PPS). Mice lacking both copies of Irf6 have severe limb, skin, palatal and esophageal abnormalities, due to significantly altered and delayed epithelial development. However, a recent report showed that MCS9.7, an enhancer near Irf6, is active in the tongue, suggesting that Irf6 may also be expressed in the tongue. Indeed, we detected Irf6 staining in the mesoderm-derived muscle during development of the tongue. Dual labeling experiments demonstrated that Irf6 was expressed only in the Myf5+ cell lineage, which originates from the segmental paraxial mesoderm and gives rise to the muscles of the tongue. Fate mapping of the segmental paraxial mesoderm cells revealed a cell-autonomous Irf6 function with reduced and poorly organized Myf5+ cell lineage in the tongue. Molecular analyses showed that the Irf6-/- embryos had aberrant cytoskeletal formation of the segmental paraxial mesoderm in the tongue. Fate mapping of the cranial neural crest cells revealed non-cell-autonomous Irf6 function with the loss of the inter-molar eminence. Loss of Irf6 function altered Bmp2, Bmp4, Shh, and Fgf10 signaling suggesting that these genes are involved in Irf6 signaling. Based on these data, Irf6 plays important cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous roles in muscular differentiation and cytoskeletal formation in the tongue.

  4. Subversion of Cell-Autonomous Host Defense by Chlamydia Infection.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Annette; Rudel, Thomas

    2016-05-13

    Obligate intracellular bacteria entirely depend on the metabolites of their host cell for survival and generation of progeny. Due to their lifestyle inside a eukaryotic cell and the lack of any extracellular niche, they have to perfectly adapt to compartmentalized intracellular environment of the host cell and counteract the numerous defense strategies intrinsically present in all eukaryotic cells. This so-called cell-autonomous defense is present in all cell types encountering Chlamydia infection and is in addition closely linked to the cellular innate immune defense of the mammalian host. Cell type and chlamydial species-restricted mechanisms point a long-term evolutionary adaptation that builds the basis of the currently observed host and cell-type tropism among different Chlamydia species. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the strategies pathogenic Chlamydia species have developed to subvert and overcome the multiple mechanisms by which eukaryotic cells defend themselves against intracellular pathogens.

  5. Autonomous, Retrievable, Deep Sea Microbial Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work by providing bacteria in anaerobic sediments with an electron acceptor (anode) that stimulates metabolism of organic matter. The buried anode is connected via control circuitry to a cathode exposed to oxygen in the overlying water. During metabolism, bacteria release hydrogen ions into the sediment and transfer electrons extra-cellularly to the anode, which eventually reduce dissolved oxygen at the cathode, forming water. The open circuit voltage is approximately 0.8 v. The voltage between electrodes is operationally kept at 0.4 v with a potentiastat. The current is chiefly limited by the rate of microbial metabolism at the anode. The Office of Naval Research has encouraged development of microbial fuel cells in the marine environment at a number of academic and naval institutions. Earlier work in shallow sediments of San Diego Bay showed that the most important environmental parameters that control fuel cell power output in San Diego Bay were total organic carbon in the sediment and seasonal water temperature. Current MFC work at SPAWAR includes extension of microbial fuel cell tests to the deep sea environment (>1000 m) and, in parallel, testing microbial fuel cells in the laboratory under deep sea conditions. One question we are asking is whether MFC power output from deep water sediments repressurized and chilled in the laboratory comparable to those measured in situ. If yes, mapping the power potential of deep sea sediments may be made much easier, requiring sediment grabs and lab tests rather than deployment and retrieval of fuel cells. Another question we are asking is whether in situ temperature and total organic carbon in the deep sea sediment can predict MFC power. If yes, then we can make use of the large collection of publicly available, deep sea oceanographic measurements to make these predictions, foregoing expensive work at sea. These regressions will be compared to those derived from shallow water measurements.

  6. Fibrogenic Lung Injury Induces Non-Cell-Autonomous Fibroblast Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Neil; Grasberger, Paula E; Mugo, Brian M; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés; Lagares, David; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Pathologic accumulation of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis appears to depend on their invasion through basement membranes and extracellular matrices. Fibroblasts from the fibrotic lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have been demonstrated to acquire a phenotype characterized by increased cell-autonomous invasion. Here, we investigated whether fibroblast invasion is further stimulated by soluble mediators induced by lung injury. We found that bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from bleomycin-challenged mice or patients with IPF contain mediators that dramatically increase the matrix invasion of primary lung fibroblasts. Further characterization of this non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion suggested that the mediators driving this process are produced locally after lung injury and are preferentially produced by fibrogenic (e.g., bleomycin-induced) rather than nonfibrogenic (e.g., LPS-induced) lung injury. Comparison of invasion and migration induced by a series of fibroblast-active mediators indicated that these two forms of fibroblast movement are directed by distinct sets of stimuli. Finally, knockdown of multiple different membrane receptors, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, lysophosphatidic acid 1, epidermal growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, mitigated the non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion induced by bronchoalveolar lavage from bleomycin-injured mice, suggesting that multiple different mediators drive fibroblast invasion in pulmonary fibrosis. The magnitude of this mediator-driven fibroblast invasion suggests that its inhibition could be a novel therapeutic strategy for pulmonary fibrosis. Further elaboration of the molecular mechanisms that drive non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion consequently may provide a rich set of novel drug targets for the treatment of IPF and other fibrotic lung diseases.

  7. Control of nausea and autonomic dysfunction with terfenadine, a peripherally acting antihistamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall L.; Calkins, Dick S.; Robinson, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Terfenadine (Seldane) was admisistered to 14 male subjects in a randomized, double-blinded, and cross-over design to assess the efficacy of this peripherally active antihistamine as an antimotion sickness drug. Terfenadine possesses practically no central side effects. A staircase profile test was administered 4 h following placebo or a single oral dose of terfenadine (300 mg). The study revealed a statistically significant therapeutic effect from terfenadine (p less than 0.05). This led to a conclusion that, because the drug does not or only poorly crosses the blood-brain barrier, a selective peripheral antihistamine action may be sufficient in the control of motion sickness induced through cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation using a rotating chair. This finding implies that other peripherally acting agents might be found that possess even greater antimotion sickness efficacy. The present research raises additional questions regarding current theories on the etiology of motion sickness, its associated autonomic system dysfunction, and the validity of assumptions that effective pharmacological agents must act centrally.

  8. Zebrafish model of tuberous sclerosis complex reveals cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of mutant tuberin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Hyung; Speirs, Christina K; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Ess, Kevin C

    2011-03-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in either the TSC1 (encodes hamartin) or TSC2 (encodes tuberin) genes. Patients with TSC have hamartomas in various organs throughout the whole body, most notably in the brain, skin, eye, heart, kidney and lung. To study the development of hamartomas, we generated a zebrafish model of TSC featuring a nonsense mutation (vu242) in the tsc2 gene. This tsc2(vu242) allele encodes a truncated Tuberin protein lacking the GAP domain, which is required for inhibition of Rheb and of the TOR kinase within TORC1. We show that tsc2(vu242) is a recessive larval-lethal mutation that causes increased cell size in the brain and liver. Greatly elevated TORC1 signaling is observed in tsc2(vu242/vu242) homozygous zebrafish, and is moderately increased in tsc2(vu242/+) heterozygotes. Forebrain neurons are poorly organized in tsc2(vu242/vu242) homozygous mutants, which have extensive gray and white matter disorganization and ectopically positioned cells. Genetic mosaic analyses demonstrate that tsc2 limits TORC1 signaling in a cell-autonomous manner. However, in chimeric animals, tsc2(vu242/vu242) mutant cells also mislocalize wild-type host cells in the forebrain in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These results demonstrate a highly conserved role of tsc2 in zebrafish and establish a new animal model for studies of TSC. The finding of a non-cell-autonomous function of mutant cells might help explain the formation of brain hamartomas and cortical malformations in human TSC.

  9. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Matthew; Grubbs, Jeremy; McDonagh, Aja; Valdes, Dominic; Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M

    2016-08-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state.

  10. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state. PMID:27487365

  11. Membrane-Tethered Ligands: Tools for Cell-Autonomous Pharmacological Manipulation of Biological Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Detection of secreted signaling molecules by cognate cell surface receptors is a major intercellular communication pathway in cellular circuits that control biological processes. Understanding the biological significance of these connections would allow us to understand how cellular circuits operate as a whole. Membrane-tethered ligands are recombinant transgenes with structural modules that allow them to act on cell-surface receptors and ion channel subtypes with pharmacological specificity in a cell-autonomous manner. Membrane-tethered ligands have been successful in the specific manipulation of ion channels as well as G-protein-coupled receptors, and, in combination with cell-specific promoters, such manipulations have been restricted to genetically defined subpopulations within cellular circuits in vivo to induce specific phenotypes controlled by those circuits. These studies establish the membrane-tethering approach as a generally applicable method for dissecting neural and physiological circuits. PMID:23636262

  12. Stromal Fat4 acts non-autonomously with Dchs1/2 to restrict the nephron progenitor pool.

    PubMed

    Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Reginensi, Antoine; Pan, Qun; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Helmbacher, Françoise; McNeill, Helen

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of the balance between progenitor self-renewal and differentiation is crucial to development. In the mammalian kidney, reciprocal signalling between three lineages (stromal, mesenchymal and ureteric) ensures correct nephron progenitor self-renewal and differentiation. Loss of either the atypical cadherin FAT4 or its ligand Dachsous 1 (DCHS1) results in expansion of the mesenchymal nephron progenitor pool, called the condensing mesenchyme (CM). This has been proposed to be due to misregulation of the Hippo kinase pathway transcriptional co-activator YAP. Here, we use tissue-specific deletions to prove that FAT4 acts non-autonomously in the renal stroma to control nephron progenitors. We show that loss of Yap from the CM in Fat4-null mice does not reduce the expanded CM, indicating that FAT4 regulates the CM independently of YAP. Analysis of Six2(-/-);Fat4(-/-) double mutants demonstrates that excess progenitors in Fat4 mutants are dependent on Six2, a crucial regulator of nephron progenitor self-renewal. Electron microscopy reveals that cell organisation is disrupted in Fat4 mutants. Gene expression analysis demonstrates that the expression of Notch and FGF pathway components are altered in Fat4 mutants. Finally, we show that Dchs1, and its paralogue Dchs2, function in a partially redundant fashion to regulate the number of nephron progenitors. Our data support a model in which FAT4 in the stroma binds to DCHS1/2 in the mouse CM to restrict progenitor self-renewal.

  13. Neuralized functions cell autonomously to regulate Drosophila sense organ development.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E; Zhou, L; Rudzik, N; Boulianne, G L

    2000-09-01

    Neurogenic genes, including Notch and Delta, are thought to play important roles in regulating cell-cell interactions required for Drosophila sense organ development. To define the requirement of the neurogenic gene neuralized (neu) in this process, two independent neu alleles were used to generate mutant clones. We find that neu is required for determination of cell fates within the proneural cluster and that cells mutant for neu autonomously adopt neural fates when adjacent to wild-type cells. Furthermore, neu is required within the sense organ lineage to determine the fates of daughter cells and accessory cells. To gain insight into the mechanism by which neu functions, we used the GAL4/UAS system to express wild-type and epitope-tagged neu constructs. We show that Neu protein is localized primarily at the plasma membrane. We propose that the function of neu in sense organ development is to affect the ability of cells to receive Notch-Delta signals and thus modulate neurogenic activity that allows for the specification of non-neuronal cell fates in the sense organ.

  14. [Effect of barnidipine hydrochloride on the autonomic nervous system: difference between short- and long-acting components of calcium antagonist].

    PubMed

    Soejima, K; Akaishi, M; Oyamada, K; Mitamura, H; Ogawa, S

    1997-07-01

    Short-acting calcium antagonists have a deleterious effect on the prognosis for patients with myocardial ischemia, possibly caused by overactivation of sympathetic nerves due to vasodilatation, negative inotropism, or coronary steal. However, there is considerable debate about whether long-acting calcium antagonists as well as the short-acting calcium antagonists have the same effect. Barnidipine-HCl is a newly-developed calcium antagonist with 1:2 short- and long-acting particles. This study evaluated the changes of autonomic tone due to barnidipine. Both the short- and long-acting effect of the calcium antagonist was evaluated. Eleven patients with primary hypertension underwent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram and blood pressure monitoring before and after the treatment with barnidipine. Heart rate and blood pressure were compared before and after the medication. Heart rate variability was analyzed with a Marquette 8000/T. High frequency power (HF), as a parameter of vagal tone, and the ratio to low frequency power (LF), as a parameter of sympathetic tone, were obtained. Twenty-four-hour average blood pressure decreased significantly during the day, but nocturnal hypotension was not observed. Heart rate did not increase. HF decreased at the peak of the short- and long-acting components. LF/HF increased at the peak of the short-acting component. Short-acting particles of barnidipine had a deleterious effect on the autonomic tone, that is overactivation of sympathetic tone and suppression of vagal tone. Long-acting particles of barnidipine suppressed the vagal tone. These findings suggest that short-acting calcium antagonists may cause arrhythmia or deterioration of coronary ischemia.

  15. Molecular basis for the autonomous promotion of cell proliferation by angiogenin

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Trish T.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2017-01-01

    Canonical growth factors act indirectly via receptor-mediated signal transduction pathways. Here, we report on an autonomous pathway in which a growth factor is internalized, has its localization regulated by phosphorylation, and ultimately uses intrinsic catalytic activity to effect epigenetic change. Angiogenin (ANG), a secreted vertebrate ribonuclease, is known to promote cell proliferation, leading to neovascularization as well as neuroprotection in mammals. Upon entering cells, ANG encounters the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor protein, which binds with femtomolar affinity. We find that protein kinase C and cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylate ANG, enabling ANG to evade its inhibitor and enter the nucleus. After migrating to the nucleolus, ANG cleaves promoter-associated RNA, which prevents the recruitment of the nucleolar remodeling complex to the ribosomal DNA promoter. The ensuing derepression of rDNA transcription promotes cell proliferation. The biochemical basis for this unprecedented mechanism of signal transduction suggests new modalities for the treatment of cancers and neurological disorders. PMID:27915233

  16. Interferon-inducible effector mechanisms in cell-autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2012-04-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of genes as part of an elaborate antimicrobial programme designed to combat infection in all nucleated cells - a process termed cell-autonomous immunity. As described in this Review, recent genomic and subgenomic analyses have begun to assign functional properties to novel IFN-inducible effector proteins that restrict bacteria, protozoa and viruses in different subcellular compartments and at different stages of the pathogen life cycle. Several newly described host defence factors also participate in canonical oxidative and autophagic pathways by spatially coordinating their activities to enhance microbial killing. Together, these IFN-induced effector networks help to confer vertebrate host resistance to a vast and complex microbial world.

  17. Wnt signaling inhibits adrenal steroidogenesis by cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Elisabeth M; Kuick, Rork; Finco, Isabella; Bohin, Natacha; Hrycaj, Steven M; Wellik, Deneen M; Hammer, Gary D

    2014-09-01

    Wnt/β-catenin (βcat) signaling is critical for adrenal homeostasis. To elucidate how Wnt/βcat signaling elicits homeostatic maintenance of the adrenal cortex, we characterized the identity of the adrenocortical Wnt-responsive population. We find that Wnt-responsive cells consist of sonic hedgehog (Shh)-producing adrenocortical progenitors and differentiated, steroidogenic cells of the zona glomerulosa, but not the zona fasciculata and rarely cells that are actively proliferating. To determine potential direct inhibitory effects of βcat signaling on zona fasciculata-associated steroidogenesis, we used the mouse ATCL7 adrenocortical cell line that serves as a model system of glucocorticoid-producing fasciculata cells. Stimulation of βcat signaling caused decreased corticosterone release consistent with the observed reduced transcription of steroidogenic genes Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, Star, and Mc2r. Decreased steroidogenic gene expression was correlated with diminished steroidogenic factor 1 (Sf1; Nr5a1) expression and occupancy on steroidogenic promoters. Additionally, βcat signaling suppressed the ability of Sf1 to transactivate steroidogenic promoters independent of changes in Sf1 expression level. To investigate Sf1-independent effects of βcat on steroidogenesis, we used Affymetrix gene expression profiling of Wnt-responsive cells in vivo and in vitro. One candidate gene identified, Ccdc80, encodes a secreted protein with unknown signaling mechanisms. We report that Ccdc80 is a novel βcat-regulated gene in adrenocortical cells. Treatment of adrenocortical cells with media containing secreted Ccdc80 partially phenocopies βcat-induced suppression of steroidogenesis, albeit through an Sf1-independent mechanism. This study reveals multiple mechanisms of βcat-mediated suppression of steroidogenesis and suggests that Wnt/βcat signaling may regulate adrenal homeostasis by inhibiting fasciculata differentiation and promoting the undifferentiated state of progenitor

  18. Wnt Signaling Inhibits Adrenal Steroidogenesis by Cell-Autonomous and Non–Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Elisabeth M.; Kuick, Rork; Finco, Isabella; Bohin, Natacha; Hrycaj, Steven M.; Wellik, Deneen M.

    2014-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin (βcat) signaling is critical for adrenal homeostasis. To elucidate how Wnt/βcat signaling elicits homeostatic maintenance of the adrenal cortex, we characterized the identity of the adrenocortical Wnt-responsive population. We find that Wnt-responsive cells consist of sonic hedgehog (Shh)-producing adrenocortical progenitors and differentiated, steroidogenic cells of the zona glomerulosa, but not the zona fasciculata and rarely cells that are actively proliferating. To determine potential direct inhibitory effects of βcat signaling on zona fasciculata-associated steroidogenesis, we used the mouse ATCL7 adrenocortical cell line that serves as a model system of glucocorticoid-producing fasciculata cells. Stimulation of βcat signaling caused decreased corticosterone release consistent with the observed reduced transcription of steroidogenic genes Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, Star, and Mc2r. Decreased steroidogenic gene expression was correlated with diminished steroidogenic factor 1 (Sf1; Nr5a1) expression and occupancy on steroidogenic promoters. Additionally, βcat signaling suppressed the ability of Sf1 to transactivate steroidogenic promoters independent of changes in Sf1 expression level. To investigate Sf1-independent effects of βcat on steroidogenesis, we used Affymetrix gene expression profiling of Wnt-responsive cells in vivo and in vitro. One candidate gene identified, Ccdc80, encodes a secreted protein with unknown signaling mechanisms. We report that Ccdc80 is a novel βcat-regulated gene in adrenocortical cells. Treatment of adrenocortical cells with media containing secreted Ccdc80 partially phenocopies βcat-induced suppression of steroidogenesis, albeit through an Sf1-independent mechanism. This study reveals multiple mechanisms of βcat-mediated suppression of steroidogenesis and suggests that Wnt/βcat signaling may regulate adrenal homeostasis by inhibiting fasciculata differentiation and promoting the undifferentiated state of progenitor

  19. Homologous Recombination between Autonomously Replicating Plasmids in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ayares, David; Spencer, James; Schwartz, Faina; Morse, Brian; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1985-01-01

    The ability of autonomously replicating plasmids to recombine in mammalian cells was investigated. Two deletion plasmids of the eukaryotic-prokaryotic shuttle vector pSV2neo were cotransfected into transformed monkey COS cells. Examination of the low molecular weight DNA isolated after 48 hr of incubation revealed that recombination between the plasmids had occurred. The DNA was also used to transform recA- E. coli. Yield of neo R colonies signified homologous recombination. Examination of the plasmid DNA from these colonies confirmed this view. Double-strand breaks in one or both of the input plasmids at the sites of deletion resulted in an enhancement of recombination frequency. The recombination process yielded monomeric and dimeric molecules. Examination of these molecules revealed that reciprocal recombination as well as gene conversion events were involved in the generation of plasmids bearing an intact neo gene. The COS cell system we describe is analogous to study of bacteriophage recombination and yeast random-spore analysis. PMID:2996980

  20. What cycles the cell? -Robust autonomous cell cycle models.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Orit; Louzoun, Yoram

    2009-12-01

    The cell cycle is one of the best studied cellular mechanisms at the experimental and theoretical levels. Although most of the important biochemical components and reactions of the cell cycle are probably known, the precise way the cell cycle dynamics are driven is still under debate. This phenomenon is not atypical to many other biological systems where the knowledge of the molecular building blocks and the interactions between them does not lead to a coherent picture of the appropriate dynamics. We here propose a methodology to develop plausible models for the driving mechanisms of embryonic and cancerous cell cycles. We first define a key property of the system (a cyclic behaviour in the case of the embryonic cell cycle) and set mathematical constraints on the types of two variable simplified systems robustly reproducing such a cyclic behaviour. We then expand these robust systems to three variables and reiterate the procedure. At each step, we further limit the type of expanded systems to fit the known microbiology until a detailed description of the system is obtained. This methodology produces mathematical descriptions of the required biological systems that are more robust to changes in the precise function and rate constants. This methodology can be extended to practically any type of subcellular mechanism.

  1. Non-autonomous cell proliferation in the mammary gland and cancer.

    PubMed

    Weber, Robert J; Desai, Tejal A; Gartner, Zev J

    2017-03-14

    Cells decide whether to grow and divide by integrating internal and external signals. Non-autonomous cell growth and proliferation occurs when microenvironmental signals from neighboring cells, both physical and secreted, license this decision. Understanding these processes is vital to developing an accurate framework for cell-cell interactions and cellular decision-making, and is useful for advancing new therapeutic strategies to prevent dysregulated growth. Here, we review some recent examples of non-autonomous cell growth in the mammary gland and tumor cell proliferation.

  2. Non-cell autonomous cell death caused by transmission of Huntingtin aggregates in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Daniel T; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that protein aggregates can spread between neurons in several neurodegenerative diseases but much remains unknown regarding the underlying mechanisms responsible for this spreading and its role in disease progression. We recently demonstrated that mutant Huntingtin aggregates spread between cells within the Drosophila brain resulting in non-cell autonomous loss of a pair of large neurons in the posterior protocerebrum. However, the full extent of neuronal loss throughout the brain was not determined. Here we examine the effects of driving expression of mutant Huntingtin in Olfactory Receptor Neurons (ORNs) by using a marker for cleaved caspase activity to monitor neuronal apoptosis as a function of age. We find widespread caspase activity in various brain regions over time, demonstrating that non-cell autonomous damage is widespread. Improved understanding of which neurons are most vulnerable and why should be useful in developing treatment strategies for neurodegenerative diseases that involve transcellular spreading of aggregates.

  3. Crim1 has cell-autonomous and paracrine roles during embryonic heart development

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Swati; Chou, Fang Yu; Wang, Richard; Chiu, Han Sheng; Raju, Vinay K. Sundar; Little, Melissa H.; Thomas, Walter G.; Piper, Michael; Pennisi, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The epicardium has a critical role during embryonic development, contributing epicardium-derived lineages to the heart, as well as providing regulatory and trophic signals necessary for myocardial development. Crim1 is a unique trans-membrane protein expressed by epicardial and epicardially-derived cells but its role in cardiogenesis is unknown. Using knockout mouse models, we observe that loss of Crim1 leads to congenital heart defects including epicardial defects and hypoplastic ventricular compact myocardium. Epicardium-restricted deletion of Crim1 results in increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of the myocardium in vivo, and an increased migration of primary epicardial cells. Furthermore, Crim1 appears to be necessary for the proliferation of epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) and for their subsequent differentiation into cardiac fibroblasts. It is also required for normal levels of cardiomyocyte proliferation and apoptosis, consistent with a role in regulating epicardium-derived trophic factors that act on the myocardium. Mechanistically, Crim1 may also modulate key developmentally expressed growth factors such as TGFβs, as changes in the downstream effectors phospho-SMAD2 and phospho-ERK1/2 are observed in the absence of Crim1. Collectively, our data demonstrates that Crim1 is essential for cell-autonomous and paracrine aspects of heart development. PMID:26821812

  4. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with cell cleavable groups for autonomous cell delivery.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mrityunjoy; Vernon Shih, Yu-Ru; Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Cabrales, Pedro; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-01-01

    Cell-responsive hydrogels hold tremendous potential as cell delivery devices in regenerative medicine. In this study, we developed a hydrogel-based cell delivery vehicle, in which the encapsulated cell cargo control its own release from the vehicle in a protease-independent manner. Specifically, we have synthesized a modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel that undergoes degradation responding to cell-secreted molecules by incorporating disulfide moieties onto the backbone of the hydrogel precursor. Our results show the disulfide-modified PEG hydrogels disintegrate seamlessly into solution in presence of cells without any external stimuli. The rate of hydrogel degradation, which ranges from hours to months, is found to be dependent upon the type of encapsulated cells, cell number, and fraction of disulfide moieties present in the hydrogel backbone. The differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells released from the hydrogels is maintained in vitro. The in vivo analysis of these cell-laden hydrogels, through a dorsal window chamber and intramuscular implantation, demonstrated autonomous release of cells to the host environment. The hydrogel-mediated implantation of cells resulted in higher cell retention within the host tissue when compared to that without a biomaterial support. Biomaterials that function as a shield to protect cell cargos and assist their delivery in response to signals from the encapsulated cells could have a wide utility in cell transplantation and could improve the therapeutic outcomes of cell-based therapies.

  5. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with cell cleavable groups for autonomous cell delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Mrityunjoy; Shih, Yu-Ru Vernon; Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Cabrales, Pedro; Varghese, Shyni

    2015-01-01

    Cell-responsive hydrogels hold tremendous potential as cell delivery devices in regenerative medicine. In this study, we developed a hydrogel-based cell delivery vehicle, in which the encapsulated cell cargo control its own release from the vehicle in a protease-independent manner. Specifically, we have synthesized a modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel that undergoes degradation responding to cell-secreted molecules by incorporating disulfide moieties onto the backbone of the hydrogel precursor. Our results show the disulfide-modified PEG hydrogels disintegrate seamlessly into solution in presence of cells without any external stimuli. The rate of hydrogel degradation, which ranges from hours to months, is found to be dependent upon the type of encapsulated cells, cell number, and fraction of disulfide moieties present in the hydrogel backbone. The differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells released from the hydrogels is maintained in vitro. The in vivo analysis of these cell-laden hydrogels, through a dorsal window chamber and intramuscular implantation, demonstrated autonomous release of cells to the host environment. The hydrogel-mediated implantation of cells resulted in higher cell retention within the host tissue when compared to that without a biomaterial support. Biomaterials that function as a shield to protect cell cargos and assist their delivery in response to signals from the encapsulated cells could have a wide utility in cell transplantation and could improve the therapeutic outcomes of cell-based therapies. PMID:26606444

  6. A non-cell autonomous mouse model of CNS haemangioblastoma mediated by mutant KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Leyuan; Al-Assar, Osama; Drynan, Lesley F.; Arends, Mark J.; Tyers, Pam; Barker, Roger A.; Rabbitts, Terence H.

    2017-01-01

    Haemangioblastoma is a rare malignancy of the CNS where vascular proliferation causes lesions due to endothelial propagation. We found that conditionally expressing mutant Kras, using Rag1-Cre, gave rise to CNS haemangioblastoma in the cortex and cerebellum in mice that present with highly vascular tumours with stromal cells similar to human haemangioblastomas. The aberrant haemangioblastoma endothelial cells do not express mutant Kras but rather the mutant oncogene is expressed in CNS interstitial cells, including neuronal cells and progeny. This demonstrates a non-cell autonomous origin of this disease that is unexpectedly induced via Rag1-Cre expression in CNS interstitial cells. This is the first time that mutant RAS has been shown to stimulate non-cell autonomous proliferation in malignancy and suggests that mutant RAS can control endothelial cell proliferation in neo-vascularisation when expressed in certain cells. PMID:28322325

  7. Both cell-autonomous mechanisms and hormones contribute to sexual development in vertebrates and insects.

    PubMed

    Bear, Ashley; Monteiro, Antónia

    2013-08-01

    The differentiation of male and female characteristics in vertebrates and insects has long been thought to proceed via different mechanisms. Traditionally, vertebrate sexual development was thought to occur in two phases: a primary and a secondary phase, the primary phase involving the differentiation of the gonads, and the secondary phase involving the differentiation of other sexual traits via the influence of sex hormones secreted by the gonads. In contrast, insect sexual development was thought to depend exclusively on cell-autonomous expression of sex-specific genes. Recently, however, new evidence indicates that both vertebrates and insects rely on sex hormones as well as cell-autonomous mechanisms to develop sexual traits. Collectively, these new data challenge the traditional vertebrate definitions of primary and secondary sexual development, call for a redefinition of these terms, and indicate the need for research aimed at explaining the relative dependence on cell-autonomous versus hormonally guided sexual development in animals.

  8. Sensing the enemy, containing the threat: cell-autonomous immunity to Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Finethy, Ryan; Coers, Jörn

    2016-07-29

    The bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of the most common sexually transmitted infection in North America and Europe. Medical complications resulting from genital C. trachomatis infections arise predominantly in women where the initial infections often remain asymptomatic and thus unrecognized. Untreated asymptomatic infections in women can ascend into the upper genital tract and establish persistence, ultimately resulting in extensive scarring of the reproductive organs, pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility and ectopic pregnancies. Previously resolved C. trachomatis infections fail to provide protective immune memory, and no effective vaccine against C. trachomatis is currently available. Critical determinants of the pathogenesis and immunogenicity of genital C. trachomatis infections are cell-autonomous immune responses. Cell-autonomous immunity describes the ability of an individual host cell to launch intrinsic immune circuits that execute the detection, containment and elimination of cell-invading pathogens. As an obligate intracellular pathogen C. trachomatis is constantly under attack by cell-intrinsic host defenses. Accordingly, C. trachomatis evolved to subvert and co-opt cell-autonomous immune pathways. This review will provide a critical summary of our current understanding of cell-autonomous immunity to C. trachomatis and its role in shaping host resistance, inflammation and adaptive immunity to genital C. trachomatis infections.

  9. Autonomous assembly of epithelial structures by subrenal implantation of dissociated embryonic inner-ear cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Kaiqing; Zhu, Helen He; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-05-27

    Microenvironment and cell-cell interactions play an important role during embryogenesis and are required for the stemness and differentiation of stem cells. The inner-ear sensory epithelium, containing hair cells and supporting cells, is derived from the stem cells within the otic vesicle at early embryonic stages. However, whether or not such microenvironment or cell-cell interactions within the embryonic otic tissue have the capacity to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and to autonomously reassemble the cells into epithelial structures is unknown. Here, we report that on enzymatic digestion and dissociation to harvest all the single cells from 13.5-day-old rat embryonic (E13.5) inner-ear tissue as well as on implantation of these cells under renal capsules; the dissociated cells are able to reassemble themselves to form epithelial structures as early as 7 days after implantation. By 25 days after implantation, more mature epithelial structures are formed. Immunostaining with cell-type-specific markers reveals that hair cells and supporting cells are not only formed, but are also well aligned with the hair cells located in the apical layer surrounded by the supporting cells. These findings suggest that microenvironment and cell-cell interactions within the embryonic inner-ear tissue have the autonomous signals to induce the formation of sensory epithelial structures. This method may also provide a useful system to study the potential of stem cells to differentiate into hair cells in vivo.

  10. A Non-Cell-Autonomous Role of BEC-1/BECN1/Beclin1 in Coordinating Cell-Cycle Progression and Stem Cell Proliferation during Germline Development.

    PubMed

    Ames, Kristina; Da Cunha, Dayse S; Gonzalez, Brenda; Konta, Marina; Lin, Feng; Shechter, Gabriel; Starikov, Lev; Wong, Sara; Bülow, Hannes E; Meléndez, Alicia

    2017-03-20

    The decision of stem cells to proliferate and differentiate is finely controlled. The Caenorhabditis elegans germline provides a tractable system for studying the mechanisms that control stem cell proliferation and homeostasis [1-4]. Autophagy is a conserved cellular recycling process crucial for cellular homeostasis in many different contexts [5], but its function in germline stem cell proliferation remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a function for autophagy in germline stem cell proliferation. We found that autophagy genes such as bec-1/BECN1/Beclin1, atg-16.2/ATG16L, atg-18/WIPI1/2, and atg-7/ATG7 are required for the late larval expansion of germline stem cell progenitors in the C. elegans gonad. We further show that BEC-1/BECN1/Beclin1 acts independently of the GLP-1/Notch or DAF-7/TGF-β pathways but together with the DAF-2/insulin IGF-1 receptor (IIR) signaling pathway to promote germline stem cell proliferation. Similar to DAF-2/IIR, BEC-1/BECN1/Beclin1, ATG-18/WIPI1/2, and ATG-16.2/ATG16L all promote cell-cycle progression and are negatively regulated by the phosphatase and tensin homolog DAF-18/PTEN. However, whereas BEC-1/BECN1/Beclin1 acts through the transcriptional regulator SKN-1/Nrf1, ATG-18/WIPI1/2 and ATG-16.2/ATG16L exert their function through the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. In contrast, ATG-7 functions in concert with the DAF-7/TGF-β pathway to promote germline proliferation and is not required for cell-cycle progression. Finally, we report that BEC-1/BECN1/Beclin1 functions non-cell-autonomously to facilitate cell-cycle progression and stem cell proliferation. Our findings demonstrate a novel non-autonomous role for BEC-1/BECN1/Beclin1 in the control of stem cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression, which may have implications for the understanding and development of therapies against malignant cell growth in the future.

  11. RoBlock: a prototype autonomous manufacturing cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baekdal, Lars K.; Balslev, Ivar; Eriksen, Rene D.; Jensen, Soren P.; Jorgensen, Bo N.; Kirstein, Brian; Kristensen, Bent B.; Olsen, Martin M.; Perram, John W.; Petersen, Henrik G.; Petersen, Morten L.; Ruhoff, Peter T.; Skjolstrup, Carl E.; Sorensen, Anders S.; Wagenaar, Jeroen M.

    2000-10-01

    RoBlock is the first phase of an internally financed project at the Institute aimed at building a system in which two industrial robots suspended from a gantry, as shown below, cooperate to perform a task specified by an external user, in this case, assembling an unstructured collection of colored wooden blocks into a specified 3D pattern. The blocks are identified and localized using computer vision and grasped with a suction cup mechanism. Future phases of the project will involve other processes such as grasping and lifting, as well as other types of robot such as autonomous vehicles or variable geometry trusses. Innovative features of the control software system include: The use of an advanced trajectory planning system which ensures collision avoidance based on a generalization of the method of artificial potential fields, the use of a generic model-based controller which learns the values of parameters, including static and kinetic friction, of a detailed mechanical model of itself by comparing actual with planned movements, the use of fast, flexible, and robust pattern recognition and 3D-interpretation strategies, integration of trajectory planning and control with the sensor systems in a distributed Java application running on a network of PC's attached to the individual physical components. In designing this first stage, the aim was to build in the minimum complexity necessary to make the system non-trivially autonomous and to minimize the technological risks. The aims of this project, which is planned to be operational during 2000, are as follows: To provide a platform for carrying out experimental research in multi-agent systems and autonomous manufacturing systems, to test the interdisciplinary cooperation architecture of the Maersk Institute, in which researchers in the fields of applied mathematics (modeling the physical world), software engineering (modeling the system) and sensor/actuator technology (relating the virtual and real worlds) could

  12. Is there consistency and specificity of autonomic changes during emotional episodes? Guidance from the Conceptual Act Theory and psychophysiology.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Karen S; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-04-01

    The consistency and specificity of autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses during emotional episodes remains a topic of debate with relevance for emotional concordance. We present a recent model of how mental states are constructed, the Conceptual Act Theory (CAT), and then review findings from existing meta-analyses and a qualitative review along with studies using pattern classification of multivariate ANS patterns to determine if there is across-study evidence for consistency and specificity of ANS responses during emotional episodes. We conclude that there is thus far minimal evidence for ANS response consistency and specificity across studies. We then review the current understanding of the functional and anatomical features of ANS including its efferent and afferent connections with the central nervous system, which suggests the need to reformulate how we conceptualize ANS response consistency and specificity. We conclude by showing how this reformulation is consistent with the CAT, and how the model suggests when we would and would not expect to see consistency and specificity in ANS responses, and concordance more generally, during emotional episodes.

  13. Non-cell-autonomous Neurotoxicity of α-synuclein Through Microglial Toll-like Receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changyoun; Lee, He-Jin; Masliah, Eliezer; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-06-01

    Synucleinopathies are a collection of neurological diseases that are characterized by deposition of α-synuclein aggregates in neurons and glia. These diseases include Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. Although it has been increasingly clear that α-synuclein is implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and other synucleinopathies, the precise mechanism underlying the disease process remains to be unraveled. The past studies on how α-synuclein exerts pathogenic actions have focused on its direct, cell-autonomous neurotoxic effects. However, recent findings suggested that there might be indirect, non-cell-autonomous pathways, perhaps through the changes in glial cells, for the pathogenic actions of this protein. Here, we present evidence that α-synuclein can cause neurodegeneration through a non-cell-autonomous manner. We show that α-synuclein can be secreted from neurons and induces inflammatory responses in microglia, which in turn secreted neurotoxic agents into the media causing neurodegeneration. The neurotoxic response of microglia was mediated by activation of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), a receptor for neuron-derived α-synuclein. This work suggests that TLR2 is the key molecule that mediates non-cell-autonomous neurotoxic effects of α-synuclein, hence a candidate for the therapeutic target.

  14. Non-autonomous consequences of cell death and other perks of being metazoan

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tin Tin

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster remains a foremost genetic model to study basic cell biological processes in the context of multi-cellular development. In such context, the behavior of one cell can influence another. Non-autonomous signaling among cells occurs throughout metazoan development and disease, and is too vast to be covered by a single review. I will focus here on non-autonomous signaling events that occur in response to cell death in the larval epithelia and affect the life-death decision of surviving cells. I will summarize the use of Drosophila to study cell death-induced proliferation, apoptosis-induced apoptosis, and apoptosis-induced survival signaling. Key insights from Drosophila will be discussed in the context of analogous processes in mammalian development and cancer biology. PMID:26069889

  15. Cell autonomous defects in cortical development revealed by two-color chimera analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Adam V; Garner, Craig C; Nelson, W James; Gertler, Frank B

    2009-05-01

    A complex program of cell intrinsic and extrinsic signals guide cortical development. Although genetic studies in mice have uncovered roles for numerous genes and gene families in multiple aspects of corticogenesis, determining their cell autonomous functions is often complicated by pleiotropic defects. Here we describe a novel lentiviral-based method to analyze cell autonomy by generating two-color chimeric mouse embryos. Ena/VASP-deficient mutant and control embryonic stem (ES) cells were labeled with different fluorescent chimeric proteins (EGFP and mCherry) that were modified to bind to the plasma membrane. These labeled ES cells were used to generate two-color chimeric embryos possessing two genetically distinct populations of cortical cells, permitting multiple aspects of neuronal morphogenesis to be analyzed and compared between the two cell populations. We observed little difference between the ability of control and Ena/VASP-deficient cells to contribute to cortical organization during development. In contrast, we observed axon fiber tracts originating from control neurons but not Ena/VASP-deficient neurons, indicating that loss of Ena/VASP causes a cell autonomous defect in cortical axon formation. This technique could be applied to determine other cell autonomous functions in different stages of cortical development.

  16. Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing.

    PubMed

    Comina, Germán; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2016-03-15

    Modern cell phones are a ubiquitous resource with a residual capacity to accommodate chemical sensing and biosensing capabilities. From the different approaches explored to capitalize on such resource, the use of autonomous disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices-conceived as only accessories to complement cell phones-underscores the possibility to entirely retain cell phones' ubiquity for distributed biosensing. The technology and principles exploited for autonomous LOC devices are here selected and reviewed focusing on their potential to serve cell phone readout configurations. Together with this requirement, the central aspects of cell phones' resources that determine their potential for analytical detection are examined. The conversion of these LOC concepts into universal architectures that are readable on unaccessorized phones is discussed within this context.

  17. Patched1 and Patched2 inhibit Smoothened non-cell autonomously

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Brock; Casillas, Catalina; Alfaro, Astrid C; Jägers, Carina; Roelink, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Smoothened (Smo) inhibition by Patched (Ptch) is central to Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a proton driven antiporter, is required for Smo inhibition via an unknown mechanism. Hh ligand binding to Ptch reverses this inhibition and activated Smo initiates the Hh response. To determine whether Ptch inhibits Smo strictly in the same cell or also mediates non-cell-autonomous Smo inhibition, we generated genetically mosaic neuralized embryoid bodies (nEBs) from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). These experiments utilized novel mESC lines in which Ptch1, Ptch2, Smo, Shh and 7dhcr were inactivated via gene editing in multiple combinations, allowing us to measure non-cell autonomous interactions between cells with differing Ptch1/2 status. In several independent assays, the Hh response was repressed by Ptch1/2 in nearby cells. When 7dhcr was targeted, cells displayed elevated non-cell autonomous inhibition. These findings support a model in which Ptch1/2 mediate secretion of a Smo-inhibitory cholesterol precursor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17634.001 PMID:27552050

  18. Stabilizing Motifs in Autonomous Boolean Networks and the Yeast Cell Cycle Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua

    2009-03-01

    Synchronously updated Boolean networks are widely used to model gene regulation. Some properties of these model networks are known to be artifacts of the clocking in the update scheme. Autonomous updating is a less artificial scheme that allows one to introduce small timing perturbations and study stability of the attractors. We argue that the stabilization of a limit cycle in an autonomous Boolean network requires a combination of motifs such as feed-forward loops and auto-repressive links that can correct small fluctuations in the timing of switching events. A recently published model of the transcriptional cell-cycle oscillator in yeast contains the motifs necessary for stability under autonomous updating [1]. [1] D. A. Orlando, et al. Nature (London), 4530 (7197):0 944--947, 2008.

  19. Retinoic acid induces Sertoli cell paracrine signals for spermatogonia differentiation but cell autonomously drives spermatocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Raverdeau, Mathilde; Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Féret, Betty; Dennefeld, Christine; Benoit, Gérard; Davidson, Irwin; Chambon, Pierre; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B

    2012-10-09

    Direct evidence for a role of endogenous retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A in the initial differentiation and meiotic entry of spermatogonia, and thus in the initiation of spermatogenesis is still lacking. RA is synthesized by dedicated enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDH), and binds to and activates nuclear RA receptors (RARA, RARB, and RARG) either within the RA-synthesizing cells or in the neighboring cells. In the present study, we have used a combination of somatic genetic ablations and pharmacological approaches in vivo to show that during the first, prepubertal, spermatogenic cycle (i) RALDH-dependent synthesis of RA by Sertoli cells (SC), the supporting cells of the germ cell (GC) lineage, is indispensable to initiate differentiation of A aligned into A1 spermatogonia; (ii) RARA in SC mediates the effects of RA, possibly through activating Mafb expression, a gene whose Drosophila homolog is mandatory to GC differentiation; (iii) RA synthesized by premeiotic spermatocytes cell autonomously induces meiotic initiation through controlling the RAR-dependent expression of Stra8. Furthermore, we show that RA of SC origin is no longer necessary for the subsequent spermatogenic cycles but essential to spermiation. Altogether, our data establish that the effects of RA in vivo on spermatogonia differentiation are indirect, via SC, but direct on meiotic initiation in spermatocytes, supporting thereby the notion that, contrary to the situation in the female, RA is necessary to induce meiosis in the male.

  20. Cell-Autonomous and Non-cell-autonomous Function of Hox Genes Specify Segmental Neuroblast Identity in the Gnathal Region of the Embryonic CNS in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Becker, Henrike; Renner, Simone; Technau, Gerhard M; Berger, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During central nervous system (CNS) development neural stem cells (Neuroblasts, NBs) have to acquire an identity appropriate to their location. In thoracic and abdominal segments of Drosophila, the expression pattern of Bithorax-Complex Hox genes is known to specify the segmental identity of NBs prior to their delamination from the neuroectoderm. Compared to the thoracic, ground state segmental units in the head region are derived to different degrees, and the precise mechanism of segmental specification of NBs in this region is still unclear. We identified and characterized a set of serially homologous NB-lineages in the gnathal segments and used one of them (NB6-4 lineage) as a model to investigate the mechanism conferring segment-specific identities to gnathal NBs. We show that NB6-4 is primarily determined by the cell-autonomous function of the Hox gene Deformed (Dfd). Interestingly, however, it also requires a non-cell-autonomous function of labial and Antennapedia that are expressed in adjacent anterior or posterior compartments. We identify the secreted molecule Amalgam (Ama) as a downstream target of the Antennapedia-Complex Hox genes labial, Dfd, Sex combs reduced and Antennapedia. In conjunction with its receptor Neurotactin (Nrt) and the effector kinase Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), Ama is necessary in parallel to the cell-autonomous Dfd pathway for the correct specification of the maxillary identity of NB6-4. Both pathways repress CyclinE (CycE) and loss of function of either of these pathways leads to a partial transformation (40%), whereas simultaneous mutation of both pathways leads to a complete transformation (100%) of NB6-4 segmental identity. Finally, we provide genetic evidences, that the Ama-Nrt-Abl-pathway regulates CycE expression by altering the function of the Hippo effector Yorkie in embryonic NBs. The disclosure of a non-cell-autonomous influence of Hox genes on neural stem cells provides new insight into the process of segmental

  1. Cell-Autonomous and Non-cell-autonomous Function of Hox Genes Specify Segmental Neuroblast Identity in the Gnathal Region of the Embryonic CNS in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Henrike; Renner, Simone; Technau, Gerhard M.; Berger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    During central nervous system (CNS) development neural stem cells (Neuroblasts, NBs) have to acquire an identity appropriate to their location. In thoracic and abdominal segments of Drosophila, the expression pattern of Bithorax-Complex Hox genes is known to specify the segmental identity of NBs prior to their delamination from the neuroectoderm. Compared to the thoracic, ground state segmental units in the head region are derived to different degrees, and the precise mechanism of segmental specification of NBs in this region is still unclear. We identified and characterized a set of serially homologous NB-lineages in the gnathal segments and used one of them (NB6-4 lineage) as a model to investigate the mechanism conferring segment-specific identities to gnathal NBs. We show that NB6-4 is primarily determined by the cell-autonomous function of the Hox gene Deformed (Dfd). Interestingly, however, it also requires a non-cell-autonomous function of labial and Antennapedia that are expressed in adjacent anterior or posterior compartments. We identify the secreted molecule Amalgam (Ama) as a downstream target of the Antennapedia-Complex Hox genes labial, Dfd, Sex combs reduced and Antennapedia. In conjunction with its receptor Neurotactin (Nrt) and the effector kinase Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), Ama is necessary in parallel to the cell-autonomous Dfd pathway for the correct specification of the maxillary identity of NB6-4. Both pathways repress CyclinE (CycE) and loss of function of either of these pathways leads to a partial transformation (40%), whereas simultaneous mutation of both pathways leads to a complete transformation (100%) of NB6-4 segmental identity. Finally, we provide genetic evidences, that the Ama-Nrt-Abl-pathway regulates CycE expression by altering the function of the Hippo effector Yorkie in embryonic NBs. The disclosure of a non-cell-autonomous influence of Hox genes on neural stem cells provides new insight into the process of segmental

  2. Autonomous proliferation and bcl-2 expression involving haematopoietic cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bincoletto, C.; Saad, S. T.; Soares da Silva, E.; Queiroz, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the autonomous proliferation, bcl-2 expression and number of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow of patients with confirmed diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Normal bone marrow cells obtained from donors of the Clinical Hospital of this university were used as a control. The autonomous proliferation, evaluated by clonal culture without exogenous growth factor, and the number of apoptotic cells in bone marrow kept for 10 days in liquid cultures at 37 degrees C and 5% carbon dioxide, were significantly greater in MDS patients than in control subjects (P = 0.001, Wilcoxon). However, bcl-2 expression, measured by immunocytochemistry, was significantly lower in MDS patients than in normal individuals (P = 0.002, Wilcoxon). These results suggest that the high proliferation activity in MDS patients may be counteracted by the high level of medullar cell death, which might be related to the lower bcl-2 expression. PMID:9744502

  3. Autonomous regulation of sex-specific developmental programming in mouse fetal germ cells.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Hirotaka; Low, Eleanor W; McCarrey, John R; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2007-10-01

    In mice, unique events regulating epigenetic programming (e.g., genomic imprinting) and replication state (mitosis versus meiosis) occur during fetal germ cell development. To determine whether these processes are autonomously programmed in fetal germ cells or are dependent upon ongoing instructive interactions with surrounding gonadal somatic cells, we isolated male and female germ cells at 13.5 days postcoitum (dpc) and maintained them in culture for 6 days, either alone or in the presence of feeder cells or gonadal somatic cells. We examined allele-specific DNA methylation in the imprinted H19 and Snrpn genes, and we also determined whether these cells remained mitotic or entered meiosis. Our results show that isolated male germ cells are able to establish a characteristic "paternal" methylation pattern at imprinted genes in the absence of any support from somatic cells. On the other hand, cultured female germ cells maintain a hypomethylated status at these loci, characteristic of the normal "maternal" methylation pattern in endogenous female germ cells before birth. Further, the surviving female germ cells entered first meiotic prophase and reached the pachytene stage, whereas male germ cells entered mitotic arrest. These results indicate that mechanisms controlling both epigenetic programming and replication state are autonomously regulated in fetal germ cells that have been exposed to the genital ridge prior to 13.5 dpc.

  4. Pejvakin, a Candidate Stereociliary Rootlet Protein, Regulates Hair Cell Function in a Cell-Autonomous Manner.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Marcin; Kazmierczak, Piotr; Peng, Anthony W; Harris, Suzan L; Shah, Prahar; Puel, Jean-Luc; Lenoir, Marc; Franco, Santos J; Schwander, Martin

    2017-03-29

    Mutations in the Pejvakin (PJVK) gene are thought to cause auditory neuropathy and hearing loss of cochlear origin by affecting noise-induced peroxisome proliferation in auditory hair cells and neurons. Here we demonstrate that loss of pejvakin in hair cells, but not in neurons, causes profound hearing loss and outer hair cell degeneration in mice. Pejvakin binds to and colocalizes with the rootlet component TRIOBP at the base of stereocilia in injectoporated hair cells, a pattern that is disrupted by deafness-associated PJVK mutations. Hair cells of pejvakin-deficient mice develop normal rootlets, but hair bundle morphology and mechanotransduction are affected before the onset of hearing. Some mechanotransducing shorter row stereocilia are missing, whereas the remaining ones exhibit overextended tips and a greater variability in height and width. Unlike previous studies of Pjvk alleles with neuronal dysfunction, our findings reveal a cell-autonomous role of pejvakin in maintaining stereocilia architecture that is critical for hair cell function.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Two missense mutations in the Pejvakin (PJVK or DFNB59) gene were first identified in patients with audiological hallmarks of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, whereas all other PJVK alleles cause hearing loss of cochlear origin. These findings suggest that complex pathogenetic mechanisms underlie human deafness DFNB59. In contrast to recent studies, we demonstrate that pejvakin in auditory neurons is not essential for normal hearing in mice. Moreover, pejvakin localizes to stereociliary rootlets in hair cells and is required for stereocilia maintenance and mechanosensory function of the hair bundle. Delineating the site of the lesion and the mechanisms underlying DFNB59 will allow clinicians to predict the efficacy of different therapeutic approaches, such as determining compatibility for cochlear implants.

  5. Convective exosome-tracing microfluidics for analysis of cell-non-autonomous neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-01-01

    The effective role of exosome delivering neurogenic microRNA (miRNA) enables to induce efficient differentiation process during neurogenesis. The microfludic system capable of visualizing the exosomal behavior such as secretion, migration, and uptake of individual exosomes can be used as a robust technique to understand the exosome-mediated change of cellular behavior. Here, we developed the exosome-tracing microfluidic system to visualize exosomal transport carrying the neurogenic miRNA from leading to neighboring cells, and found a new mode of exosome-mediated cell-non-autonomous neurogenesis. The miR-193a facilitated neurogenesis in F11 cells by blocking proliferation-related target genes. In addition to time-lapse live-cell imaging using microfluidics visualized the convective transport of exosomes from differentiated to undifferentiated cells. Individual exosomes containing miR-193a from differentiated donor cells were taken up by undifferentiated cells to lead them to neurogenesis. Induction of anti-miR-193a was sufficient to block neurogenesis in F11 cells. Inhibition of the exosomal production by manumycin-A and treatment of anti-miR-193a in the differentiated donor cells failed to induce neurogenesis in undifferentiated recipient cells. These findings indicate that exosomes of neural progenitors and neurogenic miRNA within these exosomes propagate cell-non-autonomous differentiation to neighboring progenitors, to delineate the roles of exosome mediating neurogenesis of population of homologous neural progenitor cells.

  6. FIP200 is required for the cell-autonomous maintenance of fetal hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Lee, Jae Y; Wei, Huijun; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James D; Morrison, Sean J; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2010-12-02

    Little is known about whether autophagic mechanisms are active in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or how they are regulated. FIP200 (200-kDa FAK-family interacting protein) plays important roles in mammalian autophagy and other cellular functions, but its role in hematopoietic cells has not been examined. Here we show that conditional deletion of FIP200 in hematopoietic cells leads to perinatal lethality and severe anemia. FIP200 was cell-autonomously required for the maintenance and function of fetal HSCs. FIP200-deficient HSC were unable to reconstitute lethally irradiated recipients. FIP200 ablation did not result in increased HSC apoptosis, but it did increase the rate of HSC proliferation. Consistent with an essential role for FIP200 in autophagy, FIP200-null fetal HSCs exhibited both increased mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species. These data identify FIP200 as a key intrinsic regulator of fetal HSCs and implicate a potential role for autophagy in the maintenance of fetal hematopoiesis and HSCs.

  7. The Drosophila melanogaster cinnabar gene is a cell autonomous genetic marker in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, Nagaraja; O'Brochta, David A

    2005-07-01

    The cinnabar gene of Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen) encodes for kynurenine hydroxylase, an enzyme involved in ommochrome biosynthesis. This gene is commonly included as a visible genetic marker in gene vectors used to create transgenic Aedes aegypti (L.) that are homozygous for the khw allele, the mosquito homolog of cinnabar. Unexpectedly, the phenotype of cells expressing kynurenine hydroxylase in transgenic Ae. aegypti is cell autonomous as demonstrated by the recovery of insects heterozygous for the kynurenine hydroxylase transgene with mosaic eye color patterns. In addition, a transgenic gynandromorph was recovered in which one-half of the insect was expressing the kynurenine hydroxylase transgene, including one eye with red pigmentation, whereas the other half of the insect was homozygous khw and included a white eye. The cell autonomous behavior of cinnabar in transgenic Ae. aegypti is unexpected and increases the utility of this genetic marker.

  8. Mesodermal cell displacements during avian gastrulation are due to both individual cell-autonomous and convective tissue movements.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Evan A; Czirók, András; Cui, Cheng; Little, Charles D; Rongish, Brenda J

    2006-12-26

    Gastrulation is a fundamental process in early development that results in the formation of three primary germ layers. During avian gastrulation, presumptive mesodermal cells in the dorsal epiblast ingress through a furrow called the primitive streak (PS), and subsequently move away from the PS and form adult tissues. The biophysical mechanisms driving mesodermal cell movements during gastrulation in amniotes, notably warm-blooded embryos, are not understood. Until now, a major challenge has been distinguishing local individual cell-autonomous (active) displacements from convective displacements caused by large-scale (bulk) morphogenetic tissue movements. To address this problem, we used multiscale, time-lapse microscopy and a particle image velocimetry method for computing tissue displacement fields. Immunolabeled fibronectin was used as an in situ marker for quantifying tissue displacements. By imaging fluorescently labeled mesodermal cells and surrounding extracellular matrix simultaneously, we were able to separate directly the active and passive components of cell displacement during gastrulation. Our results reveal the following: (i) Convective tissue motion contributes significantly to total cell displacement and must be subtracted to measure true cell-autonomous displacement; (ii) Cell-autonomous displacement decreases gradually after regression from the PS; and (iii) There is an increasing cranial-to-caudal (head-to-tail) cell-autonomous motility gradient, with caudal cells actively moving away from the PS faster than cranial cells. These studies show that, in some regions of the embryo, total mesodermal cell displacements are mostly due to convective tissue movements; thus, the data have profound implications for understanding cell guidance mechanisms and tissue morphogenesis in warm-blooded embryos.

  9. Autonomously Bioluminescent Mammalian Cells for Continuous and Real-time Monitoring of Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian cell-based in vitro assays have been widely employed as alternatives to animal testing for toxicological studies but have been limited due to the high monetary and time costs of parallel sample preparation that are necessitated due to the destructive nature of firefly luciferase-based screening methods. This video describes the utilization of autonomously bioluminescent mammalian cells, which do not require the destructive addition of a luciferin substrate, as an inexpensive and facile method for monitoring the cytotoxic effects of a compound of interest. Mammalian cells stably expressing the full bacterial bioluminescence (luxCDABEfrp) gene cassette autonomously produce an optical signal that peaks at 490 nm without the addition of an expensive and possibly interfering luciferin substrate, excitation by an external energy source, or destruction of the sample that is traditionally performed during optical imaging procedures. This independence from external stimulation places the burden for maintaining the bioluminescent reaction solely on the cell, meaning that the resultant signal is only detected during active metabolism. This characteristic makes the lux-expressing cell line an excellent candidate for use as a biosentinel against cytotoxic effects because changes in bioluminescent production are indicative of adverse effects on cellular growth and metabolism. Similarly, the autonomous nature and lack of required sample destruction permits repeated imaging of the same sample in real-time throughout the period of toxicant exposure and can be performed across multiple samples using existing imaging equipment in an automated fashion. PMID:24193545

  10. The cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity: structural determinants of host defence

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Shenoy, Avinash R.

    2016-01-01

    Host cells use antimicrobial proteins, pathogen-restrictive compartmentalization and cell death in their defence against intracellular pathogens. Recent work has revealed that four components of the cytoskeleton — actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments and septins, which are well known for their roles in cell division, shape and movement — have important functions in innate immunity and cellular self-defence. Investigations using cellular and animal models have shown that these cytoskeletal proteins are crucial for sensing bacteria and for mobilizing effector mechanisms to eliminate them. In this Review, we highlight the emerging roles of the cytoskeleton as a structural determinant of cell-autonomous host defence. PMID:26292640

  11. The cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity: structural determinants of host defence.

    PubMed

    Mostowy, Serge; Shenoy, Avinash R

    2015-09-15

    Host cells use antimicrobial proteins, pathogen-restrictive compartmentalization and cell death in their defence against intracellular pathogens. Recent work has revealed that four components of the cytoskeleton--actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments and septins, which are well known for their roles in cell division, shape and movement--have important functions in innate immunity and cellular self-defence. Investigations using cellular and animal models have shown that these cytoskeletal proteins are crucial for sensing bacteria and for mobilizing effector mechanisms to eliminate them. In this Review, we highlight the emerging roles of the cytoskeleton as a structural determinant of cell-autonomous host defence.

  12. Autonomous Molecular Cascades for Evaluation of Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rudchenko, Maria; Taylor, Steven; Pallavi, Payal; Dechkovskaia, Alesia; Khan, Safana; Butler, Vincent P.; Rudchenko, Sergei; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular automata are mixtures of molecules that undergo precisely defined structural changes in response to sequential interactions with inputs1–4. Previously studied nucleic acid-based-automata include game-playing molecular devices (MAYA automata3,5) and finite-state automata for analysis of nucleic acids6 with the latter inspiring circuits for the analysis of RNA species inside cells7,8. Here, we describe automata based on strand-displacement9,10 cascades directed by antibodies that can analyze cells by using their surface markers as inputs. The final output of a molecular automaton that successfully completes its analysis is the presence of a unique molecular tag on the cell surface of a specific subpopulation of lymphocytes within human blood cells. PMID:23892986

  13. Evolved Colloidosomes Undergoing Cell-like Autonomous Shape Oscillations with Buckling.

    PubMed

    Tamate, Ryota; Ueki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2016-04-18

    In living systems, there are many autonomous and oscillatory phenomena to sustain life, such as heart contractions and breathing. At the microscopic level, oscillatory shape deformations of cells are often observed in dynamic behaviors during cell migration and morphogenesis. In many cases, oscillatory behaviors of cells are not simplistic but complex with diverse deformations. So far, we have succeeded in developing self-oscillating polymers and gels, but complex oscillatory behaviors mimicking those of living cells have yet to be reproduced. Herein, we report a cell-like hollow sphere composed of self-oscillating microgels, that is, a colloidosome, that exhibits drastic shape oscillation in addition to swelling/deswelling oscillations driven by an oscillatory reaction. The resulting oscillatory profile waveform becomes markedly more complex than a conventional one. Especially for larger colloidosomes, multiple buckling and moving buckling points are observed to be analogous to cells.

  14. Developmental profiling of postnatal dentate gyrus progenitors provides evidence for dynamic cell-autonomous regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Jennifer A.; Yang, Cui-Ping; Kernie, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the most prominent regions in the postnatal mammalian brain where neurogenesis continues throughout life. There is tremendous speculation regarding the potential implications of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, though it remains unclear to what extent this ability becomes attenuated during normal aging, and what genetic changes in the progenitor population ensue over time. Using defined elements of the nestin promoter, we developed a transgenic mouse that reliably labels neural stem and early progenitors with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using a combination of immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, we characterized the progenitor cells within the dentate gyrus and created a developmental profile from postnatal day 7 (P7) until 6 months of age. In addition, we demonstrate that the proliferative potential of these progenitors is controlled at least in part by cell-autonomous cues. Finally, in order to identify what may underlie these differences, we performed stem cell-specific microarrays on GFP-expressing sorted cells from isolated P7 and postnatal day 28 (P28) dentate gyrus. We identified several differentially expressed genes that may underlie the functional differences that we observe in neurosphere assays from sorted cells and differentiation assays at these different ages. These data suggest that neural progenitors from the dentate gyrus are differentially regulated by cell-autonomous factors that change over time. PMID:20014381

  15. Cadherin-2 Is Required Cell Autonomously for Collective Migration of Facial Branchiomotor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rebman, Jane K.; Kirchoff, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Collective migration depends on cell-cell interactions between neighbors that contribute to their overall directionality, yet the mechanisms that control the coordinated migration of neurons remains to be elucidated. During hindbrain development, facial branchiomotor neurons (FBMNs) undergo a stereotypic tangential caudal migration from their place of birth in rhombomere (r)4 to their final location in r6/7. FBMNs engage in collective cell migration that depends on neuron-to-neuron interactions to facilitate caudal directionality. Here, we demonstrate that Cadherin-2-mediated neuron-to-neuron adhesion is necessary for directional and collective migration of FBMNs. We generated stable transgenic zebrafish expressing dominant-negative Cadherin-2 (Cdh2ΔEC) driven by the islet1 promoter. Cell-autonomous inactivation of Cadherin-2 function led to non-directional migration of FBMNs and a defect in caudal tangential migration. Additionally, mosaic analysis revealed that Cdh2ΔEC-expressing FBMNs are not influenced to migrate caudally by neighboring wild-type FBMNs due to a defect in collective cell migration. Taken together, our data suggest that Cadherin-2 plays an essential cell-autonomous role in mediating the collective migration of FBMNs. PMID:27716840

  16. A mechanistic framework for noncell autonomous stem cell induction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Daum, Gabor; Medzihradszky, Anna; Suzaki, Takuya; Lohmann, Jan U

    2014-10-07

    Cell-cell communication is essential for multicellular development and, consequently, evolution has brought about an array of distinct mechanisms serving this purpose. Consistently, induction and maintenance of stem cell fate by noncell autonomous signals is a feature shared by many organisms and may depend on secreted factors, direct cell-cell contact, matrix interactions, or a combination of these mechanisms. Although many basic cellular processes are well conserved between animals and plants, cell-to-cell signaling is one function where substantial diversity has arisen between the two kingdoms of life. One of the most striking differences is the presence of cytoplasmic bridges, called plasmodesmata, which facilitate the exchange of molecules between neighboring plant cells and provide a unique route for cell-cell communication in the plant lineage. Here, we provide evidence that the stem cell inducing transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS), expressed in the niche, moves to the stem cells via plasmodesmata in a highly regulated fashion and that this movement is required for WUS function and, thus, stem cell activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that cell context-independent mobility is encoded in the WUS protein sequence and mediated by multiple domains. Finally, we demonstrate that parts of the protein that restrict movement are required for WUS homodimerization, suggesting that formation of WUS dimers might contribute to the regulation of apical stem cell activity.

  17. Autonomous Hedgehog signalling is undetectable in PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Frank R K; Brown, Andrew J

    2008-08-15

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer, although this area remains controversial. Some but not all studies have noted relatively high Hedgehog pathway activity in commonly used prostate cancer cell lines. We aimed to evaluate the widely used PC-3 cell line as a model to investigate Hedgehog signalling in a prostate cancer setting. Using a sensitive Hedgehog inducible luciferase reporter assay, we found no evidence of autonomous Hedgehog signalling in PC-3 cells, irrespective of passage number. In addition, manipulations that should either increase (an oxysterol) or decrease (cyclopamine) Hedgehog pathway activity had no effect on reporter activity, and cyclopamine treatment did not affect PC-3 cell viability. Therefore, our findings contradict some earlier reports and caution against the use of PC-3 cells to investigate the Hedgehog pathway in a prostate cancer setting.

  18. Brain-resident memory T cells represent an autonomous cytotoxic barrier to viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Vincenti, Ilena; Wagner, Ingrid; Pinschewer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) persist at sites of prior infection and have been shown to enhance pathogen clearance by recruiting circulating immune cells and providing bystander activation. Here, we characterize the functioning of brain-resident memory T cells (bTRM) in an animal model of viral infection. bTRM were subject to spontaneous homeostatic proliferation and were largely refractory to systemic immune cell depletion. After viral reinfection in mice, bTRM rapidly acquired cytotoxic effector function and prevented fatal brain infection, even in the absence of circulating CD8+ memory T cells. Presentation of cognate antigen on MHC-I was essential for bTRM-mediated protective immunity, which involved perforin- and IFN-γ–dependent effector mechanisms. These findings identify bTRM as an organ-autonomous defense system serving as a paradigm for TRM functioning as a self-sufficient first line of adaptive immunity. PMID:27377586

  19. Autonomous beating rate adaptation in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eng, George; Lee, Benjamin W.; Protas, Lev; Gagliardi, Mark; Brown, Kristy; Kass, Robert S.; Keller, Gordon; Robinson, Richard B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic success of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes critically depends on their ability to respond to and integrate with the surrounding electromechanical environment. Currently, the immaturity of human cardiomyocytes derived from stem cells limits their utility for regenerative medicine and biological research. We hypothesize that biomimetic electrical signals regulate the intrinsic beating properties of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that electrical conditioning of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in three-dimensional culture promotes cardiomyocyte maturation, alters their automaticity and enhances connexin expression. Cardiomyocytes adapt their autonomous beating rate to the frequency at which they were stimulated, an effect mediated by the emergence of a rapidly depolarizing cell population, and the expression of hERG. This rate-adaptive behaviour is long lasting and transferable to the surrounding cardiomyocytes. Thus, electrical conditioning may be used to promote cardiomyocyte maturation and establish their automaticity, with implications for cell-based reduction of arrhythmia during heart regeneration. PMID:26785135

  20. Cell Autonomous and Nonautonomous Function of CUL4B in Mouse Spermatogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yan; Liu, Liren; Yang, Chenyi; Lin, Congxing; Veith, George Michael; Wang, Caihong; Sutovsky, Peter; Zhou, Pengbo; Ma, Liang

    2016-01-01

    CUL4B ubiquitin ligase belongs to the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase family. Although sharing many sequence and structural similarities, CUL4B plays distinct roles in spermatogenesis from its homologous protein CUL4A. We previously reported that genetic ablation of Cul4a in mice led to male infertility because of aberrant meiotic progression. In the present study, we generated Cul4b germ cell-specific conditional knock-out (Cul4bVasa),as well as Cul4b global knock-out (Cul4bSox2) mouse, to investigate its roles in spermatogenesis. Germ cell-specific deletion of Cul4b led to male infertility, despite normal testicular morphology and comparable numbers of spermatozoa. Notably, significantly impaired sperm mobility caused by reduced mitochondrial activity and glycolysis level were observed in the majority of the mutant spermatozoa, manifested by low, if any, sperm ATP production. Furthermore, Cul4bVasa spermatozoa exhibited defective arrangement of axonemal microtubules and flagella outer dense fibers. Our mass spectrometry analysis identified INSL6 as a novel CUL4B substrate in male germ cells, evidenced by its direct polyubiquination and degradation by CUL4B E3 ligase. Nevertheless, Cul4b global knock-out males lost their germ cells in an age-dependent manner, implying failure of maintaining the spermatogonial stem cell niche in somatic cells. Taken together, our results show that CUL4B is indispensable to spermatogenesis, and it functions cell autonomously in male germ cells to ensure spermatozoa motility, whereas it functions non-cell-autonomously in somatic cells to maintain spermatogonial stemness. Thus, CUL4B links two distinct spermatogenetic processes to a single E3 ligase, highlighting the significance of ubiquitin modification during spermatogenesis. PMID:26846852

  1. Cell Autonomous and Nonautonomous Function of CUL4B in Mouse Spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan; Liu, Liren; Yang, Chenyi; Lin, Congxing; Veith, George Michael; Wang, Caihong; Sutovsky, Peter; Zhou, Pengbo; Ma, Liang

    2016-03-25

    CUL4B ubiquitin ligase belongs to the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase family. Although sharing many sequence and structural similarities, CUL4B plays distinct roles in spermatogenesis from its homologous protein CUL4A. We previously reported that genetic ablation ofCul4ain mice led to male infertility because of aberrant meiotic progression. In the present study, we generated Cul4bgerm cell-specific conditional knock-out (Cul4b(Vasa)),as well asCul4bglobal knock-out (Cul4b(Sox2)) mouse, to investigate its roles in spermatogenesis. Germ cell-specific deletion of Cul4bled to male infertility, despite normal testicular morphology and comparable numbers of spermatozoa. Notably, significantly impaired sperm mobility caused by reduced mitochondrial activity and glycolysis level were observed in the majority of the mutant spermatozoa, manifested by low, if any, sperm ATP production. Furthermore,Cul4b(Vasa)spermatozoa exhibited defective arrangement of axonemal microtubules and flagella outer dense fibers. Our mass spectrometry analysis identified INSL6 as a novel CUL4B substrate in male germ cells, evidenced by its direct polyubiquination and degradation by CUL4B E3 ligase. Nevertheless,Cul4bglobal knock-out males lost their germ cells in an age-dependent manner, implying failure of maintaining the spermatogonial stem cell niche in somatic cells. Taken together, our results show that CUL4B is indispensable to spermatogenesis, and it functions cell autonomously in male germ cells to ensure spermatozoa motility, whereas it functions non-cell-autonomously in somatic cells to maintain spermatogonial stemness. Thus, CUL4B links two distinct spermatogenetic processes to a single E3 ligase, highlighting the significance of ubiquitin modification during spermatogenesis.

  2. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  3. Power optimization in body sensor networks: the case of an autonomous wireless EMG sensor powered by PV-cells.

    PubMed

    Penders, J; Pop, V; Caballero, L; van de Molengraft, J; van Schaijk, R; Vullers, R; Van Hoof, C

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in ultra-low-power circuits and energy harvesters are making self-powered body sensor nodes a reality. Power optimization at the system and application level is crucial in achieving ultra-low-power consumption for the entire system. This paper reviews system-level power optimization techniques, and illustrates their impact on the case of autonomous wireless EMG monitoring. The resulting prototype, an Autonomous wireless EMG sensor power by PV-cells, is presented.

  4. The cell-autonomous mechanisms underlying the activity of metformin as an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Francesca; Calderone, Alberto; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-12-06

    The biguanide drug metformin profoundly affects cell metabolism, causing an impairment of the cell energy balance and triggering a plethora of pleiotropic effects that vary depending on the cellular or environmental context. Interestingly, a decade ago, it was observed that metformin-treated diabetic patients have a significantly lower cancer risk. Although a variety of in vivo and in vitro observations emphasising the role of metformin as anticancer drug have been reported, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are perturbed by metformin treatment and that might be relevant to understand its antitumour activities. We focus on the cell-autonomous mechanisms modulating growth and death of cancer cells.

  5. The cell-autonomous mechanisms underlying the activity of metformin as an anticancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Calderone, Alberto; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    The biguanide drug metformin profoundly affects cell metabolism, causing an impairment of the cell energy balance and triggering a plethora of pleiotropic effects that vary depending on the cellular or environmental context. Interestingly, a decade ago, it was observed that metformin-treated diabetic patients have a significantly lower cancer risk. Although a variety of in vivo and in vitro observations emphasising the role of metformin as anticancer drug have been reported, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are perturbed by metformin treatment and that might be relevant to understand its antitumour activities. We focus on the cell-autonomous mechanisms modulating growth and death of cancer cells. PMID:27875520

  6. Non-Cell-Autonomous Postmortem Lignification of Tracheary Elements in Zinnia elegans[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pesquet, Edouard; Zhang, Bo; Gorzsás, András; Puhakainen, Tuula; Serk, Henrik; Escamez, Sacha; Barbier, Odile; Gerber, Lorenz; Courtois-Moreau, Charleen; Alatalo, Edward; Paulin, Lars; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Sundberg, Björn; Goffner, Deborah; Tuominen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Postmortem lignification of xylem tracheary elements (TEs) has been debated for decades. Here, we provide evidence in Zinnia elegans TE cell cultures, using pharmacological inhibitors and in intact Z. elegans plants using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, that TE lignification occurs postmortem (i.e., after TE programmed cell death). In situ RT-PCR verified expression of the lignin monomer biosynthetic cinnamoyl CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase in not only the lignifying TEs but also in the unlignified non-TE cells of Z. elegans TE cell cultures and in living, parenchymatic xylem cells that surround TEs in stems. These cells were also shown to have the capacity to synthesize and transport lignin monomers and reactive oxygen species to the cell walls of dead TEs. Differential gene expression analysis in Z. elegans TE cell cultures and concomitant functional analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in identification of several genes that were expressed in the non-TE cells and that affected lignin chemistry on the basis of pyrolysis–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. These data suggest that living, parenchymatic xylem cells contribute to TE lignification in a non-cell-autonomous manner, thus enabling the postmortem lignification of TEs. PMID:23572543

  7. Uptake of the Fusarium Effector Avr2 by Tomato Is Not a Cell Autonomous Event

    PubMed Central

    Di, Xiaotang; Gomila, Jo; Ma, Lisong; van den Burg, Harrold A.; Takken, Frank L. W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens secrete effector proteins to manipulate the host for their own proliferation. Currently it is unclear whether the uptake of effector proteins from extracellular spaces is a host autonomous process. We study this process using the Avr2 effector protein from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol). Avr2 is an important virulence factor that is secreted into the xylem sap of tomato following infection. Besides that, it is also an avirulence factor triggering immune responses in plants carrying the I-2 resistance gene. Recognition of Avr2 by I-2 occurs inside the plant nucleus. Here, we show that pathogenicity of an Avr2 knockout Fusarium (FolΔAvr2) strain is fully complemented on transgenic tomato lines that express either a secreted (Avr2) or cytosolic Avr2 (ΔspAvr2) protein, indicating that Avr2 exerts its virulence functions inside the host cells. Furthermore, our data imply that secreted Avr2 is taken up from the extracellular spaces in the presence of the fungus. Grafting studies were performed in which scions of I-2 tomato plants were grafted onto either a ΔspAvr2 or on an Avr2 rootstock. Although the Avr2 protein could readily be detected in the xylem sap of the grafted plant tissues, no I-2-mediated immune responses were induced suggesting that I-2-expressing tomato cells cannot autonomously take up the effector protein from the xylem sap. Additionally, ΔspAvr2 and Avr2 plants were crossed with I-2 plants. Whereas ΔspAvr2/I-2 F1 plants showed a constitutive immune response, immunity was not triggered in the Avr2/I-2 plants confirming that Avr2 is not autonomously taken up from the extracellular spaces to trigger I-2. Intriguingly, infiltration of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in leaves of Avr2/I-2 plants triggered I-2 mediated cell death, which indicates that Agrobacterium triggers effector uptake. To test whether, besides Fol, effector uptake could also be induced by other fungal pathogens the ΔspAvr2 and Avr2 transgenic lines were inoculated

  8. Morphological changes in autonomic ganglionic cells of the heart in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, T; Nunotani, H; Fushimi, H; Inoue, T

    1986-06-01

    To clarify the histological changes of the cardiac autonomic nervous system in diabetes mellitus, ganglionic cells of the hearts of autopsy cases were examined light microscopically. In 7 severely diabetic patients, the ganglionic neurons showed cellular contraction, cytoplasmic condensation and poor staining of Nissl substance. As neuronal alterations were obvious neither in the mild diabetic patients nor in the non-diabetic patients, these alterations therefore seemed to correlate with diabetes mellitus. The neuronal changes did not seem to correlate with major coronary arterial atherosclerotic narrowing.

  9. Mice lacking JunB are osteopenic due to cell-autonomous osteoblast and osteoclast defects.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Lukas; Hoebertz, Astrid; Beil, F Timo; Beil, Timo; Keon, Niamh; Karreth, Florian; Eferl, Robert; Scheuch, Harald; Szremska, Agnieszka; Amling, Michael; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina; Angel, Peter; Wagner, Erwin F

    2004-02-16

    Because JunB is an essential gene for placentation, it was conditionally deleted in the embryo proper. JunBDelta/Delta mice are born viable, but develop severe low turnover osteopenia caused by apparent cell-autonomous osteoblast and osteoclast defects before a chronic myeloid leukemia-like disease. Although JunB was reported to be a negative regulator of cell proliferation, junBDelta/Delta osteoclast precursors and osteoblasts show reduced proliferation along with a differentiation defect in vivo and in vitro. Mutant osteoblasts express elevated p16(INK4a) levels, but exhibit decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin A expression. Runx2 is transiently increased during osteoblast differentiation in vitro, whereas mature osteoblast markers such as osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein are strongly reduced. To support a cell-autonomous function of JunB in osteoclasts, junB was inactivated specifically in the macrophage-osteoclast lineage. Mutant mice develop an osteopetrosis-like phenotype with increased bone mass and reduced numbers of osteoclasts. Thus, these data reveal a novel function of JunB as a positive regulator controlling primarily osteoblast as well as osteoclast activity.

  10. An NAD+ biosynthetic pathway enzyme functions cell non-autonomously in C. elegans development

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matt; McReynolds, Melanie R.; Wang, Wenqing; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Background Disruption of cellular metabolite levels can adversely impact development. Specifically, loss-of-function of the C. elegans NAD+ salvage biosynthesis gene PNC-1 results in an array of developmental phenotypes. Intriguingly, PNC-1 and its functional equivalent in vertebrates are secreted, but the contributions of the extracellular enzymes are poorly understood. We sought to study the tissue-specific requirements for PNC-1 expression and to examine the role of the secreted isoform. Results A thorough analysis of PNC-1 expression did not detect expression in tissues that require PNC-1 function. Limited expression of both the secreted and intracellular PNC-1 isoforms provided function at a distance from the tissues with phenotypes. We also find that the secreted isoform contributes to in vivo PNC-1 activity. Furthermore, uv1 cell survival has the most stringent requirements in terms of PNC-1 expression pattern or level. Conclusion Using careful promoter analysis and a restricted expression approach we have shown that both the secreted and the intracellular PNC-1 isoforms function cell non-autonomously, and that the PNC-1a isoform is functionally relevant in vivo. Our work suggests a model where PNC-1 function is provided cell non-autonomously by a mix of intra and extracellular activity, most likely requiring NAD+ salvage metabolite transport between tissues. PMID:24753121

  11. Non-cell-autonomous stimulation of stem cell proliferation following ablation of Tcf3

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Fei; Merrill, Bradley J.

    2010-04-01

    A combination of cell intrinsic factors and extracellular signals determine whether mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) divide, self-renew, and differentiate. Here, we report a new interaction between cell intrinsic aspects of the canonical Wnt/Tcf/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and extracellular Lif/Jak/Stat3 stimulation that combines to promote self-renewal and proliferation of ESC. Mutant ESC lacking the Tcf3 transcriptional repressor continue to self-renew in the absence of exogenous Lif and through pharmacological inhibition of Lif/Jak/Stat3 signaling; however, proliferation rates of TCF3-/- ESC were significantly decreased by inhibiting Jak/Stat3 activity. Cell mixing experiments showed that stimulation of Stat3 phosphorylation in TCF3-/- ESC was mediated through secretion of paracrine acting factors, but did not involve elevated Lif or LifR transcription. The new interaction between Wnt and Lif/Jak/Stat3 signaling pathways has potential for new insights into the growth of tumors caused by aberrant activity of Wnt/Tcf/{beta}-catenin signaling.

  12. Distance-dependent scaling of AMPARs is cell-autonomous and GluA2 dependent.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Herring, Bruce E; Suh, Young Ho; Roche, Katherine W; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-08-14

    The extensive dendritic arbor of a pyramidal cell introduces considerable complexity to the integration of synaptic potentials. Propagation of dendritic potentials is largely passive, in contrast to regenerative axonal potentials that are maintained by voltage-gated sodium channels, leading to a declination in amplitude as dendritic potentials travel toward the soma in a manner that disproportionally affects distal synaptic inputs. To counteract this amplitude filtering, Schaffer collateral synapses onto CA1 pyramidal cells contain a varying number of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) per synapse that increases with distance from the soma, a phenomenon known as distance-dependent scaling. Here, we undertake an investigation into the molecular mechanisms of distance-dependent scaling. Using dendritic recordings from rat pyramidal neurons, we confirm the basic scaling phenomenon and find that it is expressed and can be manipulated cell autonomously. Finally, we show that it depends on the presence of both a reserve pool of AMPARs and the AMPAR subunit GluA2.

  13. Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Altrock, Philipp M; Almendro, Vanessa; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-10-02

    Cancers arise through a process of somatic evolution that can result in substantial sub-clonal heterogeneity within tumours. The mechanisms responsible for the coexistence of distinct sub-clones and the biological consequences of this coexistence remain poorly understood. Here we used a mouse xenograft model to investigate the impact of sub-clonal heterogeneity on tumour phenotypes and the competitive expansion of individual clones. We found that tumour growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation, which enhances the proliferation of all cells within a tumour by overcoming environmental constraints and yet can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors, resulting in tumour collapse. We developed a mathematical modelling framework to identify the rules underlying the generation of intra-tumour clonal heterogeneity. We found that non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth, together with clonal interference, stabilizes sub-clonal heterogeneity, thereby enabling inter-clonal interactions that can lead to new phenotypic traits.

  14. Thymus-autonomous T cell development in the absence of progenitor import.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vera C; Ruggiero, Eliana; Schlenner, Susan M; Madan, Vikas; Schmidt, Manfred; Fink, Pamela J; von Kalle, Christof; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2012-07-30

    Thymus function is thought to depend on a steady supply of T cell progenitors from the bone marrow. The notion that the thymus lacks progenitors with self-renewal capacity is based on thymus transplantation experiments in which host-derived thymocytes replaced thymus-resident cells within 4 wk. Thymus grafting into T cell-deficient mice resulted in a wave of T cell export from the thymus, followed by colonization of the thymus by host-derived progenitors, and cessation of T cell development. Compound Rag2(-/-)γ(c)(-/-)Kit(W/Wv) mutants lack competitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and are devoid of T cell progenitors. In this study, using this strain as recipients for wild-type thymus grafts, we noticed thymus-autonomous T cell development lasting several months. However, we found no evidence for export of donor HSCs from thymus to bone marrow. A diverse T cell antigen receptor repertoire in progenitor-deprived thymus grafts implied that many thymocytes were capable of self-renewal. Although the process was most efficient in Rag2(-/-)γ(c)(-/-)Kit(W/Wv) hosts, γ(c)-mediated signals alone played a key role in the competition between thymus-resident and bone marrow-derived progenitors. Hence, the turnover of each generation of thymocytes is not only based on short life span but is also driven via expulsion of resident thymocytes by fresh progenitors entering the thymus.

  15. Cytoskeletal turnover and Myosin contractility drive cell autonomous oscillations in a model of Drosophila Dorsal Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, P. F.; Blanchard, G. B.; Duque, J.; Gorfinkiel, N.

    2014-06-01

    Oscillatory behaviour in force-generating systems is a pervasive phenomenon in cell biology. In this work, we investigate how oscillations in the actomyosin cytoskeleton drive cell shape changes during the process of Dorsal Closure (DC), a morphogenetic event in Drosophila embryo development whereby epidermal continuity is generated through the pulsatile apical area reduction of cells constituting the amnioserosa (AS) tissue. We present a theoretical model of AS cell dynamics by which the oscillatory behaviour arises due to a coupling between active myosin-driven forces, actin turnover and cell deformation. Oscillations in our model are cell-autonomous and are modulated by neighbour coupling, and our model accurately reproduces the oscillatory dynamics of AS cells and their amplitude and frequency evolution. A key prediction arising from our model is that the rate of actin turnover and Myosin contractile force must increase during DC in order to reproduce the decrease in amplitude and period of cell area oscillations observed in vivo. This prediction opens up new ways to think about the molecular underpinnings of AS cell oscillations and their link to net tissue contraction and suggests the form of future experimental measurements.

  16. Pharmacotherapy of autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Shibao, Cyndya; Okamoto, Luis; Biaggioni, Italo

    2012-01-01

    The clinical picture of autonomic failure is characterized by severe and disabling orthostatic hypotension. These disorders can develop as a result of damage of central neural pathways or peripheral autonomic nerves, caused either by a primary autonomic neurodegenerative disorder or secondary to systemic illness. Treatment should be focused on decreasing presyncopal symptoms instead of achieving blood pressure goals. Non-pharmacologic strategies such as physical counter-maneuvers, dietary changes (i.e. high salt diet, rapid water drinking or compression garments) are the first line therapy. Affected patients should be screened for co-morbid conditions such as post-prandial hypotension and supine hypertension that can worsen orthostatic hypotension if not treated. If symptoms are not controlled with these conservative measures the next step is to start pharmacological agents; these interventions should be aimed at increasing intravascular volume either by promoting water and salt retention (fludrocortisone) or by increasing red blood cell mass when anemia is present (recombinant erythropoietin). When pressor agents are needed, direct pressor agents (midodrine) or agents that potentiate sympathetic activity (atomoxetine, yohimbine, pyridostigmine) can be used. It is preferable to use short-acting pressor agents that can be taken on as needed basis in preparation for upright activities. PMID:21664375

  17. Targeted inhibition of tumor-specific glutaminase diminishes cell-autonomous tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yan; Stine, Zachary E.; Xia, Jinsong; Lu, Yunqi; O’Connor, Roddy S.; Altman, Brian J.; Hsieh, Annie L.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Thomas, Ajit G.; Gao, Ping; Sun, Linchong; Song, Libing; Yan, Benedict; Slusher, Barbara S.; Zhuo, Jingli; Ooi, London L.; Lee, Caroline G.L.; Mancuso, Anthony; McCallion, Andrew S.; Le, Anne; Milone, Michael C.; Rayport, Stephen; Felsher, Dean W.; Dang, Chi V.

    2015-01-01

    Glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate, plays a key role in cancer cell metabolism, growth, and proliferation. GLS is being explored as a cancer therapeutic target, but whether GLS inhibitors affect cancer cell–autonomous growth or the host microenvironment or have off-target effects is unknown. Here, we report that loss of one copy of Gls blunted tumor progression in an immune-competent MYC-mediated mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma. Compared with results in untreated animals with MYC-induced hepatocellular carcinoma, administration of the GLS-specific inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) prolonged survival without any apparent toxicities. BPTES also inhibited growth of a MYC-dependent human B cell lymphoma cell line (P493) by blocking DNA replication, leading to cell death and fragmentation. In mice harboring P493 tumor xenografts, BPTES treatment inhibited tumor cell growth; however, P493 xenografts expressing a BPTES-resistant GLS mutant (GLS-K325A) or overexpressing GLS were not affected by BPTES treatment. Moreover, a customized Vivo-Morpholino that targets human GLS mRNA markedly inhibited P493 xenograft growth without affecting mouse Gls expression. Conversely, a Vivo-Morpholino directed at mouse Gls had no antitumor activity in vivo. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that GLS is required for tumorigenesis and support small molecule and genetic inhibition of GLS as potential approaches for targeting the tumor cell–autonomous dependence on GLS for cancer therapy. PMID:25915584

  18. In vivo cell-autonomous transcriptional abnormalities revealed in mice expressing mutant huntingtin in striatal but not cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth A; Coppola, Giovanni; Tang, Bin; Kuhn, Alexandre; Kim, SoongHo; Geschwind, Daniel H; Brown, Timothy B; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2011-03-15

    Huntington's disease (HD), caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, is characterized by abnormal protein aggregates and motor and cognitive dysfunction. Htt protein is ubiquitously expressed, but the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) is most susceptible to dysfunction and death. Abnormal gene expression represents a core pathogenic feature of HD, but the relative roles of cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous effects on transcription remain unclear. To determine the extent of cell-autonomous dysregulation in the striatum in vivo, we examined genome-wide RNA expression in symptomatic D9-N171-98Q (a.k.a. DE5) transgenic mice in which the forebrain expression of the first 171 amino acids of human Htt with a 98Q repeat expansion is limited to MSNs. Microarray data generated from these mice were compared with those generated on the identical array platform from a pan-neuronal HD mouse model, R6/2, carrying two different CAG repeat lengths, and a relatively high degree of overlap of changes in gene expression was revealed. We further focused on known canonical pathways associated with excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, dopamine signaling and trophic support. While genes related to excitotoxicity, dopamine signaling and trophic support were altered in both DE5 and R6/2 mice, which may be either cell autonomous or non-cell autonomous, genes related to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor are primarily affected in DE5 transgenic mice, indicating cell-autonomous mechanisms. Overall, HD-induced dysregulation of the striatal transcriptome can be largely attributed to intrinsic effects of mutant Htt, in the absence of expression in cortical neurons.

  19. Cell-autonomous activation of Hedgehog signaling inhibits brown adipose tissue development.

    PubMed

    Nosavanh, LaGina; Yu, Da-Hai; Jaehnig, Eric J; Tong, Qiang; Shen, Lanlan; Chen, Miao-Hsueh

    2015-04-21

    Although recent studies have shown that brown adipose tissue (BAT) arises from progenitor cells that also give rise to skeletal muscle, the developmental signals that control the formation of BAT remain largely unknown. Here, we show that brown preadipocytes possess primary cilia and can respond to Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Furthermore, cell-autonomous activation of Hh signaling blocks early brown-preadipocyte differentiation, inhibits BAT formation in vivo, and results in replacement of neck BAT with poorly differentiated skeletal muscle. Finally, we show that Hh signaling inhibits BAT formation partially through up-regulation of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII). Taken together, our studies uncover a previously unidentified role for Hh as an inhibitor of BAT development.

  20. TREX1 deficiency triggers cell-autonomous immunity in a cGAS-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ablasser, Andrea; Hemmerling, Inga; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Behrendt, Rayk; Roers, Axel; Hornung, Veit

    2014-06-15

    Cytosolic detection of DNA is crucial for the initiation of antiviral immunity but can also cause autoimmunity in the context of endogenous nucleic acids being sensed. Mutations in the human 3' repair exonuclease 1 (TREX1) have been linked to the type I IFN-associated autoimmune disease Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. The exact mechanisms driving unabated type I IFN responses in the absence of TREX1 are only partly understood, but it appears likely that accumulation of endogenous DNA species triggers a cell-autonomous immune response by activating a cytosolic DNA receptor. In this article, we demonstrate that knocking out the DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase completely abrogates spontaneous induction of IFN-stimulated genes in TREX1-deficient cells. These findings indicate a key role of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase for the initiation of self-DNA-induced autoimmune disorders, thus providing important implications for novel therapeutic approaches.

  1. Astrocytes and Microglia as Non-cell Autonomous Players in the Pathogenesis of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Hyeon, Seung Jae; Im, Hyeonjoo; Ryu, Hyun; Kim, Yunha

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that leads to a progressive muscle wasting and paralysis. The pathological phenotypes are featured by severe motor neuron death and glial activation in the lumbar spinal cord. Proposed ALS pathogenic mechanisms include glutamate cytotoxicity, inflammatory pathway, oxidative stress, and protein aggregation. However, the exact mechanisms of ALS pathogenesis are not fully understood yet. Recently, a growing body of evidence provides a novel insight on the importance of glial cells in relation to the motor neuronal damage via the non-cell autonomous pathway. Accordingly, the aim of the current paper is to overview the role of astrocytes and microglia in the pathogenesis of ALS and to better understand the disease mechanism of ALS. PMID:27790057

  2. Highlights from U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Recovery Act Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    2012-05-01

    This fact sheets highlights U.S. Department of Energy fuel cell projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). More than 1,000 fuel cell systems have been deployed through Recovery Act funding.

  3. Direct non-cell autonomous Pax6 activity regulates eye development in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lesaffre, Brigitte; Joliot, Alain; Prochiantz, Alain; Volovitch, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background Modifications in Pax6 homeogene expression produce strong eye phenotypes. This suggested to us that eye development might be an appropriate model to verify if homeoprotein intercellular passage has important functions in early development. Similar to other homeoproteins, Pax6 has two domains that enable secretion and internalization by live cells and, thus, intercellular passage. In principle, a straightforward way to test the hypothesis would be to mutate one of the two sequences to produce a 'cell autonomous only' Pax6. However, this was not possible because these sequences are in the homeodomain and their modification would affect Pax6 transcriptional properties. We have thus developed an approach aimed at blocking Pax6 only in the extracellular milieu of developing zebrafish embryos. Results A first strategy was to inject a one-cell embryo with a mRNA encoding a secreted single-chain anti-Pax6 antibody. A second, complementary, strategy was to inject a Pax6 antibody in the blastula extracellular milieu. In both cases, 'dissymmetric eyes', 'one eye only' and 'no eye' phenotypes were produced. In most cases, lens phenotypes paralleled retina malformations. Although eye phenotypes were analyzed 30 hours post-fertilization, there was a strong correlation between early eye field asymmetry, early asymmetry in Pax6 expression and later-occurring eye malformations. Several controls were introduced, demonstrating that the effect is specific to Pax6 and cannot be explained by intracellular antibody activities. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that the Pax6 transcription factor is also a signaling molecule with direct non-cell autonomous activity. PMID:17229313

  4. Deletion of psychiatric risk gene Cacna1c impairs hippocampal neurogenesis in cell-autonomous fashion.

    PubMed

    Völkening, Bianca; Schönig, Kai; Kronenberg, Golo; Bartsch, Dusan; Weber, Tillmann

    2017-05-01

    Ca(2+) is a universal signal transducer which fulfills essential functions in cell development and differentiation. CACNA1C, the gene encoding the alpha-1C subunit (i.e., Cav 1.2) of the voltage-dependent l-type calcium channel (LTCC), has been implicated as a risk gene in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. To parse the role of Cav 1.2 channels located on astrocyte-like stem cells and their descendants in the development of new granule neurons, we created Tg(GLAST-CreERT2) /Cacna1c(fl/fl) /RCE:loxP mice, a transgenic tool that allows cell-type-specific inducible deletion of Cacna1c. The EGFP reporter was used to trace the progeny of recombined type-1 cells. FACS-sorted Cacna1c-deficient neural precursor cells from the dentate gyrus showed reduced proliferative activity in neurosphere cultures. Moreover, under differentiation conditions, Cacna1c-deficient NPCs gave rise to fewer neurons and more astroglia. Similarly, under basal conditions in vivo, Cacna1c gene deletion in type-1 cells decreased type-1 cell proliferation and reduced the neuronal fate-choice decision of newly born cells, resulting in reduced net hippocampal neurogenesis. Unexpectedly, electroconvulsive seizures completely compensated for the proliferation deficit of Cacna1c deficient type-1 cells, indicating that there must be Cav 1.2-independent mechanisms of controlling proliferation related to excitation. In the aggregate, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of functional L-type 1.2 channels on type-1 cells. Cav 1.2 channels promote type-1 cell proliferation and push the glia-to-neuron ratio in the direction of a neuronal fate choice and subsequent neuronal differentiation. Cav 1.2 channels expressed on NPCs and their progeny possess the ability to shape neurogenesis in a cell-autonomous fashion.

  5. Loss of MeCP2 disrupts cell autonomous and autocrine BDNF signaling in mouse glutamatergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Charanya; Wu, Yuan-Ju; Vadhvani, Mayur; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Eickholt, Britta; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the MECP2 gene cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). Previous studies have shown that altered MeCP2 levels result in aberrant neurite outgrowth and glutamatergic synapse formation. However, causal molecular mechanisms are not well understood since MeCP2 is known to regulate transcription of a wide range of target genes. Here, we describe a key role for a constitutive BDNF feed forward signaling pathway in regulating synaptic response, general growth and differentiation of glutamatergic neurons. Chronic block of TrkB receptors mimics the MeCP2 deficiency in wildtype glutamatergic neurons, while re-expression of BDNF quantitatively rescues MeCP2 deficiency. We show that BDNF acts cell autonomous and autocrine, as wildtype neurons are not capable of rescuing growth deficits in neighboring MeCP2 deficient neurons in vitro and in vivo. These findings are relevant for understanding RTT pathophysiology, wherein wildtype and mutant neurons are intermixed throughout the nervous system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19374.001 PMID:27782879

  6. Autonomous and Autonomic Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G.; Rash, James L.; Truszkowski, Walter F.; Rouff, Christopher A.; Sterritt, Roy

    2005-01-01

    A watershed in systems engineering is represented by the advent of swarm-based systems that accomplish missions through cooperative action by a (large) group of autonomous individuals each having simple capabilities and no global knowledge of the group s objective. Such systems, with individuals capable of surviving in hostile environments, pose unprecedented challenges to system developers. Design and testing and verification at much higher levels will be required, together with the corresponding tools, to bring such systems to fruition. Concepts for possible future NASA space exploration missions include autonomous, autonomic swarms. Engineering swarm-based missions begins with understanding autonomy and autonomicity and how to design, test, and verify systems that have those properties and, simultaneously, the capability to accomplish prescribed mission goals. Formal methods-based technologies, both projected and in development, are described in terms of their potential utility to swarm-based system developers.

  7. Prkci is required for a non-autonomous signal that coordinates cell polarity during cavitation.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Izuhara, Audrey K; Lakeland, Daniel L; Wang, Charles; Mariani, Francesca V

    2016-08-01

    Polarized epithelia define boundaries, spaces, and cavities within organisms. Cavitation, a process by which multicellular hollow balls or tubes are produced, is typically associated with the formation of organized epithelia. In order for these epithelial layers to form, cells must ultimately establish a distinct apical-basal polarity. Atypical PKCs have been proposed to be required for apical-basal polarity in diverse species. Here we show that while cells null for the Prkci isozyme exhibit some polarity characteristics, they fail to properly segregate apical-basal proteins, form a coordinated ectodermal epithelium, or participate in normal cavitation. A failure to cavitate could be due to an overgrowth of interior cells or to an inability of interior cells to die. Null cells however, do not have a marked change in proliferation rate and are still capable of undergoing cell death, suggesting that alterations in these processes are not the predominant cause of the failed cavitation. Overexpression of BMP4 or EZRIN can partially rescue the phenotype possibly by promoting cell death, polarity, and differentiation. However, neither is sufficient to provide the required cues to generate a polarized epithelium and fully rescue cavitation. Interestingly, when wildtype and Prkci(-/-) ES cells are mixed together, a polarized ectodermal epithelium forms and cavitation is rescued, likely due to the ability of wildtype cells to produce non-autonomous polarity cues. We conclude that Prkci is not required for cells to respond to these cues, though it is required to produce them. Together these findings indicate that environmental cues can facilitate the formation of polarized epithelia and that cavitation requires the proper coordination of multiple basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and apical-basal polarization.

  8. Differential cell autonomous responses determine the outcome of coxsackievirus infections in murine pancreatic α and β cells

    PubMed Central

    Marroqui, Laura; Lopes, Miguel; dos Santos, Reinaldo S; Grieco, Fabio A; Roivainen, Merja; Richardson, Sarah J; Morgan, Noel G; Op de beeck, Anne; Eizirik, Decio L

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by loss of pancreatic β cells via apoptosis while neighboring α cells are preserved. Viral infections by coxsackieviruses (CVB) may contribute to trigger autoimmunity in T1D. Cellular permissiveness to viral infection is modulated by innate antiviral responses, which vary among different cell types. We presently describe that global gene expression is similar in cytokine-treated and virus-infected human islet cells, with up-regulation of gene networks involved in cell autonomous immune responses. Comparison between the responses of rat pancreatic α and β cells to infection by CVB5 and 4 indicate that α cells trigger a more efficient antiviral response than β cells, including higher basal and induced expression of STAT1-regulated genes, and are thus better able to clear viral infections than β cells. These differences may explain why pancreatic β cells, but not α cells, are targeted by an autoimmune response during T1D. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06990.001 PMID:26061776

  9. Advanced Modular "All in One" Battery System with Intelligent Autonomous Cell Balancing Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitdidier, X.; Pasquier, E.; Defer, M.; Koch, M.; Knorr, W.

    2008-09-01

    A new generation of energy storage systems based on Li-ion technology emerged at the end of the last century.To perform the first tests in safe conditions, Saft designed a simple electronic.Today, all Li-ion batteries for autonomous applications such as drones, launchers, missiles, torpedoes and "human" applications such as cellular, laptop, hybrid vehicle and nearly sub-marines need a Battery Management System.The minimum in terms of functions is the overcharge and over-discharge protections.For a battery made of 2 cells connected in series or more, a balancing system is added to maintain the available energy during all the life of the battery. For stringent/demanding applications, the state of charge and state of health are calculated by one or more computers.It is now time to take benefit of the past 10 years of Saft's experience in the domain to re-evaluate the constraints of Li-ion batteries and provide customers with improved products by optimizing the battery management.Benefits of electronic for satellite applications:• Full control over battery.• Confidence whatever the possible change of conditions in environment.• The battery system can resist long exposure to gradient conditions with mitigated and stabilized impact on performances.• The balancing function allow to use all the energy of all the cells: optimize of installed energy (compact design, mass saving). It started out with the basic fact that electrochemists are not intended to be space rated electronic experts and vice versa, even if Saft has a good heritage in the electronic battery management system. Consequently, considering heritage and expertise in their respective core businesses, Saft and ASP teamed up.It became necessary to provide an "all in one" modular energy storage system with intelligent autonomous cell balancing management.

  10. A self-powered "sense-act-treat" system that is based on a biofuel cell and controlled by boolean logic.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Nandi; Kuralay, Filiz; Windmiller, Joshua R; Parkhomovsky, Serguey; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Katz, Evgeny; Wang, Joseph

    2012-03-12

    Bio-logic-al: an autonomous, integrated "sense-act-treat" system that is based on an enzymatic biofuel cell has been developed. The system couples a biocomputing logic-detection method with a drug-release system to provide a logic-activated therapeutic intervention in response to a simulated abnormal physiological state, without the need for an external power source, control electronics, or microelectromechanical actuators.

  11. Deciphering Human Cell-Autonomous Anti-HSV-1 Immunity in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Studer, Lorenz; Smith, Gregory; Notarangelo, Luigi; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common virus that can rarely invade the human central nervous system (CNS), causing devastating encephalitis. The permissiveness to HSV-1 of the various relevant cell types of the CNS, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia cells, as well as their response to viral infection, has been extensively studied in humans and other animals. Nevertheless, human CNS cell-based models of anti-HSV-1 immunity are of particular importance, as responses to any given neurotropic virus may differ between humans and other animals. Human CNS neuron cell lines as well as primary human CNS neurons, astrocytes, and microglia cells cultured/isolated from embryos or cadavers, have enabled the study of cell-autonomous anti-HSV-1 immunity in vitro. However, the paucity of biological samples and their lack of purity have hindered progress in the field, which furthermore suffers from the absence of testable primary human oligodendrocytes. Recently, the authors have established a human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-based model of anti-HSV-1 immunity in neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, astrocytes, and neural stem cells, which has widened the scope of possible in vitro studies while permitting in-depth explorations. This mini-review summarizes the available data on human primary and iPSC-derived CNS cells for anti-HSV-1 immunity. The hiPSC-mediated study of anti-viral immunity in both healthy individuals and patients with viral encephalitis will be a powerful tool in dissecting the disease pathogenesis of CNS infections with HSV-1 and other neurotropic viruses.

  12. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  13. Multiresolution motion planning for autonomous agents via wavelet-based cell decompositions.

    PubMed

    Cowlagi, Raghvendra V; Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    2012-10-01

    We present a path- and motion-planning scheme that is "multiresolution" both in the sense of representing the environment with high accuracy only locally and in the sense of addressing the vehicle kinematic and dynamic constraints only locally. The proposed scheme uses rectangular multiresolution cell decompositions, efficiently generated using the wavelet transform. The wavelet transform is widely used in signal and image processing, with emerging applications in autonomous sensing and perception systems. The proposed motion planner enables the simultaneous use of the wavelet transform in both the perception and in the motion-planning layers of vehicle autonomy, thus potentially reducing online computations. We rigorously prove the completeness of the proposed path-planning scheme, and we provide numerical simulation results to illustrate its efficacy.

  14. Pulse-transmission Oscillators: Autonomous Boolean Models and the Yeast Cell Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua

    2010-03-01

    Models of oscillatory gene expression typically involve a constitutively expressed or positively autoregulated gene which is repressed by a negative feedback loop. In Boolean representations of such systems, which include the repressilator and relaxation oscillators, dynamical stability stems from the impossibility of satisfying all of the Boolean rules at once. We consider a different class of networks, in which oscillations are due to the transmission of a pulse of gene activation around a ring. Using autonomous Boolean modeling methods, we show how the circulating pulse can be stabilized by decoration of the ring with certain feedback and feed-forward motifs. We then discuss the relation of these models to ODE models of transcriptional networks, emphasizing the role of explicit time delays. Finally, we show that a network recently proposed as a generator of cell cycle oscillations in yeast contains the motifs required to support stable transmission oscillations.

  15. Diabetes causes bone marrow autonomic neuropathy and impairs stem cell mobilization via dysregulated p66Shc and Sirt1.

    PubMed

    Albiero, Mattia; Poncina, Nicol; Tjwa, Marc; Ciciliot, Stefano; Menegazzo, Lisa; Ceolotto, Giulio; Vigili de Kreutzenberg, Saula; Moura, Rute; Giorgio, Marco; Pelicci, Piergiuseppe; Avogaro, Angelo; Fadini, Gian Paolo

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes compromises the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment and reduces the number of circulating CD34(+) cells. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) may impact the BM, because the sympathetic nervous system is prominently involved in BM stem cell trafficking. We hypothesize that neuropathy of the BM affects stem cell mobilization and vascular recovery after ischemia in patients with diabetes. We report that, in patients, cardiovascular DAN was associated with fewer circulating CD34(+) cells. Experimental diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and ob/ob mice) or chemical sympathectomy in mice resulted in BM autonomic neuropathy, impaired Lin(-)cKit(+)Sca1(+) (LKS) cell and endothelial progenitor cell (EPC; CD34(+)Flk1(+)) mobilization, and vascular recovery after ischemia. DAN increased the expression of the 66-kDa protein from the src homology and collagen homology domain (p66Shc) and reduced the expression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) in mice and humans. p66Shc knockout (KO) in diabetic mice prevented DAN in the BM, and rescued defective LKS cell and EPC mobilization. Hematopoietic Sirt1 KO mimicked the diabetic mobilization defect, whereas hematopoietic Sirt1 overexpression in diabetes rescued defective mobilization and vascular repair. Through p66Shc and Sirt1, diabetes and sympathectomy elevated the expression of various adhesion molecules, including CD62L. CD62L KO partially rescued the defective stem/progenitor cell mobilization. In conclusion, autonomic neuropathy in the BM impairs stem cell mobilization in diabetes with dysregulation of the life-span regulators p66Shc and Sirt1.

  16. Biotinylation: a novel posttranslational modification linking cell autonomous circadian clocks with metabolism.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Hamm, J Austin; Reddy, Alex; Sams, David; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; McGinnis, Graham R; Bailey, Shannon M; Chow, Chi-Wing; Rowe, Glenn C; Chatham, John C; Young, Martin E

    2016-06-01

    Circadian clocks are critical modulators of metabolism. However, mechanistic links between cell autonomous clocks and metabolic processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report that expression of the biotin transporter slc5a6 gene is decreased in hearts of two distinct genetic mouse models of cardiomyocyte-specific circadian clock disruption [i.e., cardiomyocyte-specific CLOCK mutant (CCM) and cardiomyocyte-specific BMAL1 knockout (CBK) mice]. Biotinylation is an obligate posttranslational modification for five mammalian carboxylases: acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACCα), ACCβ, pyruvate carboxylase (PC), methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC), and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). We therefore hypothesized that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock impacts metabolism through biotinylation. Consistent with decreased slc5a6 expression, biotinylation of all carboxylases is significantly decreased (10-46%) in CCM and CBK hearts. In association with decreased biotinylated ACC, oleate oxidation rates are increased in both CCM and CBK hearts. Consistent with decreased biotinylated MCC, leucine oxidation rates are significantly decreased in both CCM and CBK hearts, whereas rates of protein synthesis are increased. Importantly, feeding CBK mice with a biotin-enriched diet for 6 wk normalized myocardial 1) ACC biotinylation and oleate oxidation rates; 2) PCC/MCC biotinylation (and partially restored leucine oxidation rates); and 3) net protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, data suggest that the RRAGD/mTOR/4E-BP1 signaling axis is chronically activated in CBK and CCM hearts. Finally we report that the hepatocyte circadian clock also regulates both slc5a6 expression and protein biotinylation in the liver. Collectively, these findings suggest that biotinylation is a novel mechanism by which cell autonomous circadian clocks influence metabolic pathways.

  17. Neural crest cell-autonomous roles of fibronectin in cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Astrof, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The chemical and mechanical properties of extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate diverse aspects of cellular fates; however, how regional heterogeneity in ECM composition regulates developmental programs is not well understood. We discovered that fibronectin 1 (Fn1) is expressed in strikingly non-uniform patterns during mouse development, suggesting that regionalized synthesis of the ECM plays cell-specific regulatory roles during embryogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we ablated Fn1 in the neural crest (NC), a population of multi-potent progenitors expressing high levels of Fn1. We found that Fn1 synthesized by the NC mediated morphogenesis of the aortic arch artery and differentiation of NC cells into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by regulating Notch signaling. We show that NC Fn1 signals in an NC cell-autonomous manner through integrin α5β1 expressed by the NC, leading to activation of Notch and differentiation of VSMCs. Our data demonstrate an essential role of the localized synthesis of Fn1 in cardiovascular development and spatial regulation of Notch signaling. PMID:26552887

  18. The chromatin structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae autonomously replicating sequences changes during the cell division cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J A; Holmes, S G; Smith, M M

    1991-01-01

    The chromatin structures of two well-characterized autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) elements were examined at their chromosomal sites during the cell division cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The H4 ARS is located near one of the duplicate nonallelic histone H4 genes, while ARS1 is present near the TRP1 gene. Cells blocked in G1 either by alpha-factor arrest or by nitrogen starvation had two DNase I-hypersensitive sites of about equal intensity in the ARS element. This pattern of DNase I-hypersensitive sites was altered in synchronous cultures allowed to proceed into S phase. In addition to a general increase in DNase I sensitivity around the core consensus sequence, the DNase I-hypersensitive site closest to the core consensus became more nuclease sensitive than the distal site. This change in chromatin structure was restricted to the ARS region and depended on replication since cdc7 cells blocked near the time of replication initiation did not undergo the transition. Subsequent release of arrested cdc7 cells restored entry into S phase and was accompanied by the characteristic change in ARS chromatin structure. Images PMID:1922046

  19. Autonomous Bioluminescent Expression of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) in a Mammalian Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J.; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH2) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. Conclusions/Significance The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies. PMID:20805991

  20. Auxin Acts through MONOPTEROS to Regulate Plant Cell Polarity and Pattern Phyllotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Neha; Bozorg, Behruz; Larsson, André; Ohno, Carolyn; Jönsson, Henrik; Heisler, Marcus G

    2016-12-05

    The periodic formation of plant organs such as leaves and flowers gives rise to intricate patterns that have fascinated biologists and mathematicians alike for hundreds of years [1]. The plant hormone auxin plays a central role in establishing these patterns by promoting organ formation at sites where it accumulates due to its polar, cell-to-cell transport [2-6]. Although experimental evidence as well as modeling suggest that feedback from auxin to its transport direction may help specify phyllotactic patterns [7-12], the nature of this feedback remains unclear [13]. Here we reveal that polarization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED 1 (PIN1) is regulated by the auxin response transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) [14]. We find that in the shoot, cell polarity patterns follow MP expression, which in turn follows auxin distribution patterns. By perturbing MP activity both globally and locally, we show that localized MP activity is necessary for the generation of polarity convergence patterns and that localized MP expression is sufficient to instruct PIN1 polarity directions non-cell autonomously, toward MP-expressing cells. By expressing MP in the epidermis of mp mutants, we further show that although MP activity in a single-cell layer is sufficient to promote polarity convergence patterns, MP in sub-epidermal tissues helps anchor these polarity patterns to the underlying cells. Overall, our findings reveal a patterning module in plants that determines organ position by orienting transport of the hormone auxin toward cells with high levels of MP-mediated auxin signaling. We propose that this feedback process acts broadly to generate periodic plant architectures.

  1. Inflammation and Proliferation Act Together to Mediate Intestinal Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Swain, John R.; Wong, Melissa H.

    2009-01-01

    Cell fusion between circulating bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and non-hematopoietic cells is well documented in various tissues and has recently been suggested to occur in response to injury. Here we illustrate that inflammation within the intestine enhanced the level of BMDC fusion with intestinal progenitors. To identify important microenvironmental factors mediating intestinal epithelial cell fusion, we performed bone marrow transplantation into mouse models of inflammation and stimulated epithelial proliferation. Interestingly, in a non-injury model or in instances where inflammation was suppressed, an appreciable baseline level of fusion persisted. This suggests that additional mediators of cell fusion exist. A rigorous temporal analysis of early post-transplantation cellular dynamics revealed that GFP-expressing donor cells first trafficked to the intestine coincident with a striking increase in epithelial proliferation, advocating for a required fusogenic state of the host partner. Directly supporting this hypothesis, induction of augmented epithelial proliferation resulted in a significant increase in intestinal cell fusion. Here we report that intestinal inflammation and epithelial proliferation act together to promote cell fusion. While the physiologic impact of cell fusion is not yet known, the increased incidence in an inflammatory and proliferative microenvironment suggests a potential role for cell fusion in mediating the progression of intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:19657387

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system for studying non-cell-autonomous mechanisms in protein-misfolding diseases.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum-Krammer, Carmen I; Morimoto, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has a number of distinct advantages that are useful for understanding the basis for cellular and organismal dysfunction underlying age-associated diseases of protein misfolding. Although protein aggregation, a key feature of human neurodegenerative diseases, has been typically explored in vivo at the single-cell level using cells in culture, there is now increasing evidence that proteotoxicity has a non-cell-autonomous component and is communicated between cells and tissues in a multicellular organism. These discoveries have opened up new avenues for the use of C. elegans as an ideal animal model system to study non-cell-autonomous proteotoxicity, prion-like propagation of aggregation-prone proteins, and the organismal regulation of stress responses and proteostasis. This Review focuses on recent evidence that C. elegans has mechanisms to transmit certain classes of toxic proteins between tissues and a complex stress response that integrates and coordinates signals from single cells and tissues across the organism. These findings emphasize the potential of C. elegans to provide insights into non-cell-autonomous proteotoxic mechanisms underlying age-related protein-misfolding diseases.

  3. hESC Differentiation toward an Autonomic Neuronal Cell Fate Depends on Distinct Cues from the Co-Patterning Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Lisette M.; Lindquist, Jeffrey N.; Walsh, Breda M.; Sia, Peik; Cimadamore, Flavio; Chen, Connie; Denzel, Martin; Pernia, Cameron D.; Ranscht, Barbara; Terskikh, Alexey; Snyder, Evan Y.; Cheresh, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To gain insight into the cellular and molecular cues that promote neurovascular co-patterning at the earliest stages of human embryogenesis, we developed a human embryonic stem cell model to mimic the developing epiblast. Contact of ectoderm-derived neural cells with mesoderm-derived vasculature is initiated via the neural crest (NC), not the neural tube (NT). Neurovascular co-patterning then ensues with specification of NC toward an autonomic fate requiring vascular endothelial cell (EC)-secreted nitric oxide (NO) and direct contact with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via T-cadherin-mediated homotypic interactions. Once a neurovascular template has been established, NT-derived central neurons then align themselves with the vasculature. Our findings reveal that, in early human development, the autonomic nervous system forms in response to distinct molecular cues from VSMCs and ECs, providing a model for how other developing lineages might coordinate their co-patterning. PMID:26004631

  4. Cell-autonomous inactivation of the Reelin pathway impairs adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Catia M.; Kron, Michelle M.; Masachs, Nuria; Zhang, Helen; Lagace, Diane C.; Martinez, Albert; Reillo, Isabel; Duan, Xin; Bosch, Carles; Pujadas, Lluis; Brunso, Lucas; Song, Hongjun; Eisch, Amelia J.; Borrell, Victor; Howell, Brian W.; Parent, Jack M.; Soriano, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be essential for learning and memory and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several disorders. Although recent studies have identified key factors regulating neuroprogenitor proliferation in the adult hippocampus, the mechanisms that control the migration and integration of adult-born neurons into circuits are largely unknown. Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein that is vital for neuronal development. Activation of the Reelin cascade leads to phosphorylation of disabled-1 (Dab1), an adaptor protein required for Reelin signaling. Here we used transgenic mouse and retroviral reporters along with Reelin signaling gain- and loss-of-function studies to show that the Reelin pathway regulates migration and dendritic development of adult-generated hippocampal neurons. Whereas overexpression of Reelin accelerated dendritic maturation, inactivation of the Reelin signaling pathway specifically in adult neuroprogenitor cells resulted in aberrant migration, decreased dendrite development, formation of ectopic dendrites in the hilus and the establishment of aberrant circuits. Our findings support a cell-autonomous and critical role for the Reelin pathway in regulating dendritic development and the integration of adult-generated granule cells and point to this pathway as a key regulator of adult neurogenesis. Moreover, our data reveal a novel role of the Reelin cascade in adult brain function with potential implications for the pathogenesis of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:22933789

  5. Guanylate-binding protein 1 (Gbp1) contributes to cell-autonomous immunity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Elizabeth M; Fentress, Sarah J; Beatty, Wandy L; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Virgin, Herbert W; Macmicking, John D; Sibley, L David

    2013-01-01

    IFN-γ activates cells to restrict intracellular pathogens by upregulating cellular effectors including the p65 family of guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs). Here we test the role of Gbp1 in the IFN-γ-dependent control of T. gondii in the mouse model. Virulent strains of T. gondii avoided recruitment of Gbp1 to the parasitophorous vacuole in a strain-dependent manner that was mediated by the parasite virulence factors ROP18, an active serine/threonine kinase, and the pseudokinase ROP5. Increased recruitment of Gbp1 to Δrop18 or Δrop5 parasites was associated with clearance in IFN-γ-activated macrophages in vitro, a process dependent on the autophagy protein Atg5. The increased susceptibility of Δrop18 mutants in IFN-γ-activated macrophages was reverted in Gbp1(-/-) cells, and decreased virulence of this mutant was compensated in Gbp1(-/-) mice, which were also more susceptible to challenge with type II strain parasites of intermediate virulence. These findings demonstrate that Gbp1 plays an important role in the IFN-γ-dependent, cell-autonomous control of toxoplasmosis and predict a broader role for this protein in host defense.

  6. Miniature Piezoelectric Shaker Mechanism for Autonomous Distribution of Unconsolidated Sample to Instrument Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Frankovich, Kent; Bao, Xiaoqi; Tucker, Curtis

    2009-01-01

    To perform in-situ measurements on Mars or other planetary bodies many instruments require powder produced using some sampling technique (drilling/coring) or sample processing technique (core crushing) to be placed in measurement cells. This usually requires filling a small sample cell using an inlet funnel. In order to minimize cross contamination with future samples and ensure the sample is transferred from the funnel to the test cell with minimal residual powder the funnel is shaken. The shaking assists gravity by fluidizing the powder and restoring flow of the material. In order to counter cross contamination or potential clogging due to settling during autonomous handling a piezoelectric shaking mechanism was designed for the deposition of sample fines in instrument inlet funnels. This device was designed to be lightweight, consume low power and demonstrated to be a resilient solid state actuator that can be mechanically and electrically tuned to shake the inlet funnel. In the final design configuration tested under nominal Mars Ambient conditions the funnel mechanism is driven by three symmetrically mounted piezoelectric flexure actuators that are out of the funnel support load path. The frequency of the actuation can be electrically controlled and monitored and mechanically tuned by the addition of tuning mass on the free end of the actuator. Unlike conventional electromagnetic motors these devices are solid state and can be designed with no macroscopically moving parts. This paper will discuss the design and testing results of these shaking mechanisms.

  7. Cell-autonomous mechanisms of chronological aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Leonov, Anna; Piano, Amanda; Svistkova, Veronika; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    A body of evidence supports the view that the signaling pathways governing cellular aging - as well as mechanisms of their modulation by longevity-extending genetic, dietary and pharmacological interventions - are conserved across species. The scope of this review is to critically analyze recent advances in our understanding of cell-autonomous mechanisms of chronological aging in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on our analysis, we propose a concept of a biomolecular network underlying the chronology of cellular aging in yeast. The concept posits that such network progresses through a series of lifespan checkpoints. At each of these checkpoints, the intracellular concentrations of some key intermediates and products of certain metabolic pathways - as well as the rates of coordinated flow of such metabolites within an intricate network of intercompartmental communications - are monitored by some checkpoint-specific ʺmaster regulatorʺ proteins. The concept envisions that a synergistic action of these master regulator proteins at certain early-life and late-life checkpoints modulates the rates and efficiencies of progression of such processes as cell metabolism, growth, proliferation, stress resistance, macromolecular homeostasis, survival and death. The concept predicts that, by modulating these vital cellular processes throughout lifespan (i.e., prior to an arrest of cell growth and division, and following such arrest), the checkpoint-specific master regulator proteins orchestrate the development and maintenance of a pro- or anti-aging cellular pattern and, thus, define longevity of chronologically aging yeast. PMID:28357241

  8. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety. PMID:26516295

  9. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-05-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety.

  10. Human skeletal myotubes display a cell-autonomous circadian clock implicated in basal myokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Laurent; Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Skarupelova, Svetlana; Pulimeno, Pamela; Chanon, Stephanie; Robert, Maud; Bouzakri, Karim; Modoux, Christine; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Dibner, Charna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Circadian clocks are functional in all light-sensitive organisms, allowing an adaptation to the external world in anticipation of daily environmental changes. In view of the potential role of the skeletal muscle clock in the regulation of glucose metabolism, we aimed to characterize circadian rhythms in primary human skeletal myotubes and investigate their roles in myokine secretion. Methods We established a system for long-term bioluminescence recording in differentiated human myotubes, employing lentivector gene delivery of the Bmal1-luciferase and Per2-luciferase core clock reporters. Furthermore, we disrupted the circadian clock in skeletal muscle cells by transfecting siRNA targeting CLOCK. Next, we assessed the basal secretion of a large panel of myokines in a circadian manner in the presence or absence of a functional clock. Results Bioluminescence reporter assays revealed that human skeletal myotubes, synchronized in vitro, exhibit a self-sustained circadian rhythm, which was further confirmed by endogenous core clock transcript expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the basal secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 by synchronized skeletal myotubes has a circadian profile. Importantly, the secretion of IL-6 and several additional myokines was strongly downregulated upon siClock-mediated clock disruption. Conclusions Our study provides for the first time evidence that primary human skeletal myotubes possess a high-amplitude cell-autonomous circadian clock, which could be attenuated. Furthermore, this oscillator plays an important role in the regulation of basal myokine secretion by skeletal myotubes. PMID:26629407

  11. NF-κB signaling regulates cell-autonomous regulation of CXCL10 in breast cancer 4T1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Darong; Park Choo, Hea-Young; Kim, Hong-Hee; Ha, Hyunil; Lee, Zang Hee

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 play a role in breast cancer metastasis to bone and osteoclast activation. However, the mechanism of CXCL10/CXCR3-induced intracellular signaling has not been fully investigated. To evaluate CXCL10-induced cellular events in the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1, we developed a new synthetic CXCR3 antagonist JN-2. In this study, we observed that secretion of CXCL10 in the supernatant of 4T1 cells was gradually increased during cell growth. JN-2 inhibited basal and CXCL10-induced CXCL10 expression and cell motility in 4T1 cells. Treatment of 4T1 cells with CXCL10 increased the expression of P65, a subunit of the NF-κB pathway, via activation of the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Ectopic overexpression of P65 increased CXCL10 secretion and blunted JN-2-induced suppression of CXCL10 secretion, whereas overexpression of IκBα suppressed CXCL10 secretion. These results indicate that the CXCL10/CXCR3 axis creates a positive feedback loop through the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway in 4T1 cells. In addition, treatment of osteoblasts with conditioned medium from JN-2-treated 4T1 cells inhibited the expression of RANKL, a crucial cytokine for osteoclast differentiation, which resulted in an inhibitory effect on osteoclast differentiation in the co-culture system of bone marrow-derived macrophages and osteoblasts. Direct intrafemoral injection of 4T1 cells induced severe bone destruction; however, this effect was suppressed by the CXCR3 antagonist via downregulation of P65 expression in an animal model. Collectively, these results suggest that the CXCL10/CXCR3-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway plays a role in the control of autonomous regulation of CXCL10 and malignant tumor properties in breast cancer 4T1 cells. PMID:28209986

  12. Autonomous replicating sequences from mouse cells which can replicate in mouse cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, H; Itani, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M

    1987-01-01

    We have already reported that the cloned mouse DNA fragment (pMU65) could replicate in a simian virus 40 T antigen-dependent system in vivo and in vitro (H. Ariga, Z. Tsuchihashi, M. Naruto, and M. Yamada, Mol. Cell. Biol. 5:563-568, 1985). The plasmid p65-tk, containing the thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes simplex virus and the BglII-EcoRI region of pMU65 homologous to the simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication, was constructed. The p65-tk persisted episomally in tk+ transformants after the transfection of p65-tk into mouse FM3Atk- cells. The copy numbers of p65-tk in FM3Atk+ cells were 100 to 200 copies per cell. Furthermore, the p65-tk replicated semiconservatively, and the initiation of DNA replication started from the mouse DNA sequences when the replicating activity of p65-tk was tested in the in vitro DNA replication system developed from the FM3A cells. These results show that a 2.5-kilobase fragment of mouse DNA contains the autonomously replicating sequences. Images PMID:3031448

  13. Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Dendritic Spine Density by PirB.

    PubMed

    Vidal, George S; Djurisic, Maja; Brown, Kiana; Sapp, Richard W; Shatz, Carla J

    2016-01-01

    Synapse density on cortical pyramidal neurons is modulated by experience. This process is highest during developmental critical periods, when mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are fully engaged. In mouse visual cortex, the critical period for ocular dominance (OD) plasticity coincides with the developmental pruning of synapses. At this time, mice lacking paired Ig-like receptor B (PirB) have excess numbers of dendritic spines on L5 neurons; these spines persist and are thought to underlie the juvenile-like OD plasticity observed in adulthood. Here we examine whether PirB is required specifically in excitatory neurons to exert its effect on dendritic spine and synapse density during the critical period. In mice with a conditional allele of PirB (PirB(fl/fl)), PirB was deleted only from L2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons in vivo by timed in utero electroporation of Cre recombinase. Sparse mosaic expression of Cre produced neurons lacking PirB in a sea of wild-type neurons and glia. These neurons had significantly elevated dendritic spine density, as well as increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that they receive a greater number of synaptic inputs relative to Cre(-) neighbors. The effect of cell-specific PirB deletion on dendritic spine density was not accompanied by changes in dendritic branching complexity or axonal bouton density. Together, results imply a neuron-specific, cell-autonomous action of PirB on synaptic density in L2/3 pyramidal cells of visual cortex. Moreover, they are consistent with the idea that PirB functions normally to corepress spine density and synaptic plasticity, thereby maintaining headroom for cells to encode ongoing experience-dependent structural change throughout life.

  14. Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Dendritic Spine Density by PirB

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Synapse density on cortical pyramidal neurons is modulated by experience. This process is highest during developmental critical periods, when mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are fully engaged. In mouse visual cortex, the critical period for ocular dominance (OD) plasticity coincides with the developmental pruning of synapses. At this time, mice lacking paired Ig-like receptor B (PirB) have excess numbers of dendritic spines on L5 neurons; these spines persist and are thought to underlie the juvenile-like OD plasticity observed in adulthood. Here we examine whether PirB is required specifically in excitatory neurons to exert its effect on dendritic spine and synapse density during the critical period. In mice with a conditional allele of PirB (PirBfl/fl), PirB was deleted only from L2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons in vivo by timed in utero electroporation of Cre recombinase. Sparse mosaic expression of Cre produced neurons lacking PirB in a sea of wild-type neurons and glia. These neurons had significantly elevated dendritic spine density, as well as increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that they receive a greater number of synaptic inputs relative to Cre– neighbors. The effect of cell-specific PirB deletion on dendritic spine density was not accompanied by changes in dendritic branching complexity or axonal bouton density. Together, results imply a neuron-specific, cell-autonomous action of PirB on synaptic density in L2/3 pyramidal cells of visual cortex. Moreover, they are consistent with the idea that PirB functions normally to corepress spine density and synaptic plasticity, thereby maintaining headroom for cells to encode ongoing experience-dependent structural change throughout life. PMID:27752542

  15. Insulin signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans regulates both endocrine-like and cell-autonomous outputs.

    PubMed

    Iser, Wendy B; Gami, Minaxi S; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2007-03-15

    In C. elegans, insulin signaling affects development, lifespan and stress resistance. Several studies have shown that insulin signaling affects lifespan in an endocrine-like manner from different cells, while the major downstream target of insulin, the FOXO transcription factor encoded by daf-16, may act preferentially in intestinal cells to prolong lifespan. This discrepancy raised the possibility that insulin may have both endocrine and cell-intrinsic outputs. Here, we further investigated the types of cells capable of producing endocrine outputs of insulin and also identified a new cell-intrinsic insulin output. We found that insulin signaling within groups of neurons promoted wildtype lifespan, showing that the endocrine outputs of insulin were not restricted to specific cells. In contrast, DAF-16 appeared to have a greater effect on lifespan when expressed in a combination of tissues. These results suggest that insulin signaling may regulate DAF-16 through cell-intrinsic and endocrine pathways. We also found that an insulin-dependent response to fasting in intestinal cells was preferentially regulated by intestinal insulin signaling and was less responsive to insulin signaling from non-intestinal cells. Together, these results show that C. elegans insulin signaling has endocrine as well as tissue-specific outputs which could influence lifespan in a combinatorial fashion.

  16. Pulsatile cell-autonomous contractility drives compaction in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Turlier, Hervé; Nédélec, François; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Mammalian embryos initiate morphogenesis with compaction, which is essential for specifying the first lineages of the blastocyst. The 8-cell-stage mouse embryo compacts by enlarging its cell-cell contacts in a Cdh1-dependent manner. It was therefore proposed that Cdh1 adhesion molecules generate the forces driving compaction. Using micropipette aspiration to map all tensions in a developing embryo, we show that compaction is primarily driven by a twofold increase in tension at the cell-medium interface. We show that the principal force generator of compaction is the actomyosin cortex, which gives rise to pulsed contractions starting at the 8-cell stage. Remarkably, contractions emerge as periodic cortical waves when cells are disengaged from adhesive contacts. In line with this, tension mapping of mzCdh1(-/-) embryos suggests that Cdh1 acts by redirecting contractility away from cell-cell contacts. Our study provides a framework to understand early mammalian embryogenesis and original perspectives on evolutionary conserved pulsed contractions.

  17. Cell-Autonomous Progeroid Changes in Conditional Mouse Models for Repair Endonuclease XPG Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg−/− mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg−/− mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging. PMID:25299392

  18. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  19. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; ...

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays manymore » progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.« less

  20. Autologous Adipose Stem Cell Therapy for Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Two Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Ankur; Young, Jane; Butler, Ian. J.

    2017-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and neurocardiogenic syncope are clinical manifestations of autonomic nervous system dysfunction (dysautonomia) that can lead to impaired daily functions. We report two young patients presenting with dysautonomia and autoimmune disease who both received autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) infusions. This report is the first description of ASCs therapy for patients with combined dysautonomia and autoimmune disease. Case 1: A 21-year-old female presented at 12 years of age with escalating severe dysautonomia with weight loss and gastrointestinal symptoms. She had elevated autoantibodies and cytokines and received multiple immune modulation therapies. Her dysautonomia was treated by volume expanders, vasoconstrictors, and beta blockers with mild improvement. She received ASCs about 2 years before this report with dramatic improvement in her dysautonomia and autoimmune symptoms with a 10 kg weight gain. Case 2: A 7-year-old boy presented at 2 years of age with polyarthritis. At 5 years of age, he manifested orthostatic intolerance. He received immune modulatory therapies with mild improvement. He received ASCs and showed marked improvement of his dysautonomia and immune symptoms. Dysautonomia symptoms of these two patients improved significantly after modulation of autoimmune components by ASC therapy. Favorable clinical responses of these two cases warrant further case–control studies. PMID:27959743

  1. Dominant, toxic gain-of-function mutations in gars lead to non-cell autonomous neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Grice, Stuart J.; Sleigh, James N.; Motley, William W.; Liu, Ji-Long; Burgess, Robert W.; Talbot, Kevin; Cader, M. Zameel

    2015-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathies are collectively the most common hereditary neurological condition and a major health burden for society. Dominant mutations in the gene GARS, encoding the ubiquitous enzyme, glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS), cause peripheral nerve degeneration and lead to CMT disease type 2D. This genetic disorder exemplifies a recurring motif in neurodegeneration, whereby mutations in essential, widely expressed genes have selective deleterious consequences for the nervous system. Here, using novel Drosophila models, we show a potential solution to this phenomenon. Ubiquitous expression of mutant GlyRS leads to motor deficits, progressive neuromuscular junction (NMJ) denervation and pre-synaptic build-up of mutant GlyRS. Intriguingly, neuronal toxicity is, at least in part, non-cell autonomous, as expression of mutant GlyRS in mesoderm or muscle alone results in similar pathology. This mutant GlyRS toxic gain-of-function, which is WHEP domain-dependent, coincides with abnormal NMJ assembly, leading to synaptic degeneration, and, ultimately, reduced viability. Our findings suggest that mutant GlyRS gains access to ectopic sub-compartments of the motor neuron, providing a possible explanation for the selective neuropathology caused by mutations in a widely expressed gene. PMID:25972375

  2. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Conti, Valentina; Gandaglia, Anna; Galli, Francesco; Tirone, Mario; Bellini, Elisa; Campana, Lara; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions.

  3. An essential cell-autonomous role for hepcidin in cardiac iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Chung, Yu Jin; Christian, Helen C; Heather, Lisa C; Brescia, Marcella; Ball, Vicky; Diaz, Rebeca; Santos, Ana; Biggs, Daniel; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Derived primarily from the liver, it inhibits the iron exporter ferroportin in the gut and spleen, the sites of iron absorption and recycling respectively. Recently, we demonstrated that ferroportin is also found in cardiomyocytes, and that its cardiac-specific deletion leads to fatal cardiac iron overload. Hepcidin is also expressed in cardiomyocytes, where its function remains unknown. To define the function of cardiomyocyte hepcidin, we generated mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of hepcidin, or knock-in of hepcidin-resistant ferroportin. We find that while both models maintain normal systemic iron homeostasis, they nonetheless develop fatal contractile and metabolic dysfunction as a consequence of cardiomyocyte iron deficiency. These findings are the first demonstration of a cell-autonomous role for hepcidin in iron homeostasis. They raise the possibility that such function may also be important in other tissues that express both hepcidin and ferroportin, such as the kidney and the brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19804.001 PMID:27897970

  4. The cell-autonomous role of excitatory synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structure and function.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Bushong, Eric A; Shih, Tiffany P; Ellisman, Mark H; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-05-08

    The cell-autonomous role of synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structural and electrical properties is unclear. We have now employed a genetic approach to eliminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto individual CA1 pyramidal neurons in a mosaic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, while electrical properties are profoundly affected in these neurons, as well as inhibitory synaptic transmission, we found little perturbation of neuronal morphology, demonstrating a functional segregation of excitatory synaptic transmission from neuronal morphological development.

  5. Epigenetic Memory Underlies Cell-Autonomous Heterogeneous Behavior of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Vionnie W C; Yusuf, Rushdia Z; Oki, Toshihiko; Wu, Juwell; Saez, Borja; Wang, Xin; Cook, Colleen; Baryawno, Ninib; Ziller, Michael J; Lee, Eunjung; Gu, Hongcang; Meissner, Alexander; Lin, Charles P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Scadden, David T

    2016-11-17

    Stem cells determine homeostasis and repair of many tissues and are increasingly recognized as functionally heterogeneous. To define the extent of-and molecular basis for-heterogeneity, we overlaid functional, transcriptional, and epigenetic attributes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) at a clonal level using endogenous fluorescent tagging. Endogenous HSC had clone-specific functional attributes over time in vivo. The intra-clonal behaviors were highly stereotypic, conserved under the stress of transplantation, inflammation, and genotoxic injury, and associated with distinctive transcriptional, DNA methylation, and chromatin accessibility patterns. Further, HSC function corresponded to epigenetic configuration but not always to transcriptional state. Therefore, hematopoiesis under homeostatic and stress conditions represents the integrated action of highly heterogeneous clones of HSC with epigenetically scripted behaviors. This high degree of epigenetically driven cell autonomy among HSCs implies that refinement of the concepts of stem cell plasticity and of the stem cell niche is warranted.

  6. Evolution of Cell-Autonomous Effector Mechanisms in Macrophages versus Non-Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Ryan G.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Specialized adaptations for killing microbes is synonymous with phagocytic cells including macrophages, monocytes, inflammatory neutrophils and eosinophils. Recent genome sequencing of extant species, however, reveals analogous antimicrobial machineries exist in certain non-immune cells and also within species that ostensibly lack a well-defined immune system. Here we probe the evolutionary record for clues about the ancient and diverse phylogenetic origins of macrophage killing mechanisms and how some of their properties are shared with cells outside the traditional bounds of immunity in higher vertebrates such as mammals. PMID:28087931

  7. Cell-autonomous and environmental contributions to the interstitial migration of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Petravic, Janka; Davenport, Miles P.

    2010-01-01

    A key to understanding the functioning of the immune system is to define the mechanisms that facilitate directed lymphocyte migration to and within tissues. The recent development of improved imaging technologies, most prominently multi-photon microscopy, has enabled the dynamic visualization of immune cells in real-time directly within intact tissues. Intravital imaging approaches have revealed high spontaneous migratory activity of T cells in secondary lymphoid organs and inflamed tissues. Experimental evidence points towards both environmental and cell-intrinsic cues involved in the regulation of lymphocyte motility in the interstitial space. Based on these data, several conceptually distinct models have been proposed in order to explain the coordination of lymphocyte migration both at the single cell and population level. These range from “stochastic” models, where chance is the major driving force, to “deterministic” models, where the architecture of the microenvironment dictates the migratory trajectory of cells. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding naïve and effector T cell migration in vivo. In addition, we discuss some of the contradictory experimental findings in the context of theoretical models of migrating leukocytes. PMID:20623124

  8. Cell-autonomous and environmental contributions to the interstitial migration of T cells.

    PubMed

    Mrass, Paulus; Petravic, Janka; Davenport, Miles P; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    A key to understanding the functioning of the immune system is to define the mechanisms that facilitate directed lymphocyte migration to and within tissues. The recent development of improved imaging technologies, most prominently multi-photon microscopy, has enabled the dynamic visualization of immune cells in real-time directly within intact tissues. Intravital imaging approaches have revealed high spontaneous migratory activity of T cells in secondary lymphoid organs and inflamed tissues. Experimental evidence points towards both environmental and cell-intrinsic cues involved in the regulation of lymphocyte motility in the interstitial space. Based on these data, several conceptually distinct models have been proposed in order to explain the coordination of lymphocyte migration both at the single cell and population level. These range from "stochastic" models, where chance is the major driving force, to "deterministic" models, where the architecture of the microenvironment dictates the migratory trajectory of cells. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding naïve and effector T cell migration in vivo. In addition, we discuss some of the contradictory experimental findings in the context of theoretical models of migrating leukocytes.

  9. Drosophila Condensin II subunit Chromosome-associated protein D3 regulates cell fate determination through non-cell-autonomous signaling

    PubMed Central

    Klebanow, Lindsey R.; Peshel, Emanuela C.; Schuster, Andrew T.; De, Kuntal; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lenoir, Jessica J.; Moore, Adrian W.; McDonald, Jocelyn A.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of the Drosophila melanogaster adult wing is heavily influenced by the expression of proteins that dictate cell fate decisions between intervein and vein during development. dSRF (Blistered) expression in specific regions of the larval wing disc promotes intervein cell fate, whereas EGFR activity promotes vein cell fate. Here, we report that the chromatin-organizing protein CAP-D3 acts to dampen dSRF levels at the anterior/posterior boundary in the larval wing disc, promoting differentiation of cells into the anterior crossvein. CAP-D3 represses KNOT expression in cells immediately adjacent to the anterior/posterior boundary, thus blocking KNOT-mediated repression of EGFR activity and preventing cell death. Maintenance of EGFR activity in these cells depresses dSRF levels in the neighboring anterior crossvein progenitor cells, allowing them to differentiate into vein cells. These findings uncover a novel transcriptional regulatory network influencing Drosophila wing vein development, and are the first to identify a Condensin II subunit as an important regulator of EGFR activity and cell fate determination in vivo. PMID:27317808

  10. HIF-1α regulates the response of primary sarcomas to radiation therapy through a cell autonomous mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minsi; Qiu, Qiong; Li, Zhizhong; Sachdeva, Mohit; Min, Hooney; Cardona, Diana M.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Han, Tracy; Ma, Yan; Luo, Lixia; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Lui, Ki; Nichols, Amanda G.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Kastan, Michael B.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Kirsch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a major cause of radiation resistance, which may predispose to local recurrence after radiation therapy (RT). While hypoxia increases tumor cell survival after RT because there is less oxygen to oxidize damaged DNA, whether signaling pathways triggered by hypoxia contribute to radiation resistance is poorly understood. For example, intratumoral hypoxia can increase hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), which may regulate pathways that contribute to radiation sensitization or radiation resistance. To clarify the role of HIF-1α in regulating tumor response to radiation therapy, we generated a novel genetically engineered mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma with an intact or deleted HIF-1α. Deletion of HIF-1α sensitized primary sarcomas to RT in vivo. Moreover, cell lines derived from primary sarcomas lacking HIF-1α, or in which HIF-1α was knocked down, had decreased clonogenic survival in vitro, demonstrating that HIF-1α can promote radiation resistance in a cell autonomous manner. In HIF-1α intact and deleted sarcoma cells, radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage repair, and activation of autophagy were similar. However, sarcoma cells lacking HIF-1α had impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolic response after radiation which might contribute to radiation resistance. These results show that HIF-1α promotes radiation resistance in a cell autonomous manner. PMID:25973951

  11. Autonomic nervous system regulation of the sinoatrial cell depolarization rate: Unifying computational models.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, P; Godinez, R

    2015-01-01

    In the last years different computational models have been proposed to simulate the sinoatrial node cell (SANC) action potential. Also, there has been a great effort to model the heart regulation mechanism by the autonomic nervous system (ANS) through the sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways. Both computational models have tried to fit the rabbit and/or the guinea-pig experimental heart rate data with an increasing success. Thus, the aim of this work was to unify the available models that have been reported to study the heart rate behavior when the SANC is stimulated by using different frequency patterns. Our results contribute to the unification of part of the Scepanovic's model [1] (involved with second messengers dynamics and its influence over specific SANC ionic channels), and the SANC ionic channels computational model proposed by Severi et al. [2] in 2012. In this model unification we did refit some parameters, particularly, those related to the Hill functions in the dynamic modeling of phosphokinase and its effect on the ionic channels currents If and ICaL, and over the Pup, parameter that is related to the Ca(++) uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Also, we eliminated the neurotransmitter effect over the ionic current IKr that is not presented in the Severi's model. These modifications were enough to successfully reproduce the heart rate experimental recordings under acetylcholine (Ach) or norepinephrine (NE) for independent stimulation: Ach 10 nM stimulation showed a 21.54% action potential shift compared with the 20% reported for experimental recordings; Isoprenaline 1 μM, also displayed a depolarization increased rate of 29.3%, compared with the experimental data of 28.2%. Furthermore, we were able to reproduce the guinea-pig experimental heart rate recordings, when the SANC model was vagal stimulated by using a 2 Hz, 10 Hz and 20 Hz frequency for 10 seconds and the experimental heart rate data for a sympathetic stimulation of 10 Hz frequency for

  12. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  13. Delayed dendritic development in newly generated dentate granule cells by cell-autonomous expression of the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Nicolás A; Giacomini, Damiana; Lombardi, Gabriela; Castaño, Eduardo M; Schinder, Alejandro F

    2013-09-01

    Neuronal connectivity and synaptic remodeling are fundamental substrates for higher brain functions. Understanding their dynamics in the mammalian allocortex emerges as a critical step to tackle the cellular basis of cognitive decline that occurs during normal aging and in neurodegenerative disorders. In this work we have designed a novel approach to assess alterations in the dynamics of functional and structural connectivity elicited by chronic cell-autonomous overexpression of the human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP). We have taken advantage of the fact that the hippocampus continuously generates new dentate granule cells (GCs) to probe morphofunctional development of GCs expressing different variants of hAPP in a healthy background. hAPP was expressed together with a fluorescent reporter in neural progenitor cells of the dentate gyrus of juvenile mice by retroviral delivery. Neuronal progeny was analyzed several days post infection (dpi). Amyloidogenic cleavage products of hAPP such as the β-C terminal fragment (β-CTF) induced a substantial reduction in glutamatergic connectivity at 21 dpi, at which time new GCs undergo active growth and synaptogenesis. Interestingly, this effect was transient, since the strength of glutamatergic inputs was normal by 35 dpi. This delay in glutamatergic synaptogenesis was paralleled by a decrease in dendritic length with no changes in spine density, consistent with a protracted dendritic development without alterations in synapse formation. Finally, similar defects in newborn GC development were observed by overexpression of α-CTF, a non-amyloidogenic cleavage product of hAPP. These results indicate that hAPP can elicit protracted dendritic development independently of the amyloidogenic processing pathway.

  14. HIF-1alpha regulates epithelial inflammation by cell autonomous NFkappaB activation and paracrine stromal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Scortegagna, Marzia; Cataisson, Christophe; Martin, Rebecca J; Hicklin, Daniel J; Schreiber, Robert D; Yuspa, Stuart H; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2008-04-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a master regulatory transcription factor controlling multiple cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous processes, such as metabolism, angiogenesis, matrix invasion, and cancer metastasis. Here we used a new line of transgenic mice with constitutive gain of HIF-1 function in basal keratinocytes and demonstrated a signaling pathway from HIF-1 to nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation to enhanced epithelial chemokine and cytokine elaboration. This pathway was responsible for a phenotypically silent accumulation of stromal inflammatory cells and a marked inflammatory hypersensitivity to a single 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) challenge. HIF-1-induced NFkappaB activation was composed of 2 elements, IkappaB hyperphosphorylation and phosphorylation of Ser276 on p65, enhancing p65 nuclear localization and transcriptional activity, respectively. NFkappaB transcriptional targets macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2/CXCL2/3), keratinocyte chemokine (KC/CXCL1), and tumor necrosis factor [alfa] (TNFalpha) were constitutively up-regulated and further increased after TPA challenge both in cultured keratinocytes and in transgenic mice. Whole animal KC, MIP-2, or TNFalpha immunodepletion each abrogated TPA-induced inflammation, whereas blockade of either VEGF or placenta growth factor (PlGF) signaling did not affect transgenic inflammatory hyper-responsiveness. Thus, epithelial HIF-1 gain of function remodels the local environment by cell-autonomous NFkappaB-mediated chemokine and cytokine secretion, which may be another mechanism by which HIF-1 facilitates either inflammatory diseases or malignant progression.

  15. Cardiomyocyte Circadian Oscillations Are Cell-Autonomous, Amplified by β-Adrenergic Signaling, and Synchronized in Cardiac Ventricle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks impact vital cardiac parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate, and adverse cardiac events such as myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, synchronizes cellular circadian clocks in the heart and many other tissues throughout the body. Cardiac ventricle explants maintain autonomous contractions and robust circadian oscillations of clock gene expression in culture. In the present study, we examined the relationship between intrinsic myocardial function and circadian rhythms in cultures from mouse heart. We cultured ventricular explants or dispersed cardiomyocytes from neonatal mice expressing a PER2::LUC bioluminescent reporter of circadian clock gene expression. We found that isoproterenol, a β-adrenoceptor agonist known to increase heart rate and contractility, also amplifies PER2 circadian rhythms in ventricular explants. We found robust, cell-autonomous PER2 circadian rhythms in dispersed cardiomyocytes. Single-cell rhythms were initially synchronized in ventricular explants but desynchronized in dispersed cells. In addition, we developed a method for long-term, simultaneous monitoring of clock gene expression, contraction rate, and basal intracellular Ca2+ level in cardiomyocytes using PER2::LUC in combination with GCaMP3, a genetically encoded fluorescent Ca2+ reporter. In contrast to robust PER2 circadian rhythms in cardiomyocytes, we detected no rhythms in contraction rate and only weak rhythms in basal Ca2+ level. In summary, we found that PER2 circadian rhythms of cardiomyocytes are cell-autonomous, amplified by adrenergic signaling, and synchronized by intercellular communication in ventricle explants, but we detected no robust circadian rhythms in contraction rate or basal Ca2+. PMID:27459195

  16. Involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the in vivo memory to glucose of pancreatic beta cell in rats.

    PubMed Central

    N'Guyen, J M; Magnan, C; Laury, M C; Thibault, C; Leveteau, J; Gilbert, M; Pénicaud, L; Ktorza, A

    1994-01-01

    The fact that the potentiating effect of prolonged hyperglycemia on the subsequent insulin secretion is observed in vivo but not in vitro suggests the involvement of extrapancreatic factors in the in vivo memory of pancreatic beta cells to glucose. We have investigated the possible role of the autonomic nervous system. Rats were made hyperglycemic by a 48-h infusion with glucose (HG rats). At the end of glucose infusion as well as 6 h postinfusion, both parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activities were profoundly altered: parasympathetic and sympathetic activities, assessed by the firing rate either of the thoracic vagus nerve or the superior cervical ganglion, were dramatically increased and decreased, respectively. Moreover, 6 h after the end of glucose infusion, insulin secretion in response to a glucose load was dramatically increased in HG rats compared to controls. To determine whether these changes could be responsible for the increased sensitivity of the beta cell to glucose, insulin release in response to glucose was measured in HG and control rats, either under subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or after administration of the alpha 2A-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline. Both treatments partially abolished the hyperresponsiveness of the beta cell to glucose in HG rats. Therefore chronic hyperglycemia brings about changes in the activity of the autonomic nervous system, which in turn are responsible, at least in part, for the generation of enhanced beta cell responsiveness to glucose in vivo. PMID:7929821

  17. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  18. odd-skipped genes and lines organize the notum anterior-posterior axis using autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Del Signore, Steven J; Hayashi, Teru; Hatini, Victor

    2012-07-01

    The growth and patterning of Drosophila wing and notum primordia depend on their subdivision into progressively smaller domains by secreted signals that emanate from localized sources termed organizers. While the mechanisms that organize the wing primordium have been studied extensively, those that organize the notum are incompletely understood. The genes odd-skipped (odd), drumstick (drm), sob, and bowl comprise the odd-skipped family of C(2)H(2) zinc finger genes, which has been implicated in notum growth and patterning. Here we show that drm, Bowl, and eyegone (eyg), a gene required for notum patterning, accumulate in nested domains in the anterior notum. Ectopic drm organized the nested expression of these anterior notum genes and downregulated the expression of posterior notum genes. The cell-autonomous induction of Bowl and Eyg required bowl, while the non-autonomous effects were independent of bowl. The homeodomain protein Bar is expressed along the anterior border of the notum adjacent to cells expressing the Notch (N) ligand Delta (Dl). bowl was required to promote Bar and repress Dl expression to pattern the anterior notum in a cell-autonomous manner, while lines acted antagonistically to bowl posterior to the Bowl domain. Our data suggest that the odd-skipped genes act at the anterior notum border to organize the notum anterior-posterior (AP) axis using both autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms.

  19. RB inactivation in keratin 18 positive thymic epithelial cells promotes non-cell autonomous T cell hyperproliferation in genetically engineered mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yurong; Sullivan, Teresa; Klarmann, Kimberly; Gilbert, Debra; O’Sullivan, T. Norene; Lu, Lucy; Wang, Sophie; Haines, Diana C.; Van Dyke, Terry; Keller, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC), as part of thymic stroma, provide essential growth factors/cytokines and self-antigens to support T cell development and selection. Deletion of Rb family proteins in adult thymic stroma leads to T cell hyperplasia in vivo. To determine whether deletion of Rb specifically in keratin (K) 18 positive TEC was sufficient for thymocyte hyperplasia, we conditionally inactivated Rb and its family members p107 and p130 in K18+ TEC in genetically engineered mice (TgK18GT121; K18 mice). We found that thymocyte hyperproliferation was induced in mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC, while normal T cell development was maintained; suggesting that inactivation of Rb specifically in K18+ TEC was sufficient and responsible for the phenotype. Transplantation of wild type bone marrow cells into mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC resulted in donor T lymphocyte hyperplasia confirming the non-cell autonomous requirement for Rb proteins in K18+ TEC in regulating T cell proliferation. Our data suggests that thymic epithelial cells play an important role in regulating lymphoid proliferation and thymus size. PMID:28158249

  20. RB inactivation in keratin 18 positive thymic epithelial cells promotes non-cell autonomous T cell hyperproliferation in genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Yurong; Sullivan, Teresa; Klarmann, Kimberly; Gilbert, Debra; O'Sullivan, T Norene; Lu, Lucy; Wang, Sophie; Haines, Diana C; Van Dyke, Terry; Keller, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC), as part of thymic stroma, provide essential growth factors/cytokines and self-antigens to support T cell development and selection. Deletion of Rb family proteins in adult thymic stroma leads to T cell hyperplasia in vivo. To determine whether deletion of Rb specifically in keratin (K) 18 positive TEC was sufficient for thymocyte hyperplasia, we conditionally inactivated Rb and its family members p107 and p130 in K18+ TEC in genetically engineered mice (TgK18GT121; K18 mice). We found that thymocyte hyperproliferation was induced in mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC, while normal T cell development was maintained; suggesting that inactivation of Rb specifically in K18+ TEC was sufficient and responsible for the phenotype. Transplantation of wild type bone marrow cells into mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC resulted in donor T lymphocyte hyperplasia confirming the non-cell autonomous requirement for Rb proteins in K18+ TEC in regulating T cell proliferation. Our data suggests that thymic epithelial cells play an important role in regulating lymphoid proliferation and thymus size.

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins.

  2. Autonomous and nonautonomous roles of Hedgehog signaling in regulating limb muscle formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jimmy Kuang-Hsien; McGlinn, Edwina; Harfe, Brian D.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle progenitor cells migrate from the lateral somites into the developing vertebrate limb, where they undergo patterning and differentiation in response to local signals. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted molecule made in the posterior limb bud that affects patterning and development of multiple tissues, including skeletal muscles. However, the cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of Shh during limb muscle formation have remained unclear. We found that Shh affects the pattern of limb musculature non-cell-autonomously, acting through adjacent nonmuscle mesenchyme. However, Shh plays a cell-autonomous role in maintaining cell survival in the dermomyotome and initiating early activation of the myogenic program in the ventral limb. At later stages, Shh promotes slow muscle differentiation cell-autonomously. In addition, Shh signaling is required cell-autonomously to regulate directional muscle cell migration in the distal limb. We identify neuroepithelial cell transforming gene 1 (Net1) as a downstream target and effector of Shh signaling in that context. PMID:22987639

  3. Human TDP-43 and FUS selectively affect motor neuron maturation and survival in a murine cell model of ALS by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wächter, Nicole; Storch, Alexander; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and fused in sarcoma (FUS) were recently found to cause familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanisms by which mutations within these genes cause ALS are not understood. We established murine embryonic stem cell (ESC)-based cell models that stably express the human wild-type (WT) and various ALS causing mutations of TDP-43 (A315T) and FUS (R514S, R521C and P525L). We investigated their effect on pan-neuron as well as motor neuron degeneration. Finally, non-cell-autonomous mediated neurodegeneration by muscle cells was investigated. Expression of mutant hTDP-43, but not wild-type TDP-43, as well as wild-type and mutant hFUS proteins induced neuronal degeneration with partial selectivity for motor neurons. Motor neuron loss was accompanied by abnormal neurite morphology and length. In chimeric coculture experiments with control motor neurons and mutant muscle cells (as their major target cells), we detected that mutant hTDP-43 A315T as well as wild-type and hFUS P525L expression only in muscle cells is sufficient to exert degenerative effects on control motor neurons. In conclusion, our data indicate that a selective vulnerability of motor neurons expressing the pathogenic ALS-causing genes TDP-43 and FUS, is, at least in part, mediated through non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

  4. Adaxial cell migration in the zebrafish embryo is an active cell autonomous property that requires the Prdm1a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yosuke; Yu, Weimiao; Jackson, Harriet E; Parkin, Caroline A; Ingham, Philip W

    2015-01-01

    Adaxial cells, the progenitors of slow-twitch muscle fibres in zebrafish, exhibit a stereotypic migratory behaviour during somitogenesis. Although this process is known to be disrupted in various mutants, its precise nature has remained unclear. Here, using in vivo imaging and chimera analysis, we show that adaxial cell migration is a cell autonomous process, during which cells become polarised and extend filopodia at their leading edge. Loss of function of the Prdm1a transcription factor disrupts the polarisation and migration of adaxial cells, reflecting a role that is independent of its repression of sox6 expression. Expression of the M- and N-cadherins, previously implicated in driving adaxial cell migration, is largely unaffected by loss of Prdm1a function, suggesting that differential cadherin expression is not sufficient for adaxial cell migration.

  5. Autonomous Stimulation of Cancer Cell Plasticity by the Human NKG2D Lymphocyte Receptor Coexpressed with Its Ligands on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Dai, Zhenpeng; Reeves, Rebecca S.; Caballero-Benitez, Andrea; Duran, Kate L.; Delrow, Jeffrey J.; Porter, Peggy L.

    2014-01-01

    The stimulatory NKG2D receptor on lymphocytes promotes tumor immune surveillance by targeting ligands selectively induced on cancer cells. Progressing tumors counteract by employing tactics to disable lymphocyte NKG2D. This negative dynamic is escalated as some human cancer cells co-opt expression of NKG2D, thereby complementing the presence of its ligands for autonomous stimulation of oncogenic signaling. Clinical association data imply relationships between cancer cell NKG2D and metastatic disease. Here we show that NKG2D promotes cancer cell plasticity by induction of phenotypic, molecular, and functional signatures diagnostic of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and of stem-like traits via induction of Sox9, a key transcriptional regulator of breast stem cell maintenance. These findings obtained with model breast tumor lines and xenotransplants were recapitulated by ex vivo cancer cells from primary invasive breast carcinomas. Thus, NKG2D may have the capacity to drive high malignancy traits underlying metastatic disease. PMID:25291178

  6. Cardiac and autonomic responses to change in posture or vitamin C supplementation in sickle cell anemia subjects.

    PubMed

    Jaja, S I; Kehinde, M O; Ogungbemi, S I

    2008-06-01

    Autonomic function following change in posture with or without vitamin C supplementation was studied in ten (10) sickle cell anemia (SCA) and twelve (12) non-sickle cell anemia (NSCA) subjects. Arterial blood pressure and electrocardiographic measurements were taken in the supine position on a couch 80cm high and immediately on assumption of the upright position. Vitamin C was then administered orally (300mg/day for 6 weeks). At the end of the period, blood pressure and ECG measurements were again made in the supine position and in response to change in posture. Change in posture significantly decreased QRS amplitude, QRS duration, PR interval, RR interval and MABP but increased HR and rate pressure product (RPP) in both groups of subjects. The HR and RPP responses were significantly higher in NSCA than in SCA subjects (p<0.001, respectively). Vitamin C caused greater reductions in QRS duration (p<0.01), PR duration p<0.001) in the NSCA subjects than in SCA subjects. It caused, however, greater reduction in RR duration (p<0.001) and MABP in SCA subjects than in NSCA subjects. It also caused significantly greater increases in HR and RPP (p<0.001, respectively) in the SCA subjects than in NSCA subjects. After vitamin C supplementation, change in posture decreased RR interval (p<0.001), QT interval (p<0.01) and MABP (p<0.05) but increased RPP (p<0.01) in NSCA subjects. In SCA subjects, there was a fall in RR interval (p<0.001) and MABP (p<0.01), but elevated RPP (p<0.001). Changes (Delta) in MABP, HR and RPP were similar between NSCA and SCA subjects. In conclusion, these findings indicate a blunted cardiovascular autonomic response to change in posture in sickle cell anemia subjects. Chronic, oral, low-dose vitamin C supplementation equilibrates this response with those of non-sickle cell anemia subjects.

  7. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  8. Autonomic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Autonomic neuropathy is a group of symptoms that occur when there is damage to the nerves that manage every day body functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, sweating, bowel and bladder emptying, and ...

  9. Mosaic Analysis Using a Ncl-1 (+) Extrachromosomal Array Reveals That Lin-31 Acts in the Pn.p Cells during Caenorhabditis Elegans Vulval Development

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L. M.; Waring, D. A.; Kim, S. K.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a genetic mosaic analysis procedure in which Caenorhabditis elegans mosaics are generated by spontaneous loss of an extrachromosomal array. This technique allows almost any C. elegans gene that can be used in germline transformation experiments to be used in mosaic analysis experiments. We identified a cosmid clone that rescues the mutant phenotype of ncl-1, so that this cell-autonomous marker could be used to analyze mosaic animals. To determine the sites of action for unc-29 and lin-31, an extrachromosomal array was constructed containing the ncl-1(+) cosmid linked to lin-31(+) and unc-29(+) cosmids. This array is mitotically unstable and can be lost to produce a clone of mutant cells. The specific cell division at which the extrachromosomal array had been lost was deduced by scoring the Ncl phenotypes of individual cells in genetic mosaics. The Unc-29 and Lin-31 phenotypes were then scored in these animals to determine in which cells these genes are required. This analysis showed that unc-29, which encodes a subunit of the acetylcholine receptor, acts in the body muscle cells. Furthermore, lin-31, which specifies cell fates during vulval induction and encodes a putative transcription factor similar to HNF-3/fork head, acts in the Pn.p cells. PMID:8807292

  10. The actin gene ACT1 is required for phagocytosis, motility, and cell separation of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, Norman E; Tsao, Che-Chia; Bowen, Josephine; Hehman, Gery L; Williams, Ruth J; Frankel, Joseph

    2006-03-01

    A previously identified Tetrahymena thermophila actin gene (C. G. Cupples and R. E. Pearlman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:5160-5164, 1986), here called ACT1, was disrupted by insertion of a neo3 cassette. Cells in which all expressed copies of this gene were disrupted exhibited intermittent and extremely slow motility and severely curtailed phagocytic uptake. Transformation of these cells with inducible genetic constructs that contained a normal ACT1 gene restored motility. Use of an epitope-tagged construct permitted visualization of Act1p in the isolated axonemes of these rescued cells. In ACT1Delta mutant cells, ultrastructural abnormalities of outer doublet microtubules were present in some of the axonemes. Nonetheless, these cells were still able to assemble cilia after deciliation. The nearly paralyzed ACT1Delta cells completed cleavage furrowing normally, but the presumptive daughter cells often failed to separate from one another and later became reintegrated. Clonal analysis revealed that the cell cycle length of the ACT1Delta cells was approximately double that of wild-type controls. Clones could nonetheless be maintained for up to 15 successive fissions, suggesting that the ACT1 gene is not essential for cell viability or growth. Examination of the cell cortex with monoclonal antibodies revealed that whereas elongation of ciliary rows and formation of oral structures were normal, the ciliary rows of reintegrated daughter cells became laterally displaced and sometimes rejoined indiscriminately across the former division furrow. We conclude that Act1p is required in Tetrahymena thermophila primarily for normal ciliary motility and for phagocytosis and secondarily for the final separation of daughter cells.

  11. Expression of a Humanized Viral 2A-Mediated lux Operon Efficiently Generates Autonomous Bioluminescence in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.; Close, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux) cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines

  12. A dual character of flavonoids in influenza A virus replication and spread through modulating cell-autonomous immunity by MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjuan; Wei, Xiuli; Zhang, Fayun; Hao, Junfeng; Huang, Feng; Zhang, Chunling; Liang, Wei

    2014-11-28

    Flavonoids are well known as a large class of polyphenolic compounds, which have a variety of physiological activities, including anti-influenza virus activity. The influenza A/WSN/33 infected A549 cells have been used to screen anti-influenza virus drugs from natural flavonoid compounds library. Unexpectedly, some flavonoid compounds significantly inhibited virus replication, while the others dramatically promoted virus replication. In this study, we attempted to understand these differences between flavonoid compounds in their antivirus mechanisms. Hesperidin and kaempferol were chosen as representatives of both sides, each of which exhibited the opposite effects on influenza virus replication. Our investigation revealed that the opposite effects produced by hesperidin and kaempferol on influenza virus were due to inducing the opposite cell-autonomous immune responses by selectively modulating MAP kinase pathways: hesperidin up-regulated P38 and JNK expression and activation, thus resulting in the enhanced cell-autonomous immunity; while kaempferol dramatically down-regulated p38 and JNK expression and activation, thereby suppressing cell-autonomous immunity. In addition, hesperidin restricted RNPs export from nucleus by down-regulating ERK activation, but kaempferol promoted RNPs export by up-regulating ERK activation. Our findings demonstrate that a new generation of anti-influenza virus drugs could be developed based on selective modulation of MAP kinase pathways to stimulate cell-autonomous immunity.

  13. Muscle Weakness and Fibrosis Due to Cell Autonomous and Non-cell Autonomous Events in Collagen VI Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Satoru; Ogawa, Megumu; Malicdan, May Christine; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2017-02-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies with collagen VI deficiency are inherited muscle disorders with a broad spectrum of clinical presentation and are caused by mutations in one of COL6A1-3 genes. Muscle pathology is characterized by fiber size variation and increased interstitial fibrosis and adipogenesis. In this study, we define critical events that contribute to muscle weakness and fibrosis in a mouse model with collagen VI deficiency. The Col6a1(GT/GT) mice develop non-progressive weakness from younger age, accompanied by stunted muscle growth due to reduced IGF-1 signaling activity. In addition, the Col6a1(GT/GT) mice have high numbers of interstitial skeletal muscle mesenchymal progenitor cells, which dramatically increase with repeated myofiber necrosis/regeneration. Our results suggest that impaired neonatal muscle growth and the activation of the mesenchymal cells in skeletal muscles contribute to the pathology of collagen VI deficient muscular dystrophy, and more importantly, provide the insights on the therapeutic strategies for collagen VI deficiency.

  14. Cell-autonomous FGF signaling regulates anteroposterior patterning and neuronal differentiation in the mesodiencephalic dopaminergic progenitor domain.

    PubMed

    Lahti, Laura; Peltopuro, Paula; Piepponen, T Petteri; Partanen, Juha

    2012-03-01

    The structure and projection patterns of adult mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (DA) neurons are one of the best characterized systems in the vertebrate brain. However, the early organization and development of these nuclei remain poorly understood. The induction of midbrain DA neurons requires sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the floor plate and fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) from the isthmic organizer, but the way in which FGF8 regulates DA neuron development is unclear. We show that, during early embryogenesis, mesodiencephalic neurons consist of two distinct populations: a diencephalic domain, which is probably independent of isthmic FGFs; and a midbrain domain, which is dependent on FGFs. Within these domains, DA progenitors and precursors use partly different genetic programs. Furthermore, the diencephalic DA domain forms a distinct cell population, which also contains non-DA Pou4f1(+) cells. FGF signaling operates in proliferative midbrain DA progenitors, but is absent in postmitotic DA precursors. The loss of FGFR1/2-mediated signaling results in a maturation failure of the midbrain DA neurons and altered patterning of the midbrain floor. In FGFR mutants, the DA domain adopts characteristics that are typical for embryonic diencephalon, including the presence of Pou4f1(+) cells among TH(+) cells, and downregulation of genes typical of midbrain DA precursors. Finally, analyses of chimeric embryos indicate that FGF signaling regulates the development of the ventral midbrain cell autonomously.

  15. The PCP Protein Vangl2 Regulates Migration of Hindbrain Motor Neurons by Acting in Floor Plate Cells, and Independently of Cilia Function

    PubMed Central

    Sittaramane, Vinoth; Pan, Xiufang; Glasco, Derrick M.; Huang, Peng; Gurung, Suman; Bock, Anagha; Li, Shike; Wang, Hui; Kawakami, Koichi; Matise, Michael P.; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Vangl2, a core component of the Planar Cell Polarity pathway, is necessary for the caudal migration of Facial Branchiomotor (FBM) neurons in the vertebrate hindbrain. Studies in zebrafish suggest that vangl2 functions largely non-cell autonomously to regulate FBM neuron migration out of rhombomere 4 (r4), but the cell-type within which it acts is not known. Here, we demonstrate that vangl2 functions largely in floor plate cells to regulate caudal neuronal migration. Furthermore, FBM neurons fail to migrate caudally in the mouse Gli2 mutant that lacks the floor plate, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for this cell type in neuronal migration. Although hindbrain floor plate cilia are disorganized in vangl2 mutant embryos, cilia appear to be dispensable for neuronal migration. Notably, Vangl2 is enriched in the basolateral, but not apical, membranes of floor plate cells. Taken together, our data suggest strongly that Vangl2 regulates FBM neuron migration by acting in floor plate cells, independently of cilia function. PMID:23988578

  16. Resistance to anticancer vaccination effect is controlled by a cancer cell-autonomous phenotype that disrupts immunogenic phagocytic removal.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek D; Elsen, Sanne; Krysko, Dmitri V; Vandenabeele, Peter; de Witte, Peter; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-09-29

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is a well-established instigator of 'anti-cancer vaccination-effect (AVE)'. ICD has shown considerable preclinical promise, yet there remain subset of cancer patients that fail to respond to clinically-applied ICD inducers. Non-responsiveness to ICD inducers could be explained by the existence of cancer cell-autonomous, anti-AVE resistance mechanisms. However such resistance mechanisms remain poorly investigated. In this study, we have characterized for the first time, a naturally-occurring preclinical cancer model (AY27) that exhibits intrinsic anti-AVE resistance despite treatment with ICD inducers like mitoxantrone or hypericin-photodynamic therapy. Further mechanistic analysis revealed that this anti-AVE resistance was associated with a defect in exposing the important 'eat me' danger signal, surface-calreticulin (ecto-CRT/CALR). In an ICD setting, this defective ecto-CRT further correlated with severely reduced phagocytic clearance of AY27 cells as well as the failure of these cells to activate AVE. Defective ecto-CRT in response to ICD induction was a result of low endogenous CRT protein levels (i.e. CRTlow-phenotype) in AY27 cells. Exogenous reconstitution of ecto-rCRT (recombinant-CRT) improved the phagocytic removal of ICD inducer-treated AY27 cells, and importantly, significantly increased their AVE-activating ability. Moreover, we found that a subset of cancer patients of various cancer-types indeed possessed CALRlow or CRTlow-tumours. Remarkably, we found that tumoural CALRhigh-phenotype was predictive of positive clinical responses to therapy with ICD inducers (radiotherapy and paclitaxel) in lung and ovarian cancer patients, respectively. Furthermore, only in the ICD clinical setting, tumoural CALR levels positively correlated with the levels of various phagocytosis-associated genes relevant for phagosome maturation or processing. Thus, we reveal the existence of a cancer cell-autonomous, anti-AVE or anti-ICD resistance

  17. Cell-autonomous expression and position-dependent repression by Li+ of two zygotic genes during sea urchin early development.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, C; Lhomond, G; Lepage, T; Gache, C

    1993-01-01

    The expression of two zygotic genes (HE and BP10) during sea urchin embryogenesis was previously found to be early, transient, spatially restricted and controlled at the transcriptional level. Here we studied how the expression of these genes is affected when cell interactions are abolished by dissociating blastomeres and when development is perturbed by treatment with Li+. We found that in isolated blastomeres, transient transcriptional activity (HE) is unchanged and both genes apparently function in the appropriate cell type. Thus HE/BP10 expression is largely cell-autonomous and should rely on maternal factors unevenly distributed in the egg. Treatment with lithium does not affect the temporal control but decreases the transcriptional activity and the size of the domain of expression of the HE/BP10 genes. As the Li+ concentration increases, the border of the domain is progressively shifted towards the animal pole. This alteration of the spatial pattern is the earliest molecular evidence of a change in cell fate detectable only much later by morphological criteria, and reveals a gradient of sensitivity to Li+ along the animal--vegetal axis. These results suggest that the activity of the HE/BP10 genes is strongly dependent on spatially organized maternal information controlling early development. Images PMID:7679074

  18. The plasmid replicon of EBV consists of multiple cis-acting elements that facilitate DNA synthesis by the cell and a viral maintenance element.

    PubMed Central

    Aiyar, A; Tyree, C; Sugden, B

    1998-01-01

    Plasmids containing oriP, the plasmid origin of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are replicated stably in human cells that express a single viral trans-acting factor, EBNA-1. Unlike plasmids of other viruses, but akin to human chromosomes, oriP plasmids are synthesized once per cell cycle, and are partitioned faithfully to daughter cells during mitosis. Although EBNA-1 binds multiple sites within oriP, its role in DNA synthesis and partitioning has been obscure. EBNA-1 lacks enzymatic activities that are present in the origin-binding proteins of other mammalian viruses, and does not interact with human cellular proteins that provide equivalent enzymatic functions. We demonstrate that plasmids with oriP or its constituent elements are synthesized efficiently in human cells in the absence of EBNA-1. Further, we show that human cells rapidly eliminate or destroy newly synthesized plasmids, and that both EBNA-1 and the family of repeats of oriP are required for oriP plasmids to escape this catastrophic loss. These findings indicate that EBV's plasmid replicon consists of genetic elements with distinct functions, multiple cis-acting elements that facilitate DNA synthesis and viral cis/trans elements that permit retention of replicated DNA in daughter cells. They also explain historical failures to identify mammalian origins of DNA synthesis as autonomously replicating sequences. PMID:9799247

  19. Auditory Hair Cell-Specific Deletion of p27Kip1 in Postnatal Mice Promotes Cell-Autonomous Generation of New Hair Cells and Normal Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Bradley J.; Liu, Zhiyong; Crabtree, Mark; Coak, Emily; Cox, Brandon C.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing in mammals relies upon the transduction of sound by hair cells (HCs) in the organ of Corti within the cochlea of the inner ear. Sensorineural hearing loss is a widespread and permanent disability due largely to a lack of HC regeneration in mammals. Recent studies suggest that targeting the retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F pathway can elicit proliferation of auditory HCs. However, previous attempts to induce HC proliferation in this manner have resulted in abnormal cochlear morphology, HC death, and hearing loss. Here we show that cochlear HCs readily proliferate and survive following neonatal, HC-specific, conditional knock-out of p27Kip1 (p27CKO), a tumor suppressor upstream of Rb. Indeed, HC-specific p27CKO results in proliferation of these cells without the upregulation of the supporting cell or progenitor cell proteins, Prox1 or Sox2, suggesting that they remain HCs. Furthermore, p27CKO leads to a significant addition of postnatally derived HCs that express characteristic synaptic and stereociliary markers and survive to adulthood, although a portion of the newly derived inner HCs exhibit cytocauds and lack VGlut3 expression. Despite this, p27CKO mice exhibit normal hearing as measured by evoked auditory brainstem responses, which suggests that the newly generated HCs may contribute to, or at least do not greatly detract from, function. These results show that p27Kip1 actively maintains HC quiescence in postnatal mice, and suggest that inhibition of p27Kip1 in residual HCs represents a potential strategy for cell-autonomous auditory HC regeneration. PMID:25411503

  20. Auditory hair cell-specific deletion of p27Kip1 in postnatal mice promotes cell-autonomous generation of new hair cells and normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Walters, Bradley J; Liu, Zhiyong; Crabtree, Mark; Coak, Emily; Cox, Brandon C; Zuo, Jian

    2014-11-19

    Hearing in mammals relies upon the transduction of sound by hair cells (HCs) in the organ of Corti within the cochlea of the inner ear. Sensorineural hearing loss is a widespread and permanent disability due largely to a lack of HC regeneration in mammals. Recent studies suggest that targeting the retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F pathway can elicit proliferation of auditory HCs. However, previous attempts to induce HC proliferation in this manner have resulted in abnormal cochlear morphology, HC death, and hearing loss. Here we show that cochlear HCs readily proliferate and survive following neonatal, HC-specific, conditional knock-out of p27(Kip1) (p27CKO), a tumor suppressor upstream of Rb. Indeed, HC-specific p27CKO results in proliferation of these cells without the upregulation of the supporting cell or progenitor cell proteins, Prox1 or Sox2, suggesting that they remain HCs. Furthermore, p27CKO leads to a significant addition of postnatally derived HCs that express characteristic synaptic and stereociliary markers and survive to adulthood, although a portion of the newly derived inner HCs exhibit cytocauds and lack VGlut3 expression. Despite this, p27CKO mice exhibit normal hearing as measured by evoked auditory brainstem responses, which suggests that the newly generated HCs may contribute to, or at least do not greatly detract from, function. These results show that p27(Kip1) actively maintains HC quiescence in postnatal mice, and suggest that inhibition of p27(Kip1) in residual HCs represents a potential strategy for cell-autonomous auditory HC regeneration.

  1. Micro autonomous robotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Hidenori; Fukuda, Toshio

    1995-12-01

    This paper deals with the structural proposal of the micro autonomous robotic system, and shows the design of the prototype. We aim at developing the micro robot, which autonomously acts based on its detection, in order to propose a solution to constitute the micro autonomous robotic system. However, as miniaturizing the size, the number of the sensors gets restricted and the information from them becomes lack. Lack of the information makes it difficult to realize an intelligence of quality. Because of that, the micro robotic system needs to develop the simple algorithm. In this paper, we propose the simply logical algorithms to control the actuator, and show the performance of the micro robot controlled by them, and design the Micro Line Trace Robot, which dimension is about 1 cm cube and which moves along the black line on the white-colored ground, and the programmable micro autonomous robot, which dimension is about 2 cm cube and which performs according to the program optionally.

  2. Magnetic Random Access Memory based non-volatile asynchronous Muller cell for ultra-low power autonomous applications

    SciTech Connect

    Di Pendina, G. E-mail: eldar.zianbetov@cea.fr Zianbetov, E. E-mail: eldar.zianbetov@cea.fr; Beigne, E. E-mail: eldar.zianbetov@cea.fr

    2015-05-07

    Micro and nano electronic integrated circuit domain is today mainly driven by the advent of the Internet of Things for which the constraints are strong, especially in terms of power consumption and autonomy, not only during the computing phases but also during the standby or idle phases. In such ultra-low power applications, the circuit has to meet new constraints mainly linked to its changing energetic environment: long idle phases, automatic wake up, data back-up when the circuit is sporadically turned off, and ultra-low voltage power supply operation. Such circuits have to be completely autonomous regarding their unstable environment, while remaining in an optimum energetic configuration. Therefore, we propose in this paper the first MRAM-based non-volatile asynchronous Muller cell. This cell has been simulated and characterized in a very advanced 28 nm CMOS fully depleted silicon-on-insulator technology, presenting good power performance results due to an extremely efficient body biasing control together with ultra-wide supply voltage range from 160 mV up to 920 mV. The leakage current can be reduced to 154 pA thanks to reverse body biasing. We also propose an efficient standard CMOS bulk version of this cell in order to be compatible with different fabrication processes.

  3. Tumor suppression in basal keratinocytes via dual non-cell-autonomous functions of a Na,K-ATPase beta subunit

    PubMed Central

    Hatzold, Julia; Beleggia, Filippo; Herzig, Hannah; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Bloch, Wilhelm; Wollnik, Bernd; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying tumor suppression are incompletely understood. Here, we identify cooperative non-cell-autonomous functions of a single gene that together provide a novel mechanism of tumor suppression in basal keratinocytes of zebrafish embryos. A loss-of-function mutation in atp1b1a, encoding the beta subunit of a Na,K-ATPase pump, causes edema and epidermal malignancy. Strikingly, basal cell carcinogenesis only occurs when Atp1b1a function is compromised in both the overlying periderm (resulting in compromised epithelial polarity and adhesiveness) and in kidney and heart (resulting in hypotonic stress). Blockade of the ensuing PI3K-AKT-mTORC1-NFκB-MMP9 pathway activation in basal cells, as well as systemic isotonicity, prevents malignant transformation. Our results identify hypotonic stress as a (previously unrecognized) contributor to tumor development and establish a novel paradigm of tumor suppression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14277.001 PMID:27240166

  4. Stochastic modeling indicates that aging and somatic evolution in the hematopoetic system are driven by non-cell-autonomous processes.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Andrii I; Salstrom, Jennifer L; DeGregori, James

    2014-12-01

    Age-dependent tissue decline and increased cancer incidence are widely accepted to be rate-limited by the accumulation of somatic mutations over time. Current models of carcinogenesis are dominated by the assumption that oncogenic mutations have defined advantageous fitness effects on recipient stem and progenitor cells, promoting and rate-limiting somatic evolution. However, this assumption is markedly discrepant with evolutionary theory, whereby fitness is a dynamic property of a phenotype imposed upon and widely modulated by environment. We computationally modeled dynamic microenvironment-dependent fitness alterations in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the Sprengel-Liebig system known to govern evolution at the population level. Our model for the first time integrates real data on age-dependent dynamics of HSC division rates, pool size, and accumulation of genetic changes and demonstrates that somatic evolution is not rate-limited by the occurrence of mutations, but instead results from aged microenvironment-driven alterations in the selective/fitness value of previously accumulated genetic changes. Our results are also consistent with evolutionary models of aging and thus oppose both somatic mutation-centric paradigms of carcinogenesis and tissue functional decline. In total, we demonstrate that aging directly promotes HSC fitness decline and somatic evolution via non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

  5. Magnetic Random Access Memory based non-volatile asynchronous Muller cell for ultra-low power autonomous applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pendina, G.; Zianbetov, E.; Beigne, E.

    2015-05-01

    Micro and nano electronic integrated circuit domain is today mainly driven by the advent of the Internet of Things for which the constraints are strong, especially in terms of power consumption and autonomy, not only during the computing phases but also during the standby or idle phases. In such ultra-low power applications, the circuit has to meet new constraints mainly linked to its changing energetic environment: long idle phases, automatic wake up, data back-up when the circuit is sporadically turned off, and ultra-low voltage power supply operation. Such circuits have to be completely autonomous regarding their unstable environment, while remaining in an optimum energetic configuration. Therefore, we propose in this paper the first MRAM-based non-volatile asynchronous Muller cell. This cell has been simulated and characterized in a very advanced 28 nm CMOS fully depleted silicon-on-insulator technology, presenting good power performance results due to an extremely efficient body biasing control together with ultra-wide supply voltage range from 160 mV up to 920 mV. The leakage current can be reduced to 154 pA thanks to reverse body biasing. We also propose an efficient standard CMOS bulk version of this cell in order to be compatible with different fabrication processes.

  6. Autonomous Soaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Victor P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the autonomous soaring flight of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). It reviews energy sources for UAVs, and two examples of UAV's that used alternative energy sources, and thermal currents for soaring. Examples of flight tests, plans, and results are given. Ultimately, the concept of a UAV harvesting energy from the atmosphere has been shown to be feasible with existing technology.

  7. Peritoneal and hematogenous metastases of ovarian cancer cells are both controlled by the p90RSK through a self-reinforcing cell autonomous mechanism.

    PubMed

    Torchiaro, Erica; Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Valdembri, Donatella; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Gai, Marta; Erriquez, Jessica; Serini, Guido; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2016-01-05

    The molecular mechanisms orchestrating peritoneal and hematogenous metastases of ovarian cancer cells are assumed to be distinct. We studied the p90RSK family of serine/threonine kinases that lie downstream the RAS-ERK/MAPK pathway and modulate a variety of cellular processes including cell proliferation, survival, motility and invasiveness. We found the RSK1 and RSK2 isoforms expressed in a number of human ovarian cancer cell lines, where they played redundant roles in sustaining in vitro motility and invasiveness. In vivo, silencing of both RSK1 and RSK2 almost abrogated short-term and long-term metastatic engraftment of ovarian cancer cells in the peritoneum. In addition, RSK1/RSK2 silenced cells failed to colonize the lungs after intravenous injection and to form hematogenous metastasis from subcutaneous xenografts. RSK1/RSK2 suppression resulted in lessened ovarian cancer cell spreading on endogenous fibronectin (FN). Mechanistically, RSK1/RSK2 knockdown diminished FN transcription, α5β1 integrin activation and TGF-β1 translation. Reduced endogenous FN deposition and TGF-β1 secretion depended on the lack of activating phosphorylation of the transcription/translation factor YB-1 by p90RSK. Altogether data show how p90RSK activates a self-reinforcing cell autonomous pro-adhesive circuit necessary for metastatic seeding of ovarian cancer cells. Thus, p90RSK inhibitors might hinder both the hematogenous and the peritoneal metastatic spread of human ovarian cancer.

  8. Role of mouse and human autophagy proteins in IFN-γ-induced cell-autonomous responses against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Jun; Lee, Youngae; Sasai, Miwa; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Su Ma, Ji; Kamiyama, Naganori; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Pann-Ghill, Suh; Hayashi, Mikako; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2014-04-01

    IFN-γ mediates cellular innate immunity against an intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, by inducing immunity-related GTPases such as p47 IFN-γ-regulated GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), which also participate in antibacterial responses via autophagy. An essential autophagy protein, Atg5, was previously shown to play a critical role in anti-T. gondii cell-autonomous immunity. However, the involvement of other autophagy proteins remains unknown. In this study, we show that essential autophagy proteins differentially participate in anti-T. gondii cellular immunity by recruiting IFN-γ-inducible GTPases. IFN-γ-induced suppression of T. gondii proliferation and recruitment of an IRG Irgb6 and GBPs are profoundly impaired in Atg7- or Atg16L1-deficient cells. In contrast, cells lacking other essential autophagy proteins, Atg9a and Atg14, are capable of mediating the anti-T. gondii response and recruiting Irgb6 and GBPs to the parasites. Although IFN-γ also stimulates anti-T. gondii cellular immunity in humans, whether this response requires GBPs and human autophagy proteins remains to be seen. To analyze the role of human ATG16L1 and GBPs in IFN-γ-mediated anti-T. gondii responses, human cells lacking ATG16L1 or GBPs were generated by the Cas9/CRISPR genome-editing technique. Although both ATG16L1 and GBPs are dispensable for IFN-γ-induced inhibition of T. gondii proliferation in the human cells, human ATG16L1 is also required for the recruitment of GBPs. Taken together, human ATG16L1 and mouse autophagy components Atg7 and Atg16L1, but not Atg9a and Atg14, participate in the IFN-γ-induced recruitment of the immunity-related GTPases to the intracellular pathogen.

  9. High-throughput viability assay using an autonomously bioluminescent cell line with a bacterial Lux reporter.

    PubMed

    Class, Bradley; Thorne, Natasha; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Cell viability assays are extensively used to determine cell health, evaluate growth conditions, and assess compound cytotoxicity. Most existing assays are endpoint assays, in which data are collected at one time point after termination of the experiment. The time point at which toxicity of a compound is evident, however, depends on the mechanism of that compound. An ideal cell viability assay allows the determination of compound toxicity kinetically without having to terminate the assay prematurely. We optimized and validated a reagent-addition-free cell viability assay using an autoluminescent HEK293 cell line that stably expresses bacterial luciferase and all substrates necessary for bioluminescence. This cell viability assay can be used for real-time, long-term measurement of compound cytotoxicity in live cells with a signal-to-basal ratio of 20- to 200-fold and Z-factors of ~0.6 after 24-, 48- 72-, or 96-h incubation with compound. We also found that the potencies of nine cytotoxic compounds correlated well with those measured by four other commonly used cell viability assays. The results demonstrated that this kinetic cell viability assay using the HEK293(lux) autoluminescent cell line is useful for high-throughput evaluation of compound cytotoxicity.

  10. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

    SciTech Connect

    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  11. Bacterial cell wall biogenesis is mediated by SEDS and PBP polymerase families functioning semi-autonomously

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hongbaek; Wivagg, Carl N.; Kapoor, Mrinal; Barry, Zachary; Rohs, Patricia D.A.; Suh, Hyunsuk; Marto, Jarrod A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-protein complexes organized by cytoskeletal proteins are essential for cell wall biogenesis in most bacteria. Current models of the wall assembly mechanism assume class A penicillin-binding proteins (aPBPs), the targets of penicillin-like drugs, function as the primary cell wall polymerases within these machineries. Here, we use an in vivo cell wall polymerase assay in Escherichia coli combined with measurements of the localization dynamics of synthesis proteins to investigate this hypothesis. We find that aPBP activity is not necessary for glycan polymerization by the cell elongation machinery as is commonly believed. Instead, our results indicate that cell wall synthesis is mediated by two distinct polymerase systems, SEDS-family proteins working within the cytoskeletal machines and aPBP enzymes functioning outside of these complexes. These findings thus necessitate a fundamental change in our conception of the cell wall assembly process in bacteria. PMID:27643381

  12. Interferon-inducible guanylate-binding proteins at the interface of cell-autonomous immunity and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Place, David E; Kuriakose, Teneema; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2017-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are essential components of cell-autonomous immunity. In response to IFN signaling, GBPs are expressed in the cytoplasm of immune and nonimmune cells, where they unleash their antimicrobial activity toward intracellular bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Recent studies have revealed that GBPs are essential for mediating activation of the caspase-1 inflammasome in response to the gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Francisella novicida, Chlamydia muridarum, Chlamydia trachomatis, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Citrobacter koseri During infection with vacuolar-restricted gram-negative bacteria, GBPs disrupt the vacuolar membrane to ensure liberation of LPS for cytoplasmic detection by caspase-11 and the noncanonical NLRP3 inflammasome. In response to certain cytosolic bacteria, GBPs liberate microbial DNA for activation of the DNA-sensing AIM2 inflammasome. GBPs also promote the recruitment of antimicrobial proteins, including NADPH oxidase subunits and autophagy-associated proteins to the Mycobacterium-containing vacuole to mediate intracellular bacterial killing. Here, we provide an overview on the emerging relationship between GBPs and activation of the inflammasome in innate immunity to microbial pathogens.

  13. The immunity-related GTPases in mammals: a fast-evolving cell-autonomous resistance system against intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hunn, Julia P; Feng, Carl G; Sher, Alan; Howard, Jonathan C

    2011-02-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) belong to the family of large, interferon-inducible GTPases and constitute a cell-autonomous resistance system essential for the control of vacuolar pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii in mice. Recent results demonstrated that numerous IRG members accumulate collaboratively at the parasitophorous vacuole of invading T. gondii leading to the destruction of the vacuole and the parasite and subsequent necrotic host cell death. Complex regulatory interactions between different IRG proteins are necessary for these processes. Disturbance of this finely balanced system, e.g., by single genetic deficiency for the important negative regulator Irgm1 or the autophagic regulator Atg5, leads to spontaneous activation of the effector IRG proteins when induced by IFNγ. This activation has cytotoxic consequences resulting in a severe lymphopenia, macrophage defects, and failure of the adaptive immune system in Irgm1-deficient mice. However, alternative functions in phagosome maturation and induction of autophagy have been proposed for Irgm1. The IRG system has been studied primarily in mice, but IRG genes are present throughout the mammalian lineage. Interestingly, the number, type, and diversity of genes present differ greatly even between closely related species, probably reflecting intimate host-pathogen coevolution driven by an armed race between the IRG resistance proteins and pathogen virulence factors. IRG proteins are targets for polymorphic T. gondii virulence factors, and genetic variation in the IRG system between different mouse strains correlates with resistance and susceptibility to virulent T. gondii strains.

  14. Excessive feedback of Cyp26a1 promotes cell non-autonomous loss of retinoic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rydeen, Ariel; Voisin, Norine; D’Aniello, Enrico; Ravisankar, Padmapriyadarshini; Devignes, Claire-Sophie; Waxman, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Teratogenic levels of retinoic acid (RA) signaling can cause seemingly contradictory phenotypes indicative of both increases and decreases of RA signaling. However, the mechanisms underlying these contradictory phenotypes are not completely understood. Here, we report that using a hyperactive RA receptor to enhance RA signaling in zebrafish embryos leads to defects associated with gain and loss of RA signaling. While the gain-of-function phenotypes arise from an initial increase in RA signaling, using genetic epistasis analysis we found that the loss-of-function phenotypes result from a clearing of embryonic RA that requires a rapid and dramatic increase in cyp26a1 expression. Thus, the sensitivity of cyp26a1 expression to increased RA signaling causes an overcompensation of negative feedback and loss of embryonic RA signaling. Additionally, we used blastula transplantation experiments to test if Cyp26a1, despite its cellular localization, can limit RA exposure to neighboring cells. We find that enhanced Cyp26a1 expression limits RA signaling in the local environment, thus providing the first direct evidence that Cyp26 enzymes can have cell non-autonomous consequences on RA levels within tissues. Therefore, our results provide novel insights into the teratogenic mechanisms of RA signaling and the cellular mechanisms by which Cyp26a1 expression can shape a RA gradient. PMID:26116175

  15. Post-transcriptional Control of Tumor Cell Autonomous Metastatic Potential by CCR4-NOT Deadenylase CNOT7

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Farhoud; Hu, Ying; Yang, Howard H.; Lee, Maxwell P.; Winkler, G. Sebastian; Hafner, Markus; Hunter, Kent W.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the role of an aberrant transcriptome as a driver of metastatic potential. Deadenylation is a general regulatory node for post-transcriptional control by microRNAs and other determinants of RNA stability. Previously, we demonstrated that the CCR4-NOT scaffold component Cnot2 is an inherited metastasis susceptibility gene. In this study, using orthotopic metastasis assays and genetically engineered mouse models, we show that one of the enzymatic subunits of the CCR4-NOT complex, Cnot7, is also a metastasis modifying gene. We demonstrate that higher expression of Cnot7 drives tumor cell autonomous metastatic potential, which requires its deadenylase activity. Furthermore, metastasis promotion by CNOT7 is dependent on interaction with CNOT1 and TOB1. CNOT7 ribonucleoprotein-immunoprecipitation (RIP) and integrated transcriptome wide analyses reveal that CNOT7-regulated transcripts are enriched for a tripartite 3’UTR motif bound by RNA-binding proteins known to complex with CNOT7, TOB1, and CNOT1. Collectively, our data support a model of CNOT7, TOB1, CNOT1, and RNA-binding proteins collectively exerting post-transcriptional control on a metastasis suppressive transcriptional program to drive tumor cell metastasis. PMID:26807845

  16. The immunity-related GTPases in mammals: a fast-evolving cell-autonomous resistance system against intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hunn, Julia P.; Feng, Carl G.; Sher, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) belong to the family of large, interferon-inducible GTPases and constitute a cell-autonomous resistance system essential for the control of vacuolar pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii in mice. Recent results demonstrated that numerous IRG members accumulate collaboratively at the parasitophorous vacuole of invading T. gondii leading to the destruction of the vacuole and the parasite and subsequent necrotic host cell death. Complex regulatory interactions between different IRG proteins are necessary for these processes. Disturbance of this finely balanced system, e.g., by single genetic deficiency for the important negative regulator Irgm1 or the autophagic regulator Atg5, leads to spontaneous activation of the effector IRG proteins when induced by IFNγ. This activation has cytotoxic consequences resulting in a severe lymphopenia, macrophage defects, and failure of the adaptive immune system in Irgm1-deficient mice. However, alternative functions in phagosome maturation and induction of autophagy have been proposed for Irgm1. The IRG system has been studied primarily in mice, but IRG genes are present throughout the mammalian lineage. Interestingly, the number, type, and diversity of genes present differ greatly even between closely related species, probably reflecting intimate host-pathogen coevolution driven by an armed race between the IRG resistance proteins and pathogen virulence factors. IRG proteins are targets for polymorphic T. gondii virulence factors, and genetic variation in the IRG system between different mouse strains correlates with resistance and susceptibility to virulent T. gondii strains. PMID:21052678

  17. Expression of human basic fibroblast growth factor cDNA in baby hamster kidney-derived cells results in autonomous cell growth

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Growth factor over-production by responsive cells might contribute to their autonomous proliferation as well as their acquisition of a transformed phenotype in culture. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been shown to induce transient changes in cell behavior that resemble those encountered in transformed cells. In addition, several types of human tumor cells have been shown to produce bFGF. To determine directly the role that bFGF might play in the induction of the transformed phenotype, we have introduced a human bFGF cDNA expression vector into baby hamster kidney-derived (BHK-21) fibroblasts. One of the BHK transfectants, termed clone 19, expresses the bFGF mRNA and produces biologically active bFGF that accumulates to a high concentration inside the cells. These properties correlate with the ability of the cells to grow in serum-free medium without the addition of exogenous bFGF. Clone 19 cells also proliferated in soft agar, indicating that constitutive expression of the bFGF gene results in a loss of anchorage-dependent growth. PMID:3360856

  18. Autonomous Agents: The Origins and Co-Evolution of Reproducing Molecular Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffman, Stuart

    1999-01-01

    The central aim of this award concerned an investigation into, and adequate formulation of, the concept of an "autonomous agent." If we consider a bacterium swimming upstream in a glucose gradient, we are willing to say of the bacterium that it is going to get food. That is, we are willing, and do, describe the bacterium as acting on its own behalf in an environment. All free living cells are, in this sense, autonomous agents. But the bacterium is "just" a set of molecules. We define an autonomous agent as a physical system able to act on its own behalf in an environment, then ask, "What must a physical system be to be an autonomous agent?" The tentative definition for a molecular autonomous agent is that it must be self-reproducing and carry out at least one thermodynamic work cycle. The work carried out in this grant involved, among other features, the development of a detailed model of a molecular autonomous agent, and study of the kinetics of this system. In particular, a molecular autonomous agent must, by the above tentative definition, not only reproduce, but must carry out at least one work cycle. I took, as a simple example of a self-reproducing molecular system, the single-stranded DNA hexamer 3'CCGCGG5' which can line up and ligate its two complementary trimers, 5'CCG3' and 5'CGG3'. But the two ligated trimers constitute the same molecular sequence in the 3' to 5' direction as the initial hexamer, hence this system is autocatalytic. On the other hand the above system is not yet an autonomous agent. At the minimum, autonomous agents, as I have defined them, are a new class of chemical reaction network. At a maximum, they may constitute a proper definition of life itself.

  19. RECOVERY ACT: MULTIMODAL IMAGING FOR SOLAR CELL MICROCRACK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Janice Hudgings; Lawrence Domash

    2012-02-08

    Undetected microcracks in solar cells are a principal cause of failure in service due to subsequent weather exposure, mechanical flexing or diurnal temperature cycles. Existing methods have not been able to detect cracks early enough in the production cycle to prevent inadvertent shipment to customers. This program, sponsored under the DOE Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies program, studied the feasibility of quantifying surface micro-discontinuities by use of a novel technique, thermoreflectance imaging, to detect surface temperature gradients with very high spatial resolution, in combination with a suite of conventional imaging methods such as electroluminescence. The project carried out laboratory tests together with computational image analyses using sample solar cells with known defects supplied by industry sources or DOE National Labs. Quantitative comparisons between the effectiveness of the new technique and conventional methods were determined in terms of the smallest detectable crack. Also the robustness of the new technique for reliable microcrack detection was determined at various stages of processing such as before and after antireflectance treatments. An overall assessment is that the new technique compares favorably with existing methods such as lock-in thermography or ultrasonics. The project was 100% completed in Sept, 2010. A detailed report of key findings from this program was published as: Q.Zhou, X.Hu, K.Al-Hemyari, K.McCarthy, L.Domash and J.Hudgings, High spatial resolution characterization of silicon solar cells using thermoreflectance imaging, J. Appl. Phys, 110, 053108 (2011).

  20. RabGDIα is a negative regulator of interferon-γ–inducible GTPase-dependent cell-autonomous immunity to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Jun; Sasai, Miwa; Liu, Jianfa; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ma, Ji Su; Lee, Youngae; Bando, Hironori; Howard, Jonathan C.; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Standley, Daron M.; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ orchestrates cell-autonomous host defense against various intracellular vacuolar pathogens. IFN-γ–inducible GTPases, such as p47 immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), are recruited to pathogen-containing vacuoles, which is important for disruption of the vacuoles, culminating in the cell-autonomous clearance. Although the positive regulation for the proper recruitment of IRGs and GBPs to the vacuoles has been elucidated, the suppressive mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor α (RabGDIα), originally identified as a Rab small GTPase inhibitor, is a negative regulator of IFN-γ–inducible GTPases in cell-autonomous immunity to the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Overexpression of RabGDIα, but not of RabGDIβ, impaired IFN-γ–dependent reduction of T. gondii numbers. Conversely, RabGDIα deletion in macrophages and fibroblasts enhanced the IFN-γ–induced clearance of T. gondii. Furthermore, upon a high dose of infection by T. gondii, RabGDIα-deficient mice exhibited a decreased parasite burden in the brain and increased resistance in the chronic phase than did control mice. Among members of IRGs and GBPs important for the parasite clearance, Irga6 and Gbp2 alone were more frequently recruited to T. gondii-forming parasitophorous vacuoles in RabGDIα-deficient cells. Notably, Gbp2 positively controlled Irga6 recruitment that was inhibited by direct and specific interactions of RabGDIα with Gbp2 through the lipid-binding pocket. Taken together, our results suggest that RabGDIα inhibits host defense against T. gondii by negatively regulating the Gbp2–Irga6 axis of IFN-γ–dependent cell-autonomous immunity. PMID:26240314

  1. RabGDIα is a negative regulator of interferon-γ-inducible GTPase-dependent cell-autonomous immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Jun; Sasai, Miwa; Liu, Jianfa; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ma, Ji Su; Lee, Youngae; Bando, Hironori; Howard, Jonathan C; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Standley, Daron M; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-08-18

    IFN-γ orchestrates cell-autonomous host defense against various intracellular vacuolar pathogens. IFN-γ-inducible GTPases, such as p47 immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), are recruited to pathogen-containing vacuoles, which is important for disruption of the vacuoles, culminating in the cell-autonomous clearance. Although the positive regulation for the proper recruitment of IRGs and GBPs to the vacuoles has been elucidated, the suppressive mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor α (RabGDIα), originally identified as a Rab small GTPase inhibitor, is a negative regulator of IFN-γ-inducible GTPases in cell-autonomous immunity to the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Overexpression of RabGDIα, but not of RabGDIβ, impaired IFN-γ-dependent reduction of T. gondii numbers. Conversely, RabGDIα deletion in macrophages and fibroblasts enhanced the IFN-γ-induced clearance of T. gondii. Furthermore, upon a high dose of infection by T. gondii, RabGDIα-deficient mice exhibited a decreased parasite burden in the brain and increased resistance in the chronic phase than did control mice. Among members of IRGs and GBPs important for the parasite clearance, Irga6 and Gbp2 alone were more frequently recruited to T. gondii-forming parasitophorous vacuoles in RabGDIα-deficient cells. Notably, Gbp2 positively controlled Irga6 recruitment that was inhibited by direct and specific interactions of RabGDIα with Gbp2 through the lipid-binding pocket. Taken together, our results suggest that RabGDIα inhibits host defense against T. gondii by negatively regulating the Gbp2-Irga6 axis of IFN-γ-dependent cell-autonomous immunity.

  2. Altered autonomic inputs as a cause of pancreatic β-cell amyloid.

    PubMed

    Watve, Milind; Bodas, Arushi; Diwekar, Manawa

    2014-01-01

    A partial loss of β-cell mass and β-cell dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is associated with amyloid deposition but whether it is causal or consequential is debated. Although the in vitro polymerization of amylin has been studied in detail, the exact trigger for the mechanism in vivo has not been identified. One suggestion is that an increased load on β-cells results in inefficient handling of proteins leading to misfolding and aggregation, but this hypothesis is faced with certain paradoxes. We suggest an alternative mechanism based on the assumption that polymerization is a spontaneous process. The concentration of the polypeptide in β-cell granules is shown to be sufficient to allow polymerization. However if the rate of turnover in normal cells is greater than the rate of polymerization, amyloid deposition will not be observed. If this is true, it follows that amyloid deposition could be a result of increased retention time of amylin in the β-cell granules. In T2D, the sympathetic inputs are known to increase which could result in suppression of the secretion process. The increase in the retention time due to this suppression can allow polymerization. In addition to this in a prediabetic state parasympathetic stimulation increases β-cell proliferation. This reduces the insulin demand per cell thereby increasing the mean retention time. Thus a combination of contrasting actions of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems could lead to increase in the amyloid deposition. We suggest testable predictions of the alternative hypotheses and the lines of research needed to test them.

  3. Autonomous cure of damaged human intestinal epithelial cells by TLR2 and TLR4-dependent production of IL-22 in response to Spirulina polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Akira; Konishi, Yuko; Taguchi, Takahiro; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Tokuichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    In order to analyze the damage of human epithelial cells, we used human quasi-normal FPCK-1-1 cells derived from a colonic polyp in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis as a monolayer, which is co-cultured with peptidoglycan (PGN)-stimulated THP-1 cells. Co-cultured FPCK-1-1 cells showed a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and the lower level of claudin-2. When Spirulina complex polysaccharides were added one day before the start of the co-culture, there was no decrease of TER and claudin-2 (early phase damage). In contrast, when Spirulina complex polysaccharides were added to FPCK-1-1 cells after the level of TER had decreased, there was no recovery at the level of claudin-2, though the TER level recovered (late phase damage). The mucosa reconstitution is suggested to be involved in the recovery from the damaged status. Interestingly, autonomous recovery of FPCK-1-1 cells from both the early and late phase damage requires the production of IL-22, because anti-IL-22 antibodies inhibited recovery in these cases. Antibodies against either TLR2 or TLR4 inhibited the production of IL-22 from FPCK-1-1 colon epithelial cells, suggesting that signals through TLR2 and TLR4 are necessary for autonomous recovery of FPCK-1-1 colon epithelial cells by producing IL-22. In conclusion, we have established a useful model for the study of intestinal damage and recovery using human colon epithelial cells and our data suggest that damage to human colon epithelial cells can, at least in part, be recovered by the autonomous production of IL-22 in response to Spirulina complex polysaccharides.

  4. Cell-autonomous regulation of fast troponin T pre-mRNA alternative splicing in response to mechanical stretch.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Rudolf J; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2012-08-01

    How mechanochemical signals induced by the amount of weight borne by the skeletal musculature are translated into modifications to muscle sarcomeres is poorly understood. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that, in response to experimentally induced increases in the weight load borne by a rat, alternative splicing of the fast skeletal muscle troponin T (Tnnt3) pre-mRNA in gastrocnemius was adjusted in a correlated fashion with the amount of added weight. (Schilder RJ, Kimball SR, Marden JH, Jefferson LS. J Exp Biol 214: 1523-1532, 2011). Thus muscle load is perceived quantitatively by the body, and mechanisms that sense it appear to control processes that generate muscle sarcomere composition plasticity, such as alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here we demonstrate how mechanical stretch (see earlier comment) of C2C12 muscle cells in culture results in changes to Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing that are qualitatively similar to those observed in response to added weight in rats. Moreover, inhibition of Akt signaling, but not that of ERK1/2, prevents the stretch-induced effect on Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing. These findings suggest that effects of muscle load on Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing are controlled by a cell-autonomous mechanism, rather than systemically. They also indicate that, in addition to its regulatory role in protein synthesis and muscle mass plasticity, Akt signaling may regulate muscle sarcomere composition by modulating alternative splicing events in response to load. Manipulation of Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing by mechanical stretch of cells in culture provides a model to investigate the biology of weight sensing by skeletal muscles and facilitates identification of mechanisms through which skeletal muscles match their performance and experienced load.

  5. Sexually Dimorphic Differentiation of a C. elegans Hub Neuron Is Cell Autonomously Controlled by a Conserved Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Oren-Suissa, Meital; Bayer, Emily A; Hobert, Oliver

    2017-01-23

    Functional and anatomical sexual dimorphisms in the brain are either the result of cells that are generated only in one sex or a manifestation of sex-specific differentiation of neurons present in both sexes. The PHC neuron pair of the nematode C. elegans differentiates in a strikingly sex-specific manner. In hermaphrodites the PHC neurons display a canonical pattern of synaptic connectivity similar to that of other sensory neurons, but in males PHC differentiates into a densely connected hub sensory neuron/interneuron, integrating a large number of male-specific synaptic inputs and conveying them to both male-specific and sex-shared circuitry. We show that the differentiation into such a hub neuron involves the sex-specific scaling of several components of the synaptic vesicle machinery, including the vesicular glutamate transporter eat-4/VGLUT, induction of neuropeptide expression, changes in axonal projection morphology, and a switch in neuronal function. We demonstrate that these molecular and anatomical remodeling events are controlled cell autonomously by the phylogenetically conserved Doublesex homolog dmd-3, which is both required and sufficient for sex-specific PHC differentiation. Cellular specificity of dmd-3 action is ensured by its collaboration with non-sex-specific terminal selector-type transcription factors, whereas the sex specificity of dmd-3 action is ensured by the hermaphrodite-specific transcriptional master regulator of hermaphroditic cell identity tra-1, which represses the transcription of dmd-3 in hermaphrodite PHC. Taken together, our studies provide mechanistic insights into how neurons are specified in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  6. The Caenorhabditis elegans Ephrin EFN-4 Functions Non-cell Autonomously with Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans to Promote Axon Outgrowth and Branching

    PubMed Central

    Schwieterman, Alicia A.; Steves, Alyse N.; Yee, Vivian; Donelson, Cory J.; Bentley, Melissa R.; Santorella, Elise M.; Mehlenbacher, Taylor V.; Pital, Aaron; Howard, Austin M.; Wilson, Melissa R.; Ereddia, Danielle E.; Effrein, Kelsie S.; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Ackley, Brian D.; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Hudson, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The Eph receptors and their cognate ephrin ligands play key roles in many aspects of nervous system development. These interactions typically occur within an individual tissue type, serving either to guide axons to their terminal targets or to define boundaries between the rhombomeres of the hindbrain. We have identified a novel role for the Caenorhabditis elegans ephrin EFN-4 in promoting primary neurite outgrowth in AIY interneurons and D-class motor neurons. Rescue experiments reveal that EFN-4 functions non-cell autonomously in the epidermis to promote primary neurite outgrowth. We also find that EFN-4 plays a role in promoting ectopic axon branching in a C. elegans model of X-linked Kallmann syndrome. In this context, EFN-4 functions non-cell autonomously in the body-wall muscle and in parallel with HS modification genes and HSPG core proteins. This is the first report of an epidermal ephrin providing a developmental cue to the nervous system. PMID:26645816

  7. A Cell-Autonomous Molecular Cascade Initiated by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Represses Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Houssein S.; Bergeron, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate essential physiological processes, and inadequate levels are associated with various pathological conditions. In testosterone-producing Leydig cells, steroidogenesis is strongly stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) via its receptor leading to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, which is essential for the initiation of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis then passively decreases with the degradation of cAMP into AMP by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated following cAMP-to-AMP breakdown in MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells. Activated AMPK then actively inhibits cAMP-induced steroidogenesis by repressing the expression of key regulators of steroidogenesis, including Star and Nr4a1. Similar results were obtained in Y-1 adrenal cells and in the constitutively steroidogenic R2C cells. We have also determined that maximum AMPK activation following stimulation of steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells occurs when steroid hormone production has reached a plateau. Our data identify AMPK as a molecular rheostat that actively represses steroid hormone biosynthesis to preserve cellular energy homeostasis and prevent excess steroid production. PMID:25225331

  8. Postnatal maturational changes in rat pelvic autonomic ganglion cells: a mixture of steroid-dependent and -independent effects.

    PubMed

    Kanjhan, R; Osborne, P B; Ouyang, M; Keast, J R

    2003-01-01

    Androgens have potent effects on the maturation and maintenance of a number of neural pathways involved in reproductive behaviors in males. Most studies in this area have focused on central pathways, but androgen receptors are expressed by many peripheral neurons innervating reproductive organs, and previous studies have demonstrated structural and chemical changes in these neurons at puberty and after castration. We have performed the first electrophysiological comparison of pelvic autonomic ganglion neurons in male rats before and after puberty and following pre- or postpubertal castration. Studies were performed in vitro on intact ganglia with hypogastric and pelvic nerves attached to allow synaptic activation of sympathetic or parasympathetic neurons, respectively. Pelvic ganglion neurons underwent many changes in their passive and active membrane properties over the pubertal period, and some of these changes were dependent on exposure to circulating androgens. The most pronounced steroid-dependent effects were on membrane capacitance (soma size) in sympathetic neurons and duration of the action potential afterhyperpolarization in tonic neurons. Our study also showed that rat pelvic ganglion cells and their synaptic inputs were more diverse than previously reported. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that rat pelvic ganglion neurons undergo considerable postnatal changes in their electrophysiological properties. The steroid dependence of some of these changes indicates that circulating androgens may influence reproductive behaviors at many locations within the nervous system not just in the brain and spinal cord.

  9. Cell non-autonomous regulation of hepatic IGF-1 and neonatal growth by Kinase Suppressor of Ras 2 (KSR2)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lili; Costanzo-Garvey, Diane L.; Smith, Deandra R.; Zavorka, Megan E.; Venable-Kang, Megan; MacDonald, Richard G.; Lewis, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with poor postnatal growth are at risk for cardiovascular and metabolic problems as adults. Here we show that disruption of the molecular scaffold Kinase Suppressor of Ras 2 (KSR2) causes selective inhibition of hepatic GH signaling in neonatal mice with impaired expression of IGF-1 and IGFBP3. ksr2−/− mice are normal size at birth but show a marked increase in FGF21 accompanied by reduced body mass, shortened body length, and reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) first evident during postnatal development. However, disrupting FGF21 in ksr2−/− mice does not normalize mass, length, or bone density and content in fgf21−/−ksr2−/− mice. Body length, BMC and BMD, but not body mass, are rescued by infection of two-day-old ksr2−/− mice with a recombinant adenovirus encoding human IGF-1. Relative to wild-type mice, GH injections reveal a significant reduction in JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation in liver, but not in skeletal muscle, of ksr2−/− mice. However, primary hepatocytes isolated from ksr2−/− mice show no reduction in GH-stimulated STAT5 phosphorylation. These data indicate that KSR2 functions in a cell non-autonomous fashion to regulate GH-stimulated IGF-1 expression in the liver of neonatal mice, which plays a key role in the development of body length. PMID:27561547

  10. Regulating the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus (SCN) Circadian Clockwork: Interplay between Cell-Autonomous and Circuit-Level Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Erik D; Hermanstyne, Tracey; Smyllie, Nicola J; Hastings, Michael H

    2017-01-03

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal circadian clock of the brain, directing daily cycles of behavior and physiology. SCN neurons contain a cell-autonomous transcription-based clockwork but, in turn, circuit-level interactions synchronize the 20,000 or so SCN neurons into a robust and coherent daily timer. Synchronization requires neuropeptide signaling, regulated by a reciprocal interdependence between the molecular clockwork and rhythmic electrical activity, which in turn depends on a daytime Na(+) drive and nighttime K(+) drag. Recent studies exploiting intersectional genetics have started to identify the pacemaking roles of particular neuronal groups in the SCN. They support the idea that timekeeping involves nonlinear and hierarchical computations that create and incorporate timing information through the interactions between key groups of neurons within the SCN circuit. The field is now poised to elucidate these computations, their underlying cellular mechanisms, and how the SCN clock interacts with subordinate circadian clocks across the brain to determine the timing and efficiency of the sleep-wake cycle, and how perturbations of this coherence contribute to neurological and psychiatric illness.

  11. An α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex in astrocytes triggers non–cell autonomous neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Gilbert; Barowski, Jessica; Ravits, John; Siddique, Teepu; Lingrel, Jerry B; Robertson, Janice; Steen, Hanno; Bonni, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations of astrocytes trigger neurodegeneration in several diseases, but the glial cell–intrinsic mechanisms that induce neurodegeneration remain poorly understood. We found that a protein complex of α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin was enriched in astrocytes expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knockdown of α2-Na/K ATPase or α-adducin in mutant SOD1 astrocytes protected motor neurons from degeneration, including in mutant SOD1 mice in vivo. Heterozygous disruption of the α2-Na/K ATPase gene suppressed degeneration in vivo and increased the lifespan of mutant SOD1 mice. The pharmacological agent digoxin, which inhibits Na/K ATPase activity, protected motor neurons from mutant SOD1 astrocyte–induced degeneration. Notably, α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin were upregulated in spinal cord of sporadic and familial ALS patients. Collectively, our findings define chronic activation of the α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex as a critical glial cell–intrinsic mechanism of non–cell autonomous neurodegeneration, with implications for potential therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25344630

  12. Apple Can Act as Anti-Aging on Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Vanessa; Mattivi, Fulvio; Silvestri, Romano; La Regina, Giuseppe; Falcone, Claudio; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism, to determine in vivo efficacy of entire apples and their components, such as flesh, skin and polyphenolic fraction, to influence aging and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that all the apple components increase lifespan, with the best result given by the whole fruit, indicating a cooperative role of all apple components. PMID:22970337

  13. Safety Evaluation of Hemoglobin-Albumin Cluster "HemoAct" as a Red Blood Cell Substitute.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Risa; Kimura, Takuya; Iwasaki, Hitomi; Yamada, Kana; Kamiyama, Ikuo; Kohno, Mitsutomo; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nagao, Saori; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2015-07-29

    A hemoglobin (Hb) wrapped covalently by human serum albumins (HSAs), a core-shell structured hemoglobin-albumin cluster designated as "HemoAct", is an O2-carrier designed for use as a red blood cell (RBC) substitute. This report describes the blood compatibility, hemodynamic response, and pharmacokinetic properties of HemoAct, and then explains its preclinical safety. Viscosity and blood cell counting measurements revealed that HemoAct has good compatibility with whole blood. Intravenous administration of HemoAct into anesthetized rats elicited no unfavorable increase in systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction. The half-life of (125)I-labeled HemoAct in circulating blood is markedly longer than that of HSA. Serum biochemical tests conducted 7 days after HemoAct infusion yielded equivalent values to those observed in the control group with HSA. Histopathologic inspections of the vital organs revealed no marked abnormality in their tissues. All results indicate that HemoAct has sufficient preclinical safety as an alternative material for RBC transfusion.

  14. Cell-autonomous activation of Hedgehog signaling inhibits brown adipose tissue development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although recent studies have shown that brown adipose tissue (BAT) arises from progenitor cells that also give rise to skeletal muscle, the developmental signals that control the formation of BAT remain largely unknown. Here, we show that brown preadipocytes possess primary cilia and can respond to ...

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency impairs muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone regeneration via cellular autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xueqin; Usas, Arvydas; Lu, Aiping; Kozemchak, Adam; Tang, Ying; Poddar, Minakshi; Sun, Xuying; Cummins, James H; Huard, Johnny

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression by donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell (MDSC)-mediated bone regeneration utilizing a critical size calvarial defect model. We found that BMP4/green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transduced MDSCs formed significantly less bone in COX-2 knock-out (Cox-2KO) than in COX-2 wild-type (WT) mice. BMP4/GFP-transduced Cox-2KO MDSCs also formed significantly less bone than transduced WT MDSCs when transplanted into calvarial defects created in CD-1 nude mice. The impaired bone regeneration in the Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP group is associated with downregulation of BMP4-pSMAD1/5 signaling, decreased osteogenic differentiation and lowered proliferation capacity after transplantation, compared with WT MDSCBMP4/GFP cells. The Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP group demonstrated a reduction in cell survival and direct osteogenic differentiation in vitro These effects were mediated in part by the downregulation of Igf1 and Igf2. In addition, the Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP cells recruited fewer macrophages than the WT MDSC/BMP4/GFP cells in the early phase after injury. We concluded that the bone regeneration capacity of Cox-2KO MDSCs was impaired because of a reduction in cell proliferation and survival capacities, reduction in osteogenic differentiation and a decrease in the ability of the cells to recruit host cells to the injury site.

  16. Bone Cell-autonomous Contribution of Type 2 Cannabinoid Receptor to Breast Cancer-induced Osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sophocleous, Antonia; Marino, Silvia; Logan, John G; Mollat, Patrick; Ralston, Stuart H; Idris, Aymen I

    2015-09-04

    The cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2) has previously been implicated as a regulator of tumor growth, bone remodeling, and bone pain. However, very little is known about the role of the skeletal CB2 receptor in the regulation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts changes associated with breast cancer. Here we found that the CB2-selective agonists HU308 and JWH133 reduced the viability of a variety of parental and bone-tropic human and mouse breast cancer cells at high micromolar concentrations. Under conditions in which these ligands are used at the nanomolar range, HU308 and JWH133 enhanced human and mouse breast cancer cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and exacerbated osteolysis, and these effects were attenuated in cultures obtained from CB2-deficient mice or in the presence of a CB2 receptor blocker. HU308 and JWH133 had no effects on osteoblast growth or differentiation in the presence of conditioned medium from breast cancer cells, but under these circumstances both agents enhanced parathyroid hormone-induced osteoblast differentiation and the ability to support osteoclast formation. Mechanistic studies in osteoclast precursors and osteoblasts showed that JWH133 and HU308 induced PI3K/AKT activity in a CB2-dependent manner, and these effects were enhanced in the presence of osteolytic and osteoblastic factors such as RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand) and parathyroid hormone. When combined with published work, these findings suggest that breast cancer and bone cells exhibit differential responses to treatment with CB2 ligands depending upon cell type and concentration used. We, therefore, conclude that both CB2-selective activation and antagonism have potential efficacy in cancer-associated bone disease, but further studies are warranted and ongoing.

  17. Bone Cell-autonomous Contribution of Type 2 Cannabinoid Receptor to Breast Cancer-induced Osteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Antonia; Marino, Silvia; Logan, John G.; Mollat, Patrick; Ralston, Stuart H.; Idris, Aymen I.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2) has previously been implicated as a regulator of tumor growth, bone remodeling, and bone pain. However, very little is known about the role of the skeletal CB2 receptor in the regulation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts changes associated with breast cancer. Here we found that the CB2-selective agonists HU308 and JWH133 reduced the viability of a variety of parental and bone-tropic human and mouse breast cancer cells at high micromolar concentrations. Under conditions in which these ligands are used at the nanomolar range, HU308 and JWH133 enhanced human and mouse breast cancer cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and exacerbated osteolysis, and these effects were attenuated in cultures obtained from CB2-deficient mice or in the presence of a CB2 receptor blocker. HU308 and JWH133 had no effects on osteoblast growth or differentiation in the presence of conditioned medium from breast cancer cells, but under these circumstances both agents enhanced parathyroid hormone-induced osteoblast differentiation and the ability to support osteoclast formation. Mechanistic studies in osteoclast precursors and osteoblasts showed that JWH133 and HU308 induced PI3K/AKT activity in a CB2-dependent manner, and these effects were enhanced in the presence of osteolytic and osteoblastic factors such as RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand) and parathyroid hormone. When combined with published work, these findings suggest that breast cancer and bone cells exhibit differential responses to treatment with CB2 ligands depending upon cell type and concentration used. We, therefore, conclude that both CB2-selective activation and antagonism have potential efficacy in cancer-associated bone disease, but further studies are warranted and ongoing. PMID:26195631

  18. Cell autonomous regulation of herpes and influenza virus infection by the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Rachel S.; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Nagy, Andras D.; Nicoll, Michael P.; Efstathiou, Stacey; O’Neill, John S.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular pathogens that hijack host cell machinery and resources to replicate. Rather than being constant, host physiology is rhythmic, undergoing circadian (∼24 h) oscillations in many virus-relevant pathways, but whether daily rhythms impact on viral replication is unknown. We find that the time of day of host infection regulates virus progression in live mice and individual cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpes and influenza A virus infections are enhanced when host circadian rhythms are abolished by disrupting the key clock gene transcription factor Bmal1. Intracellular trafficking, biosynthetic processes, protein synthesis, and chromatin assembly all contribute to circadian regulation of virus infection. Moreover, herpesviruses differentially target components of the molecular circadian clockwork. Our work demonstrates that viruses exploit the clockwork for their own gain and that the clock represents a novel target for modulating viral replication that extends beyond any single family of these ubiquitous pathogens. PMID:27528682

  19. Histone deacetylase 2 cell autonomously suppresses excitatory and enhances inhibitory synaptic function in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; Deng, Lunbin; Hackos, David H; Lo, Shih-Ching; Lauffer, Benjamin E; Steiner, Pascal; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-04-03

    Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) negatively regulates excitatory synapse number and memory performance. However, whether HDAC2 regulation of excitatory synapses occurs in a cell-autonomous manner and whether HDAC2 regulates inhibitory synaptic functions are not well understood. To examine these aspects of HDAC2 function, we used sparse transfection of rat hippocampal slice cultures and whole-cell recordings in pyramidal neurons. HDAC2 knockdown (KD) in single postsynaptic pyramidal neurons enhanced, whereas HDAC2 overexpression (OE) reduced, excitatory synaptic transmission. Postsynaptic KD of HDAC2 also facilitated expression of long-term potentiation induced by subthreshold induction stimuli, without altering long-term depression. In contrast, HDAC2 KD reduced, whereas HDAC2 OE enhanced, inhibitory synaptic transmission. Alterations of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) likely underlie the impact of HDAC2 on inhibitory transmission. Consistent with this, we observed reduced transcript and protein levels of the GABA(A)R γ2 subunit and reduced surface expression of the α2 subunit after HDAC2 KD. Furthermore, we observed a reduction in synaptic but not tonic GABA(A)R currents by HDAC2 KD, suggesting that HDAC2 selectively affects synaptic abundance of functional GABA(A)Rs. Immunostaining for postsynaptic GABA(A)Rs confirmed that HDAC2 KD and OE can regulate the synaptic abundance of these receptors. Together, these results highlight a role for HDAC2 in suppressing synaptic excitation and enhancing synaptic inhibition of hippocampal neurons. Therefore, a shift in the balance of synaptic excitation versus inhibition favoring excitation could contribute to the beneficial effects of reducing HDAC2 function in wild-type mice or of inhibiting HDACs in models of cognitive impairment.

  20. Autonomous Bacterial Localization and Gene Expression Based on Nearby Cell Receptor Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-22

    density, these cells expressed marker proteins to indicate phenotypic response. Specifically, site-specific synthesis of bacterial quorum sensing ...Escherichia coli; quorum sensing ; synthetic biology Introduction Synthetic biology engenders design-based rewiring of a cell’s genetic circuitry for the...the signal transduction processes of quorum sensing (QS) as a means of inter- and intra-species communication and the coordination of population-based

  1. Autonomous control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    KSC has been developing the Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE), which is a tool for performing automated monitoring, diagnosis, and control of electromechanical devices. KATE employs artificial intelligence computing techniques to perform these functions. The KATE system consists of a generic shell and a knowledge base. The KATE shell is the portion of the system which performs the monitoring, diagnosis, and control functions. It is generic in the sense that it is application independent. This means that the monitoring activity, for instance, will be performed with the same algorithms regardless of the particular physical device being used. The knowledge base is the portion of the system which contains specific functional and behavorial information about the physical device KATE is working with. Work is nearing completion on a project at KSC to interface a Texas Instruments Explorer running a LISP version of KATE with a Generic Checkout System (GCS) test-bed to control a physical simulation of a shuttle tanking system (humorously called the Red Wagon because of its color and mobility). The Autonomous Control System (ACS) project supplements and extends the KATE/GCS project by adding three other major activities. The activities include: porting KATE from the Texas Instruments Explorer machine to an Intel 80386-based UNIX workstation in the LISP language; rewriting KATE as necessary to run on the same 80386 workstation but in the Ada language; and investigating software and techniques to translate ANSI Standard Common LISP to Mil Standard Ada. Primary goals of this task are as follows: (1) establish the advantages of using expert systems to provide intelligent autonomous software for Space Station Freedom applications; (2) determine the feasibility of using Ada as the run-time environment for model-based expert systems; (3) provide insight into the advantages and disadvantagesof using LISP or Ada in the run-time environment for expert systems; and (4

  2. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and cytostatic acting cells in T. annulata-immune cattle.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, J S; Wiegers, P; Ritz, H; Hartwig, H; Schein, E; Schnittger, L

    2000-01-01

    Cattle immunized against Theileria annulata with schizont containing autologous cell lines are immune to challenge with a homologous parasite strain. Two cell types have been detected in the peripheral blood of the immunized animals: cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and cytostatic acting cells (CAC). Killing the target cells by CTL is infection associated and is MHC class I restricted. Hence, no cytotoxicity was observed against target cells that were treated with the theilericidal drug buparvaquone or autologous Con A-blasts. The growth inhibition of CAC is MHC unrestricted, and not mediated by cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma).

  3. B cell receptor-mediated internalization of salmonella: a novel pathway for autonomous B cell activation and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S Marieke

    2009-06-15

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and secretion of anti-Salmonella Ab by the Salmonella-specific B cells. In addition, BCR-mediated internalization leads to efficient Ag delivery to the MHC class II Ag-loading compartments, even though Salmonella remains vital intracellularly in primary B cells. Consequently, BCR-mediated bacterial uptake induces efficient CD4(+) T cell help, which boosts Salmonella-specific Ab production. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella by B cells is superior over extracellular Ag extraction to induce rapid and specific humoral immune responses and efficiently combat infection.

  4. Cell-Autonomous Sex Differences in Gene Expression in Chicken Bone Marrow–Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Nandi, Sunil; Zhao, Debiao; Sauter, Kristin A.; Vervelde, Lonneke; McBride, Derek; Sang, Helen M.; Clinton, Mike

    2015-01-01

    We have identified differences in gene expression in macrophages grown from the bone marrow of male and female chickens in recombinant chicken M-CSF (CSF1). Cells were profiled with or without treatment with bacterial LPS for 24 h. Approximately 600 transcripts were induced by prolonged LPS stimulation to an equal extent in the male and female macrophages. Many transcripts encoded on the Z chromosome were expressed ∼1.6-fold higher in males, reflecting a lack of dosage compensation in the homogametic sex. A smaller set of W chromosome–specific genes was expressed only in females. LPS signaling in mammals is associated with induction of type 1 IFN–responsive genes. Unexpectedly, because IFNs are encoded on the Z chromosome of chickens, unstimulated macrophages from the female birds expressed a set of known IFN-inducible genes at much higher levels than male cells under the same conditions. To confirm that these differences were not the consequence of the actions of gonadal hormones, we induced gonadal sex reversal to alter the hormonal environment of the developing chick and analyzed macrophages cultured from male, female, and female sex-reversed embryos. Gonadal sex reversal did not alter the sexually dimorphic expression of either sex-linked or IFN-responsive genes. We suggest that female birds compensate for the reduced dose of inducible IFN with a higher basal set point of IFN-responsive genes. PMID:25637020

  5. Cell-autonomous sex differences in gene expression in chicken bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Nandi, Sunil; Zhao, Debiao; Sauter, Kristin A; Vervelde, Lonneke; McBride, Derek; Sang, Helen M; Clinton, Mike; Hume, David A

    2015-03-01

    We have identified differences in gene expression in macrophages grown from the bone marrow of male and female chickens in recombinant chicken M-CSF (CSF1). Cells were profiled with or without treatment with bacterial LPS for 24 h. Approximately 600 transcripts were induced by prolonged LPS stimulation to an equal extent in the male and female macrophages. Many transcripts encoded on the Z chromosome were expressed ∼1.6-fold higher in males, reflecting a lack of dosage compensation in the homogametic sex. A smaller set of W chromosome-specific genes was expressed only in females. LPS signaling in mammals is associated with induction of type 1 IFN-responsive genes. Unexpectedly, because IFNs are encoded on the Z chromosome of chickens, unstimulated macrophages from the female birds expressed a set of known IFN-inducible genes at much higher levels than male cells under the same conditions. To confirm that these differences were not the consequence of the actions of gonadal hormones, we induced gonadal sex reversal to alter the hormonal environment of the developing chick and analyzed macrophages cultured from male, female, and female sex-reversed embryos. Gonadal sex reversal did not alter the sexually dimorphic expression of either sex-linked or IFN-responsive genes. We suggest that female birds compensate for the reduced dose of inducible IFN with a higher basal set point of IFN-responsive genes.

  6. INL Autonomous Navigation System

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    The INL Autonomous Navigation System provides instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The system permits high-speed autonomous navigation including obstacle avoidance, waypoing navigation and path planning in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  7. Autonomous mobile communication relays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Everett, Hobart R.; Manouk, Narek; Verma, Ambrish

    2002-07-01

    Maintaining a solid radio communication link between a mobile robot entering a building and an external base station is a well-recognized problem. Modern digital radios, while affording high bandwidth and Internet-protocol-based automatic routing capabilities, tend to operate on line-of-sight links. The communication link degrades quickly as a robot penetrates deeper into the interior of a building. This project investigates the use of mobile autonomous communication relay nodes to extend the effective range of a mobile robot exploring a complex interior environment. Each relay node is a small mobile slave robot equipped with sonar, ladar, and 802.11b radio repeater. For demonstration purposes, four Pioneer 2-DX robots are used as autonomous mobile relays, with SSC-San Diego's ROBART III acting as the lead robot. The relay robots follow the lead robot into a building and are automatically deployed at various locations to maintain a networked communication link back to the remote operator. With their on-board external sensors, they also act as rearguards to secure areas already explored by the lead robot. As the lead robot advances and RF shortcuts are detected, relay nodes that become unnecessary will be reclaimed and reused, all transparent to the operator. This project takes advantage of recent research results from several DARPA-funded tasks at various institutions in the areas of robotic simulation, ad hoc wireless networking, route planning, and navigation. This paper describes the progress of the first six months of the project.

  8. Adenosine triphosphate acts as a paracrine signaling molecule to reduce the motility of T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chiuhui Mary; Ploia, Cristina; Anselmi, Fabio; Sarukhan, Adelaida; Viola, Antonella

    2014-06-17

    Organization of immune responses requires exchange of information between cells. This is achieved through either direct cell-cell contacts and establishment of temporary synapses or the release of soluble factors, such as cytokines and chemokines. Here we show a novel form of cell-to-cell communication based on adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP released by stimulated T cells induces P2X4/P2X7-mediated calcium waves in the neighboring lymphocytes. Our data obtained in lymph node slices suggest that, during T-cell priming, ATP acts as a paracrine messenger to reduce the motility of lymphocytes and that this may be relevant to allow optimal tissue scanning by T cells.

  9. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  10. Angiogenin Mediates Cell-Autonomous Translational Control under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Attenuates Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Mami, Iadh; Bouvier, Nicolas; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Rabant, Marion; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Li, Shuping; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Chevet, Eric; Hu, Guo-Fu; Pallet, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathophysiology of kidney disease and aging, but the molecular bases underlying the biologic outcomes on the evolution of renal disease remain mostly unknown. Angiogenin (ANG) is a ribonuclease that promotes cellular adaptation under stress but its contribution to ER stress signaling remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the ANG-mediated contribution to the signaling and biologic outcomes of ER stress in kidney injury. ANG expression was significantly higher in samples from injured human kidneys than in samples from normal human kidneys, and in mouse and rat kidneys, ANG expression was specifically induced under ER stress. In human renal epithelial cells, ER stress induced ANG expression in a manner dependent on the activity of transcription factor XBP1, and ANG promoted cellular adaptation to ER stress through induction of stress granules and inhibition of translation. Moreover, the severity of renal lesions induced by ER stress was dramatically greater in ANG knockout mice (Ang(-/-)) mice than in wild-type mice. These results indicate that ANG is a critical mediator of tissue adaptation to kidney injury and reveal a physiologically relevant ER stress-mediated adaptive translational control mechanism.

  11. A cell-autonomous tumour suppressor role of RAF1 in hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeric, Ines; Maurer, Gabriele; Cavallo, Anna Lina; Raguz, Josipa; Desideri, Enrico; Tarkowski, Bartosz; Parrini, Matthias; Fischer, Irmgard; Zatloukal, Kurt; Baccarini, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but its molecular heterogeneity hampers the design of targeted therapies. Currently, the only therapeutic option for advanced HCC is Sorafenib, an inhibitor whose targets include RAF. Unexpectedly, RAF1 expression is reduced in human HCC samples. Modelling RAF1 downregulation by RNAi increases the proliferation of human HCC lines in xenografts and in culture; furthermore, RAF1 ablation promotes chemical hepatocarcinogenesis and the proliferation of cultured (pre)malignant mouse hepatocytes. The phenotypes depend on increased YAP1 expression and STAT3 activation, observed in cultured RAF1-deficient cells, in HCC xenografts, and in autochthonous liver tumours. Thus RAF1, although essential for the development of skin and lung tumours, is a negative regulator of hepatocarcinogenesis. This unexpected finding highlights the contribution of the cellular/tissue environment in determining the function of a protein, and underscores the importance of understanding the molecular context of a disease to inform therapy design. PMID:28000790

  12. A cell-autonomous defect in skeletal muscle satellite cells expressing low levels of survival of motor neuron protein.

    PubMed

    Hayhurst, Monica; Wagner, Amanda K; Cerletti, Massimiliano; Wagers, Amy J; Rubin, Lee L

    2012-08-15

    Mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) gene underlie the development of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), which currently represents the leading genetic cause of mortality in infants and toddlers. SMA is characterized by degeneration of spinal cord motor neurons and muscle atrophy. Although SMA is often considered to be a motor neuron disease, accumulating evidence suggests that muscle cells themselves may be affected by low levels of SMN. Here, we examine satellite cells, tissue-resident stem cells that play an essential role in the growth and repair of skeletal muscle, isolated from a severe SMA mouse model (Smn(-/-); SMN2(+/+)). We found similar numbers of satellite cells in the muscles of SMA and wild-type (Smn(+/+); SMN2(+/+)) mice at postnatal day 2 (P2), and, when isolated from skeletal muscle using cell surface marker expression, these cells showed comparable survival and proliferative potential. However, SMA satellite cells differentiate abnormally, revealed by the premature expression of muscle differentiation markers, and, especially, by a reduced efficiency in forming myotubes. These phenotypes suggest a critical role of SMN protein in the intrinsic regulation of muscle differentiation and suggest that abnormal muscle development contributes to the manifestation of SMA symptoms.

  13. Serum albumin acts as a shuttle to enhance cholesterol efflux from cells.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Sandhya; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Drazul-Schrader, Denise; Phillips, Michael C; Kellner-Weibel, Ginny; Rothblat, George H

    2013-03-01

    An important mechanism contributing to cell cholesterol efflux is aqueous transfer in which cholesterol diffuses from cells into the aqueous phase and becomes incorporated into an acceptor particle. Some compounds can enhance diffusion by acting as shuttles transferring cholesterol to cholesterol acceptors, which act as cholesterol sinks. We have examined whether particles in serum can enhance cholesterol efflux by acting as shuttles. This task was accomplished by incubating radiolabeled J774 cells with increasing concentrations of lipoprotein-depleted sera (LPDS) or components present in serum as shuttles and a constant amount of LDL, small unilamellar vesicles, or red blood cells (RBC) as sinks. Synergistic efflux was measured as the difference in fractional efflux in excess of that predicted by the addition of the individual efflux values of sink and shuttle alone. Synergistic efflux was obtained when LPDS was incubated with cells and LDL. When different components of LPDS were used as shuttles, albumin produced synergistic efflux, while apoA-I did not. A synergistic effect was also obtained when RBC was used as the sink and albumin as shuttle. The previously observed negative association of albumin with coronary artery disease might be linked to reduced cholesterol shuttling that would occur when serum albumin levels are low.

  14. Association of ActA to Peptidoglycan Revealed by Cell Wall Proteomics of Intracellular Listeria monocytogenes*

    PubMed Central

    García-del Portillo, Francisco; Calvo, Enrique; D'Orazio, Valentina; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterial pathogen that colonizes the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Recent transcriptomic studies have revealed that intracellular L. monocytogenes alter expression of genes encoding envelope components. However, no comparative global analysis of this cell wall remodeling process is yet known at the protein level. Here, we used high resolution mass spectrometry to define the cell wall proteome of L. monocytogenes growing inside epithelial cells. When compared with extracellular bacteria growing in a nutrient-rich medium, a major difference found in the proteome was the presence of the actin assembly-inducing protein ActA in peptidoglycan purified from intracellular bacteria. ActA was also identified in the peptidoglycan of extracellular bacteria growing in a chemically defined minimal medium. In this condition, ActA maintains its membrane anchoring domain and promotes efficient bacterial entry into nonphagocytic host cells. Unexpectedly, Internalin-A, which mediates entry of extracellular L. monocytogenes into eukaryotic cells, was identified at late infection times (6 h) as an abundant protein in the cell wall of intracellular bacteria. Other surface proteins covalently bound to the peptidoglycan, as Lmo0514 and Lmo2085, were detected exclusively in intracellular and extracellular bacteria, respectively. Altogether, these data provide the first insights into the changes occurring at the protein level in the L. monocytogenes cell wall as the pathogen transits from the extracellular environment to an intracytosolic lifestyle inside eukaryotic cells. Some of these changes include alterations in the relative amount and the mode of association of certain surface proteins. PMID:21846725

  15. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  16. An Aminopeptidase in the Drosophila Testicular Niche Acts in Germline Stem Cell Maintenance and Spermatogonial Dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Cindy; Gandhi, Shiv; Biniossek, Martin L; Feng, Lijuan; Schilling, Oliver; Urban, Siniša; Chen, Xin

    2015-10-13

    Extrinsic cues from the niche are known to regulate adult stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation. Here, we report that an aminopeptidase Slamdance (Sda) acts in the Drosophila testicular niche to maintain germline stem cells (GSCs) and regulate progenitor germ cell dedifferentiation. Mutations in sda lead to dramatic testicular niche deterioration and stem cell loss. Recombinant Sda has specific aminopeptidase activity in vitro, and the in vivo function of Sda requires an intact aminopeptidase domain. Sda is required for accumulation of mature DE-cadherin, and overexpression of DE-cadherin rescues most sda mutant phenotypes, suggesting that DE-cadherin is an important target of Sda. Finally, Sda is both necessary and sufficient to promote dedifferentiation during aging and recovery from genetically manipulated depletion of GSCs. Together, our results suggest that a niche factor promotes both stem cell maintenance and progenitor cell dedifferentiation.

  17. Suppression of the novel ER protein Maxer by mutant ataxin-1 in Bergman glia contributes to non-cell-autonomous toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shiwaku, Hiroki; Yoshimura, Natsue; Tamura, Takuya; Sone, Masaki; Ogishima, Soichi; Watase, Kei; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Non-cell-autonomous effect of mutant proteins expressed in glia has been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders, whereas molecules mediating the toxicity are currently not known. We identified a novel molecule named multiple α-helix protein located at ER (Maxer) downregulated by mutant ataxin-1 (Atx1) in Bergmann glia. Maxer is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein interacting with CDK5RAP3. Maxer anchors CDK5RAP3 to the ER and inhibits its function of Cyclin D1 transcription repression in the nucleus. The loss of Maxer eventually induces cell accumulation at G1 phase. It was also shown that mutant Atx1 represses Maxer and inhibits proliferation of Bergmann glia in vitro. Consistently, Bergmann glia are reduced in the cerebellum of mutant Atx1 knockin mice before onset. Glutamate-aspartate transporter reduction in Bergmann glia by mutant Atx1 and vulnerability of Purkinje cell to glutamate are both strengthened by Maxer knockdown in Bergmann glia, whereas Maxer overexpression rescues them. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduction of Maxer mediates functional deficiency of Bergmann glia, and might contribute to the non-cell-autonomous pathology of SCA1. PMID:20531390

  18. Suppression of the novel ER protein Maxer by mutant ataxin-1 in Bergman glia contributes to non-cell-autonomous toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shiwaku, Hiroki; Yoshimura, Natsue; Tamura, Takuya; Sone, Masaki; Ogishima, Soichi; Watase, Kei; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2010-07-21

    Non-cell-autonomous effect of mutant proteins expressed in glia has been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders, whereas molecules mediating the toxicity are currently not known. We identified a novel molecule named multiple alpha-helix protein located at ER (Maxer) downregulated by mutant ataxin-1 (Atx1) in Bergmann glia. Maxer is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein interacting with CDK5RAP3. Maxer anchors CDK5RAP3 to the ER and inhibits its function of Cyclin D1 transcription repression in the nucleus. The loss of Maxer eventually induces cell accumulation at G1 phase. It was also shown that mutant Atx1 represses Maxer and inhibits proliferation of Bergmann glia in vitro. Consistently, Bergmann glia are reduced in the cerebellum of mutant Atx1 knockin mice before onset. Glutamate-aspartate transporter reduction in Bergmann glia by mutant Atx1 and vulnerability of Purkinje cell to glutamate are both strengthened by Maxer knockdown in Bergmann glia, whereas Maxer overexpression rescues them. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduction of Maxer mediates functional deficiency of Bergmann glia, and might contribute to the non-cell-autonomous pathology of SCA1.

  19. Expression of the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) protects Hodgkin's lymphoma cells from autonomous Fas-mediated death.

    PubMed

    Dutton, A; O'Neil, J D; Milner, A E; Reynolds, G M; Starczynski, J; Crocker, J; Young, L S; Murray, P G

    2004-04-27

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is characterized by the presence of malignant so-called Hodgkin's/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, which display resistance to certain apoptotic stimuli, including a lack of sensitivity to Fas-mediated cell death. However, the mechanisms responsible for their resistance to apoptosis inducers have not been elucidated. Here we confirm that both HL-derived cell lines and the HRS cells of primary HL tissues express Fas ligand (FasL) along with the inhibitory c-FLIP protein. Down-regulation of cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) through the use of specific small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs) leads to reduced viability of the L428 and L591 HL-derived cell lines. To determine whether endogenous FasL was responsible for the reduction in cell viability observed after down-regulation of c-FLIP, L428 and L591 cells were treated with c-FLIP-specific siRNAs with and without siRNAs directed to FasL. Treatment of these cells with both c-FLIP- and FasL-specific siRNAs in combination restored cell viability to near control levels. Our results provide a mechanism whereby HRS cells are protected from autonomous FasL-mediated cell death while preserving their ability to evade immunosurveillance. Targeting c-FLIP could provide a novel approach to the treatment of HL.

  20. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  1. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology of Autonomic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic drugs are used clinically to either imitate or inhibit the normal functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. A large number of additional drug classes also interact with these systems to produce a stunning number of possible side effects. This article reviews the basic function of the autonomic nervous system and the various drug classes that act within these neural synapses. PMID:23241039

  2. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) acts as a tumor promoter on Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, N; Maire, M A; Rast, C; Bonnard, M; Vasseur, P

    2011-08-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (C(8)F(17)SO(3)) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) (C(8)HF(15)O(2)) are synthetic chemicals widely used in industrial applications for their hydrophobic and oleophobic properties. They are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to mammalian species. Their widespread distribution on earth and contamination of human serum raised concerns about long-term side effects. They are suspected to be carcinogenic through a nongenotoxic mode of action, a mechanism supported by recent findings that PFOS induced cell transformation but no genotoxicity in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. In the present study, we evaluated carcinogenic potential of PFOA using the cell transformation assay on SHE cells. The chemical was applied alone or in combination with a nontransformant concentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, 0.4 μM) in order to detect PFOA ability to act as tumor initiator or tumor promoter. The results showed that PFOA tested alone in the range 3.7 × 10(-5) to 300 μM did not induce SHE cell transformation frequency in a 7-day treatment. On the other side, the combination BaP/PFOA induced cell transformation at all PFOA concentrations tested, which revealed synergistic effects. No genotoxicity of PFOA on SHE cells was detected using the comet assay after 5 and 24 h of exposure. No significant increase in DNA breakage was found in BaP-initiated cells exposed to PFOA in a 7-day treatment. The whole results showed that PFOA acts as a tumor promoter and a nongenotoxic carcinogen. Cell transformation in initiated cells was observed at concentrations equivalent to the ones found in human serum of nonoccupationally and occupationally exposed populations. An involvement of PFOA in increased incidence of cancer recorded in occupationally exposed population cannot be ruled out.

  3. Forkhead Protein FoxO1 Acts as a Repressor to Inhibit Cell Differentiation in Human Fetal Pancreatic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zongzhe; Tian, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjian; Yan, Hao; Liu, Liping; Huang, Zhenhe; Lou, Jinning

    2017-01-01

    Our colleagues have reported previously that human pancreatic progenitor cells can readily differentiate into insulin-containing cells. Particularly, transplantation of these cell clusters upon in vitro induction for 3-4 w partially restores hyperglycemia in diabetic nude mice. In this study, we used human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells to identify the forkhead protein FoxO1 as the key regulator for cell differentiation. Thus, induction of human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells for 1 week led to increase of the pancreatic β cell markers such as Ngn3, but decrease of stem cell markers including Oct4, Nanog, and CK19. Of note, FoxO1 knockdown or FoxO1 inhibitor significantly upregulated Ngn3 and insulin as well as the markers such as Glut2, Kir6.2, SUR1, and VDCC, which are designated for mature β cells. On the contrary, overexpression of FoxO1 suppressed the induction and reduced expression of these β cell markers. Taken together, these results suggest that FoxO1 may act as a repressor to inhibit cell differentiation in human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells. PMID:28349071

  4. Autonomous oscillation/separation of cell density artificially induced by optical interlink feedback as designed interaction between two isolated microalgae chips

    PubMed Central

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Maeda, Mizuo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a designed interaction between two isolated cell populations of Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, separately confined in two 25-square micro-aquariums of lab-on-chip size. The interaction was realized by interlinking two identical optical feedback systems, which measured the cell distribution. To analyze the cell populations, we measured the cell distribution in the 25 squares and irradiated the cells with a blue light pattern as an external stimulus. The cell distribution dataset was exchanged between the two systems. Governed by a designed interaction algorithm, the feedback systems produced a dynamic blue light illumination pattern that evoked the photophobic responses of both species. We also induced autonomous cell density oscillation and cell distribution separation and clustering, and analyzed how the types and diversities of the photophobic responses affected the oscillation period and separation and clustering. We conclude that artificial interlink feedback is a promising method for investigating diverse cell–cell interactions in ecological communities, and for developing soft-computing applications with living cells. PMID:27098710

  5. Autonomous oscillation/separation of cell density artificially induced by optical interlink feedback as designed interaction between two isolated microalgae chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Maeda, Mizuo

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a designed interaction between two isolated cell populations of Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, separately confined in two 25-square micro-aquariums of lab-on-chip size. The interaction was realized by interlinking two identical optical feedback systems, which measured the cell distribution. To analyze the cell populations, we measured the cell distribution in the 25 squares and irradiated the cells with a blue light pattern as an external stimulus. The cell distribution dataset was exchanged between the two systems. Governed by a designed interaction algorithm, the feedback systems produced a dynamic blue light illumination pattern that evoked the photophobic responses of both species. We also induced autonomous cell density oscillation and cell distribution separation and clustering, and analyzed how the types and diversities of the photophobic responses affected the oscillation period and separation and clustering. We conclude that artificial interlink feedback is a promising method for investigating diverse cell–cell interactions in ecological communities, and for developing soft-computing applications with living cells.

  6. Maf acts downstream of ComGA to arrest cell division in competent cells of B. subtilis.

    PubMed

    Briley, Kenneth; Prepiak, Peter; Dias, Miguel J; Hahn, Jeanette; Dubnau, David

    2011-07-01

    Transformable (competent) cells of Bacillus subtilis are blocked in cell division because the traffic ATPase ComGA prevents the formation of FtsZ rings. Although ComGA-deficient cells elongate and form FtsZ rings, cell division remains blocked at a later stage and the cells become mildly filamented. Here we show that the highly conserved protein Maf is synthesized predominantly in competent cells under the direct control of the transcription factor ComK and is solely responsible for the later block in cell division. In vivo and in vitro data show that Maf binds to both ComGA and DivIVA. A point mutation in maf that interferes with Maf binding to DivIVA also interferes with the ability of Maf to inhibit cell division. Based on these findings, we propose that Maf and ComGA mediate mechanisms for the inhibition of cell division in competent cells with Maf acting downstream of ComGA. We further suggest that Maf must interact with DivIVA to inhibit cell division.

  7. Maf acts downstream of ComGA to arrest cell division in competent cells of B. subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Briley, Kenneth; Prepiak, Peter; Dias, Miguel J.; Hahn, Jeanette; Dubnau, David

    2011-01-01

    Transformable (competent) cells of Bacillus subtilis are blocked in cell division because the traffic ATPase ComGA prevents the formation of FtsZ rings. Although ComGA-deficient cells elongate and form FtsZ rings, cell division remains blocked at a later stage and the cells become mildly filamented. Here we show that the highly conserved protein Maf is synthesized predominantly in competent cells under the direct control of the transcription factor ComK and is solely responsible for the later block in cell division. In vivo and in vitro data show that Maf binds to both ComGA and DivIVA. A point mutation in maf that interferes with Maf binding to DivIVA also interferes with the ability of Maf to inhibit cell division. Based on these findings, we propose that Maf and ComGA mediate mechanisms for the inhibition of cell division in competent cells with Maf acting downstream of ComGA. We further suggest that Maf must interact with DivIVA to inhibit cell division. PMID:21564336

  8. Cooperative non-cell and cell autonomous regulation of Nodal gene expression and signaling by Lefty/Antivin and Brachyury in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young Ryun; Takahashi, Shuji; Wright, Christopher V E

    2006-02-15

    Dynamic spatiotemporal expression of the nodal gene and its orthologs is involved in the dose-dependent induction and patterning of mesendoderm during early vertebrate embryogenesis. We report loss-of-function studies that define a high degree of synergistic negative regulation on the Xenopus nodal-related genes (Xnrs) by extracellular Xenopus antivin/lefty (Xatv/Xlefty)-mediated functional antagonism and Brachyury-mediated transcriptional suppression. A strong knockdown of Xlefty/Xatv function was achieved by mixing translation- and splicing-blocking morpholino oligonucleotides that target both the A and B alloalleles of Xatv. Secreted and cell-autonomous inhibitors of Xnr signaling were used to provide evidence that Xnr-mediated induction was inherently long-range in this situation in the large amphibian embryo, essentially being capable of spreading over the entire animal hemisphere. There was a greater expansion of the Organizer and mesendoderm tissues associated with dorsal specification than noted in previous Xatv knockdown experiments in Xenopus, with consequent exogastrulation and long-term maintenance of expanded axial tissues. Xatv deficiency caused a modest animal-ward expansion of the marginal zone expression territory of the Xnr1 and Xnr2 genes. In contrast, introducing inhibitory Xbra-En(R) fusion constructs into Xatv-deficient embryos caused a much larger increase in the level and spatial extent of Xnr expression. However, in both cases (Xatv/Xlefty-deficiency alone, or combined with Xbra interference), Xnr2 expression was constrained to the superficial cell layer, suggesting a fundamental tissue-specific competence in the ability to express Xnrs, an observation with direct implications regarding the induction of endodermal vs. mesodermal fates. Our experiments reveal a two-level suppressive mechanism for restricting the level, range, and duration of Xnr signaling via extracellular inhibition by Xatv/Xlefty coupled with potent indirect

  9. Dicer-1-dependent Dacapo suppression acts downstream of Insulin receptor in regulating cell division of Drosophila germline stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jenn-Yah; Reynolds, Steven H.; Hatfield, Steve D.; Shcherbata, Halyna R.; Fischer, Karin A.; Ward, Ellen J.; Long, Dang; Ding, Ye; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2009-01-01

    Summary It is important to understand the regulation of stem cell division because defects in this process can cause altered tissue homeostasis or cancer. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Dacapo (Dap), a p21/p27 homolog, acts downstream of the microRNA (miRNA) pathway to regulate the cell cycle in Drosophila melanogaster germline stem cells (GSCs). Tissue-extrinsic signals, including insulin, also regulate cell division of GSCs. We report that intrinsic and extrinsic regulators intersect in GSC division control; the Insulin receptor (InR) pathway regulates Dap levels through miRNAs, thereby controlling GSC division. Using GFP-dap 3′UTR sensors in vivo, we show that in GSCs the dap 3′UTR is responsive to Dicer-1, an RNA endonuclease III required for miRNA processing. Furthermore, the dap 3′UTR can be directly targeted by miR-7, miR-278 and miR-309 in luciferase assays. Consistent with this, miR-278 and miR-7 mutant GSCs are partially defective in GSC division and show abnormal cell cycle marker expression, respectively. These data suggest that the GSC cell cycle is regulated via the dap 3′UTR by multiple miRNAs. Furthermore, the GFP-dap 3′UTR sensors respond to InR but not to TGF-β signaling, suggesting that InR signaling utilizes Dap for GSC cell cycle regulation. We further demonstrate that the miRNA-based Dap regulation may act downstream of InR signaling; Dcr-1 and Dap are required for nutrition-dependent cell cycle regulation in GSCs and reduction of dap partially rescues the cell cycle defect of InR-deficient GSCs. These data suggest that miRNA- and Dap-based cell cycle regulation in GSCs can be controlled by InR signaling. PMID:19336466

  10. Dicer-1-dependent Dacapo suppression acts downstream of Insulin receptor in regulating cell division of Drosophila germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jenn-Yah; Reynolds, Steven H; Hatfield, Steve D; Shcherbata, Halyna R; Fischer, Karin A; Ward, Ellen J; Long, Dang; Ding, Ye; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2009-05-01

    It is important to understand the regulation of stem cell division because defects in this process can cause altered tissue homeostasis or cancer. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Dacapo (Dap), a p21/p27 homolog, acts downstream of the microRNA (miRNA) pathway to regulate the cell cycle in Drosophila melanogaster germline stem cells (GSCs). Tissue-extrinsic signals, including insulin, also regulate cell division of GSCs. We report that intrinsic and extrinsic regulators intersect in GSC division control; the Insulin receptor (InR) pathway regulates Dap levels through miRNAs, thereby controlling GSC division. Using GFP-dap 3'UTR sensors in vivo, we show that in GSCs the dap 3'UTR is responsive to Dicer-1, an RNA endonuclease III required for miRNA processing. Furthermore, the dap 3'UTR can be directly targeted by miR-7, miR-278 and miR-309 in luciferase assays. Consistent with this, miR-278 and miR-7 mutant GSCs are partially defective in GSC division and show abnormal cell cycle marker expression, respectively. These data suggest that the GSC cell cycle is regulated via the dap 3'UTR by multiple miRNAs. Furthermore, the GFP-dap 3'UTR sensors respond to InR but not to TGF-beta signaling, suggesting that InR signaling utilizes Dap for GSC cell cycle regulation. We further demonstrate that the miRNA-based Dap regulation may act downstream of InR signaling; Dcr-1 and Dap are required for nutrition-dependent cell cycle regulation in GSCs and reduction of dap partially rescues the cell cycle defect of InR-deficient GSCs. These data suggest that miRNA- and Dap-based cell cycle regulation in GSCs can be controlled by InR signaling.

  11. Grp94 acts as a mediator of curcumin-induced antioxidant defence in myogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Paola; Scapin, Cristina; Vitadello, Maurizio; Florean, Cristina; Gorza, Luisa

    2010-04-01

    Curcumin is a non-toxic polyphenol with pleiotropic activities and limited bioavailability. We investigated whether a brief exposure to low doses of curcumin would induce in the myogenic C2C12 cell line an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and protect against oxidative stress. A 3-hr curcumin administration (5-10 microM) increased protein levels of the ER chaperone Grp94, without affecting those of Grp78, calreticulin and haeme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide 24 hrs after the curcumin treatment decreased caspase-12 activation, total protein oxidation and translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus, compared with untreated cells. Grp94 overexpression, achieved by means of either stable or transient trasfection, induced comparable cytoprotective effects to hydrogen peroxide. The delayed cytoprotection induced by curcumin acted through Grp94, because the curcumin-induced increase in Grp94 expression was hampered by either stable or transient transfection with antisense cDNA; in these latter cells, the extent of total protein oxidation, as well as the translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus, and the percentage of apoptotic cells were comparable to those observed in both curcumin-untreated wild-type and empty vector transfected cells. Defining the mechanism(s) by which Grp94 exerts its antioxidant defence, the determination of cytosolic calcium levels in C2C12 cells by fura-2 showed a significantly reduced amount of releasable calcium from intracellular stores, both in conditions of Grp94 overexpression and after curcumin pre-treatment. Therefore, a brief exposure to curcumin induces a delayed cytoprotection against oxidative stress in myogenic cells by increasing Grp94 protein level, which acts as a regulator of calcium homeostasis.

  12. Tympanic border cells are Wnt-responsive and can act as progenitors for postnatal mouse cochlear cells

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Taha Adnan; Chai, Renjie; Sayyid, Zahra Nabi; van Amerongen, Renée; Xia, Anping; Wang, Tian; Sinkkonen, Saku Tapani; Zeng, Yi Arial; Levin, Jared Ruben; Heller, Stefan; Nusse, Roel; Cheng, Alan Gi-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Permanent hearing loss is caused by the irreversible damage of cochlear sensory hair cells and nonsensory supporting cells. In the postnatal cochlea, the sensory epithelium is terminally differentiated, whereas tympanic border cells (TBCs) beneath the sensory epithelium are proliferative. The functions of TBCs are poorly characterized. Using an Axin2lacZ Wnt reporter mouse, we found transient but robust Wnt signaling and proliferation in TBCs during the first 3 postnatal weeks, when the number of TBCs decreases. In vivo lineage tracing shows that a subset of hair cells and supporting cells is derived postnatally from Axin2-expressing TBCs. In cochlear explants, Wnt agonists stimulated the proliferation of TBCs, whereas Wnt inhibitors suppressed it. In addition, purified Axin2lacZ cells were clonogenic and self-renewing in culture in a Wnt-dependent manner, and were able to differentiate into hair cell-like and supporting cell-like cells. Taken together, our data indicate that Axin2-positive TBCs are Wnt responsive and can act as precursors to sensory epithelial cells in the postnatal cochlea. PMID:23444352

  13. 1-Fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and its derivatives act as secretagogues on rodent mast cells.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yohei; Yoshimura, Marie; Sakamaki, Kazuma; Inoue, Asuka; Kakinoki, Aya; Hokari, Satoshi; Sakanaka, Mariko; Aoki, Junken; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that activated mast cells are involved in contact hypersensitivity, although the precise mechanisms of their activation are still not completely understood. We investigated the potential of common experimental allergens to induce mast cell activation using murine bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and rat peritoneal mast cells. Among these allergens, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinirobenzene (DNFB) were found to induce degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells. DNFB-induced degranulation is accompanied by cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization and is significantly inhibited by pertussis toxin, U73122 (a phospholipase C inhibitor), and BAPTA (a Ca(2+) chelator), raising the possibility that DNFB acts on the G protein-coupled receptors and activates Gi , which induces activation of phospholipase C, as well as known mast cell secretagogues, such as compound 48/80. DNFB could induce mast cell degranulation in the absence of serum proteins and IgE. Structure-activity relationship analyses revealed an inverse correlation between the degree of degranulation and the electron density of the C1 carbon of the DNFB derivatives. These findings raise a possibility that DNFB functions as a potent contact allergen through induction of cutaneous mast cell degranulation.

  14. Attenuation of cadmium-induced necrotic cell death by necrostatin-1: Potential necrostatin-1 acting sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.-S.; Yang, P.-M.; Tsai, J.-S.; Lin, L.-Y.

    2009-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces necrotic death in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 cells and we have established the responsible signaling pathway. Reportedly, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) rescues cells from necrotic death by mediating through the death domain receptor (DR) signaling pathway. We show here that Nec-1 also effectively attenuates necrotic death triggered by Cd. Two other treatments that cause necrotic cell death, one can (z-VAD-fmk/TNF-{alpha} on U937 cells) and the other cannot (etherynic acid (EA) on DLD-1 cells) be rescued by Nec-1, were also studied in parallel for comparison. Results show that Nec-1 is ineffectual in modulating intracellular calcium contents, calpain activity (a downstream protease), or reactive oxygen species production. It can counteract the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) caused by treating CHO K1 or U937 cells with necrosis-inducing agent. However, this effect was not found in EA-treated DLD-1 cells. Notably, Nec-1 elevates NF-{kappa}B activity in the presence or absence of necrosis-inducing agents. Our study shows that, in addition to DR-mediated necrosis, Nec-1 is effective in attenuating Cd-induced necrosis. It rescues cells with reduced MMP implying that mitochondrion is its major acting site.

  15. mGluR5 Exerts Cell-Autonomous Influences on the Functional and Anatomical Development of Layer IV Cortical Neurons in the Mouse Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ballester-Rosado, Carlos J.; Sun, Hao; Huang, Jui-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission refines synaptic connections to establish the precise neural circuits underlying sensory processing. Deleting metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in mice perturbs cortical somatosensory map formation in the primary somatosensory (S1) cortex at both functional and anatomical levels. To examine the cell-autonomous influences of mGluR5 signaling in the morphological and functional development of layer IV spiny stellate glutamatergic neurons receiving sensory input, mGluR5 genetic mosaic mice were generated through in utero electroporation. In the S1 cortex of these mosaic brains, we found that most wild-type neurons were located in barrel rings encircling thalamocortical axon (TCA) clusters while mGluR5 knock-out (KO) neurons were placed in the septal area, the cell-sparse region separating barrels. These KO neurons often displayed a symmetrical dendritic morphology with increased dendritic complexity, in contrast to the polarized pattern of wild-type neurons. The dendritic spine density of mGluR5 KO spiny stellate neurons was significantly higher than in wild-type neurons. Whole-cell electrophysiological recordings detected a significant increase in the frequencies of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic events in mGluR5 KO neurons compared with neighboring wild-type neurons. Our mosaic analysis provides strong evidence supporting the cell-autonomous influence of mGluR5 signaling on the functional and anatomical development of cortical glutamatergic neurons. Specifically, mGluR5 is required in cortical glutamatergic neurons for the following processes: (1) the placement of cortical glutamatergic neurons close to TCA clusters; (2) the regulation of dendritic complexity and outgrowth toward TCA clusters; (3) spinogenesis; and (4) tuning of excitatory inputs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Glutamatergic transmission plays a critical role in cortical circuit formation. Its dysfunction has been proposed as a core factor in the

  16. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  17. Autonomous Soaring Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on autonomous soaring flight results for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)'s is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Thermal Soaring Flight Results; 3) Autonomous Dolphin Soaring; and 4) Future Plans.

  18. Mitochondria released by cells undergoing TNF-α-induced necroptosis act as danger signals.

    PubMed

    Maeda, A; Fadeel, B

    2014-07-03

    Necrosis leads to the release of so-called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which may provoke inflammatory responses. However, the release of organelles from dying cells, and the consequences thereof have not been documented before. We demonstrate here that mitochondria are released from cells undergoing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced, receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1-dependent necroptosis, a form of programmed necrosis. The released, purified mitochondria were determined to be intact as they did not emit appreciable amounts of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) prevented mitochondrial fission in TNF-α-triggered cells, but this did not block necroptosis nor the concomitant release of mitochondria. Importantly, primary human macrophages and dendritic cells engulfed mitochondria from necroptotic cells leading to modulation of macrophage secretion of cytokines and induction of dendritic cell maturation. Our results show that intact mitochondria are released from necroptotic cells and suggest that these organelles act as bona fide danger signals.

  19. SGLT2 inhibitors act from the extracellular surface of the cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Chiara; Hirayama, Bruce A; Gorraitz, Edurne; Loo, Donald D F; Liang, Yin; Wright, Ernest M

    2014-06-01

    SGLT2 inhibitors are a new class of drugs that have been recently developed to treat type II diabetes. They lower glucose levels by inhibiting the renal Na(+)/glucose cotransporter SGLT2, thereby increasing the amount of glucose excreted in the urine. Pharmacodynamics studies have raised questions about how these inhibitors reach SGLT2 in the brush border membrane of the S1 and S2 segments of the renal proximal tubule: are these drugs filtered by the glomerulus and act extracellularly, or do they enter the cell and act intracellularly? To address this question we expressed hSGLT2 in HEK-293T cells and determined the affinity of a specific hSGLT2 inhibitor, TA-3404 (also known as JNJ-30980924), from the extra- and intracellular side of the plasma membrane. Inhibition of SGLT2 activity (Na(+)/glucose currents) by TA-3404 was determined using the whole-cell patch clamp that allows controlling the composition of both the extracellular and intracellular solutions. We compared the results to those obtained using the nonselective SGLT inhibitor phlorizin, and to the effect of TA-3404 on hSGLT1. Our results showed that TA-3404 is a potent extracellular inhibitor of glucose inward SGLT2 transport (IC50 2 nmol/L) but it was ineffective from the intracellular compartment at both low (5 mmol/L) and high (150 mmol/L) intracellular NaCl concentrations. We conclude that TA-3404 only inhibits SGLT2 from the extracellular side of the plasma membrane, suggesting that it is filtered from the blood through the glomerulus and acts from within the tubule lumen.

  20. Cultivation of human liver cell lines with microcarriers acting as biological materials of bioartificial liver

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Hu, Huan-Zhang; Yang, Ji-Zhen

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To improve the cultivation efficiency and yield of human liver cell line Cl-1. METHODS: High-density cultivation of Cl-1 on microcarriers was carried out with periodic observation of their growth and proliferation. The specific functions of human liver cell were also determined. RESULTS: Cells of Cl-1 cell line grew well on microcarrier Cytodex-3 and on the 7th day the peak was reached. The amount of Cl-1 cells was 2.13 × 108 and the total amount of albumin synthesis reached 71.23 μg, urea synthesis 23.32 mg and diazepam transformation 619.7 μg respectively. The yield of Cl-1 on microcarriers was 49.3 times that of conventional cultivation. The amounts of albumin synthesis, urea synthesis and diazepam transformation were 39.8 times, 41.6 times and 33.3 times those of conventional cultivation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The human liver cell line Cl-1 can be cultivated to a high density with Cytodex-3 and has better biological functions. High-density cultivation of Cl-1 on microcarriers can act as the biological material of bioartificial liver. PMID:11819434

  1. Trabectedin, a drug acting on both cancer cells and the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    D'Incalci, M; Badri, N; Galmarini, C M; Allavena, P

    2014-01-01

    Trabectedin is the first marine-derived anti-neoplastic drug approved for the treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and, in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, for the treatment of patients with relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. From the beginning of its development, trabectedin showed some peculiar properties that clearly distinguished it from other anti-cancer drugs. In this mini-review, we will outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mode of action of trabectedin, which appears to represent a new class of anti-neoplastic drugs acting both on cancer cells and on the tumour microenvironment. PMID:24755886

  2. Annexin A1 Induces Skeletal Muscle Cell Migration Acting through Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2012-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1, lipocortin-1) is a glucocorticoid-regulated 37-kDa protein, so called since its main property is to bind (i.e. to annex) to cellular membranes in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Although ANXA1 has predominantly been studied in the context of immune responses and cancer, the protein can affect a larger variety of biological phenomena, including cell proliferation and migration. Our previous results show that endogenous ANXA1 positively modulates myoblast cell differentiation by promoting migration of satellite cells and, consequently, skeletal muscle differentiation. In this work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that ANXA1 is able to exert effects on myoblast cell migration acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) following changes in its subcellular localization as in other cell types and tissues. The analysis of the subcellular localization of ANXA1 in C2C12 myoblasts during myogenic differentiation showed an interesting increase of extracellular ANXA1 starting from the initial phases of skeletal muscle cell differentiation. The investigation of intracellular Ca2+ perturbation following exogenous administration of the ANXA1 N-terminal derived peptide Ac2-26 established the engagement of the FPRs which expression in C2C12 cells was assessed by qualitative PCR. Wound healing assay experiments showed that Ac2-26 peptide is able to increase migration of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells and to induce cell surface translocation and secretion of ANXA1. Our results suggest a role for ANXA1 as a highly versatile component in the signaling chains triggered by the proper calcium perturbation that takes place during active migration and differentiation or membrane repair since the protein is strongly redistributed onto the plasma membranes after an rapid increase of intracellular levels of Ca2+. These properties indicate that ANXA1 may be involved in a novel repair mechanism for skeletal muscle and may have therapeutic implications with respect to the

  3. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors.

  4. Miniaturized autonomous robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Hidenori; Fukuda, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Many projects developing the miniaturized autonomous robot have been carried out in the whole world. This paper deals with our challenges developing a miniaturized autonomous robot. The miniaturized autonomous robot is defined as the miniaturized closed-loop system with micro processor, microactuators and microsensors. We have developed the micro autonomous robotic system (MARS) consisting of the microprocessor, microsensors, microactuators, communication units and batteries. The MARS controls itself by the downloaded program supplied through the IR communication system. In this paper, we demonstrate several performance of the MARS, and discuss the properties of the miniaturized autonomous robot.

  5. Immunosuppression after Sepsis: Systemic Inflammation and Sepsis Induce a Loss of Naïve T-Cells but No Enduring Cell-Autonomous Defects in T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Markwart, Robby; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Requardt, Robert P.; Borken, Farina; Schubert, Katja; Weigel, Cynthia; Bauer, Michael; Griffith, Thomas S.; Förster, Martin; Brunkhorst, Frank M.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Rubio, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis describes the life-threatening systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) of an organism to an infection and is the leading cause of mortality on intensive care units (ICU) worldwide. An acute episode of sepsis is characterized by the extensive release of cytokines and other mediators resulting in a dysregulated immune response leading to organ damage and/or death. This initial pro-inflammatory burst often transits into a state of immune suppression characterised by loss of immune cells and T-cell dysfunction at later disease stages in sepsis survivors. However, despite these appreciations, the precise nature of the evoked defect in T-cell immunity in post-acute phases of SIRS remains unknown. Here we present an in-depth functional analysis of T-cell function in post-acute SIRS/sepsis. We document that T-cell function is not compromised on a per cell basis in experimental rodent models of infection-free SIRS (LPS or CpG) or septic peritonitis. Transgenic antigen-specific T-cells feature an unaltered cytokine response if challenged in vivo and ex vivo with cognate antigens. Isolated CD4+/CD8+ T-cells from post-acute septic animals do not exhibit defects in T-cell receptor-mediated activation at the the level of receptor-proximal signalling, activation marker upregulation or expansion. However, SIRS/sepsis induced transient lymphopenia and gave rise to an environment of immune attenuation at post acute disease stages. Thus, systemic inflammation has an acute impact on T-cell numbers and adaptive immunity, but does not cause major cell-autonomous enduring functional defects in T-cells. PMID:25541945

  6. The autonomic laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

  7. Migratory dermal dendritic cells act as rapid sensors of protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lai Guan; Hsu, Alice; Mandell, Michael A; Roediger, Ben; Hoeller, Christoph; Mrass, Paulus; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Cavanagh, Lois L; Triccas, James A; Beverley, Stephen M; Scott, Phillip; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2008-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), including those of the skin, act as sentinels for intruding microorganisms. In the epidermis, DC (termed Langerhans cells, LC) are sessile and screen their microenvironment through occasional movements of their dendrites. The spatio-temporal orchestration of antigen encounter by dermal DC (DDC) is not known. Since these cells are thought to be instrumental in the initiation of immune responses during infection, we investigated their behavior directly within their natural microenvironment using intravital two-photon microscopy. Surprisingly, we found that, under homeostatic conditions, DDC were highly motile, continuously crawling through the interstitial space in a Galpha(i) protein-coupled receptor-dependent manner. However, within minutes after intradermal delivery of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, DDC became immobile and incorporated multiple parasites into cytosolic vacuoles. Parasite uptake occurred through the extension of long, highly dynamic pseudopods capable of tracking and engulfing parasites. This was then followed by rapid dendrite retraction towards the cell body. DDC were proficient at discriminating between parasites and inert particles, and parasite uptake was independent of the presence of neutrophils. Together, our study has visualized the dynamics and microenvironmental context of parasite encounter by an innate immune cell subset during the initiation of the immune response. Our results uncover a unique migratory tissue surveillance program of DDC that ensures the rapid detection of pathogens.

  8. The Autonomic Nervous System Regulates the Heart Rate through cAMP-PKA Dependent and Independent Coupled-Clock Pacemaker Cell Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Behar, Joachim; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Zhang, Jin; Yaniv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) generate spontaneous action potentials (APs) that control the cardiac rate. The brain modulates SANC automaticity, via the autonomic nervous system, by stimulating membrane receptors that activate (adrenergic) or inactivate (cholinergic) adenylyl cyclase (AC). However, these opposing afferents are not simply additive. We showed that activation of adrenergic signaling increases AC-cAMP/PKA signaling, which mediates the increase in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., positive chronotropic modulation). However, there is a limited understanding of the underlying internal pacemaker mechanisms involved in the crosstalk between cholinergic receptors and the decrease in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., negative chronotropic modulation). We hypothesize that changes in AC-cAMP/PKA activity are crucial for mediating either decrease or increase in the AP firing rate and that the change in rate is due to both internal and membrane mechanisms. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirus expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, PKA activity and AP firing rate were tightly linked in response to either adrenergic receptor stimulation (by isoproterenol, ISO) or cholinergic stimulation (by carbachol, CCh). To identify the main molecular targets that mediate between PKA signaling and pacemaker function, we developed a mechanistic computational model. The model includes a description of autonomic-nervous receptors, post- translation signaling cascades, membrane molecules, and internal pacemaker mechanisms. Yielding results similar to those of the experiments, the model simulations faithfully reproduce the changes in AP firing rate in response to CCh or ISO or a combination of both (i.e., accentuated antagonism). Eliminating AC-cAMP-PKA signaling abolished the core effect of autonomic receptor stimulation on the AP firing rate. Specifically, disabling the phospholamban modulation of the SERCA activity resulted in a significantly reduced effect

  9. The Autonomic Nervous System Regulates the Heart Rate through cAMP-PKA Dependent and Independent Coupled-Clock Pacemaker Cell Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Joachim; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Zhang, Jin; Yaniv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) generate spontaneous action potentials (APs) that control the cardiac rate. The brain modulates SANC automaticity, via the autonomic nervous system, by stimulating membrane receptors that activate (adrenergic) or inactivate (cholinergic) adenylyl cyclase (AC). However, these opposing afferents are not simply additive. We showed that activation of adrenergic signaling increases AC-cAMP/PKA signaling, which mediates the increase in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., positive chronotropic modulation). However, there is a limited understanding of the underlying internal pacemaker mechanisms involved in the crosstalk between cholinergic receptors and the decrease in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., negative chronotropic modulation). We hypothesize that changes in AC-cAMP/PKA activity are crucial for mediating either decrease or increase in the AP firing rate and that the change in rate is due to both internal and membrane mechanisms. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirus expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, PKA activity and AP firing rate were tightly linked in response to either adrenergic receptor stimulation (by isoproterenol, ISO) or cholinergic stimulation (by carbachol, CCh). To identify the main molecular targets that mediate between PKA signaling and pacemaker function, we developed a mechanistic computational model. The model includes a description of autonomic-nervous receptors, post- translation signaling cascades, membrane molecules, and internal pacemaker mechanisms. Yielding results similar to those of the experiments, the model simulations faithfully reproduce the changes in AP firing rate in response to CCh or ISO or a combination of both (i.e., accentuated antagonism). Eliminating AC-cAMP-PKA signaling abolished the core effect of autonomic receptor stimulation on the AP firing rate. Specifically, disabling the phospholamban modulation of the SERCA activity resulted in a significantly reduced effect

  10. Human Germinal Center CD4+ CD57+ T Cells Act Differently On B Cells Than Do Classical T-Helper Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bouzahzah, Farida; Bosseloir, Alain; Simar, Léon J.

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated two subtypes of helper T cells from human tonsils: CD4+ CD57+ cells, mostly located in the germinal center (GC), and CD4+ CD57- cells, distributed through the interfollicular areas but also present in the GC. In a functional study, we have compared the capacities of these T-cell subtypes to stimulate B cells in cocultures. In order to block T-cell proliferation while maintaining their activation level, we pretreated isolated T cells with mitomycin C prior to culture in the presence of B cells and added polyclonal activators such as PHA and Con A, combined or not with IL-2. Contrary to CD4+ CD57- cells, CD4+ CD57+ cells did not markedly enhance B-cell proliferation. Even when sIgD-B cells typical of germinal center cells were tested, the CD4 CD57 cells had no significant effect. This is in accordance with the location of these cells: They mainly occupy the light zones of the GC where few B cells divide. Even when added to preactivated, actively proliferating cells, CD4+ CD57+ cells failed to modulate B-cell multiplication. On the supernatants of B-cell-T-cell cocultures, we examined by the ELISA technique the effect of T cells on Ig synthesis. Contrary to CD57- T cells, whose effect was strong, CD57+ T cells weakly stimulated Ig synthesis. More IgM than IgG was generally found. Because CD57 antigen is a typical marker of natural killer cells, we tested the cytolytic activity of tonsillar CD4+ CD57+ cells on K562 target cells. Unlike NK cells, neither CD4+CD57+ nor CD4+ CD57- cells exhibit any cytotoxicity. Thus, germinal center CD4+ CD57+ cells are not cytolytic and do not strongly stimulate either B-cell proliferation or Ig secretion. CD4+ CD57- cells, however, enhance B-cell proliferation and differentiation, thus acting like the classical helper cells of the T-dependent areas. PMID:8770558

  11. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2014-09-01

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale-from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems-their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous the

  12. Small heat shock proteins mediate cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous protection in a Drosophila model for environmental-stress-induced degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Fumiko; Koonce, Noelle L; Guo, Linda; Fatima, Shahroz; Qiu, Catherine; Moon, Mackenzie T; Zheng, Yunzhen; Ordway, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Cell and tissue degeneration, and the development of degenerative diseases, are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affect protein misfolding and proteotoxicity. To better understand the role of the environment in degeneration, we developed a genetic model for heat shock (HS)-stress-induced degeneration in Drosophila This model exhibits a unique combination of features that enhance genetic analysis of degeneration and protection mechanisms involving environmental stress. These include cell-type-specific failure of proteostasis and degeneration in response to global stress, cell-nonautonomous interactions within a simple and accessible network of susceptible cell types, and precise temporal control over the induction of degeneration. In wild-type flies, HS stress causes selective loss of the flight ability and degeneration of three susceptible cell types comprising the flight motor: muscle, motor neurons and associated glia. Other motor behaviors persist and, accordingly, the corresponding cell types controlling leg motor function are resistant to degeneration. Flight motor degeneration was preceded by a failure of muscle proteostasis characterized by diffuse ubiquitinated protein aggregates. Moreover, muscle-specific overexpression of a small heat shock protein (HSP), HSP23, promoted proteostasis and protected muscle from HS stress. Notably, neurons and glia were protected as well, indicating that a small HSP can mediate cell-nonautonomous protection. Cell-autonomous protection of muscle was characterized by a distinct distribution of ubiquitinated proteins, including perinuclear localization and clearance of protein aggregates associated with the perinuclear microtubule network. This network was severely disrupted in wild-type preparations prior to degeneration, suggesting that it serves an important role in muscle proteostasis and protection. Finally, studies of resistant leg muscles revealed that they sustain proteostasis and the microtubule

  13. Small heat shock proteins mediate cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous protection in a Drosophila model for environmental-stress-induced degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Fumiko; Koonce, Noelle L.; Guo, Linda; Fatima, Shahroz; Qiu, Catherine; Moon, Mackenzie T.; Zheng, Yunzhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell and tissue degeneration, and the development of degenerative diseases, are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affect protein misfolding and proteotoxicity. To better understand the role of the environment in degeneration, we developed a genetic model for heat shock (HS)-stress-induced degeneration in Drosophila. This model exhibits a unique combination of features that enhance genetic analysis of degeneration and protection mechanisms involving environmental stress. These include cell-type-specific failure of proteostasis and degeneration in response to global stress, cell-nonautonomous interactions within a simple and accessible network of susceptible cell types, and precise temporal control over the induction of degeneration. In wild-type flies, HS stress causes selective loss of the flight ability and degeneration of three susceptible cell types comprising the flight motor: muscle, motor neurons and associated glia. Other motor behaviors persist and, accordingly, the corresponding cell types controlling leg motor function are resistant to degeneration. Flight motor degeneration was preceded by a failure of muscle proteostasis characterized by diffuse ubiquitinated protein aggregates. Moreover, muscle-specific overexpression of a small heat shock protein (HSP), HSP23, promoted proteostasis and protected muscle from HS stress. Notably, neurons and glia were protected as well, indicating that a small HSP can mediate cell-nonautonomous protection. Cell-autonomous protection of muscle was characterized by a distinct distribution of ubiquitinated proteins, including perinuclear localization and clearance of protein aggregates associated with the perinuclear microtubule network. This network was severely disrupted in wild-type preparations prior to degeneration, suggesting that it serves an important role in muscle proteostasis and protection. Finally, studies of resistant leg muscles revealed that they sustain proteostasis and the

  14. Two autonomous structural modules in the fimbrial shaft adhesin FimA mediate Actinomyces interactions with streptococci and host cells during oral biofilm development

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Arunima; Devarajan, Bharanidharan; Reardon, Melissa E.; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Krishnan, Vengadesan; Cisar, John O.; Das, Asis; Narayana, Sthanam V.L.; Ton-That, Hung

    2011-09-06

    By combining X-ray crystallography and modelling, we describe here the atomic structure of distinct adhesive moieties of FimA, the shaft fimbrillin of Actinomyces type 2 fimbriae, which uniquely mediates the receptor-dependent intercellular interactions between Actinomyces and oral streptococci as well as host cells during the development of oral biofilms. The FimA adhesin is built with three IgG-like domains, each of which harbours an intramolecular isopeptide bond, previously described in several Gram-positive pilins. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that although these isopeptide bonds are dispensable for fimbrial assembly, cell-cell interactions and biofilm formation, they contribute significantly to the proteolytic stability of FimA. Remarkably, FimA harbours two autonomous adhesive modules, which structurally resemble the Staphylococcus aureus Cna B domain. Each isolated module can bind the plasma glycoprotein asialofetuin as well as the polysaccharide receptors present on the surface of oral streptococci and epithelial cells. Thus, FimA should serve as an excellent paradigm for the development of therapeutic strategies and elucidating the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between cellular receptors and Gram-positive fimbriae.

  15. Notch signaling acts before cell division to promote asymmetric cleavage and cell fate of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2014-10-21

    Asymmetric cell divisions in the central nervous system generate neurons of diverse fates. In Drosophila melanogaster, the protein Numb localizes asymmetrically to dividing neural precursor cells such that only one daughter cell inherits Numb. Numb inhibits Notch signaling in this daughter cell, resulting in a different cell fate from the Notch-induced fate in the other-Numb-negative-daughter cell. Precursor cells undergo asymmetric cytokinesis generating daughter cells of different sizes. I found that inactivation of Notch in fly embryonic neural precursor cells disrupted the asymmetric positioning of the cleavage furrow and produced daughter cells of the same size and fate. Moreover, inactivation of Notch at different times altered the degree of asymmetric Numb localization, such that earlier inactivation of Notch caused symmetric distribution of Numb and later inactivation produced incomplete asymmetric localization of Numb. The extent of asymmetrically localized Numb positively correlated with the degree of asymmetric cytokinesis and the size disparity in daughter cells. Loss of Numb or expression of constitutively active Notch led to premature specification of the precursor cells into the fate of one of the daughter cells. Thus, in addition to its role in the specification of daughter cell fate after division, Notch controls Numb localization in the precursor cells to determine the size and fate of daughter cells. Numb also inhibits Notch signaling in precursor cells to prevent Notch-induced differentiation of the precursor cell, forming an autoregulatory loop.

  16. Clodronate acts on human osteoclastic cell proliferation, differentiation and function in a bioreversible manner

    PubMed Central

    Recenti, Raffaella; Leone, Giuseppe; Simi, Lisa; Orfei, Marco; Pinzani, Pamela; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Moneti, Gloriano; Carossino, Anna Maria; Franchi, Alessandro; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Background. Clodronate is used in high bone resorption diseases. Its action was defined as “cytotoxic” based on the induced cellular ATP loss, without any experimental verification of reversibility. In the present report the reversibility of clodronate action was tested on cultured human osteoclastic cell cultures. As “in vitro” bioeffects of clodronate are reversible, this compound should not be defined as “cytotoxic”. Introduction. Bisphosphonates are pyrophosphate analogs able to inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone resorption widely used in the treatment of diseases with high bone turnover. Several evidences have shown that bisphosphonates can be divided into two groups with distinct molecular mechanisms of action depending on the nature of the R2side chain. The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates act on osteoclasts by preventing protein prenylation, while non-nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates, like clodronate, are metabolized intracellularly to a β-γ-methylene analog of ATP that induces inhibition of the ADP/ATP translocase. Materials and Methods. In order to evaluate clodronate effects on osteoclastic cells and the bioreversibility of its action, we have used a human preosteoclastic (FLG 29.1) cell line and primary cultures of human osteoclast-like (HOC) cells. Functional and differentiative modifications were evaluated with immunocytochemical tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity (TRAcP) assay and with rapid quantitative detection of the complex “matrix metalloproteinase 9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase” (MMP9/TIMP1) by RT-PCR analysis based on “TaqMan” technology. The apoptosis phenomenon were detected by DNA ladder analysis and quantified by counting apoptotic cells with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis. Adenosine-5’-[ β - γ -dichloromethylene] triphosphate (AppCCl2p) was detected and identified in cell extract by HPLC-ESI-MS-MS Mass Spectrometry. Intracellular ATP modulation in the presence of

  17. MIBE acts as antagonist ligand of both estrogen receptor α and GPER in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The multiple biological responses to estrogens are mainly mediated by the classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, which act as ligand-activated transcription factors. ERα exerts a main role in the development of breast cancer; therefore, the ER antagonist tamoxifen has been widely used although its effectiveness is limited by de novo and acquired resistance. Recently, GPR30/GPER, a member of the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family, has been implicated in mediating the effects of estrogens in various normal and cancer cells. In particular, GPER triggered gene expression and proliferative responses induced by estrogens and even ER antagonists in hormone-sensitive tumor cells. Likewise, additional ER ligands showed the ability to bind to GPER eliciting promiscuous and, in some cases, opposite actions through the two receptors. We synthesized a novel compound (ethyl 3-[5-(2-ethoxycarbonyl-1-methylvinyloxy)-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]but-2-enoate), referred to as MIBE, and investigated its properties elicited through ERα and GPER in breast cancer cells. Methods Molecular modeling, binding experiments and functional assays were performed in order to evaluate the biological action exerted by MIBE through ERα and GPER in MCF7 and SkBr3 breast cancer cells. Results MIBE displayed the ability to act as an antagonist ligand for ERα and GPER as it elicited inhibitory effects on gene transcription and growth effects by binding to both receptors in breast cancer cells. Moreover, GPER was required for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ERK activation by EGF as ascertained by using MIBE and performing gene silencing experiments. Conclusions Our findings provide novel insights on the functional cross-talk between GPER and EGFR signaling. Furthermore, the exclusive antagonistic activity exerted by MIBE on ERα and GPER could represent an innovative pharmacological approach targeting breast carcinomas which express one or both receptors at

  18. Intelligent Mobile Autonomous System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    jerk application. (c) Negative jerk application. Group (a). Application of positve jerk. Force is increased from initial value to force of resistance...fundamentals of the new emerging area of autonomous robotics . The goal of this research is to develop a theory of design and functioning of Intelligent...scientific research. This report contributes to a new rapidly developing area of autonomous robotics . Actual experience of dealing with autonomous robots (or

  19. Auxin Acts in Xylem-Associated or Medullary Cells to Mediate Apical Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Jonathan; Chatfield, Steven; Leyser, Ottoline

    2003-01-01

    A role for auxin in the regulation of shoot branching was described originally in the Thimann and Skoog model, which proposes that apically derived auxin is transported basipetally directly into the axillary buds, where it inhibits their growth. Subsequent observations in several species have shown that auxin does not enter axillary buds directly. We have found similar results in Arabidopsis. Grafting studies indicated that auxin acts in the aerial tissue; hence, the principal site of auxin action is the shoot. To delineate the site of auxin action, the wild-type AXR1 coding sequence, which is required for normal auxin sensitivity, was expressed under the control of several tissue-specific promoters in the auxin-resistant, highly branched axr1-12 mutant background. AXR1 expression in the xylem and interfascicular schlerenchyma was found to restore the mutant branching to wild-type levels in both intact plants and isolated nodes, whereas expression in the phloem did not. Therefore, apically derived auxin can suppress branching by acting in the xylem and interfascicular schlerenchyma, or in a subset of these cells. PMID:12566587

  20. Direct conversion of patient fibroblasts demonstrates non-cell autonomous toxicity of astrocytes to motor neurons in familial and sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kathrin; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Miranda, Carlos J.; Likhite, Shibi; McElroy, Sohyun; Renusch, Samantha; Ditsworth, Dara; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Smith, Richard A.; Ravits, John; Burghes, Arthur H.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Cleveland, Don W.; Kolb, Stephen J.; Kaspar, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes motor neuron degeneration, paralysis, and death. Accurate disease modeling, identifying disease mechanisms, and developing therapeutics is urgently needed. We previously reported motor neuron toxicity through postmortem ALS spinal cord-derived astrocytes. However, these cells can only be harvested after death, and their expansion is limited. We now report a rapid, highly reproducible method to convert adult human fibroblasts from living ALS patients to induced neuronal progenitor cells and subsequent differentiation into astrocytes (i-astrocytes). Non-cell autonomous toxicity to motor neurons is found following coculture of i-astrocytes from familial ALS patients with mutation in superoxide dismutase or hexanucleotide expansion in C9orf72 (ORF 72 on chromosome 9) the two most frequent causes of ALS. Remarkably, i-astrocytes from sporadic ALS patients are as toxic as those with causative mutations, suggesting a common mechanism. Easy production and expansion of i-astrocytes now enables rapid disease modeling and high-throughput drug screening to alleviate astrocyte-derived toxicity. PMID:24379375

  1. IL-17A exacerbates diabetic retinopathy by impairing Müller cell function via Act1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ao-Wang; Bian, Zheng; Mao, Ping-An; Liu, Qing-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the most serious complications of diabetes, has been associated with inflammatory processes. We have recently reported that interleukin (IL)-17A, a proinflammatory cytokine, is increased in the plasma of diabetic patients. Further investigation is required to clarify the role of IL-17A in DR. Ins2Akita (Akita) diabetic mice and high-glucose (HG)-treated primary Müller cells were used to mimic DR-like pathology. Diabetes induced retinal expression of IL-17A and IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) in Müller cells in contrast to ganglion cells. Further evidence demonstrated that retinal Müller cells cultured in vitro increased IL-17A and IL-17RA expression as well as IL-17A secretion in the HG condition. In both the HG-treated Müller cells and Akita mouse retina, the Act1/TRAF6/IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway was activated. IL-17A further enhanced inflammatory signaling activation, whereas Act1 knockdown or IKK inhibition blocked the downstream signaling activation by IL-17A. HG- and diabetes-induced Müller cell activation and dysfunction, as determined by increased glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and glutamate levels and decreased glutamine synthetase and excitatory amino acid transporter-1 expression, were exacerbated by IL-17A; however, they were alleviated by Act1 knockdown or IKK inhibition. In addition, IL-17A intravitreal injection aggravated diabetes-induced retinal vascular leukostasis, vascular leakage and ganglion cell apoptosis, whereas Act1 silencing or anti-IL-17A monoclonal antibody ameliorated the retinal vascular damage and neuronal cell apoptosis. These findings establish that IL-17A exacerbates DR-like pathology by the promotion of Müller cell functional impairment via Act1 signaling. PMID:27980343

  2. TWIST1 associates with NF-κB subunit RELA via carboxyl-terminal WR domain to promote cell autonomous invasion through IL8 production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metastasis is the primary cause of death for cancer patients. TWIST1, an evolutionarily conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, is a strong promoter of metastatic spread and its expression is elevated in many advanced human carcinomas. However, the molecular events triggered by TWIST1 to motivate dissemination of cancer cells are largely unknown. Results Here we show that TWIST1 induces the production of interleukin 8 (IL8), which activates matrix metalloproteinases and promotes invasion of breast epithelial and cancer cells. In this novel mechanism, TWIST1-mediated IL8 transcription is induced through the TWIST1 carboxy-terminal WR (Trp-Arg) domain instead of the classic DNA binding bHLH domain. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the WR domain mediates the formation of a protein complex comprised of TWIST1 and the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) subunit RELA (p65/NF-κB3), which synergistically activates the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. This activation leads to increased DNA binding affinity of RELA to the IL8 promoter and thus induces the expression of the cytokine. Blockage of IL8 signaling by IL8 neutralizing antibodies or receptor inhibition reduced the invasiveness of both breast epithelial and cancer cells, indicating that TWIST1 induces autonomous cell invasion by establishing an IL8 antocrine loop. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the TWIST1 WR domain plays a critical role in TWIST1-induced IL8 expression through interactions with and activation of NF-κB. The produced IL8 signals through an autocrine loop and promotes extracellular matrix degradation to enable cell invasion across the basement membrane. PMID:22891766

  3. BMP4 acts as a dorsal telencephalic morphogen in a mouse embryonic stem cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Momoko; Fung, Ernest S; Chan, Felicia B; Wong, Jessica S; Coutts, Margaret; Monuki, Edwin S

    2016-12-15

    The concept of a morphogen - a molecule that specifies two or more cell fates in a concentration-dependent manner - is paradigmatic in developmental biology. Much remains unknown, however, about the existence of morphogens in the developing vertebrate central nervous system (CNS), including the mouse dorsal telencephalic midline (DTM). Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are candidate DTM morphogens, and our previous work demonstrated BMP4 sufficiency to induce one DTM cell fate - that of choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs) - in a mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) culture system. Here we used BMP4 in a modified mESC culture system to derive a second DTM fate, the cortical hem (CH). CH and CPEC markers were induced by BMP4 in a concentration-dependent manner consistent with in vivo development. BMP4 concentrations that led to CH fate also promoted markers for Cajal-Retzius neurons, which are known CH derivatives. Interestingly, single BMP4 administrations also sufficed for appropriate temporal regulation of CH, CPEC, and cortical genes, with initially broad and overlapping dose-response profiles that sharpened over time. BMP4 concentrations that yielded CH- or CPEC-enriched populations also had different steady-state levels of phospho-SMAD1/5/8, suggesting that differences in BMP signaling intensity underlie DTM fate choice. Surprisingly, inactivation of the cortical selector gene Lhx2 did not affect DTM expression levels, dose-response profiles, or timing in response to BMP4, although neural progenitor genes were downregulated. These data indicate that BMP4 can act as a classic morphogen to orchestrate both spatial and temporal aspects of DTM fate acquisition, and can do so in the absence of Lhx2.

  4. BMP4 acts as a dorsal telencephalic morphogen in a mouse embryonic stem cell culture system

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Momoko; Fung, Ernest S.; Chan, Felicia B.; Wong, Jessica S.; Coutts, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The concept of a morphogen – a molecule that specifies two or more cell fates in a concentration-dependent manner – is paradigmatic in developmental biology. Much remains unknown, however, about the existence of morphogens in the developing vertebrate central nervous system (CNS), including the mouse dorsal telencephalic midline (DTM). Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are candidate DTM morphogens, and our previous work demonstrated BMP4 sufficiency to induce one DTM cell fate – that of choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs) – in a mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) culture system. Here we used BMP4 in a modified mESC culture system to derive a second DTM fate, the cortical hem (CH). CH and CPEC markers were induced by BMP4 in a concentration-dependent manner consistent with in vivo development. BMP4 concentrations that led to CH fate also promoted markers for Cajal–Retzius neurons, which are known CH derivatives. Interestingly, single BMP4 administrations also sufficed for appropriate temporal regulation of CH, CPEC, and cortical genes, with initially broad and overlapping dose-response profiles that sharpened over time. BMP4 concentrations that yielded CH- or CPEC-enriched populations also had different steady-state levels of phospho-SMAD1/5/8, suggesting that differences in BMP signaling intensity underlie DTM fate choice. Surprisingly, inactivation of the cortical selector gene Lhx2 did not affect DTM expression levels, dose-response profiles, or timing in response to BMP4, although neural progenitor genes were downregulated. These data indicate that BMP4 can act as a classic morphogen to orchestrate both spatial and temporal aspects of DTM fate acquisition, and can do so in the absence of Lhx2. PMID:27815243

  5. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  6. HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy functions in a cell-autonomous manner for epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against bacterial pore-forming toxin in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Da; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Liu, Bang-Yu; Huang, Shin-Whei; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Lin, Yen-Hung; Huang, Cheng-Rung; Chen, Yu-Hung; Wang, Horng-Dar; Aroian, Raffi V; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular system that maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading and recycling damaged cellular components. The transcription factor HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy has been reported to regulate tolerance to bacterial infection, but less is known about the bona fide bacterial effector that activates HLH-30 and autophagy. Here, we reveal that bacterial membrane pore-forming toxin (PFT) induces autophagy in an HLH-30-dependent manner in Caenorhabditis elegans. Moreover, autophagy controls the susceptibility of animals to PFT toxicity through xenophagic degradation of PFT and repair of membrane-pore cell-autonomously in the PFT-targeted intestinal cells in C. elegans. These results demonstrate that autophagic pathways and autophagy are induced partly at the transcriptional level through HLH-30 activation and are required to protect metazoan upon PFT intoxication. Together, our data show a new and powerful connection between HLH-30-mediated autophagy and epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against the single most common mode of bacterial attack in vivo.

  7. HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy functions in a cell-autonomous manner for epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against bacterial pore-forming toxin in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Da; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Liu, Bang-Yu; Huang, Shin-Whei; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Lin, Yen-Hung; Huang, Cheng-Rung; Chen, Yu-Hung; Wang, Horng-Dar; Aroian, Raffi V.; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular system that maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading and recycling damaged cellular components. The transcription factor HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy has been reported to regulate tolerance to bacterial infection, but less is known about the bona fide bacterial effector that activates HLH-30 and autophagy. Here, we reveal that bacterial membrane pore-forming toxin (PFT) induces autophagy in an HLH-30-dependent manner in Caenorhabditis elegans. Moreover, autophagy controls the susceptibility of animals to PFT toxicity through xenophagic degradation of PFT and repair of membrane-pore cell-autonomously in the PFT-targeted intestinal cells in C. elegans. These results demonstrate that autophagic pathways and autophagy are induced partly at the transcriptional level through HLH-30 activation and are required to protect metazoan upon PFT intoxication. Together, our data show a new and powerful connection between HLH-30-mediated autophagy and epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against the single most common mode of bacterial attack in vivo. PMID:27875098

  8. Synergistically acting agonists and antagonists of G protein–coupled receptors prevent photoreceptor cell degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Palczewska, Grazyna; Masuho, Ikuo; Gao, Songqi; Jin, Hui; Dong, Zhiqian; Gieser, Linn; Brooks, Matthew J.; Kiser, Philip D.; Kern, Timothy S.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Swaroop, Anand; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell degeneration leads to visual impairment and blindness in several types of retinal disease. However, the discovery of safe and effective therapeutic strategies conferring photoreceptor cell protection remains challenging. Targeting distinct cellular pathways with low doses of different drugs that produce a functionally synergistic effect could provide a strategy for preventing or treating retinal dystrophies. We took a systems pharmacology approach to identify potential combination therapies using a mouse model of light-induced retinal degeneration. We showed that a combination of U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drugs that act on different G protein (guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibited synergistic activity that protected retinas from light-induced degeneration even when each drug was administered at a low dose. In functional assays, the combined effects of these drugs were stimulation of Gi/o signaling by activating the dopamine receptors D2R and D4R, as well as inhibition of Gs and Gq signaling by antagonizing D1R and the α1A-adrenergic receptor ADRA1A, respectively. Moreover, transcriptome analyses demonstrated that such combined GPCR-targeted treatments preserved patterns of retinal gene expression that were more similar to those of the normal retina than did higher-dose monotherapy. Our study thus supports a systems pharmacology approach to identify treatments for retinopathies, an approach that could extend to other complex disorders. PMID:27460988

  9. UVB represses melanocyte cell migration and acts through β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Juliette U; Petit, Valérie; Hacker, Elke; Berlin, Irina; Hayward, Nicholas K; Pouteaux, Marie; Sage, Evelyne; Whiteman, David C; Larue, Lionel

    2017-02-13

    The exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation can have both beneficial and deleterious effects: it can lead, for instance, to increased pigmentation and vitamin D synthesis but also to inflammation and skin cancer. UVB may induce genetic and epigenetic alterations, and have reversible effects associated with post-translational and gene regulation modifications. β-catenin is a main driver in melanocyte development; although infrequently mutated in melanoma, its cellular localization and activity is frequently altered. Here, we evaluate the consequence of UVB on β-catenin in the melanocyte lineage. We report that in vivo, UVB induces cytoplasmic/nuclear relocalization of β-catenin in melanocytes of newborn mice and adult human skin. In mouse melanocyte and human melanoma cell lines in vitro, UVB increases β-catenin stability, accumulation in the nucleus, and co-transcriptional activity, leading to the repression of cell motility and velocity. The activation of the β-catenin signaling pathway and its effect on migration by UVB are increased by an inhibitor of GSK3β, and decreased by an inhibitor of β-catenin. In conclusion, UVB represses melanocyte migration and does so by acting through the GSK3-β-catenin axis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. SNM1A Acts Downstream of ATM to Promote the G1 Cell Cycle Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Shamima; Legerski, Randy J.

    2008-01-01

    We have shown previously that SNM1A co-localizes with 53BP1 at sites of double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by IR, and that these proteins interact with or without DNA damage. However, the role of SNM1A in the DNA damage response has not been elucidated. Here, we show that SNM1A is required for an efficient G1 checkpoint arrest after IR exposure. Interestingly, the localization of SNM1A to sites of DSBs does not require either 53BP1 or H2AX, nor does the localization of 53BP1 require SNM1A. However, the localization of SNM1A does require ATM. Furthermore, SNM1A is shown to be a phosphorylation substrate of ATM in vitro, and to interact with ATM in vivo particularly after exposure of cells to IR. In addition, in the absence of SNM1A the activation of the downstream ATM target p53 is reduced. These findings suggest that SNM1A acts with ATM to promote the G1 cell cycle checkpoint. PMID:18848520

  11. Tbx1 is required autonomously for cell survival and fate in the pharyngeal core mesoderm to form the muscles of mastication

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Racedo, Silvia E.; Macchiarulo, Stephania; Hu, Zunju; Carpenter, Courtney; Guo, Tingwei; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Deyou; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2014-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a congenital anomaly disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies including velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, facial muscle hypotonia and feeding difficulties, in part due to hypoplasia of the branchiomeric muscles. Inactivation of both alleles of mouse Tbx1, encoding a T-box transcription factor, deleted on chromosome 22q11.2, results in reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles. To identify downstream pathways, we performed gene profiling of microdissected pharyngeal arch one (PA1) from Tbx1+/+ and Tbx1−/− embryos at stages E9.5 (somites 20–25) and E10.5 (somites 30–35). Basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors were reduced, while secondary heart field genes were increased in expression early and were replaced by an increase in expression of cellular stress response genes later, suggesting a change in gene expression patterns or cell populations. Lineage tracing studies using Mesp1Cre and T-Cre drivers showed that core mesoderm cells within PA1 were present at E9.5 but were greatly reduced by E10.5 in Tbx1−/− embryos. Using Tbx1Cre knock-in mice, we found that cells are lost due to apoptosis, consistent with increase in expression of cellular stress response genes at E10.5. To determine whether Tbx1 is required autonomously in the core mesoderm, we used Mesp1Cre and T-Cre mesodermal drivers in combination with inactivate Tbx1 and found reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles from PA1. These mechanistic studies inform us that Tbx1 is required upstream of key myogenic genes needed for core mesoderm cell survival and fate, between E9.5 and E10.5, resulting in formation of the branchiomeric muscles. PMID:24705356

  12. Tbx1 is required autonomously for cell survival and fate in the pharyngeal core mesoderm to form the muscles of mastication.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Racedo, Silvia E; Macchiarulo, Stephania; Hu, Zunju; Carpenter, Courtney; Guo, Tingwei; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Deyou; Morrow, Bernice E

    2014-08-15

    Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a congenital anomaly disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies including velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, facial muscle hypotonia and feeding difficulties, in part due to hypoplasia of the branchiomeric muscles. Inactivation of both alleles of mouse Tbx1, encoding a T-box transcription factor, deleted on chromosome 22q11.2, results in reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles. To identify downstream pathways, we performed gene profiling of microdissected pharyngeal arch one (PA1) from Tbx1(+/+) and Tbx1(-/-) embryos at stages E9.5 (somites 20-25) and E10.5 (somites 30-35). Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors were reduced, while secondary heart field genes were increased in expression early and were replaced by an increase in expression of cellular stress response genes later, suggesting a change in gene expression patterns or cell populations. Lineage tracing studies using Mesp1(Cre) and T-Cre drivers showed that core mesoderm cells within PA1 were present at E9.5 but were greatly reduced by E10.5 in Tbx1(-/-) embryos. Using Tbx1(Cre) knock-in mice, we found that cells are lost due to apoptosis, consistent with increase in expression of cellular stress response genes at E10.5. To determine whether Tbx1 is required autonomously in the core mesoderm, we used Mesp1(Cre) and T-Cre mesodermal drivers in combination with inactivate Tbx1 and found reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles from PA1. These mechanistic studies inform us that Tbx1 is required upstream of key myogenic genes needed for core mesoderm cell survival and fate, between E9.5 and E10.5, resulting in formation of the branchiomeric muscles.

  13. Non-autonomous DAF-16/FOXO activity antagonizes age-related loss of C. elegans germline stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhao; Hubbard, E. Jane Albert

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells maintain tissues and organs over the lifespan of individuals. How aging influences this process is unclear. Here we investigate the effects of aging on C. elegans germline stem/progenitor cells and show that the progenitor pool is depleted over time in a manner dependent on inhibition of DAF-16/FOXO by insulin/IGF-1 signalling (IIS). Our data indicate that DAF-16/FOXO activity in certain somatic gonad cells is required for germline progenitor maintenance, and that this role is separable from the effect of DAF-16/FOXO on organismal aging. In addition, blocking germ cell flux, similar to reducing IIS, maintains germline progenitors. This effect is partially dependent on gonadal DAF-16/FOXO activity. Our results imply that (1) longevity pathways can regulate aging stem cells through anatomically separable mechanisms, (2) stem cell maintenance is not necessarily prioritized and (3) stem cell regulation can occur at the level of an entire organ system such as the reproductive system. PMID:25960195

  14. Autonomous multifunctional nanobrushes-autonomous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.; Tius, Marcus A.

    2007-04-01

    In this work, taking advantage of carbon nanotubes' small size, and exceptional mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, we report on a series of nano-synthesis procedures that combine conventional chemical vapor deposition and selective substrate area growth followed by chemical functionalizations to fabricate functionalized nano-brushes from aligned carbon nanotube arrays and chemically selective functional groups. The high aspect ratio and small dimension, mechanical stability and flexibility, surface chemical and adhesive characteristics of carbon nanotubes provide opportunities to create nano-brushes with selected chemical functionalities. The nano-brushes are made from aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube bristles grafted onto long SiC fiber handles in various configurations and functionalized with various chemical functional groups. These nano-brushes can easily be manipulated physically, either manually or with the aid of motors. Here, we explain the autonomous characteristics of the functionalized nano-brushes employing functional chemical groups such that the nano-brush can potentially collect various metal particles, ions, and contaminants from liquid solutions and the air environment, autonomously. These functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube based nano-brushes can work swiftly in both liquid and air environments. With surface modification and functionalization, the nanotube nano-brushes can potentially become a versatile nano-devices in many chemical and biological applications, where they can autonomously pick up the particles they encounter since they can be chemically programmed to function as Autonomous Chemical Nano Robots (ACNR).

  15. ETV6/ARG oncoprotein confers autonomous cell growth by enhancing c-Myc expression via signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 activation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line HT93A.

    PubMed

    Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Takei, Masami

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of ETV6/ARG fusion gene by exposing the HT93A cell line to nilotinib. HT93A cells were cultured with or without nilotinib±50 ng/mL of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Nilotinib treatment inhibited cell growth by increasing the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase through the decrease of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) (Y705), STAT5 (Y694) and c-Myc expression. After stimulation with G-CSF, STAT5 but not STAT3 was significantly phosphorylated in both nilotinib-treated and untreated cells. Moreover, combination therapy with nilotinib and G-CSF returned the expression level of c-Myc, cell growth and cell cycle distribution to the control level. These findings suggest that the ETV6/ARG oncoprotein contributes to autonomous cell growth by compensating for the requirement of growth factor through activating STAT5 signaling, which leads to the up-regulation of c-Myc. Our data suggest that ETV6/ARG oncoprotein is a potential target in the treatment of leukemia.

  16. Non-cell autonomous cues for enhanced functionality of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes via maturation of sarcolemmal and mitochondrial KATP channels.

    PubMed

    Keung, Wendy; Ren, Lihuan; Sen Li; Wong, Andy On-Tik; Chopra, Anant; Kong, Chi-Wing; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Chen, Christopher S; Li, Ronald A

    2016-09-28

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a potential unlimited ex vivo source of ventricular (V) cardiomyocytes (CMs), but hESC-VCMs and their engineered tissues display immature traits. In adult VCMs, sarcolemmal (sarc) and mitochondrial (mito) ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play crucial roles in excitability and cardioprotection. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological roles and use of sarcKATP and mitoKATP in hESC-VCM. We showed that SarcIK, ATP in single hESC-VCMs was dormant under baseline conditions, but became markedly activated by cyanide (CN) or the known opener P1075 with a current density that was ~8-fold smaller than adult; These effects were reversible upon washout or the addition of GLI or HMR1098. Interestingly, sarcIK, ATP displayed a ~3-fold increase after treatment with hypoxia (5% O2). MitoIK, ATP was absent in hESC-VCMs. However, the thyroid hormone T3 up-regulated mitoIK, ATP, conferring diazoxide protective effect on T3-treated hESC-VCMs. When assessed using a multi-cellular engineered 3D ventricular cardiac micro-tissue (hvCMT) system, T3 substantially enhanced the developed tension by 3-folds. Diazoxide also attenuated the decrease in contractility induced by simulated ischemia (1% O2). We conclude that hypoxia and T3 enhance the functionality of hESC-VCMs and their engineered tissues by selectively acting on sarc and mitoIK, ATP.

  17. Non-cell autonomous cues for enhanced functionality of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes via maturation of sarcolemmal and mitochondrial KATP channels

    PubMed Central

    Keung, Wendy; Ren, Lihuan; Sen Li; Wong, Andy On-Tik; Chopra, Anant; Kong, Chi-Wing; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Chen, Christopher S.; Li, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a potential unlimited ex vivo source of ventricular (V) cardiomyocytes (CMs), but hESC-VCMs and their engineered tissues display immature traits. In adult VCMs, sarcolemmal (sarc) and mitochondrial (mito) ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play crucial roles in excitability and cardioprotection. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological roles and use of sarcKATP and mitoKATP in hESC-VCM. We showed that SarcIK, ATP in single hESC-VCMs was dormant under baseline conditions, but became markedly activated by cyanide (CN) or the known opener P1075 with a current density that was ~8-fold smaller than adult; These effects were reversible upon washout or the addition of GLI or HMR1098. Interestingly, sarcIK, ATP displayed a ~3-fold increase after treatment with hypoxia (5% O2). MitoIK, ATP was absent in hESC-VCMs. However, the thyroid hormone T3 up-regulated mitoIK, ATP, conferring diazoxide protective effect on T3-treated hESC-VCMs. When assessed using a multi-cellular engineered 3D ventricular cardiac micro-tissue (hvCMT) system, T3 substantially enhanced the developed tension by 3-folds. Diazoxide also attenuated the decrease in contractility induced by simulated ischemia (1% O2). We conclude that hypoxia and T3 enhance the functionality of hESC-VCMs and their engineered tissues by selectively acting on sarc and mitoIK, ATP. PMID:27677332

  18. Overexpression of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Disrupts Gonadal Sex Differentiation, Blocks Sex Hormone Synthesis, and Supports Cell Autonomous Sex Development in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Luke S; Morris, Kirsten; Ayers, Katie L; Wise, Terry G; O'Neil, Terri; Wilson, Susanne; Cao, Yu; Sinclair, Andrew H; Cutting, Andrew D; Doran, Timothy J; Smith, Craig A

    2016-03-01

    The primary role of Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) during mammalian development is the regression of Müllerian ducts in males. This highly conserved function is retained in birds and is supported by the high levels of AMH expression in developing testes. Mammalian AMH expression is regulated by a combination of transcription factors, the most important being Sry-type high-mobility-group box transcription factor-9 (SOX9). In the chicken embryo, however, AMH mRNA expression precedes that of SOX9, leading to the view that AMH may play a more central role in avian testicular development. To define its role in chicken gonadal development, AMH was overexpressed using the RCASBP viral vector. AMH caused the gonads of both sexes to develop as small and undeveloped structures at both embryonic and adult stages. Molecular analysis revealed that although female gonads developed testis-like cords, gonads lacked Sertoli cells and were incapable of steroidogenesis. A similar gonadal phenotype was also observed in males, with a complete loss of both Sertoli cells, disrupted SOX9 expression and gonadal steroidogenesis. At sexual maturity both sexes showed a female external phenotype but retained sexually dimorphic body weights that matched their genetic sexes. These data suggest that AMH does not operate as an early testis activator in the chicken but can affect downstream events, such as sex steroid hormone production. In addition, this study provides a unique opportunity to assess chicken sexual development in an environment of sex hormone deficiency, demonstrating the importance of both hormonal signaling and direct cell autonomous factors for somatic sex identity in birds.

  19. In situ imaging of the autonomous intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations of osteoblasts and osteocytes in bone.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Sugawara, Yasuyo; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Naruse, Keiji; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Bone cells form a complex three-dimensional network consisting of osteoblasts and osteocytes embedded in a mineralized extracellular matrix. Ca(2+) acts as a ubiquitous secondary messenger in various physiological cellular processes and transduces numerous signals to the cell interior and between cells. However, the intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics of bone cells have not been evaluated in living bone. In the present study, we developed a novel ex-vivo live Ca(2+) imaging system that allows the dynamic intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) responses of intact chick calvaria explants to be observed without damaging the bone network. Our live imaging analysis revealed for the first time that both osteoblasts and osteocytes display repetitive and autonomic [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations ex vivo. Thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum that induces the emptying of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, abolished these [Ca(2+)](i) responses in both osteoblasts and osteocytes, indicating that Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores plays a key role in the [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations of these bone cells in intact bone explants. Another possible [Ca(2+)](i) transient system to be considered is gap junctional communication through which Ca(2+) and other messenger molecules move, at least in part, across cell-cell junctions; therefore, we also investigated the role of gap junctions in the maintenance of the autonomic [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations observed in the intact bone. Treatment with three distinct gap junction inhibitors, 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid, oleamide, and octanol, significantly reduced the proportion of responsive osteocytes, indicating that gap junctions are important for the maintenance of [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in osteocytes, but less in osteoblasts. Taken together, we found that the bone cells in intact bone explants showed autonomous [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations that required the release of intracellular Ca(2+) stores. In addition, osteocytes specifically

  20. Autonomous spacecraft design methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Divita, E.L.; Turner, P.R.

    1984-08-01

    A methodology for autonomous spacecraft design blends autonomy requirements with traditional mission requirements and assesses the impact of autonomy upon the total system resources available to support faulttolerance and automation. A baseline functional design can be examined for autonomy implementation impacts, and the costs, risk, and benefits of various options can be assessed. The result of the process is a baseline design that includes autonomous control functions.

  1. Autonomous Flight Safety System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James

    2010-01-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is an independent self-contained subsystem mounted onboard a launch vehicle. AFSS has been developed by and is owned by the US Government. Autonomously makes flight termination/destruct decisions using configurable software-based rules implemented on redundant flight processors using data from redundant GPS/IMU navigation sensors. AFSS implements rules determined by the appropriate Range Safety officials.

  2. Evolutionary aspects of non-cell-autonomous regulation in vascular plants: structural background and models to study

    PubMed Central

    Evkaikina, Anastasiia I.; Romanova, Marina A.; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) serve for the exchange of information in form of miRNA, proteins, and mRNA between adjacent cells in the course of plant development. This fundamental role of PD is well established in angiosperms but has not yet been traced back to the evolutionary ancient plant taxa where functional studies lag behind studies of PD structure and ontogenetic origin. There is convincing evidence that the ability to form secondary (post-cytokinesis) PD, which can connect any adjacent cells, contrary to primary PD which form during cytokinesis and link only cells of the same lineage, appeared in the evolution of higher plants at least twice: in seed plants and in some representatives of the Lycopodiophyta. The (in)ability to form secondary PD is manifested in the symplasmic organization of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) which in most taxa of seedless vascular plants differs dramatically from that in seed plants. Lycopodiophyta appear to be suitable models to analyze the transport of developmental regulators via PD in SAMs with symplasmic organization both different from, as well as analogous to, that in angiosperms, and to understand the evolutionary aspects of the role of this transport in the morphogenesis of vascular plant taxa. PMID:24575105

  3. Evolutionary aspects of non-cell-autonomous regulation in vascular plants: structural background and models to study.

    PubMed

    Evkaikina, Anastasiia I; Romanova, Marina A; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) serve for the exchange of information in form of miRNA, proteins, and mRNA between adjacent cells in the course of plant development. This fundamental role of PD is well established in angiosperms but has not yet been traced back to the evolutionary ancient plant taxa where functional studies lag behind studies of PD structure and ontogenetic origin. There is convincing evidence that the ability to form secondary (post-cytokinesis) PD, which can connect any adjacent cells, contrary to primary PD which form during cytokinesis and link only cells of the same lineage, appeared in the evolution of higher plants at least twice: in seed plants and in some representatives of the Lycopodiophyta. The (in)ability to form secondary PD is manifested in the symplasmic organization of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) which in most taxa of seedless vascular plants differs dramatically from that in seed plants. Lycopodiophyta appear to be suitable models to analyze the transport of developmental regulators via PD in SAMs with symplasmic organization both different from, as well as analogous to, that in angiosperms, and to understand the evolutionary aspects of the role of this transport in the morphogenesis of vascular plant taxa.

  4. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Eva; Ribot, Jérôme; Di Nardo, Ariel A.; Volovitch, Michel; Prochiantz, Alain

    2016-01-01

    During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells). In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these “transfer” sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system. PMID:27171438

  5. A symmetric supercapacitor/biofuel cell hybrid device based on enzyme-modified nanoporous gold: An autonomous pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xinxin; Conghaile, Peter Ó; Leech, Dónal; Ludwig, Roland; Magner, Edmond

    2017-04-15

    The integration of supercapacitors with enzymatic biofuel cells (BFCs) can be used to prepare hybrid devices in order to harvest significantly higher power output. In this study, a supercapacitor/biofuel cell hybrid device was prepared by the immobilisation of redox enzymes with electrodeposited poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and the redox polymer [Os(2,2'-bipyridine)2(polyvinylimidazole)10Cl](+/2+)(Os(bpy)2PVI) on dealloyed nanoporous gold. The thickness of the deposition layer can be easily controlled by tuning the deposition conditions. Once charged by the internal BFC, the device can be discharged as a supercapacitor at a current density of 2mAcm(-2) providing a maximum power density of 608.8μWcm(-2), an increase of a factor of 468 when compared to the power output from the BFC itself. The hybrid device exhibited good operational stability for 50 charge/discharge cycles and ca. 7h at a discharge current density of 0.2mAcm(-2). The device could be used as a pulse generator, mimicking a cardiac pacemaker delivering pulses of 10μA for 0.5ms at a frequency of 0.2Hz.

  6. The atypical cadherin Celsr1 functions non-cell autonomously to block rostral migration of facial branchiomotor neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Glasco, Derrick M; Pike, Whitney; Qu, Yibo; Reustle, Lindsay; Misra, Kamana; Di Bonito, Maria; Studer, Michele; Fritzsch, Bernd; Goffinet, André M; Tissir, Fadel; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2016-09-01

    The caudal migration of facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons from rhombomere (r) 4 to r6 in the hindbrain is an excellent model to study neuronal migration mechanisms. Although several Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) components are required for FBM neuron migration, only Celsr1, an atypical cadherin, regulates the direction of migration in mice. In Celsr1 mutants, a subset of FBM neurons migrates rostrally instead of caudally. Interestingly, Celsr1 is not expressed in the migrating FBM neurons, but rather in the adjacent floor plate and adjoining ventricular zone. To evaluate the contribution of different expression domains to neuronal migration, we conditionally inactivated Celsr1 in specific cell types. Intriguingly, inactivation of Celsr1 in the ventricular zone of r3-r5, but not in the floor plate, leads to rostral migration of FBM neurons, greatly resembling the migration defect of Celsr1 mutants. Dye fill experiments indicate that the rostrally-migrated FBM neurons in Celsr1 mutants originate from the anterior margin of r4. These data suggest strongly that Celsr1 ensures that FBM neurons migrate caudally by suppressing molecular cues in the rostral hindbrain that can attract FBM neurons.

  7. Automatic learning by an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    de Saussure, G.; Spelt, P.F.; Killough, S.M.; Pin, F.G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes recent research in automatic learning by the autonomous mobile robot HERMIES-IIB at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR). By acting on the environment and observing the consequences during a set of training examples, the robot learns a sequence of successful manipulations on a simulated control panel. The robot learns to classify panel configurations in order to deal with new configurations that are not part of the original training set. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Erbas, Tomris

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy, once considered to be the Cinderella of diabetes complications, has come of age. The autonomic nervous system innervates the entire human body, and is involved in the regulation of every single organ in the body. Thus, perturbations in autonomic function account for everything from abnormalities in pupillary function to gastroparesis, intestinal dysmotility, diabetic diarrhea, genitourinary dysfunction, amongst others. "Know autonomic function and one knows the whole of medicine!" It is now becoming apparent that before the advent of severe pathological damage to the autonomic nervous system there may be an imbalance between the two major arms, namely the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the heart and blood vessels, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) has been linked to resting tachycardia, postural hypotension, orthostatic bradycardia and orthostatic tachycardia (POTTS), exercise intolerance, decreased hypoxia-induced respiratory drive, loss of baroreceptor sensitivity, enhanced intraoperative or perioperative cardiovascular lability, increased incidence of asymptomatic ischemia, myocardial infarction, and decreased rate of survival after myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. Autonomic dysfunction can affect daily activities of individuals with diabetes and may invoke potentially life-threatening outcomes. Intensification of glycemic control in the presence of autonomic dysfunction (more so if combined with peripheral neuropathy) increases the likelihood of sudden death and is a caveat for aggressive glycemic control. Advances in technology, built on decades of research and clinical testing, now make it possible to objectively identify early stages of CAN with the use of careful measurement of time and frequency domain analyses of autonomic function. Fifteen studies using different end points report prevalence rates of 1% to 90

  9. CD56brightCD16- NK Cells Produce Adenosine through a CD38-Mediated Pathway and Act as Regulatory Cells Inhibiting Autologous CD4+ T Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Chiesa, Sabrina; Imperatori, Andrea; Zanellato, Silvia; Mortara, Lorenzo; Gattorno, Marco; Pistoia, Vito; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies suggested that human CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells may play a role in the regulation of the immune response. Since the mechanism(s) involved have not yet been elucidated, in the present study we have investigated the role of nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes that regulate the extracellular balance of nucleotides/nucleosides and produce the immunosuppressive molecule adenosine (ADO). Peripheral blood CD56(dim)CD16(+) and CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells expressed similar levels of CD38. CD39, CD73, and CD157 expression was higher in CD56(bright)CD16(-) than in CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells. CD57 was mostly expressed by CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells. CD203a/PC-1 expression was restricted to CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells. CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells produce ADO and inhibit autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Such inhibition was 1) reverted pretreating CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with a CD38 inhibitor and 2) increased pretreating CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with a nucleoside transporter inhibitor, which increase extracellular ADO concentration. CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells isolated from the synovial fluid of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients failed to inhibit autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Such functional impairment could be related to 1) the observed reduced CD38/CD73 expression, 2) a peculiar ADO production kinetics, and 3) a different expression of ADO receptors. In contrast, CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells isolated from inflammatory pleural effusions display a potent regulatory activity. In conclusion, CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells act as "regulatory cells" through ADO produced by an ectoenzymes network, with a pivotal role of CD38. This function may be relevant for the modulation of the immune response in physiological and pathological conditions, and it could be impaired during autoimmune/inflammatory diseases.

  10. Microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) is required to expand tracheal lumen in Drosophila in a cell-autonomous manner.

    PubMed

    Baer, Magdalena M; Palm, Wilhelm; Eaton, Suzanne; Leptin, Maria; Affolter, Markus

    2012-12-15

    The Drosophila tracheal system is a useful model for dissecting the molecular mechanisms controlling the assembly and expansion of tubular organs. We have identified microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) as a new player involved in the lumen expansion in unicellular tubes. MTP is an endoplasmic reticulum resident protein that can transfer triglycerides and phospholipids between membranes in vitro. MTP lipid transfer activity is crucial for the assembly and secretion of apoB family lipoproteins, which are carriers of lipids between different tissues. Here we describe an unexpected role of MTP in tracheal development, which we postulate to be independent of its known function in lipoprotein secretion. We propose that, in tracheal cells, MTP is involved in regulation of de novo apical membrane delivery to the existing lumen and thus promotes proper expansion of the larval tracheal system.

  11. Autonomous navigation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  12. An Autonomous Flight Safety System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, James B.; Lanzi, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) being developed by NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center s Wallops Flight Facility and Kennedy Space Center has completed two successful developmental flights and is preparing for a third. AFSS has been demonstrated to be a viable architecture for implementation of a completely vehicle based system capable of protecting life and property in event of an errant vehicle by terminating the flight or initiating other actions. It is capable of replacing current human-in-the-loop systems or acting in parallel with them. AFSS is configured prior to flight in accordance with a specific rule set agreed upon by the range safety authority and the user to protect the public and assure mission success. This paper discusses the motivation for the project, describes the method of development, and presents an overview of the evolving architecture and the current status.

  13. Variability in State-Dependent Plasticity of Intrinsic Properties during Cell-Autonomous Self-Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis in Hippocampal Model Neurons1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Sunandha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract How do neurons reconcile the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with perpetual switches in patterns of afferent activity? Here, we assessed state-dependent evolution of calcium homeostasis in a population of hippocampal pyramidal neuron models, through an adaptation of a recent study on stomatogastric ganglion neurons. Calcium homeostasis was set to emerge through cell-autonomous updates to 12 ionic conductances, responding to different types of synaptically driven afferent activity. We first assessed the impact of theta-frequency inputs on the evolution of ionic conductances toward maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Although calcium homeostasis emerged efficaciously across all models in the population, disparate changes in ionic conductances that mediated this emergence resulted in variable plasticity to several intrinsic properties, also manifesting as significant differences in firing responses across models. Assessing the sensitivity of this form of plasticity, we noted that intrinsic neuronal properties and the firing response were sensitive to the target calcium concentration and to the strength and frequency of afferent activity. Next, we studied the evolution of calcium homeostasis when afferent activity was switched, in different temporal sequences, between two behaviorally distinct types of activity: theta-frequency inputs and sharp-wave ripples riding on largely silent periods. We found that the conductance values, intrinsic properties, and firing response of neurons exhibited differential robustness to an intervening switch in the type of afferent activity. These results unveil critical dissociations between different forms of homeostasis, and call for a systematic evaluation of the impact of state-dependent switches in afferent activity on neuronal intrinsic properties during neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:26464994

  14. Seipin deficiency alters brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and insulin sensitivity in a non-cell autonomous mode

    PubMed Central

    Dollet, L.; Magré, J.; Joubert, M.; Le May, C.; Ayer, A.; Arnaud, L.; Pecqueur, C.; Blouin, V.; Cariou, B.; Prieur, X.

    2016-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in BSCL2 are responsible for Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy, a rare disorder characterized by near absence of adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance. Seipin-deficient (Bscl2−/−) mice display an almost total loss of white adipose tissue (WAT) with residual brown adipose tissue (BAT). Previous cellular studies have shown that seipin deficiency alters white adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we aimed to decipher the consequences of seipin deficiency in BAT. Using a brown adipocyte cell-line, we show that seipin knockdown had very little effect on adipocyte differentiation without affecting insulin sensitivity and oxygen consumption. However, when submitted to cold acclimation or chronic β3 agonist treatment, Bscl2−/− mice displayed altered thermogenic capacity, despite several signs of BAT remodeling. Under cold activation, Bscl2−/− mice were able to maintain their body temperature when fed ad libitum, but not under short fasting. At control temperature (i.e. 21 °C), fasting worsened Bscl2−/− BAT properties. Finally, Bscl2−/− BAT displayed obvious signs of insulin resistance. Our results in these lipodystrophic mice strongly suggest that BAT activity relies on WAT as an energetic substrate provider and adipokine-producing organ. Therefore, the WAT/BAT dialogue is a key component of BAT integrity in guaranteeing its response to insulin and cold-activated adrenergic signals. PMID:27748422

  15. Autonomic disturbances in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Plazzi, Giuseppe; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Maggi, Leonardo Serra; Donadio, Vincenzo; Vetrugno, Roberto; Liguori, Rocco; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Poli, Francesca; Pizza, Fabio; Pagotto, Uberto; Ferri, Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a clinical condition characterized mainly by excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis complete the narcoleptic tetrad; disrupted night sleep, automatic behaviors and weight gain are also usual complaints. Different studies focus on autonomic changes or dysfunctions among narcoleptic patients, such as pupillary abnormalities, fainting spells, erectile dysfunction, night sweats, gastric problems, low body temperature, systemic hypotension, dry mouth, heart palpitations, headache and extremities dysthermia. Even if many studies lack sufficient standardization or their results have not been replicated, a non-secondary involvement of the autonomic nervous system in narcolepsy is strongly suggested, mainly by metabolic and cardiovascular findings. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a high risk for overweight and for metabolic syndrome in narcoleptic patients represents an important warning for clinicians in order to monitor and follow them up for their autonomic functions. We review here studies on autonomic functions and clinical disturbances in narcoleptic patients, trying to shed light on the possible contribute of alterations of the hypocretin system in autonomic pathophysiology.

  16. act up controls actin polymerization to alter cell shape and restrict Hedgehog signaling in the Drosophila eye disc.

    PubMed

    Benlali, A; Draskovic, I; Hazelett, D J; Treisman, J E

    2000-04-28

    Cells in the morphogenetic furrow of the Drosophila eye disc undergo a striking shape change immediately prior to their neuronal differentiation. We have isolated mutations in a novel gene, act up (acu), that is required for this shape change. acu encodes a homolog of yeast cyclase-associated protein, which sequesters monomeric actin; we show that acu is required to prevent actin filament polymerization in the eye disc. In contrast, profilin promotes actin filament polymerization, acting epistatically to acu. However, both acu and profilin are required to prevent premature Hedgehog-induced photoreceptor differentiation ahead of the morphogenetic furrow. These findings suggest that dynamic changes in actin filaments alter cell shape to control the movement of signals that coordinate a wave of differentiation.

  17. Heart rate variability and autonomic function tests in HIV positive individuals in India.

    PubMed

    Sakhuja, Ankit; Goyal, Ankur; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Wig, Naveet; Vajpayee, Madhu; Kumar, Ajay; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2007-06-01

    Supine heart rate variability (HRV) and autonomic tests were carried to determine whether autonomic activity was affected in HIV positive patients. The pressor response following handgrip and cold pressor test was blunted in HIV+ patients, and the degree of dysfunction correlated with CD4 cell counts. The extent of autonomic impairment was mild and subclinical.

  18. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  19. Autonomic cardiac innervation: development and adult plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these "non-classical" cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  20. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  1. Autonomous Locator of Thermals (ALOFT) Autonomous Soaring Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-03

    could exploit naturally occurring convective thermal updrafts for extending the endurance of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Essentially, the...1 AUTONOMOUS LOCATOR OF THERMALS (ALOFT) AUTONOMOUS SOARING ALGORITHM INTRODUCTION The increasing use of unmanned aerial

  2. Architecture of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  3. Architecture of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  4. Reactive oxygen species trigger motoneuron death in non-cell-autonomous models of ALS through activation of c-Abl signaling.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Fabiola; Gonzalez, David; Cortes, Nicole; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Hernández, Diego E; Fritz, Elsa; Abarzua, Sebastián; Martinez, Alexis; Elorza, Alvaro A; Alvarez, Alejandra; Court, Felipe; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which pathogenesis and death of motor neurons are triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. We showed earlier that exposing primary rat spinal cord cultures to conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) that express human SOD1(G93A) (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) quickly enhances Nav channel-mediated excitability and calcium influx, generates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and leads to death of motoneurons within days. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial structure and physiology and of the activation of c-Abl, a tyrosine kinase that induces apoptosis. We show that ACM-hSOD1(G93A), but not ACM-hSOD1(WT), increases c-Abl activity in motoneurons, interneurons and glial cells, starting at 60 min; the c-Abl inhibitor STI571 (imatinib) prevents this ACM-hSOD1(G93A)-mediated motoneuron death. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with ACM derived from astrocytes expressing SOD1(G86R) or TDP43(A315T). We further find that co-application of ACM-SOD1(G93A) with blockers of Nav channels (spermidine, mexiletine, or riluzole) or anti-oxidants (Trolox, esculetin, or tiron) effectively prevent c-Abl activation and motoneuron death. In addition, ACM-SOD1(G93A) induces alterations in the morphology of neuronal mitochondria that are related with their membrane depolarization. Finally, we find that blocking the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore with cyclosporine A, or inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uptake with Ru360, reduces ROS production and c-Abl activation. Together, our data point to a sequence of events in which a toxic factor(s) released by ALS-expressing astrocytes rapidly induces hyper-excitability, which in turn increases calcium influx and affects mitochondrial structure and physiology. ROS production, mediated at least in part through mitochondrial alterations, trigger c-Abl signaling and lead to motoneuron death.

  5. Reactive oxygen species trigger motoneuron death in non-cell-autonomous models of ALS through activation of c-Abl signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Fabiola; Gonzalez, David; Cortes, Nicole; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Hernández, Diego E.; Fritz, Elsa; Abarzua, Sebastián; Martinez, Alexis; Elorza, Alvaro A.; Alvarez, Alejandra; Court, Felipe; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which pathogenesis and death of motor neurons are triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. We showed earlier that exposing primary rat spinal cord cultures to conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) that express human SOD1G93A (ACM-hSOD1G93A) quickly enhances Nav channel-mediated excitability and calcium influx, generates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and leads to death of motoneurons within days. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial structure and physiology and of the activation of c-Abl, a tyrosine kinase that induces apoptosis. We show that ACM-hSOD1G93A, but not ACM-hSOD1WT, increases c-Abl activity in motoneurons, interneurons and glial cells, starting at 60 min; the c-Abl inhibitor STI571 (imatinib) prevents this ACM-hSOD1G93A-mediated motoneuron death. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with ACM derived from astrocytes expressing SOD1G86R or TDP43A315T. We further find that co-application of ACM-SOD1G93A with blockers of Nav channels (spermidine, mexiletine, or riluzole) or anti-oxidants (Trolox, esculetin, or tiron) effectively prevent c-Abl activation and motoneuron death. In addition, ACM-SOD1G93A induces alterations in the morphology of neuronal mitochondria that are related with their membrane depolarization. Finally, we find that blocking the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore with cyclosporine A, or inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uptake with Ru360, reduces ROS production and c-Abl activation. Together, our data point to a sequence of events in which a toxic factor(s) released by ALS-expressing astrocytes rapidly induces hyper-excitability, which in turn increases calcium influx and affects mitochondrial structure and physiology. ROS production, mediated at least in part through mitochondrial alterations, trigger c-Abl signaling and lead to motoneuron death. PMID:26106294

  6. Receptor FGFRL1 acts as a tumor suppressor in nude mice when overexpressed in HEK 293 Tet-On cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Lei; Steinberg, Florian; Trueb, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1) is a transmembrane receptor that interacts with heparin and FGF ligands. In contrast to the classical FGF receptors, FGFR1 to FGFR4, it does not appear to affect cell growth and proliferation. In the present study, an inducible gene expression system was utilized in combination with a xenograft tumor model to investigate the effects of FGFRL1 on cell adhesion and tumor formation. It was determined that recombinant FGFRL1 promotes the adhesion of HEK 293 Tet-On® cells in vitro. Moreover, when such cells are induced to express FGFRL1ΔC they aggregate into huge clusters. If injected into nude mice, the cells form large tumors. Notably, this tumor growth is completely inhibited when the expression of FGFRL1 is induced. The forced expression of FGFRL1 in the tumor tissue may restore contact inhibition, thereby preventing growth of the cells in nude mice. The results of the present study demonstrate that FGFRL1 acts as a tumor suppressor similar to numerous other cell adhesion proteins. It is therefore likely that FGFRL1 functions as a regular cell-cell adhesion protein. PMID:28101211

  7. A novel cell death gene acts to repair patterning defects in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development.

  8. Simple Autonomous Chaotic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, Jessica; Sprott, J.

    2010-03-01

    Over the last several decades, numerous electronic circuits exhibiting chaos have been proposed. Non-autonomous circuits with as few as two components have been developed. However, the operation of such circuits relies on the non-ideal behavior of the devices used, and therefore the circuit equations can be quite complex. In this paper, we present two simple autonomous chaotic circuits using only opamps and linear passive components. The circuits each use one opamp as a comparator, to provide a signum nonlinearity. The chaotic behavior is robust, and independent of nonlinearities in the passive components. Moreover, the circuit equations are among the algebraically simplest chaotic systems yet constructed.

  9. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  10. A Diguanylate Cyclase Acts as a Cell Division Inhibitor in a Two-Step Response to Reductive and Envelope Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell division arrest is a universal checkpoint in response to environmental assaults that generate cellular stress. In bacteria, the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling network is one of several signal transduction systems that regulate key processes in response to extra-/intracellular stimuli. Here, we find that the diguanylate cyclase YfiN acts as a bifunctional protein that produces c-di-GMP in response to reductive stress and then dynamically relocates to the division site to arrest cell division in response to envelope stress in Escherichia coli. YfiN localizes to the Z ring by interacting with early division proteins and stalls cell division by preventing the initiation of septal peptidoglycan synthesis. These studies reveal a new role for a diguanylate cyclase in responding to environmental change, as well as a novel mechanism for arresting cell division. PMID:27507823

  11. Skeletal muscle–specific eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α phosphorylation controls amino acid metabolism and fibroblast growth factor 21–mediated non–cell-autonomous energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Masato; Nomura, Akitoshi; Ogura, Atsushi; Takehana, Kenji; Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Takahara, Kazuna; Tsugawa, Kazue; Miyamoto, Chinobu; Miura, Naoko; Sato, Ryosuke; Kurahashi, Kiyoe; Harding, Heather P.; Oyadomari, Miho; Ron, David; Oyadomari, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) phosphorylation-dependent integrated stress response (ISR), a component of the unfolded protein response, has long been known to regulate intermediary metabolism, but the details are poorly worked out. We report that profiling of mRNAs of transgenic mice harboring a ligand-activated skeletal muscle–specific derivative of the eIF2α protein kinase R-like ER kinase revealed the expected up-regulation of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport but also uncovered the induced expression and secretion of a myokine, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), that stimulates energy consumption and prevents obesity. The link between the ISR and FGF21 expression was further reinforced by the identification of a small-molecule ISR activator that promoted Fgf21 expression in cell-based screens and by implication of the ISR-inducible activating transcription factor 4 in the process. Our findings establish that eIF2α phosphorylation regulates not only cell-autonomous proteostasis and amino acid metabolism, but also affects non–cell-autonomous metabolic regulation by induced expression of a potent myokine.—Miyake, M., Nomura, A., Ogura, A., Takehana, K., Kitahara, Y., Takahara, K., Tsugawa, K., Miyamoto, C., Miura, N., Sato, R., Kurahashi, K., Harding, H. P., Oyadomari, M., Ron, D., Oyadomari, S. Skeletal muscle–specific eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α phosphorylation controls amino acid metabolism and fibroblast growth factor 21–mediated non–cell-autonomous energy metabolism. PMID:26487695

  12. α2 Integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 act sequentially to induce differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into odontoblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Kawai, Rie; Hase, Naoko; Hiyama, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that interleukin 1β acts via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 to regulate cell proliferation and suppress apoptosis in α2 integrin-positive odontoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we characterize the signal cascade underpinning odontoblastic differentiation in mouse ES cells. The expression of α2 integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (Emmprin), and MMP-3 mRNA and protein were all potently increased during odontoblastic differentiation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of the odontoblastic biomarkers dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1 and alkaline phosphatase, and blocked odontoblast calcification. Our siRNA, western blot and blocking antibody analyses revealed a unique sequential cascade involving α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 that drives ES cell differentiation into odontoblasts. This cascade requires the interaction between α2 integrin and Emmprin and is potentiated by exogenous MMP-3. Finally, although odontoblast-like cells potently express α2, α6, αV, β1, and β3, integrins, we confirmed that β1 integrin acts as the trigger for ES cell differentiation, apparently in complex with α2 integrin. These results demonstrate a unique and unanticipated role for an α2 integrin-, Emmprin-, and MMP-3-mediated signaling cascade in driving mouse ES cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Odontoblast differentiation requires activation of α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3. • α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 form a sequential signaling cascade. • β1 integrin acts a specific trigger for odontoblast differentiation. • The role of these effectors is highly novel and unanticipated.

  13. The fission yeast cell wall stress sensor-like proteins Mtl2 and Wsc1 act by turning on the GTPase Rho1p but act independently of the cell wall integrity pathway.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Sandra; Muñoz, Sofía; Manjón, Elvira; García, Patricia; Sanchez, Yolanda

    2013-10-01

    Sensing stressful conditions that affect the cell wall reorganization is important for yeast survival. Here, we studied two proteins SpWsc1p and SpMtl2p with structural features indicative of plasma membrane-associated cell wall sensors. We found that Mtl2p and Wsc1p act by turning on the Rho1p GTPase. Each gene could be deleted individually without affecting viability, but the deletion of both was lethal and this phenotype was rescued by overexpression of the genes encoding either Rho1p or its GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs). In addition, wsc1Δ and mtl2Δ cells showed a low level of Rho1p-GTP under cell wall stress. Mtl2p-GFP (green fluorescent protein) localized to the cell periphery and was necessary for survival under different types of cell wall stress. Wsc1p-GFP was concentrated in patches at the cell tips, it interacted with the Rho-GEF Rgf2p, and its overexpression activated cell wall biosynthesis. Our results are consistent with the notion that cell wall assembly is regulated by two different networks involving Rho1p. One includes signaling from Mtl2p through Rho1p to Pck1p, while the second one implicates signaling from Wsc1p and Rgf2p through Rho1p to activate glucan synthase (GS). Finally, signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1p remained active in mtl2Δ and wsc1Δ disruptants exposed to cell wall stress, suggesting that the cell wall stress-sensing spectrum of Schizosaccharomyces pombe sensor-like proteins differs from that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. Using Dynamic Capability Evaluation to Organize a Team of Cooperative, Autonomous Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Using Dynamic Capability Evaluation to Organize a Team of Cooperative, Autonomous Robots Eric Matson Scott DeLoach Multi-agent and Cooperative...00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Using Dynamic Capability Evaluation to Organize a Team of Cooperative, Autonomous Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...company structure. Agent: Equivalent to autonomous robots in this instance. Agents coordinate through the organization via conversations and act

  15. MiR-371-373 cluster acts as a tumor-suppressor-miR and promotes cell cycle arrest in unrestricted somatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Langroudi, Lida; Jamshidi-Adegani, Fatemeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Rad, Seyed Mohammad Ali Hosseini; Keramati, Farid; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Arefian, Ehsan; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in small RNA research have implicated microRNAs (miRNAs) as important regulators of proliferation and development. The miR-371-373 cluster is prominently expressed in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and rapidly decreases after cell differentiation. MiR-371-373 cluster was investigated as one of the key factors of stem cell maintenance and pluripotency in unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) using a lentivirus system. Gene expression showed a dual effect on proliferation, which revealed a transient cell cycle progression and consequent repression in pluripotency factors and cell cycle genes. Cell proliferation analysis with CFU, MTT, and DNA content assays further confirmed the dual effect of cluster after prolonged exposure. Analyzing the course of action, it seems that miR-371-373 cluster acts as an onco/tumor suppressor-miR. MiR371-373 cluster acts by modulating the function of these factors and limiting the excessive cell cycle propagation upon oncogenic stimuli to protect cells from replicative stress, but also activate CDK inhibitors and transcriptional repressors of the retinoblastoma family to cause cell cycle arrest. In contrast to the previous studies, we believe that miR-371-373 cluster functions as a self-renewal miRNA to induce and maintain the pluripotent state but also to potentially inhibit dysregulated proliferation through cell cycle arrest. It seems that miR-371-373 cluster presents with a dual effect in this cellular context which may possess different actions in various cells. This not only expands the basic knowledge of the cluster but may offer a great chance for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Autonomous data transmission apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    1997-01-01

    A autonomous borehole data transmission apparatus for transmitting measurement data from measuring instruments at the downhole end of a drill string by generating pressure pulses utilizing a transducer longitudinally responsive to magnetic field pulses caused by electrical pulses corresponding to the measured downhole parameters.

  17. Developing Autonomous Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Defines the concept of autonomous learning. Presents the Strategies Program for Effective Learning/Thinking (SPELT), including its underlying assumptions, instructional model, teacher training procedures, research findings, and anticipated future development. Research results include implications for learning-disabled and gifted students. (KS)

  18. Autonomous Robot Skill Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Research. ix ABSTRACT AUTONOMOUS ROBOT SKILL ACQUISITION MAY 2011 GEORGE DIMITRI KONIDARIS B.Sc., UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND B.Sc. Hons., UNIVERSITY...OF THE WITWATERSRAND M.Sc., UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST Directed by: Professor Andrew G. Barto Among the most

  19. Learning for autonomous navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Autonomous off-road navigation of robotic ground vehicles has important applications on Earth and in space exploration. Progress in this domain has been retarded by the limited lookahead range of 3-D sensors and by the difficulty of preprogramming systems to understand the traversability of the wide variety of terrain they can encounter.

  20. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Maser, Raelene E; Mitchell, Braxton D; Freeman, Roy

    2003-05-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes. Despite its relationship to an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and its association with multiple symptoms and impairments, the significance of DAN has not been fully appreciated. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on the cohort studied and the methods of assessment. In randomly selected cohorts of asymptomatic individuals with diabetes, approximately 20% had abnormal cardiovascular autonomic function. DAN frequently coexists with other peripheral neuropathies and other diabetic complications, but DAN may be isolated, frequently preceding the detection of other complications. Major clinical manifestations of DAN include resting tachycardia, exercise intolerance, orthostatic hypotension, constipation, gastroparesis, erectile dysfunction, sudomotor dysfunction, impaired neurovascular function, "brittle diabetes," and hypoglycemic autonomic failure. DAN may affect many organ systems throughout the body (e.g., gastrointestinal [GI], genitourinary, and cardiovascular). GI disturbances (e.g., esophageal enteropathy, gastroparesis, constipation, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence) are common, and any section of the GI tract may be affected. Gastroparesis should be suspected in individuals with erratic glucose control. Upper-GI symptoms should lead to consideration of all possible causes, including autonomic dysfunction. Whereas a radiographic gastric emptying study can definitively establish the diagnosis of gastroparesis, a reasonable approach is to exclude autonomic dysfunction and other known causes of these upper-GI symptoms. Constipation is the most common lower-GI symptom but can alternate with episodes of diarrhea. Diagnostic approaches should rule out autonomic dysfunction and the well-known causes such as neoplasia. Occasionally, anorectal manometry and other specialized tests typically performed by the gastroenterologist may be helpful. DAN is also

  1. Autonomous Optical Lunar Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato; Crouse, Brian; D'souza, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The performance of optical autonomous navigation is investigated for low lunar orbits and for high elliptical lunar orbits. Various options for employing the camera measurements are presented and compared. Strategies for improving navigation performance are developed and applied to the Orion vehicle lunar mission

  2. Autonomous data transmission apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, O.M.

    1997-03-25

    A autonomous borehole data transmission apparatus is described for transmitting measurement data from measuring instruments at the downhole end of a drill string by generating pressure pulses utilizing a transducer longitudinally responsive to magnetic field pulses caused by electrical pulses corresponding to the measured downhole parameters. 4 figs.

  3. Dietary Estrogens Act through Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Processes and Show No Antiestrogenicity in Cultured Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Makela, S; Davis, VL; Tally, WC; Korkman, J; Salo, L; Vihko, R; Santti, R; Korach, KS

    1994-01-01

    Dietary estrogens are believed to exert their estrogenic or antiestrogenic (chemopreventive) action in estrogen responsive cells by interacting with the estrogen receptor (ER). The present study was undertaken to evaluate a direct role of ER in estrogenic or antiestrogenic activities of three dietary estrogens (coumestrol, genistein and zearalenone). HeLa cells were transiently co-transfected with an expression vector for ER and an estrogen-responsive reporter gene construct. Coumestrol, genistein, and zearalenone all increased the activity of the reporter gene, only in the presence of the ER, and the activation was blocked with the ER antagonist ICI 164,384, demonstrating an ER-specific, agonist response. In addition, in MCF-7 cells, coumestrol and zearalenone increased the expression of the estrogen-responsive pS2 gene. Coumestrol and genistein inhibited the purified estrogen-specific 17ß-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase enzyme and the conversion of estrone to 17ß-estradiol in T-47D cells, which contain this enzyme. However, they did not inhibit the estrone-induced proliferation of T-47D cells. In conclusion, coumestrol, genistein, and zearalenone are all potent estrogens in vitro, and they act through ER mediated mechanism. Our findings give no evidence to support the idea that these compounds act as antiestrogens through competition for the binding sites of ER or by inhibition of the conversion of estrone to 17ß-estradiol in breast cancer cells, since this effect was nullified by their agonist action on cell proliferation. Therefore, their suggested chemopreventive action in estrogen-related cancers must be mediated through other mechanisms. Images Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 2. E Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 4. D Figure 4. E Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. A Figure 9. B Figure 9. C PMID:9679118

  4. p19INK4d Controls Hematopoietic Stem Cells in a Cell-Autonomous Manner during Genotoxic Stress and through the Microenvironment during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hilpert, Morgane; Legrand, Céline; Bluteau, Dominique; Balayn, Natalie; Betems, Aline; Bluteau, Olivier; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Louache, Fawzia; Gonin, Patrick; Debili, Najet; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William; Gilles, Laure; Raslova, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are characterized by the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to reconstitute the entire hematopoietic compartment. Thrombopoietin maintains adult HSCs in a quiescent state through the induction of cell cycle inhibitors p57Kip2 and p19INK4d. Using the p19INK4d−/− mouse model, we investigated the role of p19INK4d in basal and stress-induced hematopoiesis. We demonstrate that p19INK4d is involved in the regulation of HSC quiescence by inhibition of the G0/G1 cell cycle transition. Under genotoxic stress conditions, the absence of p19INK4d in HSCs leads to accelerated cell cycle exit, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptosis when cells progress to the S/G2-M stages of the cell cycle. Moreover, p19INK4d controls the HSC microenvironment through negative regulation of megakaryopoiesis. Deletion of p19INK4d results in megakaryocyte hyperproliferation and increased transforming growth factor β1 secretion. This leads to fibrosis in the bone marrow and spleen, followed by loss of HSCs during aging. PMID:25458892

  5. Adenosine acts as an inhibitor of lymphoma cell growth: a major role for the A3 adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Fishman, P; Bar-Yehuda, S; Ohana, G; Pathak, S; Wasserman, L; Barer, F; Multani, A S

    2000-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrated several mechanisms exploring the inhibitory effect of low-dose adenosine on lymphoma cell growth. Adenosine, a purine nucleoside present in plasma and other extracellular fluids, acts as a regulatory molecule, by binding to G-protein associated cell-surface receptors, A1, A2 and A3. Recently we showed that low-dose adenosine released by muscle cells, inhibits tumour cell growth and thus attributes to the rarity of muscle metastases. In the present work, a cytostatic effect of adenosine on the proliferation of the Nb2-11C rat lymphoma cell line was demonstrated. This effect was mediated through the induction of cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and by decreasing the telomeric signal in these cells. Adenosine was found to exert its antiproliferative effect mainly through binding to its A3 receptor. The cytostatic anticancer activity, mediated through the A3 adenosine receptor, turns it into a potential target for the development of anticancer therapies.

  6. Brain mast cells act as an immune gate to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, I; Inoue, Y; Shimada, T; Aikawa, T

    2001-07-02

    Mast cells perform a significant role in the host defense against parasitic and some bacterial infections. Here we show that in the dog, degranulation of brain mast cells evokes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal responses via histamine release. A large number of mast cells were found in a circumscribed ventral region of the hypothalamus, including the pars tuberalis and median eminence. When these intracranial mast cells were passively sensitized with immunoglobulin E via either the intracerebroventricular or intravenous route, there was a marked increase in the adrenal cortisol secretion elicited by a subsequent antigenic challenge (whether this was delivered via the central or peripheral route). Comp.48/80, a mast cell secretagogue, also increased cortisol secretion when administered intracerebroventricularly. Pretreatment (intracerebroventricularly) with anti-corticotropin--releasing factor antibodies or a histamine H(1) blocker, but not an H(2) blocker, attenuated the evoked increases in cortisol. These data show that in the dog, degranulation of brain mast cells evokes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal responses via centrally released histamine and corticotrophin-releasing factor. On the basis of these data, we suggest that intracranial mast cells may act as an allergen sensor, and that the activated adrenocortical response may represent a life-saving host defense reaction to a type I allergy.

  7. Agent Technology, Complex Adaptive Systems, and Autonomic Systems: Their Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Rouff, Chistopher; Hincheny, Mike

    2004-01-01

    To reduce the cost of future spaceflight missions and to perform new science, NASA has been investigating autonomous ground and space flight systems. These goals of cost reduction have been further complicated by nanosatellites for future science data-gathering which will have large communications delays and at times be out of contact with ground control for extended periods of time. This paper describes two prototype agent-based systems, the Lights-out Ground Operations System (LOGOS) and the Agent Concept Testbed (ACT), and their autonomic properties that were developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to demonstrate autonomous operations of future space flight missions. The paper discusses the architecture of the two agent-based systems, operational scenarios of both, and the two systems autonomic properties.

  8. Autonomous Instrument Placement for Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, P. Chris; Maimone, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous Instrument Placement (AutoPlace) is onboard software that enables a Mars Exploration Rover to act autonomously in using its manipulator to place scientific instruments on or near designated rock and soil targets. Prior to the development of AutoPlace, it was necessary for human operators on Earth to plan every motion of the manipulator arm in a time-consuming process that included downlinking of images from the rover, analysis of images and creation of commands, and uplinking of commands to the rover. AutoPlace incorporates image analysis and planning algorithms into the onboard rover software, eliminating the need for the downlink/uplink command cycle. Many of these algorithms are derived from the existing groundbased image analysis and planning algorithms, with modifications and augmentations for onboard use.

  9. Neuromodulation and plasticity in an autonomous robot.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf; Alexander, William H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we implement a computational model of a neuromodulatory system in an autonomous robot. The output of the neuromodulatory system acts as a value signal, modulating widely distributed synaptic changes. The model is based on anatomical and physiological properties of midbrain diffuse ascending systems, in particular parts of the dopamine and noradrenaline systems. During reward conditioning, the model learns to generate tonic and phasic signals that represent predictions and prediction errors, including precisely timed negative signals if expected rewards are omitted or delayed. We test the robot's learning and behavior in different environmental contexts and observe changes in the development of the neuromodulatory system that depend upon environmental factors. Simulation of a computational model incorporating both reward-related and aversive stimuli leads to the emergence of conditioned reward and aversive behaviors. These studies represent a step towards investigating computational aspects of neuromodulatory systems in autonomous robots.

  10. Immunomodulatory drugs act as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases and induce PU.1 up-regulation in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shinya; Amano, Masayuki; Nishimura, Nao; Ueno, Niina; Ueno, Shikiko; Yuki, Hiromichi; Fujiwara, Shiho; Wada, Naoko; Hirata, Shinya; Hata, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Okuno, Yutaka

    2016-01-08

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide are efficacious in the treatment of multiple myeloma and significantly prolong their survival. However, the mechanisms of such effects of IMiDs have not been fully elucidated. Recently, cereblon has been identified as a target binding protein of thalidomide. Lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cell lines often lose the expression of cereblon, suggesting that IMiDs act as an anti-myeloma agent through interacting with cereblon. Cereblon binds to damaged DNA-binding protein and functions as a ubiquitin ligase, inducing degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 that are essential transcription factors for B and T cell development. Degradation of both IKZF1 and IKZF3 reportedly suppresses myeloma cell growth. Here, we found that IMiDs act as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases (DMNTs). We previously reported that PU.1, which is an ETS family transcription factor and essential for myeloid and lymphoid development, functions as a tumor suppressor in myeloma cells. PU.1 induces growth arrest and apoptosis of myeloma cell lines. In this study, we found that low-dose lenalidomide and pomalidomide up-regulate PU.1 expression through inducing demethylation of the PU.1 promoter. In addition, IMiDs inhibited DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b activities in vitro. Furthermore, lenalidomide and pomalidomide decreased the methylation status of the whole genome in myeloma cells. Collectively, IMiDs exert demethylation activity through inhibiting DNMT1, 3a, and 3b, and up-regulating PU.1 expression, which may be one of the mechanisms of the anti-myeloma activity of IMiDs.

  11. Epithelial tricellular junctions act as interphase cell shape sensors to orient mitosis.

    PubMed

    Bosveld, Floris; Markova, Olga; Guirao, Boris; Martin, Charlotte; Wang, Zhimin; Pierre, Anaëlle; Balakireva, Maria; Gaugue, Isabelle; Ainslie, Anna; Christophorou, Nicolas; Lubensky, David K; Minc, Nicolas; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-25

    The orientation of cell division along the long axis of the interphase cell--the century-old Hertwig's rule--has profound roles in tissue proliferation, morphogenesis, architecture and mechanics. In epithelial tissues, the shape of the interphase cell is influenced by cell adhesion, mechanical stress, neighbour topology, and planar polarity pathways. At mitosis, epithelial cells usually adopt a rounded shape to ensure faithful chromosome segregation and to promote morphogenesis. The mechanisms underlying interphase cell shape sensing in tissues are therefore unknown. Here we show that in Drosophila epithelia, tricellular junctions (TCJs) localize force generators, pulling on astral microtubules and orienting cell division via the Dynein-associated protein Mud independently of the classical Pins/Gαi pathway. Moreover, as cells round up during mitosis, TCJs serve as spatial landmarks, encoding information about interphase cell shape anisotropy to orient division in the rounded mitotic cell. Finally, experimental and simulation data show that shape and mechanical strain sensing by the TCJs emerge from a general geometric property of TCJ distributions in epithelial tissues. Thus, in addition to their function as epithelial barrier structures, TCJs serve as polarity cues promoting geometry and mechanical sensing in epithelial tissues.

  12. RhoB Acts as a Tumor Suppressor That Inhibits Malignancy of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Yu; Fan, Yang; Pang, Haigang; Gong, Huijie; Shen, Donglai; Gu, Liangyou; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the biological role of RhoB in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The expression of RhoB was examined in specimens of patients and cell lines by Western blot and Immunohistochemistry. The correlation between RhoB expression and clinicopathologic variables was also analyzed. The effects of RhoB on cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis, and invasion/migration were detected by over-expression and knockdown of RhoB level in ccRCC cells via plasmids and RNAi. The results showed that RhoB was low-expressed in ccRCC surgical specimens and cell lines compared with adjacent normal renal tissues and normal human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell lines (HKC), and its protein expression level was significantly associated with the tumor pathologic parameter embracing tumor size(P = 0.0157), pT stage(P = 0.0035), TNM stage(P = 0.0024) and Fuhrman tumor grade(P = 0.0008). Further, over-expression of RhoB remarkably inhibited the cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and promoted cancer cell apoptosis, and aslo reduced the invasion and migration ability of ccRCC cells. Interestingly, up-regulation of RhoB could induce cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and led to cell cycle regulators(CyclineB1,CDK1) and pro-apoptotic protein(casp3,casp9) aberrant expression. Moreover, knockdown of RhoB in HKC cells promoted cell proliferation and migration. Taken together, our study indicates that RhoB expression is decreased in ccRCC carcinogenesis and progression. Up-regulation of RhoB significantly inhibits ccRCC cell malignant phenotype. These findings show that RhoB may play a tumor suppressive role in ccRCC cells, raising its potential value in futural therapeutic target for the patients of ccRCC. PMID:27384222

  13. Modeling the Overproduction of Ribosomes when Antibacterial Drugs Act on Cells.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arijit; Dill, Ken A

    2016-02-02

    Bacteria that are subjected to ribosome-inhibiting antibiotic drugs show an interesting behavior: Although the drug slows down cell growth, it also paradoxically increases the cell's concentration of ribosomes. We combine our earlier nonlinear model of the energy-biomass balance in undrugged Escherichia coli cells with Michaelis-Menten binding of drugs that inactivate ribosomes. Predictions are in good agreement with experiments on ribosomal concentrations and synthesis rates versus drug concentrations and growth rates. The model indicates that the added drug drives the cell to overproduce ribosomes, keeping roughly constant the level of ribosomes producing ribosomal proteins, an important quantity for cell growth. The model also predicts that ribosomal production rates should increase and then decrease with added drug. This model gives insights into the driving forces in cells and suggests new experiments.

  14. Autonomic nervous system and immune system interactions.

    PubMed

    Kenney, M J; Ganta, C K

    2014-07-01

    The present review assesses the current state of literature defining integrative autonomic-immune physiological processing, focusing on studies that have employed electrophysiological, pharmacological, molecular biological, and central nervous system experimental approaches. Central autonomic neural networks are informed of peripheral immune status via numerous communicating pathways, including neural and non-neural. Cytokines and other immune factors affect the level of activity and responsivity of discharges in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves innervating diverse targets. Multiple levels of the neuraxis contribute to cytokine-induced changes in efferent parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve outflows, leading to modulation of peripheral immune responses. The functionality of local sympathoimmune interactions depends on the microenvironment created by diverse signaling mechanisms involving integration between sympathetic nervous system neurotransmitters and neuromodulators; specific adrenergic receptors; and the presence or absence of immune cells, cytokines, and bacteria. Functional mechanisms contributing to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway likely involve novel cholinergic-adrenergic interactions at peripheral sites, including autonomic ganglion and lymphoid targets. Immune cells express adrenergic and nicotinic receptors. Neurotransmitters released by sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve endings bind to their respective receptors located on the surface of immune cells and initiate immune-modulatory responses. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system are instrumental in orchestrating neuroimmune processes, although additional studies are required to understand dynamic and complex adrenergic-cholinergic interactions. Further understanding of regulatory mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous, parasympathetic nervous, and immune systems is critical for understanding relationships between chronic disease

  15. Glycoprotein mucin molecular brush on cancer cell surface acting as mechanical barrier against drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Shah, Aalok A.; Campbell, Robert B.; Wan, Kai-tak

    2010-12-01

    Uptake of cytotoxic drugs by typical tumor cells is limited by the dense dendritic network of oligosaccharide mucin chains that forms a mechanical barrier. Atomic force microscopy is used to directly measure the force needed to pierce the mucin layer to reach the cell surface. Measurements are analyzed by de Gennes' steric reptation theory. Multidrug resistant ovarian tumor cells shows significantly larger penetration load compared to the wide type. A pool of pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and breast cells are also characterized. The chemotherapeutic agent, benzyl-α-GalNac, for inhibiting glycosylation is shown to be effective in reducing the mechanical barrier.

  16. Two-Step Regulation of a Meristematic Cell Population Acting in Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Caihuan; Wang, Jin; Xu, Tengfei; Xu, Yan; Ohno, Carolyn; Sablowski, Robert; Heisler, Marcus G.; Theres, Klaus; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Shoot branching requires the establishment of new meristems harboring stem cells; this phenomenon raises questions about the precise regulation of meristematic fate. In seed plants, these new meristems initiate in leaf axils to enable lateral shoot branching. Using live-cell imaging of leaf axil cells, we show that the initiation of axillary meristems requires a meristematic cell population continuously expressing the meristem marker SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). The maintenance of STM expression depends on the leaf axil auxin minimum. Ectopic expression of STM is insufficient to activate axillary buds formation from plants that have lost leaf axil STM expressing cells. This suggests that some cells undergo irreversible commitment to a developmental fate. In more mature leaves, REVOLUTA (REV) directly up-regulates STM expression in leaf axil meristematic cells, but not in differentiated cells, to establish axillary meristems. Cell type-specific binding of REV to the STM region correlates with epigenetic modifications. Our data favor a threshold model for axillary meristem initiation, in which low levels of STM maintain meristematic competence and high levels of STM lead to meristem initiation. PMID:27398935

  17. Erythropoietin acts as an anti-inflammatory signal on murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, Tanja; Ehrhardt, Stefanie; Cerny, Daniela; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Klein, Sabrina; Heeg, Klaus; Kubatzky, Katharina F

    2015-05-01

    Recently it was found that the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed on innate immune cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. We found that murine bone marrow-derived mast cells express the EpoR and that its expression is increased under hypoxic conditions. Interestingly, Epo stimulation of the cells did not activate signal transducer and activator of transcription molecules, nor did we find differences in the expression of typical STAT-dependent genes, the proliferation rate, and the ability to differentiate or to protect the cells from apoptosis. Instead, we demonstrate that stimulation of mast cells with Epo leads to phosphorylation of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-kit. We hypothesize that this is due to the formation of a receptor complex between the EpoR and c-kit. The common beta chain of the IL-3 receptor family, which was described as part of the tissue protective receptor (TPR) on other non-erythroid cells, however is not activated. To investigate whether the EpoR/c-kit complex has tissue protective properties, cells were treated with the Toll-like receptor ligand LPS. Combined Epo and LPS treatment downregulated the inflammatory response of the cells as detected by a decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α secretion.

  18. TCP10L acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Jie; Cai, Hao; Wu, Yanhua; Ma, Haijie; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Chao; Han, Dingding; Ji, Guoqing; Yu, Long

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TCP10L was down-regulated in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). • Expression of TCP10L correlated significantly with tumor size and Milan criteria. • Overexpression of TCP10L attenuated growth of HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. • Knocking down TCP10L promoted cell proliferation and tumorigenesis of HCC cells. - Abstract: TCP10L (T-complex 10 (mouse)-like) has been identified as a liver and testis-specific gene. Although a potential transcriptional suppression function of TCP10L has been reported previously, biological function of this gene still remains largely elusive. In this study, we reported for the first time that TCP10L was significantly down-regulated in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples when compared to the corresponding non-tumorous liver tissues. Furthermore, TCP10L expression was highly correlated with advanced cases exceeding the Milan criteria. Overexpression of TCP10L in HCC cells suppressed colony formation, inhibited cell cycle progression through G0/G1 phase, and attenuated cell growth in vivo. Consistently, silencing of TCP10L promoted cell cycle progression and cell growth. Therefore, our study has revealed a novel suppressor role of TCP10L in HCC, by inhibiting proliferation of HCC cells, which may facilitate the diagnosis and molecular therapy in HCC.

  19. Rab14 Act as Oncogene and Induce Proliferation of Gastric Cancer Cells via AKT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenghao; Li, Qian; Zhou, Kaiyue; Zhao, Lingyu; Wang, Lumin; Yang, Juan; Huang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Rab14 is a member of RAS oncogene family, and its dysfunction has been reported to be involved in various types of human cancer. However, its expression and function were still unclear in gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the function and mechanism of Rab14 in gastric cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed in 17 gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and 4 cell lines to detect the expression of Rab14. 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), colony formation and flow cytometry assays were employed to determine the proliferative ability, cell cycle transition and apoptosis in vitro in BGC-823 or SGC-7901 cells. Western blot was performed to investigate the pathways and mechanism of Rab14 regulation. In this study, we show that Rab14 presents a significant up-regulated expression among the paired tissue samples and cell lines in gastric cancer. When we overexpressed Rab14 in SGC-7901 cells or silenced Rab14 in BGC-823 cells, we found that Rab14 could modify cell growth, cell cycle or apoptosis, which accompanied with an obvious regulation of CCND1, CDK2 and BAX involving in AKT signaling pathway. In conclusion, this study provides a new evidence on that Rab14 functions as a novel tumor oncogene and could be a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:28107526

  20. Krüppel-Like Factor 4 Acts as an Oncogene in Colon Cancer Stem Cell-Enriched Spheroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qinghua; Tan, Jun; Yue, Zhongyi; Chen, Jinhuang; Xi, Hailin; Li, Jie; Zheng, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a rare population in any type of cancers, including colon cancer, are tumorigenic. It has been thought that CSCs are responsible for cancer recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Isolating CSCs in colon cancers is challenging, and thus the molecular mechanism regulating the self-renewing and differentiation of CSCs remains unknown. We cultured DLD-1 cells, one of types of cells derived from colon cancers, in serum-free medium to obtain spheroid cells. These cells possessed the characteristics of CSCs, with the expression of CD133, CD166, Lgr5, and ALDH1, higher capacities of chemo-resistance, migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo than the adherent DLD-1 cells. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is essential factor for maintaining self-renewal of adult and embryonic stem cells. It has been used to induce pluripotent stem cells (iPS) from somatic cells. Since KLF4 is expressed in colon cancer cells, we investigated its role in spheroid cells isolated from DLD-1 cells and found that KLF4 was overexpressed only in spheroid cells and reducing the expression of KLF4 by short-hairpin RNA significantly decreased the capacities of these cells to resist the chemicals, migrate, invade, and generate tumors in vitro and in vivo. The spheroid cells with reduced KLF4 expression also had decreased expression of CSCs markers and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, culturing DLD-1 cells in serum-free medium enriches CSCs and the expression of KLF4 is essential for the characteristics of CSCs in DLD-1; thus KLF4 can be a potential therapeutic target for treating colon cancer. PMID:23418515

  1. Polyphenols act synergistically with doxorubicin and etoposide in leukaemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mahbub, AA; Le Maitre, CL; Haywood-Small, SL; Cross, NA; Jordan-Mahy, N

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of polyphenols when used in combination with doxorubicin and etoposide, and to determine whether polyphenols sensitised leukaemia cells, causing inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. This study is based on findings in solid cancer tumours, which have shown that polyphenols can sensitize cells to chemotherapy, and induce apoptosis and/or cell-cycle arrest. This could enable a reduction of chemotherapy dose and off-target effects, whilst maintaining treatment efficacy. Quercetin, apigenin, emodin, rhein and cis-stilbene were investigated alone and in combination with etoposide and doxorubicin in two lymphoid and two myeloid leukaemia cells lines. Measurements were made of ATP levels (using CellTiter-Glo assay) as an indication of total cell number, cell cycle progression (using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry) and apoptosis (NucView caspase 3 assay and Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide staining). Effects of combination treatments on caspases 3, 8 and 9 activity were determined using Glo luminescent assays, glutathione levels were measured using the GSH-Glo Glutathione Assay and DNA damage determined by anti-γH2AX staining. Doxorubicin and etoposide in combination with polyphenols synergistically reduced ATP levels, induced apoptosis and increased S and/or G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in lymphoid leukaemia cell lines. However, in the myeloid cell lines the effects of the combination treatments varied; doxorubicin had a synergistic or additive effect when combined with quercetin, apigenin, emodin, and cis-stilbene, but had an antagonistic effect when combined with rhein. Combination treatment caused a synergistic downregulation of glutathione levels and increased DNA damage, driving apoptosis via caspase 8 and 9 activation. However, in myeloid cells where antagonistic effects were observed, this was associated with increased glutathione levels and a reduction in DNA damage and

  2. Recombinant interleukin 2 and gamma-interferon act synergistically on distinct steps of in vitro terminal human B cell maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Lê thi Bich-Thuy; Fauci, A S

    1986-01-01

    The effects of recombinant interleukin 2 (IL-2) on the in vitro differentiation of human tonsillar B cells which were not preincubated with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I or with anti-human IgM were investigated. IL-2 was shown to induce the generation of Ig-containing cells in a dose-dependent fashion from 2.5 to 2,500 U IL-2/ml. Conversely, the quantities of Ig secreted in the culture supernatant were found in the majority of experiments to peak at 25 U/ml. The possible presence, in cultures stimulated with IL-2, of cells that were capable of synthesizing Ig but that did not secrete the Ig they have produced was investigated. Among a number of factors tested, we found that gamma-interferon, which did not trigger in vitro B cell differentiation when used alone, can induce an increased secretion of Ig without noticeable change in the number of Ig-containing cells in cultures stimulated with IL-2. The possibility that gamma-interferon and IL-2 act on subsequent steps of in vitro B cell differentiation is discussed. PMID:3082936

  3. Acetylcholine acts through M3 muscarinic receptor to activate the EGFR signaling and promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huangfei; Xia, Hongwei; Tang, Qiulin; Xu, Huanji; Wei, Guoqing; Chen, Ying; Dai, Xinyu; Gong, Qiyong; Bi, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), known as a neurotransmitter, regulates the functions of numerous fundamental central and peripheral nervous system. Recently, emerging evidences indicate that ACh also plays an important role in tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the role of ACh in gastric cancer. Here, we reported that ACh could be auto-synthesized and released from MKN45 and BGC823 gastric cancer cells. Exogenous ACh promoted cell proliferation in a does-dependent manner. The M3R antagonist 4-DAMP, but not M1R antagonist trihexyphenidyl and M2/4 R antagonist AFDX-116, could reverse the ACh-induced cell proliferation. Moreover, ACh, via M3R, activated the EGFR signaling to induce the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT, and blocking EGFR pathway by specific inhibitor AG1478 suppressed the ACh induced cell proliferation. Furthermore, the M3R antagonist 4-DAMP and darifenacin could markedly inhibit gastric tumor formation in vivo. 4-DAMP could also significantly enhance the cytotoxic activity of 5-Fu against the MKN45 and BGC823 cells, and induce the expression of apoptosis-related proteins such as Bax and Caspase-3. Together, these findings indicated that the autocrine ACh could act through M3R and the EGFR signaling to promote gastric cancer cells proliferation, targeting M3R or EGFR may provide us a potential therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:28102288

  4. Aloe vera inhibits proliferation of human breast and cervical cancer cells and acts synergistically with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Arif; Sharma, Chhavi; Khan, Saniyah; Shah, Kruti; Haque, Shafiul

    2015-01-01

    Many of the anti-cancer agents currently used have an origin in natural sources including plants. Aloe vera is one such plant being studied extensively for its diverse health benefits, including cancer prevention. In this study, the cytotoxic potential of Aloe vera crude extract (ACE) alone or in combination with cisplatin in human breast (MCF-7) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells was studied by cell viability assay, nuclear morphological examination and cell cycle analysis. Effects were correlated with modulation of expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and drug metabolism by RT-PCR. Exposure of cells to ACE resulted in considerable loss of cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, which was found to be mediated by through the apoptotic pathway as evidenced by changes in the nuclear morphology and the distribution of cells in the different phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, ACE did not have any significant cytotoxicity towards normal cells, thus placing it in the category of safe chemopreventive agent. Further, the effects were correlated with the downregulation of cyclin D1, CYP 1A1, CYP 1A2 and increased expression of bax and p21 in MCF-7 and HeLa cells. In addition, low dose combination of ACE and cisplatin showed a combination index less than 1, indicating synergistic growth inhibition compared to the agents applied individually. In conclusion, these results signify that Aloe vera may be an effective anti-neoplastic agent to inhibit cancer cell growth and increase the therapeutic efficacy of conventional drugs like cispolatin. Thus promoting the development of plant-derived therapeutic agents appears warranted for novel cancer treatment strategies.

  5. Laboratory studies with cloud-derived Bacterial Cells acting as Ice Nuclei in the Immersion and Deposition Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehm, C.; Chou, C.; Amato, P.; Attard, E.; Delort, A.-M.; Morris, C.; Kiselev, A.; Stetzer, O.; Möhler, O.; Leisner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play an important role in cloud microphysics. Aerosols of biological origin are a subgroup, and some of them are able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei and thus influence cloud life cycles and the climate. Some bacteria species have been found to act as ice nuclei at relatively high temperatures up to -2 degree Celsius and are therefore of particular importance as "high temperature" ice nuclei. Recently, ice nucleation experiments with bacterial cells from different sources were performed at the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. At the AIDA facility, microphysical cloud processes can be simulated and investigated in laboratory at realistic atmospheric cloud conditions. Different ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria strains were isolated from cloud water, glacier melt water and phyllosphere and examined in AIDA experiments. The living cells were suspended in nanopure or artificial cloud water and injected into the cloud chamber through a dispersion nozzle. The injected droplets evaporated in the chamber and the bacterial cells were transformed into the aerosol phase. After the spraying, the cloud formation was started by expansion cooling. Experiments were performed in the temperature range from -2 down to -20 degree Celsius. Detailed measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of the aerosol particles as well as of the droplets and ice particles were carried out during the AIDA experiments. A minor fraction of the bacteria cells was observed to act as ice nuclei in the immersion nucleation mode at higher temperatures as well as in the deposition nucleation mode at lower temperatures. The ice activity started at -6 degree Celsius. The most efficient INA bacteria species were Pseudomonas syringae 32b74 and Pseudomonas fluorescens Antarctica1. The ice active number fraction with respect to the cells varied from 0,01 to 0,1, and it does not change at different

  6. The Drosophila female germline stem cell lineage acts to spatially restrict DPP function within the niche.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Lim, Tit Meng; Cai, Yu

    2010-07-27

    Maintenance of stem cells requires spatially restricted, niche-associated signals. In the Drosophila female germline stem cell (GSC) niche, Decapentaplegic (DPP) is the primary niche-associated factor and functions over a short range to promote GSC self-renewal rather than differentiation. Here, we show that the GSC lineage and, more specifically, the stem cells themselves participate in the spatial restriction of DPP function by activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in the surrounding somatic cells. EGFR-MAPK signaling in somatic cells repressed the expression of dally, which encodes a glypican required for DPP movement and stability. Consequently, only GSCs close to the DPP source (the somatic cells in the niche) showed high signal activation and were maintained as stem cells, whereas cystoblasts outside the niche showed low signal activation and initiated differentiation. Thus, our data reveal that the reciprocal crosstalk between the GSCs and the somatic cells defines the spatial limits of DPP action and therefore the extent of the GSC niche.

  7. Mature neurons modulate neurogenesis through chemical signals acting on neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pardal, Ricardo; López Barneo, José

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of neural stem cells has revealed a much higher structural and functional plasticity in the adult nervous system than previously anticipated. Progenitor cells are able to give rise to new neurons and glial cells when needed, thanks to their surveillance of the environment from the germinal niches. Multiple different factors define neural stem cell niches, including cellular and non-cellular components. Innervation of neurogenic centers is crucial, as it allows the functional connection between stem cell behavior and surrounding neuronal activity. Although the association between organismal behavior and neurogenesis is well documented, much less is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which neurons control stem cell activity. In this review we discuss the existing data on this type of regulation from the three best characterized germinal niches in the adult nervous system: the subventricular zone, the hippocampal subgranular zone, and the carotid body. In all cases, neuronal activity modulates stem cell behavior either by neurotransmitter spillover or by synaptic-like contacts. Currently, the molecular mechanisms underlying mature neuron-stem cell interaction are being clarified. Functional consequences and potential clinical relevance of these phenomena are also discussed.

  8. Modeling the Overproduction of Ribosomes when Antibacterial Drugs Act on Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arijit; Dill, Ken A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria that are subjected to ribosome-inhibiting antibiotic drugs show an interesting behavior: Although the drug slows down cell growth, it also paradoxically increases the cell’s concentration of ribosomes. We combine our earlier nonlinear model of the energy-biomass balance in undrugged Escherichia coli cells with Michaelis-Menten binding of drugs that inactivate ribosomes. Predictions are in good agreement with experiments on ribosomal concentrations and synthesis rates versus drug concentrations and growth rates. The model indicates that the added drug drives the cell to overproduce ribosomes, keeping roughly constant the level of ribosomes producing ribosomal proteins, an important quantity for cell growth. The model also predicts that ribosomal production rates should increase and then decrease with added drug. This model gives insights into the driving forces in cells and suggests new experiments. PMID:26840738

  9. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary points 1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs) are headaches/facial pains classified together based on:a suspected common pathophysiology involving the trigeminovascular system, the trigeminoparasympathetic reflex and centres controlling circadian rhythms;a similar clinical presentation of trigeminal pain, and autonomic activation. 2. There is much overlap in the diagnostic features of individual TACs. 3. In contrast, treatment response is relatively specific and aids in establishing a definitive diagnosis. 4. TACs are often presentations of underlying pathology; all patients should be imaged. 5. The aim of the article is to provide the reader with a broad introduction to, and an overview of, TACs. The reading list is extensive for the interested reader. PMID:26516482

  10. The autonomous sciencecraft constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, R. L.; Chien, S.; Castano, R.; Rabideau, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly onboard the Air Force TechSat 21 constellation of three spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2006. ASE uses onboard continuous planning, robust task and goal-based execution, model-based mode identification and reconfiguration, and onboard machine learning and pattern recognition to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. In this paper we discuss how these AI technologies are synergistically integrated in a hybrid multi-layer control architecture to enable a virtual spacecraft science agent. Demonstration of these capabilities in a flight environment will open up tremendous new opportunities in planetary science, space physics, and earth science that would be unreachable without this technology.

  11. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  12. Replication of chromosomal and episomal DNA in X-ray-damaged human cells: A cis- or trans-acting mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.; Rose, R.; Mitchell, D.L. )

    1990-12-01

    Episomal plasmids and viruses in mammalian cells present small targets for X-ray-induced DNA damage. At doses up to 100 Gy, DNA strand breaks or endonuclease III-sensitive sites were not discernible in 10.3-kb Epstein-Barr virus-based plasmid DNA or in 4.9-kb defective simian virus 40 DNA. DNA replication in these small molecules, however, was inhibited strongly by X-ray doses of greater than or equal to 20 Gy, decreasing to only 20 to 40% of control values. Inhibition was relieved slightly by growth in caffeine but was increased by growth in 3-aminobenzamide. Inhibition of DNA replication in episomal DNA molecules that are too small to sustain significant damage directly to their DNA may be due to either (a) a trans-acting diffusible factor that transfers the consequences of DNA breakage to episomes and to other replicating molecules, (b) a cis-acting mechanism in which episomes are structurally linked to genomic chromatin, and replication of both episomal and chromosomal replicons is under common control, or (c) radiation damage on other cellular structures unrelated to DNA. The resolution of these cellular mechanisms may shed light on the X-ray-resistant replication in ataxia-telangiectasia and may suggest strategies for molecular characterization of potential trans- or cis-acting factors.

  13. Inflammatory cues acting on the adult intestinal stem cells and the early onset of cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE LERMA BARBARO, A.; PERLETTI, G.; BONAPACE, I.M.; MONTI, E.

    2014-01-01

    The observation that cancer often arises at sites of chronic inflammation has prompted the idea that carcinogenesis and inflammation are deeply interwoven. In fact, the current literature highlights a role for chronic inflammation in virtually all the steps of carcinogenesis, including tumor initiation, promotion and progression. The aim of the present article is to review the current literature on the involvement of chronic inflammation in the initiation step and in the very early phases of tumorigenesis, in a type of cancer where adult stem cells are assumed to be the cells of origin of neoplasia. Since the gastrointestinal tract is regarded as the best-established model system to address the liaison between chronic inflammation and neoplasia, the focus of this article will be on intestinal cancer. In fact, the anatomy of the intestinal epithelial lining is uniquely suited to study adult stem cells in their niche, and the bowel crypt is an ideal developmental biology system, as proliferation, differentiation and cell migration are all distributed linearly along the long axis of the crypt. Moreover, crypt stem cells are regarded today as the most likely targets of neoplastic transformation in bowel cancer. More specifically, the present review addresses the molecular mechanisms whereby a state of chronic inflammation could trigger the neoplastic process in the intestine, focusing on the generation of inflammatory cues evoking enhanced proliferation in cells not initiated but at risk of neoplastic transformation because of their stemness. Novel experimental approaches, based on triggering an inflammatory stimulus in the neighbourhood of adult intestinal stem cells, are warranted to address some as yet unanswered questions. A possible approach, the targeted transgenesis of Paneth cells, may be aimed at ‘hijacking’ the crypt stem cell niche from a status characterized by the maintenance of homeostasis to local chronic inflammation, with the prospect of initiating

  14. Critically Reflective Work Behaviour within Autonomous Professionals' Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Esther; van den Berg, B. A. M.; Endedijk, M. D.; van Beukelen, P.; Simons, P. R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Informal learning communities in which participants show critically reflective work behaviour (CRWB) have the potential to support lifelong learning. In practice this behaviour does not always occur in groups of autonomous professionals. This study explores design principles (DPs) that could act as social affordances for CRWB, within the context…

  15. Maspin acts at the cell membrane to inhibit invasion and motility of mammary and prostatic cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, S; Carey, J; Seftor, E A; Dias, L; Hendrix, M J; Sager, R

    1996-01-01

    Maspin, a novel serine protease inhibitor (serpin), inhibits tumor invasion and metastasis of mammary carcinoma. We show here that recombinant maspin protein blocks the motility of these carcinoma cells in culture over 12 h, as demonstrated by time-lapse video microscopy. Lamellopodia are withdrawn but ruffling continues. Both exogenous recombinant maspin and maspin expressed by tumor transfectants exhibit inhibitory effects on cell motility and cell invasion as shown in modified Boyden chamber assays. In addition, three prostatic cancer cell lines treated with recombinant maspin exhibited similar inhibition of both invasion and motility, suggesting a similar mode of maspin action in these two glandular epithelial cancers. When mammary carcinoma cells were treated with recombinant maspin, the protein was shown by immunostaining to bind specifically to the cell surface, suggesting that maspin activity is membrane associated. When pretreated with antimaspin antibody, maspin loses its inhibitory effects on both invasion and motility. However, when maspin is added to these cells preceding antibody treatment, the activity of maspin is no longer inhibited by subsequent addition of the antibody. It is concluded therefore that the inhibition of invasion and motility by maspin is initially localized to the cell surface. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8876194

  16. LIME acts as a transmembrane adapter mediating BCR-dependent B-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eunseon; Lee, Hyunsook; Yun, Yungdae

    2006-02-15

    Assembly of a signaling complex around the transmembrane adapter LAT is essential for the transmission of T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling. However, a LAT-like molecule responsible for the initial activation events in B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has not yet been identified. Here, we show that LIME is a transmembrane adaptor required for BCR-mediated B-cell activation. LIME was found to be expressed in mouse splenic B cells. Upon BCR cross-linking, LIME was tyrosine phosphorylated by Lyn and associated with Lyn, Grb2, PLC-gamma2, and PI3K. Reduction of LIME expression by the introduction of siRNA resulted in the disruption of BCR-mediated activation of MAPK, calcium flux, NF-AT, PI3K, and NF-kappaB. Taken together, these results establish that LIME is an essential transmembrane adaptor linking BCR ligation to the downstream signaling events that lead to B-cell activation.

  17. Native cellulose nanofibrills induce immune tolerance in vitro by acting on dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomić, Sergej; Kokol, Vanja; Mihajlović, Dušan; Mirčić, Aleksandar; Čolić, Miodrag

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose nanofibrills (CNFs) are attractive biocompatible, natural nanomaterials for wide biomedical applications. However, the immunological mechanisms of CNFs have been poorly investigated. Considering that dendritic cells (DCs) are the key immune regulatory cells in response to nanomaterials, our aim was to investigate the immunological mechanisms of CNFs in a model of DC-mediated immune response. We found that non-toxic concentrations of CNFs impaired the differentiation, and subsequent maturation of human monocyte-derived (mo)-DCs. In a co-culture with CD4+T cells, CNF-treated mo-DCs possessed a weaker allostimulatory and T helper (Th)1 and Th17 polarizing capacity, but a stronger capacity to induce Th2 cells and CD4+CD25hiFoxP3hi regulatory T cells. This correlated with an increased immunoglobulin-like transcript-4 and indolamine dioxygenase-1 expression by CNF-treated mo-DCs, following the partial internalization of CNFs and the accumulation of CD209 and actin bundles at the place of contacts with CNFs. Cumulatively, we showed that CNFs are able to induce an active immune tolerance by inducing tolerogenic DCs, which could be beneficial for the application of CNFs in wound healing and chronic inflammation therapies. PMID:27558765

  18. Cytokinins act directly on lateral root founder cells to inhibit root initiation.

    PubMed

    Laplaze, Laurent; Benkova, Eva; Casimiro, Ilda; Maes, Lies; Vanneste, Steffen; Swarup, Ranjan; Weijers, Dolf; Calvo, Vanessa; Parizot, Boris; Herrera-Rodriguez, Maria Begoña; Offringa, Remko; Graham, Neil; Doumas, Patrick; Friml, Jiri; Bogusz, Didier; Beeckman, Tom; Bennett, Malcolm

    2007-12-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, lateral roots are formed from root pericycle cells adjacent to the xylem poles. Lateral root development is regulated antagonistically by the plant hormones auxin and cytokinin. While a great deal is known about how auxin promotes lateral root development, the mechanism of cytokinin repression is still unclear. Elevating cytokinin levels was observed to disrupt lateral root initiation and the regular pattern of divisions that characterizes lateral root development in Arabidopsis. To identify the stage of lateral root development that is sensitive to cytokinins, we targeted the expression of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens cytokinin biosynthesis enzyme isopentenyltransferase to either xylem-pole pericycle cells or young lateral root primordia using GAL4-GFP enhancer trap lines. Transactivation experiments revealed that xylem-pole pericycle cells are sensitive to cytokinins, whereas young lateral root primordia are not. This effect is physiologically significant because transactivation of the Arabidopsis cytokinin degrading enzyme cytokinin oxidase 1 in lateral root founder cells results in increased lateral root formation. We observed that cytokinins perturb the expression of PIN genes in lateral root founder cells and prevent the formation of an auxin gradient that is required to pattern lateral root primordia.

  19. Native cellulose nanofibrills induce immune tolerance in vitro by acting on dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, Sergej; Kokol, Vanja; Mihajlović, Dušan; Mirčić, Aleksandar; Čolić, Miodrag

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose nanofibrills (CNFs) are attractive biocompatible, natural nanomaterials for wide biomedical applications. However, the immunological mechanisms of CNFs have been poorly investigated. Considering that dendritic cells (DCs) are the key immune regulatory cells in response to nanomaterials, our aim was to investigate the immunological mechanisms of CNFs in a model of DC-mediated immune response. We found that non-toxic concentrations of CNFs impaired the differentiation, and subsequent maturation of human monocyte-derived (mo)-DCs. In a co-culture with CD4+T cells, CNF-treated mo-DCs possessed a weaker allostimulatory and T helper (Th)1 and Th17 polarizing capacity, but a stronger capacity to induce Th2 cells and CD4+CD25hiFoxP3hi regulatory T cells. This correlated with an increased immunoglobulin-like transcript-4 and indolamine dioxygenase-1 expression by CNF-treated mo-DCs, following the partial internalization of CNFs and the accumulation of CD209 and actin bundles at the place of contacts with CNFs. Cumulatively, we showed that CNFs are able to induce an active immune tolerance by inducing tolerogenic DCs, which could be beneficial for the application of CNFs in wound healing and chronic inflammation therapies.

  20. Insulin acts as a myogenic differentiation signal for neural stem cells with multilineage differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud; Kendall, Stephen E; Moore, Daniel P; Bellum, Stephen; Cowling, Rebecca A; Nikopoulos, George N; Kubu, Chris J; Vary, Calvin; Verdi, Joseph M

    2004-09-01

    Reports of non-neural differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) have been challenged by alternative explanations for expanded differentiation potentials. In an attempt to demonstrate the plasticity of NSC, neurospheres were generated from single retrovirally labeled embryonic cortical precursors. In a defined serum-free insulin-containing media, 40% of the neurospheres contained both myogenic and neurogenic differentiated progeny. The number of NSCs displaying multilineage differentiation potential declines through gestation but does exist in the adult animal. In this system, insulin appears to function as a survival and dose-dependent myogenic differentiation signal for multilineage NSCs (MLNSC). MLNSC-derived cardiomyocytes contract synchronously, respond to sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation, and regenerate injured heart tissues. These studies provide support for the hypothesis that MLNSCs exist throughout the lifetime of the animal, and potentially provide a population of stem cells for cell-based regenerative medicine strategies inside and outside of the nervous system.

  1. The autonomic nervous system and perinatal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Milner, R D; De Gasparo, M

    1981-01-01

    The development of the autonomic nervous system in relation to perinatal metabolism is reviewed with particular attention given to the adipocyte, hepatocyte and the A and B cells of the islets of Langerhans. Adrenergic receptors develop in the B cell independently of normal innervation and by the time of birth, in most species studied, the pancreas, liver and adipose tissue respond appropriately to autonomic signals. Birth is associated with a huge surge in circulating catecholamines which is probably responsible for the early postnatal rise in free fatty acids and glucagon concentrations in plasma. beta-Blocking drugs such as propranolol have an adverse effect on fetal growth and neonatal metabolism, being responsible for hypoglycemia and for impairing the thermogenic response to cold exposure. beta-Mimetic drugs are commonly used to prevent premature labour and may help the fetus in other ways, for example, by improving the placental blood supply and the delivery of nutrients by increasing maternal fat and carbohydrate mobilization.

  2. Organophosphate Flame Retardants Act as Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in MA-10 Mouse Tumor Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Schang, Gauthier; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F

    2016-04-01

    The organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have emerged as alternatives to banned brominated flame retardants but little is known about their possible activity as endocrine disruptors. Our goal was to compare the effects of 7 commonly used OPFRsin vitroon MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells to those of a major brominated flame retardant, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47). The effects of OPFRs and BDE-47 on mitochondrial activity, cell counts, oxidative stress, steroid secretion and gene expression were investigated. BDE-47 and all 7 OPFRs tested significantly reduced MA-10 cell mitochondrial activity (concentrations ≥50 μM) and cell number (concentrations ≥10 μM). All of the OPFRs significantly increased (10 μM, 1.7-4.4-fold) superoxide production whereas BDE-47 had no significant effect. Basal progesterone production was significantly increased (10 μM, 1.5 to 3-fold) by 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate, isodecyl diphenyl phosphate, isopropylated triphenyl phosphate, tert-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate, and tricresyl phosphate, while BDE-47, triphenyl phosphate and tri-o-cresyl phosphate had no effect. Interestingly, isopropylated triphenyl phosphate enhanced dbcAMP-stimulated steroid production (∼2-fold), while tri-o-cresyl phosphate decreased (∼2/3) LH-stimulated steroid production. Several OPFRs affected the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of progesterone. In conclusion, all the OPFRs tested affected mitochondrial activity, cell survival, and superoxide production. Basal or stimulated steroid secretion was affected by all of the OPFRs except triphenyl phosphate; BDE-47 had no effect. Hence, the OPFRs currently used as alternatives affect Leydig cells to a greater extent than the brominated flame retardants that they have replaced.

  3. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Coronaviruses Acts as a Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Wang, Haiying; Ji, Yanxi; Yang, Jie; Xu, Shan; Huang, Xingyu; Wang, Zidao; Qin, Lei; Tien, Po; Zhou, Xi; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Yu

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of eukaryotic posttranscriptional gene silencing that functions in antiviral immunity in plants, nematodes, and insects. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi also plays a role in antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells. To combat RNAi-mediated antiviral responses, many viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSR) to facilitate their replication. VSRs have been widely studied for plant and insect viruses, but only a few have been defined for mammalian viruses currently. We identified a novel VSR from coronaviruses, a group of medically important mammalian viruses including Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and showed that the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of coronaviruses suppresses RNAi triggered by either short hairpin RNAs or small interfering RNAs in mammalian cells. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is closely related to SARS-CoV in the family Coronaviridae and was used as a coronavirus replication model. The replication of MHV increased when the N proteins were expressed in trans, while knockdown of Dicer1 or Ago2 transcripts facilitated the MHV replication in mammalian cells. These results support the hypothesis that RNAi is a part of the antiviral immunity responses in mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE RNAi has been well known to play important antiviral roles from plants to invertebrates. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi is also involved in antiviral response in mammalian cells. An important indication for RNAi-mediated antiviral activity in mammals is the fact that a number of mammalian viruses encode potent suppressors of RNA silencing. Our results demonstrate that coronavirus N protein could function as a VSR through its double-stranded RNA binding activity. Mutational analysis of N protein allowed us to find out the critical residues for the VSR activity. Using the MHV-A59 as the coronavirus replication model, we showed that ectopic expression

  4. ERK1/2 acts as a switch between necrotic and apoptotic cell death in ether phospholipid edelfosine-treated glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Melo-Lima, Sara; Lopes, Maria C; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is characterized by constitutive apoptosis resistance and survival signaling expression, but paradoxically is a necrosis-prone neoplasm. Incubation of human U118 glioblastoma cells with the antitumor alkylphospholipid analog edelfosine induced a potent necrotic cell death, whereas apoptosis was scarce. Preincubation of U118 cells with the selective MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126, which inhibits MEK1/2-mediated activation of ERK1/2, led to a switch from necrosis to caspase-dependent apoptosis following edelfosine treatment. Combined treatment of U0126 and edelfosine totally inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and led to RIPK1 and RelA/NF-κB degradation, together with a strong activation of caspase-3 and -8. This apoptotic response was accompanied by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway with mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss, Bcl-xL degradation and caspase-9 activation. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation also led to a dramatic increase in edelfosine-induced apoptosis when the alkylphospholipid analog was used at a low micromolar range, suggesting that ERK phosphorylation acts as a potent regulator of apoptotic cell death in edelfosine-treated U118 cells. These data show that inhibition of MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway highly potentiates edelfosine-induced apoptosis in glioblastoma U118 cells and switches the type of edelfosine-induced cell death from necrosis to apoptosis.

  5. Ski is silenced by methylation and acts as tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mian; Wu, Xiaojun; He, Chaosheng; Zhang, Jiexia; Zhang, Jinjun

    2015-12-12

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressors contributes to the development and progression of lung cancer. We recently found that Ski was hypermethylated in lung cancer. This study aimed to clarify its epigenetic alteration, molecular mechanisms and clinical significance in lung cancer. Ski methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR) and bisulfite sequencing. mRNA level of Ski was measured by RT-PCR and compared with the methylation status. Ski methylation correlated with decreased mRNA expression in human lung cancer cell lines. Ski hypermethylation was detected in 56.0% of primary lung tumors and associated with poor differentiation and late tumor stage. Demethylation agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-2'dC) restored Ski expression. Re-expression of Ski in lung cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation, clonogenicity, migration, invasion and tumor formation. Ski decreased transcriptional activities of Smads and TAZ. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with Ski positive expression had a better overall survival in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Our results revealed that Ski acts as a tumor suppressor inactivated by DNA methylation and is an independent prognostic factor of lung cancer.

  6. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    PubMed

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  7. FatJ acts via the Hippo mediator Yap1 to restrict the size of neural progenitor cell pools

    PubMed Central

    Van Hateren, Nick J.; Das, Raman M.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle; Placzek, Marysia; Wilson, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    The size, composition and functioning of the spinal cord is likely to depend on appropriate numbers of progenitor and differentiated cells of a particular class, but little is known about how cell numbers are controlled in specific cell cohorts along the dorsoventral axis of the neural tube. Here, we show that FatJ cadherin, identified in a large-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screen of cadherin genes expressed in the neural tube, is localised to progenitors in intermediate regions of the neural tube. Loss of function of FatJ promotes an increase in dp4-vp1 progenitors and a concomitant increase in differentiated Lim1+/Lim2+ neurons. Our studies reveal that FatJ mediates its action via the Hippo pathway mediator Yap1: loss of downstream Hippo components can rescue the defect caused by loss of FatJ. Together, our data demonstrate that RNAi screens are feasible in the chick embryonic neural tube, and show that FatJ acts through the Hippo pathway to regulate cell numbers in specific subsets of neural progenitor pools and their differentiated progeny. PMID:21521736

  8. An amphipathic trans-acting phosphorothioate DNA element delivers uncharged PNA and PMO nucleic acid sequences in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Harsh V.; Beaucage, Serge L.

    2016-01-01

    An innovative approach to the delivery of uncharged peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) oligomers in mammalian cells is described and consists of extending the sequence of those oligomers with a short PNA-polyA or PMO-polyA tail. Recognition of the polyA-tailed PNA or PMO oligomers by an amphipathic trans-acting polythymidylic thiophosphate triester element (dTtaPS) results in efficient internalization of those oligomers in several cell lines. Our findings indicate that cellular uptake of the oligomers occurs through an energy-dependent mechanism and macropinocytosis appears to be the predo-minant endocytic pathway used for internalization. The functionality of the internalized oligomers is demonstrated by alternate splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding luciferase in HeLa pLuc 705 cells. Amphipathic phosphorothioate DNA elements may represent a unique class of cellular transporters for robust delivery of uncharged nucleic acid sequences in live mammalian cells. PMID:27516815

  9. Screening of plants acting against Heterometrus laoticus scorpion venom activity on fibroblast cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Uawonggul, Nunthawun; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Arkaravichien, Tarinee; Chuachan, Chattong; Daduang, Sakda

    2006-01-16

    The aqueous extracts of 64 plant species, listed as animal- or insect-bite antidotes in old Thai drug recipes were screened for their activity against fibroblast cell lysis after Heterometrus laoticus scorpion venom treatment. The venom was preincubated with plant extract for 30 min and furthered treated to confluent fibroblast cells for 30 min. More than 40% efficiency (test/control) was obtained from cell treatment with venom preincubated with extracts of Andrographis paniculata Nees (Acanthaceae), Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn. (Lecythidaceae), Calamus sp. (Palmae), Clinacanthus nutans Lindau (Acanthaceae), Euphorbia neriifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae), Ipomoea aquatica Forssk (Convolvulaceae), Mesua ferrea L. (Guttiferae), Passiflora laurifolia L. (Passifloraceae), Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Labiatae), Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae), Rumex sp. (Polygonaceae) and Sapindus rarak DC. (Sapindaceae), indicating that they had a tendency to be scorpion venom antidotes. However, only Andrographis paniculata and Barringtonia acutangula extracts provided around 50% viable cells from extract treatments without venom preincubation. These two plant extracts are expected to be scorpion venom antidotes with low cytotoxicity.

  10. Recovery Act. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Gail E.

    2013-09-30

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration Project. Summarizing development of Delphi’s next generation SOFC system as the core power plant to prove the viability of the market opportunity for a 3-5 kW diesel SOFC system. Report includes test and demonstration results from testing the diesel APU in a high visibility fleet customer vehicle application.

  11. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  12. Identification of cis- and trans-acting elements regulating calretinin expression in mesothelioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kresoja-Rakic, Jelena; Kapaklikaya, Esra; Ziltener, Gabriela; Dalcher, Damian; Santoro, Raffaella; Christensen, Brock C.; Johnson, Kevin C.; Schwaller, Beat; Weder, Walter; Stahel, Rolf A.; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Calretinin (CALB2) is a diagnostic marker for epithelioid mesothelioma. It is also a prognostic marker since patients with tumors expressing high calretinin levels have better overall survival. Silencing of calretinin decreases viability of epithelioid mesothelioma cells. Our aim was to elucidate mechanisms regulating calretinin expression in mesothelioma. Analysis of calretinin transcript and protein suggested a control at the mRNA level. Treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and analysis of TCGA data indicated that promoter methylation is not likely to be involved. Therefore, we investigated CALB2 promoter by analyzing ~1kb of genomic sequence surrounding the transcription start site (TSS) + 1 using promoter reporter assay. Deletion analysis of CALB2 proximal promoter showed that sequence spanning the −161/+80bp region sustained transcriptional activity. Site-directed analysis identified important cis-regulatory elements within this −161/+80bp CALB2 promoter. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed binding of NRF-1 and E2F2 to the CALB2 promoter and siRNA knockdown of NRF-1 led to decreased expression of calretinin. Cell synchronization experiment showed that calretinin expression was cell cycle regulated with a peak of expression at G1/S phase. This study provides the first insight in the regulation of CALB2 expression in mesothelioma cells. PMID:26848772

  13. Navigator-3, a modulator of cell migration, may act as a suppressor of breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Russell, Roslin; Carvalho, Silvia; Lauriola, Mattia; Nisani, Sophia; Mancini, Maicol; Nataraj, Nishanth; Kedmi, Merav; Roth, Lee; Köstler, Wolfgang; Zeisel, Amit; Yitzhaky, Assif; Zylberg, Jacques; Tarcic, Gabi; Eilam, Raya; Wigelman, Yoav; Will, Rainer; Lavi, Sara; Porat, Ziv; Wiemann, Stefan; Ricardo, Sara; Schmitt, Fernando; Caldas, Carlos; Yarden, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination of primary tumor cells depends on migratory and invasive attributes. Here, we identify Navigator-3 (NAV3), a gene frequently mutated or deleted in human tumors, as a regulator of epithelial migration and invasion. Following induction by growth factors, NAV3 localizes to the plus ends of microtubules and enhances their polarized growth. Accordingly, NAV3 depletion trimmed microtubule growth, prolonged growth factor signaling, prevented apoptosis and enhanced random cell migration. Mathematical modeling suggested that NAV3-depleted cells acquire an advantage in terms of the way they explore their environment. In animal models, silencing NAV3 increased metastasis, whereas ectopic expression of the wild-type form, unlike expression of two, relatively unstable oncogenic mutants from human tumors, inhibited metastasis. Congruently, analyses of > 2,500 breast and lung cancer patients associated low NAV3 with shorter survival. We propose that NAV3 inhibits breast cancer progression by regulating microtubule dynamics, biasing directionally persistent rather than random migration, and inhibiting locomotion of initiated cells. PMID:25678558

  14. Spirituality and Autonomic Cardiac Control

    PubMed Central

    Berntson, Gary G.; Norman, Greg J.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirituality has been suggested to be associated with positive health, but potential biological mediators have not been well characterized. Purpose and Methods The present study examined, in a population based sample of middle-aged and older adults, the potential relationship between spirituality and patterns of cardiac autonomic control, which may have health significance. Measures of parasympathetic (high-frequency heart rate variability) and sympathetic (pre-ejection period) cardiac control were obtained from a representative sample of 229 participants. Participants completed questionnaires to assess spirituality (closeness to and satisfactory relation with God). Personality, demographic, anthropometric, health behavior, and health status information was also obtained. A series of multivariate regression models was used to examine the relations between spirituality, the autonomic measures, and two derived indexes-- cardiac autonomic balance (CAB, reflecting parasympathetic to sympathetic balance) and cardiac autonomic regulation (CAR, reflecting total autonomic control). Results Spirituality, net of demographics or other variables, was found to be associated with enhanced parasympathetic as well as sympathetic cardiac control (yielding a higher CAR); but was not associated with CAB. Although the number of cases was small (N=11), both spirituality and CAR were significant negative predictors of the prior occurrence of a myocardial infarction. Conclusions In a population based sample, spirituality appears to be associated with a specific pattern of cardiac autonomic regulation, characterized by a high level of cardiac autonomic control, irrespective of the relative contribution of the two autonomic branches. This pattern of autonomic control may have health significance. PMID:18357497

  15. Cardiovascular manifestations of autonomic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2006-02-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic manifestations of seizures occur frequently in the epileptic population. Common manifestations include alterations in heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, ECG changes and chest pain. The neuroanatomical and neurophysiological underpinnings of these autonomic manifestations are not been fully elucidated. Diagnostic confusion may arise when ictal symptoms are confined to the autonomic nervous system; conversely, such symptoms in association with convulsions or altered consciousness are more readily recognized as concomitant ictal features. Awareness of the diverse autonomic manifestations of epilepsy will enhance diagnosis and lead to more effective therapy of these patients.

  16. Coffee-mediated protective effects against directly acting genotoxins and gamma-radiation in mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S K; Vukicevic, V; Stopper, H

    2004-03-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test was performed using L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells to ascertain whether or not standard (caffeinated) instant coffee, the commonly consumed polyphenolic beverage with antioxidant activity can protect against chromosomal damage induced by the directly acting agents N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), mitomycin C (MMC), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and gamma radiation. Our results demonstrated significant reductions in the in vitro genotoxic effects of MNNG, MMC, and MMS following co-treatment of mouse lymphoma cells with standard instant coffee. Subsequently, the comet assay was carried out to assess the effect of coffee co-treatment on the level of DNA damage induced by MMS in mouse lymphoma cells. The results demonstrated a significant reduction in MMS-induced DNA damage following co-treatment with standard instant coffee. Protective effects were observed in mouse lymphoma cells which were treated with coffee immediately after exposure to gamma radiation (1 and 2 Gy). Another experiment showed protection when the mammalian cells were irradiated (0.5 and 1 Gy) midway (at 2 h) during a 4 h coffee treatment. However, the protective effect against the lower dose (0.5 Gy) was not significant. In addition we assessed the modulatory effect of coffee on MNNG-induced apoptotic frequency by flow cytometry. The results revealed only a minor influence of coffee on the frequency of apoptotic cells induced by the test compounds, rendering an increase in sensitivity for apoptosis as a reason for the reduced genomic damage an unlikely or at least incomplete explanation.

  17. Hmgn1 acts downstream of C/EBPβ to regulate the decidualization of uterine stromal cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Dang-Dang; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Guo, Chuan-Hui; Yue, Liang; Duan, Cui-Cui; Cao, Hang; Guo, Bin; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Although Hmgn1 is involved in the regulation of gene expression and cellular differentiation, its physiological roles on the differentiation of uterine stromal cells during decidualization still remain unknown. Here we showed that Hmgn1 mRNA was highly expressed in the decidua on days 6-8 of pregnancy. Simultaneously, increased expression of Hmgn1 was also observed in the artificial and in vitro induced decidualization models. Hmgn1 induced the proliferation of uterine stromal cells and expression of Ccna1, Ccnb1, Ccnb2 and Cdk1 in the absence of estrogen and progesterone. Overexpression of Hmgn1 could enhance the expression of Prl8a2 and Prl3c1 which were 2 well-known differentiation markers for decidualization, whereas inhibition of Hmgn1 with specific siRNA could reduce their expression. Further studies found that Hmgn1 could mediate the effects of C/EBPβ on the expression of Prl8a2 and Prl3c1 during in vitro decidualization. In the uterine stromal cells, cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP could stimulate the expression of Hmgn1 via C/EBPβ. Moreover, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Hmgn1 could attenuate the effects of cAMP on the differentiation of uterine stromal cells. During in vitro decidualization, Hmgn1 might act downstream of C/EBPβ to regulate the expression of Cox-2, mPGES-1 and Vegf. Progesterone could up-regulate the expression of Hmgn1 in the ovariectomized mouse uterus, uterine epithelial cells and stromal cells. Knockdown of C/EBPβ with siRNA alleviated the up-regulation of progesterone on Hmgn1 expression. Collectively, Hmgn1 may play an important role during mouse decidualization.

  18. Collaborating with Autonomous Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Cross, Charles D.; Fan, Henry; Hempley, Lucas E.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc D.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    With the anticipated increase of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) entering into the National Airspace System, it is highly likely that vehicle operators will be teaming with fleets of small autonomous vehicles. The small vehicles may consist of sUAS, which are 55 pounds or less that typically will y at altitudes 400 feet and below, and small ground vehicles typically operating in buildings or defined small campuses. Typically, the vehicle operators are not concerned with manual control of the vehicle; instead they are concerned with the overall mission. In order for this vision of high-level mission operators working with fleets of vehicles to come to fruition, many human factors related challenges must be investigated and solved. First, the interface between the human operator and the autonomous agent must be at a level that the operator needs and the agents can understand. This paper details the natural language human factors e orts that NASA Langley's Autonomy Incubator is focusing on. In particular these e orts focus on allowing the operator to interact with the system using speech and gestures rather than a mouse and keyboard. With this ability of the system to understand both speech and gestures, operators not familiar with the vehicle dynamics will be able to easily plan, initiate, and change missions using a language familiar to them rather than having to learn and converse in the vehicle's language. This will foster better teaming between the operator and the autonomous agent which will help lower workload, increase situation awareness, and improve performance of the system as a whole.

  19. Autonomous Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siders, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Robert H.

    2004-01-01

    The continued assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) is the cornerstone within NASA's overall Strategic P an. As indicated in NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), the International Space Station requires Shuttle to fly through at least the middle of the next decade to complete assembly of the Station, provide crew transport, and to provide heavy lift up and down mass capability. The ISTP reflects a tight coupling among the Station, Shuttle, and OSP programs to support our Nation's space goal . While the Shuttle is a critical component of this ISTP, there is a new emphasis for the need to achieve greater efficiency and safety in transporting crews to and from the Space Station. This need is being addressed through the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. However, the OSP is being designed to "complement" the Shuttle as the primary means for crew transfer, and will not replace all the Shuttle's capabilities. The unique heavy lift capabilities of the Space Shuttle is essential for both ISS, as well as other potential missions extending beyond low Earth orbit. One concept under discussion to better fulfill this role of a heavy lift carrier, is the transformation of the Shuttle to an "un-piloted" autonomous system. This concept would eliminate the loss of crew risk, while providing a substantial increase in payload to orbit capability. Using the guidelines reflected in the NASA ISTP, the autonomous Shuttle a simplified concept of operations can be described as; "a re-supply of cargo to the ISS through the use of an un-piloted Shuttle vehicle from launch through landing". Although this is the primary mission profile, the other major consideration in developing an autonomous Shuttle is maintaining a crew transportation capability to ISS as an assured human access to space capability.

  20. Differential cleavage of IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs) in cells infected by human rhinovirus.

    PubMed

    Chase, Amanda J; Semler, Bert L

    2014-01-20

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a major causative agent of the common cold, and thus has several important health implications. As a member of the picornavirus family, HRV has a small genomic RNA that utilizes several host cell proteins for RNA replication. Host proteins poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) are cleaved by a viral proteinase during the course of infection by the related picornavirus, poliovirus. The cleavage of PCBP2 and PTB inhibits poliovirus translation and has been proposed to mediate a switch in poliovirus template usage from translation to RNA replication. HRV RNA replication also requires a switch in template usage from translation to RNA replication; however, the mechanism is not yet known. We demonstrate that PCBP2 and PTB are differentially cleaved during HRV infection in different cell lines, suggesting that HRV utilizes a mechanism distinct from PCBP2 or PTB cleavage to mediate a switch in template usage.

  1. Salicylic Acid-Based Organic Dyes Acting as the Photosensitizer for Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungjun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Han, Ah-Reum; Ko, Kwan-Woo; Eom, Jin Hee; Namgoong, Sung Keon; Lo, Alvie S V; Gordon, Keith C; Yoon, Sungho; Han, Chi-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    A D-π-A metal-free organic dye, featuring salicylic acid as a novel acceptor/anchoring unit, has been designed, synthesized and applied to dye-sensitized solar cell. The detailed photophysical, electrochemical, photovoltaic and sensitizing properties of the organic dye were investigated, in addition to the computational studies of the dye and dye-(TiO2)6 system. A solar cell device using this new organic dye as a sensitizer produced a solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.49% (J(sc) = 6.69 mAcm-2, V(oc) = 0.74 V and ff = 0.70) under 100 mWcm(-2) simulated AM 1.5 G solar irradiation, demonstrating that the salicylic acid-based organic dye is a suitable alternative to currently used organometallic dyes.

  2. Long non-coding RNAs act as regulators of cell autophagy in diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhijie; Yan, Yuanliang; Qian, Long; Gong, Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    Identification of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) has provided a substantial increase in our understanding of the non-coding transcriptome. Studies have revealed a crucial function of lncRNAs in the modulation of cell autophagy in vitro and in vivo, further contributing to the hallmarks of disease phenotypes. These findings have profoundly altered our understanding of disease pathobiology, and may lead to the emergence of new biological concepts underlying autophagy-associated diseases, such as the carcinomas. Studies on the molecular mechanism of the lncRNA-autophagy axis may offer additional avenues for therapeutic intervention and biomarker assessment. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the multiple molecular roles of regulatory lncRNAs in the signaling pathways of cell autophagy. The emerging knowledge in this rapidly advancing field will offer novel insights into human diseases, especially cancers. PMID:28184916

  3. Toward autonomous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, L. J.; Calabrese, P. G.; Walsh, M. J.; Owens, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ways in which autonomous behavior of spacecraft can be extended to treat situations wherein a closed loop control by a human may not be appropriate or even possible are explored. Predictive models that minimize mean least squared error and arbitrary cost functions are discussed. A methodology for extracting cyclic components for an arbitrary environment with respect to usual and arbitrary criteria is developed. An approach to prediction and control based on evolutionary programming is outlined. A computer program capable of predicting time series is presented. A design of a control system for a robotic dense with partially unknown physical properties is presented.

  4. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  5. Experiments in autonomous robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is performing basic research in autonomous robotics for energy-related applications in hazardous environments. The CESAR research agenda includes a strong experimental component to assure practical evaluation of new concepts and theories. An evolutionary sequence of mobile research robots has been planned to support research in robot navigation, world sensing, and object manipulation. A number of experiments have been performed in studying robot navigation and path planning with planar sonar sensing. Future experiments will address more complex tasks involving three-dimensional sensing, dexterous manipulation, and human-scale operations.

  6. Tropomyosin-1 acts as a potential tumor suppressor in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hao; Gu, Liqun; Liu, Binjie; Li, Yiping; Wang, Yuehong; Bai, Xinna; Li, Long; Wang, Baisheng; Peng, Qian; Yao, Zhigang; Tang, Zhangui

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major contributor to the incidence and mortality of neck and head cancer. Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1), which is expressed at a low level, has been considered a prominent tumor-suppressing gene in a variety of solid tumors, although the precise mechanism of the TPM1 gene in OSCC progression remains unknown. We found that TPM1 expression levels decreased in OSCC patients and OSCC cell lines. The overall and cancer-specific survival of patients who exhibited low TPM1 levels were inferior to those of patients who had high TPM1 levels. It was also found that OSCC patients who suffered from disease stageⅠ-Ⅱ were more likely to have an up-regulated TPM1 expression level, and OSCC patients with lymph node metastasis had a higher probability of exhibiting reduced TPM1 expression. We show that overexpression of TPM1 can promote cell apoptosis and inhibit migration. Our results suggest that TPM1 can suppress tumors in OSCC, and the TPM1 expression level is related to OSCC patient prognosis. PMID:28182650

  7. Tropomyosin-1 acts as a potential tumor suppressor in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Gu, Liqun; Liu, Binjie; Li, Yiping; Wang, Yuehong; Bai, Xinna; Li, Long; Wang, Baisheng; Peng, Qian; Yao, Zhigang; Tang, Zhangui

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major contributor to the incidence and mortality of neck and head cancer. Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1), which is expressed at a low level, has been considered a prominent tumor-suppressing gene in a variety of solid tumors, although the precise mechanism of the TPM1 gene in OSCC progression remains unknown. We found that TPM1 expression levels decreased in OSCC patients and OSCC cell lines. The overall and cancer-specific survival of patients who exhibited low TPM1 levels were inferior to those of patients who had high TPM1 levels. It was also found that OSCC patients who suffered from disease stageⅠ-Ⅱ were more likely to have an up-regulated TPM1 expression level, and OSCC patients with lymph node metastasis had a higher probability of exhibiting reduced TPM1 expression. We show that overexpression of TPM1 can promote cell apoptosis and inhibit migration. Our results suggest that TPM1 can suppress tumors in OSCC, and the TPM1 expression level is related to OSCC patient prognosis.

  8. Two small GTPases act in concert with the bactofilin cytoskeleton to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Bulyha, Iryna; Lindow, Steffi; Lin, Lin; Bolte, Kathrin; Wuichet, Kristin; Kahnt, Jörg; van der Does, Chris; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2013-04-29

    Cell polarity is essential for many bacterial activities, but the mechanisms responsible for its establishment are poorly understood. In Myxococcus xanthus, the type IV pili (T4P) motor ATPases PilB and PilT localize to opposite cell poles and switch poles during cellular reversals. We demonstrate that polar localization of PilB and PilT depends on the small GTPase SofG and BacP, a bactofilin cytoskeletal protein. Polymeric BacP localizes in both subpolar regions. SofG interacts directly with polymeric BacP and associates with one of these patches, forming a cluster that shuttles to the pole to establish localization of PilB and PilT at the same pole. Next, the small GTPase MglA sorts PilB and PilT to opposite poles to establish their correct polarity. During reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the inversion of PilB and PilT polarity. Thus, three hierarchically organized systems function in a cascade to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi High Mobility Group B (TcHMGB) can act as an inflammatory mediator on mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Virginia; Alonso, Victoria L.; Manarin, Romina; Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Tavernelli, Luis; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2017-01-01

    Background High Mobility Group B (HMGB) proteins are nuclear architectural factors involved in chromatin remodeling and important nuclear events. HMGBs also play key roles outside the cell acting as alarmins or Damage-associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs). In response to a danger signal these proteins act as immune mediators in the extracellular milieu. Moreover, these molecules play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune and both infectious and sterile inflammatory chronic diseases. Principal findings We have previously identified a High mobility group B protein from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcHMGB) and showed that it has architectural properties interacting with DNA like HMGBs from other eukaryotes. Here we show that TcHMGB can be translocated to the cytoplasm and secreted out of the parasite, a process that seems to be stimulated by acetylation. We report that recombinant TcHMGB is able to induce an inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo, evidenced by the production of Nitric Oxide and induction of inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α, IL-1β and IFN-γ gene expression. Also, TGF-β and IL-10, which are not inflammatory cytokines but do play key roles in Chagas disease, were induced by rTcHMGB. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that TcHMGB can act as an exogenous immune mediator that may be important for both the control of parasite replication as the pathogenesis of Chagas disease and can be envisioned as a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) partially overlapping in function with the host DAMPs. PMID:28178282

  10. Privacy Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the Privacy Act of 1974, the Electronic Government Act of 2002, the Federal Information Security Management Act, and other information about the Environmental Protection Agency maintains its records.

  11. Vhnf1 acts downstream of Bmp, Fgf, and RA signals to regulate endocrine beta cell development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianbo; Kim, Hyon J; Gong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Ning-Ai; Lin, Shuo

    2007-03-15

    Bmp, Fgf, and retinoic acid (RA) signals have been implicated as regulators of pancreas development. However, the integration of these signaling pathways in vivo is not fully understood. Variant hnf1 (Vhnf1) is a transcription factor involved in pancreas, liver, and kidney development and its mutation in zebrafish causes underdeveloped pancreas and liver. We investigated the signaling pathways that regulate vhnf1 expression during pancreas development. First, we showed that Bmp activity is required for vhnf1 expression in the endoderm. In chordin (a Bmp antagonist) morpholino (MO)-injected embryos, vhnf1 expression in endoderm and in endocrine beta cells is expanded. On the other hand, in alk8 (a type I TGFbeta receptor) MO-injected embryos, vhnf1 expression in the endoderm is significantly reduced. Second, we showed that Fgf signaling participates in regulation of pancreas development through the vhnf1 pathway. Third, we demonstrated that RA fails to rescue reduction of insulin expression in vhnf1 mutants, whereas overexpression of vhnf1 restores insulin expression that is repressed by treatment with a RA receptor inhibitor. And finally, we revealed that both Bmp and Fgf signals act genetically upstream of RA in directing pancreas development. Taken together, our data establish that vhnf1 acts downstream of the signaling pathways of RA, Bmp, and Fgf to regulate pancreas development in zebrafish.

  12. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act: Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Packs and Hydrogen Refueling for Lift Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Block, Gus

    2011-07-31

    HEB Grocery Company, Inc. (H-E-B) is a privately-held supermarket chain with 310 stores throughout Texas and northern Mexico. H-E-B converted 14 of its lift reach trucks to fuel cell power using Nuvera Fuel Cells’ PowerEdge™ units to verify the value proposition and environmental benefits associated with the technology. Issues associated with the increasing power requirements of the distribution center operation, along with high ambient temperature in the summer and other operating conditions (such as air quality and floor surface condition), surfaced opportunities for improving Nuvera’s PowerEdge fuel cell system design in high-throughput forklift environments. The project included on-site generation of hydrogen from a steam methane reformer, called PowerTap™ manufactured by Nuvera. The hydrogen was generated, compressed and stored in equipment located outside H-E-B’s facility, and provided to the forklifts by hydrogen dispensers located in high forklift traffic areas. The PowerEdge fuel cell units logged over 25,300 operating hours over the course of the two-year project period. The PowerTap hydrogen generator produced more than 11,100 kg of hydrogen over the same period. Hydrogen availability at the pump was 99.9%. H-E-B management has determined that fuel cell forklifts help alleviate several issues in its distribution centers, including truck operator downtime associated with battery changing, truck and battery maintenance costs, and reduction of grid electricity usage. Data collected from this initial installation demonstrated a 10% productivity improvement, which enabled H-E-B to make economic decisions on expanding the fleet of PowerEdge and PowerTap units in the fleet, which it plans to undertake upon successful demonstration of the new PowerEdge reach truck product. H-E-B has also expressed interst in other uses of hydrogen produced on site in the future, such as for APUs used in tractor trailers and refrigerated transport trucks in its fleet.

  13. Awareness and Responsibility in Autonomous Weapons Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuta, Nehal; Rotolo, Antonino; Sartor, Giovanni

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Why Computational Awareness is Important in Autonomous Weapons * Flying Drones and Other Autonomous Weapons * The Impact of Autonomous Weapons Systems * From Autonomy to Awareness: A Perspective from Science Fiction * Summary and Conclusions

  14. NER and HR pathways act sequentially to promote UV-C-induced germ cell apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Stergiou, L; Eberhard, R; Doukoumetzidis, K; Hengartner, M O

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced DNA damage evokes a complex network of molecular responses, which culminate in DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the molecular pathway that mediates UV-C-induced apoptosis of meiotic germ cells in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that UV-C-induced DNA lesions are not directly pro-apoptotic. Rather, they must first be recognized and processed by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Our data suggest that NER pathway activity transforms some of these lesions into other types of DNA damage, which in turn are recognized and acted upon by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. HR pathway activity is in turn required for the recruitment of the C. elegans homolog of the yeast Rad9-Hus1-Rad1 (9-1-1) complex and activation of downstream checkpoint kinases. Blocking either the NER or HR pathway abrogates checkpoint pathway activation and UV-C-induced apoptosis. Our results show that, following UV-C, multiple DNA repair pathways can cooperate to signal to the apoptotic machinery to eliminate potentially hazardous cells. PMID:21151025

  15. Diverse activities of viral cis-acting RNA regulatory elements revealed using multicolor, long-term, single-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Ginger M; Zimdars, Laraine L; Yuan, Ming; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ahlquist, Paul; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    Cis-acting RNA structural elements govern crucial aspects of viral gene expression. How these structures and other posttranscriptional signals affect RNA trafficking and translation in the context of single cells is poorly understood. Herein we describe a multicolor, long-term (>24 h) imaging strategy for measuring integrated aspects of viral RNA regulatory control in individual cells. We apply this strategy to demonstrate differential mRNA trafficking behaviors governed by RNA elements derived from three retroviruses (HIV-1, murine leukemia virus, and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus), two hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus), and an intron-retaining transcript encoded by the cellular NXF1 gene. Striking behaviors include "burst" RNA nuclear export dynamics regulated by HIV-1's Rev response element and the viral Rev protein; transient aggregations of RNAs into discrete foci at or near the nuclear membrane triggered by multiple elements; and a novel, pulsiform RNA export activity regulated by the hepadnaviral posttranscriptional regulatory element. We incorporate single-cell tracking and a data-mining algorithm into our approach to obtain RNA element-specific, high-resolution gene expression signatures. Together these imaging assays constitute a tractable, systems-based platform for studying otherwise difficult to access spatiotemporal features of viral and cellular gene regulation.

  16. Integrin αvβ3 acting as membrane receptor for thyroid hormones mediates angiogenesis in malignant T cells.

    PubMed

    Cayrol, Florencia; Díaz Flaqué, María Celeste; Fernando, Tharu; Yang, Shao Ning; Sterle, Helena Andrea; Bolontrade, Marcela; Amorós, Mariana; Isse, Blanca; Farías, Ricardo Norberto; Ahn, Haelee; Tian, Ye F; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Singh, Ankur; Inghirami, Giorgio; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cremaschi, Graciela Alicia

    2015-01-29

    The interaction of lymphoid tumor cells with components of the extracellular matrix via integrin αvβ3 allows tumor survival and growth. This integrin was demonstrated to be the membrane receptor for thyroid hormones (THs) in several tissues. We found that THs, acting as soluble integrin αvβ3 ligands, activated growth-related signaling pathways in T-cell lymphomas (TCLs). Specifically, TH-activated αvβ3 integrin signaling promoted TCL proliferation and angiogenesis, in part, via the upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Consequently, genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of integrin αvβ3 decreased VEGF production and induced TCL cell death in vitro and in human xenograft models. In sum, we show that integrin αvβ3 transduces prosurvival signals into TCL nuclei, suggesting a novel mechanism for the endocrine modulation of TCL pathophysiology. Targeting this mechanism could constitute an effective and potentially low-toxicity chemotherapy-free treatment of TCL patients.

  17. Integrin αvβ3 acting as membrane receptor for thyroid hormones mediates angiogenesis in malignant T cells

    PubMed Central

    Cayrol, Florencia; Díaz Flaqué, María Celeste; Fernando, Tharu; Yang, Shao Ning; Sterle, Helena Andrea; Bolontrade, Marcela; Amorós, Mariana; Isse, Blanca; Farías, Ricardo Norberto; Ahn, Haelee; Tian, Ye F.; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Singh, Ankur; Inghirami, Giorgio; Cremaschi, Graciela Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of lymphoid tumor cells with components of the extracellular matrix via integrin αvβ3 allows tumor survival and growth. This integrin was demonstrated to be the membrane receptor for thyroid hormones (THs) in several tissues. We found that THs, acting as soluble integrin αvβ3 ligands, activated growth-related signaling pathways in T-cell lymphomas (TCLs). Specifically, TH-activated αvβ3 integrin signaling promoted TCL proliferation and angiogenesis, in part, via the upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Consequently, genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of integrin αvβ3 decreased VEGF production and induced TCL cell death in vitro and in human xenograft models. In sum, we show that integrin αvβ3 transduces prosurvival signals into TCL nuclei, suggesting a novel mechanism for the endocrine modulation of TCL pathophysiology. Targeting this mechanism could constitute an effective and potentially low-toxicity chemotherapy-free treatment of TCL patients. PMID:25488971

  18. The Impact of the German Tissue Act on the Manufacturing of Autologous and Allogeneic Stem Cell Preparations.

    PubMed

    Schlenke, Peter; Tapernon, Karin; Ahlke, Christoph; Mertens, Alexandra; Sibrowski, Walter

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: Cellular therapeutic agents considerably contribute to the optimal treatment of patients with hematological malignancies such as leukemia or nonhematological disorders. Over the last 50 years especially the transplantation of autologous and allogeneic stem cells from different sources after high-dose or myeloablative chemotherapy became a well-established standard therapy that cures or alleviates the symptoms in more than 50,000 patients/year worldwide. In the near future, the current progress in fundamental research on stem cells and immunobiology will allow for the clinical implementation of novel advanced cellular therapies, including gene therapeutic options. The European and German legislation have realized the need of international regulations for improved standardization and harmonization of stem cell transplants, associated cell-therapeutic agents as well as various tissue-engineered preparations in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. The Tissue Directive 2004/23/EC, issued and ratified by the European Parliament in March 2004, and its national transition into the German Tissue Act which came into force in July 2007 define the quality and safety standards for the donation, procurement, testing, processing, preservation, storage, and distribution of human tissues and cells. These standards are of high relevance to ensure the efficient prevention of the transmission of viral and nonviral infectious pathogens and to achieve the same safeguards as in the population's blood supply. This review discusses the pros and cons of the new legislation and argues for keeping the administrative and regulative demands in reasonable limits and for offering innovative approaches of cellular therapies to the European citizens.

  19. Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  20. Nemesis Autonomous Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Lee, Cin-Young; Horvath, Gregory A,; Clement, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized framework has been developed for systems validation that can be applied to both traditional and autonomous systems. The framework consists of an automated test case generation and execution system called Nemesis that rapidly and thoroughly identifies flaws or vulnerabilities within a system. By applying genetic optimization and goal-seeking algorithms on the test equipment side, a "war game" is conducted between a system and its complementary nemesis. The end result of the war games is a collection of scenarios that reveals any undesirable behaviors of the system under test. The software provides a reusable framework to evolve test scenarios using genetic algorithms using an operation model of the system under test. It can automatically generate and execute test cases that reveal flaws in behaviorally complex systems. Genetic algorithms focus the exploration of tests on the set of test cases that most effectively reveals the flaws and vulnerabilities of the system under test. It leverages advances in state- and model-based engineering, which are essential in defining the behavior of autonomous systems. It also uses goal networks to describe test scenarios.

  1. Autonomic Responses to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, W. B.; Cowings, P. S.; Miller, N. E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe how changes in autonomic nervous system responses may be used as an index of individual differences in adaptational capacity to space flight. During two separate Spacelab missions, six crewmembers wore an ambulatory monitoring system which enabled continuous recording of their physiological responses for up to twelve hours a day for 3 to 5 mission days. The responses recorded were electrocardiography, respiration wave form, skin conductance level, hand temperature, blood flow to the hands and triaxial accelerations of the head and upper body. Three of these subjects had been given training, before the mission, in voluntary control of these autonomic responses as a means of facilitating adaptation to space. Three of these subjects served as Controls, i.e., did not receive this training but took anti-motion sickness medication. Nearly 300 hours of flight data are summarized. These data were examined using time-series analyses, spectral analyses of heart rate variability, and analyses of variance. Information was obtained on responses to space motion sickness, inflight medications, circadian rhythm, workload and fatigue. Preliminary assessment was made on the effectiveness of self-regulation training as a means of facilitating adaptation, with recommendations for future flights.

  2. Autonomous Flight Safety System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Santuro, Steve; Simpson, James; Zoerner, Roger; Bull, Barton; Lanzi, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is an independent flight safety system designed for small to medium sized expendable launch vehicles launching from or needing range safety protection while overlying relatively remote locations. AFSS replaces the need for a man-in-the-loop to make decisions for flight termination. AFSS could also serve as the prototype for an autonomous manned flight crew escape advisory system. AFSS utilizes onboard sensors and processors to emulate the human decision-making process using rule-based software logic and can dramatically reduce safety response time during critical launch phases. The Range Safety flight path nominal trajectory, its deviation allowances, limit zones and other flight safety rules are stored in the onboard computers. Position, velocity and attitude data obtained from onboard global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation system (INS) sensors are compared with these rules to determine the appropriate action to ensure that people and property are not jeopardized. The final system will be fully redundant and independent with multiple processors, sensors, and dead man switches to prevent inadvertent flight termination. AFSS is currently in Phase III which includes updated algorithms, integrated GPS/INS sensors, large scale simulation testing and initial aircraft flight testing.

  3. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  4. Panobinostat acts synergistically with ibrutinib in diffuse large B cell lymphoma cells with MyD88 L265 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, Patrizia; Brea, Elliott J.; De Stanchina, Elisa; Toska, Eneda; Chang, Aaron Y.; Fennell, Myles; Seshan, Venkatraman; Garippa, Ralph; Scheinberg, David A.; Baselga, José; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) frequently harbors genetic alterations that activate the B cell receptor (BCR) and TLR pathways, which converge to activate NF-κB. While selective inhibition of BTK with ibrutinib causes clinical responses in relapsed DLBCL patients, most responses are partial and of a short duration. Here, we demonstrated that MyD88 silencing enhanced ibrutinib efficacy in DLBCL cells harboring MyD88 L265P mutations. Chemical downregulation of MyD88 expression with HDAC inhibitors also synergized with ibrutinib. We demonstrate that HDAC inhibitor regulation of MyD88 expression is mediated by STAT3. In turn, STAT3 silencing caused a decrease in MyD88 mRNA and protein levels, and enhanced the ibrutinib antilymphoma effect in MyD88 mutant DLBCL cells. Induced mutations in the STAT3 binding site in the MyD88 promotor region was associated with a decrease in MyD88 transcriptional activity. We also demonstrate that treatment with the HDAC inhibitor panobinostat decreased phosphorylated STAT3 binding to the MyD88 promotor. Accordingly, combined treatment with panobinostat and ibrutinib resulted in enhanced inhibition of NF-κB activity and caused regression of DLBCL xenografts. Our data provide a mechanistic rationale for combining HDAC inhibitors and ibrutinib for the treatment of DLBCL. PMID:28352655

  5. Fat2 acts through the WAVE regulatory complex to drive collective cell migration during tissue rotation

    PubMed Central

    Squarr, Anna Julia; Brinkmann, Klaus; Chen, Baoyu; Steinbacher, Tim; Ebnet, Klaus; Rosen, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Directional cell movements during morphogenesis require the coordinated interplay between membrane receptors and the actin cytoskeleton. The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) is a conserved actin regulator. Here, we found that the atypical cadherin Fat2 recruits the WRC to basal membranes of tricellular contacts where a new type of planar-polarized whip-like actin protrusion is formed. Loss of either Fat2 function or its interaction with the WRC disrupts tricellular protrusions and results in the formation of nonpolarized filopodia. We provide further evidence for a molecular network in which the receptor tyrosine phosphatase Dlar interacts with the WRC to couple the extracellular matrix, the membrane, and the actin cytoskeleton during egg elongation. Our data uncover a mechanism by which polarity information can be transduced from a membrane receptor to a key actin regulator to control collective follicle cell migration during egg elongation. 4D-live imaging of rotating MCF10A mammary acini further suggests an evolutionary conserved mechanism driving rotational motions in epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:26903538

  6. Jagged2 acts as a Delta-like Notch ligand during early hematopoietic cell fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Van de Walle, Inge; De Smet, Greet; Gärtner, Martina; De Smedt, Magda; Waegemans, Els; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Leclercq, Georges; Plum, Jean; Aster, Jon C.; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Kyewski, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Notch signaling critically mediates various hematopoietic lineage decisions and is induced in mammals by Notch ligands that are classified into 2 families, Delta-like (Delta-like-1, -3 and -4) and Jagged (Jagged1 and Jagged2), based on structural homology with both Drosophila ligands Delta and Serrate, respectively. Because the functional differences between mammalian Notch ligands were still unclear, we have investigated their influence on early human hematopoiesis and show that Jagged2 affects hematopoietic lineage decisions very similarly as Delta-like-1 and -4, but very different from Jagged1. OP9 coculture experiments revealed that Jagged2, like Delta-like ligands, induces T-lineage differentiation and inhibits B-cell and myeloid development. However, dose-dependent Notch activation studies, gene expression analysis, and promoter activation assays indicated that Jagged2 is a weaker Notch1-activator compared with the Delta-like ligands, revealing a Notch1 specific signal strength hierarchy for mammalian Notch ligands. Strikingly, Lunatic-Fringe– mediated glycosylation of Notch1 potentiated Notch signaling through Delta-like ligands and also Jagged2, in contrast to Jagged1. Thus, our results reveal a unique role for Jagged1 in preventing the induction of T-lineage differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells and show an unexpected functional similarity between Jagged2 and the Delta-like ligands. PMID:21372153

  7. Asteroid Exploration with Autonomic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Rouff, Christopher; Hinchey, Mike

    2004-01-01

    NASA is studying advanced technologies for a future robotic exploration mission to the asteroid belt. The prospective ANTS (Autonomous Nano Technology Swarm) mission comprises autonomous agents including worker agents (small spacecra3) designed to cooperate in asteroid exploration under the overall authoriq of at least one ruler agent (a larger spacecraft) whose goal is to cause science data to be returned to Earth. The ANTS team (ruler plus workers and messenger agents), but not necessarily any individual on the team, will exhibit behaviors that qualify it as an autonomic system, where an autonomic system is defined as a system that self-reconfigures, self-optimizes, self-heals, and self-protects. Autonomic system concepts lead naturally to realistic, scalable architectures rich in capabilities and behaviors. In-depth consideration of a major mission like ANTS in terms of autonomic systems brings new insights into alternative definitions of autonomic behavior. This paper gives an overview of the ANTS mission and discusses the autonomic properties of the mission.

  8. Expanded Perspectives on Autonomous Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxford, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores two general perspectives on autonomous learners: psychological and sociocultural. These perspectives introduce a range of theoretically grounded facets of autonomous learners, facets such as the self-regulated learner, the emotionally intelligent learner, the self-determined learner, the mediated learner, the socioculturally…

  9. Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, George T.; Carey, Robin J.; Kapushion, Blanche M.

    2016-01-01

    "Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book" includes activities and strategies to support the development of autonomous learners. More than 40 activities are included, all geared to the emotional, social, cognitive, and physical development of students. Teachers may use these activities and strategies with the entire class, small groups, or…

  10. Electrophysiology of autonomic neuromuscular transmission involving ATP.

    PubMed

    Sneddon, P

    2000-07-03

    Electrophysiological investigations of autonomic neuromuscular transmission have provided great insights into the role of ATP as a neurotransmitter. Burnstock and Holman made the first recordings of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) produced by sympathetic nerves innervating the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig vas deferens. This led to the identification of ATP as the mediator of e.j.p.s in this tissue, where ATP acts as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline. The e.j.p.s are mediated solely by ATP acting on P2X(1) receptors leading to action potentials and a rapid phasic contraction, whilst noradrenaline mediates a slower, tonic contraction which is not dependent on membrane depolarisation. Subsequent electrophysiological studies of the autonomic innervation of smooth muscles of the urogenital, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems have revealed a similar pattern of response, where ATP mediates a fast electrical and mechanical response, whilst another transmitter such as noradrenaline, acetylcholine, nitric oxide or a peptide mediates a slower response. The modulation of junction potentials by a variety of pre-junctional receptors and the mechanism of inactivation of ATP as a neurotransmitter will also be described.

  11. Synthetic peptides representing T-cell epitopes act as carriers in pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    de Velasco, E A; Merkus, D; Anderton, S; Verheul, A F; Lizzio, E F; Van der Zee, R; Van Eden, W; Hoffman, T; Verhoef, J; Snippe, H

    1995-01-01

    Improvement of antibody responses to polysaccharides through their linkage to proteins is thought to be mediated by protein-specific T helper (Th) cells. To investigate whether the carrier protein of a conjugate could be substituted by a Th epitope, Streptococcus pneumoniae type 17F polysaccharide (PS) was bromoacetylated and coupled to different peptides via their carboxy-terminal cysteines. Two peptides, one from the mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (hsp65) and the other from influenza virus hemagglutinin, are well-known Th epitopes. Two other peptides were selected from the pneumolysin sequence by Th epitope prediction methods; one of them was synthesized with cysteine either at the carboxy or the amino terminus. Three conjugates consistently elicited in mice anti-PS immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG responses that were not observed upon immunization with derivatized PS without peptide. The same conjugates induced no anti-PS antibody responses in athymic (nu/nu) mice, whereas clear responses were elicited in euthymic (nu/+) controls, demonstrating the thymus-dependent character of these conjugates. Only the three conjugates inducing anti-PS responses were capable of eliciting antipeptide antibodies. One of the immunogenic conjugates was studied in more detail. It induced significant protection and an anti-PS IgG response comprising all subclasses. On the basis of these results and proliferation studies with peptide and conjugate-primed cells, it is concluded that linkage of Th epitopes to PS in the right orientation enhances its immunogenicity in a thymus-dependent manner. Future possibilities for using peptides as carriers for inducing antibody responses to poorly immunogenic saccharide antigens are discussed. PMID:7532630

  12. Antimicrobial nisin acts against saliva derived multi-species biofilms without cytotoxicity to human oral cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae M.; Ateia, Islam; Paulus, Jefrey R.; Liu, Hongrui; Fenno, J. Christopher; Rickard, Alexander H.; Kapila, Yvonne L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nisin is a lantibiotic widely used for the preservation of food and beverages. Recently, investigators have reported that nisin may have clinical applications for treating bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ultra pure food grade Nisin ZP (>95% purity) on taxonomically diverse bacteria common to the human oral cavity and saliva derived multi-species oral biofilms, and to discern the toxicity of nisin against human cells relevant to the oral cavity. Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of taxonomically distinct oral bacteria were determined using agar and broth dilution methods. To assess the effects of nisin on biofilms, two model systems were utilized: a static and a controlled flow microfluidic system. Biofilms were inoculated with pooled human saliva and fed filter-sterilized saliva for 20–22 h at 37°C. Nisin effects on cellular apoptosis and proliferation were evaluated using acridine orange/ethidium bromide fluorescent nuclear staining and lactate dehydrogenase activity assays. Results: Nisin inhibited planktonic growth of oral bacteria at low concentrations (2.5–50 μg/ml). Nisin also retarded development of multi-species biofilms at concentrations ≥1 μg/ml. Specifically, under biofilm model conditions, nisin interfered with biofilm development and reduced biofilm biomass and thickness in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of pre-formed biofilms with nisin resulted in dose- and time-dependent disruption of the biofilm architecture along with decreased bacterial viability. Human cells relevant to the oral cavity were unaffected by the treatment of nisin at anti-biofilm concentrations and showed no signs of apoptotic changes unless treated with much higher concentrations (>200 μg/ml). Conclusion: This work highlights the potential therapeutic value of high purity food grade nisin to inhibit the growth of oral bacteria and the development of

  13. Pure autonomic failure without synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Isonaka, Risa; Holmes, Courtney; Cook, Glen A; Sullivan, Patti; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2017-04-01

    Pure autonomic failure is a rare form of chronic autonomic failure manifesting with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and evidence of sympathetic noradrenergic denervation unaccompanied by signs of central neurodegeneration. It has been proposed that pure autonomic failure is a Lewy body disease characterized by intra-neuronal deposition of the protein alpha-synuclein in Lewy bodies and neurites. A middle-aged man with previously diagnosed pure autonomic failure experienced a sudden, fatal cardiac arrest. He was autopsied, and tissues were harvested for neurochemical and immunofluorescence studies. Post-mortem microscopic neuropathology showed no Lewy bodies, Lewy neurites, or alpha-synuclein deposition by immunohistochemistry anywhere in the brain. The patient had markedly decreased immunofluorescent tyrosine hydroxylase in sympathetic ganglion tissue without detectable alpha-synuclein even in rare residual nests of tyrosine hydroxylase-containing ganglionic fibers. In pure autonomic failure, sympathetic noradrenergic denervation can occur without concurrent Lewy bodies or alpha-synuclein deposition in the brain or sympathetic ganglion tissue.

  14. High-density lipoprotein acts as an opsonin to enhance phagocytosis of group A streptococcus by U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Zhou, Lulei; Li, Yuxin; Bai, Wencheng; Liu, Na; Li, Wenlong; Gao, Yumin; Liu, Zhi; Han, Runlin

    2015-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) can specifically bind to streptococcal collagen-like protein 1 (Scl1) of M41-type group A Streptococcus (GAS). However, the pathological or physiological significance of Scl1-HDL interaction is unknown. Here, the hypothesis that HDL acts as an opsonin to enhance phagocytosis of HDL-bound GAS by monocytes given that some scavenger receptors can mediate the endocytosis of HDL was tested by using FITC-labeled bacteria, human U937 monocytes and HDL for phagocytic assays. HDL (10 µg/mL) was found to significantly enhance internalization of M41-type (ATCC 12373) GAS by U937 cells after 60 min incubation, compared with an HDL-free group. The internalized GAS were dead after 60 min incubation with U937 cells regardless of presence and absence of HDL. Although very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) could specifically bind to ATCC 12373 strain, it did not promote phagocytosis of GAS. Additionally, LDL, HDL and VLDL did not enhance phagocytosis of CMCC 32198 strain because this strain did not bind to these lipoproteins. A physiological concentration of HDL (1000 µg/mL) had a similar effect. Anti-CD36 antibody completely abolished opsonic phagocytosis whereas anti-CD4 antibody did not, indicating that CD36 is the major scavenger receptor mediating the uptake of HDL-opsonized GAS by U937 cells. Furthermore, because rScl1 competitively blocked the interaction of ATCC 12373 strain with HDL recombinant Scl1 (rScl1) derived from M41-type GAS, it significantly decreased opsonophagocytosis of ATCC 12373 strain but not of CMCC 32198 strain. Therefore, our findings suggest that HDL may be an opsonin that enhances CD36-dependent opsonophagocytosis of GAS by U937 cells.

  15. The transcription factors Slug and Snail act as repressors of Claudin-1 expression in epithelial cells1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Estrada, Ofelia M.; Cullerés, Albert; Soriano, Francesc X.; Peinado, Hector; Bolós, Victoria; Martínez, Fernando O.; Reina, Manuel; Cano, Amparo; Fabre, Myriam; Vilaró, Senén

    2005-01-01

    Claudin-1 is an integral membrane protein component of tight junctions. The Snail family of transcription factors are repressors that play a central role in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition, a process that occurs during cancer progression. Snail and Slug members are direct repressors of E-cadherin and act by binding to the specific E-boxes of its proximal promoter. In the present study, we demonstrate that overexpression of Slug or Snail causes a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance. Overexpression of Slug and Snail in MDCK (Madin–Darby canine kidney) cells down-regulated Claudin-1 at protein and mRNA levels. In addition, Snail and Slug are able to effectively repress human Claudin-1-driven reporter gene constructs containing the wild-type promoter sequence, but not those with mutations in two proximal E-box elements. We also demonstrate by band-shift assay that Snail and Slug bind to the E-box motifs present in the human Claudin-1 promoter. Moreover, an inverse correlation in the levels of Claudin-1 and Slug transcripts were observed in breast cancer cell lines. E-box elements in the Claudin-1 promoter were found to play a critical negative regulatory role in breast cancer cell lines that expressed low levels of Claudin-1 transcript. Significantly, in invasive human breast tumours, high levels of Snail and Slug correlated with low levels of Claudin-1 expression. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Claudin-1 is a direct downstream target gene of Snail family factors in epithelial cells. PMID:16232121

  16. Annona glabra Flavonoids Act As Antimicrobials by Binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Stanley de S. L.; Monteiro, Andrea de S.; Siqueira, Ezequias P.; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q.; Dias-Souza, Marcus Vinícius; Ferreira, Gabriella F.; Denadai, Angelo Márcio L.; Santos, Áquila R. C.; Lúcia dos Santos, Vera; de Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.; Monteiro-Neto, Valério

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen in opportunistic infections in humans. The increased incidence of antimicrobial-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates has highlighted the need for novel and more potent therapies against this microorganism. Annona glabra is known for presenting different compounds with diverse biological activities, such as anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities. Although other species of the family display antimicrobial actions, this has not yet been reported for A. glabra. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) obtained from the leaf hydroalcoholic extract of A. glabra. EAF was bactericidal against different strains of P. aeruginosa. EAF also presented with a time- and concentration-dependent effect on P. aeruginosa viability. Testing of different EAF sub-fractions showed that the sub-fraction 32-33 (SF32-33) was the most effective against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the chemical constituents of SF32-33 demonstrated a high content of flavonoids. Incubation of this active sub-fraction with P. aeruginosa ATCC 27983 triggered an endothermic reaction, which was accompanied by an increased electric charge, suggesting a high binding of SF32-33 compounds to bacterial cell walls. Collectively, our results suggest that A. glabra-derived compounds, especially flavonoids, may be useful for treating infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:28066374

  17. Autonomous Flying Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis,Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights.

  18. Autonomous docking ground demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Steve L.; Le, Thomas Quan; Othon, L. T.; Prather, Joseph L.; Eick, Richard E.; Baxter, Jim M.; Boyd, M. G.; Clark, Fred D.; Spehar, Peter T.; Teters, Rebecca T.

    1991-01-01

    The Autonomous Docking Ground Demonstration is an evaluation of the laser sensor system to support the docking phase (12 ft to contact) when operated in conjunction with the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) software. The docking mechanism being used was developed for the Apollo/Soyuz Test Program. This demonstration will be conducted using the 6-DOF Dynamic Test System (DTS). The DTS simulates the Space Station Freedom as the stationary or target vehicle and the Orbiter as the active or chase vehicle. For this demonstration, the laser sensor will be mounted on the target vehicle and the retroflectors will be on the chase vehicle. This arrangement was chosen to prevent potential damage to the laser. The laser sensor system, GN&C, and 6-DOF DTS will be operated closed-loop. Initial conditions to simulate vehicle misalignments, translational and rotational, will be introduced within the constraints of the systems involved.

  19. Object guided autonomous exploration for mobile robots in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Granda, Carlos; Choudhary, Siddarth; Rogers, John G.; Twigg, Jeff; Murali, Varun; Christensen, Henrik I.

    2014-06-01

    Autonomous mobile robotic teams are increasingly used in exploration of indoor environments. Accurate modeling of the world around the robot and describing the interaction of the robot with the world greatly increases the ability of the robot to act autonomously. This paper demonstrates the ability of autonomous robotic teams to find objects of interest. A novel feature of our approach is the object discovery and the use of it to augment the mapping and navigation process. The generated map can then be decomposed into semantic regions while also considering the distance and line of sight to anchor points. The advantage of this approach is that the robot can return a dense map of the region around an object of interest. The robustness of this approach is demonstrated in indoor environments with multiple platforms with the objective of discovering objects of interest.

  20. HDGF-related protein-2 (HRP-2) acts as an oncogene to promote cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Xu, Chen; Jin, Xiaofeng; Wumaier, Reziya; Ma, Jian; Peng, Jingtao; Wang, Yuqi; Tang, Yan; Yu, Long; Zhang, Pingzhao

    2015-03-20

    HDGFRP2 (HRP-2) belongs to the Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF)-related proteins (HRPs) family, which are characterized by a conserved HATH/PWWP domain at a well-conserved region of the N-terminus. However, the cellular function of HRP-2 remains unknown. In this study, we showed for the first time that HRP-2 is frequently overexpressed in human HCC tissues at mRNA and protein levels. We further showed that HRP-2 can promote HCC cells growth in vitro and xenograft tumors in vivo. Using protein affinity purification methods, we searched for functional partners of HRP-2, and found that HRP-2 interacts with various proteins known to be involved in transcription elongation and processing. Furthermore, we demonstrate HRP-2 interacts and co-localizes with RNA processing regulator IWS1, and positively regulated the mRNA level of Cyclin D1. Together, our study suggests HRP-2 may act as an mRNA processing co-factor to promote cells growth by regulating the mRNA of key oncogenes, which can be explored further for cancer treatment.

  1. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:27622049

  2. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2016-07-01

    The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells.

  3. Cybersecurity for aerospace autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    High profile breaches have occurred across numerous information systems. One area where attacks are particularly problematic is autonomous control systems. This paper considers the aerospace information system, focusing on elements that interact with autonomous control systems (e.g., onboard UAVs). It discusses the trust placed in the autonomous systems and supporting systems (e.g., navigational aids) and how this trust can be validated. Approaches to remotely detect the UAV compromise, without relying on the onboard software (on a potentially compromised system) as part of the process are discussed. How different levels of autonomy (task-based, goal-based, mission-based) impact this remote characterization is considered.

  4. Autonomous software: Myth or magic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, A.; Naylor, T.; Saunders, E. S.

    2008-03-01

    We discuss work by the eSTAR project which demonstrates a fully closed loop autonomous system for the follow up of possible micro-lensing anomalies. Not only are the initial micro-lensing detections followed up in real time, but ongoing events are prioritised and continually monitored, with the returned data being analysed automatically. If the ``smart software'' running the observing campaign detects a planet-like anomaly, further follow-up will be scheduled autonomously and other telescopes and telescope networks alerted to the possible planetary detection. We further discuss the implications of this, and how such projects can be used to build more general autonomous observing and control systems.

  5. MicroRNA-Containing T-Regulatory-Cell-Derived Exosomes Suppress Pathogenic T Helper 1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Okoye, Isobel S.; Coomes, Stephanie M.; Pelly, Victoria S.; Czieso, Stephanie; Papayannopoulos, Venizelos; Tolmachova, Tanya; Seabra, Miguel C.; Wilson, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells prevent inflammatory disease but the mechanistic basis of suppression is not understood completely. Gene silencing by RNA interference can act in a cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous manner, providing mechanisms of intercellular regulation. Here, we demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous gene silencing, mediated by miRNA-containing exosomes, is a mechanism employed by Treg cells to suppress T-cell-mediated disease. Treg cells transferred microRNAs (miRNA) to various immune cells, including T helper 1 (Th1) cells, suppressing Th1 cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. Use of Dicer-deficient or Rab27a and Rab27b double-deficient Treg cells to disrupt miRNA biogenesis or the exosomal pathway, respectively, established a requirement for miRNAs and exosomes for Treg-cell-mediated suppression. Transcriptional analysis and miRNA inhibitor studies showed that exosome-mediated transfer of Let-7d from Treg cell to Th1 cells contributed to suppression and prevention of systemic disease. These studies reveal a mechanism of Treg-cell-mediated suppression mediated by miRNA-containing exosomes. PMID:25035954

  6. Association Between Autonomic Impairment and Structural Deficit in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Pei-Chin; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Yang, I-Hsiao; Yu, Chiun-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Che

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) have impaired autonomic function and altered brain structure. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship of gray matter volume (GMV) determined by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to autonomic impairment in patients with PD. Whole-brain VBM analysis was performed on 3-dimensional T1-weighted images in 23 patients with PD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. The relationship of cardiovascular autonomic function (determined by survey) to baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) (determined from changes in heart rate and blood pressure during the early phase II of the Valsalva maneuver) was tested using least-squares regression analysis. The differences in GMV, autonomic parameters, and clinical data were correlated after adjusting for age and sex. Compared with controls, patients with PD had low BRS, suggesting worse cardiovascular autonomic function, and smaller GMV in several brain locations, including the right amygdala, left hippocampal formation, bilateral insular cortex, bilateral caudate nucleus, bilateral cerebellum, right fusiform, and left middle frontal gyri. The decreased GMVs of the selected brain regions were also associated with increased presence of epithelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the circulation. In patients with PD, decrease in cardiovascular autonomic function and increase in circulating EPC level are associated with smaller GMV in several areas of the brain. Because of its possible role in the modulation of the circulatory EPC pool and baroreflex control, the left hippocampal formation may be a bio-target for disease-modifying therapy and treatment monitoring in PD. PMID:26986144

  7. Autonomous power system brassboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merolla, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) brassboard is a 20 kHz power distribution system which has been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. The brassboard exists to provide a realistic hardware platform capable of testing artificially intelligent (AI) software. The brassboard's power circuit topology is based upon a Power Distribution Control Unit (PDCU), which is a subset of an advanced development 20 kHz electrical power system (EPS) testbed, originally designed for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The APS program is designed to demonstrate the application of intelligent software as a fault detection, isolation, and recovery methodology for space power systems. This report discusses both the hardware and software elements used to construct the present configuration of the brassboard. The brassboard power components are described. These include the solid-state switches (herein referred to as switchgear), transformers, sources, and loads. Closely linked to this power portion of the brassboard is the first level of embedded control. Hardware used to implement this control and its associated software is discussed. An Ada software program, developed by Lewis Research Center's Space Station Freedom Directorate for their 20 kHz testbed, is used to control the brassboard's switchgear, as well as monitor key brassboard parameters through sensors located within these switches. The Ada code is downloaded from a PC/AT, and is resident within the 8086 microprocessor-based embedded controllers. The PC/AT is also used for smart terminal emulation, capable of controlling the switchgear as well as displaying data from them. Intelligent control is provided through use of a T1 Explorer and the Autonomous Power Expert (APEX) LISP software. Real-time load scheduling is implemented through use of a 'C' program-based scheduling engine. The methods of communication between these computers and the brassboard are explored. In order to evaluate the features of both the

  8. Interleukin 10 acts on regulatory T cells to maintain expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 and suppressive function in mice with colitis.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masako; Turovskaya, Olga; Kim, Gisen; Madan, Rajat; Karp, Christopher L; Cheroutre, Hilde; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2009-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 suppress the activity of other cells. Here we show that interleukin 10 (IL-10) produced by CD11b(+) myeloid cells in recombination-activating gene 1-deficient (Rag1(-/-)) recipient mice was needed to prevent the colitis induced by transferred CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cells. In Il10(-/-)Rag1(-/-) mice, T(reg) cells failed to maintain Foxp3 expression and regulatory activity. The loss of Foxp3 expression occurred only in recipients with colitis, which indicates that the requirement for IL-10 is manifested in the presence of inflammation. IL-10 receptor-deficient (Il10rb(-/-)) T(reg) cells also failed to maintain Foxp3 expression, which suggested that host IL-10 acted directly on the T(reg) cells. Our data indicate that IL-10 released from myeloid cells acts in a paracrine manner on T(reg) cells to maintain Foxp3 expression.

  9. Defective quorum sensing of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells: evidence of collective behavior of leukemic populations as semi-autonomous aberrant ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapan J; Dao, Su; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a generic term used to describe cell-cell communication and collective decision making by bacterial and social insects to regulate the expression of specific genes in controlling cell density and other properties of the populations in response to nutrient supply or changes in the environment. QS mechanisms also have a role in higher organisms in maintaining homeostasis, regulation of the immune system and collective behavior of cancer cell populations. In the present study, we used a p190BCR-ABL driven pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL3) cell line derived from the pleural fluid of a terminally ill patient with ALL to test the QS hypothesis in leukemia. ALL3 cells don’t grow at low density (LD) in liquid media but grow progressively faster at increasingly high cell densities (HD) in contrast to other established leukemic cell lines that grow well at very low starting cell densities. The ALL3 cells at LD are poised to grow but shortly die without additional stimulation. Supernates of ALL3 cells (HDSN) and some other primary cells grown at HD stimulate the growth of the LD ALL3 cells without which they won’t survive. To get further insight into the activation processes we performed microarray analysis of the LD ALL3 cells after stimulation with ALL3 HDSN at days 1, 3, and 6. This screen identified several candidate genes, and we linked them to signaling networks and their functions. We observed that genes involved in lipid, cholesterol, fatty acid metabolism, and B cell activation are most up- or down-regulated upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells using HDSN. We also discuss other pathways that are differentially expressed upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells. Our findings suggest that the Ph+ ALL population achieves dominance by functioning as a collective aberrant ecosystem subject to defective quorum-sensing regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27429840

  10. ISS Update: Autonomous Mission Operations

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Jeff Mauldin, Simulation Supervisor for Autonomous Mission Operations at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson a...

  11. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M.; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  12. Autonomous Operations Mission Development Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2016-01-01

    This is a presentation related to the development of Autonomous Operations Systems at NASA Kennedy Space Center. It covers a high level description of the work of FY14, FY15, FY16 for the AES IGODU and APL projects.

  13. Autonomous Landing Hazard Avoidance Technology

    NASA Video Gallery

    Future NASA space crafts will be able to safely land on the Moon, Marsand even an asteroid, in potentially hazardous terrain areas, allautonomously. And NASA’s Autonomous Landing Hazard Avoidan...

  14. Genetic engineering and autonomous agency.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Linda

    2003-01-01

    In this paper I argue that the genetic manipulation of sexual orientation at the embryo stage could have a detrimental effect on the subsequent person's later capacity for autonomous agency. By focussing on an example of sexist oppression I show that the norms and expectations expressed with this type of genetic manipulation can threaten the development of autonomous agency and the kind of social environment that makes its exercise likely.

  15. Cooperative Autonomous Robots for Reconnaissance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-06

    REPORT Cooperative Autonomous Robots for Reconnaissance 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Collaborating mobile robots equipped with WiFi ...Cooperative Autonomous Robots for Reconnaissance Report Title ABSTRACT Collaborating mobile robots equipped with WiFi transceivers are configured as a mobile...equipped with WiFi transceivers are configured as a mobile ad-hoc network. Algorithms are developed to take advantage of the distributed processing

  16. Non-autonomous lattice systems with switching effects and delayed recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoying; Kloeden, Peter E.

    2016-09-01

    The long term behavior of a type of non-autonomous lattice dynamical systems is investigated, where these have a diffusive nearest neighborhood interaction and discontinuous reaction terms with recoverable delays. This problem is of both biological and mathematical interests, due to its application in systems of excitable cells as well as general biological systems involving delayed recovery. The problem is formulated as an evolution inclusion with delays and the existence of weak and strong solutions is established. It is then shown that the solutions generate a set-valued non-autonomous dynamical system and that this non-autonomous dynamical system possesses a non-autonomous global pullback attractor.

  17. Autonomous mission operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, J.; Spirkovska, L.; McCann, R.; Wang, Lui; Pohlkamp, K.; Morin, L.

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) project conducted an empirical investigation of the impact of time delay on today's mission operations, and of the effect of processes and mission support tools designed to mitigate time-delay related impacts. Mission operation scenarios were designed for NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH), an analog spacecraft habitat, covering a range of activities including nominal objectives, DSH system failures, and crew medical emergencies. The scenarios were simulated at time delay values representative of Lunar (1.2-5 sec), Near Earth Object (NEO) (50 sec) and Mars (300 sec) missions. Each combination of operational scenario and time delay was tested in a Baseline configuration, designed to reflect present-day operations of the International Space Station, and a Mitigation configuration in which a variety of software tools, information displays, and crew-ground communications protocols were employed to assist both crews and Flight Control Team (FCT) members with the long-delay conditions. Preliminary findings indicate: 1) Workload of both crewmembers and FCT members generally increased along with increasing time delay. 2) Advanced procedure execution viewers, caution and warning tools, and communications protocols such as text messaging decreased the workload of both flight controllers and crew, and decreased the difficulty of coordinating activities. 3) Whereas crew workload ratings increased between 50 sec and 300 sec of time delay in the Baseline configuration, workload ratings decreased (or remained flat) in the Mitigation configuration.

  18. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Dickey, John

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  19. Autonomous Mission Operations Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    As light time delays increase, the number of such situations in which crew autonomy is the best way to conduct the mission is expected to increase. However, there are significant open questions regarding which functions to allocate to ground and crew as the time delays increase. In situations where the ideal solution is to allocate responsibility to the crew and the vehicle, a second question arises: should the activity be the responsibility of the crew or an automated vehicle function? More specifically, we must answer the following questions: What aspects of mission operation responsibilities (Plan, Train, Fly) should be allocated to ground based or vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control in the presence of significant light-time delay between the vehicle and the Earth?How should the allocated ground based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed across the flight control team and ground system automation? How should the allocated vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed between the flight crew and onboard system automation?When during the mission should responsibility shift from flight control team to crew or from crew to vehicle, and what should the process of shifting responsibility be as the mission progresses? NASA is developing a roadmap of capabilities for Autonomous Mission Operations for human spaceflight. This presentation will describe the current state of development of this roadmap, with specific attention to in-space inspection tasks that crews might perform with minimum assistance from the ground.

  20. The autonomous ocean profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Echert, D.C.; White, G.B.; Geller, E.W.; Morison, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes the development and initial field test results of the Autonomous Ocean Profiler (AOP). The AOP is an oceanographic instrument platform for measuring profiles of physical, thermodynamic, and biological properties in the ocean. The profiler employs a hydrodynamic lift device to ''fly'' the instrument package up and down the water column along a taut vertical cable. Because the local currents drive the platform's vertical motion, power requirements are low, and therefore long, unattended deployments are possible. By using ARGOS or GOES satellite retrieval networks, the system can supply near real-time data. The system provides profile data at very high vertical resolution in contrast to conventional buoys, which gather data at only fixed sensor depths. Because only a single set of sensors is required to cover the vertical range desired, the system is low cost and, for many applications, expendable. The initial deployment configuration is as an Arctic drifting buoy. A satellite retransmission buoy is placed on the sea-ice surface with the cable suspended below the ice. Conductivity, temperature, and depth information are gathered over a depth range of 0 to 300 m. Data are internally recorded and relayed to the surface buoy through an inductive communications link for transmission via satellite.

  1. Autonomous landing guidance program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, John A.

    1996-05-01

    The Autonomous Landing Guidance program is partly funded by the US Government under the Technology Reinvestment Project. The program consortium consists of avionics and other equipment vendors, airlines and the USAF. A Sextant Avionique HUD is used to present flight symbology in cursive form as well as millimeter wave radar imagery from Lear Astronics equipment and FLIR Systems dual-channel, forward-looking, infrared imagery. All sensor imagery is presented in raster form. A future aim is to fuse all imagery data into a single presentation. Sensor testing has been accomplished in a Cessna 402 operated by the Maryland Advanced Development Laboratory. Development testing is under way in a Northwest Airlines simulator equipped with HUD and image simulation. Testing is also being carried out using United Airlines Boeing 727 and USAF C-135C (Boeing 707) test aircraft. The paper addresses the technology utilized in sensory and display systems as well as modifications made to accommodate the elements in the aircraft. Additions to the system test aircraft include global positioning systems, inertial navigation systems and extensive data collection equipment. Operational philosophy and benefits for both civil and military users are apparent. Approach procedures have been developed allowing use of Category 1 ground installations in Category 3 conditions.

  2. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-