Science.gov

Sample records for actual case histories

  1. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  2. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  3. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  4. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  5. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  6. Case history

    SciTech Connect

    Garelick, B. )

    1988-01-01

    Recycling offers a means by which hazardous materials can be kept from entering the environment. In addition to its environmental benefits, the recycling of certain byproducts, sludges, and spent materials generated from industrial processes was viewed by some as a means for exclusion from regulation under RCRA. Under EPA's 19 May 1980 regulations, non-listed wastes that were recycled were not regulated. Consequently, many activities called recycling occurred but were viewed by EPA as analogous to land disposal or incineration rather than recycling. Ultimately, these issues served as an impetus to reconsider the recycling provisions of the RCRA regulations; in particular, EPA undertook an extensive rewrite of the definition of solid waste. This paper explores a case of a proposed modernization to USS-POSCO's steel finishing plant in Pittsburg, California, and how it has been affected by EPA's definition of solid waste. The modernization would include a closed-loop facility in which the spent pickle liquor would be processed, resulting in hydrochloric acid that would be reused in the pickling lines. The ferric oxide produced through this process would be removed and sold.

  7. 7 CFR 400.51 - Availability of actual production history program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... History § 400.51 Availability of actual production history program. An Actual Production History (APH) Coverage Program is offered under the provisions contained in the following regulations: 7 CFR part 457... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Availability of actual production history program....

  8. 7 CFR 400.51 - Availability of actual production history program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... History § 400.51 Availability of actual production history program. An Actual Production History (APH) Coverage Program is offered under the provisions contained in the following regulations: 7 CFR part 457... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Availability of actual production history program....

  9. 7 CFR 400.51 - Availability of actual production history program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... History § 400.51 Availability of actual production history program. An Actual Production History (APH) Coverage Program is offered under the provisions contained in the following regulations: 7 CFR part 457... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Availability of actual production history program....

  10. 7 CFR 400.51 - Availability of actual production history program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... History § 400.51 Availability of actual production history program. An Actual Production History (APH) Coverage Program is offered under the provisions contained in the following regulations: 7 CFR part 457... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Availability of actual production history program....

  11. 7 CFR 400.55 - Qualification for actual production history coverage program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification for actual production history coverage... Production History § 400.55 Qualification for actual production history coverage program. (a) The approved... history is certified and T or D-Yields are not provided in the actuarial documents, (2) If actual...

  12. 7 CFR 400.51 - Availability of actual production history program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... History § 400.51 Availability of actual production history program. An Actual Production History (APH) Coverage Program is offered under the provisions contained in the following regulations: 7 CFR part 457... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability of actual production history program....

  13. [Natural history of the infection for human papillomavirus: an actualization].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gerardo González; Troconis, José Núñez

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in our understanding of the biology and natural history of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Most papillomavirus infections are transmitted by close contact of either skin to skin or mucosa to mucosa. Sexual intercourse is not a requirement for genital HPV infection. Digital-oral infections occur and there is evidence that digital-genital and oral-genital contacts can result in the transmission of HPV, although in a relatively low percentage. Vertical transmission from mother to fetus is a common route of infection; in fact, it is recognized that more than 80% of infants born from mothers infected with genital HPV will be positive for HPV DNA determination in the nasal-pharyngeal region and oral mucosa. Women with transient infections often develop cytological abnormalities that take place while there is active HPV replication. This occurs because productive HPV infections result in cytological abnormalities in infected epithelial cells. The strong association between the risk of HPV infection and increased immune suppression, supports a direct biological effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection on the natural history of HPV. PMID:24758104

  14. 7 CFR 400.55 - Qualification for actual production history coverage program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... whenever crop rotation requirements and land leasing practices limit the yield history available. FCIC will...) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Actual... subsequent crop year. The database may contain a maximum of the 10 most recent crop years and may...

  15. 7 CFR 400.55 - Qualification for actual production history coverage program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... whenever crop rotation requirements and land leasing practices limit the yield history available. FCIC will...) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Actual... subsequent crop year. The database may contain a maximum of the 10 most recent crop years and may...

  16. Aerodynamic instability: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenmann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The identification, diagnosis, and final correction of complex machinery malfunctions typically require the correlation of many parameters such as mechanical construction, process influence, maintenance history, and vibration response characteristics. The progression is reviewed of field testing, diagnosis, and final correction of a specific machinery instability problem. The case history presented addresses a unique low frequency instability problem on a high pressure barrel compressor. The malfunction was eventually diagnosed as a fluidic mechanism that manifested as an aerodynamic disturbance to the rotor assembly.

  17. Craniotomy: the first case histories.

    PubMed

    Martin

    1999-07-01

    The oldest existing case histories of craniotomy are from the false Hippocratic writings, about 330 BC, and one is reconstructed about the death of Ptolemy VI in 145 BC. Greek surgeons had rational indications for trepanning, when the difficulties of the times are understood. All compound fractures were infected, so death from an extradural abscess was likely. Trepanning was intended to drain the extra dural space. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd. PMID:10844769

  18. Predicted and actual high voltage failure - A case history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, P. H.; Brent, D. A.; Sidio, G. J.

    In the process of re-developing a high voltage transformer for space use, excellent correlation was found between predicted mechanical failure, predicted partial discharge signature, and real behavior of the parts. Some useful design and inspection criteria for potted high voltage parts were developed on a consistent basis. It was found that partial discharge testing as normally implemented will not necessarily discern all life limiting defects. Three lines of investigation were followed: material properties and stress analysis, prediction of partial discharge signature as a function of defect size, and computer field stress analysis to predict which defects are capable of discharge.

  19. Bifocal contact lenses: History, types, characteristics, and actual state and problems

    PubMed Central

    Toshida, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kozo; Sado, Kazushige; Kanai, Atsushi; Murakami, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Since people who wear contact lenses (CL) often continue using CL even when they develop presbyopia, there are growing expectations for bifocal CL. To understand actual state and problems, history, types, and their characteristics are summarized in this review. Bifocal CL have a long history over 70 years. Recently, bifocal CL have achieved remarkable progress. However, there still is an impression that prescription of bifocal CL is not easy. It should also be remembered that bifocal CL have limits, including limited addition for near vision, as well as the effects of aging and eye diseases in the aged, such as dry eye, astigmatism, cataract, etc. Analysis of the long-term users of bifocal CL among our patients has revealed the disappearance of bifocal CL that achieved unsatisfactory vision and poor contrast compared with those provided by other types of CL. Changing the prescription up to 3 times for lenses of the same brand may be appropriate. Lenses that provide poor contrast sensitivity, suffer from glare, or give unsatisfactory vision have been weeded out. The repeated replacement of products due to the emergence of improved or new products will be guessed. PMID:19668441

  20. The Case for "Big History."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, David

    1991-01-01

    Urges an approach to the teaching of history that takes the largest possible perspective, crossing time as well as space. Discusses the problems and advantages of such an approach. Describes a course on "big" history that begins with time, creation myths, and astronomy, and moves on to paleontology and evolution. (DK)

  1. Design aspects of zeppelin operations from case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiersperger, W. P.

    1975-01-01

    Some widely held beliefs concerning the practicability of rigid airships in air carrier operations are discussed. It is shown by a review of past operational experience, and some basic aerostatic theory, their actual record and the reasons for their demise. Problems of atmospheric density and temperature variations, meteorological factors, aerodynamic stability and control, and mooring difficulties are discussed and related to actual case histories. Structural and flight efficiencies are compared to airplane efficiencies for airplanes contemporary with the zeppelin as well as modern designs. The difficulty of supporting new, commercial airship developments on an economic basis is made clear.

  2. Temporal Visualization for Legal Case Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Chanda; Allen, Robert B.; Plaisant, Catherine; Shneiderman, Ben

    1999-01-01

    Discusses visualization of legal information using a tool for temporal information called "LifeLines." Explores ways "LifeLines" could aid in viewing the links between original case and direct and indirect case histories. Uses the case of Apple Computer, Inc. versus Microsoft Corporation and Hewlett Packard Company to illustrate the prototype.…

  3. Winnipegosis case history: Tableland Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, N.E.; Martindale, W.

    1988-02-01

    The geology and history of exploration in the Tableland area of southeast Saskatchewan will be reviewed in relation to a major Middle Devonian Winnipegosis oil discovery made in 1986 by Home Oil. Southern Saskatchewan is underlain by the northern third of the Williston basin. Although rich oil deposits have been found in the Devonian of the basin on the American side, dry holes have been the rule in Saskatchewan except for the Hummingbird Upper Devonian Birdbear discovery in 1966. The long history of failures in the Winnipegosis Formation had led to a general reluctance in the industry to drill deep wells especially with today's lower crude prices. Based on geology, seismic data, and modeling, Home Oil drilled Tableland 08-22-002-09W2M in february 1986 and encountered an oil-bearing Winnipegosis reef. This well has the highest production rate of any well in Saskatchewan and is the first commercially significant Winnipegosis well in a basinal setting within the Williston basin. A state-of-the-art pseudo 3-D processing of all the existing 2-D seismic data was performed to aid in choosing development well locations. As a result of this discovery, deep exploration plays in southeast Saskatchewan are now being pursued aggressively by many companies.

  4. 7 CFR 400.55 - Qualification for actual production history coverage program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... APH yield is calculated from a database containing a minimum of four yields and will be updated each subsequent crop year. The database may contain a maximum of the 10 most recent crop years and may include... only occur in the database when there are less than four years of actual and/or assigned yields....

  5. 7 CFR 400.55 - Qualification for actual production history coverage program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... APH yield is calculated from a database containing a minimum of four yields and will be updated each subsequent crop year. The database may contain a maximum of the 10 most recent crop years and may include... only occur in the database when there are less than four years of actual and/or assigned yields....

  6. Helicopter internal noise control: Three case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. D.; Cox, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    Case histories are described in which measurable improvements in the cabin noise environments of the Bell 214B, 206B, and 222 were realized. These case histories trace the noise control efforts followed in each vehicle. Among the design approaches considered, the addition of a fluid pulsation damper in a hydraulic system and the installation of elastomeric engine mounts are highlighted. It is concluded that substantial weight savings result when the major interior noise sources are controlled by design, both in altering the noise producing mechanism and interrupting the sound transmission paths.

  7. Case History: The Spelman College Endowment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonfund Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This white paper presents a case history of the Spelman College endowment and how good financial management and alternative strategies for the growth of the endowment has made Spelman's one of the largest among U.S. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). How has Spelman College been able to grow its endowment funds to this level? A…

  8. Case History Skill Assessment: Breadth versus Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haine, Charles L.; Gross, Leon J.

    1999-01-01

    Study investigated whether poor performance on the case history portion of the National Board of Examiners in Optometry clinical skills examination was due to candidates' failure to inquire about major issues or explore issues thoroughly. Data from tests administered to 1,266 candidates were analyzed. Results indicate candidates generally…

  9. Hazardous behavior of lithium batteries. Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marincic, N.

    1983-01-01

    Case histories were described of hazardous behavior for three different cell sizes ranging in nominal capacity from 300 mAh to 12,000 Ah. Design characteristics and other facts believed to have been responsible for the cell explosions, are presented. Obvious facts are discussed as causes for hazardous behavior of lithium batteries in general and oxyhalide batteries in particular.

  10. Monitoring and repairing geothermal casing cement: a case history

    SciTech Connect

    Pettitt, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A manmade geothermal reservoir has been created by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rocks, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by hydraulic fracturing, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the closed circulation loop. A second generation system, presently being drilled, will entail creating multiple, parallel, vertical fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. The original completion of injection Hole EE-1, consisting of a conventional high-temperature formulation of Class B portland cement, stabilized with 40% silica sand, did not withstand the cyclic stresses, and rapid deterioration of casing-to-cement and cement-to-formation bonds occurred, which allowed significant flow in the resulting microannulus. The performance history of the casing cement for the existing HDR EE-1 injection well, the subsequent remedial cementing program, the cement bond logs, and the radioactive isotope tracer injections tests, used to monitor the condition of the casing cement is described. (MHR)

  11. Geothermal systems: Principles and case histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybach, L.; Muffler, L. J. P.

    The classification of geothermal systems is considered along with the geophysical and geochemical signatures of geothermal systems, aspects of conductive heat transfer and regional heat flow, and geothermal anomalies and their plate tectonic framework. An investigation of convective heat and mass transfer in hydrothermal systems is conducted, taking into account the mathematical modelling of hydrothermal systems, aspects of idealized convective heat and mass transport, plausible models of geothermal reservoirs, and preproduction models of hydrothermal systems. Attention is given to the prospecting for geothermal resources, the application of water geochemistry to geothermal exploration and reservoir engineering, heat extraction from geothermal reservoirs, questions of geothermal resource assessment, and environmental aspects of geothermal energy development. A description is presented of a number of case histories, taking into account the low enthalpy geothermal resource of the Pannonian Basin in Hungary, the Krafla geothermal field in Northeast Iceland, the geothermal system of the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico, and extraction-reinjection at the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador.

  12. Perspectives on Learning History: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Michele L.; Nist, Sherrie L.

    1997-01-01

    Generates a description of the elements that supported students' performance in a university history course. Concludes that students who were flexible in their belief systems about learning and history, perceptions of task, and strategic approaches were the ones who succeeded in the course. Notes that students who performed better in the course…

  13. The Energy Crisis and the Media: Some Case Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmertz, Herbert

    The five case histories presented in this paper discuss the relations of the Mobil Oil Corporation with various news media since 1973, particularly the difficulties that the oil industry has faced in communicating with and through the news media. The case histories deal with the following topics; news stories about tankers allegedly waiting…

  14. A "Genuine Relationship with the Actual": New Perspectives on Primary Sources, History and the Internet in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eamon, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The pedagogic value of using archival holdings for the teaching of history has long been appreciated. Using primary sources in the teaching of history transcends the rote learning of facts and figures. It encourages critical thinking skills, introducing students to issues of context, selection and bias, to the nature of collective memory and to…

  15. Case-History Explorations of Scientifically Significant Earth-System Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. K.; Walker, C. S.; Mayhew, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    We are developing case histories of recent and ancient natural disasters to provide students a means of learning fundamental earth system science and applying their new understanding to mitigating disasters in the future. We distinguish case histories from case studies in that they investigate real problems that are likely to recur, as opposed to hypothetical but realistic problem scenarios. Students explore the scientific and societal conditions that caused or fueled a disaster; investigate whether the outcome might have been different under different conditions; explore how the disaster has shaped our scientific and societal understanding of such events; and propose appropriate responses and preparation measures for future events. Each case history allows for multiple directions of investigation by individuals or teams. The case histories incorporate actual datasets used by scientists to analyze the event, in addition to analysis tools such as GIS, Excel, and Google Earth. These classroom resources are appropriate for undergraduate earth system majors from first year to third year. We have completed and are field testing case histories for the 1994 M6.7 Northridge earthquake and the Super Tornado Outbreak of 1974, as well as other notable tornado outbreaks. Additionally, we are developing case histories for the 1700 Cascadia mega-tsunami and the 2005 Hurricane Katrina. Research studies of each of these events have resulted in significant changes to our understanding of the earth processes that caused them, and have spawned renewed interest in hazard mitigation. Each case history also incorporates the human element, presented from both a scientific and eyewitness perspective. Field testing includes evaluation of scientific accuracy, usability and pedagogical effectiveness, as described in the DLESE peer-review-system criteria (www.dlese-project.org/review_criteria.html) by field testers and external technical experts.

  16. Palacios field: A 3-D case history

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, R.; Torguson, B.

    1994-12-31

    In late 1992, Mitchell Energy Corporation acquired a 7.75 sq mi (20.0 km{sup 2}) 3-D seismic survey over Palacios field. Matagorda County, Texas. The company shot the survey to help evaluate the field for further development by delineating the fault pattern of the producing Middle Oligocene Frio interval. They compare the mapping of the field before and after the 3-D survey. This comparison shows that the 3-D volume yields superior fault imaging and interpretability compared to the dense 2-D data set. The problems with the 2-D data set are improper imaging of small and oblique faults and insufficient coverage over a complex fault pattern. Whereas the 2-D data set validated a simple fault model, the 3-D volume revealed a more complex history of faulting that includes three different fault systems. This discovery enabled them to reconstruct the depositional and structural history of Palacios field.

  17. Case histories of temperature surveys in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.S.

    1981-12-01

    Most crude produced in Kuwait is from naturally flowing wells. Casing, tubing, and cement in these wells remain unchanged after completion. This study discusses the major application of temperature surveys in indicating fluid movement both inside and behind the production string, hence locating any holes in the casing. Some significant cases of temperature anomalies are examined qualitatively, and suggestions are made for a more quantitative interpretation of temperature profiles. 9 refs.

  18. ANALYSIS OF CASE HISTORIES OF PERSONAL INDEX USE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JAHODA, G.; AND OTHERS

    CASE HISTORIES ARE SUMMARIZED FOR 12 RESEARCHERS IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING AT THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY, I.E., 6 CHEMISTS, 4 BIOLOGISTS, 1 ENGINEER, AND 1 METEOROLOGIST. OVER A 10-MONTH PERIOD, 258 HISTORIES WERE OBTAINED. THE DATA DO NOT PERMIT THE DETERMINATION WITH CERTAINTY THE TYPE OF SUBJECT INDEX MOST SUITABLE FOR A PARTICULAR TYPE OF…

  19. A History and Case Study at a Selected Tribal College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oltrogge, Micheal P.

    2010-01-01

    "A History and Case Study at a Selected Tribal College" focuses on a tribally chartered two-year institution of higher education. The selected Tribal College serves Native American and non-Native American populations on two separate and distinct reservations and one urban location. This study surveys the history to answer basic foundational and…

  20. Do Open Geodata Actually have the Quality they Declare? the Case Study of Milan, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, M. A.; Minghini, M.; Molinari, M. E.; Molteni, M.

    2016-06-01

    In the past number of years there has been an amazing flourishing of spatial data products released with open licenses. Researchers and professionals are extensively exploiting open geodata for many applications, which, in turn, include decision-making results and other (derived) geospatial datasets among their outputs. Despite the traditional availability of metadata, a question arises about the actual quality of open geodata, as their declared quality is typically given for granted without any systematic assessment. The present work investigates the case study of Milan Municipality (Northern Italy). A wide set of open geodata are available for this area which are released by national, regional and local authoritative entities. A comprehensive cataloguing operation is first performed, with 1061 geospatial open datasets from Italian providers found which highly differ in terms of license, format, scale, content, and release date. Among the many quality parameters for geospatial data, the work focuses on positional accuracy. An example of positional accuracy assessment is described for an openly-licensed orthophoto through comparison with the official, up-to-date, and large-scale vector cartography of Milan. The comparison is run according to the guidelines provided by ISO and shows that the positional accuracy declared by the orthophoto provider does not correspond to the reality. Similar results are found from analyses on other datasets (not presented here). Implications are twofold: raising the awareness on the risks of using open geodata by taking their quality for granted; and highlighting the need for open geodata providers to introduce or refine mechanisms for data quality control.

  1. Mr. Stinson's Vietnam: Moral Ambiguity in the History Classroom. Teaching Cases in Cross-Cultural Education, No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wineburg, Samuel S.; Kleinfeld, Judith, Ed.

    This document proposes a case study approach to U.S. history instruction. The method which the document suggests arises from an actual class discussion of the My Lai massacre that occurred during the Vietnam War. A sample class discussion concerns the setting of standards to guide national and international affairs and the particular standards…

  2. Item Writer Judgments of Item Difficulty versus Actual Item Difficulty: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sydorenko, Tetyana

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates how accurate one item writer can be on item difficulty estimates and whether factors affecting item writer judgments correspond to predictors of actual item difficulty. The items were based on conversational dialogs (presented as videos online) that focus on pragmatic functions. Thirty-five 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-year learners…

  3. Rumination in adults: two case histories.

    PubMed

    Tamburrino, M B; Campbell, N B; Franco, K N; Evans, C L

    1995-01-01

    Rumination has been reported to be a relatively rare disorder of eating during infancy. Over the past decade, there appears to be a renewed interest in and recognition of adult rumination. Although some authors believe adult rumination is benign, others have begun to link it with both eating disorders and depressive symptoms. This paper presents two adult cases whose rumination was associated with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. More identification and study of adult rumination is needed to clarify its course and medical significance. PMID:7894448

  4. Police interviewing and interrogation of juvenile suspects: a descriptive examination of actual cases.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Hayley M D

    2014-06-01

    Although empirical attention to police interrogation has gained traction in recent years, comparatively few studies have examined interrogation of juvenile suspects, and virtually none have examined actual interrogations. Despite a growing literature on youths' interrogation-related capacities, we still know very little about what actually transpires when police question youth. The present study examines electronically recorded police interviews with juveniles to describe the characteristics, processes, and outcomes that occur in actual juvenile interrogations, including interview duration, individuals present, and confessions. Fifty-seven electronic recordings from 17 police departments were analyzed using observational research software. The median juvenile interrogation lasted 46 min, though the range was extensive (6 min to nearly 5 hr). Youth frequently submitted to questioning without a parent or advocate present, and disruptions to the interview process were common. Interrogation outcomes varied and included full confessions, partially incriminating admissions, and denials of guilt. Results from this study provide context for interrogation research using other methods and suggest that youth may frequently consent to interrogation in the absence of important legal protections. PMID:24377911

  5. A Pedagogical Trebuchet: A Case Study in Experimental History and History Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brice, Lee L.; Catania, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A common problem history teachers face regardless of their field of specialization is how to help students find answers to the most difficult historical questions, those for which the sources are unavailable or inaccessible, and teach them to do so in a methodologically valid manner. This article presents a case study which shows how a project in…

  6. The history of the case report: a selective review

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    The clinical case report is a popular genre in medical writing. While authors and editors have debated the justification for the clinical case report, few have attempted to examine the long history of this genre in medical literature. By reviewing selected literature and presenting and discussing excerpts of clinical case reports from Egyptian antiquity to the 20th century, we illustrate the presence of the genre in medical science and how its form developed. Central features of the clinical case report in different time periods are discussed, including its main components, structure, style and author presence. PMID:25057387

  7. Frictions between Formal Education Policy and Actual School Choice: Case Studies in an International Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teelken, Christine; Driessen, Geert; Smit, Frederik

    2005-01-01

    This contribution is based on comparative case studies of secondary schools in England, the Netherlands and Scotland. The authors conclude that although opportunities for school choice are offered in a formal sense in each of the locations studied, in certain cases choice is not particularly encouraged. In order to explain this disparity between…

  8. Using Case Histories in Health Sciences Education- An Example: Leukemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karni, Karen; And Others

    1976-01-01

    To provide an example of how case histories have been developed and used as one means to a team approach to health care in the course, "The Patient and Health Care Team," this paper describes one topic--leukemia--to show the interaction of health care professionals, as well as input from the family itself. (HD)

  9. The Case History Method of Testing Students in Gross Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruise, Leon J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of case histories to test a student's knowledge of the previous weeks' dissection in gross anatomy class is discussed. The test is seen as a way to integrate other basic sciences. An example of this type of test is provided. (MLW)

  10. Using History to Teach Mathematics: The Case of Logarithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, Evangelos N.

    2011-01-01

    Many authors have discussed the question why we should use the history of mathematics to mathematics education. For example, Fauvel (For Learn Math, 11(2): 3-6, 1991) mentions at least fifteen arguments for applying the history of mathematics in teaching and learning mathematics. Knowing how to introduce history into mathematics lessons is a more difficult step. We found, however, that only a limited number of articles contain instructions on how to use the material, as opposed to numerous general articles suggesting the use of the history of mathematics as a didactical tool. The present article focuses on converting the history of logarithms into material appropriate for teaching students of 11th grade, without any knowledge of calculus. History uncovers that logarithms were invented prior of the exponential function and shows that the logarithms are not an arbitrary product, as is the case when we leap straight in the definition given in all modern textbooks, but they are a response to a problem. We describe step by step the historical evolution of the concept, in a way appropriate for use in class, until the definition of the logarithm as area under the hyperbola. Next, we present the formal development of the theory and define the exponential function. The teaching sequence has been successfully undertaken in two high school classrooms.

  11. A Validation Study of Bullet and Cartridge Case Comparisons Using Samples Representative of Actual Casework.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tasha P; Andrew Smith, G; Snipes, Jeffrey B

    2016-07-01

    The foundation of firearm and tool mark identification is that no two tools should produce the same microscopic marks on two separate objects that they would be inaccurately or wrongly identified. Studies addressing the validity of identification infrequently employ tests that mirror realistic casework scenarios. This study attempted to do so using a double-blind process, reducing test-taking bias. Test kits including bullets and cartridge cases but not the associated firearms were completed by 31 analysts from 22 agencies. Analysis of the results demonstrated an overall error rate of 0.303%, sensitivity of 85.2%, and specificity of 86.8%. Variability in performance across examiners is addressed, and the effect of examiners' years of experience on identification accuracy is explored. Finally, the article discusses the importance of studies using realistic case work scenarios when validating the field's performance and in providing courts with usable indicators of the accuracy of firearm and tool mark identification. PMID:27135174

  12. Did Garin and Bujadoux Actually Report a Case of Lyme Radiculoneuritis?

    PubMed Central

    Wormser, Gary P.; Wormser, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    A 1922 report by Garin and Bujadoux is widely regarded as describing the first case of neurologic Lyme borreliosis. Although the patient reported had a tick bite followed by the development of a rash and radiculoneuritis, there were a number of highly atypical features, raising the question of whether the patient, in fact, had neurologic Lyme borreliosis. The paper may not deserve the historic recognition that it has received. PMID:27419161

  13. Challenges to identifying actual diabetes case-mix complexity and total treatment charges.

    PubMed

    Baker, T; Ertle, A; Cave, D G

    1997-04-01

    Patient management programs are being used to improve the quality of care and decrease charges for both high-cost and potential high-cost claimants. Adequate information is key to program development, planning, and implementation. Claims-based data are a ready source of valuable information, but without proper processing, true case-mix complexity and total charges for patients will not be identified. PMID:10166808

  14. Did Garin and Bujadoux Actually Report a Case of Lyme Radiculoneuritis?

    PubMed

    Wormser, Gary P; Wormser, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    A 1922 report by Garin and Bujadoux is widely regarded as describing the first case of neurologic Lyme borreliosis. Although the patient reported had a tick bite followed by the development of a rash and radiculoneuritis, there were a number of highly atypical features, raising the question of whether the patient, in fact, had neurologic Lyme borreliosis. The paper may not deserve the historic recognition that it has received. PMID:27419161

  15. Case History as Minority Report in the Hippocratic Epidemics 1.

    PubMed

    Wee, John Z

    2016-01-01

    Instead of being self-evident depictions of sickness, ancient medical texts were narratives created from certain points of view and for intended purposes. As a guide for the physician travelling to an unfamiliar community of people, the treatise Airs, Waters, Places anticipated "communal" conditions resulting from seasonal changes, while admitting the possibility of "personal" sickness due to individual lifestyles. Even with its geographical situatedness, Epidemics 1 continued to prioritise population narratives, subsuming sickness within the experiences of the anonymous majority whenever possible. In both its constitutions and case histories, however, patients whose conditions deviated from majority expectations were identified for forensic purposes, so that case histories functioned as minority reports rather than exemplars of how sickness behaved. Such reports guarded against surprising deviations from the rules of prognosis, which could present a threat to the physician's credibility and livelihood as a consequence. PMID:26946676

  16. The expected and actual communication of health care workers during the management of intrapartum: An interpretive multiple case study

    PubMed Central

    Fawcus, Sue; Korpela, Mikko; De la Harpe, Retha

    2015-01-01

    Background Daily activities within a health care organisation are mediated by information communication processes (ICP) involving multiple health care professionals at different levels of care. Effective perinatal management requires critical information to be accurately communicated. If there is a breakdown in this communication patient safety is at risk for various reasons such as: inadequate critical information, misconception of information and uninformed decisions being made. The purpose of this study was to interpret the complexities around ICP in order to contribute to the effective management of the intrapartum period. Methods Multi method, multiple case study approach was used to understand the ICP during the management of the intrapartum period. During the study, the expected ICP, the actual ICP, the challenges involved and the desired ICP were analysed. Twenty-four in-depth interviews with skilled birth attendants (SBAs) employing observer-as-participant roles, field notes, and document review methods were utilised to gather the data. Thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the data using Atlas TI software. Results The study revealed three subthemes which emerged from the expected ICP, whilst three others that emerged formed the theme actual ICP. The subthemes from the expected ICP included: accessibility of obstetric services, expected referral, recommended tools, expected communication and expected documentation. The theme actual ICP held three emerging subthemes: the handover processes, collaborative information seeking, information communicated and referral processes. Conclusion This study showed that what was expected was not what was actually happening. The requirements of the policies and protocols need to be effectively implemented to improve practice building these into current biomedical guidelines. PMID:26842518

  17. Toxic multinodular goitre. Personal case histories and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Gia; Gagliano, E; Tonante, A; Taranto, F; Vermiglio, F; Sturniolo, Gio

    2013-01-01

    The authors reviewed their own case histories of surgical thyreopathy over the last 20 years in order to establish how many multinodular goitre (MNG) patients developed hyperthyroidism during the follow-up period. In agreement with the findings reported in literature, the authors observed that 220 out of 1117 patients with MNG developed hyperthyroidism caused by the appearance of hyperfunctioning nodules after 6-18 years from the initial diagnosis of MNG. PMID:24629810

  18. What do European veterinary codes of conduct actually say and mean? A case study approach.

    PubMed

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, M; More, S J; Morton, D B; Osborne, M; Hanlon, A

    2015-06-20

    Codes of Professional Conduct (CPCs) are pivotal instruments of self-regulation, providing the standards to which veterinarians should, and sometimes must, comply. Despite their importance to the training and guidance of veterinary professionals, research is lacking on the scope and emphasis of the requirements set out in veterinary CPCs. This paper provides the first systematic investigation of veterinary CPCs. It relies on a case study approach, combining content and thematic analyses of five purposively selected European CPCs: Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE), Denmark, Ireland, Portugal and the UK. Eight overarching themes were identified, including 'definitions and framing concepts', 'duties to animals', 'duties to clients', 'duties to other professionals', 'duties to competent authorities', 'duties to society', 'professionalism' and 'practice-related issues'. Some differences were observed, which may be indicative of different approaches to the regulation of the veterinary profession in Europe (which is reflected in having a 'code of ethics' or a 'code of conduct'), cultural differences on the status of animals in society, and regulatory bodies' proactivity in adapting to professional needs and to societal changes regarding the status of animals. These findings will contribute to an improved understanding of the roles of CPCs in regulating the veterinary profession in Europe. PMID:25861823

  19. Case Histories of Landslide Impact: A Database-driven Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Fundamental understanding of landslide risk requires in-depth knowledge of how landslides have impacted society in the past (e.g., Corominas et al., 2014). A key to obtain insights into the evolution of landslide risk at single facilities of critical infrastructures are case histories of landslide impact. The purpose of such historical analyses is to inform about the site-specific interactions between landslides and land-use activity. Case histories support correlating landslide events and associated damages with multiple control variables of landslide risk, including (i) previous construction works, (ii) hazard awareness, (iii) the type of structure or its material properties, and (iv) measures of post-disaster mitigation. It is a key advantage of case histories to provide an overview of the changes in the exposure and vulnerability of infrastructures over time. Their application helps to learn more about changing patterns in risk culture and the effectiveness of repair or prevention measures (e.g., Klose et al., 2014). Case histories of landslide impact are developed on the basis of information extracted from landslide databases. The use of path diagrams and illustrated flowcharts as data modeling techniques is aimed at structuring, condensing, and visualizing complex historical data sets on landslide activity and land-use. Much of the scientific potential of case histories simply depends on the quality of available database information. Landslide databases relying on a bottom-up approach characterized by targeted local data specification are optimally suited for historical impact analyses. Combined with systematic retrieval, extraction, and integration of data from multiple sources, landslide databases constitute a valuable tool for developing case histories that enable to open a whole new window on the study of landslide impacts (e.g., Damm and Klose, 2014). The present contribution introduces such a case history for a well-known landslide site at a heavily

  20. A case history: from traumatic repetition towards psychic representability.

    PubMed

    Bichi, Estela L

    2008-06-01

    This paper is devoted principally to a case history concerning an analytic process extending over a period of almost ten years. The patient is B, who consulted the author after a traumatic episode. Although that was her reason for commencing treatment, a history of previous traumatogenic situations, including a rape during her adolescence, subsequently came to light. The author describes three stages of the treatment, reflected in three different settings in accordance with the work done by both patient and analyst in enabling B to own and work through her infantile and adult traumatic experiences. The process of transformation of traumatic traces lacking psychic representation, which was undertaken by both members of the analytic couple from the beginning of the treatment, was eventually approached in a particular way on the basis of their respective creative capacities, which facilitated the patient's psychic progress towards representability and the possibility of working through the experiences of the past. Much of the challenge of this case involved the analyst's capacity to maintain and at the same time consolidate her analytic posture within her internal setting, while doing her best to overcome any possible misfit (Balint, 1968) between her own technique and the specific complexities of the individual patient. The account illustrates the alternation of phases, at the beginning of the analysis, of remembering and interpretation on the one hand and of the representational void and construction on the other. In the case history proper and in her detailed summing up, the author refers to the place of the analyst during the analytic process, the involvement of her psychic functioning, and the importance of her capacity to work on and make use of her countertransference and self-analytic introspection, with a view to neutralizing any influence that aspects of her 'real person' might have had on the analytic field and on the complex processes taking place within

  1. Case history evaluation of methane-fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrenz, D.J.; Glaub, J.C.; Jones, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an extensive case history evaluation of methane-fueled vehicles are presented. A questionnaire sent to fleet operators was designed to procure: general information regarding the fleet; information on the fuel and vehicle fuel system (source of methane, heating value of gas, and vehicle fuel tank capacity); vehicle fuel consumption and mileage information; cost information; and information regarding operational difficulties attributable to conversion for operation on methane. Twenty-eight responses were obtained, encompassing nearly 3,500 vehicles. Data from the study have been compiled into several comprehensive tables. The ranges of various parameters are discussed, as well as the operation difficulties that were reported. 13 refs.

  2. The Gemini Data Handling System: A Case History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, Séverin; Hill, Norman R.; Dunn, Jennifer; Jaeger, Shannon; Cockayne, Steve

    The Gemini Data Handling System, developed by the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre for the Gemini 8m Telescopes Project, provides the data handling infrastructure for the Observatory Control System and the instrument control systems. An overview of the preliminary design was presented at ADASS '95. In August 1998, the DHS passed its acceptance tests and was released operationally to Gemini North in Hawai'i. This paper will present a case history of the project: how the requirements changed, how the design evolved to its final form, the approaches taken, the tools used, and the problems encountered.

  3. Case histories in the great power of steady misrepresentation.

    PubMed

    Todd, J T; Morris, E K

    1992-11-01

    The widespread misrepresentation of behaviorism in the scientific and popular literature has caused its contributions to the understanding of behavior to be systematically ignored or denied. This misrepresentation is manifested, in large part, as a form of academic folklore that codifies erroneous accounts of behaviorism's assumptions, findings, and goals. This article examines three representative "case histories" of the academic folklore about behaviorism: its alleged environmentalism, totalitarian aims, and intellectual intolerance. Because academic folklore has been highly resistant to the corrective efforts of behaviorists, explicit strategies are suggested for identifying and correcting folklore and for promoting more effective interdisciplinary communication. PMID:1482006

  4. The Self Actualized Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael; Moylan, Mary Elizabeth

    A study examined the commonalities that "voracious" readers share, and how their experiences can guide parents, teachers, and librarians in assisting children to become self-actualized readers. Subjects, 25 adults ranging in age from 20 to 67 years, completed a questionnaire concerning their reading histories and habits. Respondents varied in…

  5. Case history--installation of high volume pumping equipment in Talco Field, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.D.; Etheridge, K.T.; Wilson, R.H.

    1982-09-01

    The paper presents a case history study of Exxon's high volume artificial lift program at Talco Field in Franklin and Titus Counties, Texas. The field, discovered in 1936, produces heavy crude oil from the Paluxy Sandstone at an approximate depth of 4200 feet. All wells required artificial lift installation soon after the field was discovered due to rapid salt water breakthrough. Primary recovery efficiency is expected to be only about 35 percent of the original oil in place, attributed to reservoir heterogeneity and the adverse water-oil mobility ratio. Through installation of high volume artificial lift equipment, current data indicate that significant additional recovery benefits may be realized. The paper details the practical experience Exxon has gained since the first high volume electric submersible pump was installed at Talco in 1974. Included are screening parameters used to optimize the selection of particular high volume artificial lift equipment. Also included are representative production flowstreams to quantify the additional recovery expected of typical electric submersible pump and large capacity beam pumping unit installations. An analysis of the incremental expenses and costs associated with electric submersible pumps and large capacity beam pumping units is presented. Also discussed are case production histories and operational problems encountered with actual installations.

  6. Case histories of West Valley spent fuel shipments: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, NRC/FC initiated a study on institutional issues related to spent fuel shipments originating at the former spent fuel processing facility in West Valley, New York. FC staff viewed the shipment campaigns as a one-time opportunity to document the institutional issues that may arise with a substantial increase in spent fuel shipping activity. NRC subsequently contracted with the Aerospace Corporation for the West Valley Study. This report contains a detailed description of the events which took place prior to and during the spent fuel shipments. The report also contains a discussion of the shipment issues that arose, and presents general findings. Most of the institutional issues discussed in the report do not fall under NRC's transportation authority. The case histories provide a reference to agencies and other institutions that may be involved in future spent fuel shipping campaigns. 130 refs., 7 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Anticipated and Actual Implementation of Case-Based Learning by Dental Faculty Members During and After Training.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Catalanotto, Frank A; Nascimento, Marcelle M

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the processes used to train dental faculty members in case-based learning (CBL) and to determine their beliefs about the anticipated implementation of CBL and perceptions of actual implementation following use of the CBL approach. Participants were dental faculty members at the University of Florida who received a four-day intensive training course in the use of CBL. Two focus groups were conducted. The first occurred during training to assess how the participants anticipated using CBL. The second was conducted during the faculty members' implementation of CBL. All 19 trainees participated in focus group 1 (100%). During the course of the study, two faculty members left the school; of the remaining 17, 12 participated in focus group 2 (participation rate of 71%). The findings showed that initially the faculty members were hesitant and uncertain about using CBL. Following implementation, those issues dissipated, as the participants began to consider how to optimize the effectiveness of CBL as a legitimate method for fostering student ownership of learning and active participation. Understanding what CBL means for individual educators at varying stages of change will likely allow the dental education community to better anticipate and address tensions and challenges that faculty members are likely to experience. PMID:26329029

  8. A Comparative Case Study of Self-Actualization in Eleanor Roosevelt and Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyska, Cynthia Ann

    Eleanor Roosevelt and Antoine de Saint-Exupery are described as strongly developed self-actualizing people. They were selected as subjects of this study because they are generally believed to possess self-actualizing characteristics and because their positions as public figures made it more likely that data on them would be accessible.…

  9. Case histories of EVA encapsulant discoloration in fielded modules

    SciTech Connect

    Agro, S.; Galica, J.; Holley, W.H.; Yorgensen, R.S. )

    1994-06-30

    A survey of case histories of EVA-based encapsulant discoloration in fielded modules in the U. S. reveals that the problem is limited to areas of the West and Southwest that have comparatively high solar insolation and ambient temperature. There have been no reported cases of discolored EVA encapsulant from modules fielded in the Northeast, Central U. S., or Western Europe. The absence of hard data regarding module operating temperatures, solar insolation, onset of discoloration, and quantitative information regarding the degree of discoloration has made correlation between various fabrication, placement, and operating conditions and incidence of discoloration difficult it not impossible. However, the degree of discoloration does appear to correlate with increasing average daily direct normal solar radiation and approximate maximum module operating temperature, as estimated from maximum ambient temperatures. It is clear that the discoloration problem is not limited to the modules of any one manufacturer, however, the rate and degree of discoloration do appear to vary from company to company. Also, discoloration is not limited to EVA encapsulant sheet from any one supplier.

  10. Knowledge discovery from case histories of corrosion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, P.R.; Tullmin, M.A.A.; Trethewey, K.R.

    1997-12-01

    A successful failure analysis organization has to provide the fastest possible turn around time on incoming contract work. A common problem experienced by less experienced failure analysis staff is to identify the actual cause(s) of a failure, rather than merely the mechanism of failure, and to make recommendations for avoiding future failures. Such recommendations are often the ultimate client need and the most important component of an investigation. The proficiency and confidence levels of staff in meeting this challenge should improve considerably with the aid of advice gained from previous cases. Even with a solid client base, it is relatively difficult to provide failure analysis services on a profitable basis. The costs of employing the expert and support staff have to be covered, together with capital invested in sophisticated laboratory equipment (such as scanning electron microscopes), running costs and overheads, Even a slight improvement in the efficiency of performing any of the steps of a failure analysis process thus has the potential to make a positive difference. The value of Knowledge Discovery (KD) for knowledge reuse should also be considered in the context of staff turnover, retirements or retrenchments of experienced senior personnel, the promotion of senior technical personnel to managerial positions and staff on leave.

  11. The Path of History: Narrative Analysis of History Textbooks--A Case Study of Belgian History Textbooks (1945-2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhulle, Bert

    2009-01-01

    The philosophical background of the subject history in secondary education has been mainly addressed through research based on "obvious" source types (curricula, discussions in committees or journals, ...). This article proposes a narrative method of analysing history textbooks in order to study the underlining historical philosophy of history…

  12. Historical Literacy: The Case for History in American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Paul, Ed.

    The Bradley Commission on History in Schools was created in 1987 specifically in response to the widespread concern over the inadequacy, both in quantity and in quality, of the history taught in elementary and secondary school classrooms. This book explores the conditions that contribute to, or impede, the effective teaching of history in schools.…

  13. Using History to Teach Mathematics: The Case of Logarithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panagiotou, Evangelos N.

    2011-01-01

    Many authors have discussed the question "why" we should use the history of mathematics to mathematics education. For example, Fauvel ("For Learn Math," 11(2): 3-6, 1991) mentions at least fifteen arguments for applying the history of mathematics in teaching and learning mathematics. Knowing "how" to introduce history into mathematics lessons is a…

  14. The Preference and Actual Use of Different Types of Rural Recreation Areas by Urban Dwellers—The Hamburg Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Thiemen; von Haaren, Christina; von Ruschkowski, Eick

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of urbanisation processes and the constitution of metropolitan regions, the role of the city's rural surroundings is receiving more attention from researchers and planners as rural areas offer various (cultural) ecosystem services for the urban population. Urban dwellers increasingly desire recreation and landscape experience. Although this need for recreation is generally recognized, few studies have focused on the question of people's preferences for certain types and characteristics of outdoor recreation areas in relation to the frequency of use. In order to acquire baseline data on this subject, the main objectives of this study were to explore recreation preferences of urban dwellers and the relation between actual use and perceived value of recreation areas in a case study in the Hamburg Metropolitan Region (Germany). In a social survey, Hamburg residents (n = 400) were asked about their preferences and use of four important regional recreation areas with different landscape characteristics in face-to-face interviews in different locations in the city. We found that both outdoor recreation within and outside of the city were fairly or very important for more than 70% of the questioned urban dwellers. Interestingly, the preference for a recreation area outside of the city did not depend on the frequency of use, which indicates that certain recreation areas had a symbolic value besides their use value. When people were questioned on the characteristics of recreation areas, perceived naturalness was found to be strongly related to preference. Respondents considered the diversity, uniqueness, and naturalness of the landscape to be far more important than the accessibility of the recreation areas and the provision of service facilities. PMID:25314002

  15. The preference and actual use of different types of rural recreation areas by urban dwellers--the Hamburg case study.

    PubMed

    Boll, Thiemen; von Haaren, Christina; von Ruschkowski, Eick

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of urbanisation processes and the constitution of metropolitan regions, the role of the city's rural surroundings is receiving more attention from researchers and planners as rural areas offer various (cultural) ecosystem services for the urban population. Urban dwellers increasingly desire recreation and landscape experience. Although this need for recreation is generally recognized, few studies have focused on the question of people's preferences for certain types and characteristics of outdoor recreation areas in relation to the frequency of use. In order to acquire baseline data on this subject, the main objectives of this study were to explore recreation preferences of urban dwellers and the relation between actual use and perceived value of recreation areas in a case study in the Hamburg Metropolitan Region (Germany). In a social survey, Hamburg residents (n = 400) were asked about their preferences and use of four important regional recreation areas with different landscape characteristics in face-to-face interviews in different locations in the city. We found that both outdoor recreation within and outside of the city were fairly or very important for more than 70% of the questioned urban dwellers. Interestingly, the preference for a recreation area outside of the city did not depend on the frequency of use, which indicates that certain recreation areas had a symbolic value besides their use value. When people were questioned on the characteristics of recreation areas, perceived naturalness was found to be strongly related to preference. Respondents considered the diversity, uniqueness, and naturalness of the landscape to be far more important than the accessibility of the recreation areas and the provision of service facilities. PMID:25314002

  16. Planning and design for barrier pillar recovery: Three case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    Barrier pillars created during mine development provide additional reserves during mine closure and can be the sole access to reserves previously abandoned because of mining height or out of seam dilution limitations. The safe and successful mining of barrier pillars requires a thorough knowledge of the magnitude and distribution of the vertical stress field in addition to the strength and physical properties of the coal, immediate roof, and immediate floor strata. Quantifying the vertical stress field is complicated by the combination of the overburden stress, abutment stresses transferred onto the barrier pillar from adjacent gob areas, and in multiple seam mining, stresses transferred from abandoned subjacent mines. These variables make the extraction and development of barrier pillar reserves a site specific consideration. Three case histories are presented in which barrier pillar development and extraction provides: (1) an access point and the means to ventilate a large area of low seam reserves left by a prior operator after developing only the thicker area of a multiple split reserve, (2) the means to increase total recovery of a deep, thick seam longwall reserve, and (3) opportunities for the development and retreat mining of a two mile long barrier pillar in thick seam reserves.

  17. Using ILI pigs to establish pipeline corrosion rates -- Case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.H.

    1999-07-01

    Corrosion is a major concern for the oil and gas industry. Pipelines are subject to internal and external agents that can cause corrosion affecting their safety, integrity, and profitability. Corrosion causes metal losses that may hamper the supply of energy and could lead to substantial damage to the ecology. Restoring pipelines to safe operating condition is the main goal of in-line inspection (ILI) using state-of-the-art Smart Pigs. These tools travel through the full length of pipelines gathering detailed information that is used for the assessment of both the internal and the external surfaces of the line. Ultrasound ILI tools perform direct measurements of the remaining wall thickness of the pipe. The analysis of an ultrasound ILI run determines the residual strength of the pipeline at the time of the inspection. On the other hand, the comparison of successive ultrasound runs establishes patterns of individual defect growth. Under this light the interpretation of the data leads to an assessment of the dynamics of the corrosion phenomena occurring in pipelines. Case histories are presented in this paper in order to illustrate how ultrasound ILI data are being used today to establish courses of action in corrective, preventive, and predictive maintenance of pipelines.

  18. Secular vs. Sacred History: The Case of the World History Chart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, F. K.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluates the accuracy and usefulness of "The World History Chart: A Chronology of World History According to R. H. Carling." Claims it presents a narrow, sacred interpretation of certain periods of world chronology representing the unorthodox view of one small religious group, the Mormons. (LS)

  19. Doing Local History: A Case Study of New Brunswick, New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael P.; Crocco, Margaret Smith

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a methodology that teachers can use to incorporate themes and ideas related to local history in their classrooms. Using the city of New Brunswick, New Jersey as a case study, the article offers different approaches that allow local history to be connected to wider themes in American history. The focus here on a small,…

  20. "America's Histories" Revisited: The Case of "Tell Them They Lie."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalter, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Euro-American historians have not allowed Native American scholars to participate as intellectual equals in academic debates concerning Native history. A comparison of received histories of Sequoyah and the emergence of the Cherokee syllabary and Traveller Bird's 1971 "Tell Them They Lie" reveals that Traveller Bird's argument is at least as…

  1. Educational Research--History of Education a Curious Case?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joyce; Grosvenor, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The article begins with an exploration of the current state of history of education by drawing on published reviews of history of education, thematic analysis of journal content, and mapping of postgraduate study. It then highlights "moments of insecurity". These are characterised by a particular discourse that frames the future of the discipline…

  2. Predictive seismic modeling case history from the Niger delta

    SciTech Connect

    Idowu, A.O. )

    1993-09-01

    Seismic modeling techniques provide the mechanics for simulating the geology of the subsurface by depicting the impact of a propagating seismic wavefront on subsurface structures. In practice, seismic data have been used to map the geometry of events in the subsurface, mainly from reflection continuity and the character of reflection packages. In the Niger delta, recent developments in stratigraphic exploration has induced the examination of more subtle features of reflection, mainly polarity, amplitude, and waveform to define the limits of seismic resolution and hence predict the geometry of subsurface fluid and solid interfaces. The case history discussed here involved interpretative study for defining the fluid contents of prospective oil and gas leads as indicated by anomalous seismic events on a Niger delta field located in a water depth of 25 m. An appropriate source signal (5-35 Hertz minimum phase) is selected, and the wavelet is convolved with a practical geologic model to obtain a synthetic seismogram. By an interactive process involving slight modifications in the geologic model, a synthetic seismogram is ultimately derived that matches a field signal, thus providing a more accurate prediction of the geological formation under study. The technique was effect (as confirmed by later drilling) in appraising the fluid contents of the targeted pay zones encountered at gas/water, oil/water, and gas/oil/water contacts in the O field, located in the eastern offshore area of the Niger delta. The method further demonstrated that structural and stratigraphic modeling are effective tools for testing the mapability of a geologic concept and are able to evaluate the significance of reflectivity changes or anomalies on uncalibrated seismic data.

  3. Return to flight status after cardiac rehabilitation: three case histories.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, J

    2001-01-01

    A pilot's license to operate aircraft is not valid unless it is accompanied by a medical certificate. This certificate is revoked if a pilot is diagnosed with a cardiovascular illness. After a lengthy waiting period, the medical certificate may be reinstated if the pilot meets rigid standards. For many pilots, participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program is essential to achieve the minimal functional capacity in exercise testing (10.0 metabolic equivalents), document tolerance of medications, and achieve successful rehabilitation. Our staff has assisted 11 pilots in their quest to resume commercial or recreational flying after heart surgery, pacemaker implantation, or angioplasty. This article summarizes the case histories of three pilots who returned to fight status, in three Federal Aviation Administration categories (FAA), after a cardiac illness. The principle goals of our rehabilitation program for pilots are: (1) to achieve the highest possible outcome of the rehabilitation process; (2) to establish a safe and effective independent exercise program; (3) to obtain measures of compliance and success with the independent exercise program; (4) to document tolerance of medications and ensure that medications are acceptable to the FAA; (5) to document stability of the serum glucose in diabetic patients engaged in rigorous, prolonged exercise; and (6) prepare the patient for performance of a treadmill test in which 100% predicted maximum heart rate is achieved without symptoms of cardiovascular distress. An inherent effect of pursuing these goals is dramatic risk factor modification including improved blood pressure and lipid status and reduced body mass index. After resumption of flying, none of our pilot-patients have experienced cardiac symptoms during flight, nor have they required emergency department visits or hospitalization for any reason. PMID:11591042

  4. Failures in Hybrid Microcircuits During Environmental Testing. History Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This purpose of this viewgraph presentation is to discuss failures in hermetic hybrids observed at the GSFC PA Lab during environmental stress testing. The cases discussed are: Case I. Substrate metallization failures during Thermal cycling (TC). Case II. Flex lid-induced failure. Case Ill. Hermeticity failures during TC. Case IV. Die metallization cracking during TC. and how many test cycles and parts is necessary? Case V. Wire Bond failures after life test. Case VI. Failures caused by Au/In IMC growth.

  5. Temperature histories in geothermal wells: Survey of rock thermomechanical properties and drilling, production, and injection case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, M. A.

    1981-07-01

    Thermal and mechanical properties for geothermal formations are tabulated for a range of temperatures and stress conditions. Data were obtained from the technical literature and direct contacts with industry. Heat capacity, conductivity, diffusivity and undisturbed geothermal profiles are presented. Mechanical properties include Youngs modulus and Poisson ratio. Two GEOTEMP thermal simulations of drilling, production and injection are reported. Actual drilling, production, and injection histories were simulated. Results are documented in the form of printed GEOTEMP output and plots of temperatures versus depth, radius, and time. Wellbore temperatures during drilling as a function of depth; bit temperatures over the drilling history; cement temperatures from setting to the end of drilling; and casing and formation temperatures during drilling, production, and injection are discussed.

  6. Curriculum as natural history: A life-history case study of an alternative science learning program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windward, Rolfe

    The aim of this study is to further our understanding of the nexus between individual development and conceptions of science curriculum with particular emphasis upon root metaphors. The initial conceptual springboard is based upon the rather consistent conflation of selectionist (Darwinian) and developmental cosmologies in most scientific thinking about complex systems. A partial goal of this study then being the development of a visual metaphor that offers a more coherent heuristic of what it means to be a knowing individual within a changing ecosocial reality. This is a paradigmatic examination and it is conjectured that the root assumptions underlying the bulk of curriculum theory are unrealistic, that the appearance of stability in curriculum and practice is largely a byproduct of misclassification or even category error, and that reconceptualizing curriculum as a description of an adaptive system rather than a system-by-design will assist in unpacking a number of problems including the so-called theory-practice gap. The basic procedure is a life-history case study of seven participants--three female high school students, three male high school students, and their teacher--tracked between three learning contexts: the classroom, an extracurricular science "institute," and a virtual astronomy class. The biography of the researcher is incorporated both as a matter of methodology and as a matter of interventionist stance. It is concluded that the 'science institute' embodied a number of innovative features, including more equality among all participants, that also allowed masking-off of countervailing forces perceived as antithetical to its own development. Its organization was not stable but constituted a strongly expansive instrument in the individuation of all participants, allowing the students to more clearly visualize the multiple natures of science and themselves as individuals and scientists. It also allowed the teacher involved to leverage change in his

  7. History of Science and Instructional Design: The Case of Electromagnetism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seroglou, Fanny; Koumaras, Panagiotis; Tselfes, Vassilis

    1998-01-01

    Addresses two research questions pertaining to the search for students' potential alternate conceptions within the history of science and the possibility of helping students overcome these misconceptions through historical experiments. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  8. The History of Actual School Lives and the Perspectives of "Learners"--Sickness of Secondary Students and Their Dropping out, in the Age that Lafcadio Hearn Observed--

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Numerous historical studies have been done regarding education in modern Japan from a great diversity of viewpoints. It is true that studies of educational systems and history of educational policies have made considerable progress. Still, there remains great room for improvement in terms of both quantity and quality for studies of everyday…

  9. Do Emotions Expressed Online Correlate with Actual Changes in Decision-Making?: The Case of Stock Day Traders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Govindan, Ramesh; Uzzi, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Emotions are increasingly inferred linguistically from online data with a goal of predicting off-line behavior. Yet, it is unknown whether emotions inferred linguistically from online communications correlate with actual changes in off-line activity. We analyzed all 886,000 trading decisions and 1,234,822 instant messages of 30 professional day traders over a continuous 2 year period. Linguistically inferring the traders' emotional states from instant messages, we find that emotions expressed in online communications reflect the same distributions of emotions found in controlled experiments done on traders. Further, we find that expressed online emotions predict the profitability of actual trading behavior. Relative to their baselines, traders who expressed little emotion or traders that expressed high levels of emotion made relatively unprofitable trades. Conversely, traders expressing moderate levels of emotional activation made relatively profitable trades. PMID:26765539

  10. Do Emotions Expressed Online Correlate with Actual Changes in Decision-Making?: The Case of Stock Day Traders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Govindan, Ramesh; Uzzi, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Emotions are increasingly inferred linguistically from online data with a goal of predicting off-line behavior. Yet, it is unknown whether emotions inferred linguistically from online communications correlate with actual changes in off-line activity. We analyzed all 886,000 trading decisions and 1,234,822 instant messages of 30 professional day traders over a continuous 2 year period. Linguistically inferring the traders’ emotional states from instant messages, we find that emotions expressed in online communications reflect the same distributions of emotions found in controlled experiments done on traders. Further, we find that expressed online emotions predict the profitability of actual trading behavior. Relative to their baselines, traders who expressed little emotion or traders that expressed high levels of emotion made relatively unprofitable trades. Conversely, traders expressing moderate levels of emotional activation made relatively profitable trades. PMID:26765539

  11. NATO in History and Civics Textbooks: The West German Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritzsche, K. Peter

    1990-01-01

    When analyzing the degree to which a balanced presentation of NATO is achieved in West German history and civics textbooks, two standards may be used: first, inclusion of information on NATO's formation, aims, strategies and achievements; and, second, inclusion of the criticisms that have been leveled at NATO from various points of view. This…

  12. Notable American Women: The Case of United States History Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetreault, Mary Kay

    1984-01-01

    A content analysis of secondary U.S. history textbooks revealed that texts do include discussions of women. However, the emphasis is usually on female contributions that are an extension of women's nurturing role within the family or that are supportive of male activities. Eleanor Roosevelt is the most featured woman. (RM)

  13. Longitudinal Analysis of Teacher Education: The Case of History Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martell, Christopher Charles

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, learning history has traditionally been rooted in a transmission-oriented view of teaching and learning. From this perspective, teachers transfer their historical knowledge to their students. Alternatively, this dissertation positions itself within constructivist theories of teaching and learning, where learning is a process…

  14. Assessment in History: The Case for "Decoding" the Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, David

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author suggests some principles to be considered when attempting to assess learning in history courses. He has found it most effective to pursue these goals within the framework of the Decoding the Disciplines process. This approach, developed in the Indiana University Freshman Learning Project, suggests that faculty seeking…

  15. A forme fruste of Marfan's syndrome: case history.

    PubMed

    Lamers, R J; Janevski, B K

    1990-10-01

    A thirty nine year old woman presented with multiple aneurysms and dissections of the arterial system secondary to cystic medial necrosis is presented. After assessment of the family history a diagnosis of a forme fruste of Marfan's syndrome was made. Preoperative consideration of this rare diagnosis is important for treatment and surgical management. PMID:2221468

  16. Natural history and information overload: The case of Linnaeus

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Wille, Staffan; Charmantier, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Natural History can be seen as a discipline paradigmatically engaged in ‘data-driven research.’ Historians of early modern science have begun to emphasize its crucial role in the Scientific Revolution, and some observers of present day genomics see it as engaged in a return to natural history practices. A key concept that was developed to understand the dynamics of early modern natural history is that of ‘information overload.’ Taxonomic systems, rules of nomenclature, and technical terminologies were developed in botany and zoology to catch up with the ever increasing amount of information on hitherto unknown plant and animal species. In our contribution, we want to expand on this concept. After all, the same people who complain about information overload are usually the ones who contribute to it most significantly. In order to understand this complex relationship, we will turn to the annotation practices of the Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus (1707–1778). The very tools that Linnaeus developed to contain and reduce information overload, as we aim to demonstrate, facilitated a veritable information explosion that led to the emergence of a new research object in botany: the so-called ‘natural’ system. PMID:22326068

  17. Using Sources to Teach History for the Common Good: A Case of One Teacher's Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gradwell, Jill M.

    2010-01-01

    The teacher who is the focus of this interpretive case study, uses primary sources regularly with her students in ambitious ways but does so less from the current reform efforts, recent history education scholarship, or the climate of accountability and more from her individual goals for history education, most significantly, to prepare her…

  18. The Mystery of the Blue Death: A Case Study in Epidemiology and the History of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Susan Bandoni

    2009-01-01

    This case study introduces students to John Snow, considered to be one of the founders of both epidemiology and anesthesiology, and a remarkable figure in the history of science. Although historical case studies are often less popular with students than contemporary issues (Herreid 1998), a number of aspects of this case make it attractive to…

  19. The Unheralded History of the Lemon Grove Desegregation Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrid, E. Michael

    2008-01-01

    In 1931, the Southern California community of Lemon Grove served as the unlikely stage for a dramatic and significant civil rights court case. A group of Mexican and Mexican-American parents and their children won a major victory in the battle against school segregation and the notion of separate but equal facilities. The case, now commonly…

  20. A Posterior Lingual Sulcoplasty in Implant Therapy: A Case History Report.

    PubMed

    Perri de Carvalho, Paulo Sergio; Janjacomo, Luiz Antonio; Ponzoni, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This case history report describes the deepening of a patient's posterior mandibular lingual sulcus in combination with an acrylic resin guiding device fixed to an osseointegrated dental implant to maintain the patency of the new sulcular depth. PMID:26929959

  1. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  2. A Course on Humanistic Creativity in Later Life: Literature Review, Case Histories, and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuessel, Frank; Van Stewart, Arthur; Cedeno, Aristofanes

    2001-01-01

    Presents case histories of late-life creativity in literature (May Sarton), painting (Marcel Duchamp), music (Leos Janacek), dance (Martha Graham), and theatre (Jessica Tandy). Offers suggestions for a course on humanistic creativity in later life. (Contains 74 references.) (SK)

  3. Oral cavity rare lesions: 15 years case histories

    PubMed Central

    BARTULI, F.N.; LUCIANI, F.; CARDONI, G.; MUZZI, F.; CADDEO, F.; OTTRIA, L.; ARCURI, C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. Oral cavity rare diseases include a various group of uncommon morbid conditions. For this reason they are often called “orphan diseases”, as they are not interesting for research and the description of their natural history is not easy. The aim of our study is to analyze the prevalence and the distribution of oral cavity rare diseases in order to increase their knowledge and allow a fast therapeutic approach. Methods and material. 3144 patients took part to our study, they were choosen according to specific criteria and included in a experimental program; they all were prepared for oral biopsy surgery at Fatebenefratelli Hospital - Tor Vergata University of Rome. Following the results of the histological diagnosis, patients have been grouped. Results. From 1996 to 2010, we observed 1635 men and 1509 women, average age was 53 years, higher for women (55y.) and lower for men (52y.). Conclusions. Nevertheless the low level of accordance and the difficulty in description of natural history of diseases reported in literature, we can conclude that, according to our study the onset of rare diseases shows a percentage of appearing statistically significant. PMID:23277869

  4. RISK ANALYSIS: CASE HISTORY OF PUCCINIA JACEAE ON YELLOW STARTHISTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Risk analysis has five components: Risk awareness, Risk perception, Risk assessment, Risk management, and Risk communication. Using the case with the foreign plant pathogen, Puccinia jaceae, under evaluation for biological control of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis, YST), approaches and...

  5. Case notes, case histories, and the patient's experience of insanity at Gartnavel Royal Asylum, Glasgow, in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J

    1998-08-01

    This article is concerned primarily with questions as to how and why case notes were produced and utilized, and how they may (or may not) be used by historians. More specifically, it discusses how the Glasgow Royal Asylum's case notes may be deployed to access patients' experiences of madness and confinement. The deficiencies and biases of the case record are also explored. So too is the relationship of case notes with other asylum based records, including reception order questionnaires, with a separate section on patient writings as part of the case history corpus. This leads into an analysis of how the Asylum's case notes became case histories and for what purposes. These subjects are related to changes and continuities in medical ideologies about insanity, social attitudes to the insane and the nature of medical practice in asylums. Some fundamental shifts in emphasis in the use of the case note and case history occurred in this period. These shifts were associated with an increased emphasis on organic interpretations of mental disease and on clinical approaches to insanity; with the medicalization of asylum records and the wider discourse on insanity, and with declining deference to the public at large in the presentation of cases. The survey concludes by analysing the changing place of patient testimony within the case record. PMID:11620430

  6. Global, local and focused geographic clustering for case-control data with residential histories

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M; Kaufmann, Andy; Meliker, Jaymie; Goovaerts, Pierre; AvRuskin, Gillian; Nriagu, Jerome

    2005-01-01

    Background This paper introduces a new approach for evaluating clustering in case-control data that accounts for residential histories. Although many statistics have been proposed for assessing local, focused and global clustering in health outcomes, few, if any, exist for evaluating clusters when individuals are mobile. Methods Local, global and focused tests for residential histories are developed based on sets of matrices of nearest neighbor relationships that reflect the changing topology of cases and controls. Exposure traces are defined that account for the latency between exposure and disease manifestation, and that use exposure windows whose duration may vary. Several of the methods so derived are applied to evaluate clustering of residential histories in a case-control study of bladder cancer in south eastern Michigan. These data are still being collected and the analysis is conducted for demonstration purposes only. Results Statistically significant clustering of residential histories of cases was found but is likely due to delayed reporting of cases by one of the hospitals participating in the study. Conclusion Data with residential histories are preferable when causative exposures and disease latencies occur on a long enough time span that human mobility matters. To analyze such data, methods are needed that take residential histories into account. PMID:15784151

  7. An Oral History of Janet Emig's Case Study Subject "Lynn."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelms, Gerald

    During interviews conducted with Janet Emig, the true identity of "Lynn," the primary subject of Emig's influential 1971 monograph "The Composing Processes of Twelfth Graders," was determined. Discovery of Susan Gzech's true identity led to an interview which shed some interesting light on Emig's case study and on composition instruction as well.…

  8. Energy conservation in the textile industry: 10 case histories

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Presented are ten case studies of energy conserving technologies that have been implemented by the textile industry. For each case is given: the name and location of the plant and an employee contact, description of products, energy consumption and costs in years before and after the energy conserving technology was implemented, energy savings since the energy conserving technology was implemented, description of investment decision-making process, and description of any institutional and environmental considerations. Measures included are: tandem preparation line, dyebath reuse, bump-and-run (dyebath temperature drifts for the last 85% of the hold time), foam finishing, wastewater heat recovery, wastewater chlorination and reuse, oven exhaust air counterflow, boiler economizer, wood-fired boiler, and solar industrial process heat. Several other energy conserving technologies that were not studied are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  9. JSTOR: A Case Study in the Recent History of Scholarly Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonfeld, Roger C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To argue for the consideration from an historical perspective of technology-enabled changes in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: Uses examples from the author's history of JSTOR as a case study. Findings: That the case of JSTOR offers evidence that technology-enabled changes in higher education will have historical interest.…

  10. Cooperative Learning about Nature of Science with a Case from the History of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfensberger, Balz; Canella, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a predominantly qualitative classroom study on cooperative learning about nature of science (NOS) using a case from the history of science. The purpose of the research was to gain insight into how students worked with the historical case study during cooperative group work, how students and teachers assessed the teaching unit,…

  11. Reasoning with case histories of process knowledge for efficient process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bharwani, Seraj S.; Walls, Joe T.; Jackson, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    The significance of compiling case histories of empirical process knowledge and the role of such histories in improving the efficiency of manufacturing process development is discussed in this paper. Methods of representing important investigations as cases and using the information from such cases to eliminate redundancy of empirical investigations in analogous process development situations are also discussed. A system is proposed that uses such methods to capture the problem-solving framework of the application domain. A conceptual design of the system is presented and discussed.

  12. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Case report and family history.

    PubMed

    Ries, F; Ferster, A; Rieux-Laucat, F; Biwer, A; Dicato, M

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disease caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis and is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune manifestations and increased risk of both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Most forms of the disease are due to germ line mutations of the FAS gene and manifest during the first years of life with fluctuating lymphadenopathies, hemolysis, immune thrombocytopenia. During the second decade of life disease manifestations improve spontaneously but autoimmune problems still occur and there is an increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy. We describe a typical case of ALPS in a now 44 year old man, followed since the age of 2 for disease manifestations that were unclear at the beginning. PMID:20882745

  13. [Electrical burns in children. 3 years of case histories].

    PubMed

    Caneira, E; Serafim, Z; Duarte, R; Leal, M J

    1996-01-01

    The Burn Unit of Dona Estefânia Hospital admitted a total of 454 patients from January 1992 to January 1995, 24 of these patients suffered from electric shock. Of these 24 patients 3 suffered burns in the mouth, 15 in one or both hands and 6 multiple burns. In 19 patients the burns were up to 1%. A description is made of 5 cases, male children between the ages of 9 and 13 years, which were deemed severe. The incidents occurred outdoors with different voltages and in activities considered of ludic or experimental nature: two on the roof of a house, two with railway cables and one with an electrical cable in a port zone. The burnt areas vary between 4% and 70%, all of them 2nd and 3rd degree, with hospitalization lasting from 36 to 116 days. In addition to early and coordinated medical and rehabilitative treatment, according to individual needs, a description is also made of the cutaneous sequelae (deforming cicatrices, bridles), neurologic and psychologic sequelae, with emphasis on a patient who underwent amputation of the lower left leg and 4th and 5th ranges of the right foot. It was concluded that measures should be taken in education and legislation to prevent these accidents. Relevance is given to the need for a multidisciplinary team and specialized center for the treatment of these patients. PMID:9254529

  14. Case history - installation of high volume pumping equipment in Talco Field, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The work presents a case history study of Exxon's high volume artificial lift program at Talco Field in Franklin and Titus Counties, Texas. The field produces heavy crude oil from the Paluxy sandstone at an approximate depth of 4200 ft. Discussion includes (1) screening parameters used to optimized selection of high volume artificial lift equipment; (2) representative production flowstreams to quantify the additional recovery expected; (3) analysis of incremental expenses and costs associated with electric submersible pumps and large capacity beam pumping units; and (4) case production histories and operational problems encountered.

  15. A Case of a Laryngeal MALT Lymphoma in a Patient with a History of Gastric MALT

    PubMed Central

    Ashamalla, Mark; Teng, Marita S.; Brody, Joshua; Parikh, Rahul; Dharmarajan, Kavita

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting a case of a 62-year-old African American woman with a history of gastric MALT lymphoma successfully treated with radiation who presented with a laryngeal MALT lymphoma 4 years after her original diagnosis. She received definitive radiation with a complete response. The case presented is unique for the rare presentation of a MALT lymphoma in the larynx, especially in light of the patient's previously treated gastric MALT lymphoma years ago. PMID:25664189

  16. Four Case Histories and a Literature Review of Williams Syndrome and Autistic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; Rasmussen, Peder

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the case histories of four young children with concurrent autistic disorder and Williams syndrome. Williams syndrome comprises a peculiar facial appearance, learning disorder, and often hypercalcemia, mild microcephaly, large blood vessel stenosis, and a specific behavioral phenotype. Literature on Williams syndrome is…

  17. MONITORING WELL INSTALLATION, PURGING, AND SAMPLING TECHNIQUES. PART 2. CASE HISTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three case histories are presented to illustrate the problems encountered using some monitoring well installation, purging, and sampling techniques. Hollow-stem augering was found to pose problems during the installation of monitoring wells in terms of potential for cross-contami...

  18. The Changing Nature of Church College Relations: A History and Case Study of Concordia University Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Kristi K.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a history and case study of Concordia University Texas (CTX). There has been a gap in the scholarly research literature regarding how and to what extent Concordia Texas mirrors the path of other denominational colleges and universities in terms of relationship to their founding church bodies. Therefore, the purpose of this…

  19. INFLUENCE OF EXPOSURE HISTORY ON VITELLOGENIN INDUCTION IN MEDAKA: A CASE OF "ESTROGEN MEMORY"?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Exposure History on Vitellogenin Induction in Medaka: a Case of "Estrogen Memory"? (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 50(1-5):196.

    In this study, we exposed female medaka to aqueous solutions of o,p'-DDT until tissues residues reached approximately 100 g/g. Male...

  20. CASE HISTORY OF FINE PORE DIFFUSER RETROFIT AT RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In April 1983, the Ridgewood, New Jersey Wastewater Treatment Plant underwent a retrofit from a coarse bubble to a fine pore aeration system. Also, process modification from contact stabilization to tapered aeration occurred. This report presents a case history of plant and aer...

  1. Teaching History with Comic Books: A Case Study of Violence, War, and the Graphic Novel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Alicia C.; Castro, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, the authors present a case study that demonstrates how graphic novels can be utilized in the history classroom. More specifically, they discuss the benefits (and challenges) of using comic books to teach undergraduates about war and violence. While much of their discussion focuses on the historical particularities of Uganda, their…

  2. History Places: A Case Study for Relational Database and Information Retrieval System Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, David G.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a project-based case study that was developed for students with diverse backgrounds and varied inclinations for engaging technical topics. The project, called History Places, requires that student teams develop a vision for a kind of digital library, propose a conceptual model, and use the model to derive a logical model and…

  3. The Development of Dalton's Atomic Theory as a Case Study in the History of Science: Reflections for Educators in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viana, Helio Elael Bonini; Porto, Paulo Alves

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of the history of science in science curricula--and specially, in the curricula of science teachers--is a trend that has been followed in several countries. The reasons advanced for the study of the history of science are manifold. This paper presents a case study in the history of chemistry, on the early developments of John…

  4. The Utilization of Local History in Teaching American Religious History: A Gilded Age and Progressive Era North Dakota Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Christopher Neal

    2013-01-01

    Teachers of college-level courses on American religious history generally leave out the importance of local and regional histories when telling the story of religion in America. The study of local history provides a fertile ground for understanding broad national trends in a local context. This dissertation focuses upon a little-studied religious…

  5. Graeco-Roman case histories and their influence on Medieval Islamic clinical accounts.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Millan, C

    1999-04-01

    The medieval Islamic medical tradition was the direct heir of Classical and Hellenistic medicine thanks to an unprecedented movement of translation into Arabic, commentaries and systematizations of Greek scientific texts. In the process of assimilation, not only theoretical principles, but also literary models of presenting medical knowledge were adopted, amongst them the case history. Since the clinical account can be used as a tool for medical instruction as well as an instrument for professional self-promotion, this study seeks to investigate which purpose most motivated Islamic physicians, and to demonstrate the extent to which they were influenced by the stylistic patterns which served them as a model. This article comprises an analysis of the context, literary devices and purpose of case histories of the Epidemics, Rufus of Ephesos and Galen, and compares them with those by the tenth-century Islamic physician Abu Bakr Muhammad b. Zakariya al-Razi. Author of the largest number of case histories preserved within the medieval Islamic medical literature, al-Razi's clinical records constitute an instrument with which to study and expand medical knowledge as well as providing useful material for students' medical training. Although al-Razi fused elements from the sources which served him as a model, he did not emulate Galen's use of the clinical history to assert himself in order to gain authority and prestige, but remained faithful to the Hippocratic essence. PMID:11623808

  6. Left ventricular apical hypoplasia: Case report on cardiomyopathy and a history of sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Sani, Zahra; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Rezaeian, Nahid; Seifi, Azin; Omidvar Tehrani, Sahar; Nezafati, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia with several different unrecognized dimensions is a newly discovered congenital anomaly of the heart. CASE REPORT In this report, we describe a case of cardiomyopathy of this type occurring in a 13-year-old male with a history of mental retardation and sudden cardiac death (SCD) of second-degree relatives. The patient was referred for an evaluation of cardiac status. An echocardiography analysis demonstrated a spherical left ventricle (LV) appearance with mild mitral regurgitation. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed a spherical and truncated LV appearance. The right ventricle was found to have elongated and wrapped around the LV, and diverticulum was also seen in the cardiac MRI. CONCLUSION To the best of our knowledge, this is to present the first case of LV apical hypoplasia combined with LV diverticulum and a family history of SCD. As more cases featuring this cardiomyopathy type are recognized, it will be easier to elucidate the natural history and management of such cardiac anomalies. PMID:27114737

  7. A Descriptive Study of the Classroom Instruction Component of the ESEA Title VII Bilingual Education Program. Selected Case Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardenas, Rene F.; Rudes, Blair A.

    Twenty-two case histories of bilingual education programs funded under Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act are presented as a companion volume to the technical report of the same study. The case histories were developed from site visits and surveys of administrators, teachers, and parents involved in the program. The program…

  8. Case-control geographic clustering for residential histories accounting for risk factors and covariates

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Methods for analyzing space-time variation in risk in case-control studies typically ignore residential mobility. We develop an approach for analyzing case-control data for mobile individuals and apply it to study bladder cancer in 11 counties in southeastern Michigan. At this time data collection is incomplete and no inferences should be drawn – we analyze these data to demonstrate the novel methods. Global, local and focused clustering of residential histories for 219 cases and 437 controls is quantified using time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships. Business address histories for 268 industries that release known or suspected bladder cancer carcinogens are analyzed. A logistic model accounting for smoking, gender, age, race and education specifies the probability of being a case, and is incorporated into the cluster randomization procedures. Sensitivity of clustering to definition of the proximity metric is assessed for 1 to 75 k nearest neighbors. Results Global clustering is partly explained by the covariates but remains statistically significant at 12 of the 14 levels of k considered. After accounting for the covariates 26 Local clusters are found in Lapeer, Ingham, Oakland and Jackson counties, with the clusters in Ingham and Oakland counties appearing in 1950 and persisting to the present. Statistically significant focused clusters are found about the business address histories of 22 industries located in Oakland (19 clusters), Ingham (2) and Jackson (1) counties. Clusters in central and southeastern Oakland County appear in the 1930's and persist to the present day. Conclusion These methods provide a systematic approach for evaluating a series of increasingly realistic alternative hypotheses regarding the sources of excess risk. So long as selection of cases and controls is population-based and not geographically biased, these tools can provide insights into geographic risk factors that were not specifically assessed in the case

  9. Community mental health nursing and early intervention in dementia: developing practice through a single case history.

    PubMed

    Keady, John; Woods, Bob; Hahn, Sue; Hill, Jim

    2004-09-01

    People Nursing in association with Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 6b, 57-67 Community mental health nursing and early intervention in dementia: developing practice through a single case history This paper reports on a single case history taken from the 'Dementia Action Research and Education' project, a 15-month primary care intervention study that was undertaken in North Wales in the early part of 2000. The study sought to address the meaning, context and diversity of early intervention in dementia care and employed a community mental health nurse and a psychiatric social worker to undertake early and psychosocial interventions with older people with dementia (aged 75 years and over) and their families. The workers tape-recorded, documented and analysed their interventions with 27 older people with dementia and their families over the 15-month duration of the study. Clinical supervision was also undertaken during the intervention phase. One case history is presented in this paper to illustrate the work of the community mental health nurse and to identify areas of practice development. Greater role transparency, collaborative working and improvement in educational preparation for practice are called for. PMID:15724820

  10. Case history studies of energy conservation improvements in the dairy industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    Presented are ten case histories about energy-efficient technologies implemented by the dairy industry. For each case is presented: the name and location of the company, and its product line; energy consumption and costs at the plant before and after implementation of energy-conserving technology; the factors that prompted the investment; and product quality as a result of the new equipment. The measures presented are: refrigeration compressor replacement, turbulators in boiler tubes, stack exchange on boilers, reverse osmosis, six-effect evaporator, multi-effect evaporator with thermal vapor recompressor, spray dryer heat recovery, efficient compressor operations, mechanical vapor recompression evaporator, preheated spray dryer air with recoverable waste heat. (LEW)

  11. Case Study in History of Education during the 1970s: Published Stories of the Midwest History of Education Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The rapid expansion of public schooling during the 1950s and 1960s increased the need for teachers and teacher training. Colleges accomplished this by having professors of education train other educators in foundations of education. This broke the connections between academic history, philosophy, and sociology and educational history, philosophy,…

  12. Growth and resilience of pioneering nonprofit human service organizations: a cross-case analysis of organizational histories.

    PubMed

    Kimberlin, Sara E; Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of organizational history is important for recognizing patterns in effective management and understanding how organizations respond to internal and external challenges. This cross-case analysis of 12 histories of pioneering nonprofit human service organizations contributes an important longitudinal perspective on organizational history, complementing the cross-sectional case studies that dominate the existing research on nonprofit organizations. The literature on organizational growth, including lifecycle models and growth management, is reviewed, along with the literature on organizational resilience. Based on analysis of the 12 organizational histories, a conceptual model is presented that synthesizes key factors in the areas of leadership, internal operations, and external relations that influence organizational growth and resilience to enable nonprofit organizations to survive and thrive over time. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal examples from the organizational histories illustrate the conceptual map. The paper concludes with a discussion of directions for future research on nonprofit organizational history. PMID:21416428

  13. History and Philosophy of Science through Models: The Case of Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justi, Rosária; Gilbert, John K.

    The case for a greater role for the history and philosophy of science in science education is reviewed. It is argued that such a role can only be realised if it is based on both a credible analytical approach to the history and philosophy of science and if the evolution of a sufficient number of major themes in science is known in suitable detail. Adopting Lakatos' Theory of Scientific Research Programmes as the analytical approach, it is proposed that the development, use, and replacement, of specific models forms the core of such programmes.Chemical kinetics was selected as an exemplar major topic in chemistry. Eight models which have played a central role in the evolution of the study of chemical kinetics were identified by an analysis of the literature. The implications that these models have for the teaching and learning of chemistry today are discussed.

  14. Performance of cancer cluster Q-statistics for case-control residential histories

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Chantel D.; Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Ward, Mary H.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Meliker, Jaymie R.

    2012-01-01

    Few investigations of health event clustering have evaluated residential mobility, though causative exposures for chronic diseases such as cancer often occur long before diagnosis. Recently developed Q-statistics incorporate human mobility into disease cluster investigations by quantifying space- and time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships. Using residential histories from two cancer case-control studies, we created simulated clusters to examine Q-statistic performance. Results suggest the intersection of cases with significant clustering over their life course, Qi, with cases who are constituents of significant local clusters at given times, Qit, yielded the best performance, which improved with increasing cluster size. Upon comparison, a larger proportion of true positives were detected with Kulldorf’s spatial scan method if the time of clustering was provided. We recommend using Q-statistics to identify when and where clustering may have occurred, followed by the scan method to localize the candidate clusters. Future work should investigate the generalizability of these findings. PMID:23149326

  15. Ten case history studies of energy efficiency improvements in pulp and paper mills. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The ten technologies chosen for case history development are: sonic sootblowing in boilers, boiler operation on oil-water emulsified fuel, energy efficient motors, computerized control of excess air for boilers, boiler control and load allocation, driving of waste-activated sludge by multiple effect evaporation, pre-drying of hog fuel, lime kiln computerization, heat wheel for process heat recovery, and organic Rankine bottoming cycle for thermomechanical pulping heat recovery. For each case study, there is given: the company name, employee contact, plant summary, a description of the energy consuming process and of the energy-saving action, an assessment of energy savings, and the decision process leading to the adoption of the measure. A data summary for discounted cash flow analysis is tabulated for each case. (LEW)

  16. George Gershwin -- a case of new ways in neurosurgery as well as in the history of Western music.

    PubMed

    Gasenzer, Elena; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2014-06-01

    George Gershwin, the famous American composer, died in 1937 of a temporal lobe glioma. An emergency surgery was performed by R. Nafziger and W. E. Dandy. The case of George Gershwin indicates the beginning of a new era in music history as well as in the history of neurosurgery. PMID:24633986

  17. Forms of Discourse and the Sciences of the Mind: Luria, Sacks, and the Role of Narrative in Neurological Case Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journet, Debra

    1990-01-01

    Discusses two sets of neurological case histories: A. R. Luria's "The Man with a Shattered World," and Oliver Sack's "Awakenings." Argues that these histories display two paradigmatic explanations for the mind/brain relation, and that the movement from one paradigm to another also necessitates a movement to different forms of discourse. (MM)

  18. A Case Study of the In-Class Use of a Video Game for Teaching High School History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, William R.; Mong, Christopher J.; Harris, Constance A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the case of a sophomore high school history class where "Making History", a video game designed with educational purposes in mind, is used in the classroom to teach about World War II. Data was gathered using observation, focus group and individual interviews, and document analysis. The high school was a rural school located in…

  19. Mature vs. Active Deep-Seated Landslides: A Comparison Through Two Case Histories in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, Luca; Perello, Paolo; Baietto, Alessandro; Giorza, Alessandra; Musso, Alessia; Gabriele, Piercarlo; Baster, Ira

    2016-06-01

    Two case histories are presented, concerning the still poorly known alpine deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (DSD) located nearby Lanzada (central Italian Alps), and Sarre (north-western Italian Alps). The Lanzada DSD is a constantly monitored, juvenile, and active phenomenon, partly affecting an existing hydropower plant. Its well-developed landforms allow a precise field characterization of the instability-affected area. The Sarre DSD is a mature, strongly remodeled phenomenon, where the only hazard factor is represented by secondary instability processes at the base of the slope. In this case, the remodeling imposed the adoption of complementary analytical techniques to support the field work. The two presented studies had to be adapted to external factors, namely (a) available information, (b) geological and geomorphological setting, and (c) final scope of the work. The Lanzada case essentially relied upon accurate field work; the Sarre case was mostly based on digital image and DTM processing. In both cases a sound field structural analysis formed the necessary background to understand the mechanisms leading to instability. A back-analysis of the differences between the study methods adopted in the two cases is finally presented, leading to suggestions for further investigations and design.

  20. Spirit possession in South Asia, dissociation or hysteria? Part 2: Case histories.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R J

    1994-06-01

    Psychoanalytic theory appears flawed in the way it has been traditionally applied in anthropological studies of spirit possession in South Asia. It is suggested that pathological spirit possession in South Asia has a similar etiology to multiple personality disorder in North America, which is caused by spontaneous trance reactions to extreme situations in the environment, particularly child abuse. Reanalyses of previously published case histories of spirit possession illnesses in South Asia are presented from the perspective of dissociation theory, highlighting possible etiology not considered relevant in earlier psychoanalytic theories. PMID:7924398

  1. Case histories portraying different methods of installing liners for verticle barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.K.; Crockford, R.M.; Achhorner, F.N.

    1997-12-31

    The installation of liners for vertical barriers is difficult and has been a learning experience for every contractor making the attempt. Soil stratigraphy and hydrogeologic conditions can vary over short distances, creating a variety of problems. This is particularly so when working near landfills and documentation of the as-built condition is poor. Successful installation requires detailed planning and knowledge of what to expect, as well as alternate plans for potential problems. Several successful methods of panel connection will be presented as well as a variety of installation techniques. Project case histories will be reviewed, highlighting the challenges associated with specific construction techniques.

  2. Magnetic bearing turbomachinery case histories and applications for space related equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weise, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of magnetic levitation is not a new one and can be easily traced back to the 1800's. It is only recently, however, that the congruous technologies of electronic control systems, power electronics, and magnetic materials have begun to merge to make the magnetic suspension device a viable product. A brief overview of an active magnetic bearing technology is provided. Case histories of various turbomachinery in North America presently operating on magnetic bearings are reviewed. Finally, projections are made as to the space related machinery that may be benefited by incorporating magnetic bearings into the equipment design.

  3. [Experience of two cases of tetanus without a clear history of trauma].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Fumie; Otsuka, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Tetanus develops following inoculation of damaged human tissue with Clostridium tetani which transforms into a vegetative rod-shaped bacterium and produces the tetanospasmin. Usually we make a diagnosis of tetanus based on typical symptoms and history of trauma. But, when patients have no noticeable history of trauma, we have to diagnose tetanus on the basis of the clinical course and symptoms. We report herein on two cases of tetanus without a clear history of trauma. The first patient visited us with the chief complaints of pain in the neck and shoulder, and difficulty in opening the mouth. Based on these symptoms, we diagnosed tetani in the first stage and we started treatment, consisting mainly of human anti-tetanus immunoglobulin on the first day. The second patient also had typical symptoms of tetanus. However, he rejected the use of human anti-tetanus immunoglobulin on the first day. Because his symptoms worsened on the 2nd day, we insisted that he used it. On the 5th hospital day he developed partial opisthotonus of neck. However he recovered without tracheotomy or intratracheal intubation. PMID:24601099

  4. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palatal mucosa in patient with history of anorexia: review and case report.

    PubMed

    Gilowski, Łukasz; Wiench, Rafał; Polakiewicz-Gilowska, Anna; Dwornicka, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a self-limiting disorder affecting minor salivary glands resembling a malignant process both clinically and histopathologically. The etiology of this rare inflammatory` disorder is related to an ischemic event. Identified risk factors include alcohol abuse, smoking, drugs, denture wearing, injury and systemic diseases. Also reported are cases of necrotizing sialometaplasia associated with bulimia. This paper identifies the whole body incitement among additional risk factors by presenting a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia in an 18 year old patient with the history of anorexia nervosa. Furthermore it describes the effects of extreme cooling of palatal mucosa with ice chips resulting in constriction of blood vessels as the direct cause, reinforcing ischemic etiology of necrotizing sialometaplasia. PMID:24667056

  5. Case history studies of energy conservation improvements in the meat industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    Presented are case histories for ten energy-efficient technologies implemented by the meat industry. For each case is presented: the name and location of the plant, name of plant employee contact with address and telephone number, energy consumption and costs at the plant before and after implementation of energy-conserving technology, description of the investment decision process, and changes in production or product quality as a result of the new equipment. The measures presented are: continuous rendering, high-pressure return on the boiler, heat recovery from condensate return and flash steam, continuous whole blood processing, preheating of process water with recovered refrigeration waste heat, continuous rendering of poultry scraps, electrical stimulation of beef, preheating and storing process water with recovered refrigeration waste heat, microcomputer control system, and housekeeping improvements. (LEW)

  6. Site response of heterogeneous natural deposits to harmonic excitation applied to more than 100 case histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenari, Reza Jamshidi; Bostani Taleshani, Shirin Aminzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Variation of shear-wave propagation velocity (SWV) with depth was studied by analyzing more than one hundred actual SWV profiles. Linear, power, and hyperbolic variation schemes were investigated to find the most representative form for naturally occurred alluvial deposits. It was found that hyperbolic (asymptotic) variation dominates the majority of cases and it can be reliably implemented in analytical or analytical-numerical procedures. Site response analyses for a one-layer heterogeneous stratum were conducted to find an equivalent homogeneous alternative which simplifies the analysis procedure but does not compromise the accuracy of the resonance and amplification responses. Harmonic average, arithmetic average and mid-value equivalents are chosen from the literature for investigation. Furthermore, full and partial depth averaging schemes were evaluated and compared in order to verify the validity of current practices which rely upon averaging shallow depths, viz., the first 30 m of the strata. Engineering bedrock concept was discussed and the results were compared.

  7. Familial appearance of congenital penile curvature – case history of two brothers

    PubMed Central

    Matuszewski, Marcin; Krajka, Kazimierz; Rębała, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The true prevalence of congenital penile curvature (CPC) is difficult to determine. Some study reports suggests that this problem may occur in as many as 10% of the male population [1]. However, a literature search of the Medline database revealed no reference concerning familial appearance of congenital penile curvature. For that reason we would like to present our case series. Two brothers aged 25 and 26 respectively were admitted to the department of urology due to congenital penile curvature. Each patient was assessed by a history, physical examination, auto-photography of the erect penis, and a thorough sexual history. Concomitant anomalies of penile layers were absent in both cases. The Yachia [2] and Essed-Schroeder [3] corporoplasty technique were applied respectively. In follow-up both brothers reported straight erections. A survey of the fetal penis at different stages of development shows some degree of curvature in a considerable number of embryos [4]. Penile curvature may thus be considered almost physiological in embryos between 35 and 45 mm in length. Thus, it has also been proposed that penile curvature is secondary to an arrest in normal penile development [5]. Therefore, some form of congenital local androgen deficiency may be responsible for inherited penile curvature. PMID:24579033

  8. Retesting of liquefaction and nonliquefaction case histories from the 1976 Tangshan earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moss, R.E.S.; Kayen, R.E.; Tong, L.-Y.; Liu, S.-Y.; Cai, G.-J.; Wu, J.

    2011-01-01

    A field investigation was performed to retest liquefaction and nonliquefaction sites from the 1976 Tangshan earthquake in China. These sites were carefully investigated in 1978 and 1979 by using standard penetration test (SPT) and cone penetration test (CPT) equipment; however, the CPT measurements are obsolete because of the now nonstandard cone that was used at the time. In 2007, a modern cone was mobilized to retest 18 selected sites that are particularly important because of the intense ground shaking they sustained despite their high fines content and/or because the site did not liquefy. Of the sites reinvestigated and carefully reprocessed, 13 were considered accurate representative case histories. Two of the sites that were originally investigated for liquefaction have been reinvestigated for cyclic failure of fine-grained soil and removed from consideration for liquefaction triggering. The most important outcome of these field investigations was the collection of more accurate data for three nonliquefaction sites that experienced intense ground shaking. Data for these three case histories is now included in an area of the liquefaction triggering database that was poorly populated and will help constrain the upper bound of future liquefaction triggering curves. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  9. Vulnerabilities to Rock-Slope Failure Impacts from Christchurch, NZ Case History Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, A.; Wartman, J.; Massey, C. I.; Olsen, M. J.; Motley, M. R.; Hanson, D.; Henderson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rock-slope failures during the 2010/11 Canterbury (Christchurch), New Zealand Earthquake Sequence resulted in 5 fatalities and caused an estimated US$400 million of damage to buildings and infrastructure. Reducing losses from rock-slope failures requires consideration of both hazard (i.e. likelihood of occurrence) and risk (i.e. likelihood of losses given an occurrence). Risk assessment thus requires information on the vulnerability of structures to rock or boulder impacts. Here we present 32 case histories of structures impacted by boulders triggered during the 2010/11 Canterbury earthquake sequence, in the Port Hills region of Christchurch, New Zealand. The consequences of rock fall impacts on structures, taken as penetration distance into structures, are shown to follow a power-law distribution with impact energy. Detailed mapping of rock fall sources and paths from field mapping, aerial lidar digital elevation model (DEM) data, and high-resolution aerial imagery produced 32 well-constrained runout paths of boulders that impacted structures. Impact velocities used for structural analysis were developed using lumped mass 2-D rock fall runout models using 1-m resolution lidar elevation data. Model inputs were based on calibrated surface parameters from mapped runout paths of 198 additional boulder runouts. Terrestrial lidar scans and structure from motion (SfM) imagery generated 3-D point cloud data used to measure structural damage and impacting boulders. Combining velocity distributions from 2-D analysis and high-precision boulder dimensions, kinetic energy distributions were calculated for all impacts. Calculated impact energy versus penetration distance for all cases suggests a power-law relationship between damage and impact energy. These case histories and resulting fragility curve should serve as a foundation for future risk analysis of rock fall hazards by linking vulnerability data to the predicted energy distributions from the hazard analysis.

  10. Surgical History and the Risk of Endometriosis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xishi; Long, Qiqi; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Women tend to receive more surgical procedures than men. Our mouse study shows that surgical stress promotes the development of endometriosis. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that surgery increases the risk of endometriosis. We recruited 208 patients with ovarian endometrioma and 212 age-matched patients with ovarian teratoma and retrieved information on the history of any surgical procedures after menarche, grouped by laparotomy, laparoscopy, gynecologically related procedures, cesarean section, and surgeries performed on torso and extremities was recorded. We then evaluated the association, if any, between endometriosis and history of surgical procedures. Cases and controls were comparable with respect to age, marital status, education level, and occupation. Eleven (5.3%) cases had laparotomy before the index surgery while 4 (1.9%) controls did. Sixty-six (31.7%) cases had Cesarean section while 53 (25.0%) controls did. Multivariate analysis identified age, at the index surgery laparotomy, and cesarean section as 3 factors positively associated with the risk of endometriosis while parity was found to be negatively associated with the risk. Laparotomy was associated with increased risk of endometriosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-12.31), while cesarean section was associated with 2-fold increase in risk (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.31-3.55). Both laparotomy and cesarean section may increase the risk of endometriosis probably by activation of adrenergic signaling, thus facilitating angiogenesis and accelerating the growth of endometriotic lesions that are already in existence. This finding may have important ramifications for the perioperative management of patients with increased risk or recurrence risk of endometriosis. PMID:26919976

  11. Hierarchical benchmark case study for history matching, uncertainty quantification and reservoir characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D.; Demyanov, V.; Tatum, D.; Christie, M.; Rojas, T.; Geiger, S.; Corbett, P.

    2013-01-01

    Benchmark problems have been generated to test a number of issues related to predicting reservoir behaviour (e.g. Floris et al., 2001, Christie and Blunt, 2001, Peters et al., 2010). However, such cases are usually focused on a particular aspect of the reservoir model (e.g. upscaling, property distribution, history matching, uncertainty prediction, etc.) and the other decisions in constructing the model are fixed by log values that are related to the distribution of cell properties away from the wells, fixed grids and structural features and fixed fluid properties. This is because all these features require an element of interpretation, from indirect measurements of the reservoir, noisy and incomplete data and judgments based on domain knowledge. Therefore, there is a need for a case study that would consider interpretational uncertainty integrated throughout the reservoir modelling workflow. In this benchmark study we require the modeller to make interpretational choices as well as to select the techniques applied to the case study, namely the geomodelling approach, history matching algorithm and/or uncertainty quantification technique. The interpretational choices will be around the following areas: Top structure interpretation from seismic and well picks. Fault location, dimensions and the connectivity of the network uncertainty. Facies modelling approach. Facies interpretations from well logs cutoffs. Petrophysical property prediction from the available well data. Grid resolution-choice between number of iterations and model resolution to capture the reservoir features adequately. A semi-synthetic study is based on real field data provided: production data, seismic sections to interpret the faults and top structures, wireline logs to identify facies correlations and saturation profile and porosity and permeability data and a host of other data. To make this problem useable in a manageable time period multiple hierarchically related gridded models were produced

  12. Are we too fixated on clinical trial data? The case for using embedded case histories to influence prescribing.

    PubMed

    Black, Iain

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the assumptions used to support the strategic and tactical use of clinical trial data as the main type of information provided by pharmaceutical marketers. Evidence is presented which suggests that doctors use clinical trial data to construct general beliefs about a disease or product and that it is often used incorrectly when assessing the probability that a patient has a specific disease. Further evidence is examined which suggests that clinical experience is the most important type of information used when doctors make specific prescription decisions. A call is made for the pharmaceutical industry to address the need for experiential information by examining ways to provide doctors with detailed patient case histories. PMID:16891254

  13. First riser drilling in Scientific Ocean Drilling history, Observatory drilling and casing in the Nankai Trough (IODP Exp 319)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toczko, S.; Eguchi, N. O.; Takahashi, K.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T. B.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    IODP Expedition 319 (“Riser and Riserless Observatory-1”, NanTroSEIZE Stage 2) was the first time in IODP history that scientific riser operations were conducted. As part of this groundbreaking advance in scientific drilling, other technologies and sampling methods were also introduced: scientific mud-gas monitoring, drilling cuttings collection and analysis, MDT, and VSP (walk-away and zero-offset). Although the goals and achievements for Expedition 319 were modest, we will describe the operational portions of these technologies, and also discuss the potential and benefits of future riser drilling operations. JAMSTEC’s Center for Deep Earth Exploration (CDEX), the Japanese Implementing Organization and operator of the riser drillship Chikyu, this year performed the inaugural riser drilling expedition for IODP, as part of NanTroSEIZE Stage 2, Expedition 319, “Riser and Riserless Observatories”. Riser drilling is a typical method of drilling in industry, since it helps prevent loss of petroleum while drilling at sea, and also allows for deeper drilling depths, when compared with the usual non-riser drilling. The system aboard Chikyu is an industrial design riser system, which has just completed drilling operations in the Kumano Basin, drilling and casing a riser hole, Hole C0009A, to 1607.3 mBSF in water 2054 m BSL deep. The riser drilling system maintains a connection between the riser pipe suspended from the drillship to the sea floor blowout preventer (BOP), which makes a seal between the riser pipe and well head, and below to the cased intervals of the borehole below the seafloor. This allows the drilling mud to circulate down through the drillpipe, out the bit, and back up the casing and riser pipe to the drillship. This cools the bit, clears the borehole of cuttings (recovered aboard ship in the shale shakers) and allows real-time mud-gas monitoring. Mud weight can be more carefully controlled and adjusted, improving the quality of mudcake on the

  14. Teaching Recent History in Countries that Have Experienced Human Rights Violations: Case Studies from Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, Maria Isabel; Magendzo, Abraham; Gazmuri, Renato

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating recent history into the educational curricula of countries that have experienced human rights violations combines the complexities of teaching history, teaching recent history, and human rights education. Recent history makes a historical analysis of social reality and a historiographical analysis of the immediate. It is located…

  15. Significant or Safe? Two Cases of Instructional Uses of History Feature Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Scott Alan; Suh, Yonghee

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of VHS and DVD over the past two decades has greatly expanded the influence of history movies, watched by millions of adolescents in homes and classrooms. This paper examines two secondary U.S. history teachers' instructional uses of history motion pictures in their classrooms. Ray used The Patriot (2000) to teach history as stories…

  16. Clinical characteristics of chemical sensitivity: an illustrative case history of asthma and MCS.

    PubMed

    Ross, G H

    1997-03-01

    A case history of the induction of asthma and chemical sensitivity in a 42-year-old registered nurse illustrates several of the characteristic features of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). This patient's problems started shortly after moving into a new home under construction, with associated chemical exposures. Other MCS patients report the onset of the condition with other chemical exposures such as those encountered at their places of work or use of pesticides at their residences. Patients often describe a spreading phenomenon of increasing intolerance to commonly encountered chemicals at concentrations well tolerated by other people. Symptoms usually wax and wane with exposures, and are more likely to occur in patients or families with preexisting histories of migraine or with classical allergies. Idiosyncratic medication reactions (especially to preservative chemicals) are common in MCS patients, as are dysautonomia symptoms (such as vascular instability) and poor temperature regulation. Myalgia and joint pains and food intolerance are common features as well. Contamination with xenobiotic chemicals is frequently found in these patients when they are tested. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome is a recently identified condition that exhibits features of both asthma and chemical sensitivity. MCS patients frequently have patterns of neurotoxic brain metabolism that can be confirmed on single photo emission computed tomography imaging. PMID:9167976

  17. Clinical characteristics of chemical sensitivity: an illustrative case history of asthma and MCS.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, G H

    1997-01-01

    A case history of the induction of asthma and chemical sensitivity in a 42-year-old registered nurse illustrates several of the characteristic features of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). This patient's problems started shortly after moving into a new home under construction, with associated chemical exposures. Other MCS patients report the onset of the condition with other chemical exposures such as those encountered at their places of work or use of pesticides at their residences. Patients often describe a spreading phenomenon of increasing intolerance to commonly encountered chemicals at concentrations well tolerated by other people. Symptoms usually wax and wane with exposures, and are more likely to occur in patients or families with preexisting histories of migraine or with classical allergies. Idiosyncratic medication reactions (especially to preservative chemicals) are common in MCS patients, as are dysautonomia symptoms (such as vascular instability) and poor temperature regulation. Myalgia and joint pains and food intolerance are common features as well. Contamination with xenobiotic chemicals is frequently found in these patients when they are tested. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome is a recently identified condition that exhibits features of both asthma and chemical sensitivity. MCS patients frequently have patterns of neurotoxic brain metabolism that can be confirmed on single photo emission computed tomography imaging. PMID:9167976

  18. The Three Domains of Conservation Genetics: Case Histories from Hawaiian Waters.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The scientific field of conservation biology is dominated by 3 specialties: phylogenetics, ecology, and evolution. Under this triad, phylogenetics is oriented towards the past history of biodiversity, conserving the divergent branches in the tree of life. The ecological component is rooted in the present, maintaining the contemporary life support systems for biodiversity. Evolutionary conservation (as defined here) is concerned with preserving the raw materials for generating future biodiversity. All 3 domains can be documented with genetic case histories in the waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago, an isolated chain of volcanic islands with 2 types of biodiversity: colonists, and new species that arose from colonists. This review demonstrates that 1) phylogenetic studies have identified previously unknown branches in the tree of life that are endemic to Hawaiian waters; 2) population genetic surveys define isolated marine ecosystems as management units, and 3) phylogeographic analyses illustrate the pathways of colonization that can enhance future biodiversity. Conventional molecular markers have advanced all 3 domains in conservation biology over the last 3 decades, and recent advances in genomics are especially valuable for understanding the foundations of future evolutionary diversity. PMID:27001936

  19. Dynamic protein-protein interaction subnetworks of lung cancer in cases with smoking history

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei; He, Li-Ran; Zhao, Yan-Chao; Chan, Man-Him; Zhang, Meng; He, Miao

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer and is linked to 85% of lung cancer cases. However, how lung cancer develops in patients with smoking history remains unclear. Systems approaches that combine human protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and gene expression data are superior to traditional methods. We performed these systems to determine the role that smoking plays in lung cancer development and used the support vector machine (SVM) model to predict PPIs. By defining expression variance (EV), we found 520 dynamic proteins (EV>0.4) using data from the Human Protein Reference Database and Gene Expression Omnibus Database, and built 7 dynamic PPI subnetworks of lung cancer in patients with smoking history. We also determined the primary functions of each subnetwork: signal transduction, apoptosis, and cell migration and adhesion for subnetwork A; cell-sustained angiogenesis for subnetwork B; apoptosis for subnetwork C; and, finally, signal transduction and cell replication and proliferation for subnetworks D–G. The probability distribution of the degree of dynamic protein and static protein differed, clearly showing that the dynamic proteins were not the core proteins which widely connected with their neighbor proteins. There were high correlations among the dynamic proteins, suggesting that the dynamic proteins tend to form specific dynamic modules. We also found that the dynamic proteins were only correlated with the expression of selected proteins but not all neighbor proteins when cancer occurred. PMID:23149315

  20. [Somatoform disorders in neurology visits: history and circumstances: retrospective study of 124 cases].

    PubMed

    Dubas, F; Thomas-Antérion, C

    2012-12-01

    We report 124 cases of somatoform disorders, considering psychogenic disorders at the same level as neurological disorders. We noted any psychic, somatic or social condition (history taking) and facilitating circumstances. The patients were aged 16 to 84 years old; 71.7% were women. We observed pain (35.4%), psychogenic headache (25%), sensorimotor loss (27.4%), gait and psychogenic tremor (17.7%), cognitive disorders (11.8%), ocular symptoms (7.2%), and urogenital symptoms (2.4%). Delay to consultation ranged from a few days to 20 years. Psychiatric comorbidity was noted in 30.6% of the cases. In 55.6% of 124 cases, we observed a psychological background. It was a childhood trauma in 15.3% of these cases. In one-third of the 124 situations, we noted an underlying somatic or social condition. Facilitation conditions were frequently mixed. Somatic and/or psychological conditions were noted in one-third of the 124 cases and social conditions in half of them. The neurologist is faced with the challenge of naming the symptom (most often labelled a functional disorder) and of making the decision to stop or limit investigations. Visits by patients with psychogenic disorders make up a significant percentage of neurology speciality appointments. The neurologist should not limit the consultation to differentiating "real" symptoms from psychogenic somatoform disorders, but should also propose a straightforward compassionate approach for effective therapeutic care. By carefully listening to the patient's dialogue, the neurologist can help the patient give meaning to the symptoms, and progress towards improved well-being. PMID:23153685

  1. Genome-wide association study reveals greater polygenic loading for schizophrenia in cases with a family history of illness.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, Tim B; Ripke, Stephan; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R; Gejman, Pablo V; Rietschel, Marcella; Cichon, Sven; St Clair, David; Corvin, Aiden; Kirov, George; McQuillin, Andrew; Gurling, Hugh; Rujescu, Dan; Andreassen, Ole A; Werge, Thomas; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Malhotra, Anil K; O'Donovan, Michael C; Kendler, Kenneth S; Fanous, Ayman H

    2016-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have yielded more than 100 common susceptibility variants, and strongly support a substantial polygenic contribution of a large number of small allelic effects. It has been hypothesized that familial schizophrenia is largely a consequence of inherited rather than environmental factors. We investigated the extent to which familiality of schizophrenia is associated with enrichment for common risk variants detectable in a large GWAS. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for cases reporting a family history of psychotic illness (N = 978), cases reporting no such family history (N = 4,503), and unscreened controls (N = 8,285) from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC1) study of schizophrenia. We used a multinomial logistic regression approach with model-fitting to detect allelic effects specific to either family history subgroup. We also considered a polygenic model, in which we tested whether family history positive subjects carried more schizophrenia risk alleles than family history negative subjects, on average. Several individual SNPs attained suggestive but not genome-wide significant association with either family history subgroup. Comparison of genome-wide polygenic risk scores based on GWAS summary statistics indicated a significant enrichment for SNP effects among family history positive compared to family history negative cases (Nagelkerke's R(2 ) = 0.0021; P = 0.00331; P-value threshold <0.4). Estimates of variability in disease liability attributable to the aggregate effect of genome-wide SNPs were significantly greater for family history positive compared to family history negative cases (0.32 and 0.22, respectively; P = 0.031). We found suggestive evidence of allelic effects detectable in large GWAS of schizophrenia that might be specific to particular family history subgroups. However, consideration of a polygenic risk score indicated a significant

  2. Case Histories in Late Byzantium: Reading the Patient in John Zacharias Aktouarios' On Urines.

    PubMed

    Bouras-Vallianatos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides the first analysis of case histories in the Byzantine period as they feature in the On Urines of John Zacharias Aktouarios (ca. 1275-ca. 1330). This group of clinical accounts is of special importance in that they have no counterpart in the Greek-speaking world since Galen. This study aims to illustrate various factors determining the patient's response to the physician's advice through close examination of John's clinical narratives. The first part deals with the terminology that John uses to indicate the patient's gender, age, social status, and clinical condition. The second part explores the significance of John's acquaintance with the patients, the patient's socio-economic background, and also the patient's experience in connection with the physician's professional expertise. PMID:26946687

  3. 3-D seismic case history of the dawn 156 pinnacle reef

    SciTech Connect

    Egden, J.G.; Horan, M.T. ); Nader, S.M. )

    1994-08-01

    Silurian pinnacle reefs are used for gas storage in southern Ontario and southeast Michigan. These reefs underlie surface culture that is frequently incompatible with enhanced reservoir exploitation techniques such as 3-D seismic. Further complications are encountered due to an increased awareness of environmental concerns and past exploration or local production practices. Employing proactive project management in a team-oriented environment, Union Gas Ltd., successfully conducted a 2732 ac 3-D seismic survey in 1993-1994. The project brought together a multidisciplinary team that included company employees, consultants, service companies, and surface landowners. This case history covers the project from conceptualization through the team-building processes and final selection of additional drilling locations. The project management philosophy employed has potential application in the upstream sector.

  4. Sealable joint steel sheet piling for groundwater control and remediation: Case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, D.; Jowett, R.; Gamble, M.

    1997-12-31

    The Waterloo Barrier{trademark} steel sheet piling (patents pending) incorporates a cavity at each interlocking joint that is flushed clean and injected with sealant after the piles have been driven into the ground to form a vertical cutoff wall. The installation and sealing procedures allow for a high degree of quality assurance and control. Bulk wall hydraulic conductivities of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -10} cm/sec have been demonstrated at field installations. Recent case histories are presented in which Waterloo Barrier{trademark} cutoff walls are used to prevent off-site migration of contaminated groundwater or soil gases to adjacent property and waterways. Full enclosures to isolate DNAPL source zones or portions of contaminated aquifers for pilot-scale remediation testing will also be described. Monitoring data will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Waterloo Barrier{trademark} in these applications.

  5. The Development of Dalton's Atomic Theory as a Case Study in the History of Science: Reflections for Educators in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, Hélio Elael Bonini; Porto, Paulo Alves

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of the history of science in science curricula—and specially, in the curricula of science teachers—is a trend that has been followed in several countries. The reasons advanced for the study of the history of science are manifold. This paper presents a case study in the history of chemistry, on the early developments of John Dalton’s atomic theory. Based on the case study, several questions that are worth discussing in educational contexts are pointed out. It is argued that the kind of history of science that was made in the first decades of the twentieth century (encyclopaedic, continuist, essentially anachronistic) is not appropriate for the development of the competences that are expected from the students of sciences in the present. Science teaching for current days will benefit from the approach that may be termed the “new historiography of science”.

  6. Case history and hazard analysis of two lake-damming landslides in the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidinger, Johannes T.

    1998-04-01

    In investigating the hazard and case history of natural dams in the Himalayas, two sites of landslides and their former dammed lakes in the hinterland were visited between May 1994 and October 1995 and analysed from the geomorphological, geotechnical, geohydrological, tectonic, sedimentary and climatic points of view. One of the examples studied, the landslide in the valley of Birahi Ganga (Northern India), is one of the most impressive examples of recent hazards in alpinotype high mountain regions. This study was complemented by a study of the Ghatta Khola landslide (Western Nepal). In both cases, lithotectonic and climatic conditions led to the destabilisation and failure of carbonate bedrock. The occurrence of lakes, dammed over long periods behind the barriers, is of great importance, because after the sometimes fatal landslide event itself, one is confronted and has to cope with a secondary natural hazard, the possibility of a major flood due to the failure of the dam. That is why the preparatory causal factors of the origin of the two lakes (by damming up the river due to the landslide) and their stepwise disappearance (by secondary landslides within the barrier and sedimentation into the basin) were additionally focused upon. It is shown that due to very special circumstances (availability of sediments, heavy rainfall) in the Himalayas there is a progressive decrease in the potential hazard to the landscape and to human beings lower down the main valleys over a period of only a few decades.

  7. Flood History In Karst Environments: The Case of Castellana-grotte (apulia, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, M.

    Karst environments are characterized by peculiar hydrologic features, and in particular by a very limited, if not absent, surface hydrography. Cropping out of carbonate rocks, whose permeability is generally related to fracturing in the rock mass, further enhanced by the development of karst conduits and cavities, force the water to penetrate in depth, with a very limited surface runoff. Nevertheless, on the occasion of clustered rainfall, as well as in case of prolonged precipitations, the network of fracture and conduits may not be able to allow flowing of large amounts of water in the rock mass. Thus, floods may occur. This contribution illustrates the flood history in a classical karst area of Southern Italy, the town of Castellana-Grotte, in Apulia . Castellana-Grotte is worldwide famous due to the marvellous, more than 3-km long, caves, which were explored for the first time in 1938, and soon after that became one of the most visited show caves in Italy. The oldest part of the town lies at the bottom of a karst valley, which was hit by many flood events in the last centuries. At least thirteen of them are documented, and their analysis is the main object of this paper, aimed at reconstructing the flood history at Castellana-Grotte, and the main factors which played a role in distribution and gravity of the related damage. During the first decades of the last century, in order to avoid further catastrophic floods, complex and expensive drainage and channel works, that will also be described in the article, were realized at the site.

  8. Familial history of cancer and childhood acute leukemia: a French population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ripert, Mahaut; Menegaux, Florence; Perel, Yves; Méchinaud, Françoise; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Lamagnére, Jean-Pierre; Margueritte, Geneviève; Boutard, Patrick; Robert, Alain; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Munzer, Martine; Millot, Frédéric; de Lumley, Lionel; Berthou, Christian; Rialland, Xavier; Pautard, Brigitte; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Objective A case-control study was conducted to investigate the role of a familial history of cancer in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia (AL). Methods The history of cancer in the relatives of 472 cases was compared to that of 567 population-based controls. Recruitment was frequency matched on age, gender and region. The familial history of cancer in each child’s relatives was reported by the mother in response to a standardized self-administered questionnaire. Results A familial history of solid tumor in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of ALL (OR=1.6 [1.2–2.1]), while a familial history of hematopoietic malignancies in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of AML (OR=4.3 [1.4–13]). The ORs for the histories of cancer increased with the number of relatives with cancer (OR=1.5 [1.1–2.0] for one relative and OR=2.3 [1.3–3.8] for two relatives or more; ptrend<0.0001). Significant associations between childhood AL and familial history of genital cancers and brain tumor were also observed (OR=2.7 [1.2–5.8], OR=10.7 [1.3–86], respectively). Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that a familial history of cancer may play a role in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. It also evidences some specific associations that require further investigation. PMID:17923819

  9. Histological and molecular biology diagnosis of neurocysticercosis in a patient without history of travel to endemic areas – Case report

    PubMed Central

    L’Ollivier, C.; González, L.M.; Gárate, T.; Martin, L.; Martha, B.; Duong, M.; Huerre, M.; Cuisenier, B.; Harrison, L.J.S.; Dalle, F.; Bonnin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: in endemic areas, neurocysticercosis appears mainly as a single, large, spherical and non-enhancing intracranial cyst. Case presentation: an atypical case of neurocysticercosis (NCC) in a French Caucasian, without history of travel to endemic areas, was confirmed by histology and molecular speciation. Imaging was atypical, showing several hook-bearing scolices visible in the cyst, while the serology employed was non-contributary. Conclusions: NCC should be considered when multiple taeniid scolices are observed within the same cystic lesion. PMID:23193531

  10. Case history of pressure maintenance by gas injection in the 26R gravity drainage reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, M.H.; Yu, J.P.; Moore, D.M.; Ezekwe, N.; Querin, M.E.; Williams, L.L.

    1992-02-01

    This paper is a field case history on the performance of the 26R Reservoir. This is a gravity drainage reservoir under pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection. The 26R Reservoir is a highly layered Stevens turbidite sandstone. The reservoir is located in the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR{number_sign}1) in Elk Hills, Kern County, California. The 26R Reservoir is contained within the steeply dipping southwestern limb of the 31S Anticline. The reservoir had an initial oil column of 1800 feet. Original oil-in-place (OOIP) was estimated at 424 million barrels. Pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection was initiated immediately after production began in October 1976. The total volume of gas injected is about 586 BCF. This exceeds one reservoir pore volume. Reservoir pressure has declined from 3030 psi to 2461 psi. This pressure decline believe to be due to migration of injected gas into the overlaying shale reservoirs. Under the gas injection pressure maintenance strategy, reserves are estimated to be approximately 212 million barrels. Reservoir studies have concluded that the aquifer at the base of the reservoir has been relatively inactive. Well recompletions, deepenings, and horizontal wells are used to improve oil recovery. An aggressive program of controlling gas production began in the mid 1980`s by the installation of multiple packers and sleeves. As the gas-oil contact (GOC) has dropped, sand intervals have subsequently been isolated behind packers. A cased hole logging program was recently undertaken to identify possible remaining reserves in the gas cap. 15 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Dental Treatment Considerations for Children with Complex Medical Histories: A Case of Townes-Brock Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elkaiali, Lujayn; Ratliff, Katelin; Oueis, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    It is common for oral health and dental care to be considered a lesser priority for children with complex medical histories than other aspects of their health care. Often, these patients are at a high risk for caries and infection due to poor oral health practices at home, special or restricted diets, and no early establishment of a dental home for routine dental care. Unfortunately, many of these patients present to their first dental visits with caries and require aggressive treatment, such as extractions instead of pulp therapy, or crowns instead of fillings, due to their high caries risk and the difficulty in safely managing them medically during treatment. A unique example of this occurred at the Children's Hospital of Michigan, where a patient with Townes-Brock syndrome (TBS) presented to the dental clinic with advanced caries. TBS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by major findings such as anomalies of the external ear, imperforate anus, renal malformations, and malformations of the hand. Like many medically complex cases, dental anomalies are not a direct consequence of TBS; however, due to the necessity of high calorie and high sugar feeding supplementation, many of these patients are at high risk for advanced dental caries. Due to this high caries risk, a more aggressive treatment plan is necessary to minimize the risk of recurrent decay and infection. It is critical to stress that even if the disease, syndrome, etc., of a patient does not have inherent dental consequences, it is imperative for regular dental care to be part of the comprehensive treatment plan for these patients. This includes the establishment of a dental home at a young age and proper oral health education of the patient's caregivers and their physicians. In the case of the patient with TBS, recommendations for daily brushing, especially after high sugar feedings was stressed, as well as the reduction of any other sweets within the diet. PMID:26882646

  12. Single-Case Research Methods: History and Suitability for a Psychological Science in Need of Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Parrado, Camilo; López-López, Wilson

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a historical and conceptual analysis of a group of research strategies known as the Single-Case Methods (SCMs). First, we present an overview of the SCMs, their history, and their major proponents. We will argue that the philosophical roots of SCMs can be found in the ideas of authors who recognized the importance of understanding both the generality and individuality of psychological functioning. Second, we will discuss the influence that the natural sciences' attitude toward measurement and experimentation has had on SCMs. Although this influence can be traced back to the early days of experimental psychology, during which incipient forms of SCMs appeared, SCMs reached full development during the subsequent advent of Behavior Analysis (BA). Third, we will show that despite the success of SCMs in BA and other (mainly applied) disciplines, these designs are currently not prominent in psychology. More importantly, they have been neglected as a possible alternative to one of the mainstream approaches in psychology, the Null Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST), despite serious controversies about the limitations of this prevailing method. Our thesis throughout this section will be that SCMs should be considered as an alternative to NHST because many of the recommendations for improving the use of significance testing (Wilkinson & the TFSI, 1999) are main characteristics of SCMs. The paper finishes with a discussion of a number of the possible reasons why SCMs have been neglected. PMID:25876996

  13. Definition of reservoir configuration in ancient glacial environment: case history from Rima field, south Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Penneycard, A.J.

    1986-05-01

    The Al Khlata Formation (Permian-Carboniferous) is an important reservoir unit of the Eastern Flank province of South Oman. The formation consists of an unusual series of glacial sand, silt, shale, and diamictite exhibiting such gross heterogeneity that conventional correlation techniques are ineffective. A threefold palynologic subdivision has been developed, which has allowed the recognition of a number of genetically distinct units. Major periods of erosion separate the units, erosive processes dominating the 20-40 million year period during which the Al Khlata accumulated. Deposition occurred in a sequence of deep valleys cut into the early Al Khlata and underlying Haima (Cambrian-Ordovician) reservoirs. The extent of these deposits is controlled by the morphology of these incisive valleys. A case history of the large Rima field illustrates the use of palynology in unraveling the temporal and spatial relationships of the individual Al Khlata and Haima units. The resultant reservoir-geologic model of this internally complex fields has enabled more confident assessment of variations in well performance with reservoir type, and has guided plans for future offtake levels and overall development planning.

  14. Improving hydrocarbon/water ratios in producing wells - An Indonesian case history study

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, F.O.; Marnoch, E.; Tanggu, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    Excessive water production is consistently burdening the oil industry, especially as lifting and facility costs rise and disposal of produced water becomes increasingly difficult, expensive and environmentally sensitive. A previously developed amphoteric polymer material (APM) (SPE Paper No. 14822) has been successfully applied in Indonesia. This product reduces volumes of produced water and very often increases hydrocarbon production by effectively reducing the permeability to water without significantly changing the formation permeability to hydrocarbons. This paper will review the mechanism, application and associated lab results by which the APM polymer reduces water cut with the primary emphasis on the Indonesian case histories and placement techniques. Results indicate that high permeability sandstone reservoirs, with water production problems, can benefit from APM treatments. The product can successfully and economically reduce water production with the added benefit of increased hydrocarbon production often noted. Laboratory and field results indicate good product application under high shear situations and at temperatures up to 275 {degrees}F. Careful candidate selection and good placement techniques, in conjunction with production logging to determine water location, are important to the success of APM jobs.

  15. Cross-Border Collaboration in History among Nordic Students: A Case Study about Creating Innovative ICT Didactic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spante, Maria; Karlsen, Asgjerd Vea; Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Christiansen, Rene B.

    2014-01-01

    Gränsöverskridande Nordisk Undervisning/Utdanelse (GNU, meaning Cross-Border Nordic Education), the larger Nordic project, under which this case study was carried out, aims at developing innovative, cross-border teaching models in different subject domains in elementary school, including mathematics, language, science, social studies and history.…

  16. A Case Study of Co-Teaching in an Inclusive Secondary High-Stakes World History I Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Hover, Stephanie; Hicks, David; Sayeski, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    In order to provide increasing support for students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms in high-stakes testing contexts, some schools have implemented co-teaching models. This qualitative case study explores how 1 special education teacher (Anna) and 1 general education history teacher (John) make sense of working together in an inclusive…

  17. Four Aspects of Civic Education: Teaching the History and Geography of the Land of Israel as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Aviv

    2009-01-01

    At the center of this study stands the will to understand the use of the subjects of History and Geography as means of civic education. A new theoretical framework is offered, encompassing different aspects of civic education. With the use of this framework, the Israeli educational system was evaluated as a case study. (Contains 1 table, 1 figure,…

  18. Enhancing Moral and Ethical Judgment through the Use of Case Histories: An Ethics Course for Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Danel de García, Mary Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article refers to an action research project involving pre-service teachers. The purpose of this study was to determine if specific learning outcomes could be successfully employed as objectives for an ethics course for preservice teacher preparation. Real life case histories were used by students to identify and reflect upon moral and…

  19. Seismic response in archaeological areas: the case-histories of Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, Stefano; Funiciello, Renato; Rovelli, Antonio

    1999-03-01

    Rome is affected by earthquakes associated to three different seismogenic districts: the Central Apennines area, the Colli Albani volcanic area and the Roman area. The major effects were exclusively due to Apennine seismicity and reached in some cases felt intensities up to VII-VIII degree (MCS scale). The predominant role in the damage distribution seems to be played by the local geological conditions. The historical centre of the city is characterized by the presence of two geomorphologic domains: the alluvial plain of Tiber river and the topographic relieves of Roman Hills, where tradition indicates the first site of the city foundation. In particular, the right river side is characterized by the outcropping of the regional bedrock along the Monte Mario-Gianicolo ridge, while the eastern relieves are the remnants of the Sabatini and Albani volcanic plateau, deeply eroded by the Tiber river and its tributaries during the last glacial low-stand (Würm). These domains are characterized by a large difference in seismic response, due to the high impedance contrast between Holocene coarse deposits filling the Tiber Valley and sedimentary and volcanic Plio-Pleistocene units. Seismic damage observed in 150 monuments of downtown Rome was indicating a significant concentration on alluvial recent deposits. This result was confirmed by the geographical distribution of conservation and retrofitting activities subsequent to main earthquakes, mostly related to local geological conditions. The cases of Marcus Aurelius' Column and Colosseum confirmed the influence of the Holocene alluvial network in local seismic response. During 2500 years of history, the monuments of Rome have `memorized' the seismic effects of historical earthquakes. In some cases, the integration of historical and geological research and macroseismic observations may provide original and useful indications to seismologists to define the seismic response of the city. Local site effects represent a serious

  20. A "Great Roads" Approach to Teaching Modern World History and Latin American Regional Survey Courses: A Veracruz to Mexico City Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James Seay, Jr.; Sullivan-Gonzalez, Douglass

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an innovative way of teaching "World History Since 1500" at Samford University (Birmingham, Alabama) called the "great roads" approach, centered upon important roads in a country's history. Presents the "Veracruz to Mexico City corridor" case study used to teach a Latin American modern history course. (CMK)

  1. The Hidden History of Refugee Schooling in Britain: The Case of the Belgians, 1914-18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the hidden history of refugee schooling in England during 1914-18. Focuses primarily on the Belgian refugee children who escaped to England during World War I. Invites education researchers and historians to include the aspects and issues of refugee schooling to adequately convey a clear picture of educational history. (MER)

  2. Learning about Self-Advocacy from Life History: A Case Study from the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traustadottir, Rannveig

    2006-01-01

    Many people with learning difficulties want to tell the stories of their life and have done so in collaboration with academic researchers. Life histories of people with learning difficulties are a good way to learn about self-advocacy. Life histories can tell us about how self-advocacy began and the support people need to be self-advocates. Tom…

  3. Teaching the Role of Religion in American History: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlinger, Mary Jessica

    1990-01-01

    Recounts how participation in various summer teacher workshops gave the author access to materials for use in teaching about the religious influences in U.S. history. Relates that the National Archives'"Primarily Teaching" workshop revealed primary source documents representing every period in U.S. history. Provides ways these historical documents…

  4. Effects of Authoritarianism on the Teaching of National History: The Case of Latvia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abens, Aija

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on history teaching has begun to focus on political motivation. This paper is the result of the author's dissertation, which investigates Latvian history teaching under the authoritarian regimes of Ulmanis and Stalin. It reveals the effects of authoritarianism on goals, curriculum, teaching materials and methods, and the teacher's…

  5. Space-time analysis of testicular cancer clusters using residential histories: a case-control study in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Chantel D; Nordsborg, Rikke B; Jacquez, Geoffrey M; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Meliker, Jaymie R

    2015-01-01

    Though the etiology is largely unknown, testicular cancer incidence has seen recent significant increases in northern Europe and throughout many Western regions. The most common cancer in males under age 40, age period cohort models have posited exposures in the in utero environment or in early childhood as possible causes of increased risk of testicular cancer. Some of these factors may be tied to geography through being associated with behavioral, cultural, sociodemographic or built environment characteristics. If so, this could result in detectable geographic clusters of cases that could lead to hypotheses regarding environmental targets for intervention. Given a latency period between exposure to an environmental carcinogen and testicular cancer diagnosis, mobility histories are beneficial for spatial cluster analyses. Nearest-neighbor based Q-statistics allow for the incorporation of changes in residency in spatial disease cluster detection. Using these methods, a space-time cluster analysis was conducted on a population-wide case-control population selected from the Danish Cancer Registry with mobility histories since 1971 extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System. Cases (N=3297) were diagnosed between 1991 and 2003, and two sets of controls (N=3297 for each set) matched on sex and date of birth were included in the study. We also examined spatial patterns in maternal residential history for those cases and controls born in 1971 or later (N= 589 case-control pairs). Several small clusters were detected when aligning individuals by year prior to diagnosis, age at diagnosis and calendar year of diagnosis. However, the largest of these clusters contained only 2 statistically significant individuals at their center, and were not replicated in SaTScan spatial-only analyses which are less susceptible to multiple testing bias. We found little evidence of local clusters in residential histories of testicular cancer cases in this Danish population. PMID

  6. Relation between occupational asthma case history, bronchial methacholine challenge, and specific challenge test in patients with suspected occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Huber, H; Degens, P O; Allmers, H; Ammon, J

    1998-02-01

    Inhalative methacholine challenge (MC) was performed in 229 subjects presumed to suffer from occupational asthma due to exposure to airborne latex allergens (n = 62), flour (n = 28), isocyanates (n = 114), or irritants in hairdressers' salons (n = 25). They were also subjected to specific challenges with the occupational agents they were exposed to, completed a questionnaire using an abbreviated version of the ATS-DLD, and were interviewed by an experienced physician. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in MC was defined by the results obtained in a previous study with 81 healthy volunteers. The threshold in these controls was set at a cumulative MC dose of 0.3 mg, corresponding to a sensitivity of 95%. The main purpose of the study was to investigate whether the MC and/or the occupational asthma case history are reliable predictors of the specific challenge test outcomes. In 40-72% of examined subjects, workplace-related asthma complaints occurred, with bronchial hyperreactivity in the MC ranging from 48% to 61%. However, only 12-25% demonstrated a significant bronchoconstructive reaction in the specific challenge test. MC results are only moderately associated with workplace-related asthma case histories. Positive outcomes of challenges with occupational agents are well correlated with positive MC results plus occupational asthma case histories. The combination of MC and occupational asthma case history shows a relatively high specificity (62%, 86%, 80%), but the sensitivity was moderately low (83%, 71%, 52%). MC sensitivities were 92%, 71%, and 62% (case histories of hairdressers were not available). We conclude that in most cases, occupational asthma (as defined by a specific challenge test response) is combined with bronchial hyperresponsiveness and workplace-related asthmatic symptoms. However, subjects of each exposure group demonstrated bronchial hyperresponsiveness and complained of workplace-related asthmatic symptoms, but occupational asthma could not be

  7. Investigation of Nonlinear Site Response and Seismic Compression from Case History Analysis and Laboratory Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Eric

    In this thesis I address a series of issues related to ground failure and ground motions during earthquakes. A major component is the evaluation of cyclic volumetric strain behavior of unsaturated soils, more commonly known as seismic compression, from advanced laboratory testing. Another major component is the application of nonlinear and equivalent linear ground response analyses to large-strain problems involving highly nonlinear dynamic soil behavior. These two components are merged in the analysis of a truly unique and crucial field case history of nonlinear site response and seismic compression. My first topic concerns dynamic soil testing for relatively small strain dynamic soil properties such as threshold strains, gammatv. Such testing is often conducted using specialized devices such as dual-specimen simple-shear, as devices configured for large strain testing produce noisy signals in the small strain range. Working with a simple shear device originally developed for large-strain testing, I extend its low-strain capabilities by characterizing noisy signals and utilizing several statistical methods to extract meaningful responses in the small strain range. I utilize linear regression of a transformed variable to estimate the cyclic shear strain from a noisy signal and the confidence interval on its amplitude. I utilize Kernel regression with the Nadaraya-Watson estimator and a Gaussian kernel to evaluate vertical strain response. A practical utilization of these techniques is illustrated by evaluating threshold shear strains for volume change with a procedure that takes into account uncertainties in the measured shear and vertical strains. My second topic concerns the seismic compression characteristics of non-plastic and low-plasticity silty sands with varying fines content (10 ≤ FC ≤ 60%). Simple shear testing was performed on various sand-fines mixtures at a range of modified Proctor relative compaction levels ( RC) and degrees-of-saturation (S

  8. Human exposure to natural uranium: A case history and analytical results from some postmortem tissues

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, J. K.; Dyson, E. D.; Hislop, J. S.; Leach, A. M.; Spoor, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    Donoghue, J. K., Dyson, E. D., Hislop, J. S., Leach, A. M., and Spoor, N. L. (1972).Brit. J. industr. Med.,29, 81-89. Human exposure to natural uranium: a case history and analytical results from some postmortem tissues. After the collapse and sudden death of an employee who had worked for 10 years in a natural uranium workshop, in which the airborne uranium was largely U3O8 with an Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter in the range 3·5-6·0 μm and average concentration of 300 μg/m3, his internal organs were analysed for uranium. The tissues examined included lungs (1041 g), pulmonary lymph nodes (12 g), sternum (114 g), and kidneys (217 g). Uranium was estimated by neutron activation analysis, using irradiated tissue ash, and counting the delayed neutrons from uranium-235. The concentrations of uranium (μg U/g wet tissue) in the lungs, lymph nodes, sternum, and kidneys were 1·2, 1·8, 0·09, and 0·14 respectively. The weights deposited in the lungs and lymph nodes are less than 1% of the amounts calculated from the environmental data using the parameters currently applied in radiological protection. The figures are compatible with those reported by Quigley, heartherton, and Ziegler in 1958 and by Meichen in 1962. The relation between these results, the environmental exposure data, and biological monitoring data is discussed in the context of current views on the metabolism of inhaled insoluble uranium. PMID:5060250

  9. Areal 3-D seismic technique for reservoir delineation: Case history from offshore Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Idowu, A.O. )

    1993-02-01

    In the 1950s, early exploration period in the Niger Delta witnessed the use of 2-D (two dimensional) seismic reflection method which adequate for imaging large subsurface geologic features including growth faulting and roll-over anticlines. This technique involves the Common-Depth-Point method (CDP) which acquires a plane of seismic information in distance along the surface and in time into the geological section, and is used to improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, to remove multiples and consequently give a representation of the subsurface particularly if the data are collected up- or downdip. By mid-1980s, the obvious geological structures have, in general, been discovered and it became necessary to adopt a more sophisticated technique such as the 3-D (three dimensional) seismic method to delineate more subtle reservoirs and resolve complex fault patterns in order to aid exploration as well as facilitate efficient field development. The case history discussed in this paper involves the use of areal 3-D seismic method for delineating the reservoir characterization of the O-field located in a shallow water area of the western Niger Delta. The areal 3-D seismic technique is superior to the earlier CDP method in that a cube of seismic data can be collected in two dimensions in space and one in time by a variety of techniques including the swath seismic shooting pattern adopted for gathering the 3-D data for the O-field's reservoir which involves the line of sources. The objective is to adequately sample the subsurface so that changes in various parameters such as the amplitude phase or power in the siesmic signal or velocity of propagation can be mapped areally and interpreted as an indication of changes in the physical properties of the rock matrix.

  10. Case history: Failure analysis of a 16K ROM with a polysilicon gate defect

    SciTech Connect

    Mikawa, R.E.; Campbell, A.N.

    1993-08-01

    This case history presents the analysis of a very unusual CMOS 2K {times} 8 read only memory (ROM) failure. The IC failure was discovered after a 1,000 hour, 150{degree}C static life test. Elevated quiescent power supply current was present that caused the IC to fail parametric testing, but the IC was fully functional at the specified operating power supply voltage of 10 V. Functional failures were ``forced`` by operating the IC at below nominal voltage. Electron beam probing and dynamic voltage contrast imaging performed while the IC was in the functional failing mode indicated the presence of an electrical open circuit in the polysilicon gate interconnect of a p-channel transistor. The IC was deprocessed down to the polysilicon and the defective gate was examined with a scanning electron microscope. An abrupt change in microstructure was observed at the location corresponding to the site of electrical discontinuity. Circuit simulations, performed using a series gate resistance to model the defective gate, showed that the gate signal to the p-channel transistor changed phase and high current was present if the gate resistance exceeded 1 {times} 10{sup 9} ohms. The change in microstructure and increased gate resistance are consistent with a localized reduction of dopant (phosphorus) concentration. During the life test, it is speculated that phosphorus segregated to the grain boundaries resulting in a net reduction of dopant atoms and a corresponding decrease in the conductivity of the polysilicon gate. This IC failure is apparently due to dopant segregation and carrier trapping at the grain boundaries in the polysilicon during the high temperature life test.

  11. The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study

    SciTech Connect

    1982-07-01

    This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of

  12. Mining and Visualizing Family History Associations in the Electronic Health Record: A Case Study for Pediatric Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Elizabeth S.; Melton, Genevieve B.; Wasserman, Richard C.; Rosenau, Paul T.; Howard, Diantha B.; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic childhood disease and has seen increasing prevalence worldwide. While there is existing evidence of familial and other risk factors for pediatric asthma, there is a need for further studies to explore and understand interactions among these risk factors. The goal of this study was to develop an approach for mining, visualizing, and evaluating association rules representing pairwise interactions among potential familial risk factors based on information documented as part of a patient’s family history in the electronic health record. As a case study, 10,260 structured family history entries for a cohort of 1,531 pediatric asthma patients were extracted and analyzed to generate family history associations at different levels of granularity. The preliminary results highlight the potential of this approach for validating known knowledge and suggesting opportunities for further investigation that may contribute to improving prediction of asthma risk in children. PMID:26958171

  13. Bayesian History Matching of Complex Infectious Disease Models Using Emulation: A Tutorial and a Case Study on HIV in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Andrianakis, Ioannis; Vernon, Ian R.; McCreesh, Nicky; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Oakley, Jeremy E.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Goldstein, Michael; White, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in scientific computing have allowed the development of complex models that are being routinely applied to problems in disease epidemiology, public health and decision making. The utility of these models depends in part on how well they can reproduce empirical data. However, fitting such models to real world data is greatly hindered both by large numbers of input and output parameters, and by long run times, such that many modelling studies lack a formal calibration methodology. We present a novel method that has the potential to improve the calibration of complex infectious disease models (hereafter called simulators). We present this in the form of a tutorial and a case study where we history match a dynamic, event-driven, individual-based stochastic HIV simulator, using extensive demographic, behavioural and epidemiological data available from Uganda. The tutorial describes history matching and emulation. History matching is an iterative procedure that reduces the simulator's input space by identifying and discarding areas that are unlikely to provide a good match to the empirical data. History matching relies on the computational efficiency of a Bayesian representation of the simulator, known as an emulator. Emulators mimic the simulator's behaviour, but are often several orders of magnitude faster to evaluate. In the case study, we use a 22 input simulator, fitting its 18 outputs simultaneously. After 9 iterations of history matching, a non-implausible region of the simulator input space was identified that was times smaller than the original input space. Simulator evaluations made within this region were found to have a 65% probability of fitting all 18 outputs. History matching and emulation are useful additions to the toolbox of infectious disease modellers. Further research is required to explicitly address the stochastic nature of the simulator as well as to account for correlations between outputs. PMID:25569850

  14. Bayesian history matching of complex infectious disease models using emulation: a tutorial and a case study on HIV in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Andrianakis, Ioannis; Vernon, Ian R; McCreesh, Nicky; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Oakley, Jeremy E; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Goldstein, Michael; White, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    Advances in scientific computing have allowed the development of complex models that are being routinely applied to problems in disease epidemiology, public health and decision making. The utility of these models depends in part on how well they can reproduce empirical data. However, fitting such models to real world data is greatly hindered both by large numbers of input and output parameters, and by long run times, such that many modelling studies lack a formal calibration methodology. We present a novel method that has the potential to improve the calibration of complex infectious disease models (hereafter called simulators). We present this in the form of a tutorial and a case study where we history match a dynamic, event-driven, individual-based stochastic HIV simulator, using extensive demographic, behavioural and epidemiological data available from Uganda. The tutorial describes history matching and emulation. History matching is an iterative procedure that reduces the simulator's input space by identifying and discarding areas that are unlikely to provide a good match to the empirical data. History matching relies on the computational efficiency of a Bayesian representation of the simulator, known as an emulator. Emulators mimic the simulator's behaviour, but are often several orders of magnitude faster to evaluate. In the case study, we use a 22 input simulator, fitting its 18 outputs simultaneously. After 9 iterations of history matching, a non-implausible region of the simulator input space was identified that was 10(11) times smaller than the original input space. Simulator evaluations made within this region were found to have a 65% probability of fitting all 18 outputs. History matching and emulation are useful additions to the toolbox of infectious disease modellers. Further research is required to explicitly address the stochastic nature of the simulator as well as to account for correlations between outputs. PMID:25569850

  15. Cognitive theories as reinforcement history surrogates: the case of likelihood ratio models of human recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Wixted, John T; Gaitan, Santino C

    2002-11-01

    B. F. Skinner (1977) once argued that cognitive theories are essentially surrogates for the organism's (usually unknown) reinforcement history. In this article, we argue that this notion applies rather directly to a class of likelihood ratio models of human recognition memory. The point is not that such models are fundamentally flawed or that they are not useful and should be abandoned. Instead, the point is that the role of reinforcement history in shaping memory decisions could help to explain what otherwise must be explained by assuming that subjects are inexplicably endowed with the relevant distributional information and computational abilities. To the degree that a role for an organism's reinforcement history is appreciated, the importance of animal memory research in understanding human memory comes into clearer focus. As Skinner was also fond of pointing out, it is only in the animal laboratory that an organism's history of reinforcement can be precisely controlled and its effects on behavior clearly understood. PMID:12593322

  16. Towards a History of Moral Education: Some Fundamental Considerations and a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruneau, William Arthur

    1975-01-01

    Presents definitions and understandings of moral education, surveys some historical techniques likely to yield starting points for work on a history of moral education, and examines John Locke's theory and practice of moral education. (Author/IRT)

  17. Effectiveness of Using Mobile Phone Image Capture for Collecting Secondary Data: A Case Study on Immunization History Data Among Children in Remote Areas of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Jandee, Kasemsak; Khamsiriwatchara, Amnat; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Wongwit, Waranya; Wansatid, Peerawat

    2015-01-01

    Background Entering data onto paper-based forms, then digitizing them, is a traditional data-management method that might result in poor data quality, especially when the secondary data are incomplete, illegible, or missing. Transcription errors from source documents to case report forms (CRFs) are common, and subsequently the errors pass from the CRFs to the electronic database. Objective This study aimed to demonstrate the usefulness and to evaluate the effectiveness of mobile phone camera applications in capturing health-related data, aiming for data quality and completeness as compared to current routine practices exercised by government officials. Methods In this study, the concept of “data entry via phone image capture” (DEPIC) was introduced and developed to capture data directly from source documents. This case study was based on immunization history data recorded in a mother and child health (MCH) logbook. The MCH logbooks (kept by parents) were updated whenever parents brought their children to health care facilities for immunization. Traditionally, health providers are supposed to key in duplicate information of the immunization history of each child; both on the MCH logbook, which is returned to the parents, and on the individual immunization history card, which is kept at the health care unit to be subsequently entered into the electronic health care information system (HCIS). In this study, DEPIC utilized the photographic functionality of mobile phones to capture images of all immunization-history records on logbook pages and to transcribe these records directly into the database using a data-entry screen corresponding to logbook data records. DEPIC data were then compared with HCIS data-points for quality, completeness, and consistency. Results As a proof-of-concept, DEPIC captured immunization history records of 363 ethnic children living in remote areas from their MCH logbooks. Comparison of the 2 databases, DEPIC versus HCIS, revealed

  18. Nature and History of Cenozoic Polar Ice Covers: The Case of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielhagen, R.; Thiede, J.

    2009-04-01

    The nature of the modern climate System is characterized by steep temperature gradients between the tropical and polar climatic zones and finds its most spectacular expression in the formation of ice caps in high Northern and Southern latitudes. While polar regions of Planet Earth have been glaciated repeatedly in the long course of their geological history, the Cenozoic transition from a „greenhouse" to an „icehouse" has in fact produced a unique climatic scenario with bipolar glacation, different from all previous glacial events. The Greenland ice sheet is a remainder of the Northern Hemisphere last glacial maximum ice sheets and represents hence a spectacular anomaly. Geological records from Tertiary and Quaternary terrestrial and oceanic sections have documented the presence of ice caps and sea ice covers both on the Southern as well on the Northern hemisphere since Eocene times, aqpprox. 45 Mio. years ago. While this was well known in the case of Antarctica already for some time, previous ideas about the origin of Northern hemisphere glaciation during Pliocene times (approx. 2-3 Mio. years ago) have been superceded by the dramatic findings of coarse, terrigenous ice rafted detritus in Eocene sediments from Lomonosov Ridge (close to the North Pole) apparently slightly older than the oldest Antarctic records of ice rafting.The histories of the onset of Cenozoic glaciation in high Northern and Southern latitudes remain enigmatic and are presently subjects of international geological drilling projects, with prospects to reveal some of their secrets over the coming decades. By virtue of the physical porperties of ice and the processes controlling the dynamics of the turn-over of the ice-sheets only young records of glacial ice caps on Antarctica and on Greemnland have been preserved, on Greenland with ice probably not older than a few hundred thousand years, on Antarctica potentially as old as 1.5-2 Mio. years. Deep-sea cores with their records od ice

  19. Two cases of Temple-Baraitser syndrome: natural history and further delineation of the clinical and radiologic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Joseph J

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on two individuals with Temple-Baraitser syndrome, manifesting typical hallux and pollex findings, global developmental delay, and seizures. In the five previous cases identified to date, consistent craniofacial and osseous characteristics have been observed. The children described herein exhibit minor differences within this phenotype and are older, highlighting the phenotypic variability and natural history of the clinical and radiographic findings. PMID:25629734

  20. Two cases of Temple–Baraitser syndrome: natural history and further delineation of the clinical and radiologic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on two individuals with Temple–Baraitser syndrome, manifesting typical hallux and pollex findings, global developmental delay, and seizures. In the five previous cases identified to date, consistent craniofacial and osseous characteristics have been observed. The children described herein exhibit minor differences within this phenotype and are older, highlighting the phenotypic variability and natural history of the clinical and radiographic findings. PMID:25629734

  1. The Great Depression: A Textbook Case of Problems with American History Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Steven L.; Rose, Stephen A.

    1983-01-01

    The 16 US history textbooks reviewed failed to incorporate economists' research on the causes of the Great Depression and consistently presented information that the economics profession has rejected. Strategies that social studies educators might adopt to improve the quality of economic analysis in textbooks is suggested. (Author/RM)

  2. Therapeutic Intervention in a Case of Ataxic Dysarthria Associated with a History of Amateur Boxing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to (a) describe the presenting features of ataxic dysarthria present in a participant with a long history of amateur boxing, (b) describe a novel application of behavioral principles in the treatment of this participant, and (c) discuss implications in the treatment of ataxic dysarthria secondary to boxing. The…

  3. Literacy in the History Classroom: A Cross Case Analysis of Teacher Implemented Participatory Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'warte, Jacqueline Ann

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study researches a participatory action research project undertaken by 12 history teachers in two urban school districts. In this project middle and high school teachers were engaged in a yearlong action research project that involved them in implementing literacy strategies within their classrooms and reflecting on the use and…

  4. Bridging the Two Cultures: The Case of Science and Natural History Filmmaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Walter C.

    2007-01-01

    At Montana State University's Master of Fine Arts program in Science and Natural History Filmmaking, our goal is to re-invent these areas of documentary by admitting students with undergraduate science degrees and teaching them both production and film studies in an intensive three-year curriculum. In the course I teach, "Criticism and…

  5. History and Philosophy of Science through Models: Some Challenges in the Case of "The Atom".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justi, Rosaria; Gilbert, John

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that the contribution of history and philosophy of science (HPS) to science education can be enhanced through a consideration of scientific models. Analyzes the curriculum and textbooks for 14-16 year olds in Brazil and the United Kingdom and identifies the use of hybrid models. (Contains 35 references.) (Author/YDS)

  6. Discovering History Through Artifacts. Case Study: Kingdom of Tigram II "The Great."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacobian, Mossik

    This student booklet, one in a series of seven instructional materials dealing with the history and culture of Armenian Americans, guides junior high school students through the process of discovering information about the past. The materials may be presented in four sessions. Session I introduces students to the concept of historiography through…

  7. Is Our History of Educational Philosophy Mostly Wrong?: The Case of Isocrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, James R.

    2005-01-01

    There are two very different accounts of the history of educational philosophy and ideas presently available. One account is the work of historical scholars and classicists, and is based on thorough historical research. The other account is the work of educationists and philosophers, and is generally based on little or no historical research in…

  8. Using "Master Narratives" to Teach History: The Case of the Civil Rights Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Narratives encompass ways of thinking historically and several skills of the historian, and Tom Holt believes it is imperative that educators teach--and their students learn--how to construct historical narratives. Understanding and constructing history as narratives opens up the historical project for students. Moreover, demonstrating how…

  9. The Ethnic "Other" in Ukrainian History Textbooks: The Case of Russia and the Russians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janmaat, Jan Germen

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines portrayals of Russia and the Russians in two generations of Ukrainian history textbooks. It observes that the textbooks are highly condemning of Ukraine's main ethnic other in the guise of foreign ruler: the tsarist authorities and the Soviet regime are always attributed dubious and malicious intentions even if there is…

  10. History and Philosophy of Science through Models: The Case of Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justi, Rosaria; Gilbert, John K.

    1999-01-01

    A greater role for the history and philosophy of science in science education can only be realized if it is based on both a credible analytical approach--such as that of Lakatos--and if the evolution of a sufficient number of major themes in science is known in suitable detail. Considers chemical kinetics as an example topic. Contains 62…

  11. The Natural History of Acute Recovery of Blast-Induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Series During War.

    PubMed

    Larres, David T; Carr, Walter; Gonzales, Elizandro G; Hawley, Jason S

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) secondary to blast exposure is a common injury in the Global War on Terrorism, but little is known about the acute effects, recovery, pathophysiology, and neuropathology of blast-induced mild TBI (mTBI) in humans in a battlefield environment. Moreover, there is ongoing debate whether blast-induced mTBI is a different injury with a unique pathophysiology compared with mTBI from blunt trauma. In the case series reported here from Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, 15 military service members with acute concussion/mTBI associated with blast exposure were evaluated within the first 24 hours after concussion and on days 2, 3, 5, and 7 with a Graded Symptom Checklist and a balance assessment, the Balance Error Scoring System. These data suggest that the recovery in blast-induced mTBI follows the pattern of recovery in sports-related concussion reported in The National Collegiate Athletic Association Concussion Study. In this retrospective case series, we provide the first description of the natural history of acute recovery in blast-induced mTBI, and we suspect, given our experience treating military service members, that further observations of the natural history of recovery in blast-induced mTBI will continue to mirror the natural history of recovery in sports concussion. PMID:27168549

  12. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the environmental restoration program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues on the environmental restoration process at US Department of Energy sites. PNL selected three remediation projects to study: (1) the 618-9 Burial Ground Expedited Removal Action at the Hanford Site, (2) the Chemical Consolidation Interim Response Action at the Weldon Spring Site, (3) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Removal Action and VOC-Arid Integration Demonstration at the Hanford Site. The first two case studies involve sites where a remediation activity has been complete. The third case study involves a remediation activity in its early stages of development. This study identifies OSH issues related to actual cleanup, time, documentation, training, and technology development. These issues need to be considered by DOE before making long-term planning efforts. Section 4.0 of this report describes recommendations for addressing these issues.

  13. Science Fairs and Observational Science: A Case History from Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Having judged dozens of science fairs over the years, I am repeatedly disturbed by the ground rules under which students must prepare their entries. They are almost invariably required to follow the "scientific method," involving formulating a hypothesis, a test of the hypothesis, and then a project in which this test is carried out. As a research scientist for over 40 years, I consider this approach to science fairs fundamentally unsound. It is not only too restrictive, but actually avoids the most important (and difficult) part of scientific research: recognizing a scientific problem in the first place. A well-known example is one of the problems that, by his own account, stimulated Einstein's theory of special relativity: the obvious fact that when an electric current is induced in a conductor by a magnetic field , it makes no difference whether the field or the conductor is actually (so to speak) moving. There is in other words no such thing as absolute motion. Physics was transformed by Einstein's recognition of a problem. Most competent scientists can solve problems after they have been recognized and a hypothesis properly formulated, but the ability to find problems in the first Place is much rarer. Getting down to specifics, the "scientific method" under which almost all students must operate is actually the experimental method, involving controlled variables, one of which, ideally, is changed at a time. However, there is another type of science that can be called observational science. As it happens, almost all the space research I have carried out since 1959 has been this type, not experimental science.

  14. Migration and generation of contaminants from launch through recovery: LDEF case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, E. R.; Nishimura, L. S.; Warner, K. J.; Wascher, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible to recreate the contamination history of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) through an analysis of its contaminants and selective samples that were collected from surfaces with better documented exposure histories. This data was then used to compare estimates based on monitoring methods that were selected for the purpose of tracking LDEF's exposure to contaminants. The LDEF experienced much more contamination than would have been assumed based on the monitors. Work is still in progress but much of what was learned so far is already being used in the selection of materials and in the design of systems for space. Now experiments are being prepared for flight to resolve questions created by the discoveries on the LDEF. A summary of what was learned about LDEF contaminants over the first year since recovery and deintegration is presented. Over 35 specific conclusions in 5 contamination related categories are listed.

  15. Lifestyle, Family History, and Risk of Idiopathic Parkinson Disease: A Large Danish Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F.; Ritz, Beate; Andersen, Klaus K.; Christensen, Jane; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Hansen, Johnni; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja H.; Olsen, Jørgen H.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations of these factors with idiopathic PD among 1,808 Danish patients who were diagnosed in 1996–2009 and matched to 1,876 randomly selected population controls. Although there was a downward trend in duration of smoking, this was not observed for daily tobacco consumption. A moderate intake of caffeine (3.1–5 cups/day) was associated with a lower odds ratio for PD (0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 0.62), as was a moderate intake of alcohol (3.1–7 units/week) (odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.58, 0.84); a higher daily intake did not reduce the odds further. When these behaviors were studied in combination with smoking, the odds ratios were lower than those for each one alone. Compared with never smokers with no family history of PD, never smokers who did have a family history had an odds ratio of 2.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.91, 4.13); for smokers with a family history, the odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.23). In conclusion, duration of smoking seems to be more important than intensity in the relationship between smoking and idiopathic PD. The finding of lower risk estimates for smoking in combination with caffeine or alcohol requires further confirmation. PMID:25925389

  16. [History of an epidemiological route between Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso: the case of the Koudougou sleeping sickness foci].

    PubMed

    Kiendrébéogo, D; Kambiré, R; Jamonneau, V; Lingué, K; Solano, P; Courtin, F

    2012-11-01

    In the first half of the XXth century, while Upper-Volta (now Burkina Faso) was suffering a terrible epidemic of sleeping sickness, the French colonial administration encouraged the movement of people from Upper-Volta to Ivory Coast to meet their demands for labour. This led to the establishment of Mossi villages, such as those of Koudougou, in the Ivorian forest with populations originating from areas of Upper-Volta that were not only densely populated but also severely affected by sleeping sickness. Since 2000, most cases of sleeping sickness in the Koudougou district of Burkina Faso have been in people originally from Ivory Coast. Who are they? Where did they settle in Burkina Faso? Where do they come from in Ivory Coast? After having retraced the epidemiological history of Koudougou villages in Burkina Faso and Ivory Coast, the history of ten cases of sleeping sickness detected passively at Koudougou hospital since 2000 were analysed. All cases originated from the forest area of Ivory Coast. Understanding the spread of sleeping sickness between Burkina Faso and Ivory Coast will assist in the identification of areas of disease risk. PMID:23193525

  17. An Evaluation of a Prototype JOBS Program Using an Event History Analysis of AFDC Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Thomas R.; Pillai, Vijayan K.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluation of the work experience and job training (WEJT) program of Kenosha County (Wisconsin) suggests that it has no effect on length of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), a preventive impact on AFDC cases headed by never-married African-American teenagers, and a negative impact on unemployed parent cases. (SLD)

  18. A Practice Concepts Symposium on Drug Misuse in the Elderly: Examination of a Case History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstone, Barbara; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Set of articles consisting of an introduction (Barbara Silverstone, et al.) and case study concerning drug misuse in the elderly, and six papers examining the case from the perspectives of clinical pharmacology (William Simonson); pharmacology (Peter Lamy); psychiatry (Charles Gaitz and Nancy Wilson); nursing (Delores Alford); social work (Janet…

  19. Case History Report: Immediate Rehabilitation with a Prefabricated Fibula Flap Following Removal of a Locally Aggressive Maxillary Tumor.

    PubMed

    Nkenke, Emeka; Agaimy, Abbas; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Lell, Michael; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Eitner, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The present clinical case history report describes an interdisciplinary treatment protocol that combines maxillary tumor resection with immediate reconstruction to achieve functional rehabilitation. A fibula flap that received four dental implants and a split-thickness graft epithelial layer was prefabricated for a 31-year-old man. The flap was designed so that it could be adapted to fit in different extents of tumor resection. Resection and immediate reconstruction were successfully performed 6 weeks after flap prefabrication, with the final bar-retained dental prosthesis delivered 4 weeks later. PMID:26757329

  20. Case histories of recently implemented technologies for citrus-processing energy-efficiency improvement. Volume II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    For each of six citrus industry sites where energy efficiency improvement technologies have been implemented, a case history is presented which describes the implemented technology, its investment cost, and the energy and cost savings. The technologies are: double pressing in feed mill operation; evaporator microprocessor controller; feed mill vent stack controller; addition of a waste heat evaporator to a feed mill; enhanced lime reaction for improved pressing and dewatering in a feed mill, and added effect to a temperature-accelerated short-time evaporator. (LEW)

  1. Fixed full-arch implant-supported prostheses in a patient with epidermolysis bullosa: a clinical case history report.

    PubMed

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Guzmán-Letelier, Marcelo; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare skin disorder characterized by blister formation in response to minor trauma and accompanied by extracutaneous manifestations. The use of endosseous implants to support fixed prostheses for the rehabilitation of patients with recessive dystrophic EB might provide a considerably better clinical treatment outcome than traditional prosthodontic interventions. This case history report describes the clinical management of such an afflicted patient. Implants were placed immediately following teeth extractions and subsequently loaded with fixed full-arch prostheses. This treatment option is proposed for patients with recessive dystrophic EB to preclude mucosal irritation associated with wearing removable prostheses. PMID:25588170

  2. Clarifying differences in natural history between models of screening: The case of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Knudsen, Amy B.; Zauber, Ann G.; Savarino, James; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Boer, Rob; Feuer, Eric J.; Habbema, J. Dik F.; Kuntz, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Microsimulation models are important decision support tools for screening. However, their complexity creates a barrier, making it difficult to understand models and, as a result, limiting realization of their full potential. Therefore, it is important to develop documentation that clarifies assumptions. We demonstrate this problem and explore a solution for the natural history, using three independently developed colorectal cancer screening models. Methods We begin by projecting the cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy screening for the three microsimulation models. Next, we provide a conventional presentation of each of them, including information that would usually be published with a decision analysis. Finally, for the three models, we provide the simulated reduction in clinical cancer incidence following a one-time complete removal of adenomas and preclinical cancers. We denote this measure as maximum clinical incidence reduction (MCLIR). Results There are considerable between-model differences in projected effectiveness. Conventional documentation describes model structure and associated parameter values. Given only this information, it is very difficult to compare models, largely because differences in structure make parameter values incomparable. In contrast, the MCLIR clearly shows the differences in assumptions on the key issue of the natural history: the dwell time of progressive preclinical disease, explaining between-model differences in projected effectiveness. Conclusions The simulated “maximum clinical incidence reduction” adds to the insight in dwell time, the critical characteristic of the natural history of disease, and how it differs between models. Inclusion of the MCLIR as a standard description would clarify the implications of assumptions for models applied to screening questions. PMID:21673187

  3. An Autopsy Case of Fulminant Amebic Colitis in a Patient with a History of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Naoko; Nagasawa, Miho; Nakanishi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Generally, amebic colitis is localized around the mucosal membrane and often accompanied by diarrhea and abdominal pain. We describe a patient with a history of rheumatoid arthritis who had received prolonged steroid therapy. The patient complained of breathing difficulties because of rheumatoid lung disease. Although the patient was given antibacterial agent, the symptoms did not improve until death. We did an autopsy and found that he had fulminant amebic colitis, although the patient was not previously examined. Histochemical analysis revealed severe inflammation and full-thickness necrosis of the colon by ameba, suggesting the involvement of ameba in the progression of the overall condition. PMID:27382497

  4. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  5. Teaching Nineteenth Century Afro-American History: The Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Barbara R.

    1979-01-01

    In this case study approach, teaching episodes designed using Richard Wade's thesis concerning slavery in the city are presented. Episodes include studies of Jacksonville, Florida, Savannah, Georgia, and New Orleans, Louisiana. (Author/RLV)

  6. Disparity between adjusted and actual opening cerebrospinal fluid pressure in a patient with the Codman Hakim programmable valve: occult form of shunt failure due to head banging. Case report.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Shimizu, Satoru; Utsuki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Sachio; Oka, Hidehiro; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2006-11-01

    Although the Codman Hakim programmable valve (CHPV) system is popular, several problems arising from its design have been described. The authors report an additional cause of shunt failure associated with the use of the CHPV system. A 7-year-old girl who had previously undergone placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with the CHPV system was admitted in a comatose state. Radiography did not demonstrate any breakage or change in the opening pressure of the valve. Manual pumping of the valve resulted in neurological improvement and shrinkage of the girl's ventricles. However, ventriculomegaly was again observed several hours later, and an emergency valve revision was performed. The manufacturer's examination of the extracted valve revealed a crack on the surface of the hard plastic housing covering the valve chamber, which appeared to be suggestive of some type of blunt trauma. In addition, the flat spring that transmitted resistance from the pressure control cam to the valve ball was deformed in such a manner that it caused excessive pressure against the valve ball. Because of this deformity, the actual opening pressure in this patient had reached a maximum level of 226 mm H2O instead of the adjusted pressure of 60 mm H2O. In patients with the CHPV system whose medical history is difficult to ascertain, the possibility of damage to the valve spring and the need for a prompt revision surgery should be considered. The authors conclude that placement of the CHPV system may be contraindicated in patients with a known habit of head banging. PMID:17328269

  7. Family history of hormonal cancers and colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study conducted in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji-Hyun; Cotterchio, Michelle; Gallinger, Steven; Knight, Julia A; Daftary, Darshana

    2009-08-15

    Aggregation of cancers among families with highly penetrant genetic mutations such as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is well-described. However, there is a paucity of data regarding familial aggregation of hormonal cancers (cancers of the breast, endometrial, ovarian and prostate) and colorectal cancer (CRC) in the general population. We investigated the association between having a first-degree family history of breast, endometrial, ovarian, or prostate cancer and CRC risk. Population-based CRC cases and controls were recruited by the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry (OFCCR). Logistic regression was conducted to obtain odds ratio (OR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). First-degree family history of breast cancer was associated with a modest, borderline statistically significant increased CRC risk (age-, sex-adjusted OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.5). The magnitude of CRC risk was greatest if more than one first-degree kin had breast cancer (age-, sex-adjusted OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.0, 2.0), as well as if the kin was diagnosed at >50 years of age (age-, sex-adjusted OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.8). Family history of ovarian cancer was associated with reduced CRC risk (multivariate-adjusted OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.3, 1.0). Although statistically significant increases in CRC risk were observed in the age-, sex-adjusted OR estimates for family history of endometrial and prostate cancers, the associations were no longer significant after multivariate-adjustment. In conclusion, individuals with a first-degree kin with breast cancer may have a modest increased risk for CRC compared to individuals without. PMID:19437533

  8. Space-Time Clustering of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Using Residential Histories in a Danish Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baastrup Nordsborg, Rikke; Meliker, Jaymie R.; Kjær Ersbøll, Annette; Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a frequent cancer and incidence rates have increased markedly during the second half of the 20th century; however, the few established risk factors cannot explain this rise and still little is known about the aetiology of NHL. Spatial analyses have been applied in an attempt to identify environmental risk factors, but most studies do not take human mobility into account. The aim of this study was to identify clustering of NHL in space and time in Denmark, using 33 years of residential addresses. We utilised the nation-wide Danish registers and unique personal identification number that all Danish citizens have to conduct a register-based case-control study of 3210 NHL cases and two independent control groups of 3210 each. Cases were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry and controls were matched by age and sex and randomly selected from the Civil Registration System. Residential addresses of cases and controls from 1971 to 2003 were collected from the Civil Registration System and geocoded. Data on pervious hospital diagnoses and operations were obtained from the National Patient Register. We applied the methods of the newly developed Q-statistics to identify space-time clustering of NHL. All analyses were conducted with each of the two control groups, and we adjusted for previous history of autoimmune disease, HIV/AIDS or organ transplantation. Some areas with statistically significant clustering were identified; however, results were not consistent across the two control groups; thus we interpret the results as chance findings. We found no evidence for clustering of NHL in space and time using 33 years of residential histories, suggesting that if the rise in incidence of NHL is a result of risk factors that vary across space and time, the spatio-temporal variation of such factors in Denmark is too small to be detected with the applied method. PMID:23560108

  9. Space-time clustering of non-hodgkin lymphoma using residential histories in a Danish case-control study.

    PubMed

    Baastrup Nordsborg, Rikke; Meliker, Jaymie R; Kjær Ersbøll, Annette; Jacquez, Geoffrey M; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a frequent cancer and incidence rates have increased markedly during the second half of the 20(th) century; however, the few established risk factors cannot explain this rise and still little is known about the aetiology of NHL. Spatial analyses have been applied in an attempt to identify environmental risk factors, but most studies do not take human mobility into account. The aim of this study was to identify clustering of NHL in space and time in Denmark, using 33 years of residential addresses. We utilised the nation-wide Danish registers and unique personal identification number that all Danish citizens have to conduct a register-based case-control study of 3210 NHL cases and two independent control groups of 3210 each. Cases were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry and controls were matched by age and sex and randomly selected from the Civil Registration System. Residential addresses of cases and controls from 1971 to 2003 were collected from the Civil Registration System and geocoded. Data on pervious hospital diagnoses and operations were obtained from the National Patient Register. We applied the methods of the newly developed Q-statistics to identify space-time clustering of NHL. All analyses were conducted with each of the two control groups, and we adjusted for previous history of autoimmune disease, HIV/AIDS or organ transplantation. Some areas with statistically significant clustering were identified; however, results were not consistent across the two control groups; thus we interpret the results as chance findings. We found no evidence for clustering of NHL in space and time using 33 years of residential histories, suggesting that if the rise in incidence of NHL is a result of risk factors that vary across space and time, the spatio-temporal variation of such factors in Denmark is too small to be detected with the applied method. PMID:23560108

  10. History of chickenpox in glioma risk: a report from the glioma international case-control study (GICC).

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan; Scheurer, Michael E; Zhou, Renke; Wrensch, Margaret R; Armstrong, Georgina N; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H; Lau, Ching C; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic α-herpesvirus that causes chickenpox and establishes life-long latency in the cranial nerve and dorsal root ganglia of the host. To date, VZV is the only virus consistently reported to have an inverse association with glioma. The Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC) is a large, multisite consortium with data on 4533 cases and 4171 controls collected across five countries. Here, we utilized the GICC data to confirm the previously reported associations between history of chickenpox and glioma risk in one of the largest studies to date on this topic. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling, we found that a positive history of chickenpox was associated with a 21% lower glioma risk, adjusting for age and sex (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.65-0.96). Furthermore, the protective effect of chickenpox was stronger for high-grade gliomas. Our study provides additional evidence that the observed protective effect of chickenpox against glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Future studies, including meta-analyses of the literature and investigations of the potential biological mechanism, are warranted. PMID:26972449

  11. Using the entire history in the analysis of nested case cohort samples.

    PubMed

    Rivera, C L; Lumley, T

    2016-08-15

    Countermatching designs can provide more efficient estimates than simple matching or case-cohort designs in certain situations such as when good surrogate variables for an exposure of interest are available. We extend pseudolikelihood estimation for the Cox model under countermatching designs to models where time-varying covariates are considered. We also implement pseudolikelihood with calibrated weights to improve efficiency in nested case-control designs in the presence of time-varying variables. A simulation study is carried out, which considers four different scenarios including a binary time-dependent variable, a continuous time-dependent variable, and the case including interactions in each. Simulation results show that pseudolikelihood with calibrated weights under countermatching offers large gains in efficiency if compared to case-cohort. Pseudolikelihood with calibrated weights yielded more efficient estimators than pseudolikelihood estimators. Additionally, estimators were more efficient under countermatching than under case-cohort for the situations considered. The methods are illustrated using the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. Furthermore, we present a general method to generate survival times with time-varying covariates. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26910486

  12. Rethinking the early history of post-Vygotskian psychology: the case of the Kharkov school.

    PubMed

    Yasnitsky, Anton; Ferrari, Michel

    2008-05-01

    Between the death of Vygotsky in 1934 and the discovery of Vygotsky's work in the West in 1962, Vygotskian psychology was developed through research done by the first generation of Vygotsky's students and their followers, primarily associated with the Kharkov School. Surprisingly, these studies carried out in the 1930s, of great importance for the development of virtually all subsequent Vygotskian psychology, still remain largely unknown; this represents a significant gap in understanding the history of Vygotskian psychology as an empirical study of consciousness. This paper provides a systematic overview of the research agenda of the Kharkov group between 1931 and 1941 and provides new insights into the early development of Vygotskian psychology. PMID:19048970

  13. Culture, history, and health in an Australian aboriginal community: the case of utopia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Heather; Kowal, Emma

    2012-01-01

    The poor health of Indigenous Australians is well established. However, the health of residents of one remote community in the Northern Territory of Australia called Utopia has been found recently to be much better than expected. In this article, we draw on historical anthropological research to explain this finding. We trace how cultural and social structures were maintained through changing eras of government policy from the 1930s, and show how these structures strengthened psychosocial determinants of health. We argue that the mainstream psychosocial determinants of social cohesion and self-efficacy are usefully reconceptualized in an Indigenous context as connectedness to culture and land, and collective efficacy, respectively. Continuity of cultural and social structures into the 1940s was facilitated by a combination of factors including the relatively late colonial occupation, the intercultural practices typical of the pastoral industry, the absence of a mission or government settlement, and the individual personalities and histories of those connected to Utopia. PMID:22881383

  14. TBM Performance Analysis in Pyroclastic Rocks: A Case History of Karaj Water Conveyance Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, J.; Rostami, J.; Khamehchiyan, Mashalah; Bruland, A.; Tavakoli, H. R.

    2010-07-01

    Karaj Water Conveyance Tunnel (KWCT) is 30-km long and has been designed for transferring 16 m3/s of water from Amir-Kabir dam to northwest of Tehran. Lot No. 1 of this long tunnel, with a length of 16 km, is under construction with a double shield TBM and currently about 8.7 km of the tunnel has been excavated/lined. This paper will offer an overview of the project, concentrating on the TBM operation and will review the results of field performance of the machine. In addition to analysis of the available data including geological and geotechnical information and machine operational parameters, actual penetration and advance rates will be compared to the estimated machine performance using prediction models, such as CSM, NTNU and QTBM. Also, results of analysis to correlate TBM performance parameters to rock mass characteristics will be discussed. This involves statistical analysis of the available data to develop new empirical methods. The preliminary results of this study revealed that the available prediction models need some corrections or modifications to produce a more accurate prediction in geological conditions of this particular project.

  15. Case histories of organophosphate pesticides killing birds of prey in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Kolbe, E.J.; Hill, E.F.; Blus, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982 when secondary. poisoning of Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) was documented following the recommended use of famphur on cattle, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center has tested for organophosphate (OP) poisoning in selected birds of prey found dead. This report documents the circumstances for a number of. cases where birds of prey were killed by OP pesticides in the United States. Many of the cases were brought to our attention by the U S. Fish and Wildlife Service Division of Law Enforcement The cases may be divided into three categories: misuse, approved use, and unknown. Now that we are looking for OP poisoning of birds of prey, we are finding it more frequently than previously suspected.

  16. Steroid anabolic drugs and arterial complications in an athlete--a case history.

    PubMed

    Laroche, G P

    1990-11-01

    Serious side effects and complications have been attributed to anabolic and androgenic steroids when used for medical reasons or when taken in sports in hopes of increasing strength and, hence, performance. The author presents a case of an athlete who experienced two metachronous arterial complications after taking these drugs: a cerebrovascular accident caused by a carotid artery thrombus that partially embolized to the brain and, later, a severe ischemic episode in a lower limb caused by a diffused distal arterial thrombosis. This patient represents the first reported case of vascular events in an otherwise healthy athlete taking androgens to increase his skeletal muscle mass. PMID:2244701

  17. Ideas for Urban/Rural Gifted/Talented: Case Histories and Program Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National/State Leadership Training Inst. on the Gifted and Talented, Los Angeles, CA.

    This document includes articles on programs for the gifted in urban and rural areas. Jean Blanning writes a personalized case-oriented record of an independent studies program offered in an urban high school (in New Haven, Connecticut) serving large numbers of minority children. This section gives testimony to the effectiveness of dedicated…

  18. Using History To Teach Invention and Design: The Case of the Telephone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael E.; Robinson, J. Kirby

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how an historical case such as the invention of the telephone can be used to teach invention and design in a way that combines engineering, social sciences, and humanities. Turns the historical problem of transmitting speech into a learning module. Contains 53 references. (DDR)

  19. Does Psychotherapy Recover or Invent Child Sexual Abuse Memories? A Case History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milchman, Madelyn Simring

    2008-01-01

    This case describes bodily experiences that appeared to cue child sexual abuse memories during psychotherapy by a woman who was amnesic for her childhood and suffered from chronic dissociative states. Though corroboration was unavailable, she became increasingly confident about her returning memories. Special efforts were made to avoid making…

  20. CWRUnet--Case History of a Campus-Wide Fiber-to-the-Desktop Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Raymond K.; Haigh, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the development at Case Western Reserve University of an all-fiber optic communications network linking 7,300 outlets (faculty offices, student residences, classrooms, libraries, and laboratories) with computer data, television, audio, facsimile, and image information services. (Author/DB)

  1. The Borderland of Autism and Rett Syndrome: Five Case Histories to Highlight Diagnostic Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    Case studies of 4 females and 1 male, aged 6-25, with pervasive developmental disorders are described. All met standard diagnostic criteria for autism and showed many Rett syndrome symptoms. It is concluded that there is considerable overlap between the 2 disorders and that symptomatic similarities might mirror common pathopsychological…

  2. The role of instruments in the history of Geophysics: the case of Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    Science is the study that leads to discriminate knowledge of the material world based on observation, experiment and induction. Geophysics is the combination of the former concern about the explanation of every day phenomena in our enviroment, with the achievements of physics that were exploited within the laboratory, either by experiments or by theoreticians. Unlike other disciplines such as physics or chemistry, geophysics is a mosaic of disciplines also very different among each other. The main differences concern the object and method of study or the evolutionary path. Many cyclic phenomena of the Earth are long-term processes so that a long period of study is essential to a thorough understanding. Extreme natural events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, etc. significantly contribute to the natural hazards. So, in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeology, as in those disciplines who study significant changes in climate or in geomagnetism, long time series of data are very useful, along with the instruments that registered them and the scientific paradigms within which they were produced. These aspects, contributing to the history of geophysics, are extremely useful especially for the fallout on the mankind's life and activities.To be useful, as well as the recovery, the historical data must be "normalized" to the current use we want to do of them. This process makes an essential contribution to knowledge of the instruments that recorded this data: their principles of operation, their constants and their variability over time. Many of the disciplines involved in geophysics, as seismology, geomagnetism, etc. require observations both geographically distributed and synchronized. Geomagnetic and seismological recordings, together with astronomical and meteorological observations have been frequently done in the same observatories, in the past. Despite their relative cyclic nature, since earthquakes may not occur in the exact same way, thorough analysis

  3. A case study in connectomics: the history, mapping, and connectivity of the claustrum.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Carinna M; Van Horn, John D

    2014-01-01

    The claustrum seems to have been waiting for the science of connectomics. Due to its tiny size, the structure has remained remarkably difficult to study until modern technological and mathematical advancements like graph theory, connectomics, diffusion tensor imaging, HARDI, and excitotoxic lesioning. That does not mean, however, that early methods allowed researchers to assess micro-connectomics. In fact, the claustrum is such an enigma that the only things known for certain about it are its histology, and that it is extraordinarily well connected. In this literature review, we provide background details on the claustrum and the history of its study in the human and in other animal species. By providing an explanation of the neuroimaging and histology methods have been undertaken to study the claustrum thus far-and the conclusions these studies have drawn-we illustrate this example of how the shift from micro-connectomics to macro-connectomics advances the field of neuroscience and improves our capacity to understand the brain. PMID:25426062

  4. A case study in connectomics: the history, mapping, and connectivity of the claustrum

    PubMed Central

    Torgerson, Carinna M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The claustrum seems to have been waiting for the science of connectomics. Due to its tiny size, the structure has remained remarkably difficult to study until modern technological and mathematical advancements like graph theory, connectomics, diffusion tensor imaging, HARDI, and excitotoxic lesioning. That does not mean, however, that early methods allowed researchers to assess micro-connectomics. In fact, the claustrum is such an enigma that the only things known for certain about it are its histology, and that it is extraordinarily well connected. In this literature review, we provide background details on the claustrum and the history of its study in the human and in other animal species. By providing an explanation of the neuroimaging and histology methods have been undertaken to study the claustrum thus far—and the conclusions these studies have drawn—we illustrate this example of how the shift from micro-connectomics to macro-connectomics advances the field of neuroscience and improves our capacity to understand the brain. PMID:25426062

  5. Technical site characterization of the Mercer County Ash Disposal Facility: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Walton, C.G.; Zweig, L.T. )

    1993-03-01

    The Waste-Tech Services, Inc., Mercer County Ash Disposal Facility is a proposed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility located SW of Princeton, Missouri. The facility is to accept, store, treat and landfill ash residues from RCRA-permitted hazardous waste incineration. The site was characterized for a permit application submitted to the Missouri Department of Natural Resource (MDNR). MDNR was involved during all site characterization stages, including MDNR review, input and oversight during the planning, field execution and report-preparation stages. Both parties agreed upon the needs required for characterizing the sites prior field work, and the MDNR ensured that scope of work stipulations were implemented in the field and reported. Three broad characterization categories were defined: (1) physical characteristics; (2) biological characteristics; and, (3) socio-economic considerations. Physical criteria include the geologic, geotechnical, hydrogeologic and hydrologic site conditions. Threatened and Endangered Species and Wetlands comprised the biologic issues. Socio-economics considered cultural resources, such as history and archeology, market proximity, capacity assurance and transportation.

  6. [The case of Sefeloge: a contribution to the history of forensic psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Haack, K; Herpertz, S C; Kumbier, E

    2007-05-01

    In 1850 the mentally disordered Sergeant Maximilian Joseph Sefeloge (1821-1859) tried to assassinate the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm IV (1795-1861). Besides clarification of the political background to the assassination, the question of the delinquent's criminal responsibility has been posed from the very beginning. For the first time Sefeloge's case is examined from a medicohistorical perspective. Due to the importance of the circumstances, a forensic scientist and three well-known psychiatrists made this forensic examination. These medical professionals seemed particularly competent because of their common experience with psychiatric patients. This unique case from nineteenth century Germany is exemplary in that the psychiatrist was generally accepted as an expert witness to evaluate crimes in the context of unclear mental conditions. From there the development of forensic psychiatry could proceed without hindrance. PMID:17574489

  7. The reduction of a ""safety catastrophic'' potential hazard: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    A worst case analysis is reported on the safety of time watch movements for triggering explosive packages on the lunar surface in an experiment to investigate physical lunar structural characteristics through induced seismic energy waves. Considered are the combined effects of low pressure, low temperature, lunar gravity, gear train error, and position. Control measures constitute a seal control cavity and design requirements to prevent overbanking in the mainspring torque curve. Thus, the potential hazard is reduced to safety negligible.

  8. Application of Monolithic Zirconia Ceramics in Dental Practice: A Case History Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk; Yeo, In-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Monolithic zirconia restorations increasingly have been used in dental practice in recent years and demonstrate superior mechanical performance compared with porcelain-veneered zirconia restorations. Recent advances in manufacturing technology have made possible the fabrication of translucent monolithic zirconia ceramics. This case report describes three clinical examples of monolithic zirconia fixed dental prostheses being used in the anterior and posterior regions and exhibiting acceptable esthetic results. PMID:27611758

  9. Staphylococcus lugdunensis endocarditis following vasectomy--report of a case history and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schandiz, Hossein; Olav Hermansen, Nils; Jørgensen, Trond; Roald, Borghild

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS), and part of the normal skin flora. The bacterium is an emerging pathogen that, unlike other CoNS, resembles coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus infections in virulence, tissue destruction, and clinical course. We report a fatal case following minor surgery. The frequency of S. lugdunensis infections has probably been underestimated and under-reported in the past as few clinical laboratories routinely identify coagulase-negative Staphylococci. PMID:26058423

  10. [Pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma in adults. Case histories and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Zompatori, M; Gavelli, G; Bernasconi, A; Fabbri, M; Sturani, C; Galavotti, V

    1989-04-01

    Histiocytosis X is a disease of unknown origin which usually affects multiple organs, including the lung. The age of onset, the clinical course and the pattern of spread allow a distinction to be made between 3 varieties: Letterer-Siwe, Hand-Schüller-Christian and eosinophilic granuloma. The latter form, in adult patients, may predominantly or solely affect the lungs. The authors reviewed clinical, radiographic and CT findings of 7 adult patients with pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma, picked out of a series of 265 cases of interstitial lung pathology, diagnosed since 1973. Typical pulmonary involvement is bilateral, symmetrical and predominates in the upper areas. Honeycomb pattern was found in 1 patient at the onset of symptoms, and in 2 cases during the follow-up, without severe reduction in pulmonary volumes. Pneumothorax was observed in 3 cases and bone lesions in 2. CT added new and important informations such as presence, size and wall thickness of "cystic" lesions. New laboratory tests and bronchoalveolar lavage demonstrated minor diagnostic usefulness than radiological findings. The authors conclude by discussing such problems as prognostic factors and differential diagnosis. PMID:2499017

  11. Star formation history and X-ray binary populations: the case of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, V.; Zezas, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we investigate the link between high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), our nearest star-forming galaxy. Using optical photometric data, we identify the most likely counterpart of 44 X-ray sources. Among the 40 HMXBs classified in this work, we find 33 Be/X-ray binaries (Be-XRBs), and 4 supergiant XRBs. Using this census and the published spatially resolved star formation history map of the LMC, we find that the HMXBs (and as expected the X-ray pulsars) are present in regions with star formation bursts ∼6-25 Myr ago, in contrast to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), for which this population peaks at later ages (∼25-60 Myr ago). We also estimate the HMXB production rate to be equal to one system per ∼43.5× 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 or one system per ∼143M⊙ of stars formed during the associated star formation episode. Therefore, the formation efficiency of HMXBs in the LMC is ∼17 times lower than that in the SMC. We attribute this difference primarily in the different ages and metallicity of the HMXB populations in the two galaxies. We also set limits on the kicks imparted on the neutron star during the supernova explosion. We find that the time elapsed since the supernova kick is ∼3 times shorter in the LMC than the SMC. This in combination with the average offsets of the HMXBs from their nearest star clusters results in ∼4 times faster transverse velocities for HMXBs in the LMC than in the SMC.

  12. Monomelic amyotrophy: clinical profile and natural history of 279 cases seen over 35 years (1976-2010).

    PubMed

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Gourie-Devi, Mandavilli; Thennarasu, Kandavel; Ramalingaiah, Aravinda Hanumanthapura

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to study the clinical characteristics and natural history of monomelic amyotrophy (MMA). We used a retrospective study of 279 patients diagnosed to have either upper (Hirayama disease) or lower limb MMA. Results showed that brachial MMA (BMMA) occurred in 224 patients (male:female, 9:1). Mean age of onset was 19.5 ± 4.18 years. Progression occurred over less than five years in the majority (95.9%) of patients. Duration at the last follow-up was: up to five years in 61.4%, 5-10 in 21.3%, 10-15 in 7.2%, > 15 years in 10.1%. MRI showed asymmetrical lower cervical cord atrophy in 44.6% of patients. Crural MMA (CMMA) occurred in 55 patients (male:female, 13:1). Mean age of onset was 21.38 ± 5.3 years. Similar to BMMA, most cases (65.5%) had onset between 15 and 25 years of age. Total duration of illness at the last follow-up was up to five years in 52.7%, 10 and beyond in 47.3%. In conclusion, a large cohort of patients with monomelic amyotrophy seen over 35 years (1976-2010) is described. Study data support the clinical findings and its natural history with long term follow-up, and the findings emphasize that monomelic amyotrophy is a 'benign' condition with a self-limiting course. PMID:24853410

  13. Unusual Case of Urethrorectal Fistula in Adolescence in a Patient with a History of Congenital Anorectal Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Sotirova, Ira; Papatsoris, Athanasios; Skolarikos, Andreas; Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Dellis, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Urethrorectal fistula is a rare and debilitating condition. Spontaneous closure is rarely effective, and appropriate management regarding timing of repair and surgical approach remains controversial. Case Presentation: We present a case of an 18-year-old male found to have a urethrorectal fistula after diagnostic work up for unejaculation. The patient gradually developed recurrent urinary tract infections and urine and semen leak from his rectum. He had a medical history of an anorectal reconstruction in the second postnatal day due to an anorectal malformation. Imaging with a rectal endoscopic ultrasound scan revealed a suprasphincteric urethrorectal fistula that was further confirmed with semirigid urethrocystoscopy and placement of a nitinol guidewire through the urethral fistula orifice. Its anal orifice was 3 cm above the anal verge at the 12th hour of the rectum. The fistula orifice on the rectum was identified with a transanal approach and the fistula was managed with the performance of an advancement mucosal flap and bladder catheterization. The patient developed a recurrence with this approach and finally underwent fistula ligation and reconstruction using a scrotal flap. The patient has not had a recurrence of the fistula during his follow-up. Conclusion: This is an unusual case of iatrogenic urethrorectal fistula as it presented in adolescence many years from the initial operation of anorectal reconstruction and with unusual symptoms.

  14. A biosketch of William Richard Gowers with a new review of his inpatient case history notes.

    PubMed

    Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Lees, Andrew; Cardoso, Francisco

    2013-06-01

    William Richard Gowers (1845-1915) spent his career working at the National Hospital for the Relief and Cure for the Paralyzed and Epileptic at Queen Square, in London, United Kingdom, and at the nearby University College Hospital. His "Manual of the Diseases of the Nervous System" and many published lectures were based almost entirely on his own clinical observations meticulously recorded in shorthand. In this paper, we have focused on an analysis of his inpatient case records from 1878 to 1911 preserved in the archives at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square. We reviewed all 42 volumes and analyzed 2,478 patients. Between 1897 and 1909, a mean of 129.7 cases per year were admitted to the hospital under Gowers' care. We grouped the diagnoses in 12 different categories. Epilepsy (16.5%), followed by spinal cord diseases (10.3%), cerebrovascular diseases (9.5%), and functional disorders (7.9%) were the most common diagnoses. PMID:23828525

  15. Infantile Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Its Probable Links With Parameters of the Maternal Patient History: A Forensic Case Report.

    PubMed

    Giannitsis, Charilaos; Arampatzis, Asterios; Stefanidou, Maria; Anestakis, Doxakis; Raikos, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) has a major contribution to neonatal mortality worldwide. Multiple factors associated with increased risk for RDS have been documented to effectively understand the emergence and progression of this disorder. A portion of these parameters has been broadly examined whereas the role of others, despite being clinically described, has not been fully evaluated. In this report, we analyze a forensic RDS case of a late preterm infant. Taking the maternal medical history into account, we focused on 2 not widely established risk factors, oligohydramnios and maternal age, discussing their possible pathophysiological relation to the development of RDS. Simultaneously, the fundamental role of the histopathological examination as a diagnostic tool resurfaces. Following a multidisciplinary approach derived from the collaboration of clinicians and researchers, the identification of factors that precipitate or contribute to this syndrome can be enhanced, leading to novel prognostic and therapeutic strategies against RDS. PMID:27049660

  16. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  17. Using History to Teach Invention and Design: The Case of the Telephone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Michael E.; Robinson, J. Kirby

    This paper shows how a historical case, the invention of the telephone, can be used to teach invention and design in a way that combines engineering, social sciences, and humanities. The historical problem of transmitting speech was turned into an active learning module, in which students sought to improve patents obtained by early telephone inventors like Alexander Graham Bell and Elisha Gray, using equipment similar to what was available at the time. The result was a collaborative learning environment in which students from a wide range of majors worked in teams, eventually producing a patent application. As part of the project, they were allowed to search historical materials like the Bell notebooks, which were made available on line. This experience gave them a better understanding of the invention and design process.

  18. [Pregnancy in patients with a history of ischaemic heart disease - Case series and literature review].

    PubMed

    Matura-Bedouhene, M; Maatouk, A; Moulin, F; Welter, E; Morel, O; Perdriolle-Galet, E

    2016-04-01

    Heart diseases complicate 1 to 3% of pregnancies and are the leading cause of indirect maternal deaths. Prior ischaemic heart event in pregnant patients is increasing. Most knowledge is based on few reports and there are no French nor international recommendations about the specific management of these patients. The specificity of the management of these patients during pregnancy, delivery and post-partum depends on the severity of the prior cardiac event and its consequences. This will be illustrated by the report of four recent cases managed in our hospital. First patient had myocardial infarction with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Second patient had a Tako-Tsubo syndrome with LVEF 45%. Third patient had ischemic cardiopathy with LVEF 30%. Fourth patient had myocardial infarction with LVEF 20%. A multidisciplinary follow-up should be required, especially in patients with severe ventricular dysfunction. The risk of fetal growth restriction appears to be increased, suggesting that closer ultrasound monitoring is necessary. PMID:26321610

  19. Clinical case histories and sketches of gun-shot injuries from the Carlist War.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, M H

    2001-10-01

    The Anatomical Museum of the University of Edinburgh contains a substantial collection of human osteological preparations that display the effects of musket-ball and sabre injuries. Most of these formerly belonged to the Museum Collection associated with the class of Military Surgery. This collection had principally been amassed by Sir George Ballingall to illustrate his lectures when he was Regius Professor of Military Surgery in the University of Edinburgh from 1822-55. About half of the osteological preparations in his collection had been purchased from Dr Rutherford Alcock in 1843. Alcock had collected them when he was Deputy Inspector General of Hospitals to the British Auxiliary Legion in Spain during the Carlist War of 1835-37. Just under 60% of the osteological preparations purchased from Alcock still remain on display in the Anatomy Museum of the University of Edinburgh. Previously, the only information on these items was that published in Ballingall's Catalogue of the Museum attached to the Class of Military Surgery, published in 1855. Very recently, twelve volumes of manuscript material, consisting principally of clinical case records prepared by Alcock and his medical officers have been located in the Special Collections Section of Edinburgh University Library. This has now enabled the full clinical case records of the majority of the individuals whose osteological preparations are still available in the collection to be studied. This manuscript material provides a unique record of the treatment of the sick and wounded men in this campaign. It also allows the clinical records of men wounded by musket-ball to be studied with their associated bony lesions. PMID:11697696

  20. CWRUnet: case history of a campus-wide fiber-to-the-desktop network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Raymond K.; Klingensmith, H. W.; Gumpf, Jeffrey A.; Haigh, Peter J.

    1991-02-01

    Case Western Reserve University is operating the first all fiber optic communications network on a university campus. When completely installed this system of some seven thousand outlets will interconnect all faculty offices student moms classrooms libraries and laboratories with computer data telephone audio video fax and image information resources. We refer to the system as CWRUnet and pronounce it " crewnet. " CWRUnet features a standard premise wire-once cabling architecture independence of cabling and optoelectronics and support for multimedia communications. Phase I of the network became operational in August 1989 for students in the University''s sixteen residence halls. Phase II connecting faculty and staff offices and other locations is completed in twelve more buildings with the remainder under construction or scheduled for 1990-91. CWRUnet accommodates a heterogeneous assortment of microcomputers servers and gateways to other networks telephones television equipment remotely operated surveillance devices and energy management controls. It is planned to incorporate this campus-area network into a metropolitan area network following the proposed IEEE 802. 6 standard. CWRUnet is steadily evolving into one of the earliest implementations of Broadband ISDN. The CWRUnet project has been carefully documented and precise costs are known for each element in the network. The data service is presently based on the familiar networking technologies of ethernet and TCP/IP and now offers a wide variety ofnetwork-based information services to the campus community. CWRUnet is an innovation because

  1. Brief: Offshore North Sea case histories of the environmentally friendly testing vessel, the Crystal Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Tjelta, O.; Ashwell, C.; Hilmarsen, G.; Taylor, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    One problem during offshore well-test operations, stimulations, and routine workovers are discharges into the air and sea while flaring. These procedures are usually performed by mobile drilling rigs with no storage capacity, and thus, hydrocarbons sequestered must be burned off from the rig flare booms. Another major problem has been the inability of the flare to operate at high flow rates. Because the burning process slows the pace of a test, restricting full flow testing, valuable well information is lost. Flaring of hydrocarbons also represents an economic loss. In the case of oil rigs, for example, flaring not only emits CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere but also burns off usable oil. The Crystal Sea well-test vessel was designed to address the problems inherent to flaring and, at the same time, provide cost efficiency by salvaging usable oil during well testing. The success of her initial two jobs on the Statfjord North satellite field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea confirms that sale of the salvaged oil normally lost during the flaring process could generate sufficient economic return to pay for the vessel. In addition, with its capability to receive products at twice the flow rate of conventional methods, the increased accuracy of the technical information obtained from the well test further enhances its value for improved reservoir management.

  2. Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Natural history and prognostic factors: a retrospective review of 106 cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is characterized by acute onset and progressive course, and is usually associated with a good prognosis. However, there are forms of poor prognosis, needing ventilatory support and major deficits at discharge. With this study we try to identify the factors associated with a worse outcome. Methods 106 cases of GBS admitted in our hospital between years 2000–2010 were reviewed. Epidemiological, clinical, therapeutical and evolutionary data were collected. Results At admission 45% had severe deficits, percentage which improves throughout the evolution of the illness, with full recovery or minor deficits in the 87% of patients at the first year review. Ages greater than 55 years, severity at admission (p < 0.001), injured cranial nerves (p = 0.008) and the needing of ventilator support (p = 0.003) were associated with greater sequels at the discharge and at the posterior reviews in the following months. 17% required mechanical ventilation (MV). Values < 250 L/min in the Peak Flow-test are associated with an increased likelihood of requiring MV (p < 0.001). Conclusions Older age, severe deficits at onset, injured cranial nerves, requiring MV, and axonal lesion patterns in the NCS were demonstrated as poor prognostic factors. Peak Flow-test is a useful predictive factor of respiratory failure by its easy management. PMID:23876199

  3. [Laparocele: a review of the literature and analysis of case histories].

    PubMed

    Lasagna, B; Resegotti, A; Garino, M; Balbo, G

    1990-01-01

    We analyze a group of 64 laparoceles from which it emerges a per cent distribution in the different regions and a correlation between the dimensions of the lesion and the relative regions in agreement with the data usually given in the literature. Furthermore we point out a clear dependence on pathogenetic factors of general and local order. Is therefore recognized the necessity of preventing their insurgence and reducing the risk of relapses through appropriate laparotomy incisions, with adoption of a suitable surgical technique and the correction of systemic diseases. The voluminous laparoceles are responsible of cardiac, respiratory, coagulative diseases, that must be scrupulously judged for an appropriate therapeutical approach. The surgical treatment, as well as for the cases of bigger dimensions, has mostly availed itself of an elementary technique (simple approach, apposition "en paletot" splitting of the fasciae). In the necessity of strengthening weak parietal tissues or of replacing vast losses of matter, we have limitedly resorted to autologous grafts, while good results have been observed with the lyophilized dura mater. PMID:2100109

  4. Case Histories of Six Consumers and Their Families in Cash and Counseling

    PubMed Central

    San Antonio, Patricia M; Simon-Rusinowitz, Lori; Loughlin, Dawn; Eckert, J Kevin; Mahoney, Kevin J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine how the lives of consumers and their caregivers were affected by making choices and controlling their own resources with the cash option, this paper focuses on six case studies from the Cash and Counseling Demonstration Program. Data Sources Twenty-one consumers, caregivers, and state consultants were interviewed about their experiences in the program. Study Design The data come from a larger study of over 200 interviews conducted from June 2000 to August 2004. Interview data were analyzed for themes about caregiving and program satisfaction. Principal Findings Cash and Counseling benefited consumers and caregivers by allowing consumers increased continuity and reliability of care, increased ability to set hours of care, more satisfaction with how caregiving is offered and more satisfaction with the quality of care. Conclusions The cash option allowed consumers to create, schedule, and manage their own model of care. Some consumers faced challenges in the program with paperwork, accounting, worries about receiving care, and some ineffective state consultants who could have been more helpful. PMID:17244296

  5. Downhole geophysical observatories: best installation practices and a case history from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Bulut, Fatih; Bohnhoff, Marco; Raub, Christina; Kartal, Recai F.; Alver, Fatih; Malin, Peter E.

    2015-09-01

    Downhole sensors of different types and in various environments provide substantial benefit to signal quality. They also add the depth dimension to measurements performed at the Earths' surface. Sensor types that particularly benefit from downhole installation due to the absence of near-surface noise include piezometers, seismometers, strainmeters, thermometers, and tiltmeters. Likewise, geochemical and environmental measurements in a borehole help eliminate near-surface weathering and cultural effects. Installations from a few hundred meter deep to a few kilometer deep dramatically reduce surface noise levels—the latter noticeably also reduces the hypocentral distance for shallow microearthquakes. The laying out of a borehole network is always a compromise of local boundary conditions and the involved drilling costs. The installation depth and procedure for a long-term downhole observatory can range from time limited installations, with a retrieval option, to permanently cemented sensors. Permanently cemented sensors have proven to be long-term stable with non-deteriorating coupling and borehole integrity. However, each type needs to be carefully selected and planned according to the research aims. A convenient case study is provided by a new installation of downhole seismometers along the shoreline of the eastern Marmara Sea in Turkey. These stations are being integrated into the regional net for monitoring the North Anatolian Fault Zone. Here we discuss its design, installation, and first results. We conclude that, despite the logistical challenges and installation costs, the superior quality of downhole data puts this technique at the forefront of applied and fundamental research.

  6. Female fertility, obstetric and gynaecological history in coeliac disease. A case control study.

    PubMed

    Sher, K S; Mayberry, J F

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of infertility, abortions and perinatal mortality, age at menarche and menopause in coeliac disease (CD). It was a case control study in which patients and controls matched for age and sex were sent questionnaires about their fertility profile and other obstetric and gynaecological problems. All 80 patients and 70 controls replied but only 68 groups could be matched for this study. The mean age of menarche in patients was significantly older at 13.6 years than in controls at 12.7 years. The mean age at menopause in patients and controls were 47.6 and 50.1 years respectively. The study showed the mean number of children born to patients with CD was significantly less at 1.9 (SD +/- 0.9) compared to 2.5 (SD +/- 1.2) in controls. Before diagnosis the mean number of children born to patients was 1.4 and 1.8 in controls. After diagnosis and treatment, patients had 0.5 children (SD +/- 0.9) compared to 0.7 in controls (SD +/- 1.2). It seems likely that the overall difference in fertility is due to relative infertility prior to diagnosis and its correction by a gluten-free diet. Significantly more conceptions amongst women with CD (15%) ended in miscarriage prior to diagnosis than amongst controls (6%). After diagnosis and treatment the rate of miscarriage was similar at 7 and 12% respectively. There were 120 live babies and 7 stillbirths to patients compared with 161 live babies and 1 stillbirth to controls. In conclusion, this study shows that patients with CD are subfertile and have an increased incidence of stillbirths and perinatal deaths. PMID:8063029

  7. Molecular phylogenetics of the Anolis onca series: a case history in retrograde evolution revisited.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kirsten E; Mijares-Urrutia, Abraham; Larson, Allan

    2006-09-15

    Anoles of the Anolis onca series represent a dramatic case of retrograde evolution, exhibiting great reduction (A. annectens) and loss (A. onca) of the subdigital pads considered a key innovation for the evolutionary radiation of anoles in arboreal environments. We present a molecular phylogenetic analysis of these anoles and their closest known relatives (A. auratus, A. lineatus, A. meridionalis, and A. nitens) using new mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the ND2 gene, five tRNA genes (tRNA(Trp), tRNA(Ala), tRNA(Asn), tRNA(Cys), tRNA(Tyr)), the origin of light-strand replication, and a portion of the CO1 gene (1,446 aligned base positions, 612 parsimony informative). Our results confirm monophyly of the A. onca series and suggest an evolutionary separation of approximately 10 million years between A. annectens and A. onca. Evolution of subdigital structure in this series illustrates ectopic expression of developmental programs that replace flexible subdigital lamellae of the toepad with rigid, keeled scales resembling dorsal digital scales. Our phylogenetic results indicate that narrowing of the toepad in A. auratus evolved separately from toepad reduction in the A. onca series. Expansion of the subdigital lamellae along the phalanges in A. auratus appears to compensate constriction of lamellae by digital narrowing, maintaining greater climbing capability in this species. Toepad evolution in the lineage ancestral to A. auratus features changes of the same developmental modules as the A. onca series but in the opposite direction. Large molecular distances between geographic populations of A. auratus indicate that its derived toepad structure is at least 9 million years old. PMID:16506231

  8. Cultural History and Cultural Materialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Ronald

    1990-01-01

    Historicism critiques cultural history and cultural materialism as a methodology for literary analysis. Questions the finality of interpretation, how original values change, and whether dramatic history implies actual history. Using Shakespearean plays, analyzes the power and politics of a play in relation to its audience; posits that cultural…

  9. Endobronchial fibroma in a pneumoconiosis patient with a history of tuberculosis: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meifang; Liu, Yuquan; Li, Dan; Xiong, Chang; Qian, Xin; Tang, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Bronchial fibroma is uncommon, with only 18 cases reported since 1948. The current study presents a rare case of endobronchial fibroma, along with a relevant literature review. A 54-year-old male patient with pneumoconiosis and a history of tuberculosis was admitted to the Taihe Hospital Affiliated With Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, China, due to refractory dry cough. Computed tomography of the chest showed multiple nodular and confluent opacities in the lung and one cavitation in the right upper lobe region. Bronchoscopy revealed an endobronchial mass in the left main bronchus. A bronchoscopic resection was performed, and the pathological evaluation confirmed fibroma. The patient's dry cough resolved following the removal of the fibroma, and no recurrence was detected during 6 months of follow-up. Endobronchial fibroma is an extremely rare disease, for which a pathological analysis is typically required for an accurate diagnosis. Bronchoscopic treatments, including removal by forceps, argon plasma coagulation and laser or electrocautery snares, may be used to treat patients affected by endobronchial fibroma. PMID:27446391

  10. A case of exemplarity: C. F. Rottböll's history of smallpox inoculation in Denmark-Norway, 1766.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Smallpox inoculation was one of the great discoveries of the 18th century and has been written into the grand narrative of medical progress, describing the taming of epidemic disease. Setting the perspective of progress aside, the article explores how this medical innovation was situated in 18th-century society and culture. The aim is to investigate how medical practice was intertwined with social structure and cultural patterns. The article takes its case from a book published in Copenhagen in 1766 by Professor C. F. Rottböll, former Head Physician of the Royal Inoculation House in Copenhagen. Being the first medical treatise on inoculation in Denmark-Norway, the book also has a historical section followed by a collection of reports and letters written by a number of other authors from various parts of the kingdom. Through close reading, the article explores how the introduction of the new technique was described in the texts. The reports were written to present practice and discuss cases. In doing so, they also presented a variety of other concerns so that a diversity of aims and intentions are added to the medical ones. The social and rhetorical strategies employed illuminate social ambition and systems of patronage, as well as understandings of history and of truth. PMID:21280402

  11. Precarious employment, ill health, and lessons from history: the case of casual (temporary) dockworkers 1880-1945.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    An international body of scientific research indicates that growth of job insecurity and precarious forms of employment over the past 35 years have had significant negative consequences for health and safety. Commonly overlooked in debates over the changing world of work is that widespread use of insecure and short-term work is not new, but represents a return to something resembling labor market arrangements found in rich countries in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Moreover, the adverse health effects of precarious employment were extensively documented in government inquiries and in health and medical journals. This article examines the case of a large group of casual dockworkers in Britain. It identifies the mechanisms by which precarious employment was seen to undermine workers and families' health and safety. The article also shows the British dockworker experience was not unique and there are important lessons to be drawn from history. First, historical evidence reinforces just how health-damaging precarious employment is and how these effects extend to the community, strengthening the case for social and economic policies that minimize precarious employment. Second, there are striking parallels between historical evidence and contemporary research that can inform future research on the health effects of precarious employment. PMID:24397236

  12. Case histories illustrating the characteristics of the HeliGEOTEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard S.; Hodges, Greg; Lemieux, Jean

    2009-09-01

    The HeliGEOTEM system was introduced in 2005 to provide higher resolution data than fixed-wing electromagnetic (EM) systems. The characteristics of HeliGEOTEM are illustrated by comparing the system with other airborne EM systems. A comparison with previous versions of HeliGEOTEM shows that, since 2005, the early-time information has improved allowing rapidly decaying responses to be identified. An improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio means the system is able to detect bodies at greater depth. A height attenuation test over the Nighthawk conductive body indicates that the latest system could see that target if it were buried 380m below surface. Another target that is difficult to detect (Caber) is clearly seen on the HeliGEOTEM data. A comparison of field data at the Maimon deposit indicates that the helicopter DIGHEM frequency-domain system and the HeliGEOTEM time-domain system both acquire data with similar spatial wavelengths. Data collected away from the main ore body and along strike indicate that the HeliGEOTEM sees a less attenuated response from a deeper part of the body. Also, the HeliGEOTEM is able to estimate the conductivity, whereas the DIGHEM system cannot discriminate the conductance, it can only indicate that the body is highly conductive. The DIGHEM data, however, is better able to resolve the near-surface conductivity, and the spatial form of the DIGHEM data is simpler. The data acquired with multiple transmitter-receiver coil pairs (DIGHEM and HeliGEOTEM) provides information superior to single-component data. Tools used to display fixed-wing airborne EM data have been modified to work with HeliGEOTEM data. These tools can image the structure in cases where the ground is assumed to be comprised of a) horizontal layers or b) discrete conductors. A comparison of HeliGEOTEM with the helicopter RESOLVE and fixed-wing GEOTEM systems shows that the HeliGEOTEM is able to map most of the shallow features seen on the RESOLVE and to image the

  13. A case study of systemic curricular reform: A forty-year history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, Timothy Alan

    What follows is a description of the development of a particular inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum program and how its theoretical underpinnings positively influenced a school district's (K-12) science program and also impacted district- and state-wide curriculum reform initiatives. The district's science program has evolved since the inception of the inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum reform forty years ago. Therefore, a historical case study, which incorporated grounded theory methodology, was used to convey the forty-year development of a science curriculum reform effort and its systemic influences. Data for this study were collected primarily through artifacts, such as technical and non-technical documents, and supported and augmented with interviews. Fifteen people comprised the interview consortium with professional responsibilities including (a) administrative roles, such as superintendents, assistant superintendents, principals, and curriculum consultants/coordinators; (b) classroom roles, such as elementary and secondary school teachers who taught science; (c) partnership roles, such as university faculty who collaborated with those in administrative and classroom positions within the district; and (d) the co-director of SCIS who worked with the SCIS trial center director. Data were analyzed and coded using the constant comparative method. The analysis of data uncovered five categories or levels in which the curriculum reform evolved throughout its duration. These themes are Initiation, Education, Implementation, Confirmation, and Continuation. These five categories lead to several working hypotheses that supported the sustaining and continuing of a K-12 science curriculum reform effort. These components are a committed visionary; a theory base of education; forums promoting the education of the theory base components; shared-decision making; a university-school partnership; a core group of committed educators and teachers

  14. Manifest Meanings: The Selling (Not Telling) of American Indian History and the Case of "The Black Horse Ledger"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercken, Becca

    2010-01-01

    What is the value or perceived necessity--for an Indian or for a white man--of changing Northern Cheyenne history? How are a reader's conclusions affected by her perception of the race of the person altering that history? Why is it acceptable to sell but not tell American Indian history? An examination of the visual and discursive rhetoric of "The…

  15. Exploring Gaps of Family History Documentation in EHR for Precision Medicine -A Case Study of Familial Hypercholesterolemia Ascertainment

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabi, Saeed; Wang, Yanshan; Ihrke, Donna; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    In the era of precision medicine, accurately identifying familial conditions is crucial for providing target treatment. However, it is challenging to identify familial conditions without detailed family history information. In this work, we studied the documentation of family history of premature cardiovascular disease and hypercholesterolemia. The information on patients’ family history of stroke within the Patient-provided information (PPI) forms was compared with the information gathered by clinicians in clinical notes. The agreement between PPI and clinical notes on absence of family history information in PPI was substantially higher compared to presence of family history. PMID:27570664

  16. Coral reefs in an urban embayment in Hawaii: a complex case history controlled by natural and anthropogenic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigg, R. W.

    1995-11-01

    The effects of natural and anthropogenic stress need to be separated before coral reef ecosystems can be effectively managed. In this paper, a 25 year case history of coral reefs in an urban embayment (Mamala Bay) off Honolulu, Hawaii is described and differences between natural and man-induced stress are distinguished. Mamala Bay is a 30 km long shallow coastal bay bordering the southern (leeward) shore of Oahu and the city of Honolulu in the Hawaiian Islands. During the last 25 years, this area has been hit by two magnitude 5 hurricane events (winds > 240 km/h) generating waves in excess of 7.5 m. Also during this period, two large sewer outfalls have discharged up to 90 million gallons per day (mgd) or (360 × 106 L/day) of point source pollution into the bay. Initially the discharge was raw sewage, but since 1977 it has received advanced primary treatment. Non-point source run-off from the Honolulu watershed also enters the bay on a daily basis. The results of the study show that discharge of raw sewage had a serious but highly localized impact on shallow (˜10 m) reef corals in the bay prior to 1977. After 1977, when treatment was upgraded to the advanced primary level and outfalls were extended to deep water (> 65 m), impacts to reef corals were no longer significant. No measurable effects of either point or non-point source pollution on coral calcification, growth, species composition, diversity or community structure related to pollution can now be detected. Conversely the effects of hurricane waves in 1982 and 1992 together caused major physical destruction to the reefs. In 1982, average coral cover of well-developed offshore reefs dropped from 60-75% to 5-15%. Only massive species in high relief areas survived. Today, recovery is occurring, and notwithstanding major future disturbance events, long-term biological processes should eventually return the coral ecosystems to a more mature successional stage. This case history illustrates the complex nature of

  17. The dilemma of the negative skin test reactors with a history of venom anaphylaxis: will this always be the case?

    PubMed

    Bilò, M B; Brianzoni, F; Cinti, B; Napoli, G; Bonifazi, F

    2005-11-01

    The loss of sensitization over time, the involvement of a different pathogenetic mechanism and the poor sensitivity of diagnostic tests have been included among the causes of a non IgE-mediated anaphylaxis triggered by an insect sting. To provide further insight into this topic we describe the case of a patient suffering from urticaria pigmentosa, anaphylactic shock due to a Vespid sting and monosensitive to Polistes dominulus venom, who was previous diagnosed with non-IgE mediated insect sting anaphylaxis in subjects with urticaria pigmentosa. Therefore ultra-rush specific immunotherapy using an acqueous Polistes dominulus venom extract was performed over two mornings until a total dose of 100mcg was reached without any side effects. Presently the patient is undergoing maintenance therapy with a depot Polistes dominulus venom extract at 4-weekly intervals and is free of side effects. In conclusion, despite the high cross-reactivity among the venoms of the various species of Polistes, recent evidence of a selective specificity unique to European Polistes allergens raises the problem of the need to make the American Polistes venom as well as that of Polistes dominulus (a very common insect in Europe) available both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Besides the fact that the presence of urticaria pigmentosa alone could have explained the anaphylactic reaction to the aspecific stimulation triggered by the venom, this case history also demonstrates that omitting to perform skin tests for Polistes dominulus venom would have led to the same misdiagnosis of non IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and served only to further delay commencing specific immunotherapy. PMID:16453965

  18. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  19. Asbestos Removal Case History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Stanley J.

    1986-01-01

    The engineer for a California school district describes the asbestos removal from the ceilings of El Camino High School. Discusses forming a design team, use of consultants, specifications, relations with contractors, and staff notification. (MLF)

  20. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  1. A Case History of the Science and Management Collaboration in Understanding Hypoxia Events in Long Bay, South Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanger, Denise; Hernandez, Debra; Libes, Susan; Voulgaris, George; Davis, Braxton; Smith, Erik; Shuford, Rebecca; Porter, Dwayne; Koepfler, Eric; Bennett, Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Communication of knowledge between the scientific and management communities is a difficult process complicated by the distinctive nature of professional career goals of scientists and decision-makers. This article provides a case history highlighting a collaboration between the science and management communities that resulted from a response to a 2004 hypoxia, or low dissolved oxygen, event in Long Bay, off Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. A working group of scientists and decision-makers was established at the time of the event and has continued to interact to develop a firm understanding of the drivers responsible for hypoxia formation in Long Bay. Several factors were found to be important to ensure that these collaborative efforts were productive: (1) genuine interest in collaboratively working across disciplines to examine a problem; (2) commitment by agency leadership, decision-makers, and researchers to create successful communication mechanisms; (3) respect for each others’ perspectives and an understanding how science and management are performed and that they are not mutually exclusive; (4) networking among researchers and decision-makers to ensure appropriate team members are involved in the process; (5) use of decision-maker input in the formulation of research and monitoring projects; and (6) commitment of resources for facilitation to ensure that researchers and decision-makers are communicating effectively.

  2. Case History of a Clean Water Act Compliance Agreement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    A major Clean Water Act (CWA) Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement was signed on March 25, 1991 by the US Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Field Office (DOE, RFFO) and the Water Enforcement Division of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VIII. The agreement revised the Rocky Flats Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and arose from pemittee-requested changes in effluent monitoring points and permit violations, most notably the February 22, 1989 Chromic Acid Incident. The Rocky Flats Plant, now called the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) near Golden Colorado was operated at that time by Rockwell International Corporation, who later plead guilty to six misdemeanor and felony counts of the CWA (the aforementioned NPDES permit violations) and paid a $4 million fine on March 26, 1992. The Compliance Agreement, hereafter referred to as the NPDES FFCA, called for three separate remedial action plans and contained a schedule for their submittal to the EPA. The compliance plans focussed on: (1) Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) performance upgrades, (2) source control and surface water protection, and (3) characterization of the impacts from past sludge disposal practices. Projects that implemented the compliance plans were initiated soon after submittal to the EPA and are forecast to complete in 1997 at a total cost of over $35 million. This paper presents a case history of NPDES FFCA compliance projects and highlights the successes, failures, and lessons learned.

  3. Educational Technology as a Tool for Multicultural Democratic Education: The Case of One US History Teacher in an Underresourced High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marri, Anand R.

    2005-01-01

    This case study analyzes the pedagogy of one US history teacher as he prepared students for active and effective citizenship through multicultural democratic education in an underresourced alternative public high school. In particular, the paper examines his practice and focuses on his incorporation of educational technology (the Internet,…

  4. History of Physics as a Tool to Detect the Conceptual Difficulties Experienced by Students: The Case of Simple Electric Circuits in Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    The present paper advocates the use of History of Science into the teaching of science in primary education through a case study in the field of electricity. In this study, which provides both historical and experimental evidence, a number of conceptual difficulties faced by early nineteenth century physicists are shown to be a useful tool to…

  5. Survey on the Assessment of the Current Actual Expenses Incurred by Students on the Meals and Accommodation within and around the Campuses: The Case of Tanzania Higher Education Students' Loans Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyahende, Veronica R.; Bangu, Asangye N.; Chakaza, Benedicto C.

    2015-01-01

    This Survey analyses the current actual expenses incurred by students on the meals and accommodation within and around the campuses. The study was geared towards achieving the following objectives: (i) to examine the current cost incurred by a students for meals In Campus, (ii) to examine the current cost incurred by a students for accommodation…

  6. Reionization history and CMB parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Kinney, William H.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.edu

    2013-05-01

    We study how uncertainty in the reionization history of the universe affects estimates of other cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background. We analyze WMAP7 data and synthetic Planck-quality data generated using a realistic scenario for the reionization history of the universe obtained from high-resolution numerical simulation. We perform parameter estimation using a simple sudden reionization approximation, and using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique proposed by Mortonson and Hu. We reach two main conclusions: (1) Adopting a simple sudden reionization model does not introduce measurable bias into values for other parameters, indicating that detailed modeling of reionization is not necessary for the purpose of parameter estimation from future CMB data sets such as Planck. (2) PCA analysis does not allow accurate reconstruction of the actual reionization history of the universe in a realistic case.

  7. At a Crossroad between Memory and Thinking: The Case of Primary History Education in the Greek Cypriot Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perikleous, Lukas

    2010-01-01

    At the moment primary history education in the Greek Cypriot educational system is mainly about providing substantive knowledge and promoting Greek national identity and other social goals. Debates about history education are mostly about the kind of the past that should conveyed to the students and the social aims which should be promoted through…

  8. Women and History: Outside the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, Mimi

    2007-01-01

    The active participation of women in the field of American history dates back to the earliest writings on the subject. The rich and long history of women writing, teaching and researching in the field of American History, however, is obscured by narrow disciplinary definitions of what actually counts as history and who is qualified to represent…

  9. [Actuality with the breast implants].

    PubMed

    Duchateau, J

    2013-09-01

    The author presents the history of breast implants, and the modern evolution where breast implants are largely used in both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. Breast augmentation is one of the most performed cosmetic procedures, with a high satisfaction rate. However, one needs to remind that breast implants have a limited duration of life. The estimated rate of breast implant rupture after 10 years is of 10% in the current literature, This rate will probably become lower with the new more cohesive implants recently available on the market. It is therefore essential to propose a regular follow-up to all patients having breast implants. This follow-up is performed using a combination of physical examination, mammograms, ultrasound and MRI. The more specific therapeutic approach for patients having a PIP prosthesis will also be discussed. PMID:24195240

  10. The Image of the 1967 War in Israeli History Textbooks as Test Case: Studying an Active Past in a Protracted Regional Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogev, Esther

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to shed light on the dilemma facing history education in regions beset by a protracted, and as yet unresolved ethno-political conflict. The article will examine this issue by means of a unique test case that observes a dramatic war event in Israeli textbooks. The event in question is the Six-Day War of 1967 and the study of its…

  11. U.S. Supreme Court Decisions. A Case Study Review for U.S. History and Government. A Student and Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskowitz, Douglas, Ed.; Scurti, Jason, Ed.

    This constitutional casebook is the outcome of the P.A.T.C.H. Law Program of the Northport-East Northport Union Free School District in New York. The casebook provides students and teachers in grades 7, 8, 11, and 12 with a summary review of the 22 cases mentioned in the New York State Regents' 11th grade "U.S. History and Government" syllabus and…

  12. "Finding a way out": Case histories of mental health care-seeking and recovery among long-term internally displaced persons in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrita S; Jakhaia, Nino; Amonashvili, Nino; Winch, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    Trajectories of illness and recovery are ongoing and incomplete processes cocreated by individuals, their informal support networks, formal care-givers and treatment contexts, and broader social systems. This analysis presents two case histories of care-seeking for, and recovery from, mental illness and psychosocial problems in the context of protracted internal displacement. These case histories present individuals with experiences of schizophrenia and depression drawn from a sample of adult long-term internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Georgia, a country in the South Caucasus. Dimensions of care-seeking were compiled into a matrix for analysis. Interviews were open coded, and codes were linked with matrix dimensions to construct each case history. Findings illustrated that individuals moved cyclically among self-care, household support, lay care, and formal services domains to understand and manage their problems. Living with mental illness and within displacement are experiences that intersect at various points, including in the recognition and perceived causes of illness, stressors such as discrimination and isolation, the affordability and availability of services, and the capacity of social networks to provide informal care. Interventions are needed to support informal care-givers and build lay referral networks, as well as to identify intervention points within care-seeking processes. Interventions that target the mental health needs of displaced persons have the potential to contribute to the development of an innovative community mental health care system in Georgia. PMID:26698164

  13. Improving Capture of Vaccine History: Case Study from an Evaluation of 10-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Introduction in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Harris, Aaron M; Aol, George; Ouma, Dominic; Bigogo, Godfrey; Montgomery, Joel M; Whitney, Cynthia G; Breiman, Robert F; Kim, Lindsay

    2016-06-01

    With the accelerated introduction of new vaccines in low-income settings, understanding immunization program performance is critical. We sought to improve immunization history acquisition from Ministry of Health vaccination cards during a vaccine impact study of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal carriage among young children in Kenya in 2012 and 2013. We captured immunization history in a low proportion of study participants in 2012 using vaccination cards. To overcome this challenge, we implemented a household-based reminder system in 2013 using community health workers (CHWs), and increased the retrieval of vaccine cards from 62% in 2012 to 89% in 2013 (P < 0.001). The home-based reminder system using CHWs is an example of an approach that improved immunization history data quality in a resource-poor setting. PMID:27139446

  14. Coupled inverse and forward modelling to assess the range of acceptable thermal histories, a case study from SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogné, N.; Gallagher, K.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2012-04-01

    We performed a new thermochronological study (fission track analysis and (U-Th)/He dating on apatite) in SE Brazil and integrate those data with inverse and forward modelling via QTQt software (Gallagher, 2012) to obtain thermal histories. The inversion results were used to characterize the general thermal histories and the associated uncertainties. For most of the samples we had a first phase of cooling during Late Cretaceous or Early Tertiary with subsequent reheating followed by Neogene cooling. The inverse modelling does not provide a unique solution and the associated uncertainties can be quite significant. Moreover the Tertiary parts of thermal histories were usually near the accepted resolution of the thermochronometric methods (~50-40°C). Therefore we performed deterministic forward modelling within the range of uncertainties to assess which solution is the most consistent with the data and independent geological information. These results are always conditional on the assumed kinetics for fission track annealing and diffusion of He, so we do not test the validity of that aspect. However, we can look at the range of predictions for the different forward models tested. This apporach implies that the reheating is required only for the samples around onshore Tertiary basins. For other samples we cannot conclude but geological information are against this hypothesis. However the Neogene cooling is required for all the samples.The combination of forward and inverse modelling allows us to better constrain the thermal histories for each sample in exploring the range of uncertainties and to reconcile a range of possible thermal histories with independent geological information. It also provides new information on the contrasting thermal evolution between different regions of the onshore SE Brazilian margin. Gallagher, K. 2012, Transdimensional Inverse thermal history modeling for quantitative thermochronology, Journal of Geophysical Research, in press.

  15. A case of precocious emphysema and lung cancer in a woman with a history of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Suzanna C; Brierre, Stephen; Sweet, Jon; de Boisblanc, Ben

    2008-03-01

    Severe emphysema developed in a white woman with a 26-pack-year history of tobacco use. Serum alpha(1)-antitrypsin levels were normal. A history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, angioedema, low complement, and recurrent urticaria prompted an immunologic workup that ultimately led to a diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Treatment with oral prednisone and inhaled bronchodilators improved symptoms, but 4 months after diagnosis non-small cell lung cancer was discovered and she ultimately died. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis is an uncommon cause of precocious emphysema and has not previously been reported in a patient with bronchogenic carcinoma. PMID:18321906

  16. The Use of History of Science Texts in Teaching Science: Two Cases of an Innovative, Constructivist Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koliopoulos, Dimitris; Dossis, Sotiris; Stamoulis, Efthymios

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes an empirical classification of ways to introduce elements of the history of science into science teaching, as well as describing a special way to do so characterized by the introduction of short extracts from historical texts. The aim is to motivate students to participate in problem-solving activities and to transform their…

  17. A Study on the Use of History in Middle School Mathematics: The Case of Connected Mathematics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haile, Tesfayohannes Kiflemariam

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation explores the use of history of mathematics in middle school mathematics. A rationale for the importance of the incorporation of historical dimensions (HD) of mathematics is provided through a review of the literature. The literature covers pedagogical, philosophical, psychological, and social issues and provides arguments for the…

  18. Marse Henry and His Lady Insurrecto: A Case of Fictional Reminiscences for the High School History Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of autobiography and personal memoirs as teaching tools in the history classroom. Presents information from Henry Watterson's autobiography that discusses the life of Jane Cazneau. Points out flaws in which incorrect information is presented as true. Includes a complete lesson plan for use with the example. (DK)

  19. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Family Health History Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Family Health History The Basics Family Health History & Chronic Disease Planning ...

  20. Stowaways in the history of science: the case of simian virus 40 and clinical research on federal prisoners at the US National Institutes of Health, 1960.

    PubMed

    Stark, Laura; Campbell, Nancy D

    2014-12-01

    In 1960, J. Anthony Morris, a molecular biologist at the US National Institutes of Health conducted one of the only non-therapeutic clinical studies of the cancer virus SV40. Morris and his research team aimed to determine whether SV40 was a serious harm to human health, since many scientists at the time suspected that SV40 caused cancer in humans based on evidence from in vivo animal studies and experiments with human tissue. Morris found that SV40 had no significant effect but his claim has remained controversial among scientists and policymakers through the present day--both on scientific and ethical grounds. Why did Morris only conduct one clinical study on the cancer-causing potential of SV40 in healthy humans? We use the case to explain how empirical evidence and ethical imperatives are, paradoxically, often dependent on each other and mutually exclusive in clinical research, which leaves answers to scientific and ethical questions unsettled. This paper serves two goals: first, it documents a unique--and uniquely important--study of clinical research on SV40. Second, it introduces the concept of "the stowaway," which is a special type of contaminant that changes the past in the present moment. In the history of science, stowaways are misfortunes that nonetheless afford research that otherwise would have been impossible specifically by creating new pasts. This case (Morris' study) and concept (the stowaway) bring together history of science and philosophy of history for productive dialog. PMID:25282391

  1. Impacts of biogeographic history and marginal population genetics on species range limits: a case study of Liriodendron chinense

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Aihong; Dick, Christopher W.; Yao, Xiaohong; Huang, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    Species ranges are influenced by past climate oscillations, geographical constraints, and adaptive potential to colonize novel habitats at range limits. This study used Liriodendron chinense, an important temperate Asian tree species, as a model system to evaluate the roles of biogeographic history and marginal population genetics in determining range limits. We examined the demographic history and genetic diversity of 29 L. chinense populations using both chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite loci. Significant phylogeographic structure was recovered with haplotype clusters coinciding with major mountain regions. Long-term demographical stability was suggested by mismatch distribution analyses, neutrality tests, and ecological niche models (ENM) and suggested the existence of LGM refuges within mountain regions. Differences in genetic diversity between central and marginal populations were not significant for either genomic region. However, asymmetrical gene flow was inferred from central populations to marginal populations, which could potentially limit range adaptation and expansion of L. chinense. PMID:27162176

  2. Impacts of biogeographic history and marginal population genetics on species range limits: a case study of Liriodendron chinense.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aihong; Dick, Christopher W; Yao, Xiaohong; Huang, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    Species ranges are influenced by past climate oscillations, geographical constraints, and adaptive potential to colonize novel habitats at range limits. This study used Liriodendron chinense, an important temperate Asian tree species, as a model system to evaluate the roles of biogeographic history and marginal population genetics in determining range limits. We examined the demographic history and genetic diversity of 29 L. chinense populations using both chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite loci. Significant phylogeographic structure was recovered with haplotype clusters coinciding with major mountain regions. Long-term demographical stability was suggested by mismatch distribution analyses, neutrality tests, and ecological niche models (ENM) and suggested the existence of LGM refuges within mountain regions. Differences in genetic diversity between central and marginal populations were not significant for either genomic region. However, asymmetrical gene flow was inferred from central populations to marginal populations, which could potentially limit range adaptation and expansion of L. chinense. PMID:27162176

  3. Complex life histories of fishes revealed through natural information storage devices: case studies of diadromous events as recorded by otoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfman, M.; Limburg, K. E.; Kristiansson, P.; Svedäng, H.; Westin, L.; Wickström, H.; Malmqvist, K.; Pallon, J.

    2000-03-01

    Diadromous fishes - species that move across salinity gradients as part of their life repertoire - form a major part of coastal and inland fisheries. Conventional mark-recapture techniques have long been used to track their movements, but give incomplete information at best. On the other hand, otoliths (ear-stones) of fishes can provide a complete record of major life history events, as reflected both in their microstructure and elemental composition. Strontium, which substitutes for calcium in the aragonite matrix of otoliths, is a powerful tracer of salinity histories in many migratory fishes. We measured Sr and Ca with a nuclear microprobe (PIXE) and show examples (eel, Anguilla anguilla; brown trout, Salmo trutta; American shad, Alosa sapidissima) of how the technique has solved several mysteries within fisheries biology.

  4. Pulmonary mycotic pseudo-aneurysm with a prior history of ventricular septal defect. Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Walasangikar, Vishal; Kumar Dey, Amit; Sharma, Rajaram; Murumkar, Vivek; Gadewar, Rohit; Hira, Priya; Mittal, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    In general aneurysms of the pulmonary arteries are less frequent than intracranial, aortic or other vascular locations. Infectious causes include bacteria such as Staphylococcus sp and Streptococcus sp, mycobacteria, Treponema pallidium (syphilis) and rarely fungi. We report a 7 year old female with two right-sided parahilar pseudo-aneurysm of fungal origin with a prior history of ventricular septal defect. Pulmonary mycotic pseudo-aneurysms are very rare and require a high suspicion to diagnose. If a patient is still symptomatic for fever and cough for a long time, and consolidation on x-ray is not improving on antibiotics, contrast-enhanced computed tomography is indicated. It can be suspected that the "friable mass attached to ventricular septal defect patch" was a source of fungeal emboli to pulmonary arteries thus giving weight to the infective endocarditis etiology. A prior history of ventricular septal defect repair could favour fungal endocarditis. PMID:27238181

  5. Rethinking TV History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomery, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    Proposes a rethinking of historical analysis of U. S. television history, to begin at the local level. Offers a case study of the place of Washington, DC, as a site for network news. Notes that, as a community, Washington presents an important site where forces such as migration and suburbanization shaped the early history of television. (SR)

  6. Ascending aortic aneurysm in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve, positive history of systemic autoimmune diseases and common genetic factors: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Foffa, Ilenia; Festa, Pier Luigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Mazzone, Annamaria; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and specific systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with cardiovascular manifestation, including aortic aneurysm. We reported a case of 64 year-old patient with BAV and a history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and who developed ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm. The patient presented also the homozygosity for genetic variants of MMP9, ACE, MTHFR and PAI-1 genes. Gene-environmental interactions may represent an additional pathogenetic dimension in the still challenging management of the abnormalities of the aortic wall, including dilatation, aneurysm and dissection. PMID:19580662

  7. Pulmonary nocardiosis with brain abscess in a sensitized kidney transplant recipient with a history of repeated graft loss and HLA-antibody depletion treatment--a case report.

    PubMed

    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza; Wadström, Jonas; Tufveson, Gunnar; Eriksson, Britt-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection with unfavourable prognosis and is predominantly seen in immunocompromised patients. We here present a kidney transplant recipient with a history of two early graft losses who subsequently developed Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-antibodies and underwent a desensitization treatment with plasmapheresis and monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody application. However, 3 months after a third HLA-identical kidney transplantation he developed Nocardiosis with pulmonary and asymptomatic brain manifestation. The present case report exemplifies this opportunistic infection and gives an overview of the literature. PMID:18521805

  8. A case history on an innovative solution for VOC and air toxics control designed for a medical prosthetic manufacturer of silicon breast implants

    SciTech Connect

    Quan-Handley, P.

    1997-12-31

    The case history presented here is based on the selection, design, installation, testing in, and continuous operation of a recuperative type thermal oxidation system with a built on heat exchanger unit (with a thermal efficiency of 85%) and ancillary ventilation/exhaust collection system designed for McGhan Medical Corporation (McGhan), a medical prosthetic manufacturer of silicon breast implants, located in Santa Barbara, California. There is now available three (3) consecutive years of emissions source test data which verify the achievement of the overall equipment VOC destruction removal efficiency (DRE) initially projected at 98.5% or 10 ppmv.

  9. Moral Reasoning in Hypothetical and Actual Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumprer, Gerard F.; Butter, Eliot J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of this investigation suggest that moral reasoning of college students, when assessed using the DIT format, is the same whether the dilemmas involve hypothetical or actual situations. Subjects, when presented with hypothetical situations, become deeply immersed in them and respond as if they were actual participants. (Author/BEF)

  10. Factors Related to Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, H. Wayne; McWilliams, Jettie M.

    1978-01-01

    Provides data to further support the notions that females score higher in self-actualization measures and that self-actualization scores correlate inversely to the degree of undesirability individuals assign to their heights and weights. Finds that, contrary to predictions, greater androgyny was related to lower, not higher, self-actualization…

  11. Life-history trait plasticity and its relationships with plant adaptation and insect fitness: a case study on the aphid Sitobion avenae.

    PubMed

    Dai, Peng; Shi, Xiaoqin; Liu, Deguang; Ge, Zhaohong; Wang, Da; Dai, Xinjia; Yi, Zhihao; Meng, Xiuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has recently been considered a powerful means of adaptation, but its relationships with corresponding life-history characters and plant specialization levels of insects have been controversial. To address the issues, Sitobion avenae clones from three plants in two areas were compared. Varying amounts of life-history trait plasticity were found among S. avenae clones on barley, oat and wheat. In most cases, developmental durations and their corresponding plasticities were found to be independent, and fecundities and their plasticities were correlated characters instead. The developmental time of first instar nymphs for oat and wheat clones, but not for barley clones, was found to be independent from its plasticity, showing environment-specific effects. All correlations between environments were found to be positive, which could contribute to low plasticity in S. avenae. Negative correlations between trait plasticities and fitness of test clones suggest that lower plasticity could have higher adaptive value. Correlations between plasticity and specialization indices were identified for all clones, suggesting that plasticity might evolve as a by-product of adaptation to certain environments. The divergence patterns of life-history plasticities in S. avenae, as well as the relationships among plasticity, specialization and fitness, could have significant implications for evolutionary ecology of this aphid. PMID:27426961

  12. Life-history trait plasticity and its relationships with plant adaptation and insect fitness: a case study on the aphid Sitobion avenae

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Peng; Shi, Xiaoqin; Liu, Deguang; Ge, Zhaohong; Wang, Da; Dai, Xinjia; Yi, Zhihao; Meng, Xiuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has recently been considered a powerful means of adaptation, but its relationships with corresponding life-history characters and plant specialization levels of insects have been controversial. To address the issues, Sitobion avenae clones from three plants in two areas were compared. Varying amounts of life-history trait plasticity were found among S. avenae clones on barley, oat and wheat. In most cases, developmental durations and their corresponding plasticities were found to be independent, and fecundities and their plasticities were correlated characters instead. The developmental time of first instar nymphs for oat and wheat clones, but not for barley clones, was found to be independent from its plasticity, showing environment-specific effects. All correlations between environments were found to be positive, which could contribute to low plasticity in S. avenae. Negative correlations between trait plasticities and fitness of test clones suggest that lower plasticity could have higher adaptive value. Correlations between plasticity and specialization indices were identified for all clones, suggesting that plasticity might evolve as a by-product of adaptation to certain environments. The divergence patterns of life-history plasticities in S. avenae, as well as the relationships among plasticity, specialization and fitness, could have significant implications for evolutionary ecology of this aphid. PMID:27426961

  13. Rethinking low-temperature thermochronology data sampling strategies for quantification of denudation and relief histories: A case study in the French western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, Pierre G.; van der Beek, Peter A.; Braun, Jean

    2011-07-01

    . Simulations with different model topography resolutions show that degrading the resolution for computational efficiency may result in a loss of quantitative information on denudation rates and relief history. In summary, we highlight that both thermochronological sampling strategies and the choice of thermal parameters or model topography resolution have a significant influence on predicted denudation and relief histories. Ideally, the sampling strategy should be designed using preliminary modeling of expected denudation and relief histories, and a sensitivity study on assumed thermal parameters and model resolution should be performed when modeling the data. Although our modeling is based on a particular case study of relief evolution in the French western Alps, we believe that these inferences have general relevance for thermochronological studies within mountain belts.

  14. Severe Allergic Contact Dermatitis From Temporary "Black Henna" Coloring of the Hair During Religious Cultural Celebrations: Three Different Cases, Same History.

    PubMed

    Glatstein, Miguel M; Rimon, Ayelet; Danino, Dana; Scolnik, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Contact dermatitis after the application of temporary, paint-on, henna tattoos represents a well-known, potentially serious problem of active sensitization. We describe 3 cases involving 3 children of the same age who developed a severe contact dermatitis with massive face and neck swelling after application of black henna to their hair during "Purim" celebrations. All 3 cases had a history of having applied henna tattoos in the previous year with mild local reactions. Their reactions are presumed to be due to sensitization to para-phenylenediamine. Although reactions to henna are being increasingly reported, reactions of this severity seem to be rare and could lead to permanent skin changes. PMID:24675548

  15. Applications of probabilistic methods in geotechnical engineering. Part 2. Analysis of documented case histories using a stochastic model for seismically generated pore pressure and shear strain potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kavazanjian, E. Jr.; Chameau, J.L.; Clough, G.W.; Hadk-Hamou, T.

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the basics of a new stochastic model for seismically-generated pore pressure and shear strain potential and illustrates its use for documented case histories. Model parameters are chosen according to available information on the variability of soil properties, and it is applied to sites where liquefaction was observed and where no evidence of liquefaction was observed and where no evidence of liquefaction was observed after major seismic events. Results of the analysis are in substantial agreement with observed field behavior, indicating that this model can be used in a predictive capacity if parameters are chosen correctly. An application of the model to a comprehensive risk analysis of seismically induced initial liquefaction is also briefly described. An example using available seismic information for a hypothetical soil site near San Francisco is presented to illustrate the use of this type of model. Two models are applied to documented case histories to demonstrate their applicability and to illustrate how the probabilistic design parameters are chosen. The probabilistic pore pressure model developed by Chameau (1980) and the probabilistic shear strain model developed by Hadj Hamou (1982) are used herein to analyze the behavior of three sites where liquefaction did and did not occur during earthquakes.

  16. Life history traits variation in heterogeneous environment: The case of a freshwater snail resistance to pond drying

    PubMed Central

    Chapuis, Elodie; Ferdy, Jean-Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    Ecologists and population geneticists have long suspected that the diversity of living organisms was connected to the structure of their environment. In heterogeneous environments, diversifying selection combined to restricted gene flow may indeed lead to locally adapted populations. The freshwater snail, Galba truncatula, is a good model to address this question because it is present in a heterogeneous environment composed of temporary and permanent waters. In order to test the selective importance of those environments, we proposed here to measure survival of lineages from both habitats during drought episodes. To this purpose, we experimentally submitted adults and juveniles individuals from both habitats to drought. We found a difference in desiccation resistance between temporary and permanents waters only for adults. Adults from temporary habitats were found more resistant to drought. This divergence in desiccation resistance seems to explain the unexpected life history traits differences between habitats observed. PMID:22408738

  17. Role of thermal history in atomic dynamics of chalcogenide glass: A case study on Ge20Te80 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Yashika; Kalra, Geetanjali; Murugavel, Sevi

    2016-05-01

    The non-existence of thermodynamic equilibrium in glasses, their thermal history plays a very crucial role in explaining the relaxation behavior in various time scales and its configurational states. More importantly, the associated relaxation behavior is related mainly to the structural phenomenon of the glasses. Here, we report the dependence of quenching rate on the variation of structural units. The local structures of these glasses are monitored by recording the Raman spectroscopy and related to the different configurational states. The observed variations in structural differences are reflected in the measured density of the corresponding glasses. The quenching rate dependent of the relative fractions of edge-shared and corner-shared GeTe4 tetrahedral units are shown to be consistent with the corresponding variations in the measured density values.

  18. The black soldier fly Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) as a potential measure of human postmortem interval: observations and case histories.

    PubMed

    Lord, W D; Goff, M L; Adkins, T R; Haskell, N H

    1994-01-01

    The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), has been shown to be a ubiquitous inhabitant of both surface and buried human remains throughout the southern, central and western United States and Hawaii. Unlike most other species of forensically important Diptera, this species frequently dominates bodies in the dry/post decay stage of decomposition. Adults of the black soldier fly appear to initiate oviposition (egg laying) 20 to 30 days postmortem. Even at warm temperatures (27.8 degrees C), subsequent completion of the life cycle can require an additional 55 days. Life history data for H. illucens, when used in combination with data for other cohabiting arthropod species and viewed in the context of local environmental conditions, can provide medicolegal investigators with valuable parameters for estimating the postmortem intervals for badly decomposed remains. PMID:8113702

  19. Gene flow and demographic history of the mangrove crab Neosarmatium meinerti: A case study from the western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragionieri, Lapo; Cannicci, Stefano; Schubart, Christoph D.; Fratini, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Most marine organisms are characterized by at least one planktonic phase during their life history, potentially allowing interconnection of populations separated by several hundred kilometers. For many years, the idea that marine species are genetically homogenous throughout their range of distribution, due to passive larval transport, has been a paradigm. Nowadays, a growing number of studies underline the existence of boundaries in the marine realm and highlight how larval dispersal is a complex process depending on biotic as well as abiotic factors. Marine fragmented habitats, such as atolls, mangroves and estuaries, are optimal systems for investigating the marine dispersion process under a metapopulation approach, since populations can be geographically defined a priori as opposed to those occupying open marine environments. Within this frame, the present paper investigates the population genetic structure and the demographic history of the mangrove crab Neosarmatium meinerti within the western Indian Ocean by partial sequences of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I. A total of 167 specimens were sampled from six mangrove sites distributed along the East African coast, from Kenya to South Africa, also including a mangrove forest located on Mahé Island, Seychelles. A sharp genetic break between the mainland and the Seychelles is recorded, revealing the existence of two historically distinct groups that can be defined as independent evolutionary units. Gene flow along the East African coast appears to be high enough to form a single metapopulation, probably by means of stepping stone populations. Otherwise, this mainland metapopulation is currently under expansion through a gradual moving front from the subtropical toward the equatorial populations.

  20. Petrogenesis and geological history of a uranium source rock: a case study in northeastern Washington, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.; Burruss, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    A small (4 km2) drainage basin in northeastern Washington contains highly uraniferous groundwater and highly uraniferous peaty sediments of Holocene age. The U is derived from granitic bedrock that underlies the entire drainage basin and that contains 9-16 ppm U. This local bedrock was studied by petrographic, chemical and isotopic methods to determine conditions of its petrogenesis and post-emplacement history that may have contributed to its present high U content and source-rock capability. The original magma was derived by anatexis of Precambrian continental crust of probable mixed metaigneous and metasedimentary character. Mineral-melt partitioning controlled the enrichment of U in chemically evolved phases of the crystallizing melt. Following emplacement in the upper crust at ???100 Ma, the pluton interacted with meteoric-hydrothermal water at ambient temperatures >300??C. Locally intense fracturing promoted alteration, and fracturing and alteration probably continued during later regional uplift in the Eocene. Regional uplift was followed by low-temperature alteration and weathering in the middle to late Tertiary. The combined result of hydrothermal alteration and low-temperature alteration and weathering was the redistribution of U from primary mineral hosts such as allanite to new sites on fracture surfaces and in secondary minerals such as hematite. Zones of highly fractured and altered rock show the most obvious evidence of this process. A model is proposed in which high-angle fractures beneath the drainage basin were the sites of Tertiary supergene enrichments of U. Recent glacio-isostatic uplift has elevated these older enriched zones to shallow levels where they are now being leached by oxidizing groundwater. The chemistry, mineralogy, texture and geological history of this U source-rock suggest criteria for locating other granitic terrane that may contain uraniferous waters and associated young surficial U deposits. The details of U distribution and

  1. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  2. Doing History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Robert W.

    When elementary students examine primary sources and local historical sites to gain firsthand information about life in the past, history becomes more relevant, exciting, and enjoyable. To help students understand that history is not just what is in a textbook, this student resource book focuses on making them aware that history exists all around…

  3. Art or Forgery? The Strange Case of Han Van Meegren: A Videodisc for Aesthetics and Art History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covey, Preston

    1990-01-01

    The evolution and design of a videodisk recording for classroom use in teaching aesthetics at the college level are described. The program presents an internationally notorious case study in art forgery. It facilitates three crucial tasks in visual art study: access to art and related information; detail; and analysis. (MSE)

  4. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Complex Maxillofacial Defect as an Alternative to Surgical Reconstruction: A Case History Report.

    PubMed

    Artopoulou, Ioli Ioanna; Lemon, James C

    2016-01-01

    Free tissue transfers are used to restore maxillofacial resected tissues during tumor ablative surgery. The maxillofacial prosthodontist remains an integral member of the therapeutic team, since conventional retained facial prostheses are in certain cases the most practical, trouble-free, cost-efficient, and successful means of rehabilitation. PMID:27148980

  5. The Relevance of History of Biology to Teaching and Learning in the Life Sciences: The Case of Mendel's Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagher, Zoubeida R.

    2014-01-01

    Using Mendel's laws as a case in point, the purpose of this paper is to bring historical and philosophical perspectives together to help students understand science as a human endeavor. Three questions as addressed: (1) how did the Mendelian scheme, principles, or facts become labeled as laws, (2) to what extent do Mendel's laws exhibit…

  6. History of Science and History of Philologies.

    PubMed

    Daston, Lorraine; Most, Glenn W

    2015-06-01

    While both the sciences and the humanities, as currently defined, may be too heterogeneous to be encompassed within a unified historical framework, there is good reason to believe that the history of science and the history of philologies both have much to gain by joining forces. This collaboration has already yielded striking results in the case of the history of science and humanist learning in early modern Europe. This essay argues that first, philology and at least some of the sciences (e.g., astronomy) remained intertwined in consequential ways well into the modern period in Western cultures; and second, widening the scope of inquiry to include other philological traditions in non-Western cultures offers rich possibilities for a comparative history of learned practices. The focus on practices is key; by shifting the emphasis from what is studied to how it is studied, deep commonalities emerge among disciplines--and intellectual traditions--now classified as disparate. PMID:26353442

  7. Integrating fossils, phylogenies, and niche models into biogeography to reveal ancient evolutionary history: the case of Hypericum (hypericaceae).

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Andrea S; Lobo, Jorge M; Ree, Richard; Beerling, David J; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2015-03-01

    In disciplines such as macroevolution that are not amenable to experimentation, scientists usually rely on current observations to test hypotheses about historical events, assuming that "the present is the key to the past." Biogeographers, for example, used this assumption to reconstruct ancestral ranges from the distribution of extant species. Yet, under scenarios of high extinction rates, the biodiversity we observe today might not be representative of the historical diversity and this could result in incorrect biogeographic reconstructions. Here, we introduce a new approach to incorporate into biogeographic inference the temporal, spatial, and environmental information provided by the fossil record, as a direct evidence of the extinct biodiversity fraction. First, inferences of ancestral ranges for those nodes in the phylogeny calibrated with the fossil record are constrained to include the geographic distribution of the fossil. Second, we use fossil distribution and past climate data to reconstruct the climatic preferences and potential distribution of ancestral lineages over time, and use this information to build a biogeographic model that takes into account "ecological connectivity" through time. To show the power of this approach, we reconstruct the biogeographic history of the large angiosperm genus Hypericum, which has a fossil record extending back to the Early Cenozoic. Unlike previous reconstructions based on extant species distributions, our results reveal that Hypericum stem lineages were already distributed in the Holarctic before diversification of its crown-group, and that the geographic distribution of the genus has been relatively stable throughout the climatic oscillations of the Cenozoic. Geographical movement was mediated by the existence of climatic corridors, like Beringia, whereas the equatorial tropical belt acted as a climatic barrier, preventing Hypericum lineages to reach the southern temperate regions. Our study shows that an

  8. Integrating Fossils, Phylogenies, and Niche Models into Biogeography to Reveal Ancient Evolutionary History: The Case of Hypericum (Hypericaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Meseguer, Andrea S.; Lobo, Jorge M.; Ree, Richard; Beerling, David J.; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In disciplines such as macroevolution that are not amenable to experimentation, scientists usually rely on current observations to test hypotheses about historical events, assuming that “the present is the key to the past.” Biogeographers, for example, used this assumption to reconstruct ancestral ranges from the distribution of extant species. Yet, under scenarios of high extinction rates, the biodiversity we observe today might not be representative of the historical diversity and this could result in incorrect biogeographic reconstructions. Here, we introduce a new approach to incorporate into biogeographic inference the temporal, spatial, and environmental information provided by the fossil record, as a direct evidence of the extinct biodiversity fraction. First, inferences of ancestral ranges for those nodes in the phylogeny calibrated with the fossil record are constrained to include the geographic distribution of the fossil. Second, we use fossil distribution and past climate data to reconstruct the climatic preferences and potential distribution of ancestral lineages over time, and use this information to build a biogeographic model that takes into account “ecological connectivity” through time. To show the power of this approach, we reconstruct the biogeographic history of the large angiosperm genus Hypericum, which has a fossil record extending back to the Early Cenozoic. Unlike previous reconstructions based on extant species distributions, our results reveal that Hypericum stem lineages were already distributed in the Holarctic before diversification of its crown-group, and that the geographic distribution of the genus has been relatively stable throughout the climatic oscillations of the Cenozoic. Geographical movement was mediated by the existence of climatic corridors, like Beringia, whereas the equatorial tropical belt acted as a climatic barrier, preventing Hypericum lineages to reach the southern temperate regions. Our study shows that an

  9. Reconstructing land use history from Landsat time-series. Case study of a swidden agriculture system in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrieux, Loïc P.; Jakovac, Catarina C.; Latifah, Siti H.; Kooistra, Lammert

    2016-05-01

    We developed a method to reconstruct land use history from Landsat images time-series. The method uses a breakpoint detection framework derived from the econometrics field and applicable to time-series regression models. The Breaks For Additive Season and Trend (BFAST) framework is used for defining the time-series regression models which may contain trend and phenology, hence appropriately modelling vegetation intra and inter-annual dynamics. All available Landsat data are used for a selected study area, and the time-series are partitioned into segments delimited by breakpoints. Segments can be associated to land use regimes, while the breakpoints then correspond to shifts in land use regimes. In order to further characterize these shifts, we classified the unlabelled breakpoints returned by the algorithm into their corresponding processes. We used a Random Forest classifier, trained from a set of visually interpreted time-series profiles to infer the processes and assign labels to the breakpoints. The whole approach was applied to quantifying the number of cultivation cycles in a swidden agriculture system in Brazil (state of Amazonas). Number and frequency of cultivation cycles is of particular ecological relevance in these systems since they largely affect the capacity of the forest to regenerate after land abandonment. We applied the method to a Landsat time-series of Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI) spanning the 1984-2015 period and derived from it the number of cultivation cycles during that period at the individual field scale level. Agricultural fields boundaries used to apply the method were derived using a multi-temporal segmentation approach. We validated the number of cultivation cycles predicted by the method against in-situ information collected from farmers interviews, resulting in a Normalized Residual Mean Squared Error (NRMSE) of 0.25. Overall the method performed well, producing maps with coherent spatial patterns. We identified

  10. [The history of the Confederation of historians of medicine].

    PubMed

    Lisitsyn, Iu P; Zhuravleva, T V

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with a brief essay of history and actual state of activities of the Confederation of historians of medicine which before Perestroika was named the All-Union history medical society. PMID:20731155

  11. Nuclear discs as clocks for the assembly history of early-type galaxies: the case of NGC 4458

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi, M.; Ledo, H. R.; Coccato, L.; Corsini, E. M.; Dotti, M.; Khochfar, S.; Maraston, C.; Morelli, L.; Pizzella, A.

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20 per cent of early-type galaxies host small nuclear stellar discs that are tens to a few hundred parsecs in size. Such discs are expected to be easily disrupted during major galactic encounters, hence their age serve to constrain their assembly history. We use VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral-field spectroscopic observations for the intermediate-mass E0 galaxy NGC 4458 and age-date its nuclear disc via high-resolution fitting of various model spectra. We find that the nuclear disc is at least 6 Gyr old. A clue to gain narrow limits to the stellar age is our knowledge of the nuclear disc contribution to the central surface brightness. The presence of an old nuclear disc, or the absence of disruptive encounters since z ˜ 0.6, for a small galaxy such as NGC 4458 which belongs to the Virgo cluster, may be consistent with a hierarchical picture for galaxy formation where the smallest galaxies assembles earlier and the crowded galactic environments reduce the incidence of galaxy mergers. On the other hand, NGC 4458 displays little or no bulk rotation except for a central kpc-scale kinematically decoupled core. Slow rotation and decoupled core are usually explained in terms of mergers. The presence and age of the nuclear disc constraint these mergers to have happened at high redshift.

  12. Disease History and Medication Use as Risk Factors for the Clinical Manifestation of Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Young Adults: An Explorative Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli Farsani, Soulmaz; Souverein, Patrick C.; van der Vorst, Marja M. J.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.; Knibbe, Catherijne A. J.; de Boer, Anthonius

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a highly variable asymptomatic period of beta cell destruction prior to the clinical presentation of type1 diabetes. It is not well known what triggers type 1 diabetes to become a clinically overt disease. This explorative study aimed to identify the association between disease history/medication use and the clinical manifestation of type 1 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings An explorative case control study was conducted in the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System. Cases (n  = 1,107) were younger than 25 years and had at least 2 insulin prescriptions between 1999 and 2009. For each case, up to 4 controls (without any prescription for the glucose lowering medications (n  = 4,424)) were matched by age and sex. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between disease history/medication use in the year prior to the diagnosis of type1 diabetes and clinical manifestation of this disease. Type1 diabetes was significantly associated with a history of mental disorder (odds ratio (OR) 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5–43.7), anemia (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.1–22.9), and disease of digestive system (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.2–5.5). The following drug exposures were significantly associated with the clinical manifestation of type 1 diabetes: “systemic hormonal preparations” (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6), medications for “blood and blood forming organs” (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.6), “alimentary tract and metabolism” (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.6), and “anti-infectives for systemic use” (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.01–1.4). Conclusions Our explorative study demonstrated that in the year prior to the presentation of type1 diabetes in children and young adults, hospitalization for a diverse group of diseases and drug exposures were significantly more prevalent compared with age- and sex-matched diabetes-free controls. PMID:24498320

  13. Effects of Including Misidentified Sharks in Life History Analyses: A Case Study on the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Smart, Jonathan J; Chin, Andrew; Baje, Leontine; Green, Madeline E; Appleyard, Sharon A; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; White, William T

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries observer programs are used around the world to collect crucial information and samples that inform fisheries management. However, observer error may misidentify similar-looking shark species. This raises questions about the level of error that species misidentifications could introduce to estimates of species' life history parameters. This study addressed these questions using the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos as a case study. Observer misidentification rates were quantified by validating species identifications using diagnostic photographs taken on board supplemented with DNA barcoding. Length-at-age and maturity ogive analyses were then estimated and compared with and without the misidentified individuals. Vertebrae were retained from a total of 155 sharks identified by observers as C. amblyrhynchos. However, 22 (14%) of these were sharks were misidentified by the observers and were subsequently re-identified based on photographs and/or DNA barcoding. Of the 22 individuals misidentified as C. amblyrhynchos, 16 (73%) were detected using photographs and a further 6 via genetic validation. If misidentified individuals had been included, substantial error would have been introduced to both the length-at-age and the maturity estimates. Thus validating the species identification, increased the accuracy of estimated life history parameters for C. amblyrhynchos. From the corrected sample a multi-model inference approach was used to estimate growth for C. amblyrhynchos using three candidate models. The model averaged length-at-age parameters for C. amblyrhynchos with the sexes combined were L∞ = 159 cm TL and L0 = 72 cm TL. Females mature at a greater length (l50 = 136 cm TL) and older age (A50 = 9.1 years) than males (l50 = 123 cm TL; A50 = 5.9 years). The inclusion of techniques to reduce misidentification in observer programs will improve the results of life history studies and ultimately improve management through the use of more accurate data

  14. Effects of Including Misidentified Sharks in Life History Analyses: A Case Study on the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Jonathan J.; Chin, Andrew; Baje, Leontine; Green, Madeline E.; Appleyard, Sharon A.; Tobin, Andrew J.; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; White, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries observer programs are used around the world to collect crucial information and samples that inform fisheries management. However, observer error may misidentify similar-looking shark species. This raises questions about the level of error that species misidentifications could introduce to estimates of species’ life history parameters. This study addressed these questions using the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos as a case study. Observer misidentification rates were quantified by validating species identifications using diagnostic photographs taken on board supplemented with DNA barcoding. Length-at-age and maturity ogive analyses were then estimated and compared with and without the misidentified individuals. Vertebrae were retained from a total of 155 sharks identified by observers as C. amblyrhynchos. However, 22 (14%) of these were sharks were misidentified by the observers and were subsequently re-identified based on photographs and/or DNA barcoding. Of the 22 individuals misidentified as C. amblyrhynchos, 16 (73%) were detected using photographs and a further 6 via genetic validation. If misidentified individuals had been included, substantial error would have been introduced to both the length-at-age and the maturity estimates. Thus validating the species identification, increased the accuracy of estimated life history parameters for C. amblyrhynchos. From the corrected sample a multi-model inference approach was used to estimate growth for C. amblyrhynchos using three candidate models. The model averaged length-at-age parameters for C. amblyrhynchos with the sexes combined were  L¯∞ = 159 cm TL and  L¯0 = 72 cm TL. Females mature at a greater length (l50 = 136 cm TL) and older age (A50 = 9.1 years) than males (l50 = 123 cm TL; A50 = 5.9 years). The inclusion of techniques to reduce misidentification in observer programs will improve the results of life history studies and ultimately improve management through the use of more

  15. The impact of high-resolution biostratigraphy on reservoir prediction and basin history - A Barents Sea case study

    SciTech Connect

    Husmo, T. ); Hochuli, P. )

    1991-08-01

    The Hammerfest Basin is bounded by the Troms-Finnmark Platform to the south and the Loppa High to the north. Twenty-seven exploration wells have been drilled in the basin since 1980. The objective for most of these wells was Middle Jurassic fault blocks. Until recently little attention has been paid to the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous synrift sequence. The first well drilled on Block 7120/10 tested a rotated Jurassic fault block. This well, together with two wells in an adjacent block, penetrated thin Lower Cretaceous sands near the distal pinch-outs of fault wedges. Seismic data indicated that a basinal wedge of equivalent age was present on Block 7120/10. High risk was put on the presence of sand in this basinal wedge, and a detailed biostratigraphic analysis was performed on wells along the basin margin in order to determine the timing of erosion on the margin and whether the Jurassic-Triassic coarse clastics were present in the provenance area. The analysis separated reworked from in-situ palynomorph assemblages in the synrift succession in the analyzed wells. A clear inverted stratigraphy was displayed by the reworked palynomorphs. Furthermore, a dramatic increase in reworked palynomorphs. Furthermore, a dramatic increase in reworked palynomorphs was observed in all wells at the onset of Valanginian. In particular the presence of Nannoceratopsis gracilis suggested that shallow marine Jurassic clastics were eroded at this time. Sand presence was predicted for the basinal wedge. The understanding of the basin history was also improved. Well 71Z0/10-2 drilled summer 1990 proved the success of the reservoir prediction and hence the usefulness of incorporating biostratigraphy in the assessment.

  16. History of Physics as a Tool to Detect the Conceptual Difficulties Experienced by Students: The Case of Simple Electric Circuits in Primary Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Matteo

    2014-04-01

    The present paper advocates the use of History of Science into the teaching of science in primary education through a case study in the field of electricity. In this study, which provides both historical and experimental evidence, a number of conceptual difficulties faced by early nineteenth century physicists are shown to be a useful tool to detect 5th grade pupils' conceptions about the simple electric circuits. This result was obtained through the administration of schematics showing circuital situation inspired to early 1800s experiments on the effects of electric current on water electrolysis and on the behaviour of magnetic compasses. It is also shown that the detecting of pupils' alternative ideas about electric current in a circuit is highly dependent on the survey methodology (open ended questions and drawings, multiple-choice item, connecting card work, and history of science tasks were considered in this study) and that the so-called "unipolar model" of electric circuit is more pervasive than previously acknowledged. Finally, a highly significant hybrid model of electric current is identified.

  17. Compensatory mechanisms in fish populations: Literature reviews: Volume 1, Critical evaluation of case histories of fish populations experiencing chronic exploitation or impact: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Saila, S.B.; Chen, X.; Erzini, K.; Martin, B.

    1987-05-01

    This study includes case histories of certain fish species which are experiencing chronic perturbations and related literature pertaining to compensation processes. ''Compensation'' has been defined as the ability of fish to offset the population reduction caused by natural or man-induced stresses. Certain compensation methods are widely accepted, and include cannibalism, competition, disease, growth and predation, among others. These compensation methods are examined in relation to each fish species included in the study. Stock-recruit relationships and empirical observations of changes in growth and mortality have been the focus of much of the background on compensation. One of the conclusions drawn from this study is that a significant amount of recruitment variability exists and can be attributed to environmental (rather than compensatory) factors. The stock-recruitment problem appears to be the most significant scientific problem related to compensation in the types of fish included in this study. Results of the most recent studies of the American shad support this theory. Life histories, breeding biology and other pertinent data relating to each species included in the study will be found in the appendices.

  18. Natural history of adult-onset Ménétrier's disease: Report of a case with 9-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    XIONG, LI-SHOU; GONG, YING-YING

    2016-01-01

    Ménétrier's disease (MD) is a rare disease characterized by markedly hypertrophied gastric mucosal folds typically associated with hypoalbuminemia and anemia. However, the natural history of MD in adults remains unclear and is rarely reported in the literature. The current study presents a case of MD with a 9-year follow-up. A 56-year-old man was diagnosed with MD in 2005. The patient was followed up and underwent surveillance endoscopy once or twice each year. In the present case, the anemia and hypoproteinemia were eliminated following red blood cell transfusion and intravenous iron therapies. The symptoms were relieved after 4 years. Treatment with octreotide had little effect on the gastric mucosa, while antimicrobial combination therapy provided no benefit in the present H. pylori-negative case of MD. In addition, despite abnormalities of the gastric mucosa in the patient persisting after 9 years of follow-up with no evidence of malignancy, malignant transformation in MD should not be overlooked, and regular monitoring of the gastric mucosa via endoscopy is necessary. PMID:27284333

  19. A very rare case of HPV-53-related cervical cancer, in a 79-year-old woman with a previous history of negative Pap cytology

    PubMed Central

    Zappacosta, Roberta; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Viola, Patrizia; Ianieri, Manuel Maria; Gatta, Daniela Maria Pia; Rosini, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of organized cervical cancer (CC) screening programs has drastically reduced the prevalence of CC. However the incidence is still too high, especially among elderly women. All guidelines strongly recommend a regular Papanicolaou (Pap) testing for young and middle-aged patients. On the other hand, many international professional societies no longer advise screening in women who have undergone hysterectomy, and in women aged 65 years and above, who have a previous history of regular Pap smears. Here we report the case of poorly differentiated CC, involving the pelvic lymph nodes and urinary bladder, occurring in a 79-year-old woman who regularly underwent Pap tests, with no reported cytological abnormalities. In this very rare case, the CC cells, as well as cells from metastatic lymph nodes and cells from urinary specimens, molecularly showed human papilloma virus (HPV)-53. With the limitations of a single case, this report brings important information to prevent CC in elderly patients: the utility of molecular tests to increase sensitivity of Pap smears in postmenopausal women; the importance of HPV-53 as one of the four “emergent” genotypes having a possible role in oncogenesis; and the presence of HPV-53 in lymph node metastases from cervical carcinoma, which would support the role of this virus in the maintenance of malignant status. PMID:24790420

  20. Resurgence of anorexic symptoms during smoking cessation in patients with a history of anorexia nervosa: An unseen problem?--Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Simioni, Nicolas; Cottencin, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    This report describes a resurgence of anorexic symptoms during a smoking cessation program in two patients with a history of anorexia nervosa. These two events were identified among patients lost to follow-up by using a strategy implemented to limit early drop out. In both cases, the resurgence of anorexic symptoms occurred rapidly after having reached abstinence from tobacco and was described as a response to the weight gain they had experienced just after the start of smoking cessation. The smoking cessation process itself was considered as the most plausible explanation for these two events. Given the potential serious consequences, further research is needed to determine whether such events are frequent during smoking cessation but being unseen because of being hidden in the loss to follow-up. This report also suggests that systematic screening for both binge eating and anorexic behaviors during smoking cessation is warranted. PMID:26016609

  1. The Nurse in the University: A History of University Education for South African Nurses: A Case Study of the University of the Witwatersrand

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Simonne

    2011-01-01

    This paper charts the history and debates surrounding the introduction of academic, university-based training of nurses in South Africa. This was a process that was drawn out over five decades, beginning in the late 1930s. For nurses, university training was an important part of a process of professionalization; however, for other members of the medical community, nursing was seen as being linked to women's service work. Using the case-study of the University of the Witwatersrand, one of South Africa's premier universities and the place in the country to offer a university-based nursing program, we argue that an historical understanding of the ways in which nursing education was integrated into the university system tells us a great deal about the professionalization of nursing. This paper also recognises, for the first time, the pioneers of this important process. PMID:21994840

  2. Assessing land-use history for reporting on cropland dynamics - A case study using the Land-Parcel Identification System in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Jesko; González, Ainhoa; Jones, Michael; O'Brien, Phillip; Stout, Jane C.; Green, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In developed countries, cropland and grassland conversions and management can be a major factor in Land Use and Land Use Change (LULUC) related Greenhouse Gas (GHG) dynamics. Depending on land use, management and factors such as soil properties land can either act as source or sink for GHGs. Currently many countries depend on national statistics combined with socio-economic modelling to assess current land use as well as inter-annual changes. This potentially introduces a bias as it neither provides information on direct land- use change trajectories nor spatially explicit information to assess the environmental context. In order to improve reporting countries are shifting towards high resolution spatial datasets. In this case study, we used the Land Parcel Identification System (LPIS), a pan-European geographical database developed to assist farmers and authorities with agricultural subsidies, to analyse cropland dynamics in Ireland. The database offer high spatial resolution and is updated annually. Generally Ireland is considered grassland dominated with 90 % of its agricultural area under permanent grassland, and only a small area dedicated to cropland. However an in-depth analysis of the LPIS for the years 2000 to 2012 showed strong underlying dynamics. While the annual area reported as cropland remained relatively constant at 3752.3 ± 542.3 km2, the area of permanent cropland was only 1251.9 km2. Reversely, the area that was reported as cropland for at least one year during the timeframe was 7373.4 km2, revealing a significantly higher area with cropland history than annual statistics would suggest. Furthermore, the analysis showed that one quarter of the land converting from or to cropland will return to the previous land use within a year. To demonstrate potential policy impact, we assessed cropland/grassland dynamics from the 2008 to 2012 commitment period using (a) annual statistics, and (b) data including land use history derived from LPIS. Under

  3. [A serous cystadenoma of the ovary of borderline malignancy with a fifteen-year history. A case report].

    PubMed

    Nagata, O; Aramaki, S; Iino, H; Ishikawa, S; Yoshida, H; Azekami, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Iwasa, T; Matsukuma, K; Iwata, Y

    1990-04-01

    A case of a serous cystadenoma of a ovary of borderline malignancy is reported. Sixteen years earlier, the patient had undergone an exploratory laparotomy because of ovarian tumor, and the histologic diagnosis had been a serous cystadenocarcinoma. Postoperative chemotherapy was not effective and drainage of the tumor fluid had been performed for 15 years, with the estimated drainage volume estimated to have reached, 1,000 1. Gradual malnutrition and marked tumor growth then become apparent. A reevaluation of the initial histologic slides and her clinical course strongly suggested a serous cystadenoma of borderline malignancy. Thus a tumor resection, a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a hysterectomy was performed. A histologic diagnosis of a resected specimen confirmed a serous cystadenoma of borderline malignancy and the histologic features were quite similar to those of the initial biopsy specimens. The patient is living well postoperatively for 8 months without postoperative chemotherapy. PMID:2325270

  4. History of Physical Terms: "Energy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frontali, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties encountered by teachers in giving a definition of the term "energy", and by students in grasping its actual meaning, reflect the lengthy process through which the concept eventually came to maturity around 1850. Tracing the history of this process illuminates the different aspects covered by the term and shows the important…

  5. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  6. The Natural History of Juvenile or Subacute GM2 Gangliosidosis: 21 New Cases and Literature Review of 134 Previously Reported

    PubMed Central

    Maegawa, Gustavo H. B.; Stockley, Tracy; Tropak, Michael; Banwell, Brenda; Blaser, Susan; Kok, Fernando; Giugliani, Roberto; Mahuran, Don; Clarke, Joe T. R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases caused by deficiency of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase resulting in GM2 ganglioside accumulation in brain. The purpose of this study was to delineate the natural history of the condition and identify genotype-phenotype correlations that might be helpful in predicting the course of the disease in individual patients. METHODS A cohort of 21 patients with juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis, 15 with the Tay-Sachs variant and 6 with the Sandhoff variant, was studied prospectively in 2 centers. Our experience was compared with previously published reports on 134 patients. Information about clinical features, β-hexosaminidase enzyme activity, and mutation analysis was collected. RESULTS In our cohort of patients, the mean (±SD) age of onset of symptoms was 5.3 ± 4.1 years, with a mean follow-up time of 8.4 years. The most common symptoms at onset were gait disturbances (66.7%), incoordination (52.4%), speech problems (28.6%), and developmental delay (28.6%). The age of onset of gait disturbances was 7.1 ± 5.6 years. The mean time for progression to becoming wheelchair-bound was 6.2 ± 5.5 years. The mean age of onset of speech problems was 7.0 ± 5.6 years, with a mean time of progression to anarthria of 5.6 ± 5.3 years. Muscle wasting (10.6 ± 7.4 years), proximal weakness (11.1 ± 7.7 years), and incontinence of sphincters (14.6 ± 9.7 years) appeared later in the course of the disease. Psychiatric disturbances and neuropathy were more prevalent in patients with the Sandhoff variant than in those with the Tay-Sachs variant. However, dysphagia, sphincter incontinence, and sleep problems occurred earlier in those with the Tay-Sachs variant. Cerebellar atrophy was the most common finding on brain MRI (52.9%). The median survival time among the studied and reviewed patients was 14.5 years. The genotype-phenotype correlation revealed that in patients with the Tay-Sachs variant, the presence

  7. Consistency and Representations: The Case of Actual Infinity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsamir, Pessia; Tirosh, Dina

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates how research-based knowledge of students' incompatible solutions to various representations of the same problem could be used to raise their awareness of inconsistencies in their reasoning. Reports that students' decisions as to whether two given infinite sets have the same number of elements depend on the specific representation of…

  8. New prospects for deducing the evolutionary history of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes: Aromatic biosynthesis as a case-in-point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Suhail; Jensen, Roy A.

    1988-03-01

    Metabolic pathways of prokaryotes are more biochemically diverse than is generally recognized. Distinctive biochemical features are shared by phylogenetic clusters. The hierarchical levels of characterstate clustering depends upon evolutionary events which fortuitously became fixed in the genome of a common ancestor. Prokaryotes can now be ordered on a phylogenetic tree. This allows the evolutionary steps that underlie the construction and regulation of appropriately complex biochemical pathways to be traced in an evolutionary progression of prokaryote types that house these pathways. Essentially the approach is to deduce ancestral character states at ever deeper phylogenetic levels, utilizing logical principles of maximum parsimony. The current perspective on the evolution of the biochemical pathway for biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids is developed as a case-in-point model for analyses that should be feasible with many major metabolic systems. Phenylalanine biosynthesis probably arose prior to the addition of branches leading to tyrosine and tryptophan. An evolutionary scenario is developed that begins with non-enzymatic reactions which may have operated in primitive systems, followed by the evolution of an enzymatic system that pre-dated the divergence of major lineages of modern eubacteria (Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative purple bacteria, and cyanobacteria).

  9. Preoperative Uterine Artery Embolisation for Large Uterine Fibroids with Subsequent Uterus Preservation - Three Case Histories and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    David, M; Kröncke, T

    2012-06-01

    Uterine artery embolisation (UAE) is an established procedure to treat uterine fibroids as an alternative to surgery. The combination of both approaches is reserved for only a few cases. A preoperative UAE (PUAE) contributes to reducing bleeding complications and helps preserve the uterus. We report here on 3 patients, each with very large fibroid (all > 1100 g), who were successfully treated by interdisciplinary hybrid intervention (embolisation followed by surgery). Preserving the uterus was a "sine qua non" for all 3 patients. As discussed in some articles, PUAE should be considered when treating patients who wish to preserve their uterus at all costs but who are considered preoperatively to be at increased risk of bleeding and/or patients who are considered to be at high risk of requiring a hysterectomy "for technical reasons". The additional costs of embolisation can be set against the potentially shorter hospitalisation times due to the more favourable intraoperative and postoperative course, the savings arising from the reduced need for blood transfusions, and the greater patient satisfaction. PMID:25284842

  10. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: Case report with history of urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura triggered by medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Mbonile, Lumuli

    2016-04-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare autoimmune response to raised endogenous progesterone levels that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Cutaneous, mucosal lesions and other systemic manifestations develop cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are elevated. APD symptoms usually start 3 - 10 days before menstruation and resolve 1 - 2 days after menstruation ceases. A 30-year-old woman presented with urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura lesions of the legs, forearms, neck and buttocks 1 week prior to her menses starting and 2 months after a medical abortion. She was diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and topical steroids were prescribed. Her skin conditions did not improve and were associated with her menstrual cycle. We performed an intradermal test using progesterone, which was positive. She was treated with oral contraceptive pills and the symptoms were resolved. This is a typical case of APD triggered by increased sensitivity to endogenous progesterone induced a few months after medical abortion. PMID:27032848

  11. Why the history of nephrology?

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2016-01-01

    Nephrology is a relatively new discipline that emerged at a time when the writing of the history of medicine was changing drastically. While the merits of medical history were valued since antiquity, it was only in the 18th century that the actual historiography of medicine began. It was nurtured, matured and appreciated enough that by the late 19th and early 20th centuries, medical history was incorporated into the medical curriculum and presented at national meetings. Unfortunately, the merits of medical history and its inclusion in medical education have come under increasing scrutiny over the past few decades. Ironically, the erosion began at about the same time that scholarly work on the history of medicine was flourishing whilst that of scientific discovery and innovation in medicine was accelerating. The demands of rigorous research into the history of medicine gradually led to the emergence of medical history as an independent discipline within academic departments of history. Simultaneously, the exponential growth of new information generated by medical research led to an overflow of medical knowledge in which the inclusion of medical history was contested and dismissed. That is just about the time that nephrology emerged in the 1960s. Whereas initially the quest for origins led renal journals to publish historical articles, the more recent quest to increase impact factors has led to the exclusion of historical articles from consideration for publication. This manuscript examines the reasons that brought about the separation of nephrology from its history and proposes potential solutions to their rapprochement. PMID:26913750

  12. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  13. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  14. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  15. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  16. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  17. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  18. Racial Discrimination in Occupations: Perceived and Actual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Castellano B.; Turner, Barbara F.

    The relationship between the actual representation of Blacks in certain occupations and individual perceptions of the occupational opportunity structure were examined. A scale which rated the degree of perceived discrimination against Blacks in 21 occupations was administered to 75 black male, 70 black female, 1,429 white male and 1,457 white…

  19. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  20. Bedrock temperature as a potential method for monitoring change in crustal stress: Theory, in situ measurement, and a case history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shunyun; Liu, Peixun; Liu, Liqiang; Ma, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies have confirmed that temperature is notably affected by rock deformation; therefore, change in crustal stress should be indicated by measurable changes in bedrock temperature. In this work, we investigated the possibility that the bedrock temperature might be used to explore the state of crustal stress. In situ measurement of bedrock temperature at three stations from 2011 to 2013 was used as the basis for the theoretical analysis of this approach. We began with theoretical analyses of temperature response to change in crustal stress, and of the effect of heat conduction. This allowed distinction between temperature changes produced by crustal stress (stress temperature) from temperature changes caused by conduction from the land surface (conduction temperature). Stress temperature has two properties (synchronous response and a high-frequency feature) that allow it to be distinguished from conduction temperature. The in situ measurements confirmed that apparently synchronous changes in the stress temperature of the bedrock occur and that there exist obvious short-term components of the in situ bedrock temperature, which agrees with theory. On 20 April 2013, an earthquake occurred 95 km away from the stations, fortuitously providing a case study by which to verify our method for obtaining the state of crustal stress using temperature. The results indicated that the level of local or regional seismic activity, representing the level of stress adjustment, largely accords with the stress temperature. This means that the bedrock temperature is a tool that might be applied to understand the state of stress during seismogenic tectonics. Therefore, it is possible to record changes in the state of crustal stress in a typical tectonic position by long-term observation of bedrock temperature. Hereby, the measurement of bedrock temperature has become a new tool for gaining insight into changes in the status of shallow crustal stress.

  1. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  2. Increased deep sleep in a medication-free, detoxified female offender with schizophrenia, alcoholism and a history of attempted homicide: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Nina; Tani, Pekka; Takala, Pirjo; Sailas, Eila; Putkonen, Hanna; Eronen, Markku; Virkkunen, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Background Psychiatric sleep research has attempted to identify diagnostically sensitive and specific sleep patterns associated with particular disorders. Both schizophrenia and alcoholism are typically characterized by a severe sleep disturbance associated with decreased amounts of slow wave sleep, the physiologically significant, refreshing part of the sleep. Antisocial behaviour with severe aggression, on the contrary, has been reported to associate with increased deep sleep reflecting either specific brain pathology or a delay in the normal development of sleep patterns. The authors are not aware of previous sleep studies in patients with both schizophrenia and antisocial personality disorder. Case presentation The aim of the present case-study was to characterize the sleep architecture of a violent, medication-free and detoxified female offender with schizophrenia, alcoholism and features of antisocial personality disorder using polysomnography. The controls consisted of three healthy, age-matched women with no history of physical violence. The offender's sleep architecture was otherwise very typical for patients with schizophrenia and/or alcoholism, but an extremely high amount of deep sleep was observed in her sleep recording. Conclusions The finding strengthens the view that severe aggression is related to an abnormal sleep pattern with increased deep sleep. The authors were able to observe this phenomenon in an antisocially behaving, violent female offender with schizophrenia and alcohol dependence, the latter disorders previously reported to be associated with low levels of slow wave sleep. New studies are, however, needed to confirm and explain this preliminary finding. PMID:15507139

  3. Evaluation of Data-Logging Transducer to Passively Collect Pressure Vessel p/T History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P.; Le, Son; Loew, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels owned and operated by NASA are required to be regularly certified per agency policy. Certification requires an assessment of damage mechanisms and an estimation of vessel remaining life. Since detail service histories are not typically available for most pressure vessels, a conservative estimate of vessel pressure/temperature excursions is typically used in assessing fatigue life. This paper details trial use of a data-logging transducer to passively obtain actual pressure and temperature service histories of pressure vessels. The approach was found to have some potential for cost savings and other benefits in certain cases.

  4. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  5. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  6. The history of nuclear fear

    SciTech Connect

    Weart, S.

    1993-04-01

    The history of military and civilian nuclear energy is not only a matter of hard technology, politics, and economics. Our thinking about bombs and reactors is also affected by images with a curious and sometimes overwhelming power. Weird rays that can transform flesh or create monsters, the atom-powered marvels of a future uptopia, the mad scientist who plots to destroy the world: all have an influence on the way people think. Already decades before scientists had discovered how to exploit nuclear energy, a web of interconnected symbols was fully formed in the public mind. These images can be traced back to primitive imagery and, still deeper, into common human experiences, but they were often connected specifically to nuclear energy by nuclear scientists themselves. After the actual development of nuclear technology, a variety of groups used the old symbolism for their propaganda. Since nuclear energy was the most impressive case of the application of the arcane mysteries of science by modern technological authorities, it came to stand for all that people hoped, and still more what they feared, from such authorities.

  7. The Frictional Force with Respect to the Actual Contact Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Ragnar

    1944-01-01

    Hardy's statement that the frictional force is largely adhesion, and to a lesser extent, deformation energy is proved by a simple experiment. The actual contact surface of sliding contacts and hence the friction per unit of contact surface was determined in several cases. It was found for contacts in normal atmosphere to be about one-third t-one-half as high as the macroscopic tearing strength of the softest contact link, while contacts annealed in vacuum and then tested, disclosed frictional forces which are greater than the macroscopic strength.

  8. Intellectual History as an Organizing Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Garland E.

    1970-01-01

    Advocates the study of the history of science as a means of relating science to other academic fields. Discusses the limitations of the case history approach. Suggests introductory science courses coupled with a history of science course. Indicates how a unit on the historyof genetics could fit into a history of science course and relate to an…

  9. Coalbed methane production case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The production of methane gas from coal and coal-bearing rocks is one of the prime objectives of the Department of Energy's Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project. This report contains brief description of wells that are presently producing gas from coal or coal-bearing rocks. Data from three gob gas production areas in Illinois, an in-mine horizontal borehole degasification, and eleven vertical boreholes are presented. Production charts and electric logs of the producing zones are included for some of the wells. Additional information on dry gas production from the San Juan Basin, Colorado/New Mexico and the Greater Green River Coal Region, Colorado/Wyoming is also included.

  10. A Marketing Case History Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weirick, Margaret C.

    1978-01-01

    A current marketing plan from Temple University illustrates many marketing techniques, including those dealing with enrollment objectives, market objectives, demographic characteristics of Temple students, market share analysis, and the marketing plan. Specific guidelines are provided. (LBH)

  11. Alveolar soft part sarcoma presenting as a breast metastasis in a patient with a history of thyroid cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bychkov, Andrey; Sampatanukul, Pichet

    2015-01-01

    Metastases to the breast are uncommon, accounting for 0.5% of breast tumors, and most of them are originated from lymphoma, melanoma and carcinomas of various organs. Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a very rare neoplasm that is usually found in the lower extremities. Lungs are the common site of dissemination and may represent initial manifestation of disease. We report a clinically unsuspected case of ASPS presenting as a breast metastasis in a 25-year-old woman. The patient’s medical history was notable for a thyroid cancer treated by surgery and radioiodine ablation 2 years ago. Core needle biopsy of slowly growing breast mass yielded polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm arranged into solid pattern. Differential diagnosis between apocrine cell carcinoma, paraganglioma, granular cell tumor, neuroendocrine carcinoma, ASPS and metastatic hepatocellular and renal cell carcinoma was rendered by immunohistochemistry. Strong nuclear TFE3 immunoreactivity confirmed a diagnosis of ASPS. Retrospectively a primary tumor was found in the thigh. Most likely, ASPS and thyroid cancer in the patient were growing synchronously and independently. PMID:26464747

  12. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in colon confounded by prior history of colorectal cancer: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    REN, YANLING; CHEN, ZHILU; SU, CHUANYONG; TONG, HONGYAN; QIAN, WENBIN

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old male underwent left hemicolectomy for rectal adenocarcinoma in 2008. Five years later he was admitted to hospital with abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan revealed notable thickening of the middle of the ascending colon wall, and colonoscopy revealed an ulcerofungating mass of 3×3 cm in the cecum and extending to the ascending colon. Under the consideration of cancer recurrence, laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was performed directly. Surgical specimens revealed sheets of large pleomorphic lymphoid cells with nuclei of different sizes, nucleoli and mitotic phases visible in most cells. These tested positive for CD45, CD20 and CD79a diffusely, but negative for CD3, CD5, Bcl-2, Bcl-6 and ALK. The Ki-67 proliferation index was 40%. Epstein-Barr virus in situ hybridization did not reveal any positive signals in any of the tumor cells. Based on these findings, the recurrent tumor was diagnosed as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient could have avoided surgery and received chemotherapy only; however, the case was confounded by the patient's prior history of colorectal cancer due to the rarity of colon lymphoma following rectal cancer in the same patient. It is therefore essential to investigate carefully and differentiate between potential lesions during routine postoperative colonoscopy following colorectal cancer surgery, as patients may present with rare colon lymphoma, which may be confused with a recurrence of colorectal cancer. PMID:26893766

  13. Comparison of conventional (100%), two dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) seismic data: Case histories from the Midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Schloeder, F.X. III

    1995-09-01

    The principal objective of seismic exploration is to determine three geologic parameters, the structural top, the bottom, and the lateral extent of an oil and gas reservoir. Conventional (100%) data is very efficient in locating the structural top and bottom of reservoirs. Two-dimensional (2D) common depth point (CDP) seismic data provides an immense improvement in seismic data quality over conventional (100%) data. This improvement enables the explorer to better visualize and map the reservoir in each direction of the seismic line. Three-dimensional (3D) seismic technology provides even more mappable data and capability. The explorer may visualize every imaginable direction and subtlety of a reservoir. This talk compares conventional (100%), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) seismic data from the Midcontinent. Case histories of the Douglass (Upper Pennsylvanian) in Texas, the Morrow (Lower Pennsylvanian) in Colorado, the {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes} (Mississippian) and the Hunton (Silurian-Devonian) in Oklahoma, and the Simpson (Ordovician) in Kansas will be discussed. Major and independent operators can maximize their exploration efforts by integrating existing data with three-dimensional (3D) technology and a solid geologic interpretation.

  14. Indian Law Enforcement History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, David

    Written as a tribute to American Indian law enforcement officers and the Indian Criminal Justice System, this monographh details the history of the legislative, judicial, financial, and cultural problems associated with the development of Indian law enforcement. Citing numerous court cases, pieces of legislation, and individual and organizational…

  15. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  16. Longing for the Present in the History of History Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wils, Kaat; Verschaffel, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The public debates on history education that occurred in many countries over the past decades have given rise to the idea that people live in an age of "history wars". While these wars are primarily fought on a national level, they are increasingly looked at as a global phenomenon. In most cases, they are the expression of tensions between the…

  17. Lunar History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunson, Jennifer E.

    2009-01-01

    This section of the workshop describes the history of the moon, and offers explanations for the importance of understanding lunar history for engineers and users of lunar simulants. Included are summaries of the initial impact that is currently in favor as explaining the moon's formation, the crust generation, the creation of craters by impactors, the era of the lunar cataclysm, which some believe effected the evolution of life on earth, the nature of lunar impacts, crater morphology, which includes pictures of lunar craters that show the different types of craters, more recent events include effect of micrometeorites, solar wind, radiation and generation of agglutinates. Also included is a glossary of terms.

  18. "Our Place in History": Inspiring Place-Based Social History in Schools and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, David A.; Koppelman, Nancy; Elam, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a teacher development program that engages history and social studies teachers in making connections between learning and the well-being of places in which people actually live. "Our Place in History" is a three-year, federally-funded professional development institute for twenty teachers from diverse communities in…

  19. "No Longer from Pyramids to the Empire State Building": Why Both Western Civilization and World Civilization Should Be Part of the History Major--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voeltz, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, Peter Stearns wrote, "The ongoing debate between partisans of Western civilization surveys and fans of world history continues with no signs of any abatement." No one can deny that the rise of world history has been a phenomenon in American higher education over the past 30 years. Most high school students now take some version of a world…

  20. "The Sacred Spark of Wonder": Local Museums, Australian Curriculum History, and Pre-Service Primary Teacher Education: A Tasmanian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the intersections between museum learning in a distinctive Tasmanian setting, the possibilities of a new national History curriculum, and the evolving views and professional practices of pre-service primary teachers at one Australian university. Following a brief overview of the framework for local and Australian history that…

  1. Bulletproof History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that the writers and producers of the television documentary, "The Valour and the Horror," provided a false impression of an event to fit preconceived and erroneous interpretations of history. Points out specific examples of inaccurate historical presentations and provides contradictory historical interpretations. (CFR)

  2. Arguing History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    The history of science illustrates some exciting--and sometimes controversial--moments. Unfortunately, textbooks tend to focus on results in a scientific discipline and only occasionally showcase an interesting historical vignette, telling the story behind those results. Although required studies may leave teachers little classroom time for…

  3. Making History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shein, Esther

    2008-01-01

    Jennifer Dorman was in a fix. Teaching ninth-grade US history at Holicong Middle School in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, Dorman wanted to tap into her students' interest in creating "something of value not just for their teachers, but something they could share with other students and people." But that required something a conventional paper-based…

  4. Strengthening Student Interest and Learning of Watershed Science using a Case-History Investigation of a Rapidly Changing Semi-Arid Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, A. K.; Hall, M. K.

    2007-12-01

    In a changing climate, watershed disturbances such as drought, large-scale wildfires, and extreme rainfall patterns are on the rise, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Yet, at high-school grade levels, hydrology and watershed science get minimal coverage in classrooms. To address this situation, we developed a set of GIS- based student investigations on the affect of natural and human-induced disturbances on watershed hydrology. The case history focuses on the 2003 Aspen Fire in southern Arizona, but also incorporates investigations of undisturbed watersheds. We structured these investigations around recent hydrologic, geologic, and fire data collected by USGS, USFS, and University of Arizona scientists. The investigations encourage students to use Google Earth and MyWorld GIS to learn about the watersheds of the Santa Catalina Mountains in southern Arizona. Students use precipitation and streamflow data to discover the "normal" response of a semi-arid watershed to rainfall. Through spatial visualization and analysis of the data, they learn how and why a semi-arid watershed may become vulnerable to change due to "unusual" conditions. The large-scale Aspen wildfire and subsequent massive debris flows caused watershed instability and were used as teaching tools in these investigations. Field testing has focused on increasing usability and pedagogical effectiveness, whereas external peer reviews have addressed scientific accuracy. We found the overall response to these investigations by both students and teachers to be positive. The benefits of using real, scientific data in combination with spatial visualization tools to teach about a watershed's response to fire were measured using a survey assessment of student learning during field testing.

  5. Life histories, salinity zones, and sublethal contributions of contaminants to pelagic fish declines illustrated with a case study of San Francisco Estuary, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Marjorie L.; Fleishman, Erica; Brown, Larry R.; Lehman, Peggy W.; Werner, Inge; Scholz, Nathaniel; Michelmore, Carys; Loworn, James R.; Johnson, Michael L.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Human effects on estuaries are often associated with major decreases in abundance of aquatic species. However, remediation priorities are difficult to identify when declines result from multiple stressors with interacting sublethal effects. The San Francisco Estuary offers a useful case study of the potential role of contaminants in declines of organisms because the waters of its delta chronically violate legal water quality standards; however, direct effects of contaminants on fish species are rarely observed. Lack of direct lethality in the field has prevented consensus that contaminants may be one of the major drivers of coincident but unexplained declines of fishes with differing life histories and habitats (anadromous, brackish, and freshwater). Our review of available evidence indicates that examining the effects of contaminants and other stressors on specific life stages in different seasons and salinity zones of the estuary is critical to identifying how several interacting stressors could contribute to a general syndrome of declines. Moreover, warming water temperatures of the magnitude projected by climate models increase metabolic rates of ectotherms, and can hasten elimination of some contaminants. However, for other pollutants, concurrent increases in respiratory rate or food intake result in higher doses per unit time without changes in the contaminant concentrations in the water. Food limitation and energetic costs of osmoregulating under altered salinities further limit the amount of energy available to fish; this energy must be redirected from growth and reproduction toward pollutant avoidance, enzymatic detoxification, or elimination. Because all of these processes require energy, bioenergetics methods are promising for evaluating effects of sublethal contaminants in the presence of other stressors, and for informing remediation. Predictive models that evaluate the direct and indirect effects of contaminants will be possible when data become

  6. Developing Students' Reflections on the Function and Status of Mathematical Modeling in Different Scientific Practices: History as a Provider of Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Tinne Hoff; Blomhøj, Morten

    2013-09-01

    Mathematical models and mathematical modeling play different roles in the different areas and problems in which they are used. The function and status of mathematical modeling and models in the different areas depend on the scientific practice as well as the underlying philosophical and theoretical position held by the modeler(s) and the practitioners in the extra-mathematical domain. For students to experience the significance of different scientific practices and cultures for the function and status of mathematical modeling in other sciences, students need to be placed in didactical situations where such differences are exposed and made into explicit objects of their reflections. It can be difficult to create such situations in the teaching of contemporary science in which modeling is part of the culture. In this paper we show how history can serve as a means for students to be engaged in situations in which they can experience and be challenged to reflect upon and criticize, the use of modeling and the significance of the context for the function and status of modeling and models in scientific practices. We present Nicolas Rashevsky's model of cell division from the 1930s together with a discussion of disagreement between him and some biologists as one such episode from the past. We illustrate how a group of science students at Roskilde University, through their work with this historical case, experienced that different scientific cultures have different opinions of the value of a model as an instrument for gaining scientific knowledge; that the explanatory power of a model is linked not only to the context of its use, but also to the underlying philosophical and theoretical position held by the modeler(s) and the scientists discussing the model and its use. The episode's potential to challenge students to reflect upon and criticize the modeling process and the function of models in an extra mathematical domain is discussed with respect to the notions of

  7. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  8. What Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation Actually Activates

    PubMed Central

    Curthoys, Ian S.; MacDougall, Hamish Gavin

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper in Frontiers Cohen et al. (2012) asked “What does galvanic vestibular stimulation actually activate?” and concluded that galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) causes predominantly otolithic behavioral responses. In this Perspective paper we show that such a conclusion does not follow from the evidence. The evidence from neurophysiology is very clear: galvanic stimulation activates primary otolithic neurons as well as primary semicircular canal neurons (Kim and Curthoys, 2004). Irregular neurons are activated at lower currents. The answer to what behavior is activated depends on what is measured and how it is measured, including not just technical details, such as the frame rate of video, but the exact experimental context in which the measurement took place (visual fixation vs total darkness). Both canal and otolith dependent responses are activated by GVS. PMID:22833733

  9. MODIS Solar Diffuser: Modelled and Actual Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xiong, Xiao-Xiong; Esposito, Joe; Wang, Xin-Dong; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument's solar diffuser is used in its radiometric calibration for the reflective solar bands (VIS, NTR, and SWIR) ranging from 0.41 to 2.1 micron. The sun illuminates the solar diffuser either directly or through a attenuation screen. The attenuation screen consists of a regular array of pin holes. The attenuated illumination pattern on the solar diffuser is not uniform, but consists of a multitude of pin-hole images of the sun. This non-uniform illumination produces small, but noticeable radiometric effects. A description of the computer model used to simulate the effects of the attenuation screen is given and the predictions of the model are compared with actual, on-orbit, calibration measurements.

  10. Improved results by combining reflection seismic profiling with diving wave tomography; three case histories on hi-res hybrid seismic surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, D.; Frei, W.

    2003-04-01

    The performance of high resolution reflection seismic surveys is questionable in areas with poorly defined acoustic impedance contrasts at shallow depths, but is unparalleled for delineating complex structures at greater depths. The salient feature of the diving wave tomography technique is the detailed mapping capability of the velocity field in the near surface depth range, whereas, its resolving power degrades rapidly with increasing depth. We have, for both methods, combined the efforts for the data acquisition and processing with the main objective to compensate the disadvantages of either technique by the benefits of the other. An equally important objective was to render the method routinely applicable in the cost sensitive environment of geotechnical / environmental engineering. The appropriate choice of acquisition parameters is crucial to achieve the spatial data density and recording geometry requirements by either evaluation method. Three case histories illustrate the practical use of the hybrid seismic surveying technique to characterize the shallow subsurface in the depth range of a few tenths of meters. The first example deals with the mapping of subsurface structures in close proximity to a ground failure in an urban environment. Here, both methods produce pieces of information of equivalent importance for the final outcome of the survey. They are truly complementary, since each one alone provides only an incomplete image of the subsurface. The second case study focuses on the determination of the ground water barrier beneath fluviatile sediments contaminated by toxic waste fluids. In the presence of poorly defined acoustic impedance contrasts within the sediments and at the boundary to the intensely weathered Tertiary bedrock, the information provided by the diving wave tomography technique reveals the surface topography of the bedrock with considerably greater precision than the combination of bore holes with solely reflection seismic profiling

  11. River history.

    PubMed

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2012-05-13

    During the last half century, advances in geomorphology-abetted by conceptual and technical developments in geophysics, geochemistry, remote sensing, geodesy, computing and ecology-have enhanced the potential value of fluvial history for reconstructing erosional and depositional sequences on the Earth and on Mars and for evaluating climatic and tectonic changes, the impact of fluvial processes on human settlement and health, and the problems faced in managing unstable fluvial systems. PMID:22474674

  12. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  13. Syn-orogenic extensional pulses within the contractional history of thrust wedges. The Val di Lima low-angle normal fault case study, Northern Apennines, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemenzi, Luca; Molli, Giancarlo; Storti, Fabrizio; Muchez, Philippe; Swennen, Rudy; Torelli, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    overpressures locally influenced active deformation processes and favored shear localization. We propose that the folded low-angle extensional fault system indicates the occurrence of an extensional pulse that affected this sector of the thrust wedge during the orogenic contractional history. In particular, the fault system is considered to be the flat portion of a stair-case extensional fault system developed in the shallower portion of the thrust wedge to compensate for its supercritical taper produced by uplift of the internal zone due to deep-rooted thrusting. Important pulses of wedge extension, similar to the one described here, are likely to occur during the geological history of most thrust wedges, because their long-term evolution is characterized by complex interactions among tectonics, gravitational body forces, and (sub)surface processes. The systems of brittle extensional fault zones, resulting from such extensional pulses, affect fluid circulation through the upper crust by producing articulated networks of hydraulic conduits, barriers, or mixed conduit-barrier systems. In particular, as demonstrated by our results, the effects of extensional fault zones on fluid circulation is twofold: i) they provide effective fluid pathways allowing deep infiltration of surface-derived marine or meteoric water; ii) they can trigger fluid overpressuring, especially in the footwall of shallow-dipping fault segments. Eventually, fluid circulation can exert a strong influence on the mechanical behavior of thrust wedges either by reducing the effective normal stress at depth or triggering the formation of hydrous clay minerals lowering the frictional properties of fault zones.

  14. Natural history of adult-onset eIF2B-related disorders: a multi-centric survey of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Labauge, Pierre; Horzinski, Laetitia; Ayrignac, Xavier; Blanc, Pierre; Vukusic, Sandra; Rodriguez, Diana; Mauguiere, Francois; Peter, Laure; Goizet, Cyril; Bouhour, Francoise; Denier, Christian; Confavreux, Christian; Obadia, Michael; Blanc, Frederic; de Sèze, Jérome; Fogli, Anne; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2009-08-01

    Mutations in one of the five eukaryotic initiation factor 2B genes (EIF2B1-5) were first described in childhood ataxia with cerebral hypomyelination--vanishing white matter syndrome. The syndrome is characterized by (i) cerebellar and pyramidal signs in children aged 2-5 years; (ii) extensive cavitating leucoencephalopathy; and (iii) episodes of rapid deterioration following stress. Since then a broad clinical spectrum from congenital to adult-onset forms has been reported, leading to the concept of eIF2B-related disorders. Our aim was to describe clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging characteristics, genetic findings and natural history of patients with adult-onset eIF2B-related disorders (after age 16). The inclusion criteria were based on the presence of eIF2B mutations and a disease onset after the age of 16 years. One patient with an asymptomatic diagnosis (age 16 years) was also included. Clinical and magnetic resonance findings were retrospectively recorded in all patients. All patients were examined to assess clinical evolution, using functional, pyramidal, cerebellar and cognitive scales. This multi-centric study included 16 patients from 14 families. A sex ratio imbalance was noted (male/female = 3/13). The mean age of onset was 31.1 years (range 16-62). Initial symptoms were neurologic (n = 11), psychiatric (n = 2) and ovarian failure (n = 2). Onset of the symptoms was linked to a precipitating factor in 13% of cases that included minor head trauma and delivery. During follow-up (mean: 11.2 years, range 2-22 years) 12.5% of the patients died. Of the 14 survivors, 62% showed a decline in their cognitive functions, and 79% were severely handicapped or bedridden. One case remained asymptomatic. Stress worsened clinical symptoms in 38% of the patients. Magnetic resonance imaging findings consist of constant cerebral atrophy, extensive cystic leucoencephalopathy (81%), corpus callosum (69%) and cerebellar (38%) T2-weighted hyperintensities. All

  15. History of mathematics and history of science reunited?

    PubMed

    Gray, Jeremy

    2011-09-01

    For some years now, the history of modern mathematics and the history of modern science have developed independently. A step toward a reunification that would benefit both disciplines could come about through a revived appreciation of mathematical practice. Detailed studies of what mathematicians actually do, whether local or broadly based, have often led in recent work to examinations of the social, cultural, and national contexts, and more can be done. Another recent approach toward a historical understanding of the abstractness of modern mathematics has been to see it as a species of modernism, and this thesis will be tested by the raft of works on the history of modern applied mathematics currently under way. PMID:22073775

  16. Characteristic and uncharacteristic earthquakes as possible artifacts: what does the seismic history actually tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, S.; Newman, A.

    2004-05-01

    A challenge for tectonic studies and seismic hazard analysis is that the rates and sizes of the largest observed earthquakes in an area may differ significantly from their true long-term values. This especially likely for intraplate areas or others where recurrence intervals are long, so the earthquake record length is comparable to the mean recurrence time of large earthquakes. In many areas, the largest earthquakes - termed characteristic - appear more common than expected from the log-linear frequency-magnitude relation observed for smaller earthquakes. In others, large earthquakes which we term "uncharacteristic" appear less frequently than expected from the small earthquakes. These effects may be real, or may arise from several possible situations. Apparent characteristic earthquakes can occur if earthquake recurrence intervals are distributed about the mean for that magnitude range, because sampling bias makes those with shorter intervals more likely to be observed than those with longer ones (fractions of earthquakes cannot be observed). A second possibility is suggested by the fact that characteristic earthquakes are often inferred because paleoseismic data are discordant with instrumental or historical data. Hence apparent characteristic earthquakes would occur if paleoseismic data overestimate earthquake magnitudes. This appears to have occurred for the New Madrid zone, because paleoliquification data were calibrated assuming the 1811-12 earthquakes were M 8.3 events, whereas more recent analyses find that these earthquakes were low M 7. Conversely, paleoearthquakes in the Wabash seismic zone appear "uncharacteristic", perhaps because or the paleoseismic record captures only some of the large earthquakes.

  17. Active strike-slip faulting history inferred from offsets of topographic features and basement rocks: a case study of the Arima Takatsuki Tectonic Line, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2002-01-01

    Geological, geomorphological and geophysical data have been used to determine the total displacement, slip rates and age of formation of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) in southwest Japan. The ATTL is an ENE-WSW-trending dextral strike-slip fault zone that extends for about 60 km from northwest of the Rokko Mountains to southwest of the Kyoto Basin. The ATTL marks a distinct topographic boundary between mountainous regions and basin regions. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as systematically-deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps, are recognized along the ATTL. The Quaternary drainage system shows progressive displacement along the fault traces: the greater the magnitude of stream channel, the larger the amount of offset. The maximum dextral deflection of stream channels is 600-700 m. The field data and detailed topographic analyses, however, show that pre-Neogene basement rocks on both sides of the ATTL are displaced by about 16-18 km dextrally and pre-Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains are also offset 16-17 km in dextral along the ATTL. This suggests that the ATTL formed in the period between the development of the pre-Mio-Pliocene peneplains and deflection of the Quaternary stream channels. The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence presented in this study indicates that (1) the ATTL formed after the mid-Miocene, (2) the ATTL has moved as a dextral strike-slip fault with minor vertical component since its formation to late Holocene and (3) the ATTL is presently active with dextral slip rates of 1-3 mm/year and a vertical component of >0.3 mm/year. The formation of the ATTL was probably related to the opening of the Japan Sea, which is the dominant tectonic event around Japan since mid-Miocene. The case study of the ATTL provides insight into understanding the tectonic history and relationship between tectonic landforms and structures in active strike-slip faults.

  18. Higher Education Administrators, Defamation, and Actual Malice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloud, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    In "New York Times Co. v. Sullivan," the Supreme Court held that the First Amendment protects news media defendants from libel suits by public officials and public figures. Public college and university administrators are considered to be public officials under this ruling. To prevail in defamation cases, public plaintiffs must prove actual…

  19. Uncovering History for Future History Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Fritz

    2010-01-01

    The art of history teaching is at a crossroads. Recent scholarship focuses on the need to change the teaching of history so students can better learn history, and insists that history teachers must move beyond traditional structures and methods of teaching in order to improve their students' abilities to think with history. This article presents…

  20. Virtual History and the History of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Discusses three potential problems in the application of virtual history: (1) extrapolation; (2) critical analysis; and (3) the danger of using it as wishful thinking. Offers comparative history as a possible alternative way to overcome virtual history outcomes. (KDR)

  1. The GAO History Program: A History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trask, Roger R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the planning, formation, and history of the General Accounting Office history program. Addresses functions, staff size, organizational placement, and the role of an advisory committee. Stresses oral history, policy research, and identification of documentary sources. (DK)

  2. Cygnus History

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Henderson, Raymond E. Gignac, Douglas E. Good, Mark D. Hansen, Charles V. Mitton; Daniel S. Nelson, Eugene C. Ormond; Steve R. Cordova, Isidro Molina; John R. Smith, Evan A. Rose

    2009-07-02

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site. The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images for dynamic plutonium experiments. This work will recount and discuss salient maintenance and operational issues encountered during the history of Cygnus. A brief description of Cygnus systems and rational for design selections will set the stage for this historical narrative. It is intended to highlight the team-derived solutions for technical problems encountered during extended periods of maintenance and operation. While many of the issues are typical to pulsed power systems, some of the solutions are unique. It is hoped that other source teams will benefit from this presentation, as well as other necessary disciplines (e.g., source users, system architects, facility designers and managers, funding managers, and team leaders).

  3. Hansen's Oral Life Histories and Healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Lee

    2013-08-01

    The individual oral statement is human story based on experience. The personal experience forms unconsciousness which appears in a form of oral statement by ego that doesn't want to lose existence. Thus, the process which exposes a tormented hearts is the objectification of oneself. Through this step, oral person attains a healing. If this sort of individual oral is accrued, the undeserved personal affairs could be a history. In case of Hansen's disease patient, She could escape from negative understanding about herself and the world. Furthermore, She kept formating her values about meaningful life and future oriented value. Also, She wants to keep a record of her life. She comes to know that what she denied is actually what she should surmount over oral statement. As a result, She could attains a healing for oneself through oral statement. The oral statement made her look into she's problems. Therefore, oral statement is a self-realization. Through this, person could know what the problem is and solution. This research is about only one person, so there is need for more cases and studies. If this sort of individual oral statement is accrued, there could be a curative narration. This can suggest an curative alternative when we suffer from problem of life. The merit of this research is rendering this possibility. PMID:24005645

  4. Identifying the History and Logic of Negative, Ambivalent, and Positive Responses to Literature: A Case-Study Analysis of Cultural Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thein, Amanda Haertling

    2009-01-01

    This paper begins with the assumption that the interpretive practices people acquire in social worlds often transfer to their stances toward and interpretations of worlds encountered in literature (Beach, Thein, & Parks, 2007). The goal of this paper is to identify the history and logic behind one student's negative, ambivalent, and positive…

  5. Teaching Physics to In-Service Primary School Teachers in the Context of the History of Science: The Case of Falling Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkotas, Panos; Piliouras, Panagiotis; Malamitsa, Katerina; Stamoulis, Efthymios

    2009-01-01

    Our paper presents an in-service primary school teachers' training program which is based on the idea that the history of science can play a vital role in promoting the learning of physics. This training program has been developed in the context of Comenius 2.1 which is a European Union program. This program that we have developed in the…

  6. The Changing Role of the Academic Journal: The Coverage of Higher Education in "History of Education" as a Case Study, 1972-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Roy

    2012-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the coverage of higher education in the pages of this journal since its inception. It reflects on the changing role of the academic journal during this period, on some of the related changes which have taken place in academia itself as well as changing fashions in the study of history of education. Its central…

  7. Teacher's Role and Autonomy in Instructional Planning: The Case of Secondary School History Teachers with regard to the Preparation and Implementation of Annual Instructional Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Ibrahim Hakki

    2012-01-01

    This study seeks to analyze the role of history teachers in instructional planning and their areas of autonomy in Turkey. The concept of teacher autonomy briefly refers to the authority and freedom of teachers in the planning and implementation of the instructional activities and the decisions made during the instructional process. The objective…

  8. Did the Social Studies Really Replace History in the Local Curriculum? The Case of Elyria, Ohio and the North Central States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallace, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous critics of the social studies have argued that the four-year pattern of chronological history courses in place in most U.S. schools was suddenly and pervasively replaced by interdisciplinary courses recommended by the NEA Committee on Social Studies report in 1916. In this historical study, the author challenges this view. By drawing upon…

  9. Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's "Historia Insectorum Generalis" and the Case of the Water Flea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendig, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Hasok Chang ("Sci Educ" 20:317-341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science…

  10. Ascertaining Problems with Medication Histories

    PubMed Central

    Halapy, Henry; Kertland, Heather

    2012-01-01

    , and establishing criteria for pharmacist referral for cases involving complex medication histories. PMID:23129864

  11. [To Discern the Medical Thoughts of Heo Joon, the Best Physician in Korean History--An Analysis of Disease Experiences and Treatment Cases in the Treasured Mirror of Eastern Medicine].

    PubMed

    Oh, Chaekun

    2015-12-01

    Heo Joon is one of the best-known physicians of the Chosun Dynasty, the last imperial dynasty (1392~1910) of Korea. He had served King Seonjo () during his practice, and has produced many publications on medicine. Then, how did he actually treat the patients? So far, other than the case when he treated Gwanghaegun's smallpox, it is not clearly known how and when he attended and treated the ill. In his most famous book, the Treasured Mirror of Eastern Medicine, he details the physiopathological mechanisms, diagnoses, treatments or prescriptions, and treatment cases, however, it is not clear if they're from his own clinical experiences. Nevertheless, based on the written method, the original information is reconstituted according to its respective editors of the TMEM, a particular case being included may be considered as an agreement and acceptance of an actual treatment executed. This research analyzes what type of medicinal theory that the main writer Heo Joon employed in his real treatments, as well as how he diagnosed and treated diseases. After analyzing the complete series of the TMEM, we found a total of 301 clinical cases. Here, one may wonder, why does the Section of Inner and External Bodily Elements, that deal with diseases and the structure of the body, have far outnumber cases than the Section of Miscellaneous Disorders? Why does the TMEM introduce the various types of disease experiences and treatment cases, medical cases, simple treatments, nurturing life, materia medica, and also include supernatural phenomena? Why does the TMEM include the experiences and cases from the book published in the Song, Jin, Yuan dynasty of China, moreover in the Ming Dynasty of its time. These questions can be answered to the extent that Heo Joon and the others who participated in completing the book sought to justify the new clinical medicine practices, and because it had to be acceptable to the Confucius beliefs which dominated the society, and also because the book

  12. History, Applications, and Philosophy in Mathematics Education: HAPh—A Use of Primary Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankvist, Uffe Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The article first investigates the basis for designing teaching activities dealing with aspects of history, applications, and philosophy of mathematics in unison by discussing and analyzing the different `whys' and `hows' of including these three dimensions in mathematics education. Based on the observation that a use of history, applications, and philosophy as a `goal' is best realized through a modules approach, the article goes on to discuss how to actually design such teaching modules. It is argued that a use of primary original sources through a so-called guided reading along with a use of student essay assignments, which are suitable for bringing out relevant meta-issues of mathematics, is a sensible way of realizing a design encompassing the three dimensions. Two concrete teaching modules on aspects of the history, applications, and philosophy of mathematics—HAPh-modules—are outlined and the mathematical cases of these, graph theory and Boolean algebra, are described. Excerpts of student groups' essays from actual implementations of these modules are displayed as illustrative examples of the possible effect such HAPh-modules may have on students' development of an awareness regarding history, applications, and philosophy in relation to mathematics as a (scientific) discipline.

  13. Teaching Natural History in a Wilderness Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vause, Mikel

    A college honors course called "A Field Study in American Literature and Philosophy" helps students develop foundations for an environmental philosophy, by introducing them to the literature of natural history and exploration, and more importantly, through actual participation in outdoor activities. The class spends at least four days and nights…

  14. Toward a science of history

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Linda J.; Hake, Don F.

    1983-01-01

    The scientific status of History was compared to other sciences in the critical areas event selection, investigative operations, and theory construction. First, in terms of events studied, history is regarded as a quasi-scientific study of past events. However, viewed from the science of behavior's perspective of what historians actually do, history becomes a study of current records. As a study of currently existing records, not the non-existent past, history has potential to become a science. Second, like other scientists, historians may undertake manipulative investigations: they can locate the presence and absence of a condition in records and thereby determine its relation to other recorded phenomena. A limitation has been the lack of quantification that results from emphasis on the uniqueness of things rather than on their communality. Scientific training would facilitate viewing similar things as instances of a larger class that could be counted. Another limitation that cannot be easily overcome is the inability to produce raw data. This limitation has created problems in theoretical practices, the third area of comparison, because theoretical constructions have frequently been substituted for missing data. This problem too could be reduced through scientific training, particularly in other behavior sciences. An authentic science of history is possible. PMID:22478582

  15. [The information of the schizophrenic patient: actuality].

    PubMed

    Palazzolo, J; Brousse, G; Favre, P; Llorca, P-M

    2005-01-01

    Social isolation has got to be one of the greatest losses in schizophrenia. For many authors, people with schizophrenia can have no friends, no spouse, and sometimes no family. Two thirds of patients with schizophrenia return to their parents' house after discharge from a hospital for the first psychosi episode. Family members generally receive very little education as to what they can expect. They may not know the importance of medication compliance. Family members are the primary victims of violence from psychotic individuals, usually their own son or daughter, and most families cannot believe their own son or daughter would be capable of such a thing. Although families are usually the main care givers at the beginning of schizophrenia they often find their experience very frustrating for a number of reasons, and relationships suffer. Family education and support have been shown to improve outcomes considerably and family education is the second strongest factor in relapse prevention. Without education and good relapse prevention families often burst out. Most of the homeless mentally ill in downtown city cores have lost their family relationships. It is not a reflection on their families so much as the lack of adequate treatment and support. The families tried and tried and lost their ill relative. A patient writes: "My father lives just outside of Monaco. My mother developed Alzheimer's a couple of years ago or so and with a series of mild strokes died recently. I haven't seen either of them very much in the last fifteen years. I have a sister, Nicole, who also lives in Paris. I lost those relationships to some degree over the years. I am rebuilding them now. Enter the professional friend, the case manager, usually in cases where the individual is quite disabled by schizophrenia and/or at considerable risk of relapse, and usually when the individual has lost their family relationships to some degree. I had a case manager for several years and always looked

  16. The Future of History and History Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commager, Henry Steele

    1983-01-01

    Technical history, a quantitative record of history strengthened by new techniques in mathematics, computer science, and other fields has advantages over former approaches to history--history as philosophy and historical theology. For example, it makes available more source materials. However, it has drawbacks, e.g., it directs research to highly…

  17. Ras history

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although the roots of Ras sprouted from the rich history of retrovirus research, it was the discovery of mutationally activated RAS genes in human cancer in 1982 that stimulated an intensive research effort to understand Ras protein structure, biochemistry and biology. While the ultimate goal has been developing anti-Ras drugs for cancer treatment, discoveries from Ras have laid the foundation for three broad areas of science. First, they focused studies on the origins of cancer to the molecular level, with the subsequent discovery of genes mutated in cancer that now number in the thousands. Second, elucidation of the biochemical mechanisms by which Ras facilitates signal transduction established many of our fundamental concepts of how a normal cell orchestrates responses to extracellular cues. Third, Ras proteins are also founding members of a large superfamily of small GTPases that regulate all key cellular processes and established the versatile role of small GTP-binding proteins in biology. We highlight some of the key findings of the last 28 years. PMID:21686117

  18. The curious case of the date of introduction of leaded fuel to Australia: Implications for the history of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric lead pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, D. E.; Gale, S. J.

    By comparison with the Northern Hemisphere, the history of atmospheric lead pollution in the Southern Hemisphere is still poorly understood. Until recently, the main source of atmospheric lead fallout in the Southern Hemisphere was tetraethyl lead from motor fuel and for most of the 20th century the most important single source of this pollutant was Australia. Yet there is little agreement over when leaded fuel made its first appearance in Australia. Reported dates range from the early 1920s to the late 1940s. A study of oil company advertisements and reports in motoring and oil company journals shows that leaded petrol first became available in Australia in August 1932. This date is important both for the reconstruction of lead pollution histories and in the use of lead stratigraphies to determine chronology.

  19. Kabbalah: On Spatio-Temporal Database Visualization With Historical Events: A Case Study of History Flow of Chia-Yi Beimen Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T. W.; Chiou, S. C.; Lee, J. H.

    2015-08-01

    This system is made for researchers who study pattern of city or spatial transformation by using computational way to interpret data logically. In order to make use of all historical data with GIS in system, an exact metadata is necessary and needed to build first. The Cubism project is aimed to presume how different historical data normalized to become information in spatio-temporal database. To make temporal map have higher capability with presentation of history context.

  20. Tutorial on Actual Space Environmental Hazards For Space Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Fennell, J. F.; Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    It has become common in the space science community to conduct research on diverse physical phenomena because they are thought to contribute to space weather. However, satellites contend with only three primary environmental hazards: single event effects, vehicle charging, and total dose, and not every physical phenomenon that occurs in space contributes in substantial ways to create these hazards. One consequence of the mismatch between actual threats and all-encompassing research is the often-described gap between research and operations; another is the creation of forecasts that provide no actionable information for design engineers or spacecraft operators. An example of the latter is the physics of magnetic field emergence on the Sun; the phenomenon is relevant to the formation and launch of coronal mass ejections and is also causally related to the solar energetic particles that may get accelerated in the interplanetary shock. Unfortunately for the research community, the engineering community mitigates the space weather threat (single-event effects from heavy ions above ~50 MeV/nucleon) with a worst-case specification of the environment and not with a prediction. Worst-case definition requires data mining of past events, while predictions involve large-scale systems science from the Sun to the Earth that is compelling for scientists and their funding agencies but not actionable for design or for most operations. Differing priorities among different space-faring organizations only compounds the confusion over what science research is relevant. Solar particle impacts to human crew arise mainly from the total ionizing dose from the solar protons, so the priority for prediction in the human spaceflight community is therefore much different than in the unmanned satellite community, while both communities refer to the fundamental phenomenon as space weather. Our goal in this paper is the presentation of a brief tutorial on the primary space environmental phenomena

  1. Can we (actually) assess global risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2013-04-01

    needed in a rapidly changing world. This presentation will discuss these challenges and describe a few initial attempts aiming to better understand the interactions between the different components of flood risk with reference to diverse case studies in Europe, Central America, and Africa.

  2. [New documental evidence on the history of homeopathy in Latin America: a case study of links between Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Tarcitano, Conrado Mariano; Waisse, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Homeopathy began to spread soon after it was formulated by Samuel Hahnemann in the early 1800s, reaching the Southern Cone in the 1830s. In processes of this kind, one figure is often cited as being responsible for introducing it, often attaining quasi-mythical status. Little is known, however, about how homeopathy reached Argentina at that time. Through archival research, we discovered that medical and lay homeopaths circulated between Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires. Given the well-known proselytizing of the circles gravitating around lay homeopaths B. Mure and J.V. Martins in Rio de Janeiro, the documents indicate that this movement actually went as far as Argentina, which had not been confirmed until now. PMID:27438734

  3. History at the intersection of disability and public health: the case of John Galsworthy and disabled soldiers of the First World War.

    PubMed

    Reznick, Jeffrey S

    2011-01-01

    The author presented an earlier version of this historical article to the Disability Section of the American Public Health Association (November 2009). It is part of his ongoing research in the social and cultural history of medicine as the field intersects with the history of disability, veterans, and public health, as well as current issues that touch all of these areas. This article introduces readers to perspectives on disability held by the British novelist John Galsworthy (1867-1933), which he developed primarily through his philanthropic support for and his compositions about rehabilitation programs for British and American soldiers disabled in the First World War (1914-1918). Readers will learn that Galsworthy's perspectives are as much about his identity as an individual with disabilities as they are about men disabled in the "war to end all wars." The rediscovery of Galsworthy's experiences and words more than 90 years after the end of World War I reveals how history is present today at the intersection of disability and public health. Indeed, the story of Galsworthy ultimately seeking to forget his own experiences during the "Great War," as well as the very physical and psychological disability caused by that conflict, can inspire public health professionals and disability rights advocates today to remember-indeed, to advocate for-men and women who served in battle and have returned home to realize renewed health and social participation despite permanent physical and psychological wounds. Readers will note that language used throughout this article to describe disability is period-specific and therefore not keeping with current conventions. PMID:21168804

  4. P-T-D histories from quartz: A case study of the application of the TitaniQ thermobarometer to progressive fabric development in metapelites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Kyle T.; Webb, Laura E.; Spear, Frank S.; Thomas, Jay B.

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the ability of quartz to record segments of the pressure-temperature-deformation (P-T-D) path in poly-deformed metamorphic terranes and the associated application of the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer (TitaniQ). Metapelites from the Strafford Dome (eastern Vermont) were selected for this study because they record progressive fabric development during prograde metamorphism and have well constrained P-T-D histories from previous work. Results of this investigation are in agreement with previous studies and demonstrate that quartz in these samples records additional distinct intervals of the P-T-D path. Six preserved quartz equilibration events include: (1) early prograde growth during burial; (2) kyanite-in quartz-producing reactions; (3) prenappe emplacement equilibration during isobaric heating; (4) precipitation of quartz in quartz-feldspar domains during crenulation cleavage development due to solution transfer; (5) quartz-producing (chlorite-out) reactions during heating postnappe emplacement; and (6) retrograde quartz overgrowths from an influx of siliceous fluids. Modeling quartz volume allows for the identification of quartz-producing reactions in P-T space; the same may be done for Ti-phases to better constrain activities during reequilibration events. An integration of cathodoluminescence imaging, microstructural and petrographic investigation, isochemical forward stability modeling, and thermobarometry allows identification and interpretation of zoning patterns in quartz to unravel histories that would otherwise not be obtainable.

  5. Solitary intracranial tuberculoma mimicking a malignant tumor in a patient without tubercular lesions or a history of disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier A.; Sua, Luz F.; Astudillo, Miryam; Bravo, Luis E.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral tuberculoma is a rare cause of intracranial mass. In Latin America and Colombia where tuberculosis is endemic, it represents between 5 and 30% of brain tumours. A 53-year-old Colombian woman was admitted to a third-level hospital in Cali, Colombia, after reporting loss of consciousness, headache, paresthesia, and flight of ideas for a two-week period. Imaging studies showed a left frontal mass of malignant appearance whose first possible diagnosis was metastatic neoplasia or glioma. With the initial results, absence of history of chronic infectious diseases and a history of thyroidectomy, a surgical procedure was carried out and a histopathological and molecular evaluation was conducted. The pathology report noted necrotizing granulomatous inflammation and tissue staining and molecular tests for detection of M. tuberculosis were positive and the patient was managed with anti-tubercular treatment. Intracranial masses are frequently targeted as a malignant neoplastic disease for surgical treatment. Considering an infectious etiology must be a diagnostic option. PMID:23725511

  6. KSC History Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dethloff, Henry C.

    2001-01-01

    The KSC History Project focuses on archival research and oral history interviews on the history of Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Related projects include the preparation of a precis and chapter outline for a proposed book-length narrative history, a bibliography of key primary and secondary resources, a brief monograph overview of the history of KSC, and a monograph on the history of safety at the Center. Finally, there is work on the development of a web page and a personal history data base associated with the oral history project. The KSC History Project has been a joint endeavor between Henry C. Dethloff and Dr. Noble Lee Snaples, Jr.

  7. History of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Mott T.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) geologists and the history of geology; (2) American historians and the history of geology; (3) history of geology in the 1980s; (4) sources for the history of geology (bibliographies, dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, periodicals, public/official histories, compilations, and books); (5) research opportunities; and (6) other…

  8. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., and water damage risks incurred when property is actually located in the United States and marine... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... coverage as “.825% plus .3% fire, etc. risks plus .12% water risks = 1.245%”, a reasonable basis exists...

  9. Self-actualization: Its Use and Misuse in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Stanley D.

    1982-01-01

    The writings of Abraham Maslow are analyzed to determine the meaning of the psychological term "self-actualization." After pointing out that self-actualization is a rare quality and that it has little to do with formal education, the author concludes that the concept has little practical relevance for teacher education. (PP)

  10. The Self-Actualization of Polk Community College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearsall, Howard E.; Thompson, Paul V., Jr.

    This article investigates the concept of self-actualization introduced by Abraham Maslow (1954). A summary of Maslow's Needs Hierarchy, along with a description of the characteristics of the self-actualized person, is presented. An analysis of humanistic education reveals it has much to offer as a means of promoting the principles of…

  11. From Self-Awareness to Self-Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cangemi, Joseph P.; Englander, Meryl R.

    1974-01-01

    Highest priority of education is to help students utilize as much of their talent as is possible. Third Force psychologists would interpret this as becoming self-actualized. Self-awareness is required for psychological growth. Without self-awareness there can be no growth, no mental hygiene, and no self-actualization. (Author)

  12. 12 CFR 1806.203 - Selection Process, actual award amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Selection Process, actual award amounts. 1806... OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM Awards § 1806.203 Selection Process, actual award... round: (1) To select Applicants not previously selected, using the calculation and selection...

  13. Self-Actualization and the Effective Social Studies Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rodney B.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a study undertaken to investigate the relationship between social studies teachers' degrees of self-actualization and their teacher effectiveness. Investigates validity of using Maslow's theory of self-actualization as a way of identifying the effective social studies teacher personality. (Author/DB)

  14. Facebook as a Library Tool: Perceived vs. Actual Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Terra B.

    2011-01-01

    As Facebook has come to dominate the social networking site arena, more libraries have created their own library pages on Facebook to create library awareness and to function as a marketing tool. This paper examines reported versus actual use of Facebook in libraries to identify discrepancies between intended goals and actual use. The results of a…

  15. Perceived and Actual Student Support Needs in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Lya; Visser, Yusra Laila

    2000-01-01

    This study sought to determine the academic, affective, and administrative support expectations of distance education students, and to compare actual expectations of distance education students with the instructor's perceptions of such expectations. Results demonstrated divergence between perceived and actual expectations of student support in…

  16. Gebrauchstexte im Fremdsprachenunterricht ("Actual" Texts in Foreign Language Teaching)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegesar, Detlef von

    1976-01-01

    Presents for analysis actual texts and texts specially written for teaching, arriving at a basis for a typology of actual texts. Defines teaching aims using such texts, and develops, from a TV program, a teaching unit used in a Karlsruhe school. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  17. Self-Actualizing Men and Women: A Comparison Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Eleanor G.; Hansen, Jan B.

    1997-01-01

    The self-actualization of 167 women who lived in the Martha Cook (MC) dormitory of the University of Michigan (1950-1970) was compared to that of a group of Ivy League men researched in another study. In addition, two groups of MC women were compared to each other to identify differences which might explain why some self-actualized while other did…

  18. SELF-ACTUALIZATION AND THE UTILIZATION OF TALENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRENCH, JOHN R.P.; MILLER, DANIEL R.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED (1) TO DEVELOP A THEORY OF THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION AS RELATED TO THE UTILIZATION OF TALENT, (2) TO FIT THE THEORY TO EXISTING DATA, AND (3) TO PLAN ONE OR MORE RESEARCH PROJECTS TO TEST THE THEORY. TWO ARTICLES ON IDENTITY AND MOTIVATION AND SELF-ACTUALIZATION AND SELF-IDENTITY THEORY REPORTED THE…

  19. Self-Actualization Effects Of A Marathon Growth Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dorothy S.; Medvene, Arnold M.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a marathon group experience on university student's level of self-actualization two days and six weeks after the experience. Gains in self-actualization as a result of marathon group participation depended upon an individual's level of ego strength upon entering the group. (Author)

  20. 26 CFR 1.962-3 - Treatment of actual distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of actual distributions. 1.962-3... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.962-3 Treatment of actual... a foreign corporation. (ii) Treatment of section 962 earnings and profits under § 1.959-3....

  1. School Guidance Counselors' Perceptions of Actual and Preferred Job Duties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, John Dexter

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide process data for school counselors, administrators, and the public, regarding school counselors' actual roles within the guidance counselor preferred job duties and actual job duties. In addition, factors including National Certification or no National Certification, years of counseling experience, and…

  2. Socio-Demographic, Clinical and Behavioral Characteristics Associated with a History of Suicide Attempts among Psychiatric Outpatients: A Case Control Study in a Northern Mexican City

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Arnaud-Gil, Carlos Alberto; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Molina-Espinoza, Luis Fernando; Rábago-Sánchez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the epidemiology of suicide attempts among psychiatric outpatients in Mexico. This study was aimed to determine the socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics associated with suicide attempts in psychiatric outpatients in two public hospitals in Durango, Mexico. Methods: Two hundred seventy six psychiatric outpatients (154 suicide attempters and 122 patients without suicide attempt history) attended the two public hospitals in Durango City, Mexico were included in this study. Socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics were obtained retrospectively from all outpatients and compared in relation to the presence or absence of suicide attempt history. Results: Increased prevalence of suicide attempts was associated with mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F10-19) (P=0.01), schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders (F20-29) (P=0.02), mood (affective) disorders (F30-39) (P<0.001), and disorders of adult personality and behavior (F60-69) (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that suicide attempts were associated with young age (OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.06-1.39; P=0.003), female gender (OR=2.98, 95% CI: 1.55-5.73; P=0.001), urban residence (OR=2.31, 95% CI: 1.17-4.57; P=0.01), memory impairment (OR=1.91, 95% CI: 1.07-3.40; P=0.02), alcohol consumption (OR=2.39, 95% CI: 1.21-4.70; P=0.01), and sexual promiscuity (OR=3.90, 95% CI: 1.74-8.77; P<0.001). Conclusions: We report the association of suicide attempts with socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics in psychiatric outpatients in Mexico. Results may be useful for an optimal planning of preventive measures against suicide attempts in psychiatric outpatients. PMID:24711751

  3. Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendig, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    Hasok Chang (Sci Educ 20:317-341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life sciences (HPLS). The project focuses on the study and use of descriptions, observations, experiments, and recording techniques used by early microscopists to classify various species of water flea. The first published illustrations and descriptions of the water flea were included in the Dutch naturalist Jan Swammerdam's, Historia Insectorum Generalis (1669) (Algemeene verhandeling van de bloedeloose dierkens. t'Utrrecht, Meinardus van Dreunen, ordinaris Drucker van d'Academie). After studying these, we first used the descriptions, techniques, and nomenclature recovered to observe, record, and classify the specimens collected from our university ponds. We then used updated recording techniques and image-based keys to observe and identify the specimens. The implementation of these newer techniques was guided in part by the observations and records that resulted from our use of the recovered historical methods of investigation. The series of HPLS labs constructed as part of this interdisciplinary project provided a space for students to consider and wrestle with the many philosophical issues that arise in the process of identifying an unknown organism and offered unique learning opportunities that engaged students' curiosity and critical thinking skills.

  4. Is the escape velocity in star clusters linked to extended star formation histories? Using NGC 7252: W3 as a test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Ziri, I.; Bastian, N.; Hilker, M.; Davies, B.; Schweizer, F.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Mejía-Narváez, A.; Niederhofer, F.; Brandt, T. D.; Rejkuba, M.; Bruzual, G.; Magris, G.

    2016-03-01

    The colour-magnitude diagrams of some intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr) star clusters show unexpectedly broad main-sequence turnoffs, raising the possibility that these clusters have experienced more than one episode of star formation. Such a scenario predicts the existence of an extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO) only in clusters with escape velocities above a certain threshold (>15 km s-1), which would allow them to retain or accrete gas that eventually would fuel a secondary extended star formation episode. This paper presents a test of this scenario based on the study of the young and massive cluster NGC 7252: W3. We use the HST photometry from Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and Wide Field Camera 3 images obtained with UV and optical filters, as well as MagE echellette spectrograph data from the Las Campanas Clay 6.5 m telescope, in order to construct the observed UV/optical Spectral energy distribution (SED) of NGC 7252: W3. The observations are then compared with synthetic spectra based on different star formation histories consistent with those of the eMSTO clusters. We find that the SED of this cluster is best fitted by a synthetic spectrum with a single stellar population of age 570^{+70}_{-62} Myr and mass 1.13^{+0.14}_{-0.13}× 10^8 M⊙, confirming earlier works on NGC 7252:W3. We also estimate the lower limit on the central escape velocity of 193 km s-1. We rule out extended star formation histories, like those inferred for the eMSTO clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, at high confidence. We conclude that the escape velocity of a cluster does not dictate whether a cluster can undergo extended periods of star formation.

  5. Pyroclastic Flow (Post-)Emplacement Thermal History Derived From Titanomagnetite Curie Temperatures: Mt. St. Helens and Soufrière Hills as Test Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, J.; Jackson, M.; Lappe, S. C. L. L.; Solheid, P.; Stinton, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Pumice blocks and ash matrix sampled from the 1980 pyroclastic flows at Mt. St. Helens and the 2010 flow at Soufrière Hills, Montserrat, display magnetic Curie temperatures (TC) that vary strongly with depth in the flow. We demonstrate that these TC variations result from variable degrees of cation ordering within Mg- and Al-bearing titanomagnetites, and that the degree of ordering is dependent on the emplacement temperature and post-emplacement thermal history of the sample. Curie temperatures are lowest at the tops of flows where rapid cooling has quenched in a relatively low degree of cation order. Samples that cooled more slowly at depth in the flow evolved towards a higher degree of cation order with a correspondingly higher TC. Isothermal annealing experiments in the laboratory have allowed us to document the time-temperature evolution of the cation ordering and Curie temperature, and we use this data in combination with conductive cooling calculations to forward model stratigraphic variations in TC as a function of emplacement temperature (e.g., Fig.1). Preliminary results show that modeled emplacement temperatures (Templ) are reasonably close to measured or estimated emplacement temperatures. Thermal demagnetization data from lithic clasts incorporated into some flows supports the modeled emplacement temperatures; a low-temperature overprint in the direction of the present-day field is removed at ~Templ. However, the documented variation of TC with thermal history means that care should be taken in interpreting this more traditional lithic-based paleomagnetic paleothermometry data. Modification of Curie and blocking temperatures both during natural cooling and during laboratory thermal treatments could affect lithic-based emplacement temperature estimates.

  6. Annual variation of spawning Cutthroat Trout in a small Western USA stream: A case study with implications for the conservation of potamodromous trout life history diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Stephen; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Roper, Brett B.; Budy, Phaedra

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the variability in the spatial and temporal distribution of spawning potamodromous trout despite decades of research directed at salmonid spawning ecology and the increased awareness that conserving life history diversity should be a focus of management. We monitored a population of fluvial–resident Bonneville Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii utah in a tributary to the Logan River, Utah, from 2006 to 2012 to gain insight into the distribution and timing of spawning and what factors may influence these spawning activities. We monitored Bonneville Cutthroat Trout using redd surveys with multiple observers and georeferenced redd locations. We documented an extended spawning period that lasted from late April to mid-July. The onset, median, and end of spawning was best predicted by the mean maximum water temperature during the first 13 weeks of the year (F = 130. 4, df = 5, R2 = 0.96, P < 0.0001) with spawning beginning and ending earlier in years that had warmer water temperatures prior to spawning. The distribution of redds was clumped each year and the relative density of redds was greater in a reach dominated by dams constructed by beavers Castor canadensis. Both dam failure and construction appeared to be responsible for creating new spawning habitat that was quickly occupied, demonstrating rapid temporal response to local habitat changes. Bonneville Cutthroat Trout appeared to establish and defend a redd for up to 2 d, and spawning most often occurred between similar-sized individuals. Spawning surveys for potamodromous trout are an underutilized tool that could be used to better understand the distribution and timing of spawning as well as determine the size and trends of the reproducing portion of populations of management concern. Without efforts to document the diversity of this important aspect of potamodromous trout life history, prioritization of conservation will be problematic.

  7. Annual variation of spawning cutthroat trout in a small western USA stream: a case study with implications for the conservation of potamodromous trout life history diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Stephen; Al-Chokhachy, Robert; Roper, Brett B.; Budy, Phaedra

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the variability in the spatial and temporal distribution of spawning potamodromous trout despite decades of research directed at salmonid spawning ecology and the increased awareness that conserving life history diversity should be a focus of management. We monitored a population of fluvial–resident Bonneville Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii utah in a tributary to the Logan River, Utah, from 2006 to 2012 to gain insight into the distribution and timing of spawning and what factors may influence these spawning activities. We monitored Bonneville Cutthroat Trout using redd surveys with multiple observers and georeferenced redd locations. We documented an extended spawning period that lasted from late April to mid-July. The onset, median, and end of spawning was best predicted by the mean maximum water temperature during the first 13 weeks of the year (F = 130. 4, df = 5, R2 = 0.96, P < 0.0001) with spawning beginning and ending earlier in years that had warmer water temperatures prior to spawning. The distribution of redds was clumped each year and the relative density of redds was greater in a reach dominated by dams constructed by beavers Castor canadensis. Both dam failure and construction appeared to be responsible for creating new spawning habitat that was quickly occupied, demonstrating rapid temporal response to local habitat changes. Bonneville Cutthroat Trout appeared to establish and defend a redd for up to 2 d, and spawning most often occurred between similar-sized individuals. Spawning surveys for potamodromous trout are an underutilized tool that could be used to better understand the distribution and timing of spawning as well as determine the size and trends of the reproducing portion of populations of management concern. Without efforts to document the diversity of this important aspect of potamodromous trout life history, prioritization of conservation will be problematic.

  8. Integrating the New Economic and Social History into the History Curriculum in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulson, Barry W.

    In order to address the significant gap between the ideas emerging from the new economic history and the economics actually taught in secondary school classes, successful strategies from a series of summer institutes are described. Each topic begins with a discussion of basic concepts and recent developments in the economic theory of that…

  9. The relation between actual exposure to political violence and preparatory intervention for exposure to media coverage of terrorism.

    PubMed

    Slone, Michelle; Shoshani, Anat; Baumgarten-Katz, Inbar

    2008-07-01

    This laboratory study examined differential effects of television broadcasts of terrorism on viewers' anxiety according to their actual exposure history, and differential efficacy of a preparatory intervention in moderating elevated anxiety for high or low actual exposure. Participants were 80 young Israeli adults, randomly allocated to a terrorism or non-terrorism media broadcast, and for each type of exposure, to a preparatory or control intervention. Actual political violence and terrorism exposure history was assessed, and anxiety measured explicitly and indirectly prior and subsequent to the intervention and media exposure manipulation. Results showed that in the terrorism media exposure, participants with high more than low actual political life events (PLE) exposure showed higher post-test levels of indirectly measured anxiety. Clinical intervention before the terrorism media exposure moderated indirectly measured anxiety among participants with high PLE exposure, but increased anxiety for low PLE. Findings outline preparatory measures that could maximize coping for the high PLE actual exposure at-risk sector. PMID:18938291

  10. A Case-Study of One Teacher's Use of an Interactive Whiteboard System to Support Knowledge Co-Construction in the History Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaney, Rosemary; Chapman, Arthur; Hennessy, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have rapidly become an integral feature of many classrooms across the UK and elsewhere, but debate continues regarding the pedagogical implications of their use. This article reports on an in-depth case-study from the wider T-MEDIA project (Teacher Mediation of Subject Learning with ICT: a Multimedia Approach). A key…

  11. Thermal evolution of Lower Paleozoic sedimentary successions from organic and inorganic studies: the case history of the Holy Cross Mountains (central Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolese, Matteo; Stefano Celano, Antonio; Corrado, Sveva; Caricchi, Chiara; Schito, Andrea; Aldega, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The rapid increase in shale gas production in the USA has triggered a growing interest in unconventional resources in Eastern and Northern Europe. In this framework, the potential shale gas reserves in Poland are the most promising in Europe, extending from the Baltic Sea to the Ukraine border. In this area, the Baltic, Podlasie and Lublin basins have already become objective of shale gas exploration and the Holy Cross Mountains (HCM, Central Poland) represents the outcropping analog of the buried targeted Lower Paleozoic successions, providing a unique opportunity to study and assess source rock potential. In this work, we provide new thermal maturity data of Paleozoic rocks exposed in the HCM. A multi-method approach, coupling organic matter/graptolites (i.e., marine organoclasts) optical analysis and X-ray diffraction of clay-sized fraction of sediments, was applied to constrain the burial - thermal evolution of the sedimentary succession. The investigated area of the HCM includes two different tectonic blocks: the Łysogóry region to the North and the Kielce region to the South, separated by the Holy Cross Fault (HCF). lllite content in mixed layer illite-smectite determinations and vitrinite/graptolites reflectance measurements (Roeq%), performed on samples (Cambrian - Devonian) collected from both the regions, show a substantial difference between the two blocks in terms of thermal maturity and burial history. Roeq% values in the southern block range from 0.5% to 1.0%, with few exceptions, indicating early to mid-mature stage of hydrocarbon generation. Samples collected in the northern block show much higher values, mainly from 1.2% up to 1.7%, representative of the gas generation window. The I-S ordering type also shows relevant differences in the two blocks. In the southern block, mixed-layered clay minerals varies from R1 (short-range) to R3 (long-range), whereas R3 structures are recorded in the northern block. Vitrinite reflectance and mixed-layer I

  12. A Middle to Late Holocene avulsion history of the Euphrates river: a case study from Tell ed-Dēr, Iraq, Lower Mesopotamia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An Heyvaert, Vanessa Mary; Baeteman, Cecile

    2008-12-01

    Geoarchaeological research was performed to reconstruct the floodplain history in the surroundings of two ancient Mesopotamian cities: Tell ed-Dēr and Sippar. The mapping of the floodplain is based on facies analyses of the sedimentary succession of 225 hand-operated boreholes. The archaeological sites Tell ed-Dēr and Sippar are closely linked to a palaeochannelbelt of the Euphrates, located in the western part of the study area. Channel activity started at least in ca 3100 BC/5050 cal BP, until ca 1400-1000 BC/3350-2950 cal BP. The channel belt was part of an avulsion driven multiple Euphrates channel network that gradually became abandoned from the second half of the 2nd millennium BC. A second mapped Euphrates, Tigris or Joint Euphrates -Tigris palaeochannel belt became abandoned well before 3100 BC. Examples of natural processes as well as human interactions triggering avulsion are given. Moreover, textual, archaeological and geological data show clearly that flood-control techniques and the construction of large-scale dikes seemed to be a common practice.

  13. A case study of a precision fertilizer application task generation for wheat based on classified hyperspectral data from UAV combined with farm history data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaivosoja, Jere; Pesonen, Liisa; Kleemola, Jouko; Pölönen, Ilkka; Salo, Heikki; Honkavaara, Eija; Saari, Heikki; Mäkynen, Jussi; Rajala, Ari

    2013-10-01

    Different remote sensing methods for detecting variations in agricultural fields have been studied in last two decades. There are already existing systems for planning and applying e.g. nitrogen fertilizers to the cereal crop fields. However, there are disadvantages such as high costs, adaptability, reliability, resolution aspects and final products dissemination. With an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based airborne methods, data collection can be performed cost-efficiently with desired spatial and temporal resolutions, below clouds and under diverse weather conditions. A new Fabry-Perot interferometer based hyperspectral imaging technology implemented in an UAV has been introduced. In this research, we studied the possibilities of exploiting classified raster maps from hyperspectral data to produce a work task for a precision fertilizer application. The UAV flight campaign was performed in a wheat test field in Finland in the summer of 2012. Based on the campaign, we have classified raster maps estimating the biomass and nitrogen contents at approximately stage 34 in the Zadoks scale. We combined the classified maps with farm history data such as previous yield maps. Then we generalized the combined results and transformed it to a vectorized zonal task map suitable for farm machinery. We present the selected weights for each dataset in the processing chain and the resultant variable rate application (VRA) task. The additional fertilization according to the generated task was shown to be beneficial for the amount of yield. However, our study is indicating that there are still many uncertainties within the process chain.

  14. Distribution and abundance of freshwater polychaetes, Manayunkia speciosa (Polychaeta), in the Great Lakes with a 70-year case history for western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Don W.

    2013-01-01

    Manayunkia speciosa has been a taxonomic curiosity for 150 years with little interest until 1977 when it was identified as an intermediate host of a fish parasite (Ceratomyxa shasta) responsible for fish mortalities (e.g., chinook salmon). Manayunkia was first reported in the Great Lakes in 1929. Since its discovery, the taxon has been reported in 50% (20 of 40 studies) of benthos studies published between 1960 and 2007. When found, Manayunkia comprised 2) and Georgian Bay (1790/m2) than in five other areas (mean = 60 to 553/m2) of the lakes. A 70-year history of Manayunkia in western Lake Erie indicates it was not found in 1930, was most abundant in 1961 (mean = 8039, maximum = 67,748/m2), and decreased in successive periods of 1982 (3529, 49,639/m2), 1993 (1876, 25,332/m2), and 2003 (79, 2583/m2). It occurred at 48% of stations in 1961, 58% in 1982, 52% in 1993, and 6% of stations in 2003. In all years, Manayunkia was distributed primarily near the mouth of the Detroit River. Causes for declines in distribution and abundance are unknown, but may be related to pollution-abatement programs that began in the 1970s, and invasion of dreissenid mussels in the late-1980s which contributed to de-eutrophication of western Lake Erie. At present, importance of the long-term decline of Manayunkia in Lake Erie is unknown.

  15. Using lysimeters to test the Penman Monteith actual evapotranspiration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Asher, Jiftah; Volinski, Roman; Zilberman, Arkadi; Bar Yosef, Beni; Silber, Avner

    2015-04-01

    Differences in actual transpiration (ETa) of banana plants were quantified in a lysimeter experiment. ETA was computed using instantaneous data from two weighing lysimeters and compared to PM (Penman-Monteith) model for ETa. Two critical problems were faced in this test. A) Estimating canopy and aerodynamic resistances ("rc" and "ra" respectively ) and B) converting the lysimeter changes in water volume ( LYv cm3 ) to ETa length units ( cm ). The two unknowns " rc" and "ra" were obtained from continuous measurements of the differences between canopy and air temperature (Tc - Ta). This difference was established by means of the infrared thermometry which was followed by numerical and analytical calculation of ETa using the modification suggested by R. Jackson to the PM model. The conversion of lysimeter volumetric units (LYv) to ETa length units was derived from the slope of cumulative LYv/ETa. This relationship was significantly linear (r2=0.97and 0.98.). Its slope was interpreted as "evaporating leaf area" which accounted for 1.8E4 cm2 in lysimeter 1 and 2.3E4 cm2.in lysimeter 2 . The comparison between LYv and PM model was acceptable even under very low ETa. The average of two lysimeters was 1.1mm/day (1.4 mm/day , LYv 1 and 0.8 LYv 2) while ETa calculated on the basis of PM model was 1.2 mm/day. It was concluded that although lysimeters are most accurate systems to measure ETa one of its disadvantages ( beside the high cost) is the volumetric output that in many cases should be supported by a one dimensional energy balance system. The PM model was found to be a reliable complementary tool to convert lysimeters volumetric output into conventional length units of ETa.

  16. Comparison of predicted and actual consequences of missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Miosge, Lisa A; Field, Matthew A; Sontani, Yovina; Cho, Vicky; Johnson, Simon; Palkova, Anna; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Liang, Rong; Zhang, Yafei; Lyon, Stephen; Beutler, Bruce; Whittle, Belinda; Bertram, Edward M; Enders, Anselm; Goodnow, Christopher C; Andrews, T Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Each person's genome sequence has thousands of missense variants. Practical interpretation of their functional significance must rely on computational inferences in the absence of exhaustive experimental measurements. Here we analyzed the efficacy of these inferences in 33 de novo missense mutations revealed by sequencing in first-generation progeny of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-treated mice, involving 23 essential immune system genes. PolyPhen2, SIFT, MutationAssessor, Panther, CADD, and Condel were used to predict each mutation's functional importance, whereas the actual effect was measured by breeding and testing homozygotes for the expected in vivo loss-of-function phenotype. Only 20% of mutations predicted to be deleterious by PolyPhen2 (and 15% by CADD) showed a discernible phenotype in individual homozygotes. Half of all possible missense mutations in the same 23 immune genes were predicted to be deleterious, and most of these appear to become subject to purifying selection because few persist between separate mouse substrains, rodents, or primates. Because defects in immune genes could be phenotypically masked in vivo by compensation and environment, we compared inferences by the same tools with the in vitro phenotype of all 2,314 possible missense variants in TP53; 42% of mutations predicted by PolyPhen2 to be deleterious (and 45% by CADD) had little measurable consequence for TP53-promoted transcription. We conclude that for de novo or low-frequency missense mutations found by genome sequencing, half those inferred as deleterious correspond to nearly neutral mutations that have little impact on the clinical phenotype of individual cases but will nevertheless become subject to purifying selection. PMID:26269570

  17. Comparison of predicted and actual consequences of missense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Miosge, Lisa A.; Field, Matthew A.; Sontani, Yovina; Cho, Vicky; Johnson, Simon; Palkova, Anna; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Liang, Rong; Zhang, Yafei; Lyon, Stephen; Beutler, Bruce; Whittle, Belinda; Bertram, Edward M.; Enders, Anselm; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Andrews, T. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Each person’s genome sequence has thousands of missense variants. Practical interpretation of their functional significance must rely on computational inferences in the absence of exhaustive experimental measurements. Here we analyzed the efficacy of these inferences in 33 de novo missense mutations revealed by sequencing in first-generation progeny of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–treated mice, involving 23 essential immune system genes. PolyPhen2, SIFT, MutationAssessor, Panther, CADD, and Condel were used to predict each mutation’s functional importance, whereas the actual effect was measured by breeding and testing homozygotes for the expected in vivo loss-of-function phenotype. Only 20% of mutations predicted to be deleterious by PolyPhen2 (and 15% by CADD) showed a discernible phenotype in individual homozygotes. Half of all possible missense mutations in the same 23 immune genes were predicted to be deleterious, and most of these appear to become subject to purifying selection because few persist between separate mouse substrains, rodents, or primates. Because defects in immune genes could be phenotypically masked in vivo by compensation and environment, we compared inferences by the same tools with the in vitro phenotype of all 2,314 possible missense variants in TP53; 42% of mutations predicted by PolyPhen2 to be deleterious (and 45% by CADD) had little measurable consequence for TP53-promoted transcription. We conclude that for de novo or low-frequency missense mutations found by genome sequencing, half those inferred as deleterious correspond to nearly neutral mutations that have little impact on the clinical phenotype of individual cases but will nevertheless become subject to purifying selection. PMID:26269570

  18. Safety of patients--actual problem of modern medicine (review).

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, Neriman; Samnidze, L; Beridze, T; Tsintsadze, M; Tsintsadze, Nino

    2011-09-01

    Safety of patients is actual problem of up-to-date medicine. The current successful treatment of various sicknesses is achieved by implementation in clinical practice such medical preparations (medications), which are characterized with the high therapeutic activity, low toxicity and prolonged effects. In spite of evidence of the pharmacotherapeutical advances, the frequency of complications after medication has grown - that is why the safety of patients is the acute actual problem of medicine and ecological state of human population today. PMID:22156680

  19. Subtype Analysis of Cryptosporidium Specimens from Sporadic Cases in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, and Iowa in 2007: Widespread Occurrence of One Cryptosporidium hominis Subtype and Case History of an Infection with the Cryptosporidium Horse Genotype▿

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Hlavsa, Michele C.; Yoder, Jonathan; Ewers, Christina; Dearen, Theresa; Yang, Wenli; Nett, Randall; Harris, Stephanie; Brend, Sarah M.; Harris, Meghan; Onischuk, Lisa; Valderrama, Amy L.; Cosgrove, Shaun; Xavier, Karen; Hall, Nancy; Romero, Sylvia; Young, Stephen; Johnston, Stephanie P.; Arrowood, Michael; Roy, Sharon; Beach, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Subtyping was conducted in late 2007 on 57 Cryptosporidium specimens from sporadic cases in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, and Iowa. One previously rare Cryptosporidium hominis subtype was indentified in 40 cases (70%) from all four states, and the Cryptosporidium horse genotype was identified in a pet shop employee with severe clinical symptoms. PMID:19587303

  20. Magma mixing, crustal contamination, contamination before chemical analysis or complex history? The case study from the Wołek Hill, SW Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Monika

    2015-04-01

    Wołek Hill is one of the smallest exposures from ca. 300 occurrences of Cenozoic volcanic rocks from SW Poland. The outcrop is located about 100 km SW from Wrocław and belongs to the Złotoryja Volcanic Field, which is one of the largest volcanic fields in the Polish part of the Central European Volcanic Province (Ladenberger et al. 2006). The volcanic body, which is about 20 m wide, cross-cuts older Permian volcanic rocks (trachyandesites and rhyolites) and is well exposed in an old abandoned quarry. The occurrence was studied in detail because of great amount of mantle and crustal xenoliths brought to the surface by magma. Wołek Hill is one of the two occurrences in SW Poland where amphibole crystals were recognized as results of modal metasomatism in lithospheric mantle (Nowak et al. 2012). The volcanic rock from Wołek Hill represents complex history, difficult to explain by simple model. The rock was classified as basanite (Nowak, 2012). Its texture is porphyritic to glomeroporphyritic, olivine (Ol) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) occurs as phenocrysts, Cpx is also the dominant phase in the groundmass. Wołek Hill basanite differs from other exposures in Złotoryja Volcanic Field by presence of xenocrysts of Ol and Cpx from mantle rocks and also quartz (Qrtz) and feldspars (Feld) xenocrysts from crustal rocks. Those xenocrysts with additional carbonate veins, probably related with post-volcanic processes, were a great difficulty during rock preparation for whole-rock and isotopic analyses. The complex history of Wołek Hill basanite is visible in its chemical content (slight increase of SiO2, positive Pb anomaly, 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd values), but also in its petrography (e.g. by three types of olivine phenocrysts Fo82-91 with differences in zonation patterns reflecting Fo content; the most abundant are phenocrysts with normal zoning, but also crystals with opposite zoning and oscillatory zoning were recognised). According to available data from the basanite

  1. What Is Literary "History"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Wendell V.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the meaning of the word "history" as used in the common phrase "literary history" by critics and scholars. Asserts the differences between historical scholarship and literary history. Argues that the grounding activity of literary history is insulated from the relativism insisted upon by poststructuralist theorizing. (HB)

  2. Quantitative Morphologic Analysis of Boulder Shape and Surface Texture to Infer Environmental History: A Case Study of Rock Breakdown at the Ephrata Fan, Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Viles, Heather A.; Bourke, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Boulder morphology reflects both lithology and climate and is dictated by the combined effects of erosion, transport, and weathering. At present, morphologic information at the boulder scale is underutilized as a recorder of environmental processes, partly because of the lack of a systematic quantitative parameter set for reporting and comparing data sets. We develop such a parameter set, incorporating a range of measures of boulder form and surface texture. We use standard shape metrics measured in the field and fractal and morphometric classification methods borrowed from landscape analysis and applied to laser-scanned molds. The parameter set was pilot tested on three populations of basalt boulders with distinct breakdown histories in the Channeled Scabland, Washington: (1) basalt outcrop talus; (2) flood-transported boulders recently excavated from a quarry; and (3) flood-transported boulders, extensively weathered in situ on the Ephrata Fan surface. Size and shape data were found to distinguish between flood-transported and untransported boulders. Size and edge angles (approximately 120 degrees) of flood-transported boulders suggest removal by preferential fracturing along preexisting columnar joints, and curvature data indicate rounding relative to outcrop boulders. Surface textural data show that boulders which have been exposed at the surface are significantly rougher than those buried by fan sediments. Past signatures diagnostic of flood transport still persist on surface boulders, despite ongoing overprinting by processes in the present breakdown environment through roughening and fracturing in situ. Further use of this quantitative boulder parameter set at other terrestrial and planetary sites will aid in cataloging and understanding morphologic signatures of environmental processes.

  3. Quantitative morphologic analysis of boulder shape and surface texture to infer environmental history: A case study of rock breakdown at the Ephrata Fan, Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Viles, Heather A.; Bourke, Mary C.

    2008-05-01

    Boulder morphology reflects both lithology and climate and is dictated by the combined effects of erosion, transport, and weathering. At present, morphologic information at the boulder scale is underutilized as a recorder of environmental processes, partly because of the lack of a systematic quantitative parameter set for reporting and comparing data sets. We develop such a parameter set, incorporating a range of measures of boulder form and surface texture. We use standard shape metrics measured in the field and fractal and morphometric classification methods borrowed from landscape analysis and applied to laser-scanned molds. The parameter set was pilot tested on three populations of basalt boulders with distinct breakdown histories in the Channeled Scabland, Washington: (1) basalt outcrop talus; (2) flood-transported boulders recently excavated from a quarry; and (3) flood-transported boulders, extensively weathered in situ on the Ephrata Fan surface. Size and shape data were found to distinguish between flood-transported and untransported boulders. Size and edge angles (~120°) of flood-transported boulders suggest removal by preferential fracturing along preexisting columnar joints, and curvature data indicate rounding relative to outcrop boulders. Surface textural data show that boulders which have been exposed at the surface are significantly rougher than those buried by fan sediments. Past signatures diagnostic of flood transport still persist on surface boulders, despite ongoing overprinting by processes in the present breakdown environment through roughening and fracturing in situ. Further use of this quantitative boulder parameter set at other terrestrial and planetary sites will aid in cataloging and understanding morphologic signatures of environmental processes.

  4. The volcanic history ofVolcán Alcedo, Galápagos Archipelago: a case study of rhyolitic oceanic volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Dennis J.; Howard, Keith A.; Jellinek, A. Mark; Rayder, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Volca??n Alcedo is one of the seven western Gala??pagos shields and is the only active Gala??pagos volcano known to have erupted rhyolite as well as basalt. The volcano stands 4 km above the sea floor and has a subaerial volume of 200 km3, nearly all of which is basalt. As Volca??n Alcedo grew, it built an elongate domal shield, which was partly truncated during repeated caldera-collapse and partial-filling episodes. An outward-dipping sequence of basalt flows at least 250 m thick forms the steepest (to 33??) flanks of the volcano and is not tilted; thus a constructional origin for the steep upper flanks is favored. About 1 km3 of rhyolite erupted late in the volcano's history from at least three vents and in 2-5 episodes. The most explosive of these produced a tephra blanket that covers the eastern half of the volcano. Homogeneous rhyolitic pumice is overlain by dacite-rhyolite commingled pumice, with no stratigraphic break. The tephra is notable for its low density and coarse grain size. The calculated height of the eruption plume is 23-30 km, and the intensity is estimated to have been 1.2x108 kg/s. Rhyolitic lavas vented from the floor of the caldera and from fissures along the rim overlie the tephra of the plinian phase. The age of the rhyolitic eruptions is ???120 ka, on the basis of K-Ar ages. Between ten and 20 basaltic lava flows are younger than the rhyolites. Recent faulting resulted in a moat around part of the caldera floor. Alcedo most resently erupted sometime between 1946 and 1960 from its southern flank. Alcedo maintains an active, transient hydrothermal system. Acoustic and seismic activity in 1991 is attributed to the disruption of the hydrothermal system by a regional-scale earthquake. ?? 1994 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Self-perceived and actual ability in the functional reach test in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ryckewaert, Gilles; Luyat, Marion; Rambour, Melanie; Tard, Céline; Noël, Myriam; Defebvre, Luc; Delval, Arnaud

    2015-03-01

    Falls frequently occur during daily activities such as reaching for an object in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Misjudgment is also reported to be one of the circumstances that lead to falls. The functional reach test is an indicator of dynamic balance. The primary objective was to establish whether there is a difference between self-perceived and actual ability to perform the functional reach test in patients with PD who have never fallen. Three groups of participants (all with no history of falls) were studied: young adults, elderly adults and PD patients. The participants first estimated their maximum reaching distance (but without performing the action, i.e. as a motor imagery task) and then actually performed the functional reach test (i.e. as a motor task). No significant overestimation or underestimation was observed. The reaching distance was lower in PD than in the two other groups. There were no differences between PD patients and elderly adults in terms of the forward centre of pressure displacement. Seven PD patients reported a fall in the year following the experiment. The fallers had a longer history of disease. Finally, PD patients adequately estimated their ability in the functional reach test and did not adopt an "at risk" strategy and appeared to be quite conservative (as were healthy elderly adults) in their postural control behavior. Ability to estimate self-performance is preserved in PD patients with no clinical impairments of postural control although they are at risk of future falls. PMID:25600856

  6. Gas emissions from failed and actual eruptions from Cook Inlet Volcanoes, Alaska, 1989-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, C.A.; Doukas, M.P.; Kelly, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cook Inlet volcanoes that experienced an eruption between 1989 and 2006 had mean gas emission rates that were roughly an order of magnitude higher than at volcanoes where unrest stalled. For the six events studied, mean emission rates for eruptions were ~13,000 t/d CO2 and 5200 t/d SO2, but only ~1200 t/d CO2 and 500 t/d SO2 for non-eruptive events (‘failed eruptions’). Statistical analysis suggests degassing thresholds for eruption on the order of 1500 and 1000 t/d for CO2 and SO2, respectively. Emission rates greater than 4000 and 2000 t/d for CO2 and SO2, respectively, almost exclusively resulted during eruptive events (the only exception being two measurements at Fourpeaked). While this analysis could suggest that unerupted magmas have lower pre-eruptive volatile contents, we favor the explanations that either the amount of magma feeding actual eruptions is larger than that driving failed eruptions, or that magmas from failed eruptions experience less decompression such that the majority of H2O remains dissolved and thus insufficient permeability is produced to release the trapped volatile phase (or both). In the majority of unrest and eruption sequences, increases in CO2 emission relative to SO2 emission were observed early in the sequence. With time, all events converged to a common molar value of C/S between 0.5 and 2. These geochemical trends argue for roughly similar decompression histories until shallow levels are reached beneath the edifice (i.e., from 20–35 to ~4–6 km) and perhaps roughly similar initial volatile contents in all cases. Early elevated CO2 levels that we find at these high-latitude, andesitic arc volcanoes have also been observed at mid-latitude, relatively snow-free, basaltic volcanoes such as Stromboli and Etna. Typically such patterns are attributed to injection and decompression of deep (CO2-rich) magma into a shallower chamber and open system degassing prior to eruption. Here we argue that the C/S trends probably represent

  7. Methodology for lognormal modelling of malignant pleural mesothelioma survival time distributions: a study of 5580 case histories from Europe and USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Richard F.; Lahanas, Michael; Asselain, Bernard; Brewster, David; Burgers, Sjaak A.; Damhuis, Ronald A. M.; DeRycke, Yann; Gennaro, Valerio; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila

    2004-09-01

    A truncated left-censored and right-censored lognormal model has been validated for representing pleural mesothelioma survival times in the range 5-200 weeks for data subsets grouped by age for males, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79 and 80+ years and for all ages combined for females. The cases available for study were from Europe and USA and totalled 5580. This is larger than any other pleural mesothelioma cohort accrued for study. The methodology describes the computation of reference baseline probabilities, 5-200 weeks, which can be used in clinical trials to assess results of future promising treatment methods. This study is an extension of previous lognormal modelling by Mould et al (2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 3893-924) to predict long-term cancer survival from short-term data where the proportion cured is denoted by C and the uncured proportion, which can be represented by a lognormal, by (1 - C). Pleural mesothelioma is a special case when C = 0.

  8. The combination of digital surface scanners and cone beam computed tomography technology for guided implant surgery using 3Shape implant studio software: a case history report.

    PubMed

    Lanis, Alejandro; Álvarez Del Canto, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of virtual engineering into dentistry and the digitization of information are providing new perspectives and innovative alternatives for dental treatment modalities. The use of digital surface scanners with surgical planning software allows for the combination of the radiographic, prosthetic, surgical, and laboratory fields under a common virtual scenario, permitting complete digital treatment planning. In this article, the authors present a clinical case in which a guided implant surgery was performed based on a complete digital surgical plan combining the information from a cone beam computed tomography scan and the virtual simulation obtained from the 3Shape TRIOS intraoral surface scanner. The information was imported to and combined in the 3Shape Implant Studio software for guided implant surgery planning. A surgical guide was obtained by a 3D printer, and the surgical procedure was done using the Biohorizons Guided Surgery Kit and its protocol. PMID:25822304

  9. History Circles: The Doing of Teaching History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sarah Drake

    2009-01-01

    Lesson planning is a critical task in the education of pre-service teachers, but the author has often questioned the extent to which traditional lesson plan formats truly contribute to the teaching and learning of history. Since current research in history education calls for an emphasis on building "historical thinking" skills and content…

  10. Ancient DNA and human history

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, Montgomery; Racimo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We review studies of genomic data obtained by sequencing hominin fossils with particular emphasis on the unique information that ancient DNA (aDNA) can provide about the demographic history of humans and our closest relatives. We concentrate on nuclear genomic sequences that have been published in the past few years. In many cases, particularly in the Arctic, the Americas, and Europe, aDNA has revealed historical demographic patterns in a way that could not be resolved by analyzing present-day genomes alone. Ancient DNA from archaic hominins has revealed a rich history of admixture between early modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans, and has allowed us to disentangle complex selective processes. Information from aDNA studies is nowhere near saturation, and we believe that future aDNA sequences will continue to change our understanding of hominin history. PMID:27274045

  11. Ancient DNA and human history.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, Montgomery; Racimo, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    We review studies of genomic data obtained by sequencing hominin fossils with particular emphasis on the unique information that ancient DNA (aDNA) can provide about the demographic history of humans and our closest relatives. We concentrate on nuclear genomic sequences that have been published in the past few years. In many cases, particularly in the Arctic, the Americas, and Europe, aDNA has revealed historical demographic patterns in a way that could not be resolved by analyzing present-day genomes alone. Ancient DNA from archaic hominins has revealed a rich history of admixture between early modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans, and has allowed us to disentangle complex selective processes. Information from aDNA studies is nowhere near saturation, and we believe that future aDNA sequences will continue to change our understanding of hominin history. PMID:27274045

  12. Preoperative Uterine Artery Embolisation for Large Uterine Fibroids with Subsequent Uterus Preservation – Three Case Histories and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    David, M.; Kröncke, T.

    2012-01-01

    Uterine artery embolisation (UAE) is an established procedure to treat uterine fibroids as an alternative to surgery. The combination of both approaches is reserved for only a few cases. A preoperative UAE (PUAE) contributes to reducing bleeding complications and helps preserve the uterus. We report here on 3 patients, each with very large fibroid (all > 1100 g), who were successfully treated by interdisciplinary hybrid intervention (embolisation followed by surgery). Preserving the uterus was a “sine qua non” for all 3 patients. As discussed in some articles, PUAE should be considered when treating patients who wish to preserve their uterus at all costs but who are considered preoperatively to be at increased risk of bleeding and/or patients who are considered to be at high risk of requiring a hysterectomy “for technical reasons”. The additional costs of embolisation can be set against the potentially shorter hospitalisation times due to the more favourable intraoperative and postoperative course, the savings arising from the reduced need for blood transfusions, and the greater patient satisfaction. PMID:25284842

  13. Experimental philosophy of actual and counterfactual free will intuitions.

    PubMed

    Feltz, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Five experiments suggested that everyday free will and moral responsibility judgments about some hypothetical thought examples differed from free will and moral responsibility judgments about the actual world. Experiment 1 (N=106) showed that free will intuitions about the actual world measured by the FAD-Plus poorly predicted free will intuitions about a hypothetical person performing a determined action (r=.13). Experiments 2-5 replicated this result and found the relations between actual free will judgments and free will judgments about hypothetical determined or fated actions (rs=.22-.35) were much smaller than the differences between them (ηp(2)=.2-.55). These results put some pressure on theoretical accounts of everyday intuitions about freedom and moral responsibility. PMID:26126174

  14. A Flawed Argument Against Actual Infinity in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Laraudogoitia, Jon

    2010-12-01

    In “Nonconservation of Energy and loss of Determinism II. Colliding with an Open Set” (2010) Atkinson and Johnson argue in favour of the idea that an actual infinity should be excluded from physics, at least in the sense that physical systems involving an actual infinity of component elements should not be admitted. In this paper I show that the argument Atkinson and Johnson use is erroneous and that an analysis of the situation considered by them is possible without requiring any type of rejection of the idea of infinity.

  15. Pilot Eye Scanning under Actual Single Pilot Instrument Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinoie, Kenichi; Sunada, Yasuto

    Operations under single pilot instrument flight rules for general aviation aircraft is known to be one of the most demanding pilot tasks. Scanning numerous instruments plays a key role for perception and decision-making during flight. Flight experiments have been done by a single engine light airplane to investigate the pilot eye scanning technique for IFR flights. Comparisons between the results by an actual flight and those by a PC-based flight simulator are made. The experimental difficulties of pilot eye scanning measurements during the actual IFR flight are discussed.

  16. Comparison of simulated and actual wind shear radar data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.; Crittenden, Lucille H.

    1992-01-01

    Prior to the development of the NASA experimental wind shear radar system, extensive computer simulations were conducted to determine the performance of the radar in combined weather and ground clutter environments. The simulation of the radar used analytical microburst models to determine weather returns and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) maps to determine ground clutter returns. These simulations were used to guide the development of hazard detection algorithms and to predict their performance. The structure of the radar simulation is reviewed. Actual flight data results from the Orlando and Denver tests are compared with simulated results. Areas of agreement and disagreement of actual and simulated results are shown.

  17. Positioning the actual interference fringe pattern on the tooth flank in measuring gear tooth flanks by laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Suping; Wang, Leijie; Liu, Shiqiao; Komori, Masaharu; Kubo, Aizoh

    2011-05-01

    In measuring form deviation of gear tooth flanks by laser interferometry, the collected interference fringe pattern (IFP) is badly distorted, in the case of shape, relative to the actual tooth flank. Meanwhile, a clear and definite mapping relationship between the collected IFP and the actual tooth flank is indispensable for both transforming phase differences into deviation values and positioning the measurement result on the actual tooth flank. In order to solve these problems, this paper proposes a method using the simulation tooth image as a bridge connecting the actual tooth flank and the collected IFP. The mapping relationship between the simulation tooth image and the actual tooth flank has been obtained by ray tracing methods [Fang et al., Appl. Opt. 49(33), 6409-6415 (2010)]. This paper mainly discusses how to build the relationship between the simulation tooth image and the collected IFP by using a matching algorithm of two characteristic point sets. With the combination of the two above-mentioned assistant mapping relationships, the mapping relationship between the collected IFP and the actual tooth flank can be built; the collected IFP can be positioned on the actual tooth flank. Finally, the proposed method is employed in a measurement of the form deviation of a gear tooth flank and the result proves the feasibility of the proposed method.

  18. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  19. A standard optometric headache history.

    PubMed

    Kairys, D J; Tibbetts, C; Saliba, K

    1983-02-01

    Many optometric patients present with headache as their chief complaint, or as an ancillary symptom. Since most cases of head pain are associated with few or inconstant physical signs, the key to an accurate diagnosis lies largely in a careful, systematic history. This article provides a scheme by which the busy optometric clinician can expeditiously obtain an incisive and relevant profile of every headache patient, and thereby determine the appropriate mode of management, and referral. PMID:6341437

  20. HAD Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.

  1. KSC History Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snaples, Lee

    2001-01-01

    The project is a joint endeavor between Dr. Henry Dethloff and myself and is producing a number of products related to KSC history. This report is a summary of those projects. First, there is an overview monograph covering KSC history. Second, there is a chapter outline for an eventual book-length history. Third, there is monograph on safety at KSC. Finally, there is a web page and database dedicated to the KSC oral history project.

  2. [Evaluation of the actual traceability of labile blood products using medical records].

    PubMed

    Ingrand, P; Salmi, L R; Benz-Lemoine, E; Dupuis, M

    1998-12-01

    The traceability of blood products is an essential part of haemovigilance and transfusion safety. A pilot survey assessed the actual traceability by analysing transfusion information collected from medical records of a representative sample of 390 labile blood products transfused in a French university hospital. Transfusion and distribution forms were missing in 2.3% and 6.9% respectively. Availability and validity of transfusion information varied according to the nature of the expected information, elements of patients' records and types of wards. The location where the transfusion was performed was false or ambiguous in 38% of cases in surgery. Crude traceability, evaluated by the feedback of validated distribution forms, was estimated at 85.2% whereas actual traceability was estimated at 81.9% (SD 1.7%). High availability (98.7%) of at least one of the two sheets of the distribution form in medical records, or in the blood bank, revealed that a significant improvement of traceability should come from a better compliance to the rules of information transmission. The actual traceability differed significantly according to clinical services (worse in surgery) and was lower in case of autologous or absence of previous transfusion. An analysis of markers of good traceability should suggest efficient evolution of organization and information systems. This pilot study shows the relevance and feasibility of this kind of survey which could interestingly be performed on a large national representative random sample. PMID:9894331

  3. Case History: Merging the Tools of DC Resistivity and Fracture Trace Analysis for Locating High Yield Domestic Water Wells in Karst Terrain, Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frangos, W.; Eaton, L. S.

    2004-05-01

    , suggesting underground voids. This knowledge could serve as a future guide for both well placement and for site evaluation of the potential for sinkhole occurrence. The second site is located 5 km due south of the Barth Farm. A potential residential and farm operations site was being evaluated for construction based on the availability of adequate water yield. Previous attempts of drilling on a contiguous property resulted in a fruitless 800 ft dry hole. The site is mapped as folded sedimentary rock (limestone, dolomite, shale), but outcrops are masked by ~25 m thick alluvial deposits of quartzite gravel and sand. The presence of numerous sinkholes and ponds suggests karst terrain. Fracture trace analysis was initially conducted to identify zones that may contain water-bearing conduits. A dipole-dipole DC resistivity survey followed in areas specifically delineated by the fracture trace analysis. The results lead to two strong wells, one producing 60-100 gpm at 286 ft deep, and the second well 40 gpm at 395 ft. Based on the previous drilling difficulty in this terrain, the complementary tools of high-resolution resistivity and fracture trace analysis are effective in locating high-yield water wells in karst environments. In the first case, the shallow aquifer was detected directly by the resistivity and indirectly by photo interpretation; in the second, both methods provided indirect evidence. The combined use of near-surface indications of underlying karst reservoirs is recommended for future exploration work.

  4. Conducting the Medical History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Martin A.; Alexander, Randell A.

    2011-01-01

    A key portion of the medical evaluation of child sexual abuse is the medical history. This differs from interviews or histories obtained by other professionals in that it is focuses more on the health and well-being of the child. Careful questions should be asked about all aspects of the child's medical history by a skilled, compassionate,…

  5. The Trouble with History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, John

    1990-01-01

    Cites the problems associated with teaching history: (1) lack of consensus on what and how to teach; (2) the adult perspective from which it is taught; (3) the abstract nature of history content; and (4) the concept of time. Concludes that efforts to include adolescent knowledge, skills, and attitudes should be considered in the history program.…

  6. Studying Ancient History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Robin

    1982-01-01

    Defends the value and relevance of the study of ancient history and classics in history curricula. The unique homogeneity of the classical period contributes to its instructional manageability. A year-long, secondary-level course on fifth-century Greece and Rome is described to illustrate effective approaches to teaching ancient history. (AM)

  7. Film and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaber, Robin L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of Web sites that focus on using film to teach history. Includes Web sites in five areas: (1) film and education; (2) history of cinema; (3) film and history resources; (4) film and women; and (5) film organizations. (CMK)

  8. Who Owns History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Sheldon

    1995-01-01

    Presents an interview with historian Cary Carson of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and author William Styron on the role of history in society. Outlines the once-proposed Disney history theme park near Mannassas, Virginia. Discusses historical interpretation, museums, historical sites, and popular history. (CFR)

  9. History of Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Albert E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the history of American physics, indicating that much effort has been on the atomic bond and high-energy physics, to the detriment of other topics and areas. To offset this tendency, significant research is going on in the history of solid-state physics, with glimmerings in the history of physics education. (JN)

  10. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Cancer.gov

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  11. Actualizing Concepts in Home Management: Proceedings of a National Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Home Economics Association, Washington, DC.

    The booklet prints the following papers delivered at a national conference: Actualizing Concepts in Home Management: Decision Making, Dorothy Z. Price; Innovations in Teaching: Ergonomics, Fern E. Hunt; Relevant Concepts of Home Management: Innovations in Teaching, Kay P. Edwards; Standards in a Managerial Context, Florence S. Walker; Organizing:…

  12. 26 CFR 513.8 - Addressee not actual owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONVENTIONS IRELAND Withholding of Tax § 513.8 Addressee not actual owner. (a) If any person with an address in Ireland who receives a dividend from a United States corporation with respect to which United... such reduced rate of 15 percent, such recipient in Ireland will withhold an additional amount of...

  13. Remote sensing estimates of actual evapotranspiration in an irrigation district

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate estimates of the spatial distribution of actual evapotranspiration (AET) are useful in hydrology, but can be difficult to obtain. Remote sensing provides a potential capability for routinely monitoring AET by combining remotely sensed surface temperature and vegetation cover observations w...

  14. Self Actualization of Females in an Experimental Orientation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Wilt, Robert B.; Klocke, Ronald A.

    1971-01-01

    An alternative to the traditional orientation program was developed that forced students to consider their physical and psychological outer limits. Students were confronted in a new and unique way that contributed to the self actualization process of the female portion of the group. (Author/BY)

  15. Actual Leisure Participation of Norwegian Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolva, Anne-Stine; Kleiven, Jo; Kollstad, Marit

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the actual participation in leisure activities by a sample of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome aged 14. Representing a first generation to grow up in a relatively inclusive context, they live with their families, attend mainstream schools, and are part of common community life. Leisure information was obtained in…

  16. Research into Students' Perceptions of Preferred and Actual Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John A.; And Others

    Measures of both preferred and actual classroom and school environment were administered to 1,675 secondary school students in New South Wales (Australia). Shortened versions of the My Class Inventory, Classroom Environment Scale, and Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire, as well as the Quality of School Life questionnaire were…

  17. MLCMS Actual Use, Perceived Use, and Experiences of Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon; Grönlund, Åke

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning involves use of mobile devices to participate in learning activities. Most e-learning activities are available to participants through learning systems such as learning content management systems (LCMS). Due to certain challenges, LCMS are not equally accessible on all mobile devices. This study investigates actual use, perceived…

  18. 40 CFR 74.22 - Actual SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....6 for natural gas For other fuels, the combustion source must specify the SO2 emissions factor. (c... (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.22 Actual SO2 emissions rate. (a) Data requirements. The designated representative of a combustion source shall submit...

  19. What Does the Force Concept Inventory Actually Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Douglas; Heller, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) is a 29-question, multiple-choice test designed to assess students' Newtonian and non-Newtonian conceptions of force. Presents an analysis of FCI results as one way to determine what the inventory actually measures. (LZ)

  20. Progressive Digressions: Home Schooling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Maslow's (1971) theory of primary creativeness is used as the basis for a self-actualization model of education. Examples of how to use the model in creative homeschooling are provided. Key elements include digressive and immersion learning, self-directed learning, and the integration of work and play. Teaching suggestions are provided. (Contains…