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Sample records for actual clinical care

  1. Does Simulator-Based Clinical Performance Correlate with Actual Hospital Behavior? The Effect of Extended Work Hours on Patient Care Provided by Medical Interns

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, James A.; Alexander, Erik K.; Lockley, Steven W.; Flynn-Evans, Erin; Venkatan, Suresh K.; Landrigan, Christopher P.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The correlation between simulator-based medical performance and real-world behavior remains unclear. The authors conducted this study to explore whether the effects of extended work hours on clinical performance, as reported in prior hospital-based studies, could be observed in a simulator-based testing environment. Method Intern volunteers reported to the simulator laboratory in a rested state and again in a sleep-deprived state (after a traditional 24–30 hour overnight shift [n=17]). A subset also presented after a shortened overnight shift (maximum of 16 scheduled hours [n=8]). During each laboratory visit, participants managed two critically ill patients. An on-site physician scored each case, as did a blinded rater later watching videotapes of the performances (score=1 [worst] to 8 [best]; average of both cases = session score). Results Among all participants, the average simulator session score was 6.0 (95% CI: 5.6–6.4) in the rested state, and declined to 5.0 (95% CI: 4.6–5.4) after the traditional overnight shift (P<0.001). Among those who completed the shortened overnight shift, the average post-shift simulator session score was 5.8 (95% CI: 5.0–6.6) compared to 4.3 [95%CI: 3.8–4.9]) after a traditional extended shift (P<0.001). Conclusions In a clinical simulation test, medical interns performed significantly better after working a shortened overnight shift compared to a traditional extended shift. These findings are consistent with real-time hospital studies using the same shift schedule. Such an independent correlation not only confirms the detrimental impact of extended work hours on medical performance, but also supports the validity of simulation as a clinical performance assessment tool. PMID:20881679

  2. Discordance between presumed standard of care and actual clinical practice: the example of rubber dam use during root canal treatment in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Riley, Joseph L; Eleazer, Paul D; Benjamin, Paul L; Funkhouser, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Use of a rubber dam during root canal treatment is considered the standard of care because it enhances patient safety and optimises the odds of successful treatment. Nonetheless, not all dentists use a rubber dam, creating disconnect between presumed standard of care and what is actually done in clinical practice. Little is known about dentists’ attitudes towards use of the rubber dam in their practices. The objectives were to: (1) quantify these attitudes and (2) test the hypothesis that specific attitudes are significantly associated with rubber dam use. Setting National Dental Practice-Based Research Network (NationalDentalPBRN.org). Participants 1490 network dentists. Outcome measures Dentists completed a questionnaire about their attitudes towards rubber dam use during root canal treatment. Three attitude scales comprised 33 items that used a 5-point ordinal scale to measure beliefs about effectiveness, inconvenience, ease of placement, comparison to other isolation techniques and patient factors. Factor analysis, cluster analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysed the relationship between attitudes and rubber dam use. Results All items had responses at each point on the 5-point scale, with an overall pattern of substantial variation across dentists. Five attitudinal factors (rubber dam effectiveness; inconvenient/time-consuming; ease of placement; effectiveness compared to Isolite; patient factors) and 4 clusters of practitioners were identified. Each factor and cluster was independently and strongly associated with rubber dam use. Conclusions General dentists have substantial variation in attitudes about rubber dam use. Beliefs that rubber dam use is not effective, inconvenient, time-consuming, not easy to place or affected by patient factors, were independently and significantly associated with lower rubber dam use. These attitudes explain why there is substantial discordance between presumed standard of care and actual practice

  3. [Actual problems of inpatient psychiatric care in Russia].

    PubMed

    Iastrebov, V S; Mitikhin, V G; Solokhina, T A; Shevchenko, L S; Tvorogova, N A

    2013-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of inpatient psychiatric care in Russia and some other countries is presented. A systematic analysis of the performance of psychiatric hospitals is conducted. The process of the deinstitutionalization in Russian psychiatry is highlighted. A range of problems hindering a reform of inpatient psychiatric service of the country is singled out. PMID:24300798

  4. The association between foot-care self efficacy beliefs and actual foot-care behaviour in people with peripheral neuropathy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Byron M; Swerissen, Hal; Payne, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Background People with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy often do not implement the foot-care behavioural strategies that are suggested by many health professionals. The concept of self-efficacy has been shown to be an effective predictor of behaviour in many areas of health. This study investigated the relationships between foot-care self-efficacy beliefs, self-reported foot-care behaviour and history of diabetes-related foot pathology in people with diabetes and loss of protective sensation in their feet. Methods Ninety-six participants were included in this cross-sectional study undertaken in a regional city of Australia. All participants had diabetes and clinically diagnosed loss of protective sensation in their feet. The participants completed a self-report pen-paper questionnaire regarding foot-care self efficacy beliefs (the "Foot Care Confidence Scale") and two aspects of actual foot-care behaviour-preventative behaviour and potentially damaging behaviour. Pearson correlation coefficients were then calculated to determine the association between foot-care self-efficacy beliefs and actual reported foot-care behaviour. Multiple analysis of variance was undertaken to compare mean self-efficacy and behaviour subscale scores for those with a history of foot pathology, and those that did not. Results A small positive correlation (r = 0.2, p = 0.05) was found between self-efficacy beliefs and preventative behaviour. There was no association between self-efficacy beliefs and potentially damaging behaviour. There was no difference in self-efficacy beliefs in people that had a history of foot pathology compared to those that did not. Conclusion There is little association between foot-care self-efficacy beliefs and actual foot-care behaviour. The usefulness of measuring foot-care self-efficacy beliefs to assess actual self foot-care behaviour using currently available instruments is limited in people with diabetes and loss of protective sensation. PMID:19192309

  5. Reconfiguring health workforce policy so that education, training, and actual delivery of care are closely connected.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Thomas C; Fraher, Erin P

    2013-11-01

    There is growing consensus that the health care workforce in the United States needs to be reconfigured to meet the needs of a health care system that is being rapidly and permanently redesigned. Accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes, for instance, will greatly alter the mix of caregivers needed and create new roles for existing health care workers. The focus of health system innovation, however, has largely been on reorganizing care delivery processes, reengineering workflows, and adopting electronic technology to improve outcomes. Little attention has been paid to training workers to adapt to these systems and deliver patient care in ever more coordinated systems, such as integrated health care networks that harmonize primary care with acute inpatient and postacute long-term care. This article highlights how neither regulatory policies nor market forces are keeping up with a rapidly changing delivery system and argues that training and education should be connected more closely to the actual delivery of care.

  6. Clinical reminders in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Banks, N J; Palmer, R H

    1990-01-01

    Computerized reminders are a tool to improve patient care, increase compliance, and reduce medical liability in ambulatory health care. Continuity of care is often hard to achieve given large patient loads, cost containment pressures, and regulatory requirements. Recall reminders prompt patients to make or keep appointments for health maintenance or screening exams. Physician reminders are issued to clinicians at or between visits when their patients have specific screening or diagnostic needs. Reminder systems based on clinical protocols have the added advantage of providing explicit instructions for workup or treatment of abnormal conditions. These reminder systems are especially useful to standardize care in offices with many providers. Implementation of reminder systems is aided by careful staff preparation and resource allocation. Ultimately, reminder systems enhance quality of care, increase patient satisfaction, and reduce costs through improved continuity of care and early detection of serious illness.

  7. Reconfiguring health workforce policy so that education, training, and actual delivery of care are closely connected.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Thomas C; Fraher, Erin P

    2013-11-01

    There is growing consensus that the health care workforce in the United States needs to be reconfigured to meet the needs of a health care system that is being rapidly and permanently redesigned. Accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes, for instance, will greatly alter the mix of caregivers needed and create new roles for existing health care workers. The focus of health system innovation, however, has largely been on reorganizing care delivery processes, reengineering workflows, and adopting electronic technology to improve outcomes. Little attention has been paid to training workers to adapt to these systems and deliver patient care in ever more coordinated systems, such as integrated health care networks that harmonize primary care with acute inpatient and postacute long-term care. This article highlights how neither regulatory policies nor market forces are keeping up with a rapidly changing delivery system and argues that training and education should be connected more closely to the actual delivery of care. PMID:24191074

  8. Clinical learning environments (actual and expected): perceptions of Iran University of Medical Sciences nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Pakpour, Vahid; Aalaa, Maryam; Shekarabi, Robabeh; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Haghani, Hamid; Mehrdad, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educational clinical environment has an important role in nursing students' learning. Any difference between actual and expected clinical environment will decrease nursing students’ interest in clinical environments and has a negative correlation with their clinical performance. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study is an attempt to compare nursing students' perception of the actual and expected status of clinical environments in medical-surgical wards. Participants of the study were 127 bachelor nursing students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in the internship period. Data gathering instruments were a demographic questionnaire (including sex, age, and grade point average), and the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) originally developed by Professor Chan (2001), in which its modified Farsi version (Actual and Preferred forms) consisting 42 items, 6 scales and 7 items per scale was used. Descriptive and inferential statistics (t-test, paired t-test, ANOVA) were used for data analysis through SPSS version 16. Results: The results indicated that there were significant differences between the preferred and actual form in all six scales. In other word, comparing with the actual form, the mean scores of all items in the preferred form were higher. The maximum mean difference was in innovation and the highest mean difference was in involvement scale. Conclusion: It is concluded that nursing students do not have a positive perception of their actual clinical teaching environment and this perception is significantly different from their perception of their expected environment. PMID:26034726

  9. Health care clinics in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Wollschlaeger, K

    1995-04-01

    Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care.

  10. What It Means to Care: How Educators Conceptualize and Actualize Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBee, Robin Haskell

    2007-01-01

    Seeking to put a face on educators' conceptualizations of caring, this study examines findings from open-ended surveys of 144 teacher candidates, classroom teachers, and college faculty associated with a mid-Atlantic university's teacher education program. Reflecting theoretical constructs described in the literature on resilience,…

  11. [Method for direct generation data for formatted case report forms based on requirement for data authenticity in actual clinical conditions].

    PubMed

    Shao, Ming-Yi; Liu, Bao-Yan; He, Li-Yun; Zhang, Run-Shun

    2013-04-01

    Data authenticity is the basic requirement of clinical studies. In actual clinical conditions how to establish formatted case report forms (CRF) in line with the requirement for data authenticity is the key to ensure clinical data quality. On the basis of the characteristics of clinical data in actual clinical conditions, we determined elements for establishing formatted case report forms by comparing differences in data characteristics of CRFs in traditional clinical studies and in actual clinical conditions, and then generated formatted case report forms in line with the requirement for data authenticity in actual clinical conditions. The data of formatted CRFs generated in this study could not only meet the requirement for data authenticity of clinical studies in actual clinical conditions, but also comply with data management practices for clinical studies, thus it is deemed as a progress in technical methods.

  12. Does medical students’ clinical performance affect their actual performance during medical internship?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eui-Ryoung; Chung, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study examines the relationship between the clinical performance of medical students and their performance as doctors during their internships. METHODS This retrospective study involved 63 applicants of a residency programme conducted at Chonnam National University Hospital, South Korea, in November 2012. We compared the performance of the applicants during their internship with their clinical performance during their fourth year of medical school. The performance of the applicants as interns was periodically evaluated by the faculty of each department, while their clinical performance as fourth-year medical students was assessed using the Clinical Performance Examination (CPX) and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). RESULTS The performance of the applicants as interns was positively correlated with their clinical performance as fourth-year medical students, as measured by the CPX and OSCE. The performance of the applicants as interns was moderately correlated with the patient-physician interaction items addressing communication and interpersonal skills in the CPX. CONCLUSION The clinical performance of medical students during their fourth year in medical school was related to their performance as medical interns. Medical students should be trained to develop good clinical skills through actual encounters with patients or simulated encounters using manikins, to enable them to become more competent doctors. PMID:26768172

  13. Costing nursing care: using the clinical care classification system to value nursing intervention in an acute-care setting.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jacqueline; Saba, Virginia

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to combine an established methodology for coding nursing interventions and action types using the Clinical Care Classification System with a reliable formula (relative value units) to cost nursing services. Using a flat per-diem rate to cost nursing care greatly understates the actual costs and fails to address the high levels of variability within and across units. We observed nurses performing commonly executed nursing interventions and recorded these into an electronic database with corresponding Clinical Care Classification System codes. The duration of these observations was used to calculate intervention costs using relative value unit calculation formulas. The costs of the five most commonly executed interventions were nursing care coordination/manage-refer ($2.43), nursing status report/assess-monitor ($4.22), medication treatment/perform-direct ($6.33), physical examination/assess-monitor ($3.20), and universal precautions/perform-direct ($1.96). Future studies across a variety of nursing specialties and units are needed to validate the relative value unit for Clinical Care Classification System action types developed for use with the Clinical Care Classification System nursing interventions as a method to cost nursing care.

  14. Optimal maintenance and consolidation therapy for multiple myeloma in actual clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Sup; Min, Chang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant plasma cell-originating cancer. Although its treatment outcomes have improved with the use of glucocorticoids, alkylating drugs, and novel agents, including proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib) and immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide), relapse remains a serious problem. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation and frontline treatments in non-transplant patients include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve the depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Many clinical trials have reported increased progression-free and overall survival rates after consolidation and maintenance therapy. The role of consolidation/maintenance therapy has been assessed in patients eligible and ineligible for transplantation and is a valuable option in clinical trial settings. However, the decision to use consolidation and/or maintenance therapy needs to be guided by the individual patient situation in actual clinical practice. This review analyzes the currently available evidence from several reported clinical trials to determine the optimal consolidation and maintenance therapy in clinical practice. PMID:27604793

  15. Optimal maintenance and consolidation therapy for multiple myeloma in actual clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Sup; Min, Chang-Ki

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant plasma cell-originating cancer. Although its treatment outcomes have improved with the use of glucocorticoids, alkylating drugs, and novel agents, including proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib) and immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide), relapse remains a serious problem. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation and frontline treatments in non-transplant patients include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve the depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Many clinical trials have reported increased progression-free and overall survival rates after consolidation and maintenance therapy. The role of consolidation/maintenance therapy has been assessed in patients eligible and ineligible for transplantation and is a valuable option in clinical trial settings. However, the decision to use consolidation and/or maintenance therapy needs to be guided by the individual patient situation in actual clinical practice. This review analyzes the currently available evidence from several reported clinical trials to determine the optimal consolidation and maintenance therapy in clinical practice. PMID:27604793

  16. Optimal maintenance and consolidation therapy for multiple myeloma in actual clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Sup; Min, Chang-Ki

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant plasma cell-originating cancer. Although its treatment outcomes have improved with the use of glucocorticoids, alkylating drugs, and novel agents, including proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib) and immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide), relapse remains a serious problem. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation and frontline treatments in non-transplant patients include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve the depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Many clinical trials have reported increased progression-free and overall survival rates after consolidation and maintenance therapy. The role of consolidation/maintenance therapy has been assessed in patients eligible and ineligible for transplantation and is a valuable option in clinical trial settings. However, the decision to use consolidation and/or maintenance therapy needs to be guided by the individual patient situation in actual clinical practice. This review analyzes the currently available evidence from several reported clinical trials to determine the optimal consolidation and maintenance therapy in clinical practice.

  17. Multiples clinic: a model for antenatal care.

    PubMed

    Knox, Ellen; Martin, William

    2010-12-01

    Antenatal care has become more focused in recent years with an increase in the number of specialist clinics providing care in a multidisciplinary manner. Multiple pregnancies are complex with complications for the mother and babies arising frequently. As a group they lend themselves well to a specialist clinic model where interested doctors and midwives can provide care tailored to the individual. This makes it less likely that complications will be missed and provides a consistent approach to care that patients desire. This article aims to describe models of care that can be given in such a clinic, acknowledging that one model will not fit all. The scant evidence that exists is presented along with selected examples of individual complications.

  18. Provider satisfaction in army primary care clinics.

    PubMed

    Byers, V L; Mays, M Z; Mark, D D

    1999-02-01

    The job satisfaction of physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants was assessed during the course of a multicenter study of Army primary care clinics. All providers in nine clinics at three medical centers who were engaged in adult or family care were invited to participate in the study. Questionnaires on job satisfaction and other practice style variables were completed by 26 physicians, 19 nurse practitioners, and 13 physician assistants (46, 76, and 41% of eligible providers, respectively). Analysis revealed a broad range of job satisfaction in the sample. However, average levels of job satisfaction were not significantly different across the three groups of primary care providers. Autonomy and collaboration were significant predictors of job satisfaction. It is clear that changes in health care systems that reduce, or appear to reduce, the primary care provider's autonomy in clinical matters are likely to reduce provider satisfaction as well. PMID:10050571

  19. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care. PMID:10181605

  20. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    PubMed

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains.

  1. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    PubMed

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains. PMID:23008263

  2. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  3. Clinical investigations in primary care.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Sarazin, Marie; Goetz, Celine; Dubois, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that represents the most common form of dementia. The most prominent feature of AD is the decline in cognitive function, with an early impairment of episodic memory. The memory deficit of an AD patient is characterized by the amnestic syndrome of the medial temporal type. As the disease progresses, the condition often manifests in language disorders, visuospatial deficits and executive dysfunctions. Patients often have neuropsychiatric disturbances, as apathy and psychotic symptoms. Loss of autonomy follows cognitive impairment. The clinical diagnosis of AD is based on a complete medical examination with a neuropsychological evaluation. The FCSRT (free and cued selective reminding test) is recommended for the identification of the amnestic syndrome of the medial temporal type, which is defined by: (1) a very poor free recall and (2) a decreased total recall due to an insufficient effect of cueing. The neuropsychological tests should also assess other cognitive functions that may be perturbed in AD, such as executive functions, praxis, visuospatial capacities and language. Neuroimaging and biological exams (genetics, biomarkers) are of great utility in the evaluation. Other medical, neurological, or psychiatric disorders which could account for the impairment in memory and related symptoms must be always investigated. PMID:19182457

  4. [The actual issues of private health care and voluntary medical insurance in foreign countries].

    PubMed

    Kasimovskiy, K K; Jhiliyayeva, Ye P; Zaika, N M

    2014-01-01

    The article demonstrates the issues private health care and voluntary medical insurance are facing nowadays in Australia, Great Britain, Ireland and the USA. The possible directions of overcoming these problems are discussed.

  5. The DIAMOND initiative: implementing collaborative care for depression in 75 primary care clinics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The many randomized trials of the collaborative care model for improving depression in primary care have not described the implementation and maintenance of this model. This paper reports how and the degree to which collaborative care process changes were implemented and maintained for the 75 primary care clinics participating in the DIAMOND Initiative (Depression Improvement Across Minnesota–Offering a New Direction). Methods Each clinic was trained to implement seven components of the model and participated in ongoing evaluation and facilitation activities. For this study, assessment of clinical process implementation was accomplished via completion of surveys by the physician leader and clinic manager of each clinic site at three points in time. The physician leader of each clinic completed a survey measure of the presence of various practice systems prior to and one and two years after implementation. Clinic managers also completed a survey of organizational readiness and the strategies used for implementation. Results Survey response rates were 96% to 100%. The systems survey confirmed a very high degree of implementation (with large variation) of DIAMOND depression practice systems (mean of 24.4 ± 14.6%) present at baseline, 57.0 ± 21.0% at one year (P = <0.0001), and 55.9 ± 21.3% at two years. There was a similarly large increase (and variation) in the use of various quality improvement strategies for depression (mean of 29.6 ± 28.1% at baseline, 75.1 ± 22.3% at one year (P = <0.0001), and 74.6 ± 23.0% at two years. Conclusions This study demonstrates that under the right circumstances, primary care clinics that are prepared to implement evidence-based care can do so if financial barriers are reduced, effective training and facilitation are provided, and the new design introduces the specific mental models, new care processes, and workers and expertise that are needed. Implementation was associated with a

  6. Virologic response and haematologic toxicity of boceprevir- and telaprevir-containing regimens in actual clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Butt, A. A.; Yan, P.; Shaikh, O. S.; Freiberg, M. S.; Re, V. Lo; Justice, A. C.; Sherman, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Effectiveness, safety and tolerability of boceprevir (BOC) and telaprevir (TPV) in actual clinical settings remain unknown. We determined rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) and haematologic adverse effects among persons treated with BOC- or TPV-containing regimens, compared with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PEG/RBV). Using an established cohort of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons, Electronically Retrieved Cohort of HCV Infected Veterans (ERCHIVES), we identified those treated with a BOC- or TPV-containing regimen and HCV genotype 1-infected controls treated with PEG/RBV. We excluded those with HIV co-infection and missing HCV RNA values to determine SVR. Primary endpoints were SVR (undetectable HCV RNA ≥12 weeks after treatment completion) and haematologic toxicity (grade 3/4 anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia). We evaluated 2288 persons on BOC-, 409 on TPV-containing regimen and 6308 on PEG/RBV. Among these groups, respectively, 31%, 43% and 9% were treatment-experienced; 17%, 37% and 14% had baseline cirrhosis; 63%, 54% and 48% were genotype 1a. SVR rates among noncirrhotics were as follows: treatment naïve: 65% (BOC), 67% (TPV) and 31% (PEG/RBV); treatment experienced: 57% (BOC), 54% (TPV) and 13% (PEG/RBV); (P-value not significant for BOC vs TPV; P < 0.0001 for BOC or TPV vs PEG/RBV). Haematologic toxicities among BOC-, TPV- and PEG/RBV-treated groups were as follows: grade 3/4 anaemia 7%, 11% and 3%; grade 4 thrombocytopenia 2.2%, 5.4% and 1.7%; grade 4 neutropenia 8.2%, 5.6% and 3.4%. SVR rates are higher and closer to those reported in pivotal clinical trials among BOC- and TPV-treated persons compared with PEG/RBV-treated persons. Haematologic adverse events are frequent, but severe toxicity is uncommon. PMID:25524834

  7. Caring For Evidence: Research and Care in an Obesity Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Felder, Kay; Felt, Ulrike; Penkler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in bariatric surgery rates. This form of obesity treatment is often subjected to the critique that it turns patients into passive objects of medical intervention. Similarly, efforts to 'rationalize' medicine, as in evidence-based medicine, are sometimes denounced for imposing a 'one-size-fits-all' approach that neglects patient diversity. We argue that these critiques fail to do justice to the complexities of actual care situations. In our ethnographic study of a project for bariatric pre- and aftercare, we show how research protocols not only close down but also open up spaces for patient-centered care. Despite professional cautions, experiences of stigma and broader imaginations of biomedical care often lead patients to embrace surgery as a treatment conceptualized as a technological fix. We argue that investigations of how research and clinical practice intertwine need to be both empirically grounded and sensitive to wider societal contexts. PMID:26457655

  8. The expected and actual communication of health care workers during the management of intrapartum: An interpretive multiple case study

    PubMed Central

    Fawcus, Sue; Korpela, Mikko; De la Harpe, Retha

    2015-01-01

    Background Daily activities within a health care organisation are mediated by information communication processes (ICP) involving multiple health care professionals at different levels of care. Effective perinatal management requires critical information to be accurately communicated. If there is a breakdown in this communication patient safety is at risk for various reasons such as: inadequate critical information, misconception of information and uninformed decisions being made. The purpose of this study was to interpret the complexities around ICP in order to contribute to the effective management of the intrapartum period. Methods Multi method, multiple case study approach was used to understand the ICP during the management of the intrapartum period. During the study, the expected ICP, the actual ICP, the challenges involved and the desired ICP were analysed. Twenty-four in-depth interviews with skilled birth attendants (SBAs) employing observer-as-participant roles, field notes, and document review methods were utilised to gather the data. Thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the data using Atlas TI software. Results The study revealed three subthemes which emerged from the expected ICP, whilst three others that emerged formed the theme actual ICP. The subthemes from the expected ICP included: accessibility of obstetric services, expected referral, recommended tools, expected communication and expected documentation. The theme actual ICP held three emerging subthemes: the handover processes, collaborative information seeking, information communicated and referral processes. Conclusion This study showed that what was expected was not what was actually happening. The requirements of the policies and protocols need to be effectively implemented to improve practice building these into current biomedical guidelines. PMID:26842518

  9. Introducing Optometry Students to Clinical Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gable, Eileen M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the innovative content and structure of an introductory course on clinical patient care at the Illinois College of Optometry. Critiques its success based on student grades and feedback, concluding that it was successful in imparting skills of data analysis but had minimal impact on students' ability to empathize with patients. (EV)

  10. Low Quality of Basic Caregiving Environments in Child Care: Actual Reality or Artifact of Scoring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah J.; Guss, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Quality Rating Improvement Systems (QRIS) frequently include the Infant-Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R) as part of rating and improving child care quality. However, studies utilizing the ITERS-R consistently report low quality, especially for basic caregiving items. This research examined whether the low scores reflected the…

  11. [Nursing care of clients in an abortion clinic].

    PubMed

    Corstiaensen, J; Kruiswijk, C

    1981-08-25

    The nursing care of clients visiting an abortion clinic for induced abortion is discussed. Generally good care of patients, psychosocially as well as somatically, is essential. For clients in an abortion clinic it is important that psychosocial care is optimal and technical procedures are medically responsible. The initial contact is very important to the client because first impressions of the clinic can be significant in the further course of the entire treatment. Both nurse and doctor are usually involved in the admission interview and preliminary examination. After the physician's anamnesis and internal examination to determine gestational age, patient and doctor determine future contraception. Both abortion and contraception problems are discussed and the treatment procedure explained. It is important to recognize possible patient coercion or ambivalence in which case the client is sometimes advised to think things over. The actual intervention is generally fairly short, from 5 to 15 minutes. The abortion can be emotionally taxing for the client. The nurse's role in providing reassurance and understanding is important. 30 to 60 minutes following intervention the patient can go home. Follow-up, usually 3-5 weeks after intervention, is the final phase of treatment. During this check-up and internal examination the client can discuss her experience and progress in contraception. Case studies are included giving insight into the background of abortion seekers. Abortion clinic nurses must possess specific characteristics and attitudes, such as: 1) a nonjudgmental attitude towards sexuality and induced abortion; 2) empathy in her relationship with clients; 3) personal warmth and ability to help client overcome fear; 4) ability to discuss sexuality and abortion sympathetically; 5) assessment of possible interpersonal relational problems of client; 6) ability to relate to and understand different ethnic groups; 7) be informed on contraceptive methods and agents; and 8

  12. Video capture of clinical care to enhance patient safety.

    PubMed

    Weinger, M B; Gonzales, D C; Slagle, J; Syeed, M

    2004-04-01

    Experience from other domains suggests that videotaping and analyzing actual clinical care can provide valuable insights for enhancing patient safety through improvements in the process of care. Methods are described for the videotaping and analysis of clinical care using a high quality portable multi-angle digital video system that enables simultaneous capture of vital signs and time code synchronization of all data streams. An observer can conduct clinician performance assessment (such as workload measurements or behavioral task analysis) either in real time (during videotaping) or while viewing previously recorded videotapes. Supplemental data are synchronized with the video record and stored electronically in a hierarchical database. The video records are transferred to DVD, resulting in a small, cheap, and accessible archive. A number of technical and logistical issues are discussed, including consent of patients and clinicians, maintaining subject privacy and confidentiality, and data security. Using anesthesiology as a test environment, over 270 clinical cases (872 hours) have been successfully videotaped and processed using the system.

  13. Secondary Care Clinic for Chronic Disease: Protocol

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Michèle; Juneau, Lucille; Legault-Mercier, Samuel; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of chronic disease management activities and the associated financial burden have prompted the development of organizational models, based on the integration of care and services, which rely on primary care services. However, since the institutions providing these services are continually undergoing reorganization, the Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec wanted to innovate by adapting the Chronic Care Model to create a clinic for the integrated follow-up of chronic disease that relies on hospital-based specialty care. Objective The aim of the study is to follow the project in order to contribute to knowledge about the way in which professional and management practices are organized to ensure better care coordination and the successful integration of the various follow-ups implemented. Methods The research strategy adopted is based on the longitudinal comparative case study with embedded units of analysis. The case study uses a mixed research method. Results We are currently in the analysis phase of the project. The results will be available in 2015. Conclusions The project’s originality lies in its consideration of the macro, meso, and micro contexts structuring the creation of the clinic in order to ensure the integration process is successful and to allow a theoretical generalization of the reorganization of practices to be developed. PMID:25689840

  14. Concept mapping: reducing clinical care plan paperwork and increasing learning.

    PubMed

    Schuster, P M

    2000-01-01

    The author describes how concept maps were used in place of nursing care plans to reduce care planning paperwork in fundamentals and medical-surgical clinical courses in acute care facilities. In addition to less paperwork, clinical concept mapping enhances students' critical thinking skills and clinical reasoning because students and faculty can clearly and succinctly visualize priorities and identify relationships in clinical patient data.

  15. Clinical Risk Assessment in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Asefzadeh, Saeed; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Nikpey, Ahmad; Atighechian, Golrokh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin's Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital) through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG) performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN) was in respiratory care “Ventilator's alarm malfunction (no alarm)” with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal “not washing the NG-Tube” with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care. PMID:23930171

  16. [Actual problems of medical care of aviation specialists in the Arctic region].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Vislov, A V; Lizogub, I N

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the influence of geographic and climatic conditions of the Arctic on a functional condition of aviation professionals. Marked possible effects of aggressive environmental factors on the health of the personnel. Studied the dynamics of the recovery functions of the cardio-respiratory system and of the indicators of general clinical blood test in a period of adaptation to the conditions of the middle latitudes after the return of the personnel from the Arctic. Identified the main activities to preserve the health of aviation specialists, depending on the length of stay in the Arctic region and age. PMID:25916038

  17. From Pharmacovigilance to Clinical Care Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Edward; Moses, Christopher; Ryan, Padhraig; Somai, Melek; Stone, David; Tang, Kai-ou

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In order to ensure the continued, safe administration of pharmaceuticals, particularly those agents that have been recently introduced into the market, there is a need for improved surveillance after product release. This is particularly so because drugs are used by a variety of patients whose particular characteristics may not have been fully captured in the original market approval studies. Even well-conducted, randomized controlled trials are likely to have excluded a large proportion of individuals because of any number of issues. The digitization of medical care, which yields rich and accessible drug data amenable to analytic techniques, provides an opportunity to capture the required information via observational studies. We propose the development of an open, accessible database containing properly de-identified data, to provide the substrate for the required improvement in pharmacovigilance. A range of stakeholders could use this to identify delayed and low-frequency adverse events. Moreover, its power as a research tool could extend to the detection of complex interactions, potential novel uses, and subtle subpopulation effects. This far-reaching potential is demonstrated by our experience with the open Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care (MIMIC) intensive care unit database. The new database could also inform the development of objective, robust clinical practice guidelines. Careful systematization and deliberate standardization of a fully digitized pharmacovigilance process is likely to save both time and resources for healthcare in general. PMID:26576325

  18. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here. PMID:19922199

  19. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting. PMID:27025116

  20. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting.

  1. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs. PMID:26826073

  2. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs.

  3. Improving access to a primary care medical clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Meditz, R. W.; Manberg, C. L.; Rosner, F.

    1992-01-01

    Patients presenting to an episodic care walk-in clinic often warrant prompt but not necessarily emergency attention. Legitimate reasons often prohibit these patients from attending regularly scheduled daytime weekday clinics. Most patients interviewed thought that having a single primary care provider was important to ensure continuity of care. Access to primary care can be improved by scheduling clinics and ancillary services on nontraditional times and days. Enhanced communication can help patients differentiate routine from urgent from emergency conditions. Printed and audiovisual materials can be used to increase awareness of the benefits of comprehensive care. PMID:1507251

  4. Would Socrates Have Actually Used the "Socratic Method" for Clinical Teaching?

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Hugh A; O'Dell, David V

    2016-09-01

    Medical students and residents are familiar with clinical teaching methods in which a faculty member poses a series of questions to them. This technique is often called the "Socratic method," but it is frequently perceived by learners as an attempt to demean them, a practice that is colloquially known as "pimping." The distinction between Socratic teaching and pimping lies in the perception of "psychological safety." Psychological safety allows learners to answer questions or ask for help without threats to their dignity or worthiness. In a psychologically safe clinical teaching context, learners recognize that questions posed by attending physicians probe their current understanding and guide them to expand their knowledge. In pimping, questions are posed to embarrass the learner and to reinforce the teacher's position of power over them. Absent a threat of disparagement or condemnation, learners are able to focus on building schema for knowledge, skills, and attitudes, rather than worrying about shielding their self-worth. This article presents the proper Socratic method, as intended by Socrates, and contrasts it with pimping. This perspective defines psychological safety as the pivotal factor distinguishing Socratic teaching from pimping, and establishes the foundation for empirical studies of these common practices in medical education.

  5. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed.

  6. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed. PMID:27487750

  7. Oncologist Factors That Influence Referrals to Subspecialty Palliative Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Schenker, Yael; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Dohan, Daniel; Rabow, Michael W.; Smith, Cardinale B.; White, Douglas B.; Chu, Edward; Tiver, Greer A.; Einhorn, Sara; Arnold, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Recent research and professional guidelines support expanded use of outpatient subspecialty palliative care in oncology, but provider referral practices vary widely. We sought to explore oncologist factors that influence referrals to outpatient palliative care. Methods: Multisite, qualitative interview study at three academic cancer centers in the United States with well-established palliative care clinics. Seventy-four medical oncologists participated in semistructured interviews between February and October 2012. The interview guide asked about experiences and decision making regarding outpatient palliative care use. A multidisciplinary team analyzed interview transcripts using constant comparative methods to inductively develop and refine themes related to palliative care referral decisions. Results: We identified three main oncologist barriers to subspecialty palliative care referrals at sites with comprehensive palliative care clinics: persistent conceptions of palliative care as an alternative philosophy of care incompatible with cancer therapy, a predominant belief that providing palliative care is an integral part of the oncologist's role, and a lack of knowledge about locally available services. Participants described their views of subspecialty palliative care as evolving in response to increasing availability of services and positive referral experiences, but emphasized that views of palliative care as valuable in addition to standard oncology care were not universally shared by oncologists. Conclusions: Improving provision of palliative care in oncology will likely require efforts beyond increasing service availability. Raising awareness of ways in which subspecialty palliative care complements standard oncology care and developing ways for oncologists and palliative care physicians to collaborate and integrate their respective skills may help. PMID:24301842

  8. How 3 Rural Safety Net Clinics Integrate Care for Patients

    PubMed Central

    Derrett, Sarah; Gunter, Kathryn E.; Nocon, Robert S.; Quinn, Michael T.; Coleman, Katie; Daniel, Donna M.; Wagner, Edward H.; Chin, Marshall H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrated care focuses on care coordination and patient centeredness. Integrated care supports continuity of care over time, with care that is coordinated within and between settings and is responsive to patients’ needs. Currently, little is known about care integration for rural patients. Objective To examine challenges to care integration in rural safety net clinics and strategies to address these challenges. Research Design Qualitative case study. Participants Thirty-six providers and staff from 3 rural clinics in the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative. Methods Interviews were analyzed using the framework method with themes organized within 3 constructs: Team Coordination and Empanelment, External Coordination and Partnerships, and Patient-centered and Community-centered Care. Results Participants described challenges common to safety net clinics, including limited access to specialists for Medicaid and uninsured patients, difficulty communicating with external providers, and payment models with limited support for care integration activities. Rurality compounded these challenges. Respondents reported benefits of empanelment and team-based care, and leveraged local resources to support care for patients. Rural clinics diversified roles within teams, shared responsibility for patient care, and colocated providers, as strategies to support care integration. Conclusions Care integration was supported by 2 fundamental changes to organize and deliver care to patients—(1) empanelment with a designated group of patients being cared for by a provider; and (2) a multidisciplinary team able to address rural issues. New funding and organizational initiatives of the Affordable Care Act may help to further improve care integration, although additional solutions may be necessary to address particular needs of rural communities. PMID:25310637

  9. Clinical Integration Managing across the care continuum.

    PubMed

    Karash, Julius A; Larson, Laurie

    2016-06-01

    In the changing world of health care, the traditional boundaries are vanishing and hospitals and others must integrate care within their own organizations, as well as externally, across the care continuum. Here are three approaches to accomplishing just that. PMID:27468454

  10. Teledermatology Consultations Provide Specialty Care for Farmworkers in Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Feldman, Steven R.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Brooks, Thanh; Cabral, Gonzalo; Heck, Judy; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Whalley, Lara E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural patients have limited access to dermatologic care. Farmworkers have high rates of skin disease and limited access to care. Purpose: This exploratory study assessed whether teledermatology consultations could help meet the needs of health care providers for farmworkers in rural clinics. Methods: Dermatologists provided 79…

  11. Managing clinical risk: right person, right care, right time.

    PubMed

    Graham, Frank J

    2009-07-01

    Dentists and the dental health care industry have a renewed interest in clinical risk assessment, because they offer the potential to identify a patient's clinical needs for oral health care more specifically, to maximize prevention by early intervention, and to educate patients to become more informed consumers of oral health care and direct resources where they are most needed and can produce the greatest value. To realize this potential, risk assessment must be applied appropriately, and its indirect ramifications for access to care should be considered. Several ideas for the appropriate application of risk assessment are discussed and the ramifications for access to care are explored.

  12. Clinical review: Critical care transport and austere critical care

    PubMed Central

    Rice, David H; Kotti, George; Beninati, William

    2008-01-01

    The development of modern intensive care units (ICUs) has allowed the survival of patients with advanced illness and injury, although at a cost of substantial infrastructure. Natural disasters and military operations are two common situations that can create critically ill patients in an environment that is austere or has been rendered austere. This has driven the development of two related strategies to care for these casualties. Portable ICU capability can be rapidly established in the area of need, providing relatively advanced capability but limited capacity and sustainability. The other strategy is to rapidly evacuate critically ill and injured patients following their initial stabilization. This permits medical personnel in the austere location to focus resources on a larger number of less critical patients. It also permits the most vulnerable patients to receive care in an advanced center. This strategy requires careful planning to overcome the constraints of the transport environment. The optimal strategy has not been determined, but a combination of these two approaches has been used in recent disasters and military operations and is promising. The critical care delivered in an austere setting must be integrated with a long-term plan to provide follow-on care. PMID:18373882

  13. Clinical examples of 3D dose distribution reconstruction, based on the actual MLC leaves movement, for dynamic treatment techniques

    PubMed Central

    Osewski, Wojciech; Dolla, Łukasz; Radwan, Michał; Szlag, Marta; Rutkowski, Roman; Smolińska, Barbara; Ślosarek, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Aim To present practical examples of our new algorithm for reconstruction of 3D dose distribution, based on the actual MLC leaf movement. Background DynaLog and RTplan files were used by DDcon software to prepare a new RTplan file for dose distribution reconstruction. Materials and methods Four different clinically relevant scenarios were used to assess the feasibility of the proposed new approach: (1) Reconstruction of whole treatment sessions for prostate cancer; (2) Reconstruction of IMRT verification treatment plan; (3) Dose reconstruction in breast cancer; (4) Reconstruction of interrupted arc and complementary plan for an interrupted VMAT treatment session of prostate cancer. The applied reconstruction method was validated by comparing reconstructed and measured fluence maps. For all statistical analysis, the U Mann–Whitney test was used. Results In the first two and the fourth cases, there were no statistically significant differences between the planned and reconstructed dose distribution (p = 0.910, p = 0.975, p = 0.893, respectively). In the third case the differences were statistically significant (p = 0.015). Treatment plan had to be reconstructed. Conclusion Developed dose distribution reconstruction algorithm presents a very useful QA tool. It provides means for 3D dose distribution verification in patient volume and allows to evaluate the influence of actual MLC leaf motion on the dose distribution. PMID:25337416

  14. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. Conclusion: the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization. PMID:26487133

  15. Visual Impairment/lntracranial Pressure Risk Clinical Care Data Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Baalen, Mary; Mason, Sara S.; Taiym, Wafa; Wear, Mary L.; Moynihan, Shannan; Alexander, David; Hart, Steve; Tarver, William

    2014-01-01

    Prior to 2010, several ISS crewmembers returned from spaceflight with changes to their vision, ranging from a mild hyperopic shift to frank disc edema. As a result, NASA expanded clinical vision testing to include more comprehensive medical imaging, including Optical Coherence Tomography and 3 Tesla Brain and Orbit MRIs. The Space and Clinical Operations (SCO) Division developed a clinical practice guideline that classified individuals based on their symptoms and diagnoses to facilitate clinical care. For the purposes of clinical surveillance, this classification was applied retrospectively to all crewmembers who had sufficient testing for classification. This classification is also a tool that has been leveraged for researchers to identify potential risk factors. In March 2014, driven in part by a more comprehensive understanding of the imaging data and increased imaging capability on orbit, the SCO Division revised their clinical care guidance to outline in-flight care and increase post-flight follow up. The new clinical guidance does not include a classification scheme

  16. Critical care clinical trials: getting off the roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    Optimizing care in the ICU is an important goal. The heightened severity of illness in patients who are critically ill combined with the tremendous costs of critical care make the ICU an ideal target for improvement in outcomes and efficiency. Incorporation of evidence-based medicine into everyday practice is one method to optimize care; however, intensivists have struggled to define optimal practices because clinical trials in the ICU have yielded conflicting results. This article reviews examples where such conflicts have occurred and explores possible causes of these discrepant data as well as strategies to better use critical care clinical trials in the future. PMID:22948575

  17. The role of clinical information technology in depression care management.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Amy M; McGinnis, Gretchen Flanders; Belnap, Bea Herbeck; Klinkman, Michael; Thomas, Marshall

    2006-01-01

    We examine the literature on the growing application of clinical information technology in managing depression care and highlight lessons learned from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's national program "Depression in Primary Care-Incentives Demonstrations." Several program sites are implementing depression care registries. Key issues discussed about implementing registries include using a simple yet functional format, designing registries to track multiple conditions versus depression alone (i.e., patient-centric versus disease-centric registries) and avoiding violations of patient privacy with the advent of more advanced information technologies (e.g., web-based formats). Finally, we discuss some implications of clinical information technology for health care practices and policy makers.

  18. The Day Care Clinic as Container.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovensiepen, Gustav

    1994-01-01

    Describes the operations of a clinic for the long-term psychiatric treatment of adolescents in Germany. The different types of container as opposed to contained relationships evident in the clinic structure are discussed. The metaphor of the clinic as container for the troubled youth is useful in understanding its effectiveness. (SLD)

  19. Clinical trial design in the neurocritical care unit.

    PubMed

    Hall, C E; Mirski, M; Palesch, Y Y; Diringer, M N; Qureshi, A I; Robertson, C S; Geocadin, R; Wijman, C A C; Le Roux, P D; Suarez, Jose I

    2012-02-01

    Clinical trials provide a robust mechanism to advance science and change clinical practice across the widest possible spectrum. Fundamental in the Neurocritical Care Society's mission is to promote Quality Patient Care by identifying and implementing best medical practices for acute neurological disorders that are consistent with the current scientific knowledge. The next logical step will be to foster rapid growth of our scientific body of evidence, to establish and disseminate these best practices. In this manuscript, five invited experts were impaneled to address questions, identified by the conference organizing committee as fundamental issues for the design of clinical trials in the neurological intensive care unit setting. PMID:21792753

  20. The application of design principles to innovate clinical care delivery.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael D; Duncan, Alan K; Armbruster, Ryan R; Montori, Victor M; Feyereisn, Wayne L; LaRusso, Nicholas F

    2009-01-01

    Clinical research centers that support hypothesis-driven investigation have long been a feature of academic medical centers but facilities in which clinical care delivery can be systematically assessed and evaluated have heretofore been nonexistent. The Institute of Medicine report "Crossing the Quality Chasm" identified six core attributes of an ideal care delivery system that in turn relied heavily on system redesign. Although manufacturing and service industries have leveraged modern design principles in new product development, healthcare has lagged behind. In this article, we describe a methodology utilized by our facility to study the clinical care delivery system that incorporates modern design principles. PMID:19343895

  1. Point-of-Care Technologies for Precision Cardiovascular Care and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    King, Kevin; Grazette, Luanda P.; Paltoo, Dina N.; McDevitt, John T.; Sia, Samuel K.; Barrett, Paddy M.; Apple, Fred S.; Gurbel, Paul A.; Weissleder, Ralph; Leeds, Hilary; Iturriaga, Erin J.; Rao, Anupama; Adhikari, Bishow; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Galis, Zorina S.; Libby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care technologies (POC or POCT) are enabling innovative cardiovascular diagnostics that promise to improve patient care across diverse clinical settings. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group to discuss POCT in cardiovascular medicine. The multidisciplinary working group, which included clinicians, scientists, engineers, device manufacturers, regulatory officials, and program staff, reviewed the state of the POCT field; discussed opportunities for POCT to improve cardiovascular care, realize the promise of precision medicine, and advance the clinical research enterprise; and identified barriers facing translation and integration of POCT with existing clinical systems. A POCT development roadmap emerged to guide multidisciplinary teams of biomarker scientists, technologists, health care providers, and clinical trialists as they: 1) formulate needs assessments; 2) define device design specifications; 3) develop component technologies and integrated systems; 4) perform iterative pilot testing; and 5) conduct rigorous prospective clinical testing to ensure that POCT solutions have substantial effects on cardiovascular care. PMID:26977455

  2. Clinical review: Medication errors in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Moyen, Eric; Camiré, Eric; Stelfox, Henry Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Medication errors in critical care are frequent, serious, and predictable. Critically ill patients are prescribed twice as many medications as patients outside of the intensive care unit (ICU) and nearly all will suffer a potentially life-threatening error at some point during their stay. The aim of this article is to provide a basic review of medication errors in the ICU, identify risk factors for medication errors, and suggest strategies to prevent errors and manage their consequences. PMID:18373883

  3. [Clinical case: Complicated grief in primary care. Care plan].

    PubMed

    Ruymán Brito-Brito, Pedro; Rodríguez-Ramos, Mercedes; Pérez-García-Talavera, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This is the case of a 61-year-old patient woman that visits her nurse in Primary Health Care to get the control of blood pressure and glycemia. In the last two years has suffered the loss of her husband and of two brothers beside having lived through other vital stressful events that have taken her to a situation of complicated grief. The care plan is realized using the M. Gordon assessment system and standardized languages NANDA, NOC and NIC. The principal aims were the improvement of the depression level and the improvement in the affliction resolution. As suggested interventions were proposed to facilitate the grief and the derivation to a mental health unit. A follow-up of the patient was realized in nursing consultation at Primary health care to weekly intervals, in the beginning, and monthly, later. The evaluation of the care plan reflects an improvement in the criteria of Prigerson's complicated grief; an increase of the recreative activities; the retreat of the mourning that still she was guarding; as well as an improvement in the control of the blood pressure numbers. The attention of nurses before a case of complicated grief turns out to be complex. Nevertheless the suitable accomplishment of certain interventions orientated to facilitating the grief, with a follow-up in consultation, shows the efficiency. The difficulty in the boarding of the psychosocial problems meets increased at the moment of are necessary the nursing diagnostics adapted for every individual case. The work in group between nurses could improves the consensus.

  4. Communicating Nursing Care Using the Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Matney, Susan A; Dolin, Gay; Buhl, Lindy; Sheide, Amy

    2016-03-01

    A care plan provides a patient, family, or community picture and outlines the care to be provided. The Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) Release 2 Care Plan Document is used to structure care plan data when sharing the care plan between systems and/or settings. The American Nurses Association has recommended the use of two terminologies, Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for assessments and outcomes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for problems, procedures (interventions), outcomes, and observation findings within the C-CDA. This article describes C-CDA, introduces LOINC and SNOMED CT, discusses how the C-CDA Care Plan aligns with the nursing process, and illustrates how nursing care data can be structured and encoded within a C-CDA Care Plan.

  5. Evidence supporting primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases with statins: Gaps between updated clinical results and actual practice.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The use of pharmacological lipid-lowering intervention in individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and known cardiovascular disease or diabetes/chronic kidney disease is well established. Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend immediate initiation of drugs in adjunct to lifestyle intervention in these patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk. In these clinical settings, statins are generally chosen as the first-choice drug intervention, in consideration of the robust evidence showing a reduction in all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In contrast, primary prevention with statins, even in the subset of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events, is not well implemented. This might be related to a lack of public awareness regarding the actual risk associated with prolonged exposure to high concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and uncertainties in the clinical evidence coming from the earliest trials in this patient subset. However, recent observational studies suggest that lowering LDL-C earlier in life and for a longer duration can substantially decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Moreover, results from recent well-conducted large meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that primary prevention with statins reduced all-cause mortality by 14% and MACE by > 20% - findings similar to those observed for the use of statins in secondary prevention. Recently published American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol emphasize that primary prevention using high-dose statins in individuals with LDL-C ≥ 190 mg/dL induces a benefit in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk reduction that clearly exceeds the potential for adverse effects. We aim in this review to discuss the new data that advocate the use of statins in primary prevention earlier and more frequently, putting the efficacy evidence into

  6. Ritual and the organisation of care in primary care clinics in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Simon; Green, Judith

    2009-04-01

    Few sociological studies have examined care organisation in primary health settings in low- and middle-income countries. This paper explores the organisation of health care work in primary care clinics in Cape Town, South Africa, by analysing two elements of clinic organisation as rituals. The first is a formal, policy-driven element of care: directly observed therapy for tuberculosis patients. The second is an informal ritual, seemingly separate from the clinical work of the team: morning prayers in the clinic. We draw on data from an ethnography in which seven clinics providing care to people with tuberculosis were theoretically sampled for study. These data include participant observation of clinic sessions, and interviews and group discussions with providers and patients, which were analysed using approaches drawn from grounded theory. Our findings suggest that rather than seeing the ritualised aspects of clinic activities as merely traditional elements of care that potentially interfere with the application of good practice, it is essential to understand their symbolic values if their contribution to health care organisation is to be recognised. While both staff and patients participate in these rituals, these performances do not demonstrate or facilitate cohesion across these groups but rather embody the conflicting values of patients and staff in these clinics. As such, rituals act to reinforce asymmetrical relations of power between different constituencies, and to strengthen conventional modes of provider-patient interaction.

  7. Mexican patient satisfaction in a rural Minnesota primary care clinic.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katelyn

    2008-08-01

    The Latino population in rural Minnesota has grown significantly in recent years. Despite the increase, few studies have considered whether these newcomers are satisfied with the care they receive from local medical clinics. This article describes the results of a pilot study that assessed 20 Mexican patients' satisfaction with care they received in a primary care clinic in rural central Minnesota. Participants were interviewed using questions from Stewart's Interpersonal Care Survey and open-ended questions. Results showed the patients were generally satisfied with their health care. However, they suggested improvements in the areas of communication and involvement in decisions. Answers to the open-ended questions suggested that even though patients seemed satisfied with their care, they still strongly desired a bilingual physician.

  8. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  9. Alternative clinical trial design in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos; Maas, Andrew I R; Souter, Michael J; Martin, Renee H; Chesnut, Randal M; DeSantis, Stacia M; Sung, Gene; Leroux, Peter D; Suarez, Jose I

    2015-06-01

    Neurocritical care involves the care of highly complex patients with combinations of physiologic derangements in the brain and in extracranial organs. The level of evidence underpinning treatment recommendations remains low due to a multitude of reasons including an incomplete understanding of the involved physiology; lack of good quality, prospective, standardized data; and the limited success of conventional randomized controlled trials. Comparative effectiveness research can provide alternative perspectives and methods to enhance knowledge and evidence within the field of neurocritical care; these include large international collaborations for generation and maintenance of high quality data, statistical methods that incorporate heterogeneity and individualize outcome prediction, and finally advanced bioinformatics that integrate large amounts of variable-source data into patient-specific phenotypes and trajectories. PMID:25894451

  10. Alternative clinical trial design in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos; Maas, Andrew I R; Souter, Michael J; Martin, Renee H; Chesnut, Randal M; DeSantis, Stacia M; Sung, Gene; Leroux, Peter D; Suarez, Jose I

    2015-06-01

    Neurocritical care involves the care of highly complex patients with combinations of physiologic derangements in the brain and in extracranial organs. The level of evidence underpinning treatment recommendations remains low due to a multitude of reasons including an incomplete understanding of the involved physiology; lack of good quality, prospective, standardized data; and the limited success of conventional randomized controlled trials. Comparative effectiveness research can provide alternative perspectives and methods to enhance knowledge and evidence within the field of neurocritical care; these include large international collaborations for generation and maintenance of high quality data, statistical methods that incorporate heterogeneity and individualize outcome prediction, and finally advanced bioinformatics that integrate large amounts of variable-source data into patient-specific phenotypes and trajectories.

  11. Clinical care paths: a role for finance in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Michael N; Cummings, Simone; Hage, Dana

    2012-12-01

    Care paths map the critical actions and decision points across a patient's course of medical treatment; their purpose is to guide physicians in the delivery of high-quality care while reducing care costs by avoiding services that do not contribute meaningfully to positive outcomes. Each care path development initiative should be led by a respected physician champion, whose specialty is in the area of the care episode being mapped, with the support of a clinician project manager. Once the care path has been developed and implemented, the finance leader's role begins in earnest with the tracking of financial and clinical data against care paths.

  12. Changes In Actual And Perceived Physical Abilities In Clinically Obese Children: A 9-Month Multi-Component Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Milena; Colella, Dario; Rutigliano, Irene; Fiore, Pietro; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Campanozzi, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives (1) To examine relationships among changes in physical activity, physical fitness and some psychosocial determinants of activity behavior in a clinical sample of obese children involved in a multi-component program; (2) to investigate the causal relationship over time between physical activity and one of its strongest correlates (i.e. perceived physical ability). Methods Self-reported physical activity and health-related fitness tests were administered before and after a 9-month intervention in 24 boys and 20 girls aged 8 to 11 years. Individuals’ perceptions of strength, speed and agility were assessed using the Perceived Physical Ability Scale, while body image was measured using Collins’ Child Figure Drawings. Results Findings showed that body mass index, physical activity, performances on throwing and weight-bearing tasks, perceived physical ability and body image significantly improved after treatment among obese children. Gender differences were found in the correlational analyses, showing a link between actual and perceived physical abilities in boys, but not in girls. For the specific measurement interval of this study, perception of physical ability was an antecedent and not a potential consequence of physical activity. Conclusions Results indicate that a multi-component activity program not based merely on a dose-effect approach enhances adherence of the participants and has the potential to increase the lifelong exercise skills of obese children. Rather than focusing entirely on diet and weight loss, findings support the inclusion of interventions directed toward improving perceived physical ability that is predictive of subsequent physical activity. PMID:23239985

  13. Adolescent health care maintenance in a teen-friendly clinic.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Nicole; Shore, William B

    2014-09-01

    Adolescence is marked by complex physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development, which can be stressful for families and adolescents. Before the onset of puberty, providers should clearly lay the groundwork for clinical care and office visits during the adolescent years. This article addresses the guidelines and current legal standards for confidentiality in adolescent care, the most frequently used psychosocial screening tools, and current recommendations for preventive health services and immunizations. Through the creation of teen-friendly clinics, primary care providers are well positioned to offer guidance and support to teens and their parents during this time of transition and growth.

  14. Caring in nursing education: reducing anxiety in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Audet, M C

    1995-01-01

    It has been well-documented that the clinical experience is one of the most anxiety-producing aspects of nursing education. When feelings of anxiety become severe, they present a clear threat to the student's success in the program. This article explores the role of "caring" in nursing education as a means of reducing student anxiety. Caring, described at length by Jean Watson, has become one of the most popular trends in the education of young nurses. When caring behaviors are demonstrated in a meaningful way by clinical instructors, the student may experience a sense of comfort and belonging, which may in turn be effective in reducing anxiety and enabling the student to successfully complete a clinical rotation. The aim of this article is to inspire nurses, not only those in the educational setting but in all settings and at all levels of their careers, to reconsider the effects and benefits of displaying a caring attitude.

  15. A review of analytics and clinical informatics in health care.

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Ahumada, Luis M; Gálvez, Jorge A; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Federal investment in health information technology has incentivized the adoption of electronic health record systems by physicians and health care organizations; the result has been a massive rise in the collection of patient data in electronic form (i.e. "Big Data"). Health care systems have leveraged Big Data for quality and performance improvements using analytics-the systematic use of data combined with quantitative as well as qualitative analysis to make decisions. Analytics have been utilized in various aspects of health care including predictive risk assessment, clinical decision support, home health monitoring, finance, and resource allocation. Visual analytics is one example of an analytics technique with an array of health care and research applications that are well described in the literature. The proliferation of Big Data and analytics in health care has spawned a growing demand for clinical informatics professionals who can bridge the gap between the medical and information sciences.

  16. The medical director in integrated clinical care models.

    PubMed

    Parker, Thomas F; Aronoff, George R

    2015-07-01

    Integrated clinical care models, like Accountable Care Organizations and ESRD Seamless Care Organizations, present new opportunities for dialysis facility medical directors to affect changes in care that result in improved patient outcomes. Currently, there is little scholarly information on what role the medical director should play. In this opinion-based review, it is predicted that dialysis providers, the hospitals in which the medical director and staff physicians practice, and the payers with which they contract are going to insist that, as care becomes more integrated, dialysis facility medical directors participate in new ways to improve quality and decrease the costs of care. Six broad areas are proposed where dialysis unit medical directors can have the greatest effect on shifting the quality-care paradigm where integrated care models are used. The medical director will need to develop an awareness of the regional medical care delivery system, collect and analyze actionable data, determine patient outcomes to be targeted that are mutually agreed on by participating physicians and institutions, develop processes of care that result in improved patient outcomes, and lead and inform the medical staff. Three practical examples of patient-centered, quality-focused programs developed and implemented by dialysis unit medical directors and their practice partners that targeted dialysis access, modality choice, and fluid volume management are presented. Medical directors are encouraged to move beyond traditional roles and embrace responsibilities associated with integrated care.

  17. Electronic Nursing Documentation: Patient Care Continuity Using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC).

    PubMed

    Whittenburg, Luann; Meetim, Aunchisa

    2016-01-01

    An innovative nursing documentation project conducted at Bumrungrad International Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand demonstrated patient care continuity between nursing patient assessments and nursing Plans of Care using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC). The project developed a new generation of interactive nursing Plans of Care using the six steps of the American Nurses Association (ANA) Nursing process and the MEDCIN® clinical knowledgebase to present CCC coded concepts as a natural by-product of a nurse's documentation process. The MEDCIN® clinical knowledgebase is a standardized point-of-care terminology intended for use in electronic health record systems. The CCC is an ANA recognized nursing terminology. PMID:27332153

  18. Routine primary care management of acute low back pain: adherence to clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    González-Urzelai, Violeta; Palacio-Elua, Loreto; López-de-Munain, Josefina

    2003-12-01

    One of the major challenges for general practitioners is to manage individuals with acute low back pain appropriately to reduce the risk of chronicity. A prospective study was designed to assess the actual management of acute low back pain in one primary care setting and to determine whether existing practice patterns conform to published guidelines. Twenty-four family physicians from public primary care centers of the Basque Health Service in Bizkaia, Basque Country (Spain), participated in the study. A total of 105 patients aged 18-65 years presenting with acute low back pain over a 6-month period were included. Immediately after consultation, a research assistant performed a structured clinical interview. The patients' care provided by the general practitioner was compared with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) guidelines and guidelines issued by the Royal College of General Practitioners. The diagnostic process showed a low rate of appropriate use of history (27%), physical examination (32%), lumbar radiographs (31%), and referral to specialized care (33%). Although the therapeutic process showed a relatively high rate of appropriateness in earlier mobilization (77%) and educational advice (65%), only 23% of patients were taught about the benign course of back pain. The study revealed that management of acute low back pain in the primary care setting is far from being in conformance with published clinical guidelines. PMID:14605973

  19. Structuring Clinical Workflows for Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Lasierra, N.; Oberbichler, S.; Toma, I.; Fensel, A.; Hoerbst, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Electronic health records (EHRs) play an important role in the treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. Although the interoperability and selected functionality of EHRs are already addressed by a number of standards and best practices, such as IHE or HL7, the majority of these systems are still monolithic from a user-functionality perspective. The purpose of the OntoHealth project is to foster a functionally flexible, standards-based use of EHRs to support clinical routine task execution by means of workflow patterns and to shift the present EHR usage to a more comprehensive integration concerning complete clinical workflows. Objectives The goal of this paper is, first, to introduce the basic architecture of the proposed OntoHealth project and, second, to present selected functional needs and a functional categorization regarding workflow-based interactions with EHRs in the domain of diabetes. Methods A systematic literature review regarding attributes of workflows in the domain of diabetes was conducted. Eligible references were gathered and analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. Subsequently, a functional workflow categorization was derived from diabetes-specific raw data together with existing general workflow patterns. Results This paper presents the design of the architecture as well as a categorization model which makes it possible to describe the components or building blocks within clinical workflows. The results of our study lead us to identify basic building blocks, named as actions, decisions, and data elements, which allow the composition of clinical workflows within five identified contexts. Conclusions The categorization model allows for a description of the components or building blocks of clinical workflows from a functional view. PMID:25024765

  20. Integrated and Gender-Affirming Transgender Clinical Care and Research

    PubMed Central

    Radix, Asa; Deutsch, Madeline B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Transgender (trans) communities worldwide, particularly those on the trans feminine spectrum, are disproportionately burdened by HIV infection and at risk for HIV acquisition/transmission. Trans individuals represent an underserved, highly stigmatized, and under-resourced population not only in HIV prevention efforts but also in delivery of general primary medical and clinical care that is gender affirming. We offer a model of gender-affirmative integrated clinical care and community research to address and intervene on disparities in HIV infection for transgender people. We define trans terminology, briefly review the social epidemiology of HIV infection among trans individuals, highlight gender affirmation as a key social determinant of health, describe exemplar models of gender-affirmative clinical care in Boston MA, New York, NY, and San Francisco, CA, and offer suggested “best practices” for how to integrate clinical care and research for the field of HIV prevention. Holistic and culturally responsive HIV prevention interventions must be grounded in the lived realities the trans community faces to reduce disparities in HIV infection. HIV prevention interventions will be most effective if they use a structural approach and integrate primary concerns of transgender people (eg, gender-affirmative care and management of gender transition) alongside delivery of HIV-related services (eg, biobehavioral prevention, HIV testing, linkage to care, and treatment). PMID:27429189

  1. The normativity of clinical health care: perspectives on moral realism.

    PubMed

    Nortvedt, Per

    2012-06-01

    The paper argues that a particular version of moral realism constitutes an important basis for ethics in medicine and health care. Moral realism is the position that moral value is a part of the fabric of relational and interpersonal reality. But even though moral values are subject to human interpretations, they are not themselves the sole product of these interpretations. Moral values are not invented but discovered by the subject. Moral realism argues that values are open to perception and experience and that moral subjectivity must be portrayed in how moral values are discovered and perceived by the human subject. Moral values may exist independent of the particular subject's interpretative evaluations as a part of reality. This epistemological point about normativity is particularly significant in medical care and in health care. The clinician perceives moral value in the clinical encounter in a way that is important for competent clinical understanding. Clinical understanding in medical care and health care bears on the encounter with moral values in the direct and embodied relations to patients, with their experiences of illness and their vulnerabilities. Good clinical care is then partly conditioned upon adequate understanding of such moral realities.

  2. Integrated and Gender-Affirming Transgender Clinical Care and Research.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Sari L; Radix, Asa; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-08-15

    Transgender (trans) communities worldwide, particularly those on the trans feminine spectrum, are disproportionately burdened by HIV infection and at risk for HIV acquisition/transmission. Trans individuals represent an underserved, highly stigmatized, and under-resourced population not only in HIV prevention efforts but also in delivery of general primary medical and clinical care that is gender affirming. We offer a model of gender-affirmative integrated clinical care and community research to address and intervene on disparities in HIV infection for transgender people. We define trans terminology, briefly review the social epidemiology of HIV infection among trans individuals, highlight gender affirmation as a key social determinant of health, describe exemplar models of gender-affirmative clinical care in Boston MA, New York, NY, and San Francisco, CA, and offer suggested "best practices" for how to integrate clinical care and research for the field of HIV prevention. Holistic and culturally responsive HIV prevention interventions must be grounded in the lived realities the trans community faces to reduce disparities in HIV infection. HIV prevention interventions will be most effective if they use a structural approach and integrate primary concerns of transgender people (eg, gender-affirmative care and management of gender transition) alongside delivery of HIV-related services (eg, biobehavioral prevention, HIV testing, linkage to care, and treatment). PMID:27429189

  3. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care.

  4. A national evaluation of specialists' clinics in primary care settings.

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, A; Bond, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encouraged by the increased purchasing power of general practitioners (GPs), specialist-run clinics in general practice and community health care settings (known as specialist outreach clinics) have increased rapidly across England. The activities of local commissioning schemes within primary care groups are likely to accelerate this trend. AIM: To evaluate the costs, processes, and benefits of specialists' outreach clinics held in GPs' surgeries, compared with hospital outpatient clinics. DESIGN OF STUDY: A case-referent (comparative) study comparing the characteristics of outreach clinics (cases) with matched outpatient control clinics. SETTING: Thirty-eight outreach clinics, compared with 38 matched outpatient clinics as controls, covering 14 hospital trust areas across England. METHOD: Self-administered questionnaires were given to patients in both clinic settings. These covered processes, satisfaction, personal costs, and health status, with postal follow-up at six months to assess health outcomes. Self-administered questionnaires were also given to the specialists and GPs whose clinics were included in the study (individual patient clinical sheet and an attitude questionnaire), practice managers, and trust accountants (process and costs questionnaire). Evaluation of the costs, processes, and benefits of specialist outreach clinics versus hospital outpatient clinics was carried out by comparing questionnaire responses. RESULTS: In comparison with outpatients, outreach clinic patients spent less time on the waiting lists for appointments to see the specialist, they had shorter waiting times in clinics, fewer follow-up appointments, and were more likely to be completely discharged after the sampled attendance. Outreach patients were more satisfied than outpatients with the range of clinic process items asked about. Most doctors felt that the outreach clinic was 'worthwhile'. While patients' personal costs were lower in outreach than in outpatients

  5. "Drop-Outs" and "Push-Outs": Finding Hope at a School that Actualizes the Ethic of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Wanda; Bates, Anita

    2005-01-01

    This study profiles a school that is committed to enacting the ethic of care with a population of underserved "at-risk" adolescents students with a history of criminal activity and dropping out or being expelled from school due to troublesome and troubled behavior. This article gives voice to the narratives of administrators, teachers, and…

  6. Caring--the work of the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, K M; Lucke, K T

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) to quality patient care is important for educators and administrators as they plan for the care of patients in an increasingly complex health care system. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical practice of CNSs as reported by practicing CNSs. Grounded theory methodology was used in collecting and analyzing the data. The subjects consisted of a theoretical sample of 17 Master's prepared CNSs who had functioned in the role of the CNS for a minimum of 1 year, and three recorded case studies from the literature. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted by the principle investigator. Using the constant comparative method, the data were line-coded and clustered to form groups of data that could be labeled as constructs. When theoretical saturation was reached, no further interviews were conducted. The investigators proposed that caring was the basic social psychological process (BSP), which was validated in a literature review. Scientific caring included investigating and teaching. Humanistic caring included creating-the-new, showing-the-way, working-with-others, and taking-care-of-the-environment. CNSs took care of the caretakers as well as the patients and their families.

  7. [Clinical bioethics for primary health care].

    PubMed

    González-de Paz, L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical decision making process with ethical implications in the area of primary healthcare differs from other healthcare areas. From the ethical perspective it is important to include these issues in the decision making model. This dissertation explains the need for a process of bioethical deliberation for Primary Healthcare, as well as proposing a method for doing so. The decision process method, adapted to this healthcare area, is flexible and requires a more participative Healthcare System. This proposal involves professionals and the patient population equally, is intended to facilitate the acquisition of responsibility for personal and community health.

  8. [Clinical bioethics for primary health care].

    PubMed

    González-de Paz, L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical decision making process with ethical implications in the area of primary healthcare differs from other healthcare areas. From the ethical perspective it is important to include these issues in the decision making model. This dissertation explains the need for a process of bioethical deliberation for Primary Healthcare, as well as proposing a method for doing so. The decision process method, adapted to this healthcare area, is flexible and requires a more participative Healthcare System. This proposal involves professionals and the patient population equally, is intended to facilitate the acquisition of responsibility for personal and community health. PMID:23608158

  9. Development of a clinical data warehouse from an intensive care clinical information system.

    PubMed

    de Mul, Marleen; Alons, Peter; van der Velde, Peter; Konings, Ilse; Bakker, Jan; Hazelzet, Jan

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few institutions that have developed clinical data warehouses, containing patient data from the point of care. Because of the various care practices, data types and definitions, and the perceived incompleteness of clinical information systems, the development of a clinical data warehouse is a challenge. In order to deal with managerial and clinical information needs, as well as educational and research aims that are important in the setting of a university hospital, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands, developed a data warehouse incrementally. In this paper we report on the in-house development of an integral part of the data warehouse specifically for the intensive care units (ICU-DWH). It was modeled using Atos Origin Metadata Frame method. The paper describes the methodology, the development process and the content of the ICU-DWH, and discusses the need for (clinical) data warehouses in intensive care.

  10. Characteristics of effective clinical teachers of ambulatory care medicine.

    PubMed

    Irby, D M; Ramsey, P G; Gillmore, G M; Schaad, D

    1991-01-01

    This study identified characteristics of clinical teachers in ambulatory care settings that influenced ratings of overall teaching effectiveness and examined the impacts of selected variables of the clinic environment on teaching effectiveness ratings. A survey instrument derived from prior research and observations of ambulatory care teaching was sent to 165 senior medical students and 60 medicine residents at the University of Washington School of Medicine in 1988. A total of 122 (74%) of the seniors and 60 (71%) of the residents responded. Results indicate that the most important characteristics of the ambulatory care teachers were that they actively involved the learners, promoted learner autonomy, and demonstrated patient care skills. Environmental variables did not have a substantial influence on these ratings.

  11. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects.

  12. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    PubMed

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  13. Providing care to transgender persons: a clinical approach to primary care, hormones, and HIV management.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Transgender (TG) persons have had historically difficult interactions with health care providers, leading to limited care and risks for a broad spectrum of health problems. This is of particular concern for TG persons with or at risk for HIV infection. This article discusses care providers' roles in establishing TG-friendly clinical care sites; conducting appropriate and thorough physical examinations for TG patients; managing hormones, especially in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy; and engaging TG persons in education about prevention and treatment of HIV. PMID:20363651

  14. Primary health-care services with a functional ambulatory care clinical pharmacy in a low-income housing project clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Oke, T. O.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the establishment of clinical pharmacy services at a primary health-care clinic in a low-income housing area in New Orleans. The St Thomas Health Care Services Outpatient Clinic was established in 1987 by the Catholic Sisters of Charity. The clinic provides care for 4500 ambulatory patients who otherwise have inadequate health care. Xavier University College of Pharmacy established pharmacy services in the clinic as a site for its ambulatory clerkship students. The pharmacy provides training for students on the principles and practice standards of ambulatory care pharmacy services, which include taking medication history and performing drug therapy review. A computer-generated medical record was developed to provide access to patients' demographic and drug profiles. The system was designed to help the pharmacist preceptor and students detect, resolve, and prevent drug-related problems, and to aid in learning to monitor the progression of disease(s) and whether the patient is experiencing the desired therapeutic outcome. Direct contact with patients allows the pharmacist and the students to become familiar with patient compliance problems, adverse drug reaction monitoring, patient counseling techniques, and providing patient education. PMID:8078084

  15. Ethical Behaviours in Clinical Practice Among Mexican Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Martínez, Edith; Lavielle, Pilar; Bedolla, Miguel; Squires, Allison

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the cultural domain of ethical behaviours in clinical practice as defined by health care providers in Mexico. Structured interviews were carried out with 500 health professionals employed at the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Mexico City. The Smith Salience Index was used to evaluate the relevance of concepts gathered from the free listings of the interviewees. Cluster analysis and factor analysis facilitated construction of the conceptual categories, which the authors refer to as ‘dimensions of ethical practice’. Six dimensions emerged from the analysis to define the qualities that comprise ethical clinical practice for Mexican health care providers: overall quality of clinical performance; working conditions that favour quality of care; use of ethical considerations as prerequisites for any health care intervention; values favouring teamwork in the health professional–patient relationship; patient satisfaction scores; and communication between health care providers and patients. The findings suggest that improved working conditions and management practices that promote the values identified by the study’s participants would help to improve quality of care. PMID:18849364

  16. Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

    2010-01-01

    Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care.

  17. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, D.I.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  18. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  19. The Madison Clinic: Evaluation of a collaborative outpatient paediatric palliative care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Siden, Harold; Straatman, Lynn; Miller, Tanice; Ham, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND A multidisciplinary outpatient clinic at a tertiary care children’s hospital supported and staffed by a children’s hospice was created to enhance and expand the inpatient palliative care services available to families of children with life-limiting conditions. This clinic was created with input from clinicians, program leaders and families in developing the goals and format. METHOD The clinic was evaluated with indicators that included program data from palliative care consultations. This information was collected and recorded on a prospective basis. RESULTS In the first 29 months of operation, 43 clinics were held, 39 individual patients were seen and there were 59 visits. The majority of visits were for pain and symptom management (75%), while 20% were for assessment for the hospice program. The hospice-palliative care team also provided telephone support, videoconference support and inpatient consultations. Patients reported overall satisfaction with their experiences at the clinic. DISCUSSION A major benefit of this outpatient palliative care clinic is its ability to offer continuity of care for patients and their families. It also serves as a preliminary introduction to palliative care, particularly significant for families who are not yet ready to learn about or engage in the full hospice program. PMID:20592973

  20. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care: reporting standards.

    PubMed

    Brölmann, Fleur E; Eskes, Anne M; Sumpio, Bauer E; Mayer, Dieter O; Moore, Zena; Agren, Magnus S; Hermans, Michel; Cutting, Keith; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2013-01-01

    In wound care research, available high-level evidence according to the evidence pyramid is rare, and is threatened by a poor study design and reporting. Without comprehensive and transparent reporting, readers will not be able to assess the strengths and limitations of the research performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are universally acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects. To give high-level evidence the appreciation it deserves in wound care, we propose a step-by-step reporting standard for comprehensive and transparent reporting of RCTs in wound care. Critical reporting issues (e.g., wound care terminology, blinding, predefined outcome measures, and a priori sample size calculation) and wound-specific barriers (e.g., large diversity of etiologies and comorbidities of patients with wounds) that may prevent uniform implementation of reporting standards in wound care research are addressed in this article. The proposed reporting standards can be used as guidance for authors who write their RCT, as well as for peer reviewers of journals. Endorsement and application of these reporting standards may help achieve a higher standard of evidence and allow meta-analysis of reported wound care data. The ultimate goal is to help wound care professionals make better decisions for their patients in clinical practice.

  1. Facilitators and barriers to implementing clinical care pathways

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The promotion of care pathways in the recent Governmental health policy reports of Lord Darzi is likely to increase efforts to promote the use of care pathways in the NHS. Evidence on the process of pathway implementation, however, is sparse and variations in how organisations go about the implementation process are likely to be large. This paper summarises what is known about factors which help or hinder clinicians in adopting and putting care pathways into practice, and which consequently promote or hinder the implementation of scientific evidence in clinical practice. Discussion Care pathways can provide patients with clear expectations of their care, provide a means of measuring patient's progress, promote teamwork on a multi-disciplinary team, facilitate the use of guidelines, and may act as a basis for a payment system. In order to achieve adequate implementation, however, facilitators and barriers must be considered, planned for, and incorporated directly into the pathway with full engagement among clinical and management staff. Barriers and/or facilitators may be present at each stage of development, implementation and evaluation; and, barriers at any stage can impede successful implementation. Important considerations to be made are ensuring the inclusion of all types of staff, plans for evaluating and incorporating continuous improvements, allowing for organisational adaptations and promoting the use of multifaceted interventions. Summary Although there is a dearth of information regarding the successful implementation of care pathways, evidence is available which may be applied when implementing a care pathway. Multifaceted interventions which incorporate all staff and facilitate organisational adaptations must be seriously considered and incorporated alongside care pathways in a continuous manner. In order to better understand the mechanism upon which care pathways are effective, however, more research specifically addressing conditions under

  2. Patient care simulations: role playing to enhance clinical understanding.

    PubMed

    Comer, Shirley K

    2005-01-01

    Role-play techniques can serve as an effective substitute for, and supplement to, simulation technology when teaching clinical nursing skills. They provide risk-free opportunities to practice clinical skills and develop clinical judgment. A two-phase patient care simulation, performed in real time, is described. Students are presented with a scenario and work cooperatively in role-playing appropriate care, with one student using a prepared script to assume the role of patient. The class functions as a resource for four students who assume the nursing role. Students reported increased understanding of course material as a result of participation in the clinical simulation scenario. Faculty observed a decreased failure rate on the corresponding course examination.

  3. ‘I am actually doing something to keep well. That feels really good’: Experiences of exercise within hospice care

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Karen; Tookman, Adrian; Bristowe, Katherine; Maddocks, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with advanced cancer frequently experience functional impairment and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic exercise can provide benefit and be made accessible through the use of tailored programmes. Most studies examining exercise programmes for people with advanced cancer have used quantitative outcome measures and focussed on objective physical function, therefore offer a limited perspective on the experience of exercise participation. Methods: This qualitative study explored patients' experiences of an exercise programme within a palliative care setting. The interviews focussed on the perceived impact on all aspects of quality of life. Results: Nine people with advanced cancer, attending a hospice-based exercise programme, completed a one-to-one interview with a senior physiotherapist to explore the physical, emotional, and social impacts of their participation. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Patients reported an awareness of the positive physical, psychological, and social consequences of exercising. Their experiences reflected on all dimensions of quality of life, the impact of others and the sense of meaning gained through participation in exercise. Conclusion: Our findings highlight that exercise in palliative care should not be viewed solely a physical intervention, but one that has potential to enhance many aspects of patients' quality of life. PMID:27453639

  4. Interprofessional primary care in academic family medicine clinics

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Neil; Abbott, Karen; Williamson, Tyler; Somji, Behnaz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the status and processes of interprofessional work environments and the implications for interprofessional education in a sample of family medicine teaching clinics. Design Focus group interviews using a purposive sampling procedure. Setting Four academic family medicine clinics in Alberta. Participants Seven family physicians, 9 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 2 residents, 1 psychologist, 1 informatics specialist, 1 pharmacist, 1 dietitian, 1 nurse practitioner, 1 receptionist, and 1 respiratory therapist. Methods Assessment of clinic status and performance in relation to established principles of interprofessional work and education was explored using semistructured focus group interviews. Main findings Our data supported the D’Amour and Oandasan model of successful interprofessional collaborative practice in terms of the model’s main “factors” (ie, shared goals and vision, sense of belonging, governance, and the structuring of clinical care) and their constituent “elements.” It is reasonable to conclude that the extent to which these factors and elements are both present and positively oriented in academic clinic settings is an important contributory factor to the establishment of interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care. Using this model, 2 of the 4 clinics were rated as expressing substantial progress in relation to interprofessional work, while the other 2 clinics were rated as less successful on that dimension. None of the clinics was identified as having a clear and explicit focus on providing interprofessional education. Conclusion The key factor in relation to the implementation of interprofessional work in primary care appears to be the existence of clear and explicit leadership in that direction. Substantial scope exists for improvement in the organization, conduct, and promotion of interprofessional education for Canadian primary care. PMID:22893347

  5. Standardized Cardiovascular Data for Clinical Research, Registries, and Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, H. Vernon; Weintraub, William S.; Radford, Martha J.; Kremers, Mark S.; Roe, Matthew T.; Shaw, Richard E.; Pinchotti, Dana M.; Tcheng, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Relatively little attention has been focused on standardization of data exchange in clinical research studies and patient care activities. Both are usually managed locally using separate and generally incompatible data systems at individual hospitals or clinics. In the past decade there have been nascent efforts to create data standards for clinical research and patient care data, and to some extent these are helpful in providing a degree of uniformity. Nevertheless these data standards generally have not been converted into accepted computer-based language structures that could permit reliable data exchange across computer networks. The National Cardiovascular Research Infrastructure (NCRI) project was initiated with a major objective of creating a model framework for standard data exchange in all clinical research, clinical registry, and patient care environments, including all electronic health records. The goal is complete syntactic and semantic interoperability. A Data Standards Workgroup was established to create or identify and then harmonize clinical definitions for a base set of standardized cardiovascular data elements that could be used in this network infrastructure. Recognizing the need for continuity with prior efforts, the Workgroup examined existing data standards sources. A basic set of 353 elements was selected. The NCRI staff then collaborated with the two major technical standards organizations in healthcare, the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium and Health Level 7 International, as well as with staff from the National Cancer Institute Enterprise Vocabulary Services. Modeling and mapping were performed to represent (instantiate) the data elements in appropriate technical computer language structures for endorsement as an accepted data standard for public access and use. Fully implemented, these elements will facilitate clinical research, registry reporting, administrative reporting and regulatory compliance, and patient care. PMID

  6. Clinical trials and oral care R&D.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robert W

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of hydrogen peroxide whitening strips in 2000 has contributed to new paradigms for treatment and expanded interest in tooth whitening. Clinical trials played a prominent role in the whitening strip research and development process. Four case studies from the whitening strip development program are used to review the fundamentals of clinical trials design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation as part of new product development in oral care.

  7. [Individualised care plan during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Call Mañosa, S; Pujol Garcia, A; Chacón Jordan, E; Martí Hereu, L; Pérez Tejero, G; Gómez Simón, V; Estruga Asbert, A; Gallardo Herrera, L; Vaquer Araujo, S; de Haro López, C

    2016-01-01

    An individualised care plan is described for a woman diagnosed with pneumonia, intubated, and on invasive mechanical ventilation, who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A nursing care plan was designed based on Marjory Gordon functional patterns. The most important nursing diagnoses were prioritised, using a model of clinical reasoning model (Analysis of the current status) and NANDA taxonomy. A description is presented on, death anxiety, impaired gas exchange, decreased cardiac output, dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility, risk for disuse syndrome, infection risk, and bleeding risk. The principal objectives were: to reduce the fear of the family, achieve optimal respiratory and cardiovascular status, to maintain gastrointestinal function, to avoid immobility complications, and to reduce the risk of infection and bleeding. As regards activities performed: we gave family support; correct management of the mechanical ventilation airway, cardio-respiratory monitoring, skin and nutritional status; control of possible infections and bleeding (management of therapies, care of catheters…). A Likert's scale was used to evaluate the results, accomplishing all key performance indicators which were propose at the beginning. Individualised care plans with NNN taxonomy using the veno-venous ECMO have not been described. Other ECMO care plans have not used the same analysis model. This case can help nurses to take care of patients subjected to veno-venous ECMO treatment, although more cases are needed to standardise nursing care using NANDA taxonomy.

  8. The work of a clinical psychologist in primary care.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M

    1978-11-01

    The data presented suggest that general practitioners would be likely to refer a large number of patients with diverse problems to clinical psychologists working in health centres. Compared with a centrally organized clinical psychology service, the work of the primary care psychologist is likely to offer the following advantages:1. Access to psychological help for patients with a need for such help, but who could not attend a central clinic owing to problems associated with travel, work, physical disability, or even a presenting problem such as agoraphobia.2. Greater continuity of care of patients.3. Increased communication between the psychologist and members of the primary care teams.4. Possibility of the psychologist seeing the patient earlier, before the problems have become entrenched.5. Less need for referral to other agencies.6. Reduced stigma for the patient.7. Development of new therapeutic approaches relevant to problems presenting in primary care.8. More flexible and more relevant therapy due to seeing the patients in their home setting.9. Greater therapeutic involvement of the patient's family.10. Reduced costs and inconvenience for the patient's family.11. Reduced administrative and ambulance service costs.While these points do not overcome the need for a formal evaluation of the work of psychologists in primary care, they do suggest that there are advantages in this type of service over the services which are currently available and that a full evaluation would be worth undertaking.

  9. Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Richard A.; Siegel, Lawrence; Hahn, Steven; Kuslansky, Gail; Byrne, Kathy; Fyffe, Denise; Passman, Vicki; Stewart, Douglas; Hinrichsen, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica,…

  10. Perspectives on clinical informatics: integrating large-scale clinical, genomic, and health information for clinical care.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-12-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  11. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K.

    2013-01-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

  12. Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Lwin, Khin Maung; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Nosten, Francois; Loff, Bebe

    2013-07-01

    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international clinical research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Empirical research on the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit's (SMRU) vivax malaria treatment trial was then undertaken to demonstrate whether and how these obligations might be upheld in a resource-poor setting. Our findings show that fulfilment of the ancillary care obligations is feasible where there is commitment from chief investigators and funders and is strongly facilitated by SMRU's dual role as a research unit and medical non-governmental organization. PMID:23864908

  13. Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Lwin, Khin Maung; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Nosten, Francois; Loff, Bebe

    2013-07-01

    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international clinical research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Empirical research on the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit's (SMRU) vivax malaria treatment trial was then undertaken to demonstrate whether and how these obligations might be upheld in a resource-poor setting. Our findings show that fulfilment of the ancillary care obligations is feasible where there is commitment from chief investigators and funders and is strongly facilitated by SMRU's dual role as a research unit and medical non-governmental organization.

  14. Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Lwin, Khin Maung; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Nosten, Francois; Loff, Bebe

    2013-01-01

    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international clinical research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger’s health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Empirical research on the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit’s (SMRU) vivax malaria treatment trial was then undertaken to demonstrate whether and how these obligations might be upheld in a resource-poor setting. Our findings show that fulfilment of the ancillary care obligations is feasible where there is commitment from chief investigators and funders and is strongly facilitated by SMRU’s dual role as a research unit and medical non-governmental organization. PMID:23864908

  15. Dignity in care in the clinical setting: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yea-Pyng; Watson, Roger; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2013-03-01

    This review aimed to explore nursing literature and research on dignity in care of inpatients and to evaluate how the care patients received in the hospital setting was related to perceived feelings of being dignified or undignified. Studies conducted between 2000 and 2010 were considered, using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and MEDLINE, and the search terms 'patient dignity', 'dignity in care', 'human dignity and nursing' and 'dignity and nursing ethics'. Findings revealed, from the perspectives of nurses and patients, that dignity in care in the hospital setting is seen to be influenced by physical environment, staff attitude and behaviour, organisational culture and patient independence. This review can help nurses to better understand dignity in care, and for policy makers, there are implications about determining the physical environment, staff attitude and behaviour and organisational culture needed to promote patient dignity in nursing. By identifying the most important factors from patients' and nurses' perspectives that contribute to dignity in care, nursing interventions, such as campaigns and education in clinical practice, can be developed.

  16. Treating Addictions: Harm Reduction in Clinical Care and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Ernest; Anderson, Kenneth; Haemmig, Robert; Heimer, Robert; Small, Dan; Walley, Alex; Wood, Evan; van Beek, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the role of clinical practitioners and clinical researchers internationally in establishing the utility of harm-reduction approaches to substance use. It thus illustrates the potential for clinicians to play a pivotal role in health promoting structural interventions based on harm-reduction goals and public health models. Popular media images of drug use as uniformly damaging, and abstinence as the only acceptable goal of treatment, threaten to distort clinical care away from a basis in evidence, which shows that some ways of using drugs are far more harmful than others and that punitive approaches and insistence on total abstinence as the only goal of treatment often increases the harms of drug use rather than reducing drug use. Therefore the leadership and scientific authority of clinicians who understand the health impact of harm-reduction strategies is needed. Through a review of harm-reduction interventions in Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Switzerland, and the Netherlands, we identify three ways that clinicians have helped to achieve a paradigm shift from punitive approaches to harm-reduction principles in clinical care and in drug policy: (1) through clinical research to provide data establishing the effectiveness and feasibility of harm-reduction approaches, (2) by developing innovative clinical programmes that employ harm reduction, and thereby (3) changing the standard of care to include routine use of these evidence-based (but often misunderstood) approaches in their practices. We argue that through promotion of harm-reduction goals and methods, clinicians have unique opportunities to improve the health outcomes of vulnerable populations. PMID:27112489

  17. Multimedia abstract generation of intensive care data: the automation of clinical processes through AI methodologies.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Desmond; Rose, Sydney E

    2010-04-01

    Medical errors from communication failures are enormous during the perioperative period of cardiac surgical patients. As caregivers change shifts or surgical patients change location within the hospital, key information is lost or misconstrued. After a baseline cognitive study of information need and caregiver workflow, we implemented an advanced clinical decision support tool of intelligent agents, medical logic modules, and text generators called the "Inference Engine" to summarize individual patient's raw medical data elements into procedural milestones, illness severity, and care therapies. The system generates two displays: 1) the continuum of care, multimedia abstract generation of intensive care data (MAGIC)-an expert system that would automatically generate a physician briefing of a cardiac patient's operative course in a multimodal format; and 2) the isolated point in time, "Inference Engine"-a system that provides a real-time, high-level, summarized depiction of a patient's clinical status. In our studies, system accuracy and efficacy was judged against clinician performance in the workplace. To test the automated physician briefing, "MAGIC," the patient's intraoperative course, was reviewed in the intensive care unit before patient arrival. It was then judged against the actual physician briefing and that given in a cohort of patients where the system was not used. To test the real-time representation of the patient's clinical status, system inferences were judged against clinician decisions. Changes in workflow and situational awareness were assessed by questionnaires and process evaluation. MAGIC provides 200% more information, twice the accuracy, and enhances situational awareness. This study demonstrates that the automation of clinical processes through AI methodologies yields positive results. PMID:20012610

  18. Interprofessional student-run primary health care clinics

    PubMed Central

    Pammett, Robert; Landry, Eric; Jorgenson, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Interprofessional student-run primary health care clinics have been a flagship model of health professional education in Canada for many years. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is support for implementing this educational model in the United Kingdom and to highlight the implications for pharmacy education in Scotland. Method: A cross-sectional postal survey of 3000 randomly selected citizens of Aberdeen city and shire, Scotland, aged 18 years and older. Results: Of the 824 questionnaires that were returned (response rate 27.5%), more than half of the respondents (62.4%; n = 514) would consider accessing health care from a student-led, walk-in service. The range of services they expect to see includes general health checks (60%; n = 494), help for sexually transmitted diseases (57.5%; n = 474), weight management (56.8%; n = 468), smoking cessation (54.4%; n = 448) and drug misuse services (47.2%; n = 387). Concerns raised pertained to student ability, suitability for children and accessibility. Many comments pertained to the improvement of the current system by offering after-hours care. Discussion: The positive response from the general public towards an interprofessional student-run primary health care clinic in Aberdeen suggests that this Canadian model of interdisciplinary health professional education would likely be a successful addition to the pharmacy curriculum in Scotland. PMID:26150889

  19. The cost effectiveness of a nurse-led shared-care prostate assessment clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, P.; Drudge-Coates, L.; Smith, K.; Booth, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Nurse-led prostate clinics (NPCs) have proved to be a highly effective method of assessing patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and most urology units now run such clinics. However, it was not known whether they are cost-effective and this analysis ansWers that question. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During one year, a trained urology nurse assessed 1,080 patients in our NPC following GP referral using a standard pro forma. Costs included those incurred for the salary of a grade D nurse at 30 min per patient, all investigations, indirect charges and overheads. This was compared to the cost of seeing all patients in clinic directly, either by a consultant, staff grade urologist or registrar. Of these 1,080 patients, 350 were sent back to their GPs after NPC assessment. RESULTS: The NPC cost of 44.25 pounds per patient compared favourably with an average medical out-patient clinic cost of 50.46 pounds per patient, yielding an actual annual saving of 6,706.80 pounds. Since a third of the patients assessed in the NPC were sent directly back to primary care, saving the cost of a medical follow-up appointment, the true savings in secondary care were 17,661.00 pounds (50.46 x 350pounds), giving a total annual saving of 24,367.80 pounds. CONCLUSIONS: A nurse-led shared-care prostate clinic is a cost effective, thorough and speedy method of assessing men presenting with suspected bladder outflow obstruction. The approach used has a wider generic, cost-benefit potential for the NHS. PMID:12398125

  20. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by

  1. Characterizing Primary Care Visit Activities at Veterans Health Administration Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Jennifer C; Terwiesch, Christian; Pelak, Mary; Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Medical home models seek to increase efficiency and maximize the use of resources by ensuring that all care team members work at the top of their licenses. We sought to break down primary care office visits into measurable activities to better under stand how primary care providers (PCPs) currently spend visit time and to provide insight into potential opportunities for revision or redistribution of healthcare tasks. We videotaped 27 PCPs during office visits with 121 patients at four Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Based on patterns emerging from the data, we identified a taxonomy of 12 provider activity categories that enabled us to quantify the frequency and duration of activities occurring during routine primary care visits. We conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses to examine associations between visit characteristics and provider and clinic characteristics. We found that PCPs spent the greatest percentage of their visit time discussing existing conditions (20%), discussing new conditions (18%), record keeping (13%), and examining patients (13%). Providers spent the smallest percentage of time on preventive care and coordination of care. Mean visit length was 22.9 minutes (range 7.9-58.0 minutes). Site-level ratings of medical home implementation were not associated with differences in how visit time was spent. These data provide a window into how PCPs are spending face-to-face time with patients. The methodology and taxonomy presented here may prove useful for future quality improvement and research endeavors, particularly those focused on opportunities to increase nonappointment care and to ensure that team members work at the top of their skill level.

  2. How do clinicians actually use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in clinical practice and why we need to know more.

    PubMed

    First, Michael B; Bhat, Venkat; Adler, David; Dixon, Lisa; Goldman, Beth; Koh, Steve; Levine, Bruce; Oslin, David; Siris, Sam

    2014-12-01

    The clinical use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is explicitly stated as a goal for both the DSM Fourth Edition and DSM Fifth Edition (DSM-5) revisions. Many uses assume a relatively faithful application of the DSM diagnostic definitions. However, studies demonstrate significant discrepancies between clinical psychiatric diagnoses with those made using structured interviews suggesting that clinicians do not systematically apply the diagnostic criteria. The limited information regarding how clinicians actually use the DSM raises important questions: a) How can the clinical use be improved without first having a baseline assessment? b) How can potentially significant shifts in practice patterns based on wording changes be assessed without knowing the extent to which the criteria are used as written? Given the American Psychiatric Association's plans for interim revisions to the DSM-5, the value of a detailed exploration of its actual use in clinical practice remains a significant ongoing concern and deserves further study including a number of survey and in vivo studies.

  3. Clinical governance: bridging the gap between managerial and clinical approaches to quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Buetow, S. A.; Roland, M.

    1999-01-01

    Clinical governance has been introduced as a new approach to quality improvement in the UK national health service. This article maps clinical governance against a discussion of the four main approaches to measuring and improving quality of care: quality assessment, quality assurance, clinical audit, and quality improvement (including continuous quality improvement). Quality assessment underpins each approach. Whereas clinical audit has, in general, been professionally led, managers have driven quality improvement initiatives. Quality assurance approaches have been perceived to be externally driven by managers or to involve professional inspection. It is discussed how clinical governance seeks to bridge these approaches. Clinical governance allows clinicians in the UK to lead a comprehensive strategy to improve quality within provider organisations, although with an expectation of greatly increased external accountability. Clinical governance aims to bring together managerial, organisational, and clinical approaches to improving quality of care. If successful, it will define a new type of professionalism for the next century. Failure by the professions to seize the opportunity is likely to result in increasingly detailed external control of clinical activity in the UK, as has occurred in some other countries. PMID:10847876

  4. Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of ... Research / Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone Fall 2010 Issue: Volume 5 Number ...

  5. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Miller, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Background Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state’s emergency department [ED] physicians). The respondents were predominantly male (85%) and practicing in solo or private practice (45%), hospital (43%), or academia (15%). The majority were ED (57%), followed by primary care (16%) physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion These pilot-level data suggest that patient satisfaction survey utilization may promote, under certain circumstances, job dissatisfaction, attrition, and inappropriate clinical care among some physicians. This is concerning, especially in the context of the progressive incorporation of patient satisfaction ratings as a quality-of-care metric, and highlights the need for a rigorous evaluation of the optimal methods

  6. Improving COPD Care in a Medically Underserved Primary Care Clinic: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Irene; Wang, Fei; Reardon, Jane; Vergara, Cunegundo D; Salvietti, Ralph; Acevedo, Myrtha; Santana, Blanca; Fortunato, Gil

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation.

  7. Improving COPD Care in a Medically Underserved Primary Care Clinic: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Irene; Wang, Fei; Reardon, Jane; Vergara, Cunegundo D; Salvietti, Ralph; Acevedo, Myrtha; Santana, Blanca; Fortunato, Gil

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation. PMID:26807853

  8. Multidisciplinary care in cystic fibrosis: a clinical-nutrition review.

    PubMed

    Haack, A; Carvalho Garbi Novaes, M R

    2012-01-01

    The multidisciplinary care, at different referral centers of cystic fibrosis, is aimed at monitoring and treating cystic fibrosis patients. Mortality attributed to this hereditary disease is high, since it affects the exocrine glands, involving multiple organs, and evolves in a chronic, progressive way. However, systemized care and the improved, shared understanding of gastroenterologists, nutritionists and pulmonologists, contribute to prolonged survival and abated morbimortality. The aim of this study is to describe the main aspects of clinical and nutritional intervention in cystic fibrosis patients so that monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is optimized and performed as early as possible. The review was carried out on articles indexed in the Medline, Lilacs, SciELO, Current Contents and Cochrane databases, finding 189 articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish, with emphasis on articles published between 2000 and 2011. Due to the scientific relevant contribution, some publications before 2000 were included totalized 77 related to the multidisciplinary care. The reviewed studies suggest that multidisciplinary care is essential for knowledge integration in order to impose permanent update of scientific information, thereby contributing to the development of intervention strategies that enhance survival and motivate the development of skills to cope with the complex treatment regimen that is necessary for cystic fibrosis treatment and prevention of related complications.

  9. Multidisciplinary care in cystic fibrosis: a clinical-nutrition review.

    PubMed

    Haack, A; Carvalho Garbi Novaes, M R

    2012-01-01

    The multidisciplinary care, at different referral centers of cystic fibrosis, is aimed at monitoring and treating cystic fibrosis patients. Mortality attributed to this hereditary disease is high, since it affects the exocrine glands, involving multiple organs, and evolves in a chronic, progressive way. However, systemized care and the improved, shared understanding of gastroenterologists, nutritionists and pulmonologists, contribute to prolonged survival and abated morbimortality. The aim of this study is to describe the main aspects of clinical and nutritional intervention in cystic fibrosis patients so that monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is optimized and performed as early as possible. The review was carried out on articles indexed in the Medline, Lilacs, SciELO, Current Contents and Cochrane databases, finding 189 articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish, with emphasis on articles published between 2000 and 2011. Due to the scientific relevant contribution, some publications before 2000 were included totalized 77 related to the multidisciplinary care. The reviewed studies suggest that multidisciplinary care is essential for knowledge integration in order to impose permanent update of scientific information, thereby contributing to the development of intervention strategies that enhance survival and motivate the development of skills to cope with the complex treatment regimen that is necessary for cystic fibrosis treatment and prevention of related complications. PMID:22732957

  10. Copy number variants in a sample of patients with psychotic disorders: is standard screening relevant for actual clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Kerkhof, Noortje WA; Feenstra, Ilse; van der Heijden, Frank MMA; de Leeuw, Nicole; Pfundt, Rolph; Stöber, Gerald; Egger, Jos IM; Verhoeven, Willem MA

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of new genetic techniques such as genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization, studies on the putative genetic etiology of schizophrenia have focused on the detection of copy number variants (CNVs), ie, microdeletions and/or microduplications, that are estimated to be present in up to 3% of patients with schizophrenia. In this study, out of a sample of 100 patients with psychotic disorders, 80 were investigated by array for the presence of CNVs. The assessment of the severity of psychiatric symptoms was performed using standardized instruments and ICD-10 was applied for diagnostic classification. In three patients, a submicroscopic CNV was demonstrated, one with a loss in 1q21.1 and two with a gain in 1p13.3 and 7q11.2, respectively. The association between these or other CNVs and schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses and their clinical implications still remain equivocal. While the CNV affected genes may enhance the vulnerability for psychiatric disorders via effects on neuronal architecture, these insights have not resulted in major changes in clinical practice as yet. Therefore, genome-wide array analysis should presently be restricted to those patients in whom psychotic symptoms are paired with other signs, particularly dysmorphisms and intellectual impairment. PMID:22848183

  11. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  12. American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical expert statement on cancer survivorship care planning.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Snyder, Claire F; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2014-11-01

    The seminal report from the Institute of Medicine, "From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition," identified four essential components of survivorship care and recommended that a survivorship care plan (SCP), consisting of a treatment summary and follow-up care plan, be developed and used as a tool to deliver patient-centered care by enhancing communication between the oncology team and the patient as well as communication and coordination of care between the oncology team and the primary care provider (PCP). Nearly a decade ago, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) initiated a series of activities to promote chemotherapy treatment plans and summaries and SCPs. Unfortunately, there has been limited success in implementing SCPs in oncology practice because of barriers including, but not limited to, the time-consuming process of completing an SCP, lack of role clarity, and lack of reimbursement for preparation time. ASCO developed this statement and revised template to provide a framework for completing and sharing SCPs and to set clear expectations for survivorship care planning in the oncology setting. This statement is intended to help clinicians recognize the importance of developing patient-centered SCPs and delivering the information to both the patient and PCP and to identify barriers that may exist in completing and delivering these documents effectively.

  13. Progressing the utilisation of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics into clinical care.

    PubMed

    Trent, Ronald J; Cheong, Pak Leng; Chua, Eng Wee; Kennedy, Martin A

    2013-06-01

    Understanding human genetic variation and how it impacts on gene function is a major focus in genomic-based research. Translation of this knowledge into clinical care is exemplified by pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics. The identification of particular gene variants that might influence drug uptake, metabolism, distribution or excretion promises a more effective personalised medicine approach in choosing the right drug or its dose for any particular individual. Adverse drug responses can then be avoided or mitigated. An understanding of germline or acquired (somatic) DNA mutations can also be used to identify drugs that are more likely to be therapeutically beneficial. This represents an area of growing interest in the treatment of cancer.

  14. Can district nurses and care home staff improve bowel care for older people using a clinical benchmarking tool?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Claire; L Davies, Sue; Norton, Christine; Fader, Mandy; Morris, Jackie; Wells, Mandy; Gage, Heather

    2013-12-01

    A quasi-experimental study tested a clinical benchmarking tool (Essence of Care) to improve bowel-related care for older people living in six care homes. In the intervention care homes, district nurses and care home staff used the clinical benchmarking tool to discuss and plan how to improve bowel care for residents. In the control care homes, staff were provided with detailed information about the residents and continence services contact details. The intervention was acceptable to care home and district nursing staff, and possible to incorporate into existing working patterns. The study did not demonstrate a significant reduction in bowel-related problems, although there was evidence in one care home of reduction in episodes of avoidable faecal incontinence. At an individual level of care, there were observable benefits, and examples of person-centred care were prompted through participating in the intervention and improved staff awareness. Clinical benchmarking tools can be used to structure discussion between district nurses and care home staff to review and plan care for residents. However, it takes time to achieve change and embedding this kind of approach requires either robust pre-existing working relationships or the involvement of a facilitator.

  15. How accurately does the VIVO Harvester reflect actual Clinical and Translational Sciences Award–affiliated faculty member publications?*

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan D.; Kroth, Philip J.; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Hantak, Chad M.; Weagel, Edward F.; Hannigan, Gale G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The research tested the accuracy of the VIVO Harvester software in identifying publications authored by faculty members affiliated with a National Institutes of Health Clinical and Translational Sciences Award (CTSA) site. Methods: Health sciences librarians created “gold standard” lists of references for the years 2001 to 2011 from PubMed for twenty-five randomly selected investigators from one CTSA site. These gold standard lists were compared to the same twenty-five investigators' reference lists produced by VIVO Harvester. The authors subjected the discrepancies between the lists to sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results: The VIVO Harvester correctly identified only about 65% of the total eligible PubMed references for the years 2001–2011 for the CTSA-affiliated investigators. The identified references produced by VIVO Harvester were precise yet incomplete. The sensitivity rate was 0.65, and the specificity rate was 1.00. Conclusion: While the references produced by VIVO Harvester could be confirmed in PubMed, the VIVO Harvester retrieved only two-thirds of the required references from PubMed. National Institutes of Health CTSA sites will need to supplement VIVO Harvester–produced references with the expert searching skills of health sciences librarians. Implications: Health sciences librarians with searching skills need to alert their CTSA sites about these deficiencies and offer their skills to advance their sites' missions. PMID:25552940

  16. [Ethics in clinical practice and in health care].

    PubMed

    Pintor, S; Mennuni, G; Fontana, M; Nocchi, S; Giarrusso, P; Serio, A; Fraioli, A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical ethics is the identification, analysis and solution of moral problems that can arise during the care of a patient. Given that when dealing with ethical issues in health care some risks will be encountered (talking about ethics in general, or as a problem overlapped with others in this area, or by delegation to legislative determinations) in the text certain important aspects of the topic are examined. First of all ethics as human quality of the relationship between people for the common good, especially in health services where there are serious problems like the life and the health. It is also necessary a "humanizing relationship" between those who work in these services in order to achieve quality and efficiency in this business. It is important a proper training of health professionals, especially doctors, so that they can identify the real needs and means of intervention. It is also important that scientific research must respect fundamental ethical assumptions. In conclusion, ethics in health care is not a simple matter of "cookbook" rules, but involves the responsibility and consciousness of individual operators.

  17. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities.

  18. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities. PMID:23568381

  19. Evidence based dental care: integrating clinical expertise with systematic research.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Mallika; Panat, Sunil R; Aggarwal, Ashish; Agarwal, Nupur; Upadhyay, Nitin; Alok, Abhijeet

    2014-02-01

    Clinical dentistry is becoming increasingly complex and our patients more knowledgeable. Evidence-based care is now regarded as the "gold standard" in health care delivery worldwide. The basis of evidence based dentistry is the published reports of research projects. They are, brought together and analyzed systematically in meta analysis, the source for evidence based decisions. Activities in the field of evidence-based dentistry has increased tremendously in the 21(st) century, more and more practitioners are joining the train, more education on the subject is being provided to elucidate the knotty areas and there is increasing advocacy for the emergence of the field into a specialty discipline. Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD), if endorsed by the dental profession, including the research community, may well- influence the extent to which society values dental research. Hence, dental researchers should understand the precepts of EBD, and should also recognize the challenges it presents to the research community to strengthen the available evidence and improve the processes of summarizing the evidence and translating it into practice This paper examines the concept of evidence-based dentistry (EBD), including some of the barriers and will discuss about clinical practice guidelines. PMID:24701551

  20. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Preetinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student’s t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student’s t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. PMID:23515133

  1. A Lean Neck Mass Clinic Model: Adding Value to Care

    PubMed Central

    Tillman, Brittny N.; Glazer, Tiffany A.; Ray, Amrita; Brenner, J. Chad; Spector, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate that ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (USFNA) with on-site cytopathologic analysis eliminates unnecessary diagnostic testing, return visits, repeat procedures and optimizes quality of care. Study Design Retrospective Cohort Methods 61 new patients (28 female; 33 male; age range 19-85) were seen in our dedicated neck mass clinic over a one-year period. All patients underwent USFNA of masses located in neck levels I-VI (40), parotid gland (20), or parapharyngeal space (1). Each patient underwent two USFNA passes followed by on-site cytopathologic analysis with additional passes if required for diagnosis. Results Diagnosis was made in 93.4% (57) of patients allowing for counseling and treatment planning at the first visit. In order to obtain a diagnosis, more than half (57.4%, 35) of our patients required additional passes which implies that they would have required an additional visit without on-site cytopathologic analysis. Treatment included: Observation in 42.6% (26) of patients, surgery in 32.8 % (20) of patients and nonsurgical treatment (chemotherapy, radiation, other) in 24.6% (15) of patients. The average time from check-in to checkout including the clinic visit, biopsy and treatment counseling was 103 minutes, and the average round trip mileage traveled per patient was 127.6 miles. Conclusion The adult neck mass is a commonly encountered scenario in otolaryngology. For the patient this can be a stressful situation in which timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. A dedicated lean neck mass clinic model with USFNA and on-site cytopathologic analysis can be both an efficient part of one's practice and a valuable addition to patient care. PMID:26256915

  2. Managed Care and the Evolving Role of the Clinical Social Worker in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses developments for practitioners in mental health care with the advent of managed care. With managed care's influence and new cost-containment strategies, the roles of clinical social workers, clinical psychologists, and psychiatrists are evolving, creating role conflict and competition. This article outlines the changes that have occurred…

  3. Proteomics and Ovarian Cancer: Integrating Proteomics Information Into Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Hays, John L.; Kim, Geoffrey; Giuroiu, Iulia; Kohn, Elise C.

    2010-01-01

    The power of proteomics allows unparalleled opportunity to query the molecular mechanisms of a malignant cell and the tumor microenvironment in patients with ovarian cancer and other solid tumors. This information has given us insight into the perturbations of signaling pathways within tumor cells and has aided the discovery of new drug targets for the tumor and possible prognostic indicators of outcome and disease response to therapy. Proteomics analysis of serum and ascites has also given us sources with which to discover possible early markers for the presence of new disease and for the progression of established cancer throughout the course of treatment. Unfortunately, this wealth of information has yielded little to date in changing the clinical care of these patients from a diagnostic, prognostic, or treatment perspective. The rational examination and translation of proteomics data in the context of past clinical trials and the design of future clinical trials must occur before we can march forward into the future of personalized medicine. PMID:20561909

  4. Clinical Effectiveness of Online Training in Palliative Care of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Agra-Varela, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) have a major responsibility in the management of palliative patients. Online palliative care (PC) education has not been shown to have a clinical impact on patients that is equal or different to traditional training. Objective This study tested the clinical effectiveness of online PC education of physicians through impact on symptom control, quality of life (QOL), caregiver satisfaction, and knowledge-attitude of physicians at 18 months of the intervention. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 169 physicians randomly assigned to receive the online model or traditional training. Consecutive patients with advanced cancer requiring PC were included. Physicians and patients completed the Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS), and patients the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL) twice, 7 to 10 days apart. Caregivers completed the SERVQUAL. Physicians' level of knowledge-attitude was measured at 18 months. Results Sixty-seven physicians enrolled 117 patients. The intervention group had reduced scores for pain, symptoms, and family anxiety. The global RSCL scale showed a difference between groups. There was no significant difference in the questionnaires used. Caregiver satisfaction was comparable between groups. Physicians in the intervention group significantly increased their knowledge without any differences in attitude. Online training was completed by 86.6% in the intervention group, whereas 13.4% in the control group accessed traditional training. Conclusions Participation in an online PC education program by PCPs improved patient scores for some symptoms and family anxiety on the POS and also showed improved global QOL. Significant differences were found in physicians' knowledge at short and long term. PMID:23987657

  5. Identifying the barriers to conducting outcomes research in integrative health care clinic settings - a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Integrative health care (IHC) is an interdisciplinary blending of conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with the purpose of enhancing patients' health. In 2006, we designed a study to assess outcomes that are relevant to people using such care. However, we faced major challenges in conducting this study and hypothesized that this might be due to the lack of a research climate in these clinics. To investigate these challenges, we initiated a further study in 2008, to explore the reasons why IHC clinics are not conducting outcomes research and to identify strategies for conducting successful in-house outcomes research programs. The results of the latter study are reported here. Methods A total of 25 qualitative interviews were conducted with key participants from 19 IHC clinics across Canada. Basic content analysis was used to identify key themes from the transcribed interviews. Results Barriers identified by participants fell into four categories: organizational culture, organizational resources, organizational environment and logistical challenges. Cultural challenges relate to the philosophy of IHC, organizational leadership and practitioner attitudes and beliefs. Participants also identified significant issues relating to their organization's lack of resources such as funding, compensation, infrastructure and partnerships/linkages. Environmental challenges such as the nature of a clinic's patient population and logistical issues such as the actual implementation of a research program and the applicability of research data also posed challenges to the conduct of research. Embedded research leadership, integration of personal and professional values about research, alignment of research activities and clinical workflow processes are some of the factors identified by participants that support IHC clinics' ability to conduct outcomes research. Conclusions Assessing and enhancing the broader evaluation culture of IHC clinics

  6. Assessing the Proximity Relationship of Walk-in Clinics and Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alissa; Revere, Lee; Ramphul, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the spatial relationship between primary care provider clinics and walk-in clinics. Using ZIP code level data from Harris County, Texas, the results suggest that primary care physicians and walk-in clinics are similarly located at lower rates in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status. Although current clinic location choices effectively broaden the gap in primary care access for the lower income population, the growing number of newly insured individuals may make it increasingly attractive for walk-in clinics to locate in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status and less competition from primary care physicians. PMID:27576053

  7. The role of clinical governance as a strategy for quality improvement in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stephen M; Sweeney, Grace M

    2002-01-01

    This power considers the process of implementing clinical governance in primary care and its impact on quality improvement. It discuss how clinical governance is being implemented both at the level of Primary Care Organisations and general practices, and the challenges to implementing clinical governance. It also suggests a model for promoting the factors that will help clinical governance improve quality of care. The experience of implementing clinical governance is broadly positive to date. However, the government needs to match its commitment to a ten-year programme of change with realistic timetables to secure the cultural and organisational changes needed to improve quality of care. PMID:12389764

  8. [HOLDING OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ANESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE CLINICAL RESIDENCY IN STATE GRADUATES CERTIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Schegolev, A V; Andreenko, A A; Ershov, E N; Lahin, R E; Makarenko, E P

    2016-01-01

    The modern system of medical education requires objective methods to assess clinical competence of medical specialists. Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) during the final certification of graduates of clinical residency allows to evaluate the theoretical knowledge, manual skills. Enabling simulation scenarios in the program makes it possible to objectively evaluate the important non-technical skills of anesthesiologists, identify gaps in the system of training and modify it. The experience of the objective structured clinical examination as part of the state certification of graduates of clinical residency of the Department ofAnesthesiology and Intensive Care, Military MedicalAcademy after C M Kirov allows us to consider this technique in an objective way a comprehensive assessment of the competence of health professionals. Students confirmed its highly realistic, they have revealed the presence of emotional stress during the simulation sessions, the majority agreed that the simulation session increased the level of their readiness to address these situations in clinical practice. Staff of the department is planning to testing and introduction rating scales into a system of assessment, to improved exam program, increasing the number of clinical scenarios for simulation sessions. PMID:27192861

  9. Publicly Funded Clinical Trials and the Future of Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Publicly sponsored trials, conducted primarily by cooperative groups sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, and commercially sponsored trials are necessary to create new knowledge, improve the care of oncology patients, and develop new drugs and devices. Commercial sponsors launch clinical trials that will result in drug approval, label extension, expansion of market share, and an increase in shareholder value. Conversely, publicly sponsored trials seek to optimize therapy for a particular disease, create new knowledge, and improve public health; these trials can also result in label extension of a drug and even in initial drug approval. Publicly sponsored trials may combine and/or compare drugs developed by different commercial sponsors, develop multimodality therapies (e.g., the combination of chemotherapy and radiation), or develop novel treatment schedules or routes of drug administration (e.g., intraperitoneal chemotherapy). Publicly sponsored trials are more likely to focus on therapies for rare diseases and to study survivorship and quality of life; these areas may not be a priority for commercial entities. Screening and prevention strategies have been developed almost exclusively by the public sector given the large sample size and long follow-up period needed to complete the trial and, therefore, the lack of short-term commercial gain. Finally, given the public nature of the funding, clinical investigators are expected to publish their results even if the outcomes are unfavorable for the investigational therapy. With the ongoing reorganization of the cooperative groups to form a national clinical trials network, opportunities exist to create a robust platform for biomarker discovery and validation through the expanded collection of well-annotated biospecimens obtained from clinical trial participants. Thus, publicly funded trials are vital to developing and refining new cancer treatments and disseminating results to the medical community and the

  10. Wearable technology as a booster of clinical care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Stephan; Hannig, Andreas; Spreckelsen, Cord; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2014-03-01

    Wearable technology defines a new class of smart devices that are accessories or clothing equipped with computational power and sensors, like Google Glass. In this work, we propose a novel concept for supporting everyday clinical pathways with wearable technology. In contrast to most prior work, we are not focusing on the omnipresent screen to display patient information or images, but are trying to maintain existing workflows. To achieve this, our system supports clinical staff as a documenting observer, only intervening adequately if problems are detected. Using the example of medication preparation and administration, a task known to be prone to errors, we demonstrate the full potential of the new devices. Patient and medication identifier are captured with the built-in camera, and the information is send to a transaction server. The server communicates with the hospital information system to obtain patient records and medication information. The system then analyses the new medication for possible side-effects and interactions with already administered drugs. The result is sent to the device while encapsulating all sensitive information respecting data security and privacy. The user only sees a traffic light style encoded feedback to avoid distraction. The server can reduce documentation efforts and reports in real-time on possible problems during medication preparation or administration. In conclusion, we designed a secure system around three basic principles with many applications in everyday clinical work: (i) interaction and distraction is kept as low as possible; (ii) no patient data is displayed; and (iii) device is pure observer, not part of the workflow. By reducing errors and documentation burden, our approach has the capability to boost clinical care.

  11. The Point-of-Care Laboratory in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Drancourt, Michel; Michel-Lepage, Audrey; Boyer, Sylvie; Raoult, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) laboratories that deliver rapid diagnoses of infectious diseases were invented to balance the centralization of core laboratories. POC laboratories operate 24 h a day and 7 days a week to provide diagnoses within 2 h, largely based on immunochromatography and real-time PCR tests. In our experience, these tests are conveniently combined into syndrome-based kits that facilitate sampling, including self-sampling and test operations, as POC laboratories can be operated by trained operators who are not necessarily biologists. POC laboratories are a way of easily providing clinical microbiology testing for populations distant from laboratories in developing and developed countries and on ships. Modern Internet connections enable support from core laboratories. The cost-effectiveness of POC laboratories has been established for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections in both developed and developing countries. PMID:27029593

  12. Improved Prevention Counseling by HIV Care Providers in a Multisite, Clinic-Based Intervention: Positive STEPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrun, Mark; Cook, Paul F.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy A.; Gardner, Lytt; Marks, Gary; Wright, Julie; Wilson, Tracey E.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; O'Daniels, Christine; Raffanti, Stephen; Thompson, Melanie; Golin, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended that HIV care clinics incorporate prevention into clinical practice. This report summarizes HIV care providers' attitudes and counseling practices before and after they received training to deliver a counseling intervention to patients. Providers at seven HIV clinics received training…

  13. Clinical Instructor Characteristics, Behaviors and Skills in Allied Health Care Settings: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Sexton, Patrick; Willeford, K. Sean; Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to compare both clinical instructor and student perceptions of helpful and hindering clinical instructor characteristics, behaviors and skills in athletic training and allied health care settings. Clinical education in athletic training is similar to that of other allied health care professions. Clinical…

  14. A Feminine Care Clinical Research Program Transforms Women's Lives.

    PubMed

    Tzeghai, Ghebre E; Ajayi, Funmilayo O; Miller, Kenneth W; Imbescheid, Frank; Sobel, Jack D; Farage, Miranda A

    2015-01-01

    Feminine hygiene products and menstruation education have transformed the lives of women throughout the world. The P&G Feminine Care Clinical Innovation Research Program has played a key role by expanding scientific knowledge as well as developing technical insights and tools for the development of feminine hygiene products. The aim has been to meet the needs of women throughout their life stages, advancing their urogenital health beyond just menstruation, as well as helping to understand the role of sex hormones in various important health issues that women face. This review article highlights key contributions and research findings in female hygiene products, urogenital health research, and method development. The clinical research team focused on utilizing the results of clinical safety studies to advance the acceptance of feminine hygiene products world-wide. Key findings include that perception of skin sensitivity is not limited to the facial area, but is also relevant to the body and the genital area. Also, they shed light on the role of estrogen in autoimmune diseases as well as premenstrual syndrome. Efforts in the method development area focused on innovative tools that are reliable, predictive of clinical trial results and capable of measuring wear comfort, genital skin health, and the impact of product use on the consumer's quality of life. A novel method, behind-the-knee (BTK) test, developed to model irritation under normal wear conditions, was the first to account for both chemical and mechanical sources of irritation. The method has been accepted by the FDA as a substitute in clinical trials in some cases, and by American Society for Testing and Materials as a global standard test method. Additional proprietary methods were developed to enhance visual grading of irritation using cross-polarized light, to measure the amount of lotion transferred from sanitary pads, and to evaluate the skin mildness. Finally, the Farage Quality of Life tool was created

  15. A Feminine Care Clinical Research Program Transforms Women's Lives.

    PubMed

    Tzeghai, Ghebre E; Ajayi, Funmilayo O; Miller, Kenneth W; Imbescheid, Frank; Sobel, Jack D; Farage, Miranda A

    2015-01-01

    Feminine hygiene products and menstruation education have transformed the lives of women throughout the world. The P&G Feminine Care Clinical Innovation Research Program has played a key role by expanding scientific knowledge as well as developing technical insights and tools for the development of feminine hygiene products. The aim has been to meet the needs of women throughout their life stages, advancing their urogenital health beyond just menstruation, as well as helping to understand the role of sex hormones in various important health issues that women face. This review article highlights key contributions and research findings in female hygiene products, urogenital health research, and method development. The clinical research team focused on utilizing the results of clinical safety studies to advance the acceptance of feminine hygiene products world-wide. Key findings include that perception of skin sensitivity is not limited to the facial area, but is also relevant to the body and the genital area. Also, they shed light on the role of estrogen in autoimmune diseases as well as premenstrual syndrome. Efforts in the method development area focused on innovative tools that are reliable, predictive of clinical trial results and capable of measuring wear comfort, genital skin health, and the impact of product use on the consumer's quality of life. A novel method, behind-the-knee (BTK) test, developed to model irritation under normal wear conditions, was the first to account for both chemical and mechanical sources of irritation. The method has been accepted by the FDA as a substitute in clinical trials in some cases, and by American Society for Testing and Materials as a global standard test method. Additional proprietary methods were developed to enhance visual grading of irritation using cross-polarized light, to measure the amount of lotion transferred from sanitary pads, and to evaluate the skin mildness. Finally, the Farage Quality of Life tool was created

  16. Continuing Need for Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinics After the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Parsell, Bradley W.; Leichliter, Jami S.; Habel, Melissa A.; Tao, Guoyu; Pearson, William S.; Gift, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the characteristics of sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients, their reasons for seeking health services in STD clinics, and their access to health care in other venues. Methods. In 2013, we surveyed persons who used publicly funded STD clinics in 21 US cities with the highest STD morbidity. Results. Of the 4364 STD clinic patients we surveyed, 58.5% were younger than 30 years, 72.5% were non-White, and 49.9% were uninsured. They visited the clinic for STD symptoms (18.9%), STD screening (33.8%), and HIV testing (13.6%). Patients chose STD clinics because of walk-in, same-day appointments (49.5%), low cost (23.9%), and expert care (8.3%). Among STD clinic patients, 60.4% had access to another type of venue for sick care, and 58.5% had access to another type of venue for preventive care. Most insured patients (51.6%) were willing to use insurance to pay for care at the STD clinic. Conclusions. Despite access to other health care settings, patients chose STD clinics for sexual health care because of convenient, low-cost, and expert care. Policy Implication. STD clinics play an important role in STD prevention by offering walk-in care to uninsured patients. PMID:26447908

  17. Challenges in Translating GWAS Results to Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Scheinfeldt, Laura B.; Schmidlen, Tara J.; Gerry, Norman P.; Christman, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing for Mendelian disorders is standard of care in many cases; however, it is less clear to what extent and in which situations clinical genetic testing may improve preventive efforts, diagnosis and/or prognosis of complex disease. One challenge is that much of the reported research relies on tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to act as proxies for assumed underlying functional variants that are not yet known. Here we use coronary artery disease and melanoma as case studies to evaluate how well reported genetic risk variants tag surrounding variants across population samples in the 1000 Genomes Project Phase 3 data. We performed a simulation study where we randomly assigned a “functional” variant and evaluated how often this simulated functional variant was correctly tagged in diverse population samples. Our results indicate a relatively large error rate when generalizing increased genetic risk of complex disease across diverse population samples, even when generalizing within geographic regions. Our results further highlight the importance of including diverse populations in genome-wide association studies. Future work focused on identifying functional variants will eliminate the need for tag SNPs; however, until functional variants are known, caution should be used in the interpretation of genetic risk for complex disease using tag SNPs. PMID:27527156

  18. Challenges in Translating GWAS Results to Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeldt, Laura B; Schmidlen, Tara J; Gerry, Norman P; Christman, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing for Mendelian disorders is standard of care in many cases; however, it is less clear to what extent and in which situations clinical genetic testing may improve preventive efforts, diagnosis and/or prognosis of complex disease. One challenge is that much of the reported research relies on tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to act as proxies for assumed underlying functional variants that are not yet known. Here we use coronary artery disease and melanoma as case studies to evaluate how well reported genetic risk variants tag surrounding variants across population samples in the 1000 Genomes Project Phase 3 data. We performed a simulation study where we randomly assigned a "functional" variant and evaluated how often this simulated functional variant was correctly tagged in diverse population samples. Our results indicate a relatively large error rate when generalizing increased genetic risk of complex disease across diverse population samples, even when generalizing within geographic regions. Our results further highlight the importance of including diverse populations in genome-wide association studies. Future work focused on identifying functional variants will eliminate the need for tag SNPs; however, until functional variants are known, caution should be used in the interpretation of genetic risk for complex disease using tag SNPs. PMID:27527156

  19. Antenatal care in practice: an exploratory study in antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The potential of antenatal care for reducing maternal morbidity and improving newborn survival and health is widely acknowledged. Yet there are worrying gaps in knowledge of the quality of antenatal care provided in Tanzania. In particular, determinants of health workers' performance have not yet been fully understood. This paper uses ethnographic methods to document health workers' antenatal care practices with reference to the national Focused Antenatal Care guidelines and identifies factors influencing health workers' performance. Potential implications for improving antenatal care provision in Tanzania are discussed. Methods Combining different qualitative techniques, we studied health workers' antenatal care practices in four public antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania. A total of 36 antenatal care consultations were observed and compared with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Participant observation, informal discussions and in-depth interviews with the staff helped to identify and explain health workers' practices and contextual factors influencing antenatal care provision. Results The delivery of antenatal care services to pregnant women at the selected antenatal care clinics varied widely. Some services that are recommended by the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines were given to all women while other services were not delivered at all. Factors influencing health workers' practices were poor implementation of the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines, lack of trained staff and absenteeism, supply shortages and use of working tools that are not consistent with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Health workers react to difficult working conditions by developing informal practices as coping strategies or "street-level bureaucracy". Conclusions Efforts to improve antenatal care should address shortages of trained staff through expanding training opportunities, including health worker cadres with little pre

  20. Clinically assisted hydration and the Liverpool Care Pathway: Catholic ethics and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Nowarska, Anna

    2015-08-01

    The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP), a framework introduced for providing comfortable care at the last stage of life, has recently become highly contentious. Among the most serious allegations levelled against it, has been that the LCP may be used as a covert form of euthanasia by withdrawal of clinically assisted hydration (CAH). This concern has been raised, in particular by a number of Catholic medical professionals, who have asserted that the LCP is incompatible with Catholic ethics. This paper examines the key Catholic ethical principles relevant to treatment and care towards the end of life (the sanctity/inviolability of life principle, the distinction between ordinary and extraordinary means). Relevant current clinical evidence regarding CAH in relation to terminal thirst, dehydration, prolongation of life and possible negative impacts on the dying is also scrutinised. It is argued that for some patients at the very end of life it may be permissible and even desirable to withhold or withdraw it. Thus, as administration of CAH may become extraordinary, forgoing it in some situations is fully compatible with Catholic ethics. The article therefore concludes that the stance of the LCP in respect of provision of CAH is fully in alignment with Catholic teaching.

  1. Bioinformatics Methods and Tools to Advance Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lecroq, T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. Method We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. Results The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook’s section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. Conclusions The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their

  2. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-05-12

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a "Mayo Model" of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings.

  3. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  4. 75 FR 21301 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services; Elder Care Initiative Long-Term Care Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Office of Clinical and Preventive Services; Elder Care Initiative Long-Term Care Grant Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Announcement Number: HHS-2010-IHS-EHC-0001... Service (IHS) announces the availability of up to $600,000 for competitive grants through the Elder...

  5. Evolution, current structure, and role of a primary care clinical pharmacy service in an integrated managed care organization.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Rachel M F; Campbell, Stephanie M; Kroner, Beverly A; Proksel, Jenel R; Billups, Sarah J; Witt, Daniel M; Helling, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the declining number of primary care physicians is exacerbated by a growing elderly population in need of chronic disease management. Primary care clinical pharmacy specialists, with their unique knowledge and skill set, are well suited to address this gap. At Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO), primary care clinical pharmacy specialists have a long history of integration with medical practices and are located in close proximity to physicians, nurses, and other members of the health care team. Since 1992, Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Services (PCCPS) has expanded from 4 to 30 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to provide services in all KPCO medical office buildings. With this growth in size, PCCPS has evolved to play a vital role in working with primary care medical teams to ensure that drug therapy is effective, safe, and affordable. In addition, PCCPS specialists provide ambulatory teaching sites for pharmacy students and pharmacy residents. There is approximately 1 specialist FTE for every 13,000 adult KPCO members and every 9 clinical FTEs of internal medicine and family medicine physicians. All clinical pharmacy specialists in the pharmacy department are required to have a PharmD degree, to complete postgraduate year 2 residencies, and, as a condition of employment, to become board certified in an applicable specialty. The evolution, current structure, and role of PCCPS at KPCO, including factors facilitating successful integration within the medical team, are highlighted. Patient and nonpatient care responsibilities are described.

  6. Home-based clinical video teleconferencing care: Clinical considerations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morland, Leslie A; Poizner, Jeffrey M; Williams, Kathryn E; Masino, Tonya T; Thorp, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical video teleconferencing (CVT) is a treatment delivery modality that can be used to provide services to clinical populations that experience barriers to accessing mental health care. Recently, home-based CVT (HBCVT) has been developed in order to deliver treatment via CVT to patients in their homes. A number of clinical considerations, including the appropriate clinical population and individual patient factors, need to be taken into account when delivering CVT. Particular challenges can exist when setting up the home environment for HBCVT. Concerns about maintaining patient privacy while living in shared spaces, ensuring adequate CVT technology in the patient's home, and conducting risk management remotely are important to consider when delivering treatment via CVT. Since treatments delivered via CVT are often conducted across state lines, novel ethical and legal issues such as privacy laws, licensing of providers, prescribing practices, and insurance reimbursements need to be addressed when conducting services via these modalities. Future research on HBCVT will provide researchers and clinicians with information regarding which patients are most appropriate for treatment delivered via this modality and help further develop evidence for the cost-effectiveness of CVT and HBCVT clinical practice guidelines.

  7. Building a pediatric neurocritical care program: a multidisciplinary approach to clinical practice and education from the intensive care unit to the outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Mark S; Grimason, Michele; Goldstein, Joshua; Smith, Craig M; Amlie-Lefond, Catherine; Revivo, Gadi; Noah, Zehava L; Harris, Zena L; Epstein, Leon G

    2014-12-01

    We describe our 10-year experience developing the Ruth D. & Ken M. Davee Pediatric Neurocritical Care Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. The neurocritical care team includes intensivists, neurologists, and an advanced practice nurse who have expertise in critical care neurology and who continue care in long-term follow-up of intensive care unit patients in a dedicated neurocritical care outpatient clinic. Brain-directed critical care requires collaboration between intensivists and neurologists with specific expertise in neurocritical care, using protocol-directed consistent care, and physiological measures to protect brain function. The heterogeneity of neurologic disorders in the pediatric intensive care unit requires a background in the relevant basic science and pathophysiology that is beyond the scope of standard neurology or critical care fellowships. To address this need, we also created a fellowship in neurocritical care for intensivists, neurologists, and advanced practice nurses. Last, we discuss the implications for pediatric neurocritical care from the experience of management of pediatric stroke and the development of stroke centers.

  8. Clinical Profile of Cerebral Malaria at a Secondary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Jency Maria; Koshy, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral malaria (CM) is one of the most common causes for non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. It affects both the urban and rural population. It is a challenge to treat these patients in a resource limited setting; where majority of these cases present. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried out from September 2005 to December 2006 at Jiwan Jyoti Christian Hospital in Eastern Uttar Pradesh in India. This is a secondary level care with limited resources. We studied the clinical profile, treatment and outcome of all the patients above the age of 14 years diagnosed with CM. Results: There were a total of 53 patients with CM of which 38 (71.7%) of them were females. Among them, 35 (66%) patients were less than 30 years of age. The clinical features noted were seizure (39.62%), anemia (84.9%), icterus (16.98%), hypotension (13.2%), bleeding (3.7%), hepatomegaly (5.66%), splenomegaly (5.66%), non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema (16.98%) and renal dysfunction (37.36%). Co-infection with Plasmodium vivax was present in 13 (24.53%) of them. Treatment received included artesunin compounds or quinine. Median time of defervescence was 2 (interquartile range1-3). Complete recovery was achieved in 43 (81%) of them. Two (3.7%) of them died. Conclusion: CM, once considered to be a fatal disease has shown remarkable improvement in the outcome with the wide availability of artesunin and quinine components. To combat the malaria burden, physicians in resource limited setting should be well trained to manage these patients especially in the endemic areas. The key to management is early diagnosis and initiation of treatment based on a high index of suspicion. Anticipation and early recognition of the various complications are crucial. PMID:24791238

  9. Adolescents with Special Needs: Clinical Challenges in Reproductive Health Care.

    PubMed

    Quint, Elisabeth H

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents with special needs have unique reproductive health care needs related to their physical and cognitive issues. This review discusses some of the most common concerns that are encountered in clinical practice, as the clinician will partner with the adolescent and her family to guide her through the pubertal transition and to help navigate the risks and rights of reproduction. Families often seek anticipatory guidance before menarche on menstrual hygiene, abuse risk and sexuality and can be reassured that most teens with special needs do very well with menstruation. The clinician needs to evaluate the teenager's reproductive knowledge as well her risk for abuse and coercion and her ability to consent to sexual activity, if she requests contraception. Menstrual management is mostly based on the impact of the menstrual cycles on the teenager's life and activities. The adolescents may have a decreased ability to tolerate menses or pain, or experience changes in seizure pattern or altered mood. Hormonal treatment is often used to assist with menstrual hygiene, cyclical mood changes or dysmenorrhea. The goal of treatment can be complete amenorrhea, alleviate pain or regulate and decrease menstrual flow. The unique risks and benefits of hormonal treatment for this special population are highlighted.

  10. Cardiovascular diseases and other evidence for primary care clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This issue includes several articles about various cardiovascular illnesses.(1-4) and another on a disease with increased risk for heart disease: hereditary hemochromatosis.(5) Yet another explores some myth busting about mortality and diabetes.(6) Two articles provide data with the support of patient and/or family organizations (Parent Heart Watch(1) and the Iron Disorders Institute(5)). Another 2 articles address maternal-child health, one considers treatment of hyperbilirubinemia,(7) and one describes an innovative team structure for pre-, post-, and intrapartum care.(8) We also provide preliminary data on azithromycin for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Pop quiz: What is the common contaminant with cocaine that causes serious side effects? What are these side effects? And another: What nonliver disease should be considered for children with elevated transaminase levels? (See the brief reports for answers.) Two reviews provide up-to-the minute practical facts for vaccinations and treatment-resistant hypertension that can be immediately incorporated into clinical practice. We also have an update on physician perspectives after 2 years of electronic medical record use and another with insights about the satisfaction of family physicians who are working in health centers in the first few years out of their residency. PMID:22773706

  11. Evolving Systems of Care with Total Clinical Outcomes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John S.; Epstein, Richard A.; Jordan, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The current article proposes that further specification of the system of care concept is required. Based on the assertions that the system of care concept (a) refers to an ideal as opposed to an observable phenomenon, and (b) is engaged in offering transformational experiences, the authors propose that the system of care definition must be…

  12. Clinical review: Sleep measurement in critical care patients: research and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Richard S; Minelli, Cosetta; Mills, Gary H; Kandler, Rosalind

    2007-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in critically ill patients and have been characterised by numerous studies using polysomnography. Issues regarding patient populations, monitoring duration and timing (nocturnal versus continuous), as well as practical problems encountered in critical care studies using polysomnography are considered with regard to future interventional studies on sleep. Polysomnography is the gold standard in objectively measuring the quality and quantity of sleep. However, it is difficult to undertake, particularly in patients recovering from critical illness in an acute-care area. Therefore, other objective (actigraphy and bispectral index) and subjective (nurse or patient assessment) methods have been used in other critical care studies. Each of these techniques has its own particular advantages and disadvantages. We use data from an interventional study to compare agreement between four of these alternative techniques in the measurement of nocturnal sleep quantity. Recommendations for further developments in sleep monitoring techniques for research and clinical application are made. Also, methodological problems in studies validating various sleep measurement techniques are explored. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN47578325. PMID:17764582

  13. Depression Care for Low-Income, Minority, Safety Net Clinic Populations with Comorbid Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ell, Kathleen; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Xie, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Increasingly, mental health care is provided within the general health care sector. Accompanying this significant change is the demand for evidence-based as well as cost-effective or cost-neutral care models. Method: The authors present a pooled analysis of three large randomized clinical trials in which social workers provide…

  14. The Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care: Assessing Resident Perceptions of Internal Medicine Continuity Clinics and Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, John M.; Chang, Barbara K.; Gilman, Stuart C.; Keitz, Sheri A.; Kaminetzky, Catherine P.; Aron, David C.; Baz, Sam; Cannon, Grant W.; Zeiss, Robert A.; Holland, Gloria J.; Kashner, T. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented a national patient-centered care initiative that organized primary care into interdisciplinary teams of health care professionals to provide patient-centered, continuous, and coordinated care. Objective We assessed the discriminate validity of the Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care (LPS-PC), a tool designed to measure residents' perceptions about their primary and patient-centered care experiences. Methods Between October 2010 and June 2011, the LPS-PC was administered to Loma Linda University Medical Center internal medicine residents assigned to continuity clinics at the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System (VALLHCS), a university setting, or the county hospital. Adjusted differences in satisfaction ratings across settings and over domains (patient- and family-centered care, faculty and preceptors, learning, clinical, work and physical environments, and personal experience) were computed using a generalized linear model. Results Our response rate was 86% (77 of 90). Residents were more satisfied with patient- and family-centered care at the VALLHCS than at either the university or county (P < .001). However, faculty and preceptors (odds ratio [OR]  =  1.53), physical (OR  =  1.29), and learning (OR  =  1.28) environments had more impact on overall resident satisfaction than patient- and family-centered care (OR  =  1.08). Conclusions The LPS-PC demonstrated discriminate validity to assess residents' perceptions of their patient-centered clinical training experience across outpatient primary care settings at an internal medicine residency program. The largest difference in scores was the patient- and family-centered care domain, in which residents rated the VALLHCS much higher than the university or county sites. PMID:24455006

  15. Toward a pediatric subacute care model: clinical and administrative features.

    PubMed

    Grebin, B; Kaplan, S C

    1995-12-01

    Subacute care, like our health care system generally, is designed primarily to meet the needs of the adult patient. Emphasis on the adult patient, however, ignores the children who could be appropriately and cost-effectively treated at a subacute level of care. These children offer the most persuasive argument yet for broadening our perspective on subacute care beyond the adult model, but to do so means considering the special needs of children, particularly in the areas of family-centered and age-appropriate care. In this article, we draw upon experience at 2 pediatric subacute care facilities to (1) identify specific treatment programs for children; (2) identify essential features of program delivery; (3) discuss how the typical adult-centered model needs to be modified for children; and (4) offer amendments that make the current adult-centered definitions of subacute care more responsive to children's needs.

  16. ClinicalKey 2.0: Upgrades in a Point-of-Care Search Engine.

    PubMed

    Huslig, Mary Ann; Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    ClinicalKey 2.0, launched September 23, 2014, offers a mobile-friendly design with a search history feature for targeting point-of-care resources for health care professionals. Browsing is improved with searchable, filterable listings of sources highlighting new resources. ClinicalKey 2.0 improvements include more than 1,400 new Topic Pages for quick access to point-of-care content. A sample search details some of the upgrades and content options.

  17. Diabetes Information Technology: Designing Informatics Systems to Catalyze Change in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lester, William T.; Zai, Adrian H.; Chueh, Henry C.; Grant, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Current computerized reminder and decision support systems intended to improve diabetes care have had a limited effect on clinical outcomes. Increasing pressures on health care networks to meet standards of diabetes care have created an environment where information technology systems for diabetes management are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems, and poorly integrated into the existing workflow. After defining the components of diabetes disease management, the authors present an eight-step conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective diabetes information technology systems for translating clinical information into clinical action. PMID:19885355

  18. Student perceptions of the care of children: impacts of pre-clerkship pediatric and primary care clinical teaching

    PubMed Central

    Karras, Beverley; Selvaraj, Saumya; McConnell, Athena; Andres, Deirdre; Trinder, Krista; McKague, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric clinical skills teaching sessions provide an early opportunity for students to be exposed to the medical care of children. This report describes second and third year medical students’ perceptions of and attitudes towards working with children before and after the pediatric clinical skills teaching sessions, and the experiences of those students precepted by pediatricians only compared to those students working with a combination of pediatricians and family physicians. Method A 13 question survey was voluntarily completed before and after teaching sessions. Written reflective assignments were qualitatively analyzed for key themes. Response rate averaged 68% with class sizes of 84 and 85 students. Results Students’ perceptions of the care of children were generally very positive. Some differences were found based on gender, phase of study and prior clinical exposure to pediatric care. Pre and post responses were similar, regardless of preceptor specialty. Students with family physician preceptors identified the themes of prevention, health promotion and multidisciplinary care in their reflections. Conclusions Students had already formed positive attitudes toward the medical care of children and intended to care for children in their future practice. Further research is needed into the effects of pre-clerkship experiences in the care of children on choice of medical specialty. PMID:26451220

  19. Could home STI specimen collection with e-prescription be a cost-effective strategy for clinical trials and clinical care?

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Diane R; Spielberg, Freya; Levy, Vivian; Lensing, Shelly; Wolff, Peter A.; Venkatasubramanian, Lalitha; Acevedo, Nincoshka; Padian, Nancy; Chattopadhyay, Ishita; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Results of a recent demonstration project evaluating feasibility, acceptability, and cost of a web-based STI testing and e-prescription treatment program (eSTI) suggest that this approach could be a feasible alternative to clinic based testing and treatment, but the results need to be confirmed by a randomized comparative effectiveness trial. Methods We modeled a decision tree comparing: 1) cost of eSTI screening using a home collection kit and an e-prescription for uncomplicated treatment versus 2) hypothetical costs derived from the literature for referral to standard clinic based STI screening and treatment. Primary outcome was number of STIs detected. Analyses were conducted from the clinical trial perspective and the healthcare system perspective. Results The eSTI strategy detected 75 infections, and the Clinic-referral strategy detected 45 infections. Total cost of eSTI was $94,938 ($1,266/STI detected) from the clinical trial perspective and $96,088 ($1,281/STI detected) from the healthcare system perspective. Total cost of clinic referral was $87,367 ($1,941/STI detected) from the clinical trial perspective and $71,668 ($1,593/STI detected) from the healthcare system perspective. Conclusions Results indicate that eSTI will likely be more cost-effective (lower cost/STI detected) than clinic based STI screening, both in the context of clinical trials and in routine clinical care. Although our results are promising, they are based on a demonstration project and estimates from other small studies. A comparative effectiveness research (CER) trial is needed to determine actual cost and impact of the eSTI system on identification and treatment of new infections and prevention of their sequelae. PMID:25504295

  20. A multidisciplinary stroke clinic for outpatient care of veterans with cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Arlene A; Kapoor, John R; Miech, Edward J; Kuehn, Deborah; Dallas, Mary I; Kerns, Robert D; Lo, Albert C; Concato, John; Phipps, Michael S; Couch, Cody D; Moran, Eileen; Williams, Linda S; Goble, Layne A; Bravata, Dawn M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Managing cerebrovascular risk factors is complex and difficult. The objective of this program evaluation was to assess the effectiveness of an outpatient Multidisciplinary Stroke Clinic model for the clinical management of veterans with cerebrovascular disease or cerebrovascular risk factors. Methods: The Multidisciplinary Stroke Clinic provided care to veterans with cerebrovascular disease during a one-half day clinic visit with interdisciplinary evaluations and feedback from nursing, health psychology, rehabilitation medicine, internal medicine, and neurology. We conducted a program evaluation of the clinic by assessing clinical care outcomes, patient satisfaction, provider satisfaction, and costs. Results: We evaluated the care and outcomes of the first consecutive 162 patients who were cared for in the clinic. Patients had as many as six clinic visits. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased: 137.2 ± 22.0 mm Hg versus 128.6 ± 19.8 mm Hg, P = 0.007 and 77.9 ± 14.8 mm Hg versus 72.0 ± 10.2 mm Hg, P = 0.004, respectively as did low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (101.9 ± 23.1 mg/dL versus 80.6 ± 25.0 mg/dL, P = 0.001). All patients had at least one major change recommended in their care management. Both patients and providers reported high satisfaction levels with the clinic. Veterans with stroke who were cared for in the clinic had similar or lower costs than veterans with stroke who were cared for elsewhere. Conclusion: A Multidisciplinary Stroke Clinic model provides incremental improvement in quality of care for complex patients with cerebrovascular disease at costs that are comparable to usual post-stroke care. PMID:21594062

  1. Clinical pharmacy should adopt a consistent process of direct patient care.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ila M; Phillips, Beth; Boyce, Eric; Griesbach, Sara; Hope, Charlene; Sanoski, Cynthia; Sokos, Denise; Wargo, Kurt

    2014-08-01

    Although the application of a consistent process of care serves as a foundational principle for most health care professions, this is not true for the discipline of clinical pharmacy. Without an explicit, reproducible process of care, it is not possible to demonstrate to patients, caregivers, or health professionals the ways in which the clinical pharmacist can reliably contribute to improved medication-related outcomes. A consistent patient care process should describe the key steps that all clinical pharmacists will follow when they encounter a patient, regardless of the type of practice, the clinical setting, or the medical conditions or medications involved. Four essential elements serve as the cornerstones of the clinical pharmacist's patient care process: assess the patient and his or her medication therapy, develop a plan of care, implement the plan, and evaluate the outcomes of the plan. Despite the fact that several processes of care have been advocated for clinical pharmacists, none has been adopted by the clinical pharmacy discipline. In addition, numerous publications evaluate outcomes related to clinical pharmacy services, but it is difficult to determine what process of patient care was used in most of these studies. In our view, a consistent process of direct patient care that includes the four essential elements should be adopted by the clinical pharmacy discipline. This process should be clear, straightforward and intuitive, readily documentable, and applicable to all practice settings. Once adopted, the process should be implemented across practice settings, taught in professional degree programs, integrated into students' clinical rotations, refined during residency training, and used as a foundation for future large-scale studies to rigorously study the effects of the clinical pharmacist on patients' medication-related outcomes.

  2. OpenClinical: Promoting Knowledge Management for Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Richard; Fox, John

    2001-01-01

    OpenClinical (www.openclinical.org) is a non-profit web resource centred on knowledge technologies for healthcare. OpenClinical showcases advances in decision support, intelligent protocols and guidelines, clinical workflow tools etc. OpenClinical seeks to promote awareness of these technologies in the medical and commercial communities and their wider adoption in routine clinical practice. The site supports a variety of information services and resources for anyone interested in this area.

  3. Clinical Practice Strategies outside the Realm of Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walfish, Steven

    While more and more psychologists criticize managed care companies, most must depend upon them in order to maintain their practices. In this study, psychologists were surveyed and asked to identify activities in their own independent practice that fall outside of the purview of managed care. A total of 180 specific activities were identified that…

  4. Infant mortality and prenatal care: contributions of the clinic in the light of Canguilhem and Foucault.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Paula Pereira de; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Pimpão, Fernanda Demutti

    2012-01-01

    This review study aimed to verify how studies conducted in Brazil have related infant mortality to prenatal care and to present contributions of the clinic in the light of Canguilhem and Foucault for qualification of the care. An integrative literature review was conducted from searches in the databases SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE and BDENF for the period 2000 to 2009. The relationship between infant mortality and prenatal care is related to the insufficient number of consultations or to the quality of the care provided. Even when the number of and routine consultations in the prenatal care were adequate, avoidable deaths were present. For the qualification of prenatal care, it is suggested that the clinical knowledge and other elements that comprise the process of human living are considered, in order that the clinical view is enlarged and articulated to the technologies available in the health system and, together, they are able to contribute to the reduction of infant mortality in Brazil.

  5. Gaps in quality of diabetes care in internal medicine residency clinics suggest the need for better ambulatory care training.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Lorna; Hess, Brian J; Weng, Weifeng; Lipner, Rebecca S; Holmboe, Eric S

    2012-01-01

    To ensure that medical residents will be prepared to deliver consistently high-quality care, they should be trained in settings that provide such care. Residents in internal medicine, particularly, need to learn good care habits in order to meet the needs of patients with diabetes and other common chronic and high-impact illnesses. To assess the strength of such training, we compared the quality of medical care provided in sixty-seven US internal medicine residency ambulatory clinics with the quality of care provided by 703 practicing general internists. We found significant quality gaps in process, intermediate outcome, and patient-experience measures. These inadequacies in ambulatory training for internal medicine residents must be addressed by policy makers and educators-for example, by accelerating the movement toward new residency curricula that emphasize competency-based training.

  6. An interdisciplinary memory clinic: a novel practice setting for pharmacists in primary care.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos H; Patel, Tejal; Lee, Linda

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacists have developed innovative practices in various settings as singular providers or as members of multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary teams. Examples include pharmacists practicing in heart failure, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia clinics. There is a paucity of literature describing pharmacists in interdisciplinary memory clinics and specifically pharmacists practicing in interdisciplinary, primary care-based memory clinics. New practice models should be disseminated to guide others in the development of similar models given the complexity of this population. Patients with dementia are more difficult to manage because of cognitive impairment, behavioral and psychological symptoms, the common presence of multiple comorbidities, and related polypharmacy and caregiver issues. These challenges require expertise in neurodegenerative disorders and geriatrics. The purpose of this article is to describe the role of clinical pharmacists providing care to patients with cognitive complaints in a primary care-based, interdisciplinary memory clinic, with a focus on how the pharmacist practices and is integrated in this collaborative care setting. Patients are assessed using an interdisciplinary approach, with team consensus for assessment and planning of care. Pharmacists' activities include assessment of (1) appropriateness of medications based on frailty, (2) medications that can impair cognition and/or function, (3) medication adherence and management skills, and (4) vascular risk factor control. Pharmacists provide education regarding medications and diseases, ensure appropriate transitions in care, and conduct home visits. Pharmacist participation in this clinic represents a novel opportunity to advance pharmacy practice in primary care, interdisciplinary models. Work is ongoing to describe outcomes attributable to pharmacist participation in this clinic.

  7. "Youth friendly" clinics: considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-02-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents' unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how "youth friendly" clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics' physical environment; and (3) clinics' social environment. Working to create 'youth friendly' clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents' unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth.

  8. An issue tracking system to facilitate the enhancement of clinical data quality in the clinical breast care project.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Sun, Weihong; Gutchell, Emily M; Hu, Hai; Liebman, Michael N; Shriver, Craig D; Mural, Richard J

    2007-10-11

    An online issue tracking (QAIT) system was developed to support the QA of questionnaire-based clinical data and tissue banking in the Clinical Breast Care Project (CBCP). The web-based system provides a centralized storage and management of QA issues and role-based access to related information and functions via internet. The QAIT system greatly improved the QA process for the CBCP clinical data and tissue banking and can be easily adapted to other applications.

  9. Genes, race, and culture in clinical care: racial profiling in the management of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Linda M; Truesdell, Nicole D; Kreiner, Meta J

    2013-06-01

    Race, although an unscientific concept, remains prominent in health research and clinical guidelines, and is routinely invoked in clinical practice. In interviews with 58 primary care clinicians we explored how they understand and apply concepts of racial difference. We found wide agreement that race is important to consider in clinical care. They explained the effect of race on health, drawing on common assumptions about the biological, class, and cultural characteristics of racial minorities. They identified specific race-based clinical strategies for only a handful of conditions and were inconsistent in the details of what they said should be done for minority patients. We conclude that using race in clinical medicine promotes and maintains the illusion of inherent racial differences and may result in minority patients receiving care aimed at presumed racial group characteristics, rather than care selected as specifically appropriate for them as individuals.

  10. Sleeping on a problem: the impact of sleep disturbance on intensive care patients - a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Lori J; Van Haren, Frank; Lopez, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered amongst intensive care patients and has significant psychophysiological effects, which protract recovery and increases mortality. Bio-physiological monitoring of intensive care patients reveal alterations in sleep architecture, with reduced sleep quality and continuity. The etiological causes of sleep disturbance are considered to be multifactorial, although environmental stressors namely, noise, light and clinical care interactions have been frequently cited in both subjective and objective studies. As a result, interventions are targeted towards modifiable factors to ameliorate their impact. This paper reviews normal sleep physiology and the impact that sleep disturbance has on patient psychophysiological recovery, and the contribution that the clinical environment has on intensive care patients' sleep.

  11. Providing pastoral care services in a clinical setting to veterans at-risk of suicide.

    PubMed

    Kopacz, Marek S

    2013-09-01

    The value of enhanced spiritual wellbeing has largely been overlooked as part of suicide prevention efforts in Veterans. The aim of this qualitative study is to examine the clinical pastoral care services provided by VA Chaplains to Veterans at-risk of suicide. This study was conducted using in-depth interviews with five Chaplains affiliated with a medical center located in upstate New York. This study was able to show that some at-risk individuals do actively seek out pastoral care, demonstrating a demand for such services. In conclusion, a pastoral care framework may already exist in some clinical settings, giving at-risk Veterans the opportunity to access spiritual care.

  12. Evolving systems of care with total clinical outcomes management.

    PubMed

    Lyons, John S; Epstein, Richard A; Jordan, Neil

    2010-02-01

    The current article proposes that further specification of the system of care concept is required. Based on the assertions that the system of care concept (a) refers to an ideal as opposed to an observable phenomenon, and (b) is engaged in offering transformational experiences, the authors propose that the system of care definition must be expanded to include measurement and outcomes monitoring strategies that extend beyond current quality improvement initiatives. The authors propose that communication across multiple levels is essential if the goal of offering transformational experiences to children and families is to be realized.

  13. [Positioning of registered clinical laboratories in proper health care].

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Takeshi

    2003-09-01

    "Proper Health Care" is deemed to mean "Patient-conscious Health Care". On this basis, we have four tasks to achieve. They are: improvement in testing precision (quality control), heightened sense of medical ethics, satisfying the needs of medical institutions to outsource laboratory tests, and increased contribution to community health care. We are certainly aware that these tasks cannot be achieved overnight, however, we are determined to do our very best to reach our goal through day-to-day efforts in providing our customers with consistent and reliable services.

  14. Marketing retail health clinics: challenges and controversies arising from a health care innovation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cheryl-Ann N; Khanfar, Nile M; Harrington, Catherine; Loudon, David

    2011-01-01

    Since their founding in 2000, retail-based health care clinics, also called convenient care clinics, have flourished but continue to generate controversy. This article examines the literature with respect to the industry's background, establishment of industry standards, types of services offered, marketing of retail health clinics, industry growth with new target markets, and patient demographics. It also examines the growing relationship with insurers and third-party payers, quality-of-care concerns by medical associations, and legal regulations and their potential impact on industry growth nationwide.

  15. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-01-01

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a “Mayo Model” of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings. PMID:27175350

  16. Exemplary Care and Learning Sites: A Model for Achieving Continual Improvement in Care and Learning in the Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ogrinc, Greg; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Stevenson, Katherine M.; Shalaby, Marc; Beard, Albertine S.; Thörne, Karin E.; Coleman, Mary T.; Baum, Karyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Current models of health care quality improvement do not explicitly describe the role of health professions education. The authors propose the Exemplary Care and Learning Site (ECLS) model as an approach to achieving continual improvement in care and learning in the clinical setting. Approach From 2008–2012, an iterative, interactive process was used to develop the ECLS model and its core elements—patients and families informing process changes; trainees engaging both in care and the improvement of care; leaders knowing, valuing, and practicing improvement; data transforming into useful information; and health professionals competently engaging both in care improvement and teaching about care improvement. In 2012–2013, a three-part feasibility test of the model, including a site self-assessment, an independent review of each site’s ratings, and implementation case stories, was conducted at six clinical teaching sites (in the United States and Sweden). Outcomes Site leaders reported the ECLS model provided a systematic approach toward improving patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. Most sites found it challenging to incorporate the patients and families element. The trainee element was strong at four sites. The leadership and data elements were self-assessed as the most fully developed. The health professionals element exhibited the greatest variability across sites. Next Steps The next test of the model should be prospective, linked to clinical and educa tional outcomes, to evaluate whether it helps care delivery teams, educators, and patients and families take action to achieve better patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. PMID:26760058

  17. The primary care clinic as a setting for continuing medical education: program description.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cuevas, R; Reyes, H; Guiscafré, H; Juárez-Díaz, N; Oviedo, M; Flores, S; Muñoz, O

    2000-11-14

    The Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) is Mexico's Largest state-financed health care system, providing care to 50 million people. This system comprises 1450 family medicine clinics staffed by 14,000 family physicians, as well as 240 secondary care hospitals and 10 tertiary care medical centres. We developed a program of continuing medical education (CME) for IMSS family physicians. The program had 4 stages, which were completed over a 7-month period: development of clinical guidelines, training of clinical instructors, an educational intervention (consisting of interactive workshops, individual tutorials and peer group sessions), and evaluation of both physicians' performance and patients' health status. The pilot study was conducted in an IMSS family medicine clinic providing care to 45,000 people; 20 family physicians and 4 clinical instructors participated. The 2 main reasons for visits to IMSS family medicine clinics are acute respiratory infections and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, patients being treated at the clinic for either of these illnesses were included in the study. The sources of data were interviews with physicians and patients, clinical records and written prescriptions. A 1-group pretest-posttest design was used to compare physicians' performance in treating the 2 illnesses of interest. We found that the daily activities of the clinic could be reorganized to accommodate the CME program and that usual provision of health care services was maintained. Physicians accepted and participated actively in the program, and their performance improved over the course of the study. We conclude that this CME strategy is feasible, is acceptable to family physicians and may improve the quality of health care provided at IMSS primary care facilities. The effectiveness and sustainability of the strategy should be measured through an evaluative study.

  18. A Pilot Study to Explore the Feasibility of Using the Clinical Care Classification System for Developing a Reliable Costing Method for Nursing Services

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Patricia C.; Wantland, Dean; Whittenburg, Luann; Lipsitz, Stuart; Saba, Virginia K.

    2013-01-01

    While nursing activities represent a significant proportion of inpatient care, there are no reliable methods for determining nursing costs based on the actual services provided by the nursing staff. Capture of data to support accurate measurement and reporting on the cost of nursing services is fundamental to effective resource utilization. Adopting standard terminologies that support tracking both the quality and the cost of care could reduce the data entry burden on direct care providers. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of using a standardized nursing terminology, the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC), for developing a reliable costing method for nursing services. Two different approaches are explored; the Relative Value Unit RVU and the simple cost-to-time methods. We found that the simple cost-to-time method was more accurate and more transparent in its derivation than the RVU method and may support a more consistent and reliable approach for costing nursing services. PMID:24551343

  19. A pilot study to explore the feasibility of using theClinical Care Classification System for developing a reliable costing method for nursing services.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Patricia C; Wantland, Dean; Whittenburg, Luann; Lipsitz, Stuart; Saba, Virginia K

    2013-01-01

    While nursing activities represent a significant proportion of inpatient care, there are no reliable methods for determining nursing costs based on the actual services provided by the nursing staff. Capture of data to support accurate measurement and reporting on the cost of nursing services is fundamental to effective resource utilization. Adopting standard terminologies that support tracking both the quality and the cost of care could reduce the data entry burden on direct care providers. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of using a standardized nursing terminology, the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC), for developing a reliable costing method for nursing services. Two different approaches are explored; the Relative Value Unit RVU and the simple cost-to-time methods. We found that the simple cost-to-time method was more accurate and more transparent in its derivation than the RVU method and may support a more consistent and reliable approach for costing nursing services.

  20. Clinic-wide intervention lowers financial risk and improves revenue to HIV clinics through fewer missed primary care visits.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Lytt I; Marks, Gary; Wilson, Tracey E; Giordano, Thomas P; Sullivan, Meg; Raper, James L; Rodriguez, Allan E; Keruly, Jeanne; Malitz, Faye

    2015-04-01

    : We calculated the financial impact in 6 HIV clinics of a low-effort retention in care intervention involving brief motivational messages from providers, patient brochures, and posters. We used a linear regression model to calculate absolute changes in kept primary care visits from the preintervention year (2008-2009) to the intervention year (2009-2010). Revenue from patients' insurance was also assessed by clinic. Kept visits improved significantly in the intervention year versus the preintervention year (P < 0.0001). We found a net-positive effect on clinic revenue of +$24,000/year for an average-size clinic (7400 scheduled visits/year). We encourage HIV clinic administrators to consider implementing this low-effort intervention.

  1. Evaluation of the clinical process in a critical care information system using the Lean method: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are numerous applications for Health Information Systems (HIS) that support specific tasks in the clinical workflow. The Lean method has been used increasingly to optimize clinical workflows, by removing waste and shortening the delivery cycle time. There are a limited number of studies on Lean applications related to HIS. Therefore, we applied the Lean method to evaluate the clinical processes related to HIS, in order to evaluate its efficiency in removing waste and optimizing the process flow. This paper presents the evaluation findings of these clinical processes, with regards to a critical care information system (CCIS), known as IntelliVue Clinical Information Portfolio (ICIP), and recommends solutions to the problems that were identified during the study. Methods We conducted a case study under actual clinical settings, to investigate how the Lean method can be used to improve the clinical process. We used observations, interviews, and document analysis, to achieve our stated goal. We also applied two tools from the Lean methodology, namely the Value Stream Mapping and the A3 problem-solving tools. We used eVSM software to plot the Value Stream Map and A3 reports. Results We identified a number of problems related to inefficiency and waste in the clinical process, and proposed an improved process model. Conclusions The case study findings show that the Value Stream Mapping and the A3 reports can be used as tools to identify waste and integrate the process steps more efficiently. We also proposed a standardized and improved clinical process model and suggested an integrated information system that combines database and software applications to reduce waste and data redundancy. PMID:23259846

  2. Utilizing clinical pharmacists to improve delivery of evidence-based care for depression and anxiety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Amanda; Kamo, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Access to mental health providers has become an increasingly common challenge for many patients with depression and anxiety disorders. Primary care providers often manage this gap in care and currently provide solo care without the assistance of other team members. In order to provide quality care that aligns with best practice, we developed a depression and anxiety disorder treatment pathway utilizing a multidisciplinary team based on each members' individual skill set, or skill-task alignment. The main change to treatment implemented by the pathway was the addition of a clinical pharmacist in the management of patient care. This pathway was trialed over five months targeting two adult primary care teams (approximately 34 physicians and Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners [ARNPs]) while the other five teams continued with current practice standards. Post-implementation metrics indicated that clinical pharmacists successfully contacted 55% (406 of 738) of patients started on medication or who had a medication changed. Of these patients reached, 82 (20%) had an intervention completed. In addition, all physician leaders on the planning team (n=6) stated the new pathway was well received and delivered positive feedback from team members. PMID:27493753

  3. Utilizing clinical pharmacists to improve delivery of evidence-based care for depression and anxiety in primary care.

    PubMed

    Locke, Amanda; Kamo, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Access to mental health providers has become an increasingly common challenge for many patients with depression and anxiety disorders. Primary care providers often manage this gap in care and currently provide solo care without the assistance of other team members. In order to provide quality care that aligns with best practice, we developed a depression and anxiety disorder treatment pathway utilizing a multidisciplinary team based on each members' individual skill set, or skill-task alignment. The main change to treatment implemented by the pathway was the addition of a clinical pharmacist in the management of patient care. This pathway was trialed over five months targeting two adult primary care teams (approximately 34 physicians and Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners [ARNPs]) while the other five teams continued with current practice standards. Post-implementation metrics indicated that clinical pharmacists successfully contacted 55% (406 of 738) of patients started on medication or who had a medication changed. Of these patients reached, 82 (20%) had an intervention completed. In addition, all physician leaders on the planning team (n=6) stated the new pathway was well received and delivered positive feedback from team members. PMID:27493753

  4. The genome clinic: a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the opportunities and challenges of integrating genomic analysis into clinical care.

    PubMed

    Bowdin, Sarah; Ray, Peter N; Cohn, Ronald D; Meyn, M Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Our increasing knowledge of how genomic variants affect human health and the falling costs of whole-genome sequencing are driving the development of individualized genetic medicine. This new clinical paradigm uses knowledge of an individual's genomic variants to guide health care decisions throughout life, to anticipate, diagnose, and manage disease. While individualized genetic medicine offers the promise of transformative change in health care, it forces us to reconsider existing ethical, scientific, and clinical paradigms. The potential benefits of presymptomatic identification of at risk individuals, improved diagnostics, individualized therapy, accurate prognosis, and avoidance of adverse drug reactions coexist with the potential risks of uninterpretable results, psychological harm, outmoded counseling models, and increased health care costs. Here, we review the challenges of integrating genomic analysis into clinical practice and describe a prototype for implementing genetic medicine. Our multidisciplinary team of bioinformaticians, health economists, ethicists, geneticists, genetic counselors, and clinicians has designed a "Genome Clinic" research project that addresses multiple challenges in genomic medicine-ranging from the development of bioinformatics tools for the clinical assessment of genomic variants and the discovery of disease genes to health policy inquiries, assessment of clinical care models, patient preference, and the ethics of consent.

  5. Clinical review: The Israeli experience: conventional terrorism and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Aschkenasy-Steuer, Gabriella; Shamir, Micha; Rivkind, Avraham; Mosheiff, Rami; Shushan, Yigal; Rosenthal, Guy; Mintz, Yoav; Weissman, Charles; Sprung, Charles L; Weiss, Yoram G

    2005-01-01

    Over the past four years there have been 93 multiple-casualty terrorist attacks in Israel, 33 of them in Jerusalem. The Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center is the only Level I trauma center in Jerusalem and has therefore gained important experience in caring for critically injured patients. To do so we have developed a highly flexible operational system for managing the general intensive care unit (GICU). The focus of this review will be on the organizational steps needed to provide operational flexibility, emphasizing the importance of forward deployment of intensive care unit personnel to the trauma bay and emergency room and the existence of a chain of command to limit chaos. A retrospective review of the hospital's response to multiple-casualty terror incidents occurring between 1 October 2000 and 1 September 2004 was performed. Information was assembled from the medical center's trauma registry and from GICU patient admission and discharge records. Patients are described with regard to the severity and type of injury. The organizational work within intensive care is described. Finally, specific issues related to the diagnosis and management of lung, brain, orthopedic and abdominal injuries, caused by bomb blast events associated with shrapnel, are described. This review emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach in caring for these patients. PMID:16277738

  6. Using the patient-centred medicine clinical framework to better appreciate and explore the many barriers to care in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Janes, Ron; Titchener, Janet

    2014-12-01

    There are many barriers to diabetes care. This paper explores whether organising these barriers to Type 2 diabetes care within the clinical framework of patient-centred medicine (PCM) enables a better appreciation and conceptualisation of these barriers. The terms 'diabetes', 'barriers to care', 'self-management', 'patient-centred care' and 'outcome assessment' were used to identify 28 articles describing multiple barriers (minimum of three) to care in Type 2 diabetes. Identified barriers were organised within the clinical framework of PCM. Barriers to diabetes care were numerous and diverse, but all could be accommodated within the PCM framework, except for one, that of patient non-compliance (non-adherence). This paternalistic concept contradicts patient autonomy, a key component of the PCM paradigm. Accepting non-adherence as a plausible barrier stops providers from recognising the actual barriers to diabetes self-management. Clinicians need to stop attributing blame for poor disease outcomes on patients, and instead to become partners in identifying and addressing their patients' real barriers to better health by using the practical clinical framework of PCM.

  7. [Embracing Jean Watson's theory of Human Caring through a reflective practice within a clinical situation].

    PubMed

    Cara, Chantal; O'Reilly, Louise

    2008-12-01

    Essentially based on humanistic values of respect, collaboration, and uniqueness rather than on objectification, control, and categorization of the person cared-for, a professional's practice rooted in caring is aimed at helping individuals and their families, which can only be carried out through respect for human dignity. If we are to consider caring as the core of nursing, nurses will undoubtedly have to make a conscious effort to preserve human caring within their clinical practice (Cara, 2004b; O'Reilly, 2008, Watson, 2002). However, to support this endeavour, caring theories, such as the one proposed by Jean Watson, are essential. Inspired by Cara's (2003) continuing education paper, this reflection paper takes a pragmatic approach to promote the understanding of key elements involved in Watson's caring theory through a process of reflective practice within a rehabilitation clinical situation.

  8. Primary care satellite clinics and improved access to general and mental health services.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheck, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationship between the implementation of community-based primary care clinics and improved access to general health care and/or mental health care, in both the general population and among people with disabling mental illness. STUDY SETTING: The 69 new community-based primary care clinics in underserved areas, established by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) between the last quarter of FY 1995 and the second quarter of FY 1998, including the 21 new clinics with a specialty mental health care component. DATA SOURCES: VA inpatient and outpatient workload files, 1990 U.S. Census data, and VA Compensation and Pension files were used to determine the proportion of all veterans, and the proportion of disabled veterans, living in each U.S. county who used VA general health care services and VA mental health services before and after these clinics began operation. DESIGN: Analysis of covariance was used to compare changes, from late FY 1995 through early FY 1998, in access to VA services in counties in which new primary care clinics were located, in counties in which clinics that included specialized mental health components were located, and for comparison, in other U.S. counties, adjusting for potentially confounding factors. KEY FINDINGS: Counties in which new clinics were located showed a significant increase from the FY 1995-FY 1998 study dates in the proportion of veterans who used general VA health care services. This increase was almost twice as large as that observed in comparison counties (4.2% vs. 2.5%: F = 12.6, df = 1,3118, p = .0004). However, the introduction of these clinics was not associated with a greater use of specialty VA mental health services in the general veteran population, or of either general health care services or mental health services among veterans who received VA compensation for psychiatric disorders. In contrast, in counties with new clinics that included a mental health component the proportion of

  9. Walking the Walk in Team-Based Education: The Crimson Care Collaborative Clinic in Family Medicine.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, Kirsten; Wohler, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Effective implementation of robust team-based care in the United States requires significant training for all team members. This education is integral to creating a culture of collaboration and respect among interprofessional members of the health care team. The lack of interprofessional clinical educational experiences contributes to a "hidden curriculum" that reinforces the problematic view that medicine is at the top of a hierarchy among health professions. However, learners themselves have started resisting this view by integrating cross-disciplinary team-based training into their own education. One example of learner-based leadership in interprofessional team care is the Crimson Care Collaborative at Cambridge Health Alliance, a student-faculty collaborative family medicine clinic. This successful clinic demonstrates that high-quality interprofessional clinical education can be accomplished through partnerships between educational institutions and existing patient-centered medical homes. PMID:27669136

  10. Why do we observe a limited impact of primary care access measures on clinical quality indicators?

    PubMed

    Chung, Sukyung; Panattoni, Laura; Hung, Dorothy; Johns, Nicole; Trujillo, Laurel; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the effects of enhanced primary care access and continuity on clinical quality in a large, multipayer, multispecialty ambulatory care organization with fee-for-service provider incentives. The difference-in-differences estimates indicate that access to own primary care physician is a statistically significant predictor of improved clinical quality, although the effect size is small such that clinical significance may be negligible. Reduced time for own primary care physician appointment and increased enrollment in electronic personal health record are positive predictors of chronic disease management processes and preventive screening but are inconsistently associated with clinical outcomes. Challenges in identifying relationships between access and quality outcomes in a real-world setting are also discussed. PMID:24594563

  11. Clinic, hospital try to fulfill vision of coordinated care with joint venture company.

    PubMed

    2000-09-01

    Coordinated Care Services Inc., a joint venture of Carle Foundation and Carle Clinic Association in Urbana, IL, shares its initial successes and ongoing challenges after one year of operation. The biggest barrier to further improvements remains insufficient information management capability.

  12. Health Care Rationing in a Just Society: The Clinical Effectiveness Model.

    PubMed

    Weisleder, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    Representing 18% of gross domestic product, and projected to increase to 20% by 2022, health care costs in the United States are an unsustainable expense. The clinical effectiveness model of cost containment is an ethical and self-sustaining paradigm that can assist bending the health care-cost curve. As envisioned by Buyx et al, clinically effective care is aimed at making the practice of medicine more explicitly evidence based with the goals of improving clinical success, efficiency, and value. I provide a vision for applying the clinical effectiveness model to the American health care system. I illustrate its use with 2 examples from the practice of child neurology: DOC-band (helmet therapy) for the treatment of positional plagiocephaly-relatively inexpensive but ineffective, and adrenocorticotropic hormone for the treatment of infantile spasms-expensive but effective.

  13. Criteria for clinical audit of women friendly care and providers' perception in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kongnyuy, Eugene J; van den Broek, Nynke

    2008-01-01

    Background There are two dimensions of quality of maternity care, namely quality of health outcomes and quality as perceived by clients. The feasibility of using clinical audit to assess and improve the quality of maternity care as perceived by women was studied in Malawi. Objective We sought to (a) establish standards for women friendly care and (b) explore attitudinal barriers which could impede the proper implementation of clinical audit. Methods We used evidence from Malawi national guidelines and World Health Organisation manuals to establish local standards for women friendly care in three districts. We equally conducted a survey of health care providers to explore their attitudes towards criterion based audit. Results The standards addressed different aspects of care given to women in maternity units, namely (i) reception, (ii) attitudes towards women, (iii) respect for culture, (iv) respect for women, (v) waiting time, (vi) enabling environment, (vii) provision of information, (viii) individualised care, (ix) provision of skilled attendance at birth and emergency obstetric care, (x) confidentiality, and (xi) proper management of patient information. The health providers in Malawi generally held a favourable attitude towards clinical audit: 100.0% (54/54) agreed that criterion based audit will improve the quality of care and 92.6% believed that clinical audit is a good educational tool. However, there are concerns that criterion based audit would create a feeling of blame among providers (35.2%), and that manager would use clinical audit to identify and punish providers who fail to meet standards (27.8%). Conclusion Developing standards of maternity care that are acceptable to, and valued by, women requires consideration of both the research evidence and cultural values. Clinical audit is acceptable to health professionals in Malawi although there are concerns about its negative implications to the providers. PMID:18647388

  14. [Critical issues in clinical practice guidelines for geriatric care].

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Ermellina

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(BPSD) are one of the most disturbing issues in the management of patients, both for caregivers and health care personnel. Aim of this paper is to critically appraise the available guidelines on the non pharmacological management of BPSD. Some effective interventions such as person centred care, communication skills e dementia care mapping are not mentioned while interventions of dubious efficacy (aromatherapy, per therapy, light therapy or music therapy) are proposed. The variability in the expression of behavioral disorders and the different causes suggest an accurate tailoring of the interventions, based on the assessment of the patient, the organization and the environment. Further studies are necessary to improve the implementation of the non drug strategies for the management of BPSDs. PMID:25532924

  15. [Critical issues in clinical practice guidelines for geriatric care].

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Ermellina

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(BPSD) are one of the most disturbing issues in the management of patients, both for caregivers and health care personnel. Aim of this paper is to critically appraise the available guidelines on the non pharmacological management of BPSD. Some effective interventions such as person centred care, communication skills e dementia care mapping are not mentioned while interventions of dubious efficacy (aromatherapy, per therapy, light therapy or music therapy) are proposed. The variability in the expression of behavioral disorders and the different causes suggest an accurate tailoring of the interventions, based on the assessment of the patient, the organization and the environment. Further studies are necessary to improve the implementation of the non drug strategies for the management of BPSDs.

  16. “Youth friendly” clinics: Considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Amanda E.; Philbin, Morgan M.; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents’ unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how “youth friendly” clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics’ physical environment; and (3) clinics’ social environment. Working to create ‘youth friendly’ clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents’ unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth. PMID:23782040

  17. Preliminary Validation of a Screening Tool for Adolescent Panic Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Alexander H.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Hershorin, Eugene R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the validity of a brief screening tool for adolescent panic disorder (PD) in a primary care setting. A total of 165 participants (ages 12-17 years) seen in two pediatric primary care clinics completed the Autonomic Nervous System Questionnaire (ANS; Stein et al. in Psychosomatic Med 61:359-364, 40). A subset of those screening…

  18. Rural Health Clinics and Diabetes-Related Primary Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries in Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkbride, Kelly; Wallace, Neal

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study assessed whether Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) were associated with higher rates of recommended primary care services for adult beneficiaries diagnosed with diabetes in Oregon's Medicaid program, the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Methods: OHP claims data from 2002 to 2003 were used to assess quality of diabetic care for…

  19. Opening the Black Box of Clinical Collaboration in Integrated Care Models for Frail, Elderly Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Stampa, Matthieu; Vedel, Isabelle; Bergman, Howard; Novella, Jean-Luc; Lechowski, Laurent; Ankri, Joel; Lapointe, Liette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to understand better the clinical collaboration process among primary care physicians (PCPs), case managers (CMs), and geriatricians in integrated models of care. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study with semistructured interviews. A purposive sample of 35 PCPs, 7 CMs, and 4 geriatricians was selected in…

  20. Developing Memory Clinics in Primary Care: An Evidence-Based Interprofessional Program of Continuing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Linda; Weston, W. Wayne; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care is challenged to meet the needs of patients with dementia. A training program was developed to increase capacity for dementia care through the development of Family Health Team (FHT)-based interprofessional memory clinics. The interprofessional training program consisted of a 2-day workshop, 1-day observership, and 2-day…

  1. The Promise Clinic: a service learning approach to increasing access to health care.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Manuel; Tan-Billet, Jennifer; Babineau, John; Jimenez, Jennifer Endres; Billet, Todd; Flash, Charlene; Levin, Steven; West, Bernadette; Tallia, Alfred

    2008-08-01

    The goal of the Promise Clinic (a project of an academic medical center and a local social services group) is to increase access to primary care for an underserved population while addressing deficiencies in medical education. Students manage common primary care problems, creating access for this mostly uninsured population.

  2. Primary care patients in psychiatric clinical trials: a pilot study using videoconferencing

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Janet BW; Ellis, Amy; Middleton, Arthur; Kobak, Kenneth A

    2007-01-01

    Background While primary care physicians play a pivotal role in the treatment of depression, collaboration between primary care and psychiatry in clinical research has been limited. Primary care settings provide unique opportunities to improve the methodology of psychiatric clinical trials, by providing more generalizable and less treatment-resistant patients. We examined the feasibility of identifying, recruiting, screening and assessing primary care patients for psychiatric clinical trials using high-quality videoconferencing in a mock clinical trial. Methods 1329 patients at two primary care clinics completed a self-report questionnaire. Those screening positive for major depression, panic, or generalized anxiety were given a diagnostic interview via videoconference. Those eligible were provided treatment as usual by their primary care physician, and had 6 weekly assessments by the off-site clinician via videoconferencing. Results 45 patients were enrolled over 22 weeks, with 36 (80%) completing the six-week study with no more than two missed appointments. All diagnostic groups improved significantly; 94% reported they would participate again, 87% would recommend participation to others, 96% felt comfortable communicating via videoconference, and 94% were able to satisfactorily communicate their feelings via video. Conclusion Results showed that primary care patients will enroll, participate in and complete psychiatric research protocols using remote interviews conducted via videoconference. PMID:17916254

  3. Clinical Effectiveness Research in Managed-care Systems: Lessons from the Pediatric Asthma Care PORT

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Jonathan A; Lozano, Paula; Streiff, Kachen A; Arduino, Kelly E; Sisk, Cynthia A; Wagner, Edward H; Weiss, Kevin B; Inui, Thomas S

    2002-01-01

    Objective To highlight the unique challenges of evaluative research on practice behavior change in the “real world” settings of contemporary managed-care organizations, using the experience of the Pediatric Asthma Care PORT (Patient Outcomes Research Team). Study Setting The Pediatric Asthma Care PORT is a five-year initiative funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to study strategies for asthma care improvement in three managed-care plans in Chicago, Seattle, and Boston. At its core is a randomized trial of two care improvement strategies compared with usual care: (1) a targeted physician education program using practice based Peer Leaders (PL) as change agents, (2) adding to the PL intervention a “Planned Asthma Care Intervention” incorporating joint “asthma check-ups” by nurse-physician teams. During the trial, each of the participating organizations viewed asthma care improvement as an immediate priority and had their own corporate improvement programs underway. Data Collection Investigators at each health plan described the organizational and implementation challenges in conducting the PAC PORT randomized trial. These experiences were reviewed for common themes and “lessons” that might be useful to investigators planning interventional research in similar care-delivery settings. Conclusions Randomized trials in “real world” settings represent the most robust design available to test care improvement strategies. In complex, rapidly changing managed-care organizations, blinding is not feasible, corporate initiatives may complicate implementation, and the assumption that a “usual care” arm will be static is highly likely to be mistaken. Investigators must be prepared to use innovative strategies to maintain the integrity of the study design, including: continuous improvement within the intervention arms, comanagement by researchers and health plan managers of condition-related quality improvement initiatives, procedures

  4. Instinctive Clinical Teaching: Erasing the Mental Boundary Between Clinical Education and Patient Care to Promote Natural Learning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yih-Ming; Kim, Christopher H.; Briones, Michael A.; Hilinski, Joseph A.; Greenwald, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Effective clinical teaching is essential in physician education, yet faculty members rarely receive formal training in clinical teaching. Formal models for training clinical educators are often tedious and require significant time and effort. Instinctive clinical teaching allows clinicians to seamlessly integrate and promote effective teaching into their clinical practice. The approach is guided by similarities between the components of Kolb's experiential learning cycle—concrete experience, reflective observation, abstract conceptualization, and active experimentation—and the elements of the patient care process—history and physical, initial assessment, differential, hypothesis, final diagnosis, management, and follow-up. Externalization of these clinical thought processes allows for inclusion of learners and promotes effective clinical teaching. PMID:26279765

  5. Integrated care through disease-oriented clinical care pathways: experience from Japan’s regional health planning initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Etsuji; Miyamoto, Masaki; Hara, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Jun; Muto, Masaki; Hirai, Aizan; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagata, Hiroshi; Yamakata, Daisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In April 2008, Japan launched a radical reform in regional health planning that emphasized the development of disease-oriented clinical care pathways. These ‘inter-provider critical paths’ have sought to ensure effective integration of various providers ranging among primary care practitioners, acute care hospitals, rehabilitation hospitals, long-term care facilities and home care. Description of policy practice All 47 prefectures in Japan developed their Regional Health Plans pursuant to the guideline requiring that these should include at least four diseases: diabetes, acute myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident and cancer. To illustrate the care pathways developed, this paper describes the guideline referring to strokes and provides examples of the new Regional Health Plans as well as examples of disease-oriented inter-provider clinical paths. In particular, the paper examines the development of information sharing through electronic health records (EHR) to enhance effective integration among providers is discussed. Discussion and conclusion Japan’s reform in 2008 is unique in that the concept of ‘disease-oriented regional inter-provider critical paths’ was adopted as a national policy and all 47 prefectures developed their Regional Health Plans simultaneously. How much the new regional health planning policy has improved the quality and outcome of care remains to be seen and will be evaluated in 2013 after the five-year planned period of implementation has concluded. Whilst electronic health records appear to be a useful tool in supporting care integration they do not guarantee success in the application of an inter-provider critical path. PMID:22128281

  6. Clinical ethics and nursing: "yes" to caring, but "no" to a female ethics of care.

    PubMed

    Kuhse, Helga

    1995-07-01

    According to a contemporary school of thought there is a specific female approach to ethics which is based not on abstract "male" ethical principles or rules, but on "care". Nurses have taken a keen interest in these female approaches to ethics. Drawing on the views expounded by Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings, nurses claim that a female "ethics of care" better captures their moral experiences than a traditional male "ethics of justice". This paper argues that "care" is best understood in a dispositional sense, that is, as sensitivity and responsiveness to the particularities of a situation and the needs of "concrete" others. While "care", in this sense, is necessary for ethics, it is not sufficient. Ethics needs "justice" as well as "care". If women and nurses excessively devalue principles and norms, they will be left without the theoretical tools to condemn some actions or practices, and to defend others. They will, like generations of nurses before them, be condemned to silence.

  7. The new production theory for health care through clinical reengineering: a study of clinical guidelines--Part II.

    PubMed

    Sharp, J R

    1995-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part article, in the December 1994 issue of the journal, the author discussed the manufacturing theories of Peter Drucker in terms of their applicability for the health care field. He concluded that Drucker's four principles and practices of manufacturing--statistical quality control, manufacturing accounting, modular organization, and systems approach--do have application to the health care system. Clinical guidelines, a variation on the Drucker theory, are a specific example of the manufacturing process in health. The performance to date of some guidelines and their implications for the health care reform debate are discussed in Part II of the article. PMID:10139603

  8. The changing role of imaging in clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rahul; Kurhanewicz, John

    2014-01-01

    Considerable developments in prostate cancer in 2013 have emerged from the imaging field. Hyperpolarized 13C-MRI can monitor metabolic activity to identify high-grade disease and treatment response, and novel PET radiotracers might identify distinct subsets of patients with advanced disease. These examples highlight the progress made at all stages of care. PMID:24418808

  9. RETURN OF RESULTS: ETHICAL AND LEGAL DISTINCTIONS BETWEEN RESEARCH AND CLINICAL CARE

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie; Evans, Barbara J; Jarvik, Gail P

    2014-01-01

    The return of individual results to research participants has been vigorously debated. Consensus statements indicate that researchers and bioethicists consider the return of research results most appropriate when the findings are clinically relevant. Even when clinical utility is the motivator, however, the return of individual research results is not equivalent to clinical care. There are important differences in the domains of research and medical care, both from a legal standpoint and in terms of the ethical responsibilities of clinicians and researchers. As a corollary, researchers risk promoting a therapeutic misconception if they create quasi-clinical settings for return of clinically relevant research results. Rather, efforts should be focused on clarity in the provision of research results, appropriate caveats and, most important, appropriate referrals when the results may be helpful to consider in medical care. PMID:24616381

  10. [Conflicts of interests in clinical research in primary health care].

    PubMed

    González-de Paz, L; Navarro-Rubio, M D; Sisó-Almirall, A

    2014-03-01

    Conflicts of interests between professionals and patients in biomedical research, is an ethical problem. None of the laws in Spain mention whether the clinical researcher has to clarify to participants the reasons why it proposes them to participate in a clinical trial. In this article, conflicts of interests in research are discussed in the context of primary healthcare. In this area conflicts of interests might alter the confidence between patients and healthcare professionals. Finally, we suggest some practical strategies that can help participants make the decision to participate in a clinical trial more willingly and freely.

  11. Embedding surveillance into clinical care to detect serious adverse events in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Anna C; Barsosio, Helen C; Koech, Angela; Berkley, James A

    2016-01-01

    Severe maternal complications in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa contribute to high maternal mortality and morbidity. Incidence data on severe maternal complications, life-threatening conditions, maternal deaths and birth outcomes are essential for clinical audit and to inform trial design of the types and frequency of expected severe adverse events (SAEs). However, such data are very limited, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. We set up standardized, systematic clinical surveillance embedded into routine clinical care in a rural county hospital in Kenya. Pregnant women and newborns are systematically assessed and investigated. Data are reported using a standardized Maternal Admission Record that forms both the hospital’s clinical record and the data collection tool. Integrating clinical surveillance with routine clinical care is feasible and should be expanded in sub-Saharan Africa, both for improving clinical practice and as a basis for intervention studies to reduce maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity where rates are highest. PMID:26254977

  12. Does providing more accessible primary care psychology services lower the clinical threshold for referrals?

    PubMed Central

    Tata, P; Eagle, A; Green, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The growing number of specialist services being provided within primary care has lead to the argument that this will reduce the clinical threshold for referrals to these clinics. AIM: The possibility that increasing the accessibility of primary care psychology services will reduce the threshold for referral was examined by comparing levels of psychological disturbance among patients seen by practice-based clinical psychologists with those attending outpatient clinics. METHOD: Psychological symptoms, distress, disruption in daily life and satisfaction with life were assessed using a questionnaire-based methodology. A consecutive series of 177 patients, assessed in a local general practice or an outpatient department across a wide range of urban locations, was studied over a fixed period. RESULTS: The study revealed equivalent levels of psychopathology within both specialist and primary care clinics. Of the overall sample, 79% were likely to merit a formal psychiatric diagnosis, relating primarily to mood disorder. Levels of subjective distress and life satisfaction were also equivalent at both service locations. CONCLUSION: The lack of evidence for a reduction in clinical threshold for referral within the primary care sample suggests that general practitioners' referral rates are similar regardless of whether practice-based clinical psychology services are available. This has implications for primary-care-led commissioning of mental health services. PMID:8949326

  13. Adverse selection and moral hazard in the provision of clinical trial ancillary care.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael R; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2013-04-01

    As more and more clinical trials are conducted in developing countries, concerns arise about non-trial medical care available to study participants. Recent work argues for ancillary care - medical care not part of the clinical trial per se - to be formally incorporated into these studies. Although the provision of ancillary care is often justified on ethical grounds, a number of crucial implementation issues remain unresolved, including its scope, duration and financing. Drawing on lessons from health insurance benefit design, we highlight two overlooked challenges for ancillary care adoption - adverse selection and moral hazard - and offer recommendations that could attenuate their consequences. Specifically, adverse selection and moral hazard could be reduced by offering a choice between ancillary medical care and monetary compensation or rewarding low ancillary care utilization. Alternatively, researchers' financial risk due to ancillary care could be shifted to a third-party insurer. Recognizing participants' behavioral responses to prospective offers of ancillary medical care would allow funders and research teams to forecast the demand for ancillary care more accurately and to prepare for its provision more adequately. PMID:22464397

  14. Intimate Partner Violence and Health Care-Seeking Patterns Among Female Users of Urban Adolescent Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michele R.; Raj, Anita; Reed, Elizabeth; Marable, Danelle; Silverman, Jay G.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and associations with health care-seeking patterns among female patients of adolescent clinics, and to examine screening for IPV and IPV disclosure patterns within these clinics. A self-administered, anonymous, computerized survey was administered to female clients ages 14–20 years (N = 448) seeking care in five urban adolescent clinics, inquiring about IPV history, reasons for seeking care, and IPV screening by and IPV disclosure to providers. Two in five (40%) female urban adolescent clinic patients had experienced IPV, with 32% reporting physical and 21% reporting sexual victimization. Among IPV survivors, 45% reported abuse in their current or most recent relationship. IPV prevalence was equally high among those visiting clinics for reproductive health concerns as among those seeking care for other reasons. IPV victimization was associated with both poor current health status (AOR 1.57, 95% CI 1.03–2.40) and having foregone care in the past year (AOR 2.59, 95% CI 1.20–5.58). Recent IPV victimization was associated only with past 12 month foregone care (AOR 2.02, 95% CI 1.18–3.46). A minority (30%) reported ever being screened for IPV in a clinical setting. IPV victimization is pervasive among female adolescent clinic attendees regardless of visit type, yet IPV screening by providers appears low. Patients reporting poor health status and foregone care are more likely to have experienced IPV. IPV screening and interventions tailored for female patients of adolescent clinics are needed. PMID:19760162

  15. An interdisciplinary clinic in rural Tanzania – observations on chiropractic care in a developing nation

    PubMed Central

    Lemire, Joe; Budgell, Brian

    2016-01-01

    It appears that a great many chiropractors and chiropractic institutions are involved in health care initiatives in developing countries. Developing nations present extraordinary opportunities to do good, but also carry risks, for practitioners and organizations, which may not be obvious prior to actual local engagement. This paper describes the guiding principles under which one international collaboration has evolved in rural Tanzania, a so-called ‘low resource’ setting where the majority of families subsist in extreme poverty. Several challenges to effective care are also identified. PMID:27385832

  16. An interdisciplinary clinic in rural Tanzania - observations on chiropractic care in a developing nation.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Joe; Budgell, Brian

    2016-06-01

    It appears that a great many chiropractors and chiropractic institutions are involved in health care initiatives in developing countries. Developing nations present extraordinary opportunities to do good, but also carry risks, for practitioners and organizations, which may not be obvious prior to actual local engagement. This paper describes the guiding principles under which one international collaboration has evolved in rural Tanzania, a so-called 'low resource' setting where the majority of families subsist in extreme poverty. Several challenges to effective care are also identified. PMID:27385832

  17. Clinic Network Collaboration and Patient Tracing to Maximize Retention in HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, James H.; Moore, Richard; Eu, Beng; Tee, Ban-Kiem; Chen, Marcus; El-Hayek, Carol; Street, Alan; Woolley, Ian; Buggie, Andrew; Collins, Danielle; Medland, Nicholas; Hoy, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding retention and loss to follow up in HIV care, in particular the number of people with unknown outcomes, is critical to maximise the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. Individual-level data are not available for these outcomes in Australia, which has an HIV epidemic predominantly focused amongst men who have sex with men. Methods and Findings A network of the 6 main HIV clinical care sites was established in the state of Victoria, Australia. Individuals who had accessed care at these sites between February 2011 and June 2013 as assessed by HIV viral load testing but not accessed care between June 2013 and February 2014 were considered individuals with potentially unknown outcomes. For this group an intervention combining cross-referencing of clinical data between sites and phone tracing individuals with unknown outcomes was performed. 4966 people were in care in the network and before the intervention estimates of retention ranged from 85.9%–95.8% and the proportion with unknown outcomes ranged from 1.3-5.5%. After the intervention retention increased to 91.4–98.8% and unknown outcomes decreased to 0.1–2.4% (p<.01 for all sites for both outcomes). Most common reasons for disengagement from care were being too busy to attend or feeling well. For those with unknown outcomes prior to the intervention documented active psychiatric illness at last visit was associated with not re-entering care (p = 0.04) Conclusions The network demonstrated low numbers of people with unknown outcomes and high levels of retention in care. Increased levels of retention in care and reductions in unknown outcomes identified after the intervention largely reflected confirmation of clinic transfers while a smaller number were successfully re-engaged in care. Factors associated with disengagement from care were identified. Systems to monitor patient retention, care transfer and minimize disengagement will maximise individual and population-level outcomes for

  18. Clinical care of adult Turner syndrome--new aspects.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Hjerrild, Britta E; Cleemann, Line; Gravholt, Claus H

    2012-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is characterized by numerous medical challenges during adolescence and adulthood. Puberty has to be induced in most cases, and female sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) should continue during adult years. These issues are normally dealt with by the paediatrician, but once a TS female enters adulthood it is less clear who should be the primary care giver. Morbidity and mortality is increased, especially due to the risk of dissection of the aorta and other cardiovascular diseases, as well as the risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, thyroid disease and other diseases. The proper dose of HRT with female sex steroids has not been established, and, likewise, benefits and/or drawbacks from HRT have not been thoroughly evaluated. The transition period from paediatric to adult care seems to be especially vulnerable and the proper framework for transition has not yet been established. Likewise, no framework is in place for continuous follow-up during adult years in many countries. Today, most treatment recommendations are based on expert opinion and are unfortunately not evidence based, although more areas, such as growth hormone and oxandrolone treatment for increasing height, are becoming well founded. Osteoporosis, diabetes, both type 1 and 2, hypothyroidism, obesity and a host of other endocrine diseases and conditions are seen more frequently in TS. Prevention, intervention and proper treatment is only just being recognized. Hypertension is frequent and can be a forerunner of cardiovascular disease. The description of adult life with TS has been broadened and medical, social and psychological aspects are being added at a compelling pace. Proper care during adulthood should be studied and a framework for care should be in place, since most morbidity potentially is amenable to intervention. In summary, TS is a condition associated with a number of diseases and conditions which need the attention of a multi-disciplinary team during

  19. [Maternal mortality: relation between directive management and opportune clinical care].

    PubMed

    Montesano-Delfín, Jesús Rafael; Hernández, Arturo; Zapién-Moreno, José; Olivares-Durán, Enrique; Guizar-Mendoza, Juan Manuel; Luna-Ruiz, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    The authorities of the High Medical Specialized Units (HMSUs) Obstetric/Gynecology Service (OB/GYN) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) elaborated a strategy, which included the organization and interrelation of both hospital services and the implementation of an Epidemiologic Monitoring Program for all critical complicated pregnancies. This plan consisted in an assignment of personnel for special care, immediate communication with heads of services to coordinate the attention and to facilitate the resources for medical attention in these patients, as well as daily follow up by the authorities until complete resolution. Through epidemiological monitoring, 274 cases of pregnant women with high risk of mortality were identified during 2005, and 437 during 2006 (increased 59 %). The admittance to ICU for this reason in 2003 was 17; in 2005 was 24 and in 2006 was 42 (147 % from 2003 to 2006). Maternal deaths diminished from: 3/17 (17.6 %) to 1/24 (4.1 %) to 2/42 (4.7 %) during the same years, respectively. The maternal death rate from 2004 to 2006 was: 33.2, 17.4, and 22 per 100,000 newborns, respectively, below the national and institutional average. The coordination between the Headquarters and the HMSUs that take care of obstetrical patients helped diminution maternal death over this period.

  20. Development and implementation of collaborative care for depression in HIV clinics.

    PubMed

    Curran, Geoffrey M; Pyne, Jeffrey; Fortney, John C; Gifford, Allen; Asch, Stephen M; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Monson, Thomas P; Kilbourne, Amy M; Hagedorn, Hilde; Atkinson, Joseph H

    2011-12-01

    We sought to develop and implement collaborative depression care in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics in a project called HIV Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (HITIDES). Here we describe: (i) the formative evaluation (FE) conducted prior to implementation; (ii) the process used to adapt the primary care collaborative care model for depression to specialty HIV clinics; and (iii) the intervention itself. The overall design of HITIDES was a multi-site randomized trial in United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) HIV clinics comparing the depression collaborative care intervention to usual depression care. Qualitative methods were used for the FEs and informed the evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI) methods that were used for adapting and implementing the intervention. Baseline assessments were completed by 249 depressed HIV participants. Summaries of respective key informant interviews with eight HIV patients who were receiving depression treatment and 25 HIV or mental health (MH) providers were presented to each site. EBQI methods were used to tailor the HITIDES intervention to each site while maintaining true to the evidence base for depression collaborative care. EBQI methods provided a useful framework for intervention adaptation and implementation. The HITIDES study provides the opportunity to evaluate collaborative depression care in a specialty physical health clinic setting with a population that has a high prevalence of depression and MH comorbidity.

  1. Serving transgender people: clinical care considerations and service delivery models in transgender health.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan; Knudson, Gail; Khan, Sharful Islam; Bonierbale, Mireille; Watanyusakul, Suporn; Baral, Stefan

    2016-07-23

    The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) standards of care for transsexual, transgender, and gender non-conforming people (version 7) represent international normative standards for clinical care for these populations. Standards for optimal individual clinical care are consistent around the world, although the implementation of services for transgender populations will depend on health system infrastructure and sociocultural contexts. Some clinical services for transgender people, including gender-affirming surgery, are best delivered in the context of more specialised facilities; however, the majority of health-care needs can be delivered by a primary care practitioner. Across high-income and low-income settings alike, there often remains a dearth of educational programming for health-care professionals in transgender health, although the best evidence supports introducing modules on transgender health early during clinical education of clinicians and allied health professionals. While these challenges remain, we review the increasing evidence and examples of the defined roles of the mental health professional in transgender health-care decisions, effective models of health service provision, and available surgical interventions for transgender people. PMID:27323926

  2. Serving transgender people: clinical care considerations and service delivery models in transgender health.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan; Knudson, Gail; Khan, Sharful Islam; Bonierbale, Mireille; Watanyusakul, Suporn; Baral, Stefan

    2016-07-23

    The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) standards of care for transsexual, transgender, and gender non-conforming people (version 7) represent international normative standards for clinical care for these populations. Standards for optimal individual clinical care are consistent around the world, although the implementation of services for transgender populations will depend on health system infrastructure and sociocultural contexts. Some clinical services for transgender people, including gender-affirming surgery, are best delivered in the context of more specialised facilities; however, the majority of health-care needs can be delivered by a primary care practitioner. Across high-income and low-income settings alike, there often remains a dearth of educational programming for health-care professionals in transgender health, although the best evidence supports introducing modules on transgender health early during clinical education of clinicians and allied health professionals. While these challenges remain, we review the increasing evidence and examples of the defined roles of the mental health professional in transgender health-care decisions, effective models of health service provision, and available surgical interventions for transgender people.

  3. Clinical Decision Support and Closed-Loop Control for Cardiopulmonary Management and Intensive Care Unit Sedation Using Expert Systems.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Behnood; Bailey, James M; Haddad, Wassim M; Tannenbaum, Allen R

    2012-03-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the ICU, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. While physicians select the agent(s) used for sedation and cardiovascular function, the actual administration of these agents is the responsibility of the nursing staff. If clinical decision support systems and closed-loop control systems could be developed for critical care monitoring and lifesaving interventions as well as the administration of sedation and cardiopulmonary management, the ICU nurse could be released from the intense monitoring of sedation, allowing her/him to focus on other critical tasks. One particularly attractive strategy is to utilize the knowledge and experience of skilled clinicians, capturing explicitly the rules expert clinicians use to decide on how to titrate drug doses depending on the level of sedation. In this paper, we extend the deterministic rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and ICU sedation framework presented in [1] to a stochastic setting by using probability theory to quantify uncertainty and hence deal with more realistic clinical situations.

  4. Ethics outside of inpatient care: the need for alliances between clinical and organizational ethics.

    PubMed

    Barina, Rachelle

    2014-12-01

    The norms and practices of clinical ethics took form relative to the environment and relationships of hospital care. These practices do not easily translate into the outpatient context because the environment and relational dynamics differ. Yet, as outpatient care becomes the center of health care delivery, the experiences of ethical tension for outpatient clinicians warrant greater responses. Although a substantial body of literature on the nature of the doctor-physician relationship has been developed and could provide theoretical groundwork for an outpatient ethics, this literature is not sufficient to support outpatient caregivers in practical dilemmas. For physicians who are employed by or affiliated with a larger organization, a stronger alliance between clinical ethics and organizational ethics, identity, and mission will promote expansion of ethics resources in outpatient settings and address structural constraints in outpatient clinical care.

  5. Clinical Curriculum Reform and Advanced Care Training at the New England College of Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how the New England College of Optometry has expanded clinical education so graduates are equipped to handle new and advanced clinical and patient-care responsibilities and meet the changing standards of professional entry-level competency. The reform process, third- and fourth-year curriculum components, rotations, and plans for…

  6. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  7. Acute care for alcohol intoxication. Be prepared to consider clinical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Yost, David A

    2002-12-01

    The clinical assessment of an acutely intoxicated patient should be performed with meticulous care and include repetitive examinations to properly determine the patient's condition. Multiple factors, such as trauma and concomitant use of other drugs, can confuse the diagnostic picture and affect the choice of therapy. In this article, Dr Yost reviews the diagnostic considerations, appropriate treatment, and clinic discharge for the intoxicated patient.

  8. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  9. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

  10. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  11. Role Model Ambulatory Care Clinical Training Site in a Community-Based Pharmacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magarian, Edward O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary project provided ambulatory care clinical training for pharmacy and nursing students in community-based pharmacies, promoting early detection and medical follow-up of common health problems within the community. Students learned new clinical skills in patient health assessment, new diagnostic technologies, patient education…

  12. [Clinical consensus statement on the care of the child with a tracheostomy].

    PubMed

    Urrestarazu, Paula; Varón, Juan; Rodríguez, Aldana; Ton, Valeria; Vila, Fernando; Cipriani, Silvina; Moncada, Karina; Antonioli, Cintia P; Timoni, María A; Altina, Martha E; Nociti, Yamila B; Silva, Mariana L; Del Valle Rodríguez, Liliana; Rivas, Esteban; Boailchuk, Ivanna; Nieto, Mary E; Botto, Hugo A

    2016-02-01

    The care of the child with a tracheostomy deserves special attention because of the potential devastating airway compromise and because of the need of competent care by caregivers and professionals. The recommendations on tracheostomy care published are few and approaches are inconsistent among different institutions. This clinical consensus statement aims to improve care for children with tracheostomies. A literature search was conducted, reviewed and revised by this group of experts, who concurred with these statements, based on the best evidence available and taking into account the local context. PMID:26914079

  13. [Clinical consensus statement on the care of the child with a tracheostomy].

    PubMed

    Urrestarazu, Paula; Varón, Juan; Rodríguez, Aldana; Ton, Valeria; Vila, Fernando; Cipriani, Silvina; Moncada, Karina; Antonioli, Cintia P; Timoni, María A; Altina, Martha E; Nociti, Yamila B; Silva, Mariana L; Del Valle Rodríguez, Liliana; Rivas, Esteban; Boailchuk, Ivanna; Nieto, Mary E; Botto, Hugo A

    2016-02-01

    The care of the child with a tracheostomy deserves special attention because of the potential devastating airway compromise and because of the need of competent care by caregivers and professionals. The recommendations on tracheostomy care published are few and approaches are inconsistent among different institutions. This clinical consensus statement aims to improve care for children with tracheostomies. A literature search was conducted, reviewed and revised by this group of experts, who concurred with these statements, based on the best evidence available and taking into account the local context.

  14. Are clinical audits enough to bring about improvement in overall health care delivery?

    PubMed

    Rajani, Amin; Sohail, Syed M

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the entire spectrum of initiatives that have evolved globally over time in health care delivery mechanisms. The quality improvement initiatives that have been reviewed were undertaken at the department of radiology at a tertiary care teaching hospital in the developing world. This article reveals that conducting only clinical audits is not enough to bring about improvements in the health care delivery processes. It also illustrates examples of other initiatives that combine to enable sustainable, safe and high quality health care services for the patients whom we serve.

  15. Taking care of the caretakers: a partial explanation of clinical nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, K M

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical practice of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). Data were collected from three recorded case studies and interviews from a theoretical sample of 17 masters-prepared CNSs who had functioned in the CNS role for a minimum of 1 year. Using the constant comparative method, transcribed interviews were line-coded and clustered to form groups of data that could be labelled as constructs. Caring was validated as the basic psychological process. Scientific caring included investigating and teaching; humanistic caring included creating the new, showing the way, working with others, and taking care of the environment. It was found that CNSs took care of the caretakers as well as the patients and their families.

  16. Acute care clinical pharmacy practice: unit- versus service-based models.

    PubMed

    Haas, Curtis E; Eckel, Stephen; Arif, Sally; Beringer, Paul M; Blake, Elizabeth W; Lardieri, Allison B; Lobo, Bob L; Mercer, Jessica M; Moye, Pamela; Orlando, Patricia L; Wargo, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    This commentary from the 2010 Task Force on Acute Care Practice Model of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy was developed to compare and contrast the "unit-based" and "service-based" orientation of the clinical pharmacist within an acute care pharmacy practice model and to offer an informed opinion concerning which should be preferred. The clinical pharmacy practice model must facilitate patient-centered care and therefore must position the pharmacist to be an active member of the interprofessional team focused on providing high-quality pharmaceutical care to the patient. Although both models may have advantages and disadvantages, the most important distinction pertains to the patient care role of the clinical pharmacist. The unit-based pharmacist is often in a position of reacting to an established order or decision and frequently is focused on task-oriented clinical services. By definition, the service-based clinical pharmacist functions as a member of the interprofessional team. As a team member, the pharmacist proactively contributes to the decision-making process and the development of patient-centered care plans. The service-based orientation of the pharmacist is consistent with both the practice vision embraced by ACCP and its definition of clinical pharmacy. The task force strongly recommends that institutions pursue a service-based pharmacy practice model to optimally deploy their clinical pharmacists. Those who elect to adopt this recommendation will face challenges in overcoming several resource, technologic, regulatory, and accreditation barriers. However, such challenges must be confronted if clinical pharmacists are to contribute fully to achieving optimal patient outcomes.

  17. The future of retail clinics: in a volatile health care environment.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer

    2010-01-01

    Recent estimates put the total number of retail clinics at more than 1000 nationwide. Some forecasts estimate that explosive growth will continue in the future, whereas others suggest that the retail clinic boom might be ending. This article assesses the retail clinic trend and explores its future viability in the volatile health care environment. Eight administrative and clinical leaders in 7 health systems that are affiliated with or own retail clinics were asked specific questions about the future evolution of retail clinics. Respondents offered mixed opinions about the future of retail clinics, and most were skeptical about their growth potential. Some of the respondents believed that health care reform will be supportive of retail clinics, but there was uncertainty about the specific effects of expansion in insurance coverage. Respondents reacted differently to the prospect of retail clinics expanding their scope of practice to include chronic conditions. Some of them welcomed the trend, but the majority was critical of it for various reasons. At this turning point for the health care system, it is not clear whether retail clinics will represent a significant value proposition for the system or whether they are a fad that will soon pass and disappear.

  18. Process indicators of quality clinical pharmacy services during transitions of care.

    PubMed

    Kirwin, Jennifer; Canales, Ann E; Bentley, Michael L; Bungay, Kathy; Chan, Tammy; Dobson, Erica; Holder, Renee M; Johnson, Daniel; Lilliston, Andrea; Mohammad, Rima A; Spinler, Sarah A

    2012-11-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy charged the Public and Professional Relations Committee to develop a short white paper describing quality measures of clinical pharmacists' patient care services in transitional care settings. Transitional care describes patient movement from one health care setting or service to another. Care transitions are associated with an increased risk of adverse events for patients. Pharmacists play an important role in ensuring that medication errors and adverse events are minimized during these transitions, largely through the reconciliation of medications and assurance of continuity of care. Quality measures are often divided into three domains: structure, process, and outcome. Given the typical nature of the pharmacist's role, process indicators are best suited to evaluate quality clinical pharmacist services. However, process indicators relevant to pharmacists' activities are not yet fully described in the literature. The committee searched available literature describing quality measures that are directly influenced by the pharmacist during care transitions. This white paper describes these process indicators as quality measures of clinical pharmacists' services, identifies the transitional settings and activities to which they are most applicable, and provides the published sources from which indicators were derived. For process indicators that could not be found in published sources, we propose relevant measures that can be adapted for use in a given setting. As pharmacists become more involved in diverse and emerging patient care areas such as transitional care, it will be critical that they use these types of measures to document the quality of new services and reinforce the need for pharmacist participation during transitions of care.

  19. Patients' perception and actual practice of informed consent, privacy and confidentiality in general medical outpatient departments of two tertiary care hospitals of Lahore

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, Ayesha; Fatima, Noor; Naqqash, Shahid; Hussain, Salwa; Rasheed, Almas; Imtiaz, Huma; Imam, Sardar Zakariya

    2008-01-01

    Background The principles of informed consent, confidentiality and privacy are often neglected during patient care in developing countries. We assessed the degree to which doctors in Lahore adhere to these principles during outpatient consultations. Material & Method The study was conducted at medical out-patient departments (OPDs) of two tertiary care hospitals (one public and one private hospital) of Lahore, selected using multi-stage sampling. 93 patients were selected from each hospital. Doctors' adherence to the principles of informed consent, privacy and confidentiality was observed through client flow analysis performed by trained personnel. Overall patient perception was also assessed regarding these practices and was compared with the assessment made by our data collectors. Results Some degree of informed consent was obtained from only 9.7% patients in the public hospital and 47.8% in the private hospital. 81.4% of patients in the public hospital and 88.4% in the private hospital were accorded at least some degree of privacy. Complete informational confidentiality was maintained only in 10.8% and 35.5% of cases in public & private hospitals respectively. Informed consent and confidentiality were better practiced in the private compared to the public hospital (two-sample t-test > 2, p value < 0.05). There was marked disparity between the patients' perspective of these ethical practices and the assessment of our trained data collectors. Conclusion Observance of medical ethics is inadequate in hospitals of Lahore. Doctors should be imparted formal training in medical ethics and national legislation on medical ethics is needed. Patients should be made aware of their rights to medical ethics. PMID:18816413

  20. A mini-fellowship in clinical nutrition for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Deen, D; Karp, R; Lowell, B

    2000-01-01

    When the Regional Nutrition Center's (RNC's) mini-fellowship was being developed, physicians teaching in medical schools and residency programs had little formal training in nutrition, so it was difficult to identify faculty to serve as role models and clinical preceptors. Using funds provided by an NIH/NCI R-25 grant, the mini-fellowship in clinical nutrition was developed as a model to meet the nutrition education needs of senior residents and junior faculty in primary care disciplines. It provided a brief but broad exposure to clinical nutrition topics, with a focus on issues relevant to the practice of primary care and teaching skills. In four weeks, fellows completed didactic course work, a clinical preceptorship, and a teaching project. Tracking of the 55 physicians who completed the program by questionnaires has shown significant improvement in their nutrition-related patient care activities. PMID:11019758

  1. Establishing research in a palliative care clinical setting: perceived barriers and implemented strategies.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Tracey; Maher, Kate; Rosenberg, John P; Smith, Bradley

    2014-02-01

    There are many challenges in developing research projects in research-naïve clinical settings, especially palliative care where resistance to participate in research has been identified. These challenges to the implementation of research are common in nursing practice and are associated with attitudes towards research participation, and some lack of understanding of research as a process to improve clinical practice. This is despite the professional nursing requirement to conduct research into issues that influence palliative care practice. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of implementing a clinical research project in collaboration with the clinicians of a palliative care community team and to reflect on the strategies implemented to overcome the challenges involved. The challenges presented here demonstrate the importance of proactively implementing engagement strategies from the inception of a research project in a clinical setting.

  2. Physician Professional Satisfaction and Area of Clinical Practice: Evidence from an Integrated Health Care Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Caloyeras, John P; Kanter, Michael; Ives, Nicole; Kim, Chong Y; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Berry, Sandra H; Brook, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Context: For health care reform to succeed, health care systems need a professionally satisfied primary care workforce. Evidence suggests that primary care physicians are less satisfied than those in other medical specialties. Objective: To assess three domains of physician satisfaction by area of clinical practice among physicians practicing in an established integrated health system. Design: Cross-sectional online survey of all Southern California Permanente Medical Group (SCPMG) partner and associate physicians (N = 1034) who were primarily providing clinic-based care in 1 of 4 geographically and operationally distinct Kaiser Permanente Southern California Medical Centers. Main Outcome Measures: Primary measure was satisfaction with one’s day-to-day professional life as a physician. Secondary measures were satisfaction with quality of care and income. Results: Of the 636 physicians responding to the survey (61.5% response rate), on average, 8 in 10 SCPMG physicians reported satisfaction with their day-to-day professional life as a physician. Primary care physicians were only minimally less likely to report being satisfied (difference of 8.2–9.5 percentage points; p < 0.05) than were other physicians. Nearly all physicians (98.2%) were satisfied with the quality of care they are able to provide. Roughly 8 in 10 physicians reported satisfaction with their income. No differences were found between primary care physicians and those in other clinical practice areas regarding satisfaction with quality of care or income. Conclusion: It is possible to create practice settings, such as SCPMG, in which most physicians, including those in primary care, experience high levels of professional satisfaction. PMID:27057819

  3. Health Care Infrastructure for Financially Sustainable Clinical Genomics.

    PubMed

    Lennerz, Jochen K; McLaughlin, Heather M; Baron, Jason M; Rasmussen, David; Sumbada Shin, Meini; Berners-Lee, Nancy; Miller Batten, Julie; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Gala, Manish K; Winter, Harland S; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Sweetser, David A; Boswell, Marianne; Pacula, Maciej; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Le, Long P; Hynes, William; Rehm, Heidi L; Klibanski, Anne; Black-Schaffer, Stephen W; Golden, Jeffrey A; Louis, David N; Weiss, Scott T; Iafrate, A John

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing has evolved technically and economically into the method of choice for interrogating the genome in cancer and inherited disorders. The introduction of procedural code sets for whole-exome and genome sequencing is a milestone toward financially sustainable clinical implementation; however, achieving reimbursement is currently a major challenge. As part of a prospective quality-improvement initiative to implement the new code sets, we adopted Agile, a development methodology originally devised in software development. We implemented eight functionally distinct modules (request review, cost estimation, preauthorization, accessioning, prebilling, testing, reporting, and reimbursement consultation) and obtained feedback via an anonymous survey. We managed 50 clinical requests (January to June 2015). The fraction of pursued-to-requested cases (n = 15/50; utilization management fraction, 0.3) aimed for a high rate of preauthorizations. In 13 of 15 patients the insurance plan required preauthorization, which we obtained in 70% and ultimately achieved reimbursement in 50%. Interoperability enabled assessment of 12 different combinations of modules that underline the importance of an adaptive workflow and policy tailoring to achieve higher yields of reimbursement. The survey confirmed a positive attitude toward self-organizing teams. We acknowledge the individuals and their interactions and termed the infrastructure: human pipeline. Nontechnical barriers currently are limiting the scope and availability of clinical genomic sequencing. The presented human pipeline is one approach toward long-term financial sustainability of clinical genomics.

  4. Screening for Harsh Punishment in a Pediatric Primary Care Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigelman, Susan; Dubowitz, Howard; Lane, Wendy; Prescott, Leslie; Meyer, Walter; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Kim, Jeongeun

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine: (1) the prevalence of harsh punishment among parents in a pediatric clinic, and (2) the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and stability of a brief screening measure. Methods: A subset of families involved in a study of child maltreatment prevention were recruited for this study. Two items in a parent screening…

  5. Health Care Infrastructure for Financially Sustainable Clinical Genomics.

    PubMed

    Lennerz, Jochen K; McLaughlin, Heather M; Baron, Jason M; Rasmussen, David; Sumbada Shin, Meini; Berners-Lee, Nancy; Miller Batten, Julie; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Gala, Manish K; Winter, Harland S; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Sweetser, David A; Boswell, Marianne; Pacula, Maciej; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Le, Long P; Hynes, William; Rehm, Heidi L; Klibanski, Anne; Black-Schaffer, Stephen W; Golden, Jeffrey A; Louis, David N; Weiss, Scott T; Iafrate, A John

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing has evolved technically and economically into the method of choice for interrogating the genome in cancer and inherited disorders. The introduction of procedural code sets for whole-exome and genome sequencing is a milestone toward financially sustainable clinical implementation; however, achieving reimbursement is currently a major challenge. As part of a prospective quality-improvement initiative to implement the new code sets, we adopted Agile, a development methodology originally devised in software development. We implemented eight functionally distinct modules (request review, cost estimation, preauthorization, accessioning, prebilling, testing, reporting, and reimbursement consultation) and obtained feedback via an anonymous survey. We managed 50 clinical requests (January to June 2015). The fraction of pursued-to-requested cases (n = 15/50; utilization management fraction, 0.3) aimed for a high rate of preauthorizations. In 13 of 15 patients the insurance plan required preauthorization, which we obtained in 70% and ultimately achieved reimbursement in 50%. Interoperability enabled assessment of 12 different combinations of modules that underline the importance of an adaptive workflow and policy tailoring to achieve higher yields of reimbursement. The survey confirmed a positive attitude toward self-organizing teams. We acknowledge the individuals and their interactions and termed the infrastructure: human pipeline. Nontechnical barriers currently are limiting the scope and availability of clinical genomic sequencing. The presented human pipeline is one approach toward long-term financial sustainability of clinical genomics. PMID:27471182

  6. [Medical practice and clinical research: keys to generate knowledge and improve care].

    PubMed

    Martínez Castuera-Gómez, Carla; Talavera, Juan O

    2013-01-01

    The increased quality in medical care may be immediately accomplished if clinical research is integrated into daily clinical practice. In the generation of medical knowledge are four steps: an unanswered question awakened from clinical practice, the critical analysis of specialized literature, the development of a research protocol, and, finally, the publication of outcomes. Decision making and continuous training are becoming part of an effective strategy of medical attention improvement.

  7. Evaluation of the Clinical and Cost Effectiveness of Intermediate Care Clinics for Diabetes (ICCD): A Multicentre Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Ainsley; Raymond, Neil; Szczepura, Ala; Crossman, Ric; Baines, Darrin; Khunti, Kamlesh; Kumar, Sudhesh; Saravanan, Ponnusamy

    2014-01-01

    Background Configuring high quality care for the rapidly increasing number of people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major challenge worldwide for both providers and commissioners. In the UK, about two thirds of people with T2D are managed entirely in primary care, with wide variation in management strategies and achievement of targets. Pay for performance, introduced in 2004, initially resulted in improvements but disparities exist in ethnic minorities and the improvements are levelling off. Community based, intermediate care clinics for diabetes (ICCDs) were considered one solution and are functioning across the UK. However, there is no randomised trial evidence for the effectiveness of such clinics. Trial Design, Methods and Findings This is a cluster-randomised trial, involving 3 primary care trusts, with 49 general practices randomised to usual care (n = 25) or intervention (ICCDs; n = 24). All eligible adult patients with T2D were invited; 1997 were recruited and 1280 followed-up after 18-months intervention. Primary outcome: achievement of all three of the NICE targets [(HbA1c≤7.0%/53 mmol/mol; Blood Pressure <140/80 mmHg; cholesterol <154 mg/dl (4 mmol/l)]. Primary outcome was achieved in 14.3% in the intervention arm vs. 9.3% in the control arm (p = 0.059 after adjustment for covariates). The odds ratio (95% CI) for achieving primary outcome in the intervention group was 1.56 (0.98, 2.49). Primary care and community clinic costs were significantly higher in the intervention group, but there were no significant differences in hospital costs or overall healthcare costs. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of +£7,778 per QALY gained, indicated ICCD was marginally more expensive at producing health gain. Conclusions Intermediate care clinics can contribute to improving target achievement in patients with diabetes. Further work is needed to investigate the optimal scale and organisational structure of ICCD services and whether, over

  8. Integrating patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Denise Baird

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the application of patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice, illustrate the process in a case study, and promote change in the current healthcare clinical ethics model. Nutrition support clinicians have an opportunity to add another dimension to their practice with the incorporation of patient-centered care and clinical ethics. This represents a culture change for healthcare professionals, including nutrition support clinicians, patients and their family. All of these individuals are stakeholders in the process and have the ability to modify the current healthcare system to improve communication and facilitate a change by humanizing nutrition support practice. Nutrition support is a medical, life-sustaining treatment, and the use of this therapy requires knowledge by the nutrition support clinician of patient-centered care concepts, preventive clinical ethics, religion/spirituality and cultural diversity, palliative care team role, and advance care planning. Integrating these into the practice of nutrition support is an innovative approach and results in new knowledge that requires a change in the culture of care and engagement and empowerment of the patient and their family in the process. This is more than a healthcare issue; it involves a social/family conversation movement that will be enhanced by the nutrition support clinician's participation.

  9. Intensive care discharges: improving the quality of clinical handover through changes to discharge documentation.

    PubMed

    Hall, William; Keane, Philip; Wang, Sarra; Debell, Frances; Allana, Alisha; Karia, Priyesh

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have stepped down from intensive care tread a precarious clinical course, and the handover of care between clinical teams at this point should be treated as a high risk event. Poor handover can leave patients vulnerable to suboptimal care and preventable harm. Properly structured written discharge summaries have been shown to improve information transfer and quality of care. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published guidelines entitled "Acute illness in adults in hospital: recognising and responding to deterioration," which states that patients transferred from intensive care should have a formal structured handover supported by a written plan, and it provides minimum criteria for what information should be included. A retrospective audit was carried out (n=28) to identify if discharge summaries were compliant with these standards. Discharge summaries consistently lacked essential criteria, including psychosocial needs (29%), nutritional needs (50%), therapy needs (29%), ceilings of care (39%), and communication needs (18%). Less than a third of verbal handovers between the nursing and medical teams were documented. After consultation, a new summary template was developed and embedded into practice. The new design prompted trainees to ensure they completed adequate information in all domains of care. Additional sections were added to improve recording of when, and to whom, clinical handover took place, which led to improved clinical governance. The overall quality of discharge summaries was improved, with increased compliance in 11 out of 13 domains. Feedback from staff about the new discharge summaries was positive. This project is easily transferable, and has the potential to improve patient safety and quality of care. PMID:26734430

  10. Developing an International Register of Clinical Prediction Rules for Use in Primary Care: A Descriptive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Keogh, Claire; Wallace, Emma; O’Brien, Kirsty K.; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Susan M.; Lewis, Cliona; Cummins, Anthony; Cousins, Grainne; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Fahey, Tom

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We describe the methodology used to create a register of clinical prediction rules relevant to primary care. We also summarize the rules included in the register according to various characteristics. METHODS To identify relevant articles, we searched the MEDLINE database (PubMed) for the years 1980 to 2009 and supplemented the results with searches of secondary sources (books on clinical prediction rules) and personal resources (eg, experts in the field). The rules described in relevant articles were classified according to their clinical domain, the stage of development, and the clinical setting in which they were studied. RESULTS Our search identified clinical prediction rules reported between 1965 and 2009. The largest share of rules (37.2%) were retrieved from PubMed. The number of published rules increased substantially over the study decades. We included 745 articles in the register; many contained more than 1 clinical prediction rule study (eg, both a derivation study and a validation study), resulting in 989 individual studies. In all, 434 unique rules had gone through derivation; however, only 54.8% had been validated and merely 2.8% had undergone analysis of their impact on either the process or outcome of clinical care. The rules most commonly pertained to cardiovascular disease, respiratory, and musculoskeletal conditions. They had most often been studied in the primary care or emergency department settings. CONCLUSIONS Many clinical prediction rules have been derived, but only about half have been validated and few have been assessed for clinical impact. This lack of thorough evaluation for many rules makes it difficult to retrieve and identify those that are ready for use at the point of patient care. We plan to develop an international web-based register of clinical prediction rules and computer-based clinical decision support systems. PMID:25024245

  11. The effect of communicating the genetic risk of cardiometabolic disorders on motivation and actual engagement in preventative lifestyle modification and clinical outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Sherly X; Ye, Zheng; Whelan, Kevin; Truby, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Genetic risk prediction of chronic conditions including obesity, diabetes and CVD currently has limited predictive power but its potential to engage healthy behaviour change has been of immense research interest. We aimed to understand whether the latter is indeed true by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating whether genetic risk communication affects motivation and actual behaviour change towards preventative lifestyle modification. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCT) since 2003 investigating the impact of genetic risk communication on health behaviour to prevent cardiometabolic disease, without restrictions on age, duration of intervention or language. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses for perceived motivation for behaviour change and clinical changes (weight loss) and a narrative analysis for other outcomes. Within the thirteen studies reviewed, five were vignette studies (hypothetical RCT) and seven were clinical RCT. There was no consistent effect of genetic risk on actual motivation for weight loss, perceived motivation for dietary change (control v. genetic risk group standardised mean difference (smd) -0·15; 95 % CI -1·03, 0·73, P=0·74) or actual change in dietary behaviour. Similar results were observed for actual weight loss (control v. high genetic risk SMD 0·29 kg; 95 % CI -0·74, 1·31, P=0·58). This review found no clear or consistent evidence that genetic risk communication alone either raises motivation or translates into actual change in dietary intake or physical activity to reduce the risk of cardiometabolic disorders in adults. Of thirteen studies, eight were at high or unclear risk of bias. Additional larger-scale, high-quality clinical RCT are warranted. PMID:27405704

  12. The effect of communicating the genetic risk of cardiometabolic disorders on motivation and actual engagement in preventative lifestyle modification and clinical outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Sherly X; Ye, Zheng; Whelan, Kevin; Truby, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Genetic risk prediction of chronic conditions including obesity, diabetes and CVD currently has limited predictive power but its potential to engage healthy behaviour change has been of immense research interest. We aimed to understand whether the latter is indeed true by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating whether genetic risk communication affects motivation and actual behaviour change towards preventative lifestyle modification. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCT) since 2003 investigating the impact of genetic risk communication on health behaviour to prevent cardiometabolic disease, without restrictions on age, duration of intervention or language. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses for perceived motivation for behaviour change and clinical changes (weight loss) and a narrative analysis for other outcomes. Within the thirteen studies reviewed, five were vignette studies (hypothetical RCT) and seven were clinical RCT. There was no consistent effect of genetic risk on actual motivation for weight loss, perceived motivation for dietary change (control v. genetic risk group standardised mean difference (smd) -0·15; 95 % CI -1·03, 0·73, P=0·74) or actual change in dietary behaviour. Similar results were observed for actual weight loss (control v. high genetic risk SMD 0·29 kg; 95 % CI -0·74, 1·31, P=0·58). This review found no clear or consistent evidence that genetic risk communication alone either raises motivation or translates into actual change in dietary intake or physical activity to reduce the risk of cardiometabolic disorders in adults. Of thirteen studies, eight were at high or unclear risk of bias. Additional larger-scale, high-quality clinical RCT are warranted.

  13. Augmenting Predictive Modeling Tools with Clinical Insights for Care Coordination Program Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tracy L.; Brewer, Daniel; Estacio, Raymond; Vlasimsky, Tara; Durfee, Michael J.; Thompson, Kathy R.; Everhart, Rachel M.; Rinehart, Deborath J.; Batal, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Context: The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) awarded Denver Health’s (DH) integrated, safety net health care system $19.8 million to implement a “population health” approach into the delivery of primary care. This major practice transformation builds on the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) and Wagner’s Chronic Care Model (CCM) to achieve the “Triple Aim”: improved health for populations, care to individuals, and lower per capita costs. Case description: This paper presents a case study of how DH integrated published predictive models and front-line clinical judgment to implement a clinically actionable, risk stratification of patients. This population segmentation approach was used to deploy enhanced care team staff resources and to tailor care-management services to patient need, especially for patients at high risk of avoidable hospitalization. Developing, implementing, and gaining clinical acceptance of the Health Information Technology (HIT) solution for patient risk stratification was a major grant objective. Findings: In addition to describing the Information Technology (IT) solution itself, we focus on the leadership and organizational processes that facilitated its multidisciplinary development and ongoing iterative refinement, including the following: team composition, target population definition, algorithm rule development, performance assessment, and clinical-workflow optimization. We provide examples of how dynamic business intelligence tools facilitated clinical accessibility for program design decisions by enabling real-time data views from a population perspective down to patient-specific variables. Conclusions: We conclude that population segmentation approaches that integrate clinical perspectives with predictive modeling results can better identify high opportunity patients amenable to medical home-based, enhanced care team interventions. PMID:26290884

  14. Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in a Primary Care Pediatric Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chelimsky, Thomas; Li, Hong; Chelimsky, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are a common problem in pediatric patients and can affect quality of life. However, the extent of these disorders may vary in different subpopulations of children. This study investigated the prevalence of FGIDs in an inner-city primary care practice. Healthy patients between the ages of 9 and 17 were administered a validated questionnaire that assessed for FGIDs and other somatic complaints. Eleven of 145 patients (7.5%) met criteria for FGIDs based on Rome III Diagnostic Criteria. Raynaud-like symptoms tended to occur more often in patients meeting criteria for FGIDs, although this association was not statistically significant (P = .07). The lower prevalence of FGIDs in this population compared with earlier studies may suggest a link between socioeconomic status and the prevalence of FGIDs. Larger population-based studies consisting of a heterogeneous cohort from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds are necessary to further elucidate the true connection between FGIDs and socioeconomic status. PMID:27335938

  15. Point-of-Care Clinical Ultrasound for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, J.; Hansen, L. S.; Wemmelund, K.; Sørensen, A. H.; Ilkjaer, C.; Cloete, E.; Nolte, D.; Roodt, F.; Dyer, R.; Swanevelder, J.; Sloth, E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Our institution has recently implemented a point-of-care (POC) ultrasound training program, consisting of an e-learning course and systematic practical hands-on training. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the learning outcome of this curriculum. Materials and Methods: 16 medical students with no previous ultrasound experience comprised the study group. The program covered a combination of 4 well-described point-of-care (POC) ultrasound protocols (focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography, focused assessment with sonography in trauma, lung ultrasound, and dynamic needle tip positioning for ultrasound-guided vascular access) and it consisted of an e-learning course followed by 4 h of practical hands-on training. Practical skills and image quality were tested 3 times during the study: at baseline, after e-learning, and after hands-on training. Results: Practical skills improved for all 4 protocols; after e-learning as well as after hands-on training. The number of students who were able to perform at least one interpretable image of the heart increased from 7 at baseline to 12 after e-learning, p<0.01, and to all 16 students after hands-on-training, p<0.01. The number of students able to cannulate an artificial vessel increased from 3 to 8 after e-learning and to 15 after hands-on training. Conclusion: Medical students with no previous ultrasound experience demonstrated a considerable improvement in practical skill after interactive e-learning and 4 h of hands-on training. PMID:27689155

  16. [Community resources prescription for self-care improvement in chronic illnesses. Clinical case management in Primary Health Care].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vico-Díaz de Rada, Lucía; González-Suárez, Miriam; Duarte-Clíments, Gonzalo; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of a 52 year-old male seen in a Primary Care nursing clinic for a type 2 diabetes mellitus metabolic control. The frequency of the visits increased due to perceived difficulties caused by changing the medical treatment. A focused interview was conducted under functional health patterns framework. The patient was unable to write or read, had not worked for the last 25 years, and expressed a lack of control over his self-care. An action plan was prepared, prioritizing Ineffective Health Maintenance, Powerlessness, and Impaired Social Interaction NANDA-I nursing diagnoses. The goals were set at improving knowledge and control over his disease and participating in leisure activities. To achieve these, the social health resources in the area were contacted, and agreed that the patient could attend activities that could improve his self-care and his quality of life. An improvement in his diabetes control was observed in the following evaluations, with an increase in his level of knowledge and self-care. The Primary Health care nurse should consider available community resources by using a comprehensive approach to chronic diseases for their therapeutic benefit and management, especially in those patients with adverse sociocultural conditions.

  17. Leveraging HIV platforms to work toward comprehensive primary care in rural Malawi: the Integrated Chronic Care Clinic.

    PubMed

    Wroe, Emily B; Kalanga, Noel; Mailosi, Bright; Mwalwanda, Stanley; Kachimanga, Chiyembekezo; Nyangulu, Kondwani; Dunbar, Elizabeth; Kerr, Lila; Nazimera, Lawrence; Dullie, Luckson

    2015-12-01

    This case study describes an integrated chronic care clinic that utilizes a robust HIV program as a platform for NCD screening and treatment. A unique model, the integrated chronic care clinic provides longitudinal care for patients with an array of chronic diseases including HIV and common NCDs, allowing for a single visit for all of a patient's conditions. Set in Malawi's remote Neno District, this clinic structure aims to (1) increase access to care for NCD patients, (2) maximize efficiency given the severe human resource shortages, and (3) replicate strong HIV outcomes for patients with other chronic conditions. The goal is to increase the number of health facilities in Neno capable of fully delivering Malawi's Essential Health Package, the set of cost-effective interventions endorsed by Malawi MOH to reduce burden of disease and leading causes of death. While implementation is ongoing and processes are evolving, this model of healthcare delivery has already improved the accessibility of NCD care by allowing patients to have all of their chronic conditions treated on the same day at their nearest health facility, notably without additional investment of human and financial resources. Currently, 6781 patients on antiretroviral therapy and 721 patients with NCDs are benefitting, including 379 with hypertension, 187 with asthma, 144 with epilepsy, and 76 with diabetes. Among the NCD patient population, 15.1% are HIV-positive. Success hinged largely on several factors, including clear leadership and staff ownership of their specific duties, and a well-defined and uniform patient flow process. Furthermore, deliberate and regular conversations about challenges allowed for constant iteration and improvement of processes. Moving forward, several tasks remain. We are refining the data management process to further consolidate medical records, along with integrating our tracking processes for clients who miss appointments. Additionally, we are exploring opportunities for

  18. Improving documentation of clinical care within a clinical information network: an essential initial step in efforts to understand and improve care in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tuti, Timothy; Bitok, Michael; Malla, Lucas; Paton, Chris; Muinga, Naomi; Gathara, David; Gachau, Susan; Mbevi, George; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Ogero, Morris; Julius, Thomas; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2016-01-01

    In many low income countries health information systems are poorly equipped to provide detailed information on hospital care and outcomes. Information is thus rarely used to support practice improvement. We describe efforts to tackle this challenge and to foster learning concerning collection and use of information. This could improve hospital services in Kenya. We are developing a Clinical Information Network, a collaboration spanning 14 hospitals, policy makers and researchers with the goal of improving information available on the quality of inpatient paediatric care across common childhood illnesses in Kenya. Standardised data from hospitals’ paediatric wards are collected using non-commercial and open source tools. We have implemented procedures for promoting data quality which are performed prior to a process of semi-automated analysis and routine report generation for hospitals in the network. In the first phase of the Clinical Information Network, we collected data on over 65 000 admission episodes. Despite clinicians’ initial unfamiliarity with routine performance reporting, we found that, as an initial focus, both engaging with each hospital and providing them information helped improve the quality of data and therefore reports. The process has involved mutual learning and building of trust in the data and should provide the basis for collaborative efforts to improve care, to understand patient outcome, and to evaluate interventions through shared learning. We have found that hospitals are willing to support the development of a clinically focused but geographically dispersed Clinical Information Network in a low-income setting. Such networks show considerable promise as platforms for collaborative efforts to improve care, to provide better information for decision making, and to enable locally relevant research. PMID:27398232

  19. Confronting Disparities in Diabetes Care: The Clinical Effectiveness of Redesigning Care Management for Minority Patients in Rural Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Paul; Thompson, Debra; Wynn, Joan D.; Cummings, Doyle M.; Whetstone, Lauren

    2005-01-01

    Context: Diabetes mellitus and its complications disproportionately affect minority citizens in rural communities, many of whom have limited access to comprehensive diabetes management services. Purpose: To explore the efficacy of combining care management and interdisciplinary group visits for rural African American patients with diabetes…

  20. [Clinic of environmental pediatric care in a high complexity hospital].

    PubMed

    Gaioli, Marisa; Amoedo, Diego; González, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Children environmental health is considered by The World Health Organization as one of the main challenges of Public Health during the Century XXI. They promote the development of programs that allow approaching, disclosure or mitigation of the impact of polluting agents on health at every level of pediatric attention. The Children Hospital "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan" has created an Environmental Health Office in order to address the demands of those patients with suspected or verified exposure to environmental risks. An Environmental Clinical History has been elaborated with this purpose.

  1. Clinical events classification for using the EHR to provide better patient care.

    PubMed

    Lugovkina, Tatyana; Richards, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The Healthcare Record has been used in a "Before and After" situation to improve patient care. The main paradigm of the modern Health Care is changing towards pervasive person-centric care including prevention and home care. Medical compunetics is a very important applicative field for improving the interoperability and the quality of the healthcare information system, especially in the current climate with the empowerment patients. The success depends on the choice of the Clinical Events Classification for structuring the span of clinical information. For the purposes of universalizing medical electronic data-bases, it is very important to organize the data regarding Clinical Events in such manner that it would be possible to use this information-structure in different fields of Clinical Practice: e.g., for the creation of the diagnostic and drug-assistance protocols, for the evaluation of the quality of drug prescribing, and for communication with patients as well. For this purpose all Clinical Events were divided to 5 classes. This Paper will describe a "Before and After" situation consequent upon the introduction of the Clinical Events Classification and the introduction of Protocols for drug-prescribing. Use of the Protocol brought about a 50% reduction in mortality. PMID:20543351

  2. Transitioning adolescents with HIV to adult care: Lessons learned from twelve adolescent medicine clinics

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Amanda E.; Philbin, Morgan M.; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To maximize positive health outcomes for youth with HIV as they transition from youth to adult care, clinical staff need strategies and protocols to help youth maintain clinic engagement and medication adherence. Accordingly, this paper describe transition processes across twelve clinics within the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) to provide lessons learned and inform the development of transition protocols to improve health outcomes as youth shift from adolescent to adult HIV care. Design and Methods During a large multi-method Care Initiative program evaluation, three annual visits were completed at each site from 2010–2012 and conducted 174 semi-structured interviews with clinical and program staff (Baseline n=64, Year 1 n=56, Year 2=54). Results The results underscore the value of adhering to recent American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) transition recommendations, including: developing formal transition protocols, preparing youth for transition, facilitating youth’s connection to the adult clinic, and identifying necessary strategies for transition evaluation. Conclusions Transitioning youth with HIV involves targeting individual-, provider-, and system-level factors. Acknowledging and addressing key barriers is essential for developing streamlined, comprehensive, and context-specific transition protocols. Practice Implications Adolescent and adult clinic involvement in transition is essential to reduce service fragmentation, provide coordinated and continuous care, and support individual and community level health. PMID:27133767

  3. The evolution of eProtocols that enable reproducible clinical research and care methods.

    PubMed

    Blagev, Denitza P; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Sward, Katherine; Thompson, B Taylor; Brower, Roy; Truwit, Jonathon; Hite, Duncan; Steingrub, Jay; Orme, James F; Clemmer, Terry P; Weaver, Lindell K; Thomas, Frank; Grissom, Colin K; Sorenson, Dean; Sittig, Dean F; Wallace, C Jane; East, Thomas D; Warner, Homer R; Morris, Alan H

    2012-08-01

    Unnecessary variation in clinical care and clinical research reduces our ability to determine what healthcare interventions are effective. Reducing this unnecessary variation could lead to further healthcare quality improvement and more effective clinical research. We have developed and used electronic decision support tools (eProtocols) to reduce unnecessary variation. Our eProtocols have progressed from a locally developed mainframe computer application in one clinical site (LDS Hospital) to web-based applications available in multiple languages and used internationally. We use eProtocol-insulin as an example to illustrate this evolution. We initially developed eProtocol-insulin as a local quality improvement effort to manage stress hyperglycemia in the adult intensive care unit (ICU). We extended eProtocol-insulin use to translate our quality improvement results into usual clinical care at Intermountain Healthcare ICUs. We exported eProtocol-insulin to support research in other US and international institutions, and extended our work to the pediatric ICU. We iteratively refined eProtocol-insulin throughout these transitions, and incorporated new knowledge about managing stress hyperglycemia in the ICU. Based on our experience in the development and clinical use of eProtocols, we outline remaining challenges to eProtocol development, widespread distribution and use, and suggest a process for eProtocol development. Technical and regulatory issues, as well as standardization of protocol development, validation and maintenance, need to be addressed. Resolution of these issues should facilitate general use of eProtocols to improve patient care.

  4. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach.

  5. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach. PMID:26792305

  6. Utilizing the language of Jean Watson's caring theory within a computerized clinical documentation system.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Susan

    2006-01-01

    The healthcare facility described in the following article is part of an eight-hospital organization that adopted Watson's Theory of Caring as part of their nursing philosophy. According to Watson, this theory is an attempt to find and deepen the language specific to nurse caring relations and its many meanings. Yet during the implementation of the theory within the setting described, it was noted that there was no mechanism in the current documentation system for clinical nursing staff to document the patient experience using any language specific to the theory. Nursing members recognized an opportunity to develop a new context in charting during an extensive clinical documentation system upgrade. A discussion of the steps taken and the results within the clinical documentation system supporting the newly adopted caring philosophy are summarized here.

  7. Developing a sustainable foot care clinic in a homeless shelter within an academic-community partnership.

    PubMed

    Schoon, Patricia M; Champlin, Barbara E; Hunt, Roberta J

    2012-12-01

    Nursing faculty are confronted with the need to design community learning activities with vulnerable populations to prepare students for nursing practice. The creation of sustainable academic-community partnerships with agencies providing care to underserved populations meets this challenge. This article describes the development and implementation of a foot care clinic in a homeless shelter, created through a model of curricular integration, faculty engagement, and a long-term academic-community partnership. A transformative pedagogical approach based on service-learning was used to facilitate student understanding of social justice through activities that promote citizenship, develop advocacy skills, and increase knowledge and skills related to the role of the public health nurse in the community. The process of designing and developing a community clinical learning activity and the essential components for sustainability are discussed. Student outcomes are addressed. Recommendations for implementing a foot care clinic within an academic–community partnership are outlined. PMID:23362514

  8. [The evaluation of costs: standards of medical care and clinical statistic groups].

    PubMed

    Semenov, V Iu; Samorodskaia, I V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the comparative analysis of techniques of evaluation of costs of hospital treatment using medical economic standards of medical care and clinical statistical groups. The technique of evaluation of costs on the basis of clinical statistical groups was developed almost fifty years ago and is largely applied in a number of countries. Nowadays, in Russia the payment for completed case of treatment on the basis of medical economic standards is the main mode of payment for medical care in hospital. It is very conditionally a Russian analogue of world-wide prevalent system of diagnostic related groups. The tariffs for these cases of treatment as opposed to clinical statistical groups are counted on basis of standards of provision of medical care approved by Minzdrav of Russia. The information derived from generalization of cases of treatment of real patients is not applied.

  9. Patient-centeredness and empathy in a bilingual interprofessional primary care teaching clinic: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Sallie D; Peterfy, Erika; Crossman, Steven H; Phipps, Lisa Burroughs; Vanderbilt, Allison A

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the Consultation and Relational Empathy survey, this project examined the perceptions of care team empathy and patient-centeredness between English- and Spanish-speaking patients. From fall through spring semesters, patient surveys from a primary care, interprofessional student-led teaching clinic were collected and analyzed. Overall, mean scores for both English- and Spanish-speaking patients were above the reported normative average for general practitioners. While, overall, patients expressed satisfaction with the student-led teaching clinic in terms of empathy and patient-centeredness, English-speaking patients had higher median scores than Spanish-speaking patients. Analyzed individually, questions related to communication and provider attitudes were scored lower by Spanish-speaking patients. These results demonstrate that student-led clinics can deliver patient-centered care and highlight the continuing need to investigate and address disparities between English- and Spanish-speaking patients with regard to feelings of empathy and patient-centeredness. PMID:27601915

  10. Patient-centeredness and empathy in a bilingual interprofessional primary care teaching clinic: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sallie D; Peterfy, Erika; Crossman, Steven H; Phipps, Lisa Burroughs; Vanderbilt, Allison A

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the Consultation and Relational Empathy survey, this project examined the perceptions of care team empathy and patient-centeredness between English- and Spanish-speaking patients. From fall through spring semesters, patient surveys from a primary care, interprofessional student-led teaching clinic were collected and analyzed. Overall, mean scores for both English- and Spanish-speaking patients were above the reported normative average for general practitioners. While, overall, patients expressed satisfaction with the student-led teaching clinic in terms of empathy and patient-centeredness, English-speaking patients had higher median scores than Spanish-speaking patients. Analyzed individually, questions related to communication and provider attitudes were scored lower by Spanish-speaking patients. These results demonstrate that student-led clinics can deliver patient-centered care and highlight the continuing need to investigate and address disparities between English- and Spanish-speaking patients with regard to feelings of empathy and patient-centeredness. PMID:27601915

  11. Patient-centeredness and empathy in a bilingual interprofessional primary care teaching clinic: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Sallie D; Peterfy, Erika; Crossman, Steven H; Phipps, Lisa Burroughs; Vanderbilt, Allison A

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the Consultation and Relational Empathy survey, this project examined the perceptions of care team empathy and patient-centeredness between English- and Spanish-speaking patients. From fall through spring semesters, patient surveys from a primary care, interprofessional student-led teaching clinic were collected and analyzed. Overall, mean scores for both English- and Spanish-speaking patients were above the reported normative average for general practitioners. While, overall, patients expressed satisfaction with the student-led teaching clinic in terms of empathy and patient-centeredness, English-speaking patients had higher median scores than Spanish-speaking patients. Analyzed individually, questions related to communication and provider attitudes were scored lower by Spanish-speaking patients. These results demonstrate that student-led clinics can deliver patient-centered care and highlight the continuing need to investigate and address disparities between English- and Spanish-speaking patients with regard to feelings of empathy and patient-centeredness.

  12. Optimizing pediatric clinical care and advocacy in an online era

    PubMed Central

    Dollin, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To help busy FPs find useful current information and keep up to date on pediatric infectious disease and immunization topics by highlighting the work of one excellent source of reliable information in this area, the Canadian Paediatric Society Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee. Composition of the committee Committee members were appointed to represent the Canadian Paediatric Society, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the National Advisory Committee on Immunization. Methods This article highlights important pediatric practice points generated by the Canadian Paediatric Society Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee at a typical meeting in January 2013 from the perspective of an FP liaison. It also describes the committee’s work methods and its background thinking related to the most current and changing issues. Report Learn specific online links to updated pediatric infectious disease topics from the detailed content of this report. Topics include caring for kids new to Canada, vaccine-hesitant parents, influenza, human papillomavirus, pertussis, sexually transmitted infections, multidrug-resistant bacteria, and advocacy, among others. Conclusion Learn where to find this new and continuously changing information and how to stay evergreen in your knowledge. PMID:25022634

  13. Clinical Evaluation of Bleeding and Bruising in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Neutze, Dana; Roque, Jodi

    2016-02-15

    Bleeding and bruising are common symptoms in the primary care setting. The patient history can help determine whether the bruising or bleeding is abnormal. The International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis has developed a bleeding assessment tool that can be used to indicate possible pathology. A family history of bleeding problems may suggest a hereditary coagulation defect. Such a history is especially important in children who may not have experienced a major bleeding episode. Medication review can identify pharmacologic causes of the bleeding or bruising. Physical examination findings such as mucocutaneous bleeding suggest that the underlying condition is caused by platelet dysfunction, whereas hemarthroses or hematomas are more common in coagulopathy. If the history and physical examination findings suggest a bleeding diathesis, initial laboratory testing includes a complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, prothrombin time (PT), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT). A normal PT and PTT indicate a platelet disorder, the most common of which is von Willebrand disease. A normal PT and prolonged PTT signal a deficit in the intrinsic pathway, and a mixing study should be performed. A vitamin K challenge is indicated in patients with an abnormal PT and normal PTT. A workup for liver failure is warranted in patients with prolonged PT and PTT. If initial testing does not reveal an etiology in a patient with a high suspicion for a bleeding disorder, the patient should be referred to a hematologist for additional evaluation. PMID:26926815

  14. Bayesian Networks for Clinical Decision Support in Lung Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Nicholson, Ann E.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Kadir, Timor; Brady, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Survival prediction and treatment selection in lung cancer care are characterised by high levels of uncertainty. Bayesian Networks (BNs), which naturally reason with uncertain domain knowledge, can be applied to aid lung cancer experts by providing personalised survival estimates and treatment selection recommendations. Based on the English Lung Cancer Database (LUCADA), we evaluate the feasibility of BNs for these two tasks, while comparing the performances of various causal discovery approaches to uncover the most feasible network structure from expert knowledge and data. We show first that the BN structure elicited from clinicians achieves a disappointing area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (± 0.03), whereas a structure learned by the CAMML hybrid causal discovery algorithm, which adheres with the temporal restrictions, achieves 0.81 (± 0.03). Second, our causal intervention results reveal that BN treatment recommendations, based on prescribing the treatment plan that maximises survival, can only predict the recorded treatment plan 29% of the time. However, this percentage rises to 76% when partial matches are included. PMID:24324773

  15. Clinical Care of the HIV-Infected Drug User

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and chemical dependency, both of which are complicated by and intertwined with mental illness, are complex, overlapping spheres that adversely influence each other and the overall clinical outcomes of the affected individual [1]. Each disorder individually impacts tens of millions of people, with explosive epidemics described worldwide. Drug users have increased age matched morbidity and mortality for a number of medical and psychiatric conditions. HIV/AIDS, with its immunosuppressed states and direct virologic effects, exacerbate morbidity and mortality further among HIV-infected drug users. This article addresses the adverse consequences of HIV/AIDS, drug injection, the secondary comorbidities of both, and the impact of immunosuppression on presentation of disease as well as approaches to managing the HIV-infected drug user. PMID:17502234

  16. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities. PMID:23134277

  17. Comparison of patients' experiences in public and private primary care clinics in Malta.

    PubMed

    Pullicino, Glorianne; Sciortino, Philip; Calleja, Neville; Schäfer, Willemijn; Boerma, Wienke; Groenewegen, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Demographic changes, technological developments and rising expectations require the analysis of public-private primary care (PC) service provision to inform policy makers. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study using the dataset of the Maltese arm of the QUALICOPC Project to compare the PC patients' experiences provided by public-funded and private (independent) general practitioners in Malta. Seven hundred patients from 70 clinics completed a self-administered questionnaire. Direct logistic regression showed that patients visiting the private sector experienced better continuity of care with more difficulty in accessing out-of-hours care. Such findings help to improve (primary) healthcare service provision and resource allocation.

  18. Telehealth nurse practitioner student clinical experiences: an essential educational component for today's health care setting.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Shelley Yerger

    2012-11-01

    In order to meet the continuous changes and innovations within the health care system, nurse practitioner faculty must look to the future and prepare nurse practitioner graduates who deliver safe, quality patient care addressing the realities of a global society with a fast-paced expansion of technologies. Preparing nurse practitioner students for practice must include more than information technology knowledge in graduate nursing programs. Formal clinical experiences using various telehealth applications must be integrated into nurse practitioner training. Innovative strategies must be explored by nurse practitioner faculty to assure that graduates can meet the demanding technological demands of our current health care society.

  19. Development of a level 1 geriatric outpatient social work screen in a veterans primary care clinic.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn K; Emery, Lori; Williams, Angela; Powers, James S

    2015-01-01

    Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) provide primary care to veterans. We describe our experience in a PACT (average age 66, 98% men, 8 medications, 16% yearly hospitalization rate) using a nurse-administered screen to identify patients in need of intervention by a Masters-level Social Worker. Our screening results--98% Positive predictive value (included social work concerns) and 73% negative predictive value (excluded social work concerns)--suggest that the nurse accurately identified patients. Another 15% of patients were identified by the social worker. Similar screens used in interprofessional clinics could help target patients in need of further social work care.

  20. Clinically applied medical ethnography: relevance to cultural competence in patient care.

    PubMed

    Engebretson, Joan

    2011-06-01

    Medical anthropology provides an excellent resource for nursing research that is relevant to clinical nursing. By expanding the understanding of ethnographic research beyond ethnicity, nurses can conduct research that explores patient's constructions and explanatory models of health and healing and how they make meaning out of chronic conditions and negotiate daily life. These findings can have applicability to culturally competent care at both the organizational or systems level, as well as in the patient/provider encounter. Individual patient care can be improved by applying ethnographic research findings to build provider expertise and then using a cultural negotiation process for individualized patient care.

  1. Developing an outpatient wound care clinic in an acute rehabilitation setting.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Diane Dudas; Zeigler, Mary H

    2010-01-01

    People with disability are at high risk for skin breakdown,which requires ongoing prevention and management. An outpatient rehabilitation wound clinic was developed to handle a variety of acute and chronic wounds for this unique population. This article describes how two advanced practice nurses proposed the idea for the wound care clinic and formulated a business plan, which was critical to successfully administering an outpatient wound care service. Essential components of the business plan included the goals, scope of service, professional practice model, benefits, rationale, marketing analysis, predicted volumes, regulatory imperatives, and financial needs.

  2. Best practices: Best practices for improving engagement of clients in clinic care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas E; Burgos, Jeannette; Dexter, Victoria; Norcott, James; Pappas, Stella V; Shuman, Ellen; Appel, Anita; Harrison, Myla E; Nossel, Ilana R; Essock, Susan M

    2010-04-01

    Mental health clinicians and program administrators must implement effective strategies for engaging and retaining clients in care. At a recent series of forums open to providers from clinics in New York City that was sponsored by the city and state public mental health authorities, high-performing providers described their client engagement strategies. In this column the effective strategies reported are summarized in four areas: the first session, staff training and expertise, productivity measures, and engaging families and support persons. The approaches should be of use to administrators to improve programs' ability to engage and retain clients in community-based clinic care.

  3. Care episode retrieval: distributional semantic models for information retrieval in the clinical domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patients' health related information is stored in electronic health records (EHRs) by health service providers. These records include sequential documentation of care episodes in the form of clinical notes. EHRs are used throughout the health care sector by professionals, administrators and patients, primarily for clinical purposes, but also for secondary purposes such as decision support and research. The vast amounts of information in EHR systems complicate information management and increase the risk of information overload. Therefore, clinicians and researchers need new tools to manage the information stored in the EHRs. A common use case is, given a - possibly unfinished - care episode, to retrieve the most similar care episodes among the records. This paper presents several methods for information retrieval, focusing on care episode retrieval, based on textual similarity, where similarity is measured through domain-specific modelling of the distributional semantics of words. Models include variants of random indexing and the semantic neural network model word2vec. Two novel methods are introduced that utilize the ICD-10 codes attached to care episodes to better induce domain-specificity in the semantic model. We report on experimental evaluation of care episode retrieval that circumvents the lack of human judgements regarding episode relevance. Results suggest that several of the methods proposed outperform a state-of-the art search engine (Lucene) on the retrieval task. PMID:26099735

  4. Care episode retrieval: distributional semantic models for information retrieval in the clinical domain.

    PubMed

    Moen, Hans; Ginter, Filip; Marsi, Erwin; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Salakoski, Tapio; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Patients' health related information is stored in electronic health records (EHRs) by health service providers. These records include sequential documentation of care episodes in the form of clinical notes. EHRs are used throughout the health care sector by professionals, administrators and patients, primarily for clinical purposes, but also for secondary purposes such as decision support and research. The vast amounts of information in EHR systems complicate information management and increase the risk of information overload. Therefore, clinicians and researchers need new tools to manage the information stored in the EHRs. A common use case is, given a--possibly unfinished--care episode, to retrieve the most similar care episodes among the records. This paper presents several methods for information retrieval, focusing on care episode retrieval, based on textual similarity, where similarity is measured through domain-specific modelling of the distributional semantics of words. Models include variants of random indexing and the semantic neural network model word2vec. Two novel methods are introduced that utilize the ICD-10 codes attached to care episodes to better induce domain-specificity in the semantic model. We report on experimental evaluation of care episode retrieval that circumvents the lack of human judgements regarding episode relevance. Results suggest that several of the methods proposed outperform a state-of-the art search engine (Lucene) on the retrieval task.

  5. Do Evidence-Based Youth Psychotherapies Outperform Usual Clinical Care? A Multilevel Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, John R.; Kuppens, Sofie; Eckshtain, Dikla; Ugueto, Ana M.; Hawley, Kristin M.; Jensen-Doss, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Context Research across four decades has produced numerous empirically-tested evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for youth psychopathology, developed to improve upon usual clinical interventions. Advocates argue that these should replace usual care; but do the EBPs produce better outcomes than usual care? Objective This question was addressed in a meta-analysis of 52 randomized trials directly comparing EBPs to usual care. Analyses assessed the overall effect of EBPs vs. usual care, and candidate moderators; multilevel analysis was used to address the dependency among effect sizes that is common but typically unaddressed in psychotherapy syntheses. Data Sources The PubMed, PsychINFO, and Dissertation Abstracts International databases were searched for studies from January 1, 1960 – December 31, 2010. Study Selection 507 randomized youth psychotherapy trials were identified. Of these, the 52 studies that compared EBPs to usual care were included in the meta-analysis. Data Extraction Sixteen variables (participant, treatment, and study characteristics) were extracted from each study, and effect sizes were calculated for all EBP versus usual care comparisons. Data Synthesis EBPs outperformed usual care. Mean effect size was 0.29; the probability was 58% that a randomly selected youth receiving an EBP would be better off after treatment than a randomly selected youth receiving usual care. Three variables moderated treatment benefit: Effect sizes decreased for studies conducted outside North America, for studies in which all participants were impaired enough to qualify for diagnoses, and for outcomes reported by people other than the youths and parents in therapy. For certain key groups (e.g., studies using clinically referred samples and diagnosed samples), significant EBP effects were not demonstrated. Conclusions EBPs outperformed usual care, but the EBP advantage was modest and moderated by youth, location, and assessment characteristics. There is room for

  6. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective.

  7. Pathologists' roles in clinical utilization management. A financing model for managed care.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J J; Liberman, A

    2000-03-01

    In ancillary or laboratory utilization management, the roles of pathologists have not been explored fully in managed care systems. Two possible reasons may account for this: pathologists' potential contributions have not been defined clearly, and effective measurement of and reasonable compensation for the pathologist's contribution remains vague. The responsibilities of pathologists in clinical practice may include clinical pathology and laboratory services (which have long been well-defined and are compensated according to a resource-based relative value system-based coding system), laboratory administration, clinical utilization management, and clinical research. Although laboratory administration services have been compensated with mechanisms such as percentage of total service revenue or fixed salary, the involvement of pathologists seems less today than in the past, owing to increased clinical workload and time constraints in an expanding managed care environment, especially in community hospital settings. The lack of financial incentives or appropriate compensation mechanisms for the services likely accounts for the current situation. Furthermore, the importance of pathologist-driven utilization management in laboratory services lacks recognition among hospital administrators, managed care executives, and pathologists themselves, despite its potential benefits for reducing cost and enhancing quality of care. We propose a financial compensation model for such services and summarize its advantages.

  8. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective. PMID:26683238

  9. Involuntary Consent: Conditioning Access to Health Care on Participation in Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Yearby, Ruqaiijah A

    2016-09-01

    American bioethics has served as a safety net for the rich and powerful, often failing to protect minorities and the economically disadvantaged. For example, minorities and the economically disadvantaged are often unduly influenced into participating in clinical trials that promise monetary gain or access to health care. This is a violation of the bioethical principle of "respect for persons," which requires that informed consent for participation in clinical trials is voluntary and free of undue influence. Promises of access to health care invalidate the voluntariness of informed consent not only because it unduly induces minorities and the economically disadvantaged to participate in clinical trials to obtain access to potentially life saving health care, but it is also manipulative because some times the clinical trial is conducted by the very institutions that are denying minorities and the economically disadvantaged access to health care. To measure whether consent is voluntary and free of undue influence, federal agencies should require researchers to use the Vulnerability and Equity Impact Assessment tool, which I have created based on the Health Equity Impact Assessment tool, to determine whether minorities and the economically disadvantaged are being unduly influenced into participating in clinical trials in violation of the "respect for persons" principle. PMID:27587449

  10. Pathologists' roles in clinical utilization management. A financing model for managed care.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J J; Liberman, A

    2000-03-01

    In ancillary or laboratory utilization management, the roles of pathologists have not been explored fully in managed care systems. Two possible reasons may account for this: pathologists' potential contributions have not been defined clearly, and effective measurement of and reasonable compensation for the pathologist's contribution remains vague. The responsibilities of pathologists in clinical practice may include clinical pathology and laboratory services (which have long been well-defined and are compensated according to a resource-based relative value system-based coding system), laboratory administration, clinical utilization management, and clinical research. Although laboratory administration services have been compensated with mechanisms such as percentage of total service revenue or fixed salary, the involvement of pathologists seems less today than in the past, owing to increased clinical workload and time constraints in an expanding managed care environment, especially in community hospital settings. The lack of financial incentives or appropriate compensation mechanisms for the services likely accounts for the current situation. Furthermore, the importance of pathologist-driven utilization management in laboratory services lacks recognition among hospital administrators, managed care executives, and pathologists themselves, despite its potential benefits for reducing cost and enhancing quality of care. We propose a financial compensation model for such services and summarize its advantages. PMID:10705812

  11. Centers Speak Up: The Clinical Context for Health Information Technology in the Ambulatory Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ming; Webster, Tashonna R.; Curry, Leslie; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Fifield, Judith; Burstin, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Clinicians in ambulatory care settings are increasingly called upon to use health information technology (health IT) to improve practice efficiency and performance. Successful adoption of health IT requires an understanding of how clinical tasks and workflows will be affected; yet this has not been well described. Objective To describe how health IT functions within a clinical context. Design Qualitative study, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Participants Executives and staff at 4 community health centers, 3 health center networks, and 1 large primary care organization. Approach Transcribed audio-recorded interviews, analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Systematic characterization of clinical context identified 6 primary clinical domains. These included results management, intra-clinic communication, patient education and outreach, inter-clinic coordination, medication management, and provider education and feedback. We generated clinical process diagrams to characterize these domains. Participants suggested that underlying workflows for these domains must be fully operational to ensure successful deployment of health IT. Conclusions Understanding the clinical context is a necessary precursor to successful deployment of health IT. Process diagrams can serve as the basis for EHR certification, to identify challenges, to measure health IT adoption, or to develop curricular content regarding the role of health IT in clinical practice. PMID:18373132

  12. Discoveries in Down syndrome: moving basic science to clinical care.

    PubMed

    Kleschevnikov, A M; Belichenko, P V; Salehi, A; Wu, C

    2012-01-01

    This review describes recent discoveries in neurobiology of Down syndrome (DS) achieved with use of mouse genetic models and provides an overview of experimental approaches aimed at development of pharmacological restoration of cognitive function in people with this developmental disorder. Changes in structure and function of synaptic connections within the hippocampal formation of DS model mice, as well as alterations in innervations of the hippocampus by noradrenergic and cholinergic neuromodulatory systems, provided important clues for potential pharmacological treatments of cognitive disabilities in DS. Possible molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this genetic disorder have been addressed. We discuss novel mechanisms engaging misprocessing of amyloid precursor protein (App) and other proteins, through their affect on axonal transport and endosomal dysfunction, to "Alzheimer-type" neurodegenerative processes that affect cognition later in life. In conclusion, a number of therapeutic strategies have been defined that may restore cognitive function in mouse models of DS. In the juvenile and young animals, these strategists focus on restoration of synaptic plasticity, rate of adult neurogenesis, and functions of the neuromodulatory subcortical systems. Later in life, the major focus is on recuperation of misprocessed App and related proteins. It is hoped that the identification of an increasing number of potential targets for pharmacotherapy of cognitive deficits in DS will add to the momentum for creating and completing clinical trials. PMID:22541294

  13. Clinical Impact of Education Provision on Determining Advance Care Planning Decisions among End Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Regular Hemodialysis in University Malaya Medical Centre

    PubMed Central

    Hing (Wong), Albert; Chin, Loh Ee; Ping, Tan Li; Peng, Ng Kok; Kun, Lim Soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of shared decision-making about future health-care plans between patients, health care providers, and family members, should patients becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP discussions enhance patient's autonomy, focus on patient's values and treatment preferences, and promote patient-centered care. ACP is integrated as part of clinical practice in Singapore and the United States. Aim: To assess the clinical impact of education provision on determining ACP decisions among end-stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). To study the knowledge and attitude of patients toward ACP and end-of-life issues. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients were recruited from UMMC. About 43 questions pretest survey adapted from Lyon's ACP survey and Moss's cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attitude survey was given to patients to answer. An educational brochure is then introduced to these patients, and a posttest survey carried out after that. The results were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. Results: Opinion on ACP, including CPR decisions, showed an upward trend on the importance percentage after the educational brochure exposure, but this was statistically not significant. Seventy-five percent of participants had never heard of ACP before, and only 3.6% had actually prepared a written advanced directive. Conclusion: The ACP educational brochure clinically impacts patients’ preferences and decisions toward end-of-life care; however, this is statistically not significant. Majority of patients have poor knowledge on ACP. This study lays the foundation for execution of future larger scale clinical trials, and ultimately, the incorporation of ACP into clinical practice in Malaysia. PMID:27803566

  14. Use of Drop-In Clinic Versus Appointment-Based Care for LGBT Youth: Influences on the Likelihood to Access Different Health-Care Structures.

    PubMed

    Newman, Bernie S; Passidomo, Kim; Gormley, Kate; Manley, Alecia

    2014-06-01

    The structure of health-care service delivery can address barriers that make it difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents to use health services. This study explores the differences among youth who access care in one of two service delivery structures in an LGBT health-care center: the drop-in clinic or the traditional appointment-based model. Analysis of 578 records of LGBT and straight youth (aged 14-24) who accessed health care either through a drop-in clinic or appointment-based care within the first year of offering the drop-in clinic reveals patterns of use when both models are available. We studied demographic variables previously shown to be associated with general health-care access to determine how each correlated with a tendency to use the drop-in structure versus routine appointments. Once the covariates were identified, we conducted a logistic regression analysis to identify its association with likelihood of using the drop-in clinic. Insurance status, housing stability, education, race, and gender identity were most strongly associated with the type of clinic used. Youth who relied on Medicaid, those in unstable housing, and African Americans were most likely to use the drop-in clinic. Transgender youth and those with higher education were more likely to use the appointment-based clinic. Although sexual orientation and HIV status were not related to type of clinic used, youth who were HIV positive used the appointment-based clinic more frequently. Both routes to health care served distinct populations who often experience barriers to accessible, affordable, and knowledgeable care. Further study of the factors related to accessing health care may clarify the extent to which drop-in hours in a youth-friendly context may increase the use of health care by the most socially marginalized youth.

  15. Use of Drop-In Clinic Versus Appointment-Based Care for LGBT Youth: Influences on the Likelihood to Access Different Health-Care Structures.

    PubMed

    Newman, Bernie S; Passidomo, Kim; Gormley, Kate; Manley, Alecia

    2014-06-01

    The structure of health-care service delivery can address barriers that make it difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents to use health services. This study explores the differences among youth who access care in one of two service delivery structures in an LGBT health-care center: the drop-in clinic or the traditional appointment-based model. Analysis of 578 records of LGBT and straight youth (aged 14-24) who accessed health care either through a drop-in clinic or appointment-based care within the first year of offering the drop-in clinic reveals patterns of use when both models are available. We studied demographic variables previously shown to be associated with general health-care access to determine how each correlated with a tendency to use the drop-in structure versus routine appointments. Once the covariates were identified, we conducted a logistic regression analysis to identify its association with likelihood of using the drop-in clinic. Insurance status, housing stability, education, race, and gender identity were most strongly associated with the type of clinic used. Youth who relied on Medicaid, those in unstable housing, and African Americans were most likely to use the drop-in clinic. Transgender youth and those with higher education were more likely to use the appointment-based clinic. Although sexual orientation and HIV status were not related to type of clinic used, youth who were HIV positive used the appointment-based clinic more frequently. Both routes to health care served distinct populations who often experience barriers to accessible, affordable, and knowledgeable care. Further study of the factors related to accessing health care may clarify the extent to which drop-in hours in a youth-friendly context may increase the use of health care by the most socially marginalized youth. PMID:26789623

  16. Public health clinic-based hepatitis C testing and linkage to care in Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Falade-Nwulia, O; Mehta, S H; Lasola, J; Latkin, C; Niculescu, A; O'Connor, C; Chaulk, P; Ghanem, K; Page, K R; Sulkowski, M S; Thomas, D L

    2016-05-01

    Testing and linkage to care are important determinants of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment effectiveness. Public health clinics serve populations at high risk of HCV. We investigated their potential to serve as sites for HCV testing, initiation of and linkage to HCV care. Cross-sectional study of patients accessing sexually transmitted infection (STI) care at the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) STI clinics, from June 2013 through April 2014 was conducted. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with HCV infection and specialist linkage to care. Between 24 June 2013 and 15 April 2014, 2681 patients were screened for HCV infection. Overall, 189 (7%) were anti-HCV positive, of whom 185 (98%) received follow-up HCV RNA testing, with 155 (84%) testing RNA positive. Of 155 RNA-positive individuals, 138 (89%) returned to the STI clinic for HCV RNA results and initial HCV care including counselling regarding transmission and harm reduction in alcohol, and 132 (85%) were referred to a specialist for HCV care. With provision of patient navigation services, 81 (52%) attended an offsite HCV specialist appointment. Alcohol use and lack of insurance coverage were associated with lower rates of specialist linkage (OR 0.4 [95% CI 0.1-0.9] and OR 0.4 [95% CI 0.1-0.9], respectively). We identified a high prevalence of HCV infection in BCHD STI clinics. With availability of patient navigation services, a large proportion of HCV-infected patients linked to off-site specialist care. PMID:26840570

  17. Whether Health Departments Should Provide Clinical Services After the Implementation of the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    I have described a decision support tool that may facilitate local decisions regarding the provision and billing of clinical services. I created a 2 by 2 matrix of health professional shortage and Medicaid expansion availability as of July 2015. I found that health departments in 93% of US counties may still need to provide clinical services despite the institution of the Affordable Care Act. Local context and market conditions should guide health departments’ decision to act as safety net providers. PMID:26691131

  18. Comparative clinical trials and the changing marketplace for oral care: innovation, evidence and implications.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robert W; Biesbrock, Aaron R

    2002-09-01

    The development of a trayless bleaching system (Crest Whitestrips) and a novel battery-powered toothbrush (Crest SpinBrush) has fueled growth in the bleaching and power toothbrush markets. Beyond offering convenient, low-cost options for patients, the effectiveness of each product is supported by a robust clinical program. New comparative research involving these products expands evidence on the clinical meaningfulness of the benefits of this whitening system and powered toothbrush for patient care. PMID:12512984

  19. Women’s Management of Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis and Experiences of Clinical Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Jade; Walker, Sandra; McNair, Ruth; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher; Chen, Marcus; Bradshaw, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Background Few data are available on how women manage recurring bacterial vaginosis (BV) and their experiences of the clinical care of this condition. This study aimed to explore women’s recurrent BV management approaches and clinical care experiences, with a view to informing and improving the clinical management of BV. Methods A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty-five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past 5 years took part in semi-structured interviews. Results The majority of women reported frustration and dissatisfaction with current treatment regimens and low levels of satisfaction with the clinical management of BV. Overall, women disliked taking antibiotics regularly, commonly experienced adverse side effects from treatment and felt frustrated at having symptoms recur quite quickly after treatment. Issues in clinical care included inconsistency in advice, misdiagnosis and inappropriate diagnostic approaches and insensitive or dismissive attitudes. Women were more inclined to report positive clinical experiences with sexual health physicians than primary care providers. Women’s frustrations led most to try their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications in an attempt to treat symptoms and prevent recurrences, including well-known risk practices such as douching. Conclusion In the face of considerable uncertainty about the cause of BV, high rates of recurrence, unacceptable treatment options and often insensitive and inconsistent clinical management, women are trying their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications to prevent recurrences, often with little effect. Clinical management of BV could be improved through the use of standardised diagnostic approaches, increased sensitivity and understanding of the impact of BV, and the provision of evidence based advice about known BV related risk factors. PMID:27010725

  20. A Neurohospitalist Discharge Clinic Shortens the Transition From Inpatient to Outpatient Care

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Vanja; Scott, Brian; Josephson, S. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Medicine hospitalist programs have effectively incorporated hospitalist-run discharge clinics into clinical practice to help bridge the vulnerable transition periods after hospital discharge. A neurohospitalist discharge clinic would similarly allow continuity with the inpatient provider while addressing challenges in the coordination of neurologic care. We anticipated that this would afford a greater total number of patients to be seen and at a shorter interval. Methods: The number of posthospital discharge patients who were seen in general continuity per month in the 6 months prior to establishment of neurohospitalist discharge clinic and those seen over 1 full calendar year 6 months after clinic began was compared by reviewing medical records. Average length of time between discharge from hospital and first clinic visit was compared between patients seen in general neurology continuity clinic and those seen in discharge clinic. Results: There was a significant increase in the average number of postdischarge visits per month after initiation of neurohospitalist discharge clinic compared to prior (16.1 visits vs 10.5 visits, P = .001). Patients were seen significantly sooner after hospitalization in discharge clinic (35.9 ± 4.3 days) compared to those seen in general continuity clinic during the same time epoch (57.6 ± 4.1 days; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Creation of a neurohospitalist discharge clinic was effective in increasing posthospital discharge follow-up frequency and shortening duration of time to follow-up. PMID:27053983

  1. Primary care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-part 4: understanding the clinical manifestations of a progressive disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher B; Dransfield, Mark

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews the main factors influencing the pathophysiology, symptoms, and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including dynamic hyperinflation, exacerbations, and comorbid illness. Key clinical trials and reviews were identified. After formal presentations to a panel of pulmonary specialists and primary care physicians, a series of concepts, studies, and practical clinical implications related to COPD progression were integrated into this article, the last in a 4-part mini-symposium. The main points of roundtable consensus were as follows: (1) COPD is characterized by declining pulmonary function as classically measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), but the complex pathophysiology and the rationale for bronchodilator therapy are actually better understood in terms of progressive hyperinflation, both at rest (static) and worsening during exercise (dynamic) and exacerbations; (2) although COPD progression is often thought of as inevitable and continuous, the clinical course is actually quite variable and probably influenced by the frequency of exacerbations; (3) preventing exacerbations with pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic care can influence overall morbidity; (4) comorbidities such as lung cancer, cardiovascular disease, and skeletal muscle dysfunction also contribute to declining patient health; and (5) surgical lung volume reduction and lung transplantation should be considered for selected patients with very severe COPD. We conclude that the concept of COPD as a gradual but relentlessly progressive illness that is best monitored via FEV(1) is outdated and likely compromises patient care. Many patients now being managed in primary care settings will benefit from an earlier, broad-based, and aggressive approach to management.

  2. The rationale for primary spine care employing biopsychosocial, stratified and diagnosis-based care-pathways at a chiropractic college public clinic: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Current management practices for low back pain have led to rising costs without evidence of improvement in the quality of care. Low back pain remains a diagnostic and management challenge for practitioners of many types and is now thought to be a leading global cause of disability. Beyond many published clinical practice guidelines, there are emerging, evidence-based care-pathways including stratification according to the patient's prognosis, classification-based management, diagnosis-based clinical decision guides and biopsychosocial models of care. A proposed solution for successfully addressing low back pain is to train residents at a chiropractic college public clinic to function as primary spine care practitioners, employing evidence-based care-pathways. The rationale for such is described with expected benefits to patient care, improved financial health of medical delivery systems and the training of chiropractors to successfully fill a niche in the healthcare system. PMID:23758900

  3. Balancing patient care and student education: learning to deliver bad news in an optometry teaching clinic.

    PubMed

    Spafford, Marlee M; Schryer, Catherine F; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of seven senior optometry students and six optometrist instructors at a Canadian optometry teaching clinic. The participants described their experiences in learning to deliver bad news. Using a grounded theory approach, our analysis was informed by situated learning and activity theory. Optometry students received formal classroom training regarding how to deliver bad news, including exposure to the medically-based six-step SPIKES protocol (Baile et al. The Oncologist, 5, 302-311, 2000). Yet, application of this protocol to the teaching clinic was limited by the lack of exposure most instructors had received to this strategy. Determinants of the students' complex learning process during their clinical apprenticeship, included: (i) knowing one's place, (ii) knowing one's audience, (iii) knowing through feedback, and (iv) knowing who speaks. The experiences of these participants pointed toward the need for: (1) more instructional "scaffolding" (Bruner and Sherwood Play: Its role in development and evolution, p. 280, 1976) in the clinical setting when the learning task is complex, and (2) explicit discussions about the impacts that unfold when the activities of patient care and student education overlap. We reflect on the possible consequences to student education and patient care in the absence of these changes.

  4. Current Practices and Opportunities in a Resident Clinic Regarding the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenborn, Nancy L.; Boyd, Cynthia M.; McNabney, Matthew; Ray, Anushree; Cayea, Danelle

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Multimorbidity (≥2 chronic conditions) affects more than half of all older adults. The American Geriatrics Society developed and published guiding principles for the care of older adults with multimorbidity in 2012. Improved clinician training in caring for older adults with multimorbidity is needed, but it is not clear what opportunities arise within clinical encounters to apply the guiding principles or how clinicians at all stages of training currently practice in this area. This project aimed to characterize current practice and opportunities for improvement in an internal medicine residency clinic regarding the care of older adults with multimorbidity. DESIGN Qualitative content analysis of audio-recorded clinic visits. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Thirty clinic visits between 21 internal medicine residents and 30 of their primary care patients aged 65 and older with two or more chronic conditions were audio-recorded. Patients’ mean age was 73.6, and they had on average 3.7 chronic conditions and took 12.6 medications. MEASUREMENTS Transcripts of the audio-recorded visit discussions were analyzed using standard techniques of qualitative content analysis to describe the content and frequency of discussions in the clinic visits related to the five guiding principles: patient preferences, interpreting the evidence, prognosis, clinical feasibility, and optimizing therapies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS All visits except one included discussions that were thematically related to at least one guiding principle, suggesting regular opportunities to apply the guiding principles in primary care encounters with internal medicine residents. Discussions related to some guiding principles occurred much more frequently than others. Patients presented a number of opportunities to incorporate the guiding principles that the residents missed, suggesting target areas for future educational interventions. PMID:26200347

  5. A Year of Infection in the Intensive Care Unit: Prospective Whole Genome Sequencing of Bacterial Clinical Isolates Reveals Cryptic Transmissions and Novel Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Roach, David J.; Burton, Joshua N.; Lee, Choli; Stackhouse, Bethany; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequencing holds promise as a disruptive technology in clinical microbiology, but it has not yet been applied systematically or comprehensively within a clinical context. Here, over the course of one year, we performed prospective collection and whole genome sequencing of nearly all bacterial isolates obtained from a tertiary care hospital’s intensive care units (ICUs). This unbiased collection of 1,229 bacterial genomes from 391 patients enables detailed exploration of several features of clinical pathogens. A sizable fraction of isolates identified as clinically relevant corresponded to previously undescribed species: 12% of isolates assigned a species-level classification by conventional methods actually qualified as distinct, novel genomospecies on the basis of genomic similarity. Pan-genome analysis of the most frequently encountered pathogens in the collection revealed substantial variation in pan-genome size (1,420 to 20,432 genes) and the rate of gene discovery (1 to 152 genes per isolate sequenced). Surprisingly, although potential nosocomial transmission of actively surveilled pathogens was rare, 8.7% of isolates belonged to genomically related clonal lineages that were present among multiple patients, usually with overlapping hospital admissions, and were associated with clinically significant infection in 62% of patients from which they were recovered. Multi-patient clonal lineages were particularly evident in the neonatal care unit, where seven separate Staphylococcus epidermidis clonal lineages were identified, including one lineage associated with bacteremia in 5/9 neonates. Our study highlights key differences in the information made available by conventional microbiological practices versus whole genome sequencing, and motivates the further integration of microbial genome sequencing into routine clinical care. PMID:26230489

  6. A Year of Infection in the Intensive Care Unit: Prospective Whole Genome Sequencing of Bacterial Clinical Isolates Reveals Cryptic Transmissions and Novel Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Roach, David J; Burton, Joshua N; Lee, Choli; Stackhouse, Bethany; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Cookson, Brad T; Shendure, Jay; Salipante, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequencing holds promise as a disruptive technology in clinical microbiology, but it has not yet been applied systematically or comprehensively within a clinical context. Here, over the course of one year, we performed prospective collection and whole genome sequencing of nearly all bacterial isolates obtained from a tertiary care hospital's intensive care units (ICUs). This unbiased collection of 1,229 bacterial genomes from 391 patients enables detailed exploration of several features of clinical pathogens. A sizable fraction of isolates identified as clinically relevant corresponded to previously undescribed species: 12% of isolates assigned a species-level classification by conventional methods actually qualified as distinct, novel genomospecies on the basis of genomic similarity. Pan-genome analysis of the most frequently encountered pathogens in the collection revealed substantial variation in pan-genome size (1,420 to 20,432 genes) and the rate of gene discovery (1 to 152 genes per isolate sequenced). Surprisingly, although potential nosocomial transmission of actively surveilled pathogens was rare, 8.7% of isolates belonged to genomically related clonal lineages that were present among multiple patients, usually with overlapping hospital admissions, and were associated with clinically significant infection in 62% of patients from which they were recovered. Multi-patient clonal lineages were particularly evident in the neonatal care unit, where seven separate Staphylococcus epidermidis clonal lineages were identified, including one lineage associated with bacteremia in 5/9 neonates. Our study highlights key differences in the information made available by conventional microbiological practices versus whole genome sequencing, and motivates the further integration of microbial genome sequencing into routine clinical care. PMID:26230489

  7. Linking HIV-positive adolescents to care in 15 different clinics across the United States: Creating solutions to address structural barriers for linkage to care

    PubMed Central

    Philbin, Morgan M.; Tanner, Amanda E.; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Linkage to care is a critical corollary to expanded HIV testing, but many adolescents are not successfully linked to care, in part due to fragmented care systems. Through a collaboration of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Adolescent Trials Network (ATN), a linkage to care outreach worker was provided to ATN clinics. Factors related to linkage were explored to better understand how to improve retention rates and health outcomes for HIV-positive adolescents. We conducted 124 interviews with staff at 15 Adolescent Trials Network clinics to better understand linkage to care processes, barriers, and facilitators. Content analysis was conducted focusing on structural barriers to care and potential solutions, specifically at the macro-, meso-, and micro-levels. Macro-level barriers included navigating health insurance policies, transportation to appointments, and ease of collecting and sharing client-level contact information between testing agencies, local health departments and clinics; meso-level barriers included lack of youth friendliness within clinic space and staff, and duplication of linkage services; micro-level barriers included adolescents’ readiness for care and adolescent developmental capacity. Staff initiated solutions included providing transportation for appointments and funding clinic visits and tests with a range of grants and clinic funds while waiting for insurance approval. However, such solutions were often ad hoc and partial, using micro-level solutions to address macro-level barriers. Comprehensive initiatives to improve linkage to care are needed to address barriers to HIV-care for adolescents, whose unique developmental needs make accessing care particularly challenging. Matching the level of structural solution to the level of structural barriers (i.e., macro-level with macro-level), such as creating policy to address needed youth healthcare entitlements versus covering

  8. Using a Narrative Approach to Enhance Clinical Care for Patients With Asthma.

    PubMed

    Owton, Helen; Allen-Collinson, Jacquelyn; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2015-07-01

    There are currently > 230 million people in the world with asthma, and asthma attacks result in the hospitalization of someone every 7 min. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute outlines four components of clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma, which tend to take a biomedical focus: (1) measures of assessment and monitoring, obtained by objective tests, physical examination, patient history, and patient report, to diagnose and assess the characteristics and severity of asthma and to monitor whether asthma control is achieved and maintained; (2) education for a partnership in asthma care; (3) control of environmental factors and comorbid conditions that affect asthma; and (4) pharmacologic therapy. Many national guidelines include providing patients with asthma with (1) written action plans, (2) inhaler technique training, and (3) structured annual reviews. Although current guidelines help improve clinical processes of care for asthma, there is also a need to improve self-care of asthma by empowering individuals to take more control of their condition. There is a growing appreciation that a narrative approach with patients with asthma, which focuses on the illness experience and aims to enhance patient-clinician understanding, might improve self-care. We explore how a framework for clinicians to listen to patients' stories, developed from research on individuals with asthma, might enhance communication, improve patient-clinician relationship, and foster better patient self-care. The article closes with the implications of this approach for clinical practice and future research.

  9. How to start and sustain a successful pediatric cardiac intensive care program: A combined clinical and administrative strategy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anthony C.

    2002-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To delineate key clinical and administrative factors in starting a pediatric cardiac intensive care program and to introduce a scorecard concept to measure excellence in such a new program. Methods: Review of current clinical research data in pediatric cardiac intensive care and administrative business concepts for their application to the pediatric cardiac intensive care program. RESULTS: Although clinical concepts in cardiac intensive care are useful as basic philosophical strategies at the bedside, administrative principles are essential in operational strategies vital to the success of such a program. Using both clinical and business administrative concepts, a balanced strategy can be formulated. CONCLUSIONS: Starting a pediatric cardiac intensive care program is a difficult endeavor. A combined clinical and administrative approach is needed in starting and sustaining excellence in a pediatric cardiac intensive care program. Monitoring excellence in such a program warrants application of a scorecard system. PMID:12780977

  10. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement

    PubMed Central

    Kittinger, Benjamin J.; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C.

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures. PMID:26903784

  11. Clinical care of incarcerated people with HIV, viral hepatitis, or tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rich, Josiah D; Beckwith, Curt G; Macmadu, Alexandria; Marshall, Brandon D L; Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Amon, Joseph J; Milloy, M-J; King, Maximilian R F; Sanchez, Jorge; Atwoli, Lukoye; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-09-10

    The burden of HIV/AIDS and other transmissible diseases is higher in prison and jail settings than in the non-incarcerated communities that surround them. In this comprehensive review, we discuss available literature on the topic of clinical management of people infected with HIV, hepatitis B and C viruses, and tuberculosis in incarcerated settings in addition to co-occurrence of one or more of these infections. Methods such as screening practices and provision of treatment during detainment periods are reviewed to identify the effect of community-based treatment when returning inmates into the general population. Where data are available, we describe differences in the provision of medical care in the prison and jail settings of low-income and middle-income countries compared with high-income countries. Structural barriers impede the optimal delivery of clinical care for prisoners, and substance use, mental illness, and infectious disease further complicate the delivery of care. For prison health care to reach the standards of community-based health care, political will and financial investment are required from governmental, medical, and humanitarian organisations worldwide. In this review, we highlight challenges, gaps in knowledge, and priorities for future research to improve health-care in institutions for prisoners. PMID:27427452

  12. Perspective: Upcoming paradigm shifts for psychiatry in clinical care, research, and education.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Eugene H; Zorumski, Charles F

    2012-03-01

    Psychiatry is facing a crisis fueled by a fragmented and inefficient system of care delivery and a disconnection between the state of research and the state of psychiatry education and practice. Many factors contribute to the current state of psychiatric care. Psychiatry is a shortage specialty, and this will become worse in the near future. In addition, financial pressures have led to decreases in psychiatric inpatient and outpatient services and to shorter lengths of hospitalization for even the sickest patients. This has resulted in fragmented care and an overreliance on polypharmacy. To reach the large number of patients needing psychiatric services, health care systems must change and take advantage of collaborative and integrative care models and new technologies. Psychiatrists must learn to partner more effectively with primary care providers to extend their expertise to the greatest number of patients. Currently, psychiatric diagnosis is based on a criteria-based system that was developed in the 1970s. Advances in systems and molecular neuroscience are beginning to elucidate specific brain systems that are dysfunctional in psychiatric illness. This has the potential to revolutionize psychiatric diagnosis and treatment in the future. However, psychiatry has not yet been successful in incorporating the language of this research into clinically meaningful terminology. If neuroscientific progress is to be translated into clinical advances, this must change. Residency programs must better prepare their graduates to keep up with a psychiatry literature that will increasingly use the language of neural circuits to describe psychiatric symptomatology and treatments.

  13. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Kittinger, Benjamin J; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures. PMID:26903784

  14. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. V: Creating Alternatives to Clinical Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, William G.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this guide deals with the process of creating alternatives to clinical care in Vance and Franklin counties. Specifically, this booklet details the chronological development of the…

  15. 75 FR 2549 - Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  16. Linking Postdoctoral General Dentistry Programs with Community-Based Clinical Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Richard G.; Gray, Carolyn F.; Demby, Neal A.; Cinotti, William R.; Clark, Nereyda P.; Hicks, Jeffrey L.

    1997-01-01

    Reports results of a working group convened by the American Association of Dental Schools to examine establishment of dental education programs with significant affiliations with community-based clinical care settings. Identifies factors and conditions believed to be critical to successful program linkages, including goals and objectives, support…

  17. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  18. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  19. The Role of Ethnicity in Clinical Psychopathology and Care Pathways of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakanikos, Elias; McCarthy, Jane; Kravariti, Eugenia; Fearon, Paul; Bouras, Nick

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether people with intellectual disability from ethnic minority groups have higher rates of mental health problems and access different care pathways than their White counterparts. Clinical and socio-demographic data were collected for 806 consecutive new referrals to a specialist mental health service…

  20. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  1. The intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the causes of cancer, early detection, prevention or treatment need accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The clinical laboratory provides important cancer information needed for physicians which influence clinical decisions regarding treatment, diagnosis and patient monitoring. Poor communication between health care providers and clinical laboratory personnel can lead to medical errors and wrong decisions in providing cancer care. Because of the key impact of laboratory information on cancer diagnosis and treatment the quality of the tests, lab reports, and appropriate lab management are very important. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) can have an important role in diagnosis, fast and effective access to cancer data, decrease redundancy and costs, and facilitate the integration and collection of data from different types of instruments and systems. In spite of significant advantages LIMS is limited by factors such as problems in adaption to new instruments that may change existing work processes. Applications of intelligent software simultaneously with existing information systems, in addition to remove these restrictions, have important benefits including adding additional non-laboratory-generated information to the reports, facilitating decision making, and improving quality and productivity of cancer care services. Laboratory systems must have flexibility to change and have the capability to develop and benefit from intelligent devices. Intelligent laboratory information management systems need to benefit from informatics tools and latest technologies like open sources. The aim of this commentary is to survey application, opportunities and necessity of intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

  2. A glimpse into Texas Scottish Rite Hospital's educational, clinical care, and research development.

    PubMed

    Herring, J Anthony; Birch, John G; Johnston, Charles E; Richards, B Stephens

    2015-03-01

    This article describes four areas of pediatric orthopaedic education, research, and clinical care undertaken at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital (TSRH) over the past 25 years. These areas include the weekly preoperative conferences, the evolution of the limb lengthening and deformity correction program, the development of the TSRH instrumentation system, and the evolution of the clubfoot treatment program.

  3. Respiratory Virus Detection and Clinical Diagnosis in Children Attending Day Care

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Nina; Pedersen, Bård; Nordbø, Svein Arne; Skanke, Lars Høsøien; Krokstad, Sidsel; Smyrnaios, Anastasios; Døllner, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory viruses often have been studied in children with respiratory tract infection (RTI), but less knowledge exists about viruses in asymptomatic children. We have studied the occurrence of a broad panel of respiratory viruses in apparently healthy children attending day care, taking into account the influence of possible confounding factors, such as age, clinical signs of respiratory tract infection (RTI), location (day-care section) and season. Methods We have studied 161 children in two day-care centers, each with separate sections for younger and older children, during four autumn and winter visits over a two-year period. A total of 355 clinical examinations were performed, and 343 nasopharyngeal samples (NPS) were analyzed by semi-quantitative, real-time, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for 19 respiratory pathogens. Result Forty-three percent of all NPS were PCR-positive for ≥ 1 of 13 virus species, with high species variation during visits. Rhinovirus 26% (88/343 NPS), enterovirus 12% (40/343) and parechovirus 9% (30/343) were detected in every visit, and the rates varied in relation to age, day-care section and season. Ten other viruses were detected in ≤ 3% of the NPS. Generally, viruses occurred together in the NPS. In 24% (79/331) of the clinical examinations with available NPS, the children had clear signs of RTI, while in 41% (135/331) they had mild signs, and in 35% (117/331) the children had no signs of RTI. Moreover, viruses were found in 70% (55/79) of children with clear signs of RTI, in 41% (55/135) with mild signs and in 30% (35/117) without any signs of RTI (p < 0.001). Conclusions Positive PCR tests for respiratory viruses, particularly picornaviruses, were frequently detected in apparently healthy children attending day care. Virus detection rates were related to age, presence of clinical signs of RTI, location in day care and season. PMID:27433803

  4. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Gretchen M.; Edwards, Mary E.; Butson, Linda C.; Auten, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n=21), interviews (n=2), and an online survey (n=167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly effective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians’ perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics. PMID:26211792

  5. [Review of legislation regarding clinical research in the Spanish health care system and hospital pharmacy services].

    PubMed

    Laguna-Goya, Noa; Serrano, M Antonia; Gómez-Chacón, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The call for public funding for the Spanish Health Care System clinical research with drugs for human use projects Subprogramme highlights the need for hospital pharmacy services to include the manufacture of investigational drugs which are the subject of a clinical trial, developed by either a researcher or a group of researchers, within its activities. This article discusses the legislation concerning the manufacture of investigational drugs and the requirements that the pharmacy services must meet in order to develop, distribute, or conceal an investigational drug in a clinical trial sponsored by a professional from the SHS.

  6. Clinical Preventive Services for Older Adults: The Interface Between Personal Health Care and Public Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Chesley L.; Shenson, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Healthy aging must become a priority objective for both population and personal health services, and will require innovative prevention programming to span those systems. Uptake of essential clinical preventive services is currently suboptimal among adults, owing to a number of system- and office-based care barriers. To achieve maximum health results, prevention must be integrated across community and clinical settings. Many preventive services are portable, deliverable in either clinical or community settings. Capitalizing on that flexibility can improve uptake and health outcomes. Significant reductions in health disparities, mortality, and morbidity, along with decreases in health spending, are achievable through improved collaboration and synergy between population health and personal health systems. PMID:22390505

  7. [THE CLINICAL ORGANIZATIONAL SUBSTANTIATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGY OF HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRIC CARE].

    PubMed

    Podsevatkin, V G; Blinov, D S; Podsevatkin, D V; Podsevatkina, S V; Smirnova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The new technology of hospital psychiatric care, developed and implemented in the Mordovia republican clinical hospital, permits resolving problems of hospitalism, lethality, pharmaceutical resistance and others. The essence of this technology is in staging of hospital care under condition of intensification and standardization of curative diagnostic process, implementation of complex approach to treatment of psychiatric disorders. The patient sequentially passes through three stages: intensive diagnostics and intensive treatment (intensive care department, intensive therapy department), supportive therapy (general psychiatric department); rehabilitation measures (curative rehabilitative department). The concentration of resources at the first stage, application of intensive therapy techniques permit in the shortest period to arrest acute psychotic symptomatic. The described new technology of hospital psychiatric care permits enhancing effectiveness of treatment, significantly shorten period of hospitalization (37.5 days), to obtain lasting and qualitative remission, to rehabilitate most fully social working status of patient and to significantly decrease lethality.

  8. Form and Actuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Michel

    A basic choice underlies physics. It consists of banishing actual situations from theoretical descriptions, in order to reach a universal formal construct. Actualities are then thought of as mere local appearances of a transcendent reality supposedly described by the formal construct. Despite its impressive success, this method has left major loopholes in the foundations of science. In this paper, I document two of these loopholes. One is the problem of time asymmetry in statistical thermodynamics, and the other is the measurement problem of quantum mechanics. Then, adopting a broader philosophical standpoint, I try to turn the whole picture upside down. Here, full priority is given to actuality (construed as a mode of the immanent reality self-reflectively being itself) over formal constructs. The characteristic aporias of this variety of "Copernican revolution" are discussed.

  9. The Quality of Care Provided to Women with Urinary Incontinence in Two Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Alas, Alexandriah; Litwin, Mark S.; Chu, Stephanie D.; Bresee, Catherine; Roth, Carol P.; Rashid, Rezoana; Shekelle, Paul; Wenger, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to test the feasibility of a set of quality-of-care indicators for urinary incontinence (UI) and, at the same time, measure the care provided to women with UI in two different clinical settings. Materials and Methods This was a pilot test of a set of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). This was a pilot test of a set of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). Twenty QIs were previously developed using the RAND Appropriateness method. These QIs were used to measure care received for 137 women with a urinary incontinence (UI) diagnosis in a 120-physician hospital-based multi-specialty medical group (MSG). We also performed an abstraction of 146 patient records from primary care offices in Southern California. These charts were previously used as part of the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders Project (ACOVE). As a post-hoc secondary analysis, the two populations were compared with respect to quality, as measured by compliance with the QIs. Results In the ACOVE population, 37.7% of patients with UI underwent a pelvic examination, versus 97.8% in the MSG. Only 15.6% of cases in the MSG and 14.2% in ACOVE (p=0.86) had documentation that pelvic floor exercises were offered. Relatively few women with a body mass index (BMI) of >25 were counseled about weight loss in either population (20.9% MSG vs. 26.1% ACOVE, p=0.76). For women undergoing sling surgery, documentation of counseling about risks was lacking, and only 9.3% of eligible cases (MSG only) had documentation of the risks of mesh. Conclusions QIs are a feasible means to measure the care provided to women with UI. Care varied by population studied, yet deficiencies in care were prevalent in both patient populations studied. PMID:27164512

  10. Information needs of health care professionals in an AIDS outpatient clinic as determined by chart review.

    PubMed Central

    Giuse, N B; Huber, J T; Giuse, D A; Brown, C W; Bankowitz, R A; Hunt, S

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the information needs of health care professionals in HIV-related clinical encounters, and to determine the suitability of existing information sources to address those needs. SETTING: HIV outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Seven health care professionals with diverse training and patient care involvement. METHODS: Based on patient charts describing 120 patient encounters, participants generated 266 clinical questions. Printed and on-line information sources were used to answer questions in two phases: using commonly available sources and using all available medical library sources. MEASUREMENTS: The questions were divided into 16 categories by subject. The number of questions answered, their categories, the information source(s) providing answers, and the time required to answer questions were recorded for each phase. RESULTS: Each participant generated an average of 3.8 clinical questions per chart. Five categories accounted for almost 75% of all questions; the treatment protocols/regimens category was most frequent (24%). A total of 245 questions (92%) were answered, requiring an average of 15 minutes per question. Most (87%) of the questions were answered via electronic sources, even though paper sources were consulted first. CONCLUSIONS: The participating professionals showed considerable information needs. A combination of on-line and paper sources was necessary to provide the answers. The study suggests that present-day information sources are not entirely satisfactory for answering clinical questions generated by examining charts of HIV-infected patients. PMID:7850563

  11. Elevated serum CA 19-9 level associated with a splenic cyst: which is the actual clinical management? Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bresadola, Vittorio; Pravisani, Riccardo; Terrosu, Giovanni; Risaliti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Splenic cysts are relatively rare entities. The differential diagnosis for these lesions includes parasite infections, results of previous trauma or infarction, congenital forms, primitive splenic neoplasm or cystic metastasis. They can be either symptomatic, causing mainly abdominal pain, or asymptomatic, thus being diagnosed as in incidental finding during radiological examination for other clinical reasons: among these a raised serum level of CA 19-9 can be a case. It has been demonstrated that epidermoid and mesothelial congenital cyst can be associated with a pathological level of this tumor marker which is usually correlated to biliopancreatic and colonic carcinomas. The aim of the present study is to present the case of an asymptomatic epidermoid splenic cyst associated with a continuous increase of CA 19-9 and to describe the applied clinical workup and surgical management by laparoscopic total splenectomy. Moreover, to analyze the demographics, clinical and pathological features of these infrequent lesions and to confront our therapeutic management with that of the other reported cases, we conducted a systematic review of the literature.

  12. Clinical audit, a valuable tool to improve quality of care: General methodology and applications in nephrology

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Pasquale; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation and improvement of quality of care provided to the patients are of crucial importance in the daily clinical practice and in the health policy planning and financing. Different tools have been developed, including incident analysis, health technology assessment and clinical audit. The clinical audit consist of measuring a clinical outcome or a process, against well-defined standards set on the principles of evidence-based medicine in order to identify the changes needed to improve the quality of care. In particular, patients suffering from chronic renal diseases, present many problems that have been set as topics for clinical audit projects, such as hypertension, anaemia and mineral metabolism management. Although the results of these studies have been encouraging, demonstrating the effectiveness of audit, overall the present evidence is not clearly in favour of clinical audit. These findings call attention to the need to further studies to validate this methodology in different operating scenarios. This review examines the principle of clinical audit, focusing on experiences performed in nephrology settings. PMID:25374819

  13. Clinical audit, a valuable tool to improve quality of care: General methodology and applications in nephrology.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Pasquale; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    Evaluation and improvement of quality of care provided to the patients are of crucial importance in the daily clinical practice and in the health policy planning and financing. Different tools have been developed, including incident analysis, health technology assessment and clinical audit. The clinical audit consist of measuring a clinical outcome or a process, against well-defined standards set on the principles of evidence-based medicine in order to identify the changes needed to improve the quality of care. In particular, patients suffering from chronic renal diseases, present many problems that have been set as topics for clinical audit projects, such as hypertension, anaemia and mineral metabolism management. Although the results of these studies have been encouraging, demonstrating the effectiveness of audit, overall the present evidence is not clearly in favour of clinical audit. These findings call attention to the need to further studies to validate this methodology in different operating scenarios. This review examines the principle of clinical audit, focusing on experiences performed in nephrology settings.

  14. Amount of health care and self-care following a randomized clinical trial comparing flexion-distraction with exercise program for chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Gudavalli, M Ram; McGregor, Marion; Jedlicka, James; Keenum, Michael; Ghanayem, Alexander J; Patwardhan, Avinash G; Furner, Sylvia E

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous clinical trials have assessed the percentage of participants who utilized further health care after a period of conservative care for low back pain, however no chiropractic clinical trial has determined the total amount of care during this time and any differences based on assigned treatment group. The objective of this clinical trial follow-up was to assess if there was a difference in the total number of office visits for low back pain over one year after a four week clinical trial of either a form of physical therapy (Exercise Program) or a form of chiropractic care (Flexion Distraction) for chronic low back pain. Methods In this randomized clinical trial follow up study, 195 participants were followed for one year after a four-week period of either a form of chiropractic care (FD) or a form of physical therapy (EP). Weekly structured telephone interview questions regarded visitation of various health care practitioners and the practice of self-care for low back pain. Results Participants in the physical therapy group demonstrated on average significantly more visits to any health care provider and to a general practitioner during the year after trial care (p < 0.05). No group differences were noted in the number of visits to a chiropractor or physical therapist. Self-care was initiated by nearly every participant in both groups. Conclusion During a one-year follow-up, participants previously randomized to physical therapy attended significantly more health care visits than those participants who received chiropractic care. PMID:16930489

  15. Factors impacting on nurses' transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Saras

    2002-12-01

    Since nurse education moved to universities, a reoccurring concern of health consumers, health administrators, and some practising nurses is that nurses are not able to transfer the theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. Much has been written about this concern usually under the heading of the theory-practice gap. A common reason that has been highlighted as the cause of this gap is that the theoretical knowledge that nurses learn in academia is predicated on concepts such as humanism and holistic caring. In contrast, the bureaucratic organisation where nurses provide care tends to be based on management concepts where cost containment and outcome measures are more acceptable. Hence nurses' learned values of holistic caring are pitted against the reality of the practice setting. So what is this practice reality? This paper attempts to provide an insider view of why the theoretical knowledge of holistic care may be difficult to enact in the clinical setting. In-depth taped interviews with nurses and participant observation were conducted in acute care hospitals in Western Australia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The findings indicated that utilitarian nursing and role models had impacted on the transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. The paper outlines some measures that nurses themselves can undertake to ensure the narrowing of the theory-practice gap in this area.

  16. Designing Clinically Valuable Telehealth Resources: Processes to Develop a Community-Based Palliative Care Prototype

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Deidre Diane; Swetenham, Kate; To, Timothy Hong Man; Currow, David Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background Changing population demography and patterns of disease are increasing demands on the health system. Telehealth is seen as providing a mechanism to support community-based care, thus reducing pressure on hospital services and supporting consumer preferences for care in the home. Objective This study examined the processes involved in developing a prototype telehealth intervention to support palliative care patients involved with a palliative care service living in the community. Methods The challenges and considerations in developing the palliative care telehealth prototype were reviewed against the Center for eHealth Research (CeHRes) framework, a telehealth development model. The project activities to develop the prototype were specifically mapped against the model’s first four phases: multidisciplinary project management, contextual inquiry, value specification, and design. This project has been developed as part of the Telehealth in the Home: Aged and Palliative Care in South Australia initiative. Results Significant issues were identified and subsequently addressed during concept and prototype development. The CeHRes approach highlighted the implicit diversity in views and opinions among participants and stakeholders and enabled issues to be considered, resolved, and incorporated during design through continuous engagement. Conclusions The CeHRes model provided a mechanism that facilitated “better” solutions in the development of the palliative care prototype by addressing the inherent but potentially unrecognized differences in values and beliefs of participants. This collaboration enabled greater interaction and exchange among participants resulting in a more useful and clinically valuable telehealth prototype. PMID:25189279

  17. Change management in cancer care: a one-stop gynaecology clinic.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jenny A

    'Creating a Patient-Led NHS' (Department of Health, 2005b) advises us to develop services with the patient at the centre of all that we do. In today's current agenda for reform and improvement, with the additional pressure on organizations to achieve Government performance targets where there is increasing demand and limited resources, it is sometimes difficult to provide the optimum patient experience. This article describes how a district general hospital used continuous quality improvement methodology to improve quality of care when developing a one-stop diagnostic clinic for patients urgently referred with suspected gynaecological cancer. As well as increasing clinic capacity and meeting access targets, redesigning the patient care pathway to improve services also provides the opportunity to build in patient choice and convenience. The article also discusses how clinical teams can involve patients when planning and evaluating services, and explores user involvement as a core component of continuous quality improvement methodology.

  18. Virtual Patients in Primary Care: Developing a Reusable Model That Fosters Reflective Practice and Clinical Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Zary, Nabil; Björklund, Karin; Toth-Pal, Eva; Leanderson, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care is an integral part of the medical curriculum at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. It is present at every stage of the students’ education. Virtual patients (VPs) may support learning processes and be a valuable complement in teaching communication skills, patient-centeredness, clinical reasoning, and reflective thinking. Current literature on virtual patients lacks reports on how to design and use virtual patients with a primary care perspective. Objective The objective of this study was to create a model for a virtual patient in primary care that facilitates medical students’ reflective practice and clinical reasoning. The main research question was how to design a virtual patient model with embedded process skills suitable for primary care education. Methods The VP model was developed using the Open Tufts University Sciences Knowledgebase (OpenTUSK) virtual patient system as a prototyping tool. Both the VP model and the case created using the developed model were validated by a group of 10 experienced primary care physicians and then further improved by a work group of faculty involved in the medical program. The students’ opinions on the VP were investigated through focus group interviews with 14 students and the results analyzed using content analysis. Results The VP primary care model was based on a patient-centered model of consultation modified according to the Calgary-Cambridge Guides, and the learning outcomes of the study program in medicine were taken into account. The VP primary care model is based on Kolb’s learning theories and consists of several learning cycles. Each learning cycle includes a didactic inventory and then provides the student with a concrete experience (video, pictures, and other material) and preformulated feedback. The students’ learning process was visualized by requiring the students to expose their clinical reasoning and reflections in-action in every learning cycle. Content analysis of the focus

  19. Identifying low-value clinical practices in critical care medicine: protocol for a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Daniel J; McCormick, T Jared; Straus, Sharon E; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Jeffs, Lianne P; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing unnecessary, low-value clinical practice (ie, de-adoption) is key to improving value for money in healthcare, especially among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) where resource consumption exceeds other medical and surgical populations. Research suggests that low-value clinical practices are common in medicine, however systematically and objectively identifying them is a widely cited barrier to de-adoption. We will conduct a scoping review to identify low-value clinical practices in adult critical care medicine that are candidates for de-adoption. Methods and analysis We will systematically search the literature to identify all randomised controlled trials or systematic reviews that focus on diagnostic or therapeutic interventions in adult patients admitted to medical, surgical or specialty ICUs, and are published in 3 general medical journals with the highest impact factor (New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association). 2 investigators will independently screen abstracts and full-text articles against inclusion criteria, and extract data from included citations. Included citations will be classified according to whether or not they represent a repeat examination of the given research question (ie, replication research), and whether the results are similar or contradictory to the original study. Studies with contradictory results will determine clinical practices that are candidates for de-adoption. Ethics and dissemination Our scoping review will use robust methodology to systematically identify a list of clinical practices in adult critical care medicine with evidence supporting their de-adoption. In addition to adding to advancing the study of de-adoption, this review may also serve as the launching point for clinicians and researchers in critical care to begin reducing the number of low-value clinical practices. Dissemination of these results to relevant stakeholders will include

  20. The Emerging Microbe Project: Developing Clinical Care Plans Based on Pathogen Identification and Clinical Case Studies.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Lauren A; Perry, Michael W; Doup, Dane't R

    2015-12-01

    For many students in the health sciences, including doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, basic and clinical sciences often appear detached from each other. In the infectious disease field, PharmD students additionally struggle with mastering the diversity of microorganisms and the corresponding therapies. The objective of this study was to design an interdisciplinary project that integrates fundamental microbiology with clinical research and decision-making skills. The Emerging Microbe Project guided students through the identification of a microorganism via genetic sequence analysis. The unknown microbe provided the basis for a patient case that asked the student to design a therapeutic treatment strategy for an infected patient. Outside of lecture, students had two weeks to identify the pathogen using nucleotide sequences, compose a microbiology report on the pathogen, and recommend an appropriate therapeutic treatment plan for the corresponding clinical case. We hypothesized that the students would develop a better understanding of the interplay between basic microbiology and infectious disease clinical practice, and that they would gain confidence and skill in independently selecting appropriate antimicrobial therapies for a new disease state. The exercise was conducted with PharmD students in their second professional year of pharmacy school in a required infectious disease course. Here, we demonstrate that the Emerging Microbe Project significantly improved student learning through two assessment strategies (assignment grades and exam questions), and increased student confidence in clinical infectious disease practice. This exercise could be modified for other health sciences students or undergraduates depending upon the level of clinical focus required of the course.

  1. The Role of Rural Health Clinics in Hospitalization Due to Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions: A Study in Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wanqing; Mueller, Keith J.; Chen, Li-Wu; Conway, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitalization due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) is often used as an indicator for measuring access to primary care. Rural health clinics (RHCs) provide basic primary care services for rural residents in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs). The relationship between RHCs and ACSCs is unclear. Purpose: The purpose…

  2. The Vermont Model for Rural HIV Care Delivery: Eleven Years of Outcome Data Comparing Urban and Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Christopher; Kutzko, Deborah; Alston, W. Kemper; Ramundo, Mary; Polish, Louis; Osler, Turner

    2010-01-01

    Context: Provision of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care in rural areas has encountered unique barriers. Purpose: To compare medical outcomes of care provided at 3 HIV specialty clinics in rural Vermont with that provided at an urban HIV specialty clinic. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Findings: Over an 11-year period 363 new…

  3. Factors contributing to nonadherence to follow-up appointments in a resident glaucoma clinic versus primary eye care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Fudemberg, Scott J; Lee, Brian; Waisbourd, Michael; Murphy, Rachel A; Dai, Yang; Leiby, Benjamin E; Hark, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate of adherence to follow-up appointment recommendations in a resident glaucoma clinic with no mechanism for reminders, compared to a resident cataract and primary eye care (CPEC) clinic in which telephone reminders were used, and to identify factors that contribute to adherence in each patient group. Methods This retrospective cohort study included subjects in the CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders and those in the glaucoma clinic who did not. Each sample was selected to have a similar proportion of follow-up recommendations for 1, 3, and 6 months. Subjects were considered adherent if they returned within a specified timeframe. Results A total of 144 subjects from the glaucoma clinic and 151 subjects from the CPEC clinic were included. There was no significant difference between follow-up adherence rates of patients who received telephone reminders and those who did not (odds ratio [OR] =1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–2.32, P=0.28). Patients who were on more than two ocular medications were more likely to return for follow-up (OR=3.11, 95% CI 1.53–6.35, P=0.0018). Subjects between the ages 50 and 80 years were more likely to be adherent compared to their younger and older peers (P=0.02). Conclusion The follow-up adherence of patients in a CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders was similar to patients in a glaucoma clinic who did not receive any intervention to increase their adherence. Younger (⩽50 years old) and elderly (⩾80 years old) subjects, as well as patients using less than two glaucoma medications, were less likely to adhere to their follow-up appointments. PMID:26811672

  4. Improving diabetic foot screening at a primary care clinic: A quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michelle L.; Gunst, Colette

    2016-01-01

    Background Foot screening is an important part of diabetic care as it prevents significant morbidity, loss of function and mortality from diabetic foot complications. However, foot screening is often neglected. Aim This project was aimed at educating health care workers (HCWs) in a primary health care clinic to increase diabetic foot screening practices. Setting A primary health care clinic in the Western Cape province of South Africa Methods A quality improvement project was conducted. HCWs’ needs were assessed using a questionnaire. This was followed by focus group discussions with the HCWs, which were recorded, transcribed and assessed using a general inductive approach. An intervention was designed based on common themes. Staff members were trained on foot screening and patient information pamphlets and screening tools were made available to all clinic staff. Thirty-two consecutive diabetic patient folders were audited to compare screening in 2013 with that in 2014 after initiation of the quality improvement cycle. Results HCWs’ confidence in conducting foot screening using the diabetic foot assessment questionnaire improved markedly after training. Diabetic foot screening practices increased from 9% in 2013 to 69% in 2014 after the first quality improvement cycle. A strengths, opportunities, aspirations and results (SOAR) analysis showed promise for continuing quality improvement cycles. Conclusion The findings showed a significant improvement in the number of diabetic patients screened. Using strategic planning with appreciative intent based on SOAR, proved to be motivational and can be used in the planning of the next cycle. PMID:27608673

  5. The development and evaluation of a nursing information system for caring clinical in-patient.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Wen; Li, Chih-Ping; Wang, Mei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to develop a nursing information system in order to simplify the admission procedure for caring clinical in-patient, enhance the efficiency of medical information documentation. Therefore, by correctly delivering patients’ health records, and providing continues care, patient safety and care quality would be effectively improved. The study method was to apply Spiral Model development system to compose a nursing information team. By using strategies of data collection, working environment observation, applying use-case modeling, and conferences of Joint Application Design (JAD) to complete the system requirement analysis and design. The Admission Care Management Information System (ACMIS) mainly included: (1) Admission nursing management information system. (2) Inter-shift meeting information management system. (3) The linkage of drug management system and physical examination record system. The framework contained qualitative and quantitative components that provided both formative and summative elements of the evaluation. System evaluation was to apply information success model, and developed questionnaire of consisting nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction. The results of questionnaires were users’ satisfaction, the perceived self-involvement, age and information quality were positively to personal and organizational effectiveness. According to the results of this study, the Admission Care Management Information System was practical to simplifying clinic working procedure and effective in communicating and documenting admission medical information. PMID:26578276

  6. The development and evaluation of a nursing information system for caring clinical in-patient.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Wen; Li, Chih-Ping; Wang, Mei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to develop a nursing information system in order to simplify the admission procedure for caring clinical in-patient, enhance the efficiency of medical information documentation. Therefore, by correctly delivering patients’ health records, and providing continues care, patient safety and care quality would be effectively improved. The study method was to apply Spiral Model development system to compose a nursing information team. By using strategies of data collection, working environment observation, applying use-case modeling, and conferences of Joint Application Design (JAD) to complete the system requirement analysis and design. The Admission Care Management Information System (ACMIS) mainly included: (1) Admission nursing management information system. (2) Inter-shift meeting information management system. (3) The linkage of drug management system and physical examination record system. The framework contained qualitative and quantitative components that provided both formative and summative elements of the evaluation. System evaluation was to apply information success model, and developed questionnaire of consisting nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction. The results of questionnaires were users’ satisfaction, the perceived self-involvement, age and information quality were positively to personal and organizational effectiveness. According to the results of this study, the Admission Care Management Information System was practical to simplifying clinic working procedure and effective in communicating and documenting admission medical information.

  7. The Technical Quality of Delivered Care for People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz Gastroenterology Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Asghari, Sima; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Gharibi, Farid; Alidoost, Saeideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is considered as one of the chronic diseasesre-quiring complicated treatment. This study aimed to assess technical quality of providing care for pa-tients with IBD. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 94 people with IBD using interviews and simple random sampling methods in Gastroenterology, Endoscopy and clinic of Imam Reza Hospital and Golgasht Clinic in Tabriz in 2012. The data collection tool was a researcher-designed questionnaire whose validity and reliability had been confirmed. In order to investigate the statistical relationship between the background variables and compliance with the standards the Chi-square test was applied using SPSS 17 Software. Results: "visit by the physician" and "diet advice by the dietitian" have had the highest and the lowest levels of compliance with the standard respectively, and "the care related to the disease exacerbation" and "the care provided by the other physicians" were not compatible with the standards in 80% of the cases. Data analyses also showed that there was a significant relationship between participant’s age, job, education and the smoking status and compliance of some care with the relevant standards (P<0.05). Conclusion: The results indicate a substantial gap between provided care for the people with IBD and the relevant standards. This indicates the areas that need of improvement and requires the serious attention of the authorities. PMID:26634198

  8. The feasibility and validity of care mapping in the clinical neurosciences.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, Katie; Leigh, Andrew; Sheldrick, Russell; Surr, Claire; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2015-01-01

    Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) is an observational tool and process that is widely used in dementia care in measuring and improving person-centred care (PCC). DCM was previously piloted on a neurorehabilitation ward, where it was found to be feasible and acceptable in this setting. Following this, a new modified tool and accompanying manual were developed: Care Mapping - Neurorehabilitation (DCM-NR). The current study aimed to assess the feasibility and validity of DCM-NR by piloting its use in a range of clinical neuroscience settings. A mixed-methods design was used employing both quantitative and qualitative techniques. The new DCM-NR was found to be feasible for use both in terms of the suitability of its coding system and the implementation process. DCM-NR was shown to have a moderate level of concurrent validity with participants' self-report of PCC. Participants' subjective reports on their experiences of care provided validation for the areas of psychological need observed in DCM-NR. The results of this study indicate that DCM-NR is feasible and valid for use in a range of clinical neuroscience settings. Further longitudinal research is required to evaluate the impact of DCM-NR on PCC practices over time.

  9. Familiarity knowledge in student nurses' clinical studies: exemplified by student nurses in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Grethe; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In this article based on a literary study, the form of knowledge named familiarity knowledge is examined. Although rooted in the philosophical tradition of Wittgenstein and Polanyi, the development of familiarity knowledge is tied in with clinical practice and particular patients and contexts while paying attention to the framework factors influencing the setting as a whole as well as with theoretical knowledge relevant to the situation at hand. Palliative care makes a backdrop for some of the discussion. Familiarity knowledge can never be context free and attends to that which is unique in every nurse-patient relationship. Both assertive and familiarity knowledge are needed to care for dying patients in a competent, sensitive, and truly caring manner. Mentors need to help students synthesize assertive knowledge and familiarity knowledge during their clinical studies to enrich both kinds of knowledge and deepen their understanding. Student nurses expertly mentored and tutored while caring for dying patients living at home become, for instance, less apprehensive about facing dying patients than students not so mentored. Nurses need to understand the complexity of nursing care to be able to see the uniqueness of the situation and approach the individual patient on the bases of experience and insight.

  10. Impact analysis studies of clinical prediction rules relevant to primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Emma; Uijen, Maike J M; Clyne, Barbara; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Keogh, Claire; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Following appropriate validation, clinical prediction rules (CPRs) should undergo impact analysis to evaluate their effect on patient care. The aim of this systematic review is to narratively review and critically appraise CPR impact analysis studies relevant to primary care. Setting Primary care. Participants Adults and children. Intervention Studies that implemented the CPR compared to usual care were included. Study design Randomised controlled trial (RCT), controlled before–after, and interrupted time series. Primary outcome Physician behaviour and/or patient outcomes. Results A total of 18 studies, incorporating 14 unique CPRs, were included. The main study design was RCT (n=13). Overall, 10 studies reported an improvement in primary outcome with CPR implementation. Of 6 musculoskeletal studies, 5 were effective in altering targeted physician behaviour in ordering imaging for patients presenting with ankle, knee and neck musculoskeletal injuries. Of 6 cardiovascular studies, 4 implemented cardiovascular risk scores, and 3 reported no impact on physician behaviour outcomes, such as prescribing and referral, or patient outcomes, such as reduction in serum lipid levels. 2 studies examined CPRs in decision-making for patients presenting with chest pain and reduced inappropriate admissions. Of 5 respiratory studies, 2 were effective in reducing antibiotic prescribing for sore throat following CPR implementation. Overall, study methodological quality was often unclear due to incomplete reporting. Conclusions Despite increasing interest in developing and validating CPRs relevant to primary care, relatively few have gone through impact analysis. To date, research has focused on a small number of CPRs across few clinical domains only. PMID:27008685

  11. Diabetes self-care behaviours and clinical outcomes among Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Chung-Mei; Dwyer, Johanna T; Jacques, Paul F; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Haas, Catherine F; Weinger, Katie

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influences of patients' background characteristics on the frequency of performing five diabetes self-care behaviours that 185 Taiwanese outpatients reported. All patients had type 2 diabetes diagnosed for more than a year and attended an outpatient clinic at a large university hospital where they had received at least one dietitian-led individual nutrition education session and one nurse-led diabetes education session during the course of their care. Seventy nine percent of the patients regularly (defined as responses often or always on the questionnaire) took their medications and over half followed recommended meal plans and exercised, but fewer performed foot care (38%) or checked their blood glucose levels (20%) regularly. The associations between patients' demographics and disease-related characteristics and their performance of self-care behaviours were assessed with logistic regression. Although checking blood glucose levels and performing diabetes foot care were unrelated to any clinical outcome examined, patients who took their diabetes medications had lower hemoglobin A1c levels and fewer chronic complications than those who did not. Furthermore, patients who followed a diabetes meal plan also had lower hemoglobin A1c levels, and those who exercised regularly had healthier body mass indices (BMI) than those who did not. PMID:26420184

  12. Comprehensive clinical care for men who have sex with men: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Kenneth H; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Stall, Ron; Grulich, Andrew E; Colfax, Grant; Lama, Javier R

    2012-07-28

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have unique health-care needs, not only because of biological factors such as an increased susceptibility to infection with HIV and sexually transmitted infections associated with their sexual behaviour, but also because of internalisation of societal stigma related to homosexuality and gender non-conformity, resulting in depression, anxiety, substance use, and other adverse outcomes. Successful responses to the global HIV/AIDS epidemic will require the development of culturally sensitive clinical care programmes for MSM that address these health disparities and root causes of maladaptive behaviour (eg, societal homophobia). Health-care providers need to become familiar with local outreach agencies, hotlines, and media that can connect MSM with positive role models and social opportunities. Research is needed to understand how many MSM lead resilient and productive lives in the face of discrimination to develop assets-based interventions that build on community support. Optimum clinical care for sexual and gender minorities is a fundamental human right. MSM deserve to be treated with respect, and health-care providers need to interact with them in ways that promote disclosure of actionable health information.

  13. Comprehensive clinical care for men who have sex with men: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Kenneth H; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Stall, Ron; Grulich, Andrew E; Colfax, Grant; Lama, Javier R

    2012-07-28

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have unique health-care needs, not only because of biological factors such as an increased susceptibility to infection with HIV and sexually transmitted infections associated with their sexual behaviour, but also because of internalisation of societal stigma related to homosexuality and gender non-conformity, resulting in depression, anxiety, substance use, and other adverse outcomes. Successful responses to the global HIV/AIDS epidemic will require the development of culturally sensitive clinical care programmes for MSM that address these health disparities and root causes of maladaptive behaviour (eg, societal homophobia). Health-care providers need to become familiar with local outreach agencies, hotlines, and media that can connect MSM with positive role models and social opportunities. Research is needed to understand how many MSM lead resilient and productive lives in the face of discrimination to develop assets-based interventions that build on community support. Optimum clinical care for sexual and gender minorities is a fundamental human right. MSM deserve to be treated with respect, and health-care providers need to interact with them in ways that promote disclosure of actionable health information. PMID:22819653

  14. [Gluten--mechanisms of intolerance, symptoms and treatment possibilities of IgE-related allergy for gluten in the light of actual clinical and immunological studies].

    PubMed

    Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Waga, Jacek; Dyga, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Gluten is the product of a chemical bond of wheat prolamin proteins (glia- dins and glutenins) in an aqueous me- dium. IgE mediated gluten allergy can be induced either by gluten as an in- gredient in foods or wheat prolamines present in the air. The aim of the study was clinical analysis of 13 patients, who demonstrated elevated levels of gluten specific IgE and identification of the most allergenic protein fractions from several samples of wheat using serum of examined subjects. Clinical analysis showed the occupational allergy to gluten in the form of rhinitis, asthma and airborne dermatistis in 9 subjects, whose symptoms disappeared during isolation from occupational exposure despite the use of a normal diet. In case of 4 patients with severe forms of chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis, who are also allergic to grass pollen at the same time, the introduction of a gluten-free diet resulted in improvement of health conditions. The study of wheat protein fractions revealed a significant polymorphism dependent on the wheat sample. In the protein fractions, low and high molecular glutenin fractions, and alpha, beta, gamma, and omega-gliadins were separated. It has been shown that the strongest immunogenic effect causes omega-5 gliadin fraction. The removal of this fraction resulted in reduction of skin reactivity evaluated by skin prick test in the studied patients.

  15. The culture of care within psychiatric services: tackling inequalities and improving clinical and organisational capabilities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cultural Consultation is a clinical process that emerged from anthropological critiques of mental healthcare. It includes attention to therapeutic communication, research observations and research methods that capture cultural practices and narratives in mental healthcare. This essay describes the work of a Cultural Consultation Service (ToCCS) that improves service user outcomes by offering cultural consultation to mental health practitioners. The setting is a psychiatric service with complex and challenging work located in an ethnically diverse inner city urban area. Following a period of 18 months of cultural consultation, we gather the dominant narratives that emerged during our evaluation of our service. Results These narratives highlight how culture is conceptualized and acted upon in the day-to-day practices of individual health and social care professionals, specialist psychiatric teams and in care systems. The findings reveal common narratives and themes about culture, ethnicity, race and their perceived place and meaningfulness in clinical care. These narratives express underlying assumptions and covert rules for managing, and sometimes negating, dilemmas and difficulties when considering “culture” in the presentation and expression of mental distress. The narratives reveal an overall “culture of understanding cultural issues” and specific “cultures of care”. These emerged as necessary foci of intervention to improve service user outcomes. Conclusion Understanding the cultures of care showed that clinical and managerial over-structuring of care prioritises organisational proficiency, but it leads to inflexibility. Consequently, the care provided is less personalised and less accommodating of cultural issues, therefore, professionals are unable to see or consider cultural influences in recovery. PMID:23020856

  16. Comparative Effectiveness of Five Smoking Cessation Pharmacotherapies in Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stevens S.; McCarthy, Danielle E.; Japuntich, Sandra J.; Christiansen, Bruce; Piper, Megan E.; Jorenby, Douglas E.; Fraser, David L.; Fiore, Michael C.; Baker, Timothy B.; Jackson, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Randomized efficacy clinical trials conducted in research settings may not accurately reflect the benefits of tobacco dependence treatments when used in real-world clinical settings. Effectiveness trials (e.g., in primary care settings) are needed to estimate the benefits of cessation treatments in real-world use. Methods 1346 primary care patients attending routine appointments were recruited by medical assistants in 12 primary care clinics. Patients were randomly assigned to five active pharmacotherapies: three monotherapies (Nicotine Patch, Nicotine Lozenge, and Bupropion SR) and two combination therapies (Patch+Lozenge and Bupropion+Lozenge). Patients were referred to a telephone quitline for cessation counseling. Primary outcomes included seven-day point-prevalence abstinence at one week, eight weeks, and six months post-quit, and number of days to relapse. Results Among 7128 eligible smokers (≥ 10 cigarettes per day) attending routine primary care appointments, 19% (N=1346) enrolled in the study. Six month abstinence rates were: Bupropion=16.8%; Lozenge=19.9%; Patch=17.7%; Patch+Lozenge=26.9%; and Bupropion+Lozenge=29.9%. Bupropion SR+Lozenge was superior to all of the monotherapies (odds ratios [ORs]: 0.46 to 0.56); Patch+Lozenge was superior to Patch and Bupropion monotherapies (ORs: 0.56 and 0.54, respectively). Conclusions One in five smokers attending a routine primary care appointment was willing to make a serious quit attempt that included evidence-based counseling and medication. In this comparative effectiveness study of five tobacco dependence treatments, combination pharmacotherapy significantly increased abstinence compared to monotherapies. Provision of free cessation medications plus quitline counseling arranged in the primary care setting holds promise for assisting large numbers of smokers to quit. PMID:20008701

  17. Impact of Clinical Pharmacist on the Pediatric Intensive Care Practice: An 11-Year Tertiary Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Heidi M.; Fryer, Karen R.; Graner, Kevin K.; Arteaga, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: With increasing complexity of critical care medicine comes an increasing need for multidisciplinary involvement in care. In many institutions, pharmacists are an integral part of this team, but long-term data on the interventions performed by pharmacists and their effects on patient care and outcomes are limited. We aimed to describe the role of pediatric clinical pharmacists in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) practice. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of pharmacy interventions in the PICU at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from 2003-2013, with a distinct period of increased pharmacist presence in the PICU from 2008 onward. We compared demographic and outcome data on patients who did and who did not have pharmacy interventions during 2 periods (2003–2007 and 2008–2013). RESULTS: We identified 27,773 total interventions by pharmacists during the 11-year period, of which 79.8% were accepted by the clinical team. These interventions were made on 10,963 unique PICU admissions and prevented 5867 order entry errors. Pharmacists' interventions increased year over year, including a significant change in 2008. Patients who required pharmacy involvement were younger, sicker, and had longer intensive care unit, hospital, and ventilator duration. Average central line infections and central line entry rates decreased significantly over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Increased pharmacist presence in the PICU is associated with increased interventions and prevention of adverse drug events. Pharmacist participation during rounds and order entry substantially improved the care of critically sick children and should be encouraged. PMID:26380569

  18. Experience in Strategic Networking to Promote Palliative Care in a Clinical Academic Setting in India

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shoba; Tarey, SD; Barathi, B; Mary, Thiophin Regina; Mathew, Lovely; Daniel, Sudha Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Background: Palliative care in low and middle-income countries is a new discipline, responding to a greater patient need, than in high-income countries. By its very nature, palliative as a specialty has to network with other specialties to provide quality care to patients. For any medical discipline to grow as a specialty, it should be well established in the teaching medical institutions of that country. Data show that palliative care is more likely to establish and grow in an academic health care institution. It is a necessity that multiple networking strategies are adopted to reach this goal. Objectives: (1) To describe a strategic approach to palliative care service development and integration into clinical academic setting. (2) To present the change in metrics to evaluate progress. Design and Setting: This is a descriptive study wherein, the different strategies that are adopted by the Department of Palliative Medicine for networking in an academic health care institution and outside the institution are scrutinized. Measurement: The impact of this networking was assessed, one, at the level of academics and the other, at the level of service. The number of people who attended various training programs conducted by the department and the number of patients who availed palliative care service over the years were assessed. Results: Ten different strategies were identified that helped with networking of palliative care in the institution. During this time, the referrals to the department increased both for malignant diseases (52–395) and nonmalignant diseases (5–353) from 2000 to 2013. The academic sessions conducted by the department for undergraduates also saw an increase in the number of hours from 6 to 12, apart from the increase in a number of courses conducted by the department for doctors and nurses. Conclusion: Networking is an essential strategy for the establishment of a relatively new medical discipline like palliative care in a developing and

  19. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Gayle, Krystal A T; Tulloch Reid, Marshall K; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K; McFarlane, Shelly R; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A; Boyne, Michael S; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-10-12

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90%) reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. Approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82%) or leather shoes (64%), fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%), and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. In conclusion, approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided.

  20. Clinical waste management in the context of the Kanye community home-based care programme, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Kang'ethe, Simon M

    2008-07-01

    This study examines clinical waste disposal and handling in the context of a community home-based care (CHBC) programme in Kanye, southern Botswana. This qualitative study involved 10 focus group discussions with a total of 82 HIV/AIDS primary caregivers in Kanye, one-to-one interviews with the five nurses supervising the programme, and participant observation. Numerous aspects of clinical or healthcare waste management were found to be hazardous and challenging to the home-based caregivers in the Kanye CHBC programme, namely: lack of any clear policies for clinical waste management; unhygienic waste handling and disposal by home-based caregivers, including burning and burying the healthcare wastes, and the absence of pre-treatment methods; inadequate transportation facilities to ferry the waste to clinics and then to appropriate disposal sites; stigma and discrimination associated with the physical removal of clinical waste from homes or clinics; poor storage of the healthcare waste at clinics; lack of incinerators for burning clinical waste; and a high risk of contagion to individuals and the environment at all stages of managing the clinical waste.

  1. Preparing for the primary care clinic: an ambulatory boot camp for internal medicine interns

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Lindsay M.; Bird, Amber-Nicole; Oyler, Julie L.; Lee, Wei Wei; Shah, Sachin D.; Pincavage, Amber T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Internal medicine (IM) interns start continuity clinic with variable ambulatory training. Multiple other specialties have utilized a boot camp style curriculum to improve surgical and procedural skills, but boot camps have not been used to improve interns’ ambulatory knowledge and confidence. The authors implemented and assessed the impact of an intern ambulatory boot camp pilot on primary care knowledge, confidence, and curricular satisfaction. Methods During July 2014, IM interns attended ambulatory boot camp. It included clinically focused case-based didactic sessions on common ambulatory topics as well as orientation to the clinic and electronic medical records. Interns anonymously completed a 15-question pre-test on topics covered in the boot camp as well as an identical post-test after the boot camp. The interns were surveyed regarding their confidence and satisfaction. Results Thirty-eight interns participated in the boot camp. Prior to the boot camp, few interns reported confidence managing common outpatient conditions. The average pre-test knowledge score was 46.3%. The average post-test knowledge score significantly improved to 76.1% (p<0.001). All interns reported that the boot camp was good preparation for clinics and 97% felt that the boot camp boosted their confidence. Conclusions The ambulatory boot camp pilot improved primary care knowledge, and interns thought it was good preparation for clinic. The ambulatory boot camp was well received and may be an effective way to improve the preparation of interns for primary care clinic. Further assessment of clinical performance and expansion to other programs and specialties should be considered. PMID:26609962

  2. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level. PMID:25187892

  3. [Evaluation of secondary care in oral health: a study of specialty clinics in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Goes, Paulo Sávio Angeiras de; Figueiredo, Nilcema; Neves, Jerlucia Cavalcanti das; Silveira, Fabiana Moura da Motta; Costa, José Felipe Riani; Pucca Júnior, Gilberto Alfredo; Rosales, Maritza Sosa

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the evaluation of secondary care in the area of health surveillance. This was a descriptive and normative/evaluative study. Performance analysis drew on secondary data, based on a historical series of dental procedures conducted at the specialized dental clinics implemented in Brazil and recorded by the Outpatient Information System of the Unified National Health System (SIA/SUS) in 2007, as well as primary data from site visits to the clinics, based on questionnaires completed by clinic staff. Performance of the clinics was poor in most regions of the country, and the North of Brazil had the lowest percentage of specialty services implemented. The indicator "Performance of Secondary Care in Oral Health" was 64.4%. The type 3 specialty clinics showed better results in terms of performance and achievement of targets. The study showed the need to review the legal framework for implementing specialized dental clinics by adjusting the criteria and norms, as well as definition of new standards for achievement of goals in the evaluation and monitoring of these services.

  4. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

  5. Clinical care of two patients with Ebola virus disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G Marshall; Mehta, Aneesh K; Varkey, Jay B; Brantly, Kent; Plyler, Lance; McElroy, Anita K; Kraft, Colleen S; Towner, Jonathan S; Spiropoulou, Christina; Ströher, Ute; Uyeki, Timothy M; Ribner, Bruce S

    2014-12-18

    West Africa is currently experiencing the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history. Two patients with EVD were transferred from Liberia to our hospital in the United States for ongoing care. Malaria had also been diagnosed in one patient, who was treated for it early in the course of EVD. The two patients had substantial intravascular volume depletion and marked electrolyte abnormalities. We undertook aggressive supportive measures of hydration (typically, 3 to 5 liters of intravenous fluids per day early in the course of care) and electrolyte correction. As the patients' condition improved clinically, there was a concomitant decline in the amount of virus detected in plasma.

  6. Encouraging primary care research: evaluation of a one-year, doctoral clinical epidemiology research course

    PubMed Central

    Liira, Helena; Koskela, Tuomas; Thulesius, Hans; Pitkälä, Kaisu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Research and PhDs are relatively rare in family medicine and primary care. To promote research, regular one-year research courses for primary care professionals with a focus on clinical epidemiology were started. This study explores the academic outcomes of the first four cohorts of research courses and surveys the participants’ perspectives on the research course. Design An electronic survey was sent to the research course participants. All peer-reviewed scientific papers published by these students were retrieved by literature searches in PubMed. Setting Primary care in Finland. Subjects A total of 46 research course participants who had finished the research courses between 2007 and 2012. Results Of the 46 participants 29 were physicians, eight nurses, three dentists, four physiotherapists, and two nutritionists. By the end of 2014, 28 of the 46 participants (61%) had published 79 papers indexed in PubMed and seven students (15%) had completed a PhD. The participants stated that the course taught them critical thinking, and provided basic research knowledge, inspiration, and fruitful networks for research. Conclusion A one-year, multi-professional, clinical epidemiology based research course appeared to be successful in encouraging primary care research as measured by research publications and networking. Activating teaching methods, encouraging focus on own research planning, and support from peers and tutors helped the participants to embark on research projects that resulted in PhDs for 15% of the participants. Key PointsClinical research and PhDs are rare in primary care in Finland, which has consequences for the development of the discipline and for the availability of clinical lecturers at the universities.A clinical epidemiology oriented, one-year research course increased the activity in primary care research. Focus on own research planning and learning the challenges of research with peers appeared to enhance the success of a doctoral

  7. Clinical reasoning and population health: decision making for an emerging paradigm of health care.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ian; Richardson, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Chronic conditions now provide the major disease and disability burden facing humanity. This development has necessitated a reorientation in the practice skills of health care professions away from hospital-based inpatient and outpatient care toward community-based management of patients with chronic conditions. Part of this reorientation toward community-based management of chronic conditions involves practitioners' understanding and adoption of a concept of population health management based on appropriate theoretical models of health care. Drawing on recent studies of expertise in physiotherapy, this article proposes a clinical reasoning and decision-making framework to meet these challenges. The challenge of population and community-based management of chronic conditions also provides an opportunity for physiotherapists to further clarify a professional epistemology of practice that embraces the kinds of knowledge and clinical reasoning processes used in physiotherapy practice. Three case studies related to the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain in different populations are used to exemplify the range of epistemological perspectives that underpin community-based practice. They illustrate the link between conceptualizations of practice problems and knowledge sources that are used as a basis for clinical reasoning and decision making as practitioners are increasingly required to move between the clinic and the community.

  8. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  9. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  10. [Relationship between the activity of home care supporting clinics and the place of death in Tokyo, Japan].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Akiko; Hanabusa, Hiroo; Mikami, Hiroshi

    2010-12-01

    We examined the relation between the activity of home care supporting clinics and the place of death in Tokyo, Japan. Of 1,209 clinics certified home care supporting clinics by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, 9.1% were not functioning for a year and 34.7% of them did not deal with patient's home death. Of patients who died at home, 64.3% utilized home care supporting clinics which dealt with 11 or more patient's death at home per year.

  11. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care.

  12. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care. PMID:27688865

  13. Automated Clinical Reminders for Primary Care Providers in the Care of CKD: A Small Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Fischer, Gary S; Li, Jie; Moore, Charity G; Hess, Rachel; Unruh, Mark L

    2011-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) care for the majority of non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Studies suggest that PCPs may deliver suboptimal CKD care. One means to improve PCP treatment of CKD is clinical decision support systems (CDSS). Study Design Cluster randomized controlled trial Setting & Participants Thirty PCPs in a university-based outpatient general internal medicine practice and their 248 moderate to advanced CKD patients who had not been referred to a nephrologist. Intervention Two CKD educational sessions were held for PCPs in both arms. The 15 intervention arm PCPs also received real-time automated electronic medical record alerts for patients with estimated glomerular filtration rates < 45 ml/min/1.73m2 recommending renal referral and urine albumin quantification if not done within the prior year. Outcomes Primary outcome was referral to a nephrologist; secondary outcomes were albuminuria/proteinuria assessment, CKD documentation, optimal blood pressure (i.e., < 130/80), and use of renoprotective medications. Results The intervention and control arms did not differ in renal referrals (9.7% vs. 16.5%, respectively; between group difference, −6.8% (95% CI, −15.5% to 1.8%; P=0.1)) or proteinuria assessments (39.3% vs. 30.1%, respectively; between group difference, 9.2% (95% CI, −2.7% to 21.1%; P=0.1)). Among intervention and control group patients without a baseline proteinuria assessment, 27.7% versus 16.3%, respectively had one at follow-up (P=0.06). After controlling for clustering, these findings were largely unchanged and no significant differences were apparent between the groups. Limitations Small single-center university based practice, use of a passive CDSS that required PCPs to trigger the electronic order set. Conclusions PCPs were willing to partake in a randomized trial of CDSS to improve outpatient CKD care. While CDSS may possess potential, larger studies are needed to further explore how best

  14. 'Healthy gums do matter': A case study of clinical leadership within primary dental care.

    PubMed

    Moore, D; Saleem, S; Hawthorn, E; Pealing, R; Ashley, M; Bridgman, C

    2015-09-25

    The Health and Social Care Act 2012 heralded wide reaching reforms intended to place clinicians at the heart of the health service. For NHS general dental practice, the conduits for this clinical leadership are the NHS England local professional networks. In Greater Manchester, the local professional network has developed and piloted a clinician led quality improvement project: 'Healthy Gums DO Matter, a Practitioner's Toolkit'. Used as a case study, the project highlighted the following facilitators to clinical leadership in dentistry: supportive environment; mentoring and transformational leadership; alignment of project goals with national policy; funding allowance; cross-boundary collaboration; determination; altruism; and support from wider academic and specialist colleagues. Barriers to clinical leadership identified were: the hierarchical nature of healthcare, territorialism and competing clinical commitments. PMID:26404983

  15. 'Healthy gums do matter': A case study of clinical leadership within primary dental care.

    PubMed

    Moore, D; Saleem, S; Hawthorn, E; Pealing, R; Ashley, M; Bridgman, C

    2015-09-25

    The Health and Social Care Act 2012 heralded wide reaching reforms intended to place clinicians at the heart of the health service. For NHS general dental practice, the conduits for this clinical leadership are the NHS England local professional networks. In Greater Manchester, the local professional network has developed and piloted a clinician led quality improvement project: 'Healthy Gums DO Matter, a Practitioner's Toolkit'. Used as a case study, the project highlighted the following facilitators to clinical leadership in dentistry: supportive environment; mentoring and transformational leadership; alignment of project goals with national policy; funding allowance; cross-boundary collaboration; determination; altruism; and support from wider academic and specialist colleagues. Barriers to clinical leadership identified were: the hierarchical nature of healthcare, territorialism and competing clinical commitments.

  16. Well-Child Care Clinical Practice Redesign at a Community Health Center: Provider and Staff Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Kelly; Moreno, Candice; Chung, Paul J.; Elijah, Jacinta; Coker, Tumaini R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community health centers (CHCs) are a key element of the health care safety net for underserved children. They may be an ideal setting to create well-child care (WCC) clinical practice redesign to drastically improve WCC delivery. Objective To examine the perspectives of clinical and administrative staff at a large, multisite urban CHC on alternative ways to deliver WCC services for low-income children aged 0 to 3 years. Methods Eight semistructured interviews were conducted with 4 pediatric teams (each consisting of 1 pediatrician and 2 medical assistants) and 4 CHC executive/administrative staff (Medical Director, COO, CEO, and Nurse Supervisor). Discussions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method of qualitative analysis. Salient themes included WCC delivery challenges and endorsed WCC clinical practice redesign solutions. Results The 3 main WCC delivery challenges included long wait times due to insurance verification and intake paperwork, lack of time for parent education and sick visits due to WCC visit volume, and absence of a system to encourage physicians to use non–face-to-face communication with parents. To address WCC delivery challenges, CHC providers and administrators endorsed several options for clinical practice redesign in their setting. These included use of a health educator in a team-based model of care, a previsit tool for screening and surveillance, Web site health education, a structured system for non–face-to-face (eg, phone) parent communication, and group visits. Conclusion CHC-specific strategies for WCC clinical practice redesign endorsed by a large, multisite safety net clinic may lead to more efficient, effective, and family-centered WCC for low-income populations. PMID:24327599

  17. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  18. Patient perspectives on care received at community acupuncture clinics: a qualitative thematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Community acupuncture is a recent innovation in acupuncture service delivery in the U.S. that aims to improve access to care through low-cost treatments in group-based settings. Patients at community acupuncture clinics represent a broader socioeconomic spectrum and receive more frequent treatments compared to acupuncture users nationwide. As a relatively new model of acupuncture in the U.S., little is known about the experiences of patients at community acupuncture clinics and whether quality of care is compromised through this high-volume model. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ perspectives on the care received through community acupuncture clinics. Methods The investigators conducted qualitative, thematic analysis of written comments from an observational, cross-sectional survey of clients of the Working Class Acupuncture clinics in Portland, Oregon. The survey included an open-ended question for respondents to share comments about their experiences with community acupuncture. Comments were received from 265 community acupuncture patients. Results Qualitative analysis of written comments identified two primary themes that elucidate patients’ perspectives on quality of care: 1) aspects of health care delivery unique to community acupuncture, and 2) patient engagement in health care. Patients identified unique aspects of community acupuncture, including structures that facilitate access, processes that make treatments more comfortable and effective and holistic outcomes including physical improvements, enhanced quality of life, and empowerment. The group setting, community-based locations, and low cost were highlighted as aspects of this model that allow patients to access acupuncture. Conclusions Patients’ perspectives on the values and experiences unique to community acupuncture offer insights on the quality of care received in these settings. The group setting, community-based locations, and low cost of this model potentially

  19. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  20. Thinking inside the box: the tele-intensive care unit as a new clinical site.

    PubMed

    Sepples, Susan B; Goran, Susan F; Zimmer-Rankin, Melinda

    2013-07-01

    The tele-intensive care unit (ICU) offers students an opportunity to observe the decision-making process of nurses working in consultative teams in a high-acuity environment, providing a unique opportunity for novices to "see" into the thinking and the communication of expert nurses. Students are often overwhelmed by the physical environment of an ICU--specifically, its noise, technology, and pace--and often are relegated to the sidelines when a patient becomes unstable. Clinical education in the tele-ICU allows students to participate safely in the care of complex, unstable patients. Nurse educators, as experienced tele-ICU nurses, can help students to process complex information and can model intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary communication about patient concerns. The experience moves the students from engagement in tasks and a linear process of thinking to engagement in decision making and a more complex understanding of the nurse's role in patient care. PMID:23755941

  1. A Population Health Approach to Clinical Social Work with Complex Patients in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Rose, Stephen M; Hatzenbuehler, Stephanie; Gilbert, Erika; Bouchard, Mark P; McGill, Debra

    2016-05-01

    Chronic diseases disproportionately occur among people from disadvantaged backgrounds. These backgrounds correlate with poor health in adulthood. Capacity for patients' to collaborate in their care tends to be lower than among other patients, leading to inefficient uses in medical services and higher risk of adverse events. In the course of this study, social workers engaged patients with increased inpatient and emergency department (ED) use and barriers to self-management, and evaluated them for lifetime exposure to material disadvantage and violence. Intervention focused on creating a primary care team that improved patients' self-efficacy, increased locus of control, and improved capacity for engagement. Results include a 49 percent decrease in admissions and a 5 percent decrease in ED utilization with significant cost savings. Authors recommend further study to analyze social, clinical, and financial risk in a larger sample, which may yield information about a health care provider's most at-risk patients for early targeted intervention. PMID:27263199

  2. A Collaborative Paradigm for Improving Management of Sleep Disorders in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Jack D.; Grubber, Janet; Ulmer, Christi; Zervakis, Jennifer; Olsen, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To test a collaborative care model for interfacing sleep specialists with primary care providers to enhance patients' sleep disorders management. Methods: This study used a randomized, parallel group, clinical intervention trial design. A total of 137 adult (29 women) VA outpatients with sleep complaints were enrolled and randomly assigned to (1) an intervention (INT) consisting of a one-time consultation with a sleep specialist who provided diagnostic feedback and treatment recommendations to the patient and the patient's primary care provider; or (2) a control condition consisting of their usual primary care (UPC). Provider-focused outcomes included rates of adherence to recommended diagnostic procedures and sleep-focused interventions. Patient-focused outcomes included measures taken from sleep diaries and actigraphy; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores; and self-report measures of sleepiness, fatigue, mood, quality of life, and satisfaction with health care. Results: The proportions of provider-initiated sleep-focused interventions were significantly higher in the INT group than in the UPC group for polysomnography referrals (49% versus 6%; P < 0.001) and mental health clinic referrals (19% versus 6%; P = 0.02). At the 10-mo follow up, INT recipients showed greater estimated mean reductions in diary total wake time (−17.0 min; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −30.9, −3.1; P = 0.02) and greater increases in sleep efficiency (+3.7%; 95% CI: 0.8, 6.5; P = 0.01) than did UPC participants. A greater proportion of the INT group showed ≥ 1 standard deviation decline on the PSQI from baseline to the 10-mo follow-up (41% versus 21%; P = 0.02). Moreover, 69% of the INT group had normal (≤ 10) Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores at the 10-mo follow-up, whereas only 50% of the UPC group fell below this clinical cutoff (P = 0.03). Conclusions: A one-time sleep consultation significantly increased healthcare providers' attention to sleep problems and

  3. Diagnoses made in a secondary care “fits, faints, and funny turns” clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hindley, D; Ali, A; Robson, C

    2006-01-01

    Aims To investigate the diagnoses made for children referred to a “fits, faints, and funny turns” clinic. Methods Prospective study of 380 children referred to a dedicated secondary care clinic over an eight year period. Results Twenty three per cent of children were given a final diagnosis of one of the childhood epilepsies, with 48% of these having a specific epilepsy syndrome. Syncope was the commonest cause of a non‐epileptic event (syncope and reflex anoxic seizures comprised 100/238, 42%) but there were a wide variety of other causes. Fifty three events (14%) were unclassified and managed without a diagnostic label or treatment. Conclusions In children with funny turns referred to secondary care, the diagnostic possibilities are numerous; among non‐epileptic events, syncopes predominate. The majority do not have epilepsy. Unclassifiable events with no clear epileptic or non‐epileptic cause are common and can be safely managed expectantly. PMID:16492885

  4. 21st century paradigm of tissue banking: the Clinical Breast Care Project.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Craig D

    2010-07-01

    The Clinical Breast Care Project (CBCP) is a congressionally mandated program that began in the year 2000. The military-civilian collaboration was founded on five pillars: (1) center of excellence in clinical care, (2) risk reduction for women at risk for developing breast cancer, (3) tissue banking to develop and maintain the world's finest repository of human biospecimens of breast diseases, (4) targeted research into the molecular signatures of breast diseases and cancer, and (5) biomedical informatics core to support the data warehouse needs of the project. Now in its eighth year of operation, these efforts have resulted in more than 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications and dozens of collaborations with world leaders in cancer research. In this short time, CBCP has created what is believed to be the world's largest breast tissue biorepository.

  5. Preparing culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students for clinical practice in the health care setting.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Frohman, Rena

    2013-07-01

    The number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students seeking enrollment in higher education courses in Western countries where English is the predominant language has grown considerably in the past decade, especially in undergraduate health care courses. When enrolled in nursing courses, students are required to complete clinical placements. Such experiences can create significant challenges for CALD students where language, cultural differences, and interpretation of cultural norms complicate the learning process. To assist CALD nursing students to transition successfully, an extracurricular integrated curriculum program was developed and implemented at a university in Queensland, Australia. The program is a series of interactive workshops based on the principles of caring pedagogy and student-centered learning. The program applies strategies that combine small-group discussions with peers, role-plays, and interactions with final-year nursing student volunteers. Evaluation of the program suggests it has assisted most of the students surveyed to be successful in their clinical studies. PMID:23721071

  6. Preparing culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students for clinical practice in the health care setting.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Frohman, Rena

    2013-07-01

    The number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students seeking enrollment in higher education courses in Western countries where English is the predominant language has grown considerably in the past decade, especially in undergraduate health care courses. When enrolled in nursing courses, students are required to complete clinical placements. Such experiences can create significant challenges for CALD students where language, cultural differences, and interpretation of cultural norms complicate the learning process. To assist CALD nursing students to transition successfully, an extracurricular integrated curriculum program was developed and implemented at a university in Queensland, Australia. The program is a series of interactive workshops based on the principles of caring pedagogy and student-centered learning. The program applies strategies that combine small-group discussions with peers, role-plays, and interactions with final-year nursing student volunteers. Evaluation of the program suggests it has assisted most of the students surveyed to be successful in their clinical studies.

  7. CPI (clinical practice improvement): improving quality and decreasing cost in managed care.

    PubMed

    Horn, S D

    1995-07-01

    The focus on quality has never been greater. As a result, a new concept, clinical practice improvement (CPI), is emerging. Clinical practice improvement is the application of the scientific method to the day-to-day practice of medicine and can be employed in all health care settings: inpatient or ambulatory, large or small. According to the author, CPI has proved to be effective in reducing costs and improving outcomes because it requires the committed support of clinicians who are involved directly in the process of designing studies, analyzing data, and developing more efficient forms of treatment in their own organizations. PMID:10143825

  8. Appropriateness of medical admissions from a Malaysian public primary care clinic.

    PubMed

    Chan, S C

    1999-09-01

    Appropriateness of medical admissions from a Malaysian public primary care clinic (Outpatient Department, Hospital Ipoh) was assessed by two physicians using a modified appropriateness evaluation protocol. Of 122 admissions between 16/6/96 and 15/7/96, 107 records (88%) could be traced from the records office. Eighty percent (86/107) were found to be appropriate and 20% (21/107) inappropriate admissions. Inappropriate admissions included admissions to the wrong discipline and patients who could be investigated and stabilised as outpatients or could be referred to specialist clinics. Protocols, provisions for urgent referrals and medical updates for doctors are recommended.

  9. Clinical trials, case studies, and oral care R&D: inclusivity, consistency, and other atypical evidence.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robert W

    2010-03-01

    Evidence-based assessment plays an obvious, growing, and critical role in directly informing clinical decisions in dentistry. The inputs are complex from diverse sources, and outcomes can appreciably influence the research and development process. Emerging trends may indicate the need for assessment of even more complex data. As exemplified by whitening strips development, inclusive, consistent, and atypical evidence may be considered for informed decision making. In addition to the direct applications, such assessment may indirectly support decision making by professional associations, government authorities, and other health care organizations that influence clinical practice behaviors.

  10. Trifecta approach to breastfeeding: clinical care in the integrated mental health model.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Maya; Dunn, Dena M; Watkins, Lorry; Talmi, Ayelet

    2014-05-01

    The breastfeeding experience for the mother and infant is often complicated by a constellation of challenges that are difficult for lactation consultants alone to treat. To address this issue, a breastfeeding consultation clinic at Children's Hospital Colorado developed a multidisciplinary team: a pediatrician specializing in breastfeeding medicine, a lactation consultant, and a clinical psychologist specializing in infant mental health and child development. This Trifecta Breastfeeding Approach meets families' needs by addressing the infant's medical care, functional breastfeeding challenges, and the developing mother-infant relationship, and by screening for concurrent pregnancy-related mood disorders. The Approach also recognizes family dynamics and the transition to parenthood within the breastfeeding consultation. Issues of lost expectations, grief, infertility, high-risk infants, and fussiness often need to be addressed. Case examples here illustrate the benefits of this multidisciplinary, integrated health model. This type of integrated care will likely have an increased presence in health care systems as reimbursement for psychologists' fees and innovative models of care continue to emerge. PMID:24595703

  11. Comparing fibromyalgia patients from primary care and rheumatology settings: clinical and psychosocial features.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Ana Lledó; Mira Pastor, Maria Angeles; Calatayud, Nieves Pons; Lopez-Roig, Sofía; Cantero Terol, Maria Carmen

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical symptoms, perceived health status, health resource use and psychosocial features in fibromyalgia (FM) patients at different health care levels. A total of 315 participants were recruited from primary care (PC) (n=101) and rheumatology settings (RS) (n=214). Subjects completed a protocol of clinical features and health resource use, hospital anxiety and depression scale, sickness impact profile, chronic pain self-efficacy scale, multidimensional pain locus of control scale, perceived health competence scale and chronic pain coping inventory. Student's t test, effect size, and contrast and power test were performed to examine differences between samples. FM patients treated in PC and RS were similar in most variables assessed and only differed significantly in tender points, sleep disturbance, wellness-focused coping strategies and in self-efficacy beliefs. The similarities do not support patient selection through care levels and thus, in the Spanish health care system at least, endorse PC as a reference unit for treatment and questioning the benefits of referring patients to RS.

  12. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Smoking Cessation Treatments Provided in HIV Clinical Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Identifying successful smoking treatment interventions and methods of delivery is critical given the smoking rates among HIV-positive populations and the medical implications of smoking in this population. This study compared the efficacy of 3 smoking cessation interventions provided in HIV clinical treatment settings. Methods: Following a baseline assessment, 209 HIV-positive smokers were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions in a parallel group design. Treatment conditions were individual counseling plus nicotine replacement treatment (NRT), a computer-based Internet smoking treatment plus NRT, and self-help plus NRT. Smoking status was determined at follow-up assessments completed at 12, 24, 36, and 52 weeks following treatment initiation. Results: Cessation rates ranged from 15% to 29%; however, no statistically significant differences in abstinence were found among the treatment conditions over time. Those employed, those who reported a greater desire to quit, or those with lower mood disturbance scores were more likely to achieve abstinence (p < .01). The number of cigarettes participants reported smoking in the 24hr prior to each assessment significantly declined over time (p < .001). Conclusions: Although we found no differences in abstinence rates across groups, the results indicate that integration of smoking cessation interventions is feasible in HIV clinical treatment settings, and cessation results are promising. The overall abstinence rates we report are comparable to those found in similar treatment studies across multiple populations. Further research is warranted. PMID:23430708

  13. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Joshua; Rosedahl, Jordan; Finnie, Dawn; Glasgow, Amy; Takahashi, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL). Aims To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT) program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care) aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16). Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21). Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant differences in self-reported general, physical, or mental health. Conclusion We detected no difference over time in QoL between MCCT patients and those receiving usual care, and a nonsignificant QoL decline in MCCT participants after 1 year. Progression of chronic disease may overwhelm any QoL improvement attributable to the MCCT intervention. The MCCT interventions may blunt expected declines in QoL, producing

  14. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Joshua; Rosedahl, Jordan; Finnie, Dawn; Glasgow, Amy; Takahashi, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL). Aims To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT) program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care) aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16). Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21). Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant differences in self-reported general, physical, or mental health. Conclusion We detected no difference over time in QoL between MCCT patients and those receiving usual care, and a nonsignificant QoL decline in MCCT participants after 1 year. Progression of chronic disease may overwhelm any QoL improvement attributable to the MCCT intervention. The MCCT interventions may blunt expected declines in QoL, producing

  15. Effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rebekah J; Campbell, Jennifer A; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations.

  16. Effective Strategies for Global Health Research, Training and Clinical Care: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Rebekah J.; Campbell, Jennifer A.; Egede, Leonard E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations. PMID:25716404

  17. Alcohol Screening among Opioid Agonist Patients in a Primary Care Clinic and an Opioid Treatment Program

    PubMed Central

    Klimas, Jan; Muench, John; Wiest, Katharina; Croff, Raina; Rieckmann, Traci; McCarty, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n =208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. Among the patients treated in the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counsellors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested organizational, structural, provider, patient and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow. PMID:25715074

  18. Focused Cardiovascular Care for Women: The Need and Role in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mariana; Miller, Virginia M; Gulati, Martha; Hayes, Sharonne N; Manson, JoAnn E; Wenger, Nanette K; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Mankad, Rekha; Pollak, Amy W; Mieres, Jennifer; Kling, Juliana; Mulvagh, Sharon L

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, an emerging clinical research focus on cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD) risk in women has highlighted sex-specific factors that are uniquely important in the prevention and early detection of coronary atherosclerosis in women. Concurrently, a 30% decrease in the number of female deaths from CVD has been observed. Despite this, CVD continues to be the leading cause of death in women, outnumbering deaths from all other causes combined. Clinical practice approaches that focus on the unique aspects of CV care for women are needed to provide necessary resources for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of CVD in women. In addition to increasing opportunities for women to participate in CV research, Women's Heart Clinics offer unique settings in which to deliver comprehensive CV care and education, ensuring appropriate diagnostic testing, while monitoring effectiveness of treatment. This article reviews the emerging need and role of focused CV care to address sex-specific aspects of diagnosis and treatment of CVD in women. PMID:26848004

  19. The prevalence of medical/clinical technology over psychosocial care actions in outpatient mental health services.

    PubMed

    Fiorati, Regina Celia; Saeki, Toyoko

    2013-10-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate how aspects of mental health policy in Brazil have been conceived and implemented in outpatient services, such as the Regional Outpatient Mental Health Clinic and the Psychosocial Care Center II, both in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo. Semi-direct interviews and focus groups were conducted with 22 health professionals. The theoretical method and data analysis were supported by the dialectical hermeneutic framework of Jürgen Habermas. The following aspects were detected: considerable technological advancement in health actions and centrality of clinical-medical technology in relation to other nonmedical therapeutic actions; the prioritization of treatment options emphasizing pathology and drug therapy, and a process of mounting precariousness in labor relations. With respect to psychosocial rehabilitation, analysis revealed that instrumental and technically-oriented treatment is imposed upon the practical and dialogical rationale proposed by Brazilian Psychiatric Reform. As an alternative, participatory evaluative research is required in order to unify clinical and psychosocial rehabilitation actions in therapeutic projects, while establishing mechanisms to promote the improvement of care based on the psychosocial care model.

  20. Clinical metric and medication persistency effects: evidence from a Medicaid care management program.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gregory D; Leary, Fredric; Medina, Wendie; Donnelly, Shawn; Warnick, Kathleen

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to estimate clinical metric and medication persistency impacts of a care management program. The data sources were Medicaid administrative claims for a sample population of 32,334 noninstitutionalized Medicaid-only aged, blind, or disabled patients with diagnosed conditions of asthma, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, or heart failure between 2005 and 2009. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test the hypothesis that exposure to a care management intervention increased the likelihood of having the appropriate medication or procedures performed, as well as increased medication persistency. Statistically significant clinical metric improvements occurred in each of the 5 conditions studied. Increased medication persistency was found for beta-blocker medication for members with coronary artery disease, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker and diuretic medications for members with heart failure, bronchodilator and corticosteroid medications for members with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and aspirin/antiplatelet medications for members with diabetes. This study demonstrates that a care management program increases the likelihood of having an appropriate medication dispensed and/or an appropriate clinical test performed, as well as increased likelihood of medication persistency, in people with chronic conditions.

  1. What Would It Take? Stakeholders’ Views and Preferences for Implementing a Health Care Manager Program in Community Mental Health Clinics Under Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Gomes, Arminda P.; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders’ recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice. PMID:25542194

  2. The accuracy of clinical malaria case reporting at primary health care facilities in Honiara, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Kunimitsu, Ayano

    2009-01-01

    Background The accuracy of malaria case reporting is challenging due to restricted human and material resources in many countries. The reporting often depends on the clinical diagnosis because of the scarcity of microscopic examinations. Particularly, clinical malaria case reporting by primary health care facilities (local clinics), which constitutes the baseline data of surveillance, has never previously been sufficiently evaluated. In order to improve the malaria reporting system to the level required to eventually eliminate this disease, this study estimates the gaps between the records of clinics and government statistics regarding the incidence of clinical malaria, and then also examines some factors that might explain the data discrepancy, including such variables as clinic staffing and record keeping. Methods All medical records for outpatients in 2007, handwritten by nurses, were collected from local clinics in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands. The all-monthly clinical malaria cases were then recalculated. The corresponding monthly data in official statistics were provided by the government. Next, in order to estimate any data discrepancy, the ratio of the cases recorded at clinics to the cases reported to the government was determined on the monthly basis. Finally, the associations between the monthly discrepancy and other variables were evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. Results The mean data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics was 21.2% (n = 96). Significant associations were observed between the discrepancy and the average number of patients (coefficient: 0.05, 95%CI: 0.31, 0.07), illegible handwriting (coefficient: 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.15), the use of tally sheets (coefficient:-0.38, 95%CI: -0.54, -0.22), and the clinic level (coefficient:-0.48, 95%CI:-0.89,-0.06). Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the huge data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics in

  3. SU-E-T-588: Characterization and Clinical Validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dewyngaert, K; Jozsef, G; Formenti, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care: a platform for prone breast radiation therapy. Methods: Patients treated using Breast Conserving Radiation Therapy may benefit from treatment in the prone position with the breast tissue falling freely away from the body. This geometry allows the breast tissue to be treated while avoiding the lung and heart tissue. Eighteen patients simulated and treated using the Varian Medical Systems Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care were monitored over the course of treatment for positioning integrity and reproducibility. As this carbon-fiber platform actually replaces a portion of the couch top, indexing is inherent to its design. Patients were positioned on the couch and aligned using fiducial markers and lateral SSD to the breast fiducial point. The daily couch coordinates then serves as indicators for positioning variability with this system. Results: The variations in couch vertical, longitudinal and lateral positions were centered on a mean value of zero with standard deviations of 0.44cm, 0.75cm and 0.79cm respectively. Other factors explored were variations in distance of mid-sternum to table edge and patient rotation into the opening. The median rotation of the chest wall was found to be 11.5 degrees at CT-Simulation with a median distance of 2.5cm from midsternum to support opening. Patient rotation was not associated with either breast size or distance from edge of platform. Conclusion: The Pivotal™ Treatment solution consists of a couch top that replaces the standard top and as such is open from beneath without obstruction. This is a distinction from all other solutions which rely on a platform positioned above and indexed to the treatment couch. We found the reproducibility to be consistent with our historical measures while offering benefits of an integrated solution as stated above. supported by Professional Services Agreeement with

  4. Evaluation of Team-Based Care in an Urban Free Clinic Setting.

    PubMed

    Iddins, Brenda W; Frank, Jennifer Sandson; Kannar, Pegah; Curry, William A; Mullins, Melissa; Hites, Lisle; Selleck, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the experiences of a school of nursing, academic health center, and community-based organization working via an interprofessional collaborative practice model to meet the mutual goal of serving the health care needs of an indigent, largely minority population in Birmingham, Alabama. The population suffers disproportionately from chronic health problems including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and mental health disorders. The program emphasizes diabetes management because the academic health center recognized the need for transitional and primary care, including mental health services, for the increasing numbers of uninsured patients with diabetes and its comorbidities. Half of the clinicians involved in this project had no prior experience with interprofessional collaborative practice, and there was confusion regarding the roles of team members from the partnering institutions. Activities involving care coordination consistently received low scores on weekly rating scales leading to the creation of positions for a nurse care manager and pharmaceutical patient assistance program coordinator. Conversely, shared decision making and cooperation ratings were consistently high. Evaluation identified the need for reliable, accessible data and data analysis to target clinically effective interventions and care coordination and to assess cost effectiveness. The strengths, challenges, lessons learned, and next steps required for sustainability of this alignment are discussed. PMID:26049603

  5. Clinical research, prophylaxis, therapy, and care for HIV disease in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, K M; Lucas, S B; Lucas, S; Agness, J; Kadio, A; Gayle, H D

    1993-01-01

    By the end of the century, citizens of resource-poor countries will constitute 90% of the world's human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people. Clinical management of such persons in developing countries has been neglected; most AIDS research has concentrated on epidemiology, and donor agencies have generally invested in the prevention of HIV infection. The heavy burden of HIV disease in Africa requires that care for AIDS be addressed, and prevention and care should be seen as interrelated. Prevention and treatment of tuberculosis, the commonest severe infection in persons with AIDS in Africa, illustrate this interrelationship. We outline priorities for applied research on the management of HIV disease in a resource-poor environment, and discuss prophylaxis, therapy for opportunistic diseases, terminal care, and use of antiretroviral therapy. Research should define the standard of care that can realistically be demanded for HIV disease in a resource-poor environment. Research and public health programs for AIDS in developing countries must address AIDS care and attempt to reduce the widening gap between interventions available for HIV-infected persons in different parts of the world. PMID:8214225

  6. A mixed methods evaluation of a patient care clinic located within a pharmacy school.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Derek J; Landry, Eric J L; Lysak, Katherine J

    2016-08-01

    Background The Medication Assessment Center is a faculty and student run patient care clinic located within the pharmacy school at the University of Saskatchewan (Canada). It was created as a novel experiential education site for pharmacy students and to provide clinical pharmacist services for complex patients who have trouble accessing services elsewhere. Objective To determine if the clinical services provided by faculty and students at the Medication Assessment Center are valuable to patients who are referred to the program. Setting The Medication Assessment Center, which is faculty and student run patient care clinic. Method Convergent mixed methods design comprised of a retrospective patient chart audit and a paper based patient experience survey. All patients who attended at least one appointment at the Medication Assessment Center between March 1, 2014 and July 31, 2015 were included in the chart audit. All new patients who were referred between April 1, 2015 and October 26, 2015 were included in the survey. Main outcome measures Recommendations made by the pharmacist and patient experience survey indicators. Results 173 patients were included in the chart audit, which found that patients were elderly (64.8 years), highly medically complex (13.8 medications and 6.5 diagnoses each), and had a large number of recommendations made by the pharmacist to adjust drug therapy (6.2 per patient). 121 questionnaires were mailed to patients with a response rate of 66.9 % (n = 81). The survey found high levels of support and satisfaction for the program, including more than half of patients (59.2 %) who reported that their health had improved as a result of the Medication Assessment Center. Conclusion The patient care and experiential education program offered by the Medication Assessment Center provides a valuable service to patients who are referred to the clinic. PMID:27166829

  7. Clinical audit of multidisciplinary care at a medium-sized hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary care is a key enabler in the provision of high quality care for cancer patients. Despite compelling evidence supporting their benefit to patients and for providers, multidisciplinary cancer conferences (MCC) are not universally occurring. Team composition of MCC reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the body. Lack of nursing input can have a negative impact on team decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate multidisciplinary care and adherence to national recommendations at a medium-sized hospital through a clinical audit of cancer conferences and clinical records. Methods A total of 77 multidisciplinary cancer conferences were visited and 496 electronic health records were reviewed. The regularity of meetings and multidisciplinary attendance were evaluated. Each electronic health record was checked to verify documented prospective discussion before any treatment was started. Results Nine multidisciplinary teams meet on a weekly or biweekly basis at the hospital with an average number of ten people and six different specialties represented. Average duration of meetings was 46.8 min. Though most patients (64.5%) were discussed at some point at the relevant cancer conference, only 40% had a documented multidisciplinary team discussion prior to the first treatment. Pathological stage (pTNM) was documented in 53.6% of clinical records. Conclusions Nursing representatives should be included as usual attendees at cancer conferences. Prospective discussion of all cancer cases should be encouraged. Use of checklists and systematic collection of key information, specifically cancer staging, could improve clinical documentation in the electronic clinical record. PMID:24597686

  8. [Mediation of transcultural nursing care in clinical context: a tightrope walk].

    PubMed

    Domenig, D

    1999-12-01

    Our wish for suggestions for a line of action regarding our contact with migrants in the clinical context has led us to an increased acceptance of "Transcultural Nursing" by Madeleine Leininger. However, an uncritical adoption of this theory without theoretical and historical background information produces in practice a stereotyped image of migrants, and a cultural rating of social and individual aspects instead of mutual understanding. Hence, from the present-day perspective, Leininger's model is not suitable to establish transcultural nursing care in practice. A theory not encouraging the analysis of socio-cultural backgrounds of one's own but the sight "from without" of the so-called alien--a theory that does not make interaction its main object but culture, cannot serve as a basis for transcultural nursing care. Up-to-date transcultural nursing care does not need the introduction of a specific nursing concept for migrants but an extension of nursing by a socio-cultural and migration-specific dimension. However, nursing care does not seem to accept this challenge, what with it being far easier to add the "Leininger Culture Care Theory" to the existing curricula as an additional model. Thus nursing loses the opportunity of grappling with the adoption of certain theories and models of other disciplines. Even though Leininger is herself a nurse, she has developed her model in her capacity as a cultural anthropologist using the background of anthropological theories. But, the supplying of transcultural nursing care demands also from cultural anthropologists an analysis of the concrete context of nursing care and its approaches. Only by bearing this in mind, cultural anthropology can counter effectively the danger of being marginalized as a fringe discipline, and of being reduced to the level of providing cooking recipes.

  9. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made. PMID:26641959

  10. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  11. Engaging hospitalized patients in clinical care: Study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Prey, Jennifer; Ryan, Beatriz; Alarcon, Irma; Qian, Min; Bakken, Suzanne; Feiner, Steven; Hripcsak, George; Polubriaginof, Fernanda; Restaino, Susan; Schnall, Rebecca; Strong, Philip; Vawdrey, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who are better informed and more engaged in their health care have higher satisfaction with health care and better health outcomes. While patient engagement has been a focus in the outpatient setting, strategies to engage inpatients in their care have not been well studied. We are undertaking a study to assess how patients’ information needs during hospitalization can be addressed with health information technologies. To achieve this aim, we developed a personalized inpatient portal that allows patients to see who is on their care team, monitor their vital signs, review medications being administered, review current and historical lab and test results, confirm allergies, document pain scores and send questions and comments to inpatient care providers. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol for the study. Methods/design This pragmatic randomized controlled trial will enroll 426 inpatient cardiology patients at an urban academic medical center into one of three arms receiving: 1) usual care, 2) iPad with general internet access, or 3) iPad with access to the personalized inpatient portal. The primary outcome of this trial is patient engagement, which is measured through the Patient Activation Measure. To assess scalability and potential reach of the intervention, we are partnering with a West Coast community hospital to deploy the patient engagement technology in their environment with an additional 160 participants. Conclusion This study employs a pragmatic randomized control trial design to test whether a personalized inpatient portal will improve patient engagement. If the study is successful, continuing advances in mobile computing technology should make these types of interventions available in a variety of clinical care delivery settings. PMID:26795675

  12. The perception of intuition in clinical practice by Iranian critical care nurses: a phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Parkhide; Abdi, Alireza; Jalali, Rostam; Salari, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Background Intuition as a way of learning in nursing is applied to decision making and judgment in complicated clinical situations. Several studies have been conducted on intuition in clinical settings, but comprehension of this concept is unclear. Moreover, there is a lack of information about intuition in critical care nurses caring for more seriously ill patients. This study aimed to explore Iranian critical care nurses’ understanding of intuition in clinical practice. Methods In a descriptive–phenomenological study, 12 nurses employed in critical care units of the hospitals affiliated to Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences were purposively recruited to the study. A semistructured interview was administered, and then written verbatim. The data were managed by MAXQDA 10 software, and qualitative analysis was undertaken using the seven-stage approach of Colaizzi. Results Of the 12 nurses who participated in the study, 7 (58.3%) were female and married, and 10 (88.3%) held a bachelor’s degree in nursing. The mean and standard deviations of participants’ age, job experience, and critical care experience were 36.66±7.01, 13.75±6.82, and 7.66±3.36 years, respectively. Four main themes and eleven sub-themes were elicited from the qualitative analysis; the main themes including “Understanding intuition as a feeling”, “Understanding intuition as a thought”, “Understanding intuition as receiving signs”, and “Understanding intuition as an alarm”. Because they have trust in their own intuition, the nurses made further assessments and paid more attention to patients. They were also better prepared after receiving intuition alarms to perform the appropriate responses, and acting upon the alarms reduced the nurses’ physical and psychological signs. Conclusion The findings showed how intuition was understood by the critical care nurses; therefore, these results can be considered to form a theoretical basis for designing other studies. Because

  13. Indices to assess patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in clinical trials, long-term observational studies, and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Castrejón, I; Tani, C; Jolly, M; Huang, A; Mosca, M

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises most currently used indices to assess and monitor patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in clinical trials, long-term observational studies, and clinical care. Six SLE disease activity indices include the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Index (BILAG), European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM), Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), Lupus Activity Index (LAI), and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ). Three SLE responder indices include Responder Index for Lupus Erythematosus (RIFLE), SLE Responder Index (SRI), and BILAG Based Combined Lupus Assessment (BICLA). Three SLE damage indices include the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology-Damage Index (SLICC/ACE-DI), Lupus Damage Index Questionnaire (LDIQ), and Brief Index of Lupus Damage (BILD). The SLAQ, LDIQ and the BILD are patient self-report questionnaires, which appear to give similar information to physician-completed indices, but are pragmatically more easily completed as patients do almost all the work. Additional self-report indices which have been used to assess and monitor patients with in SLE include a generic general health short form 36 (SF36), a SLE-specific Lupus Patient Reported Outcome (LupusPRO), and a generic rheumatology index, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3). These activity, response, damage and patient self-report indices have been validated at different levels with no consensus about what it is the most appropriate for every setting. Sensitive and feasible assessment of SLE in clinical trials, observational studies, and busy clinical settings remains a challenge to the rheumatology community.

  14. Epilepsy and seizure ontology: towards an epilepsy informatics infrastructure for clinical research and patient care

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Satya S; Lhatoo, Samden D; Gupta, Deepak K; Cui, Licong; Zhao, Meng; Jayapandian, Catherine; Bozorgi, Alireza; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy encompasses an extensive array of clinical and research subdomains, many of which emphasize multi-modal physiological measurements such as electroencephalography and neuroimaging. The integration of structured, unstructured, and signal data into a coherent structure for patient care as well as clinical research requires an effective informatics infrastructure that is underpinned by a formal domain ontology. Methods We have developed an epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) using a four-dimensional epilepsy classification system that integrates the latest International League Against Epilepsy terminology recommendations and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) common data elements. It imports concepts from existing ontologies, including the Neural ElectroMagnetic Ontologies, and uses formal concept analysis to create a taxonomy of epilepsy syndromes based on their seizure semiology and anatomical location. Results EpSO is used in a suite of informatics tools for (a) patient data entry, (b) epilepsy focused clinical free text processing, and (c) patient cohort identification as part of the multi-center NINDS-funded study on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. EpSO is available for download at http://prism.case.edu/prism/index.php/EpilepsyOntology. Discussion An epilepsy ontology consortium is being created for community-driven extension, review, and adoption of EpSO. We are in the process of submitting EpSO to the BioPortal repository. Conclusions EpSO plays a critical role in informatics tools for epilepsy patient care and multi-center clinical research. PMID:23686934

  15. Potential impact of advanced clinical information technology on cancer care in 2015.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F

    2006-08-01

    New clinical information technologies now sporadically available will soon be in routine clinical use, bringing many changes to all phases of the cancer care continuum. For example, new technologies such as: (1) The next generation Internet; (2) Real-time clinical decision support systems; (3) Off-line, population-based systems; (4) Large, integrated, individual patient-level phenotypic and genotypic databases with intelligent data mining capabilities; (5) Wireless, invasive and non-invasive physiologic monitoring devices; (6) Natural Language Processing (NLP) systems; and (7) Mathematical models of complex biological systems all have the potential to impact significantly the provision of cancer care throughout its continuum. While new information management and communication techniques and technologies will reduce many of the inefficiencies and inaccuracies of our present systems, there will be an equal, and potentially far more dangerous, set of unintended consequences. Informatics investigators, cancer specialists, and health system administrators must focus on the study of what is working and what is not, as well as, on development and testing of the new clinical information management and communication technologies, if we are to be ready for the future. PMID:16783609

  16. Practice nurse involvement in general practice clinical care: policy and funding issues need resolution.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Karnon, Jonathan; Beilby, Justin; Gray, Jodi; Holton, Christine; Banham, David

    2014-06-01

    In Australia, primary care-based funding initiatives have been implemented to encourage general practices to employ practice nurses. The aim of this paper is to discuss limitations of the current funding and policy arrangements in enhancing the clinical role of practice nurses in the management of chronic conditions. This paper draws on the results of a real-world economic evaluation, the Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP). The PCSIP linked routinely collected clinical and resource use data to undertake a risk-adjusted cost-effectiveness analysis of increased practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of diabetes and obesity. The findings of the PCSIP suggested that the active involvement of practice nurses in collaborative clinical-based activities is cost-effective, as well as addressing general practice workforce issues. Although primary healthcare organisations (e.g. Medicare Locals) can play a key role in supporting enhanced practice nurse roles, improvements to practice nurse funding models could further encourage more efficient use of an important resource. PMID:24870661

  17. Electroconvulsive therapy clinical database: a standardized approach in tertiary care psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Rai, Susan; Kivisalu, Trisha; Rabheru, Kiran; Kang, Nirmal

    2010-12-01

    Across health care disciplines research reflects the usefulness of integrating computer technology into administrative and clinical practices. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) researchers are often interested in examining 3 primary areas: patient characteristics, treatment characteristics, and treatment outcomes. Generating reports and conducting research analysis via the traditional patient chart review are a time-consuming and costly method. At Riverview Hospital, a tertiary care psychiatric hospital, the active use of a clinical database for patients receiving ECT allows for detailed treatment tracking and evaluation of pretreatment and posttreatment patient outcome measures. Initially, designed as part of a quality improvement process to readily access patient information and generate periodic reports, the ECT clinical database is now a central resource for ECT-specific patient, treatment, and outcome tracking. The relevance, design, content variables, and subsequent functions of the entry and storage of ECT-related administrative, treatment, outcome, and patient factors are clearly outlined and discussed. Strengths and limitations to the existing database are shared. Recommendations to other ECT services to implement this valuable documentation strategy are addressed. This approach can be an invaluable tool in providing the field of psychiatry with further contributions to ECT clinical outcomes. PMID:20357667

  18. Clinical Care Providers’ Perspectives on Body Size and Weight Management Among Long-Term Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Allison M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Coa, Kisha I; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Caulfield, Laura E.; Peairs, Kimberly S.; Shockney, Lillie D.; Klassen, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine clinical care providers’ perspectives on cancer survivors’ body size and weight management Study Design In-depth, semi-structured, qualitative interviews Methods Interviews were conducted with 33 providers (e.g., oncologists, surgeons, primary care providers, nurses, dietitians) across academic and community clinical settings. They were transcribed, coded, and analyzed thematically using constant comparative analysis. Results Providers conceptualized weight in relation to acute treatment, cancer outcomes, or overall health/comorbidities. These patterns were reflected in their reported framing of weight discussions, although providers indicated that they counsel patients on weight to varying extents. Perspectives differed based on professional roles and patient populations. Providers reported that survivors are motivated to lose weight, particularly due to comorbidity concerns, but face numerous barriers to doing so. Conclusion Providers described survivor-level and capacity-level factors influencing survivors’ weight management. Differences by provider type highlighted the role of provider knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs in clinical encounters. Opportunities for research and intervention include developing and disseminating evidence-based clinical resources for weight management among cancer survivors, addressing capacity barriers, and exploring communication strategies at interpersonal and population levels. PMID:25716349

  19. Evidence, research, and clinical practice: a patient-centered framework for progress in wound care.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Gray, Mikel

    2011-09-01

    Traditional criteria used in selecting wound care interventions are being slowly replaced with an evidence-based practice approach. The value of such an approach for providing optimal care has been established, but the definition of evidence- based care and the process used to generate evidence continue to evolve. For example, the role of studies developed to demonstrate efficacy, randomized controlled trials (RCT), the value of effectiveness studies designed to evaluate outcomes in real world practice, and the use of disease-oriented (interim) study outcomes for wound care research such as reduces wound fluid or improves granulation tissue formation have been topics of international conversations and consensus documents. In addition, the use in some clinical studies and most systematic study reviews of ingredient- or characteristic-based categories to group products that may not share a common operational definition of how they function has led to a high variability in outcomes, resulting in inconclusive or low-level evidence. These concerns and debates, along with their influence on practice, may cast doubt on the value of evidence-based practice guidelines for some clinicians, slowing their rate of implementation and extending the discussion about definitions of evidence-based care and the relative merits of various research designs. At the same time, amid growing concerns about medical device safety, clinicians must answer three questions about an intervention and its related products or devices in order to provide safe and effective care: 1) Can it work? 2) Does it work? 3) Is it worth it? Reviewing current knowledge about wound care, wound treatment modalities, and the basic principles of research within the existing framework of questions to be answered suggests a clear path toward obtaining much-needed evidence. In wound care, using clearly defined process- es to study patient-centered outcomes (eg, quality of life, complete healing) and

  20. Evidence, research, and clinical practice: a patient-centered framework for progress in wound care.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Gray, Mikel

    2012-01-01

    Traditional criteria used in selecting wound care interventions are being slowly replaced with an evidence-based practice approach. The value of such an approach for providing optimal care has been established, but the definition of evidence-based care and the process used to generate evidence continue to evolve. For example, the role of studies developed to demonstrate efficacy, randomized controlled trials, the value of effectiveness studies designed to evaluate outcomes in real world practice, and the use of disease-oriented (interim) study outcomes for wound care research, such as reduces wound fluid or improves granulation tissue formation, have been topics of international conversations and consensus documents. In addition, the use in some clinical studies and most systematic study reviews of ingredient or characteristic-based categories to group products that may not share a common operational definition of how they function has led to a high variability in outcomes, resulting in inconclusive or low-level evidence. These concerns and debates, along with their influence on practice, may cast doubt on the value of evidence-based practice guidelines for some clinicians, slowing their rate of implementation, and extending the discussion about definitions of evidence-based care and the relative merits of various research designs. At the same time, amid growing concerns about medical device safety, clinicians must answer 3 questions about an intervention and its related products or devices in order to provide safe and effective care: (1) Can it work? (2) Does it work? (3) Is it worth it? Reviewing current knowledge about wound care, wound treatment modalities, and the basic principles of research within the existing framework of questions to be answered suggests a clear path toward obtaining much-needed evidence. In wound care, using clearly defined processes to study patient-centered outcomes (eg, quality of life, complete healing) and only product groupings that

  1. [The health-disease-care process from the perspective of the users of a primary care clinic in Montevideo, Uruguay: An analysis of therapeutic trajectories].

    PubMed

    Evia Bertullo, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze, using an ethnographic approach, the health-disease-care experiences of the users of a multi-specialty clinic that forms part of the Metropolitan Primary Health Care Network of Uruguay's Public Health Services. The fieldwork was carried out in the northeast of Montevideo from July 2012 to November 2013, combining participant observation in social and care spaces and interviews with more than 20 users. In our analysis of care trajectories we found that people incorporate different practices and beliefs when facing their health problems. The use of biomedical health care services is predominant in Uruguay; nevertheless, people engage in self-care practices and in some cases, in the use of folk, religious/magical or alternative remedies. Medical pluralism is therefore observed in facing certain common ailments or significant experiences of disease.

  2. The impact of a clinical training unit on integrated child health care in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Guiscafré, H.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Villa, S.; Espinosa, P.; Bojalil, R.; Gutiérrez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This study had two aims: to describe the activities of a clinical training unit set up for the integrated management of sick children, and to evaluate the impact of the unit after its first four years of operation. The training unit was set up in the outpatient ward of a government hospital and was staffed by a paediatrician, a family medicine physician, two nurses and a nutritionist. The staff kept a computerized database for all patients seen and they were supervised once a month. During the first three years, the demand for first-time medical consultation increased by 477% for acute respiratory infections (ARI) and 134% for acute diarrhoea (AD), with an average annual increase of demand for medical care of 125%. Eighty-nine per cent of mothers who took their child for consultation and 85% of mothers who lived in the catchment area and had a deceased child received training on how to recognize alarming signs in a sick child. Fifty-eight per cent of these mothers were evaluated as being properly trained. Eighty-five per cent of primary care physicians who worked for government institutions (n = 350) and 45% of private physicians (n = 90) were also trained in the recognition and proper management of AD and ARI. ARI mortality in children under 1 year of age in the catchment area (which included about 25,000 children under 5 years of age) decreased by 43.2% in three years, while mortality in children under 5 years of age decreased by 38.8%. The corresponding figures for AD mortality reduction were 36.3% and 33.6%. In this same period, 11 clinical research protocols were written. In summary, we learned that a clinical training unit for integrated child care management was an excellent way to offer in-service training for primary health care physicians. PMID:11417039

  3. Measurement of retention in care among adults infected with HIV in an urban clinic.

    PubMed

    Marx, Katherine A; Malka, Edmond S; Ravishankar, Jayashree; Schwartz, Rebecca M

    2011-10-01

    Adults infected with HIV live longer when they receive regular medical care, yet many adults are not retained in care. Providers measure retention in order to evaluate interventions to improve retention and quality of HIV care. However, multiple measures for retention exist. This study compares two methods of operationalizing retention and evaluates the contribution of individual characteristics on the likelihood of retention. A chart review was performed for a random sample of 212 active clients of an urban HIV primary care clinic. Data on clinic utilization, sex, age, race, mental illness, substance use, AIDS diagnosis, language, and housing were collected for each participant. Clinic utilization data were used to classify participants for retention status and to score them by frequency of visits. Binary logistic regression analysis was compared with ordinal logistic regression analysis, using distinct retention measures as outcome variables. In the binary model, those with a history of substance use were about half as likely to be retained (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.29-0.94) and those with an AIDS diagnosis were more than twice as likely to be retained (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.17-4.09). These characteristics were significant predictors in the ordinal model, with the additional finding that those reporting English as a primary language were less likely to have higher retention scores (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.19-0.84). An ordinal score for retention can identify unexpected predictors, but a dichotomous measure of retention may be easier to use and interpret for providers involved in retention-related quality improvement activities.

  4. Diagnosis of paediatric HIV infection in a primary health care setting with a clinical algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, C.; Liebeschuetz, S.; Blaauw, D.; Cassol, S.; Qazi, S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity of an algorithm used by primary care health workers to identify children with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This HIV algorithm is being implemented in South Africa as part of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), a strategy that aims to improve childhood morbidity and mortality by improving care at the primary care level. As AIDS is a leading cause of death in children in southern Africa, diagnosis and management of symptomatic HIV infection was added to the existing IMCI algorithm. METHODS: In total, 690 children who attended the outpatients department in a district hospital in South Africa were assessed with the HIV algorithm and by a paediatrician. All children were then tested for HIV viral load. The validity of the algorithm in detecting symptomatic HIV was compared with clinical diagnosis by a paediatrician and the result of an HIV test. Detailed clinical data were used to improve the algorithm. FINDINGS: Overall, 198 (28.7%) enrolled children were infected with HIV. The paediatrician correctly identified 142 (71.7%) children infected with HIV, whereas the IMCI/HIV algorithm identified 111 (56.1%). Odds ratios were calculated to identify predictors of HIV infection and used to develop an improved HIV algorithm that is 67.2% sensitive and 81.5% specific in clinically detecting HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Children with symptomatic HIV infection can be identified effectively by primary level health workers through the use of an algorithm. The improved HIV algorithm developed in this study could be used by countries with high prevalences of HIV to enable IMCI practitioners to identify and care for HIV-infected children. PMID:14997238

  5. AB022. Harnessing big data to transform clinical care of cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the heart and vascular system are the leading causes of mortality worldwide. A number of risk factors have already been identified such as obesity, diabetes and smoking; in the recent years, research has shifted its focus on genetic risk factors. Discoveries on the role of genes partnered with the technological developments have enabled advances in the understanding of human genetics and its influence on disease and treatment. There are initiatives now to combine medical records and genetic and other molecular data into a single “knowledge network” to achieve these aptly known as precision medicine. With next generation sequencing readily available at a more affordable cost, it is expected that genetic information of patients will be increasingly available and can be used to guide clinical decisions. Big data generated and stored necessitates broad and extensive interpretation to be valuable in clinical care. Accumulating evidence on the use of such genetic information in the cardiovascular clinics will be presented.

  6. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ellen A.; Shakbatyan, Rimma; Evans, Jason; Rossetti, Peter; Graham, Chet; Sharma, Himanshu; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lebo, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient’s genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS) with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS. PMID:26927186

  7. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ellen A; Shakbatyan, Rimma; Evans, Jason; Rossetti, Peter; Graham, Chet; Sharma, Himanshu; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lebo, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient's genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS) with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS. PMID:26927186

  8. Medical Care in a Free Clinic: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Patient Experience, Incentives, and Barriers to Optimal Medical Care with Consideration of a Facility Fee

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinwei; Nash, Bee; Sullivan, Sara; Garris, Stephanie; Hardy, Marvin; Lee, Michael; Simms-Cendan, Judith; Pasarica, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Free and charitable clinics are important contributors to the health of the United States population. Recently, funding for these clinics has been declining, and it is, therefore, useful to identify what qualities patients value the most in clinics in an effort to allocate funding wisely. In order to identify targets and incentives for improvement of patients’ health, we performed a comprehensive analysis of patients’ experience at a free clinic by analyzing a patient survey (N=94). The survey also assessed patient opinions of a small facility fee, which could be used to offset the decrease in funds. Interestingly, our patients believed it is appropriate to be charged a facility fee (78%) because it increases involvement in their care (r = 0.69, p < 0.001) and self-respect (r = 0.66, p < 0.001). Incentives to medical care include continuity of care, faith-based care, having a patient medical provider partnership, and charging a facility fee. Barriers include affordable housing, transportation, medication, and accessible information. In order to improve medical care in the uninsured population, our study suggested that we need to: 1) offer continuity of medical care; 2) offer affordable preventive health screenings; 3) support affordable transportation, housing, and medications; and 4) consider including a facility fee. PMID:27014534

  9. Incorporating Experiential Learning Techniques to Improve Self-Efficacy in Clinical Special Care Dentistry Education.

    PubMed

    Watters, Amber L; Stabulas-Savage, Jeanine; Toppin, James D; Janal, Malvin N; Robbins, Miriam R

    2015-09-01

    The New York University College of Dentistry has introduced a clinical rotation for fourth-year dental students that focuses on treating people with special health care needs (PSN). The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that clinical experience in treating patients with special health care needs during predoctoral education is associated with increased self-assessed student ability and comfort and therefore self-efficacy. The study also investigated whether other characteristics, such as prior personal or volunteer experience with this population, service-mindedness, and/or the inclination to treat underserved populations, were associated with comfort in treating PSN. A survey was used to assess changes in students' perceived knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes regarding treating PSN before and after the clinical experience for July 2012-June 2013. The survey included questions about students' service-mindedness, comfort, perceptions of abilities of PSN and educational importance of learning to treat PSN, desire for clinical experience, and future intent or interest in treating PSN. Out of 364 students invited to participate, 127 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 34.9%. The results showed statistically significant increases on six items following training: impressions about the importance of oral health among PSN, comfort in treating people with cognitive disabilities and with medical complexities, intent to treat PSN in future practice, interest in including PSN in postgraduate training, and belief that PSN could be treated in the private practice setting. These students reported preferring to learn in the clinical setting over didactic instruction. This clinical experience was associated with improved self-efficacy in treating PSN and increased intentions to treat this population in future practice. Improvements were particularly evident among those with the least prior experience with PSN and were independent of other aspects of the

  10. Incorporating Experiential Learning Techniques to Improve Self-Efficacy in Clinical Special Care Dentistry Education.

    PubMed

    Watters, Amber L; Stabulas-Savage, Jeanine; Toppin, James D; Janal, Malvin N; Robbins, Miriam R

    2015-09-01

    The New York University College of Dentistry has introduced a clinical rotation for fourth-year dental students that focuses on treating people with special health care needs (PSN). The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that clinical experience in treating patients with special health care needs during predoctoral education is associated with increased self-assessed student ability and comfort and therefore self-efficacy. The study also investigated whether other characteristics, such as prior personal or volunteer experience with this population, service-mindedness, and/or the inclination to treat underserved populations, were associated with comfort in treating PSN. A survey was used to assess changes in students' perceived knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes regarding treating PSN before and after the clinical experience for July 2012-June 2013. The survey included questions about students' service-mindedness, comfort, perceptions of abilities of PSN and educational importance of learning to treat PSN, desire for clinical experience, and future intent or interest in treating PSN. Out of 364 students invited to participate, 127 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 34.9%. The results showed statistically significant increases on six items following training: impressions about the importance of oral health among PSN, comfort in treating people with cognitive disabilities and with medical complexities, intent to treat PSN in future practice, interest in including PSN in postgraduate training, and belief that PSN could be treated in the private practice setting. These students reported preferring to learn in the clinical setting over didactic instruction. This clinical experience was associated with improved self-efficacy in treating PSN and increased intentions to treat this population in future practice. Improvements were particularly evident among those with the least prior experience with PSN and were independent of other aspects of the

  11. Clinical Alarms in Intensive Care Units: Perceived Obstacles of Alarm Management and Alarm Fatigue in Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ok Min; Lee, Young Whee; Cho, Insook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the current situation of clinical alarms in intensive care unit (ICU), nurses' recognition of and fatigue in relation to clinical alarms, and obstacles in alarm management. Methods Subjects were ICU nurses and devices from 48 critically ill patient cases. Data were collected through direct observation of alarm occurrence and questionnaires that were completed by the ICU nurses. The observation time unit was one hour block. One bed out of 56 ICU beds was randomly assigned to each observation time unit. Results Overall 2,184 clinical alarms were counted for 48 hours of observation, and 45.5 clinical alarms occurred per hour per subject. Of these, 1,394 alarms (63.8%) were categorized as false alarms. The alarm fatigue score was 24.3 ± 4.0 out of 35. The highest scoring item was "always get bothered due to clinical alarms". The highest scoring item in obstacles was "frequent false alarms, which lead to reduced attention or response to alarms". Conclusions Nurses reported that they felt some fatigue due to clinical alarms, and false alarms were also obstacles to proper management. An appropriate hospital policy should be developed to reduce false alarms and nurses' alarm fatigue. PMID:26893950

  12. Provision of Private Care by Doctors Employed in Public Health Institutions: Ethical Considerations and Implications for Clinical Training.

    PubMed

    Benbassat, Jochanan

    2015-06-01

    This paper summarizes the difficulties that may emerge when the same care-provider attends to private and public patients within the same or different clinical settings. First, I argue that blurring the boundaries between public and private care may start a slippery slope leading to "black" under-the-table payments for preferential patient care. Second, I question whether public hospitals that allow their doctors to attend to private patients provide an appropriate learning environment for medical students and residents. Finally, I propose a way to both maintain the advantages of private care and avoid its negative consequences: complete separation between the public and the private health care systems.

  13. A qualitative study of the cultural changes in primary care organisations needed to implement clinical governance.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Martin; Sheaff, Rod; Rogers, Anne; Campbell, Stephen; Halliwell, Shirley; Pickard, Susan; Sibbald, Bonnie; Roland, Martin

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is commony claimed that changing the culture of health organisations is a fundamental prerequisite for improving the National Health Service (NHS). Little is currently known about the nature or importance of culture and cultural change in primary care groups and trusts (PCG/Ts) or their constituent general practices. AIMS: To investigate the importance of culture and cultural change for the implementation of clinical governance in general practice by PCG/Ts, to identify perceived desirable and undesirable cultural attributes of general practice, and to describe potential facilitators and barriers to changing culture. DESIGN: Qualitative: case studies using data derived from semi-structured interviews and review of documentary evidence. SETTING: Fifty senior non-clinical and clinical managers from 12 purposely sampled PCGs or trusts in England. RESULTS: Senior primary care managers regard culture and cultural change as fundamental aspects of clinical governance. The most important desirable cultural traits were the value placed on a commitment to public accountability by the practices, their willingness to work together and learn from each other, and the ability to be self-critical and learn from mistakes. The main barriers to cultural change were the high level of autonomy of practices and the perceived pressure to deliver rapid measurable changes in general practice. CONCLUSIONS: The culture of general practice is perceived to be an important component of health system reform and quality improvement. This study develops our understanding of a changing organisational culture in primary care; however, further work is required to determine whether culture is a useful practical lever for initiating or managing improvement. PMID:12171222

  14. Adjunctive naturopathic care for type 2 diabetes: patient-reported and clinical outcomes after one year

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several small, uncontrolled studies have found improvements in self-care behaviors and reductions in clinical risk in persons with type 2 diabetes who received care from licensed naturopathic physicians. To extend these findings and determine the feasibility and promise of a randomized clinical trial, we conducted a prospective study to measure the effects of adjunctive naturopathic care (ANC) in primary care patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods Forty patients with type 2 diabetes were invited from a large integrated health care system to receive up to eight ANC visits for up to one year. Participants were required to have hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values between 7.5-9.5 % and at least one additional cardiovascular risk factor (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia or overweight). Standardized instruments were administered by telephone to collect outcome data on self-care, self-efficacy, diabetes problem areas, perceived stress, motivation, and mood. Changes from baseline scores were calculated at 6- and 12-months after entry into the study. Six and 12-month changes in clinical risk factors (i.e., HbA1c, lipid and blood pressure) were calculated for the ANC cohort, and compared to changes in a cohort of 329 eligible, non-participating patients constructed using electronic medical records data. Between-cohort comparisons were adjusted for age, gender, baseline HbA1c, and diabetes medications. Six months was pre-specified as the primary endpoint for outcome assessment. Results Participants made 3.9 ANC visits on average during the year, 78 % of which occurred within six months of entry into the study. At 6-months, significant improvements were found in most patient-reported measures, including glucose testing (P = 0.001), diet (P = 0.001), physical activity (P = 0.02), mood (P = 0.001), self-efficacy (P = 0.0001) and motivation to change lifestyle (P = 0.003). Improvements in glucose testing, mood, self-efficacy and motivation to change

  15. [Exactly what is ethical nursing care? the perspective of the clinical humanities].

    PubMed

    Yu, An-Bang

    2014-10-01

    As Taiwan enters the post-modern era of professional medical care, a host of issues relating to nursing care are becoming increasingly pressing. On the one hand, the wide range of ailments of body and mind requiring treatment is placing a major financial burden on the national health care system. On the other hand, few hospitals are able to provide "comprehensive care of body and mind." In addition to primary prevention, the most effective way to reduce the overall cost of medical care is to effectively bring volunteer caregivers (those who have an "ethical connection" with the patient, i.e., family, friends, neighbors, volunteers, etc.) into all levels of the caregiving process. Moreover, as medical ethics becomes increasingly focused on the well-being of the patient, more attention is being given to the healing relationship itself. Due to its ability to swiftly relieve a wide variety of ailments, the Western medical model has become widely accepted in Asia. Yet, a patient may feel a greater sense of healing when treatment is based on the principles of ethical caregiving. For example, in the way it quickly relieves the prevailing symptoms, psychiatric medication is like a freeway. By contrast, volunteer caregiving is more like a local road, which may be slower, but eventually takes one all the way home. Thus, making nursing care more person-centered and indigenized gives the patient a sense of not only being cured, but also being "cared for." However, for a long time the theory and practice of nursing education in Taiwan has been based on the Western model of nursing. In this model nursing is treated as a branch of the biological sciences, an overall approach quite different from the traditional view of caregiving in Asian societies. Nonetheless, recent research and clinical practice indicates that an indigenized form of nursing care may be a more suitable approach to comprehensive care, and that such an approach has much potential for widespread application in

  16. Client Factors Affect Provider Adherence to Clinical Guidelines during First Antenatal Care

    PubMed Central

    Agyepong, Irene Akua; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P. A.; Kayode, Gbenga A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Ansah, Evelyn K

    2016-01-01

    Background The first antenatal clinic (ANC) visit helps to distinguish pregnant women who require standard care, from those with specific problems and so require special attention. There are protocols to guide care providers to provide optimal care to women during ANC. Our objectives were to determine the level of provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines in the Safe Motherhood Protocol (SMP), and assess patient factors that determine complete provider adherence. Methods This cross-sectional study is part of a cohort study that recruited women who delivered in eleven health facilities and who had utilized antenatal care services during their pregnancy in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. A record review of the first antenatal visit of participants was carried out to assess the level of adherence to the SMP, using a thirteen-point checklist. Information on their socio-demographic characteristics and previous pregnancy history was collected using a questionnaire. Percentages of adherence levels and baseline characteristics were estimated and cluster-adjusted odds ratios (OR) calculated to identify determinants. Results A total of 948 women who had delivered in eleven public facilities were recruited with a mean age (SD) of 28.2 (5.4) years. Overall, complete adherence to guidelines pertained to only 48.1% of pregnant women. Providers were significantly more likely to completely adhere to guidelines when caring for multiparous women [OR = 5.43 (1.69–17.44), p<0.01] but less likely to do so when attending to women with history of previous pregnancy complications [OR = 0.50 (0.33–0.75), p<0.01]. Conclusion Complete provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines is low across different facility types in the Greater Accra region of Ghana and is determined by parity and history of previous pregnancy complication. Providers should be trained and supported to adhere to the guidelines during provision of care to all pregnant women. PMID:27322643

  17. Renegotiating inter-professional boundaries in maternity care: implementing a clinical pathway for normal labour.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Billie; Segrott, Jeremy

    2014-06-01

    This article presents findings from a study of a clinical pathway for normal labour (Normal Labour Pathway) implemented in Wales, UK. The study was conducted between 2004 and 2006. The pathway aimed to support normal childbirth and reduce unnecessary childbirth interventions by promoting midwife-led care. This article focuses on how the pathway influenced the inter-professional relationships and boundaries between midwives and doctors. Data are drawn from semi-participant observation, focus groups and semi-structured interviews with 41 midwives, and semi-structured interviews with five midwifery managers and six doctors, working in two research sites. Whereas some studies have shown how clinical pathways may act as 'boundary objects', dissolving professional boundaries, promoting interdisciplinary care and de-differentiating professional identities, the 'normal labour pathway' was employed by midwives as an object of demarcation, which legitimised a midwifery model of care, clarified professional boundaries and accentuated differences in professional identities and approaches to childbirth. The pathway represented key characteristics of a professional project: achieving occupational autonomy and closure. Stricter delineation of the boundary between midwifery and obstetric work increased the confidence and professional visibility of midwives but left doctors feeling excluded and undervalued, and paradoxically reduced the scope of midwifery practice through redefining what counted as normal. PMID:24640992

  18. A web-based intensive care clinical decision support system: from design to evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Deniz; Bilge, Ugur; Zayim, Nese; Cengiz, Melike

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a web-based clinical decision support system (CDSS) containing clinical guidelines and protocols that will support intensive care unit (ICU) providers in making decisions more effectively and quickly. First, a survey was carried out with 38 physicians in order to determine their preferences, needs and concerns regarding decision support tools. After the survey, guidelines were prepared by a group of specialists in ICU, and a medical informatician converted the guidelines into algorithm forms. Ten CDSS were developed using the algorithms, and placed onto the Intensive Care Decision Support Website (ICDSW). In order to evaluation of the website, 15 physicians were asked to answer 10 questions in 10 different scenarios first using a paper-based approach, then with ICDSW. When the answers were analyzed, it was found that the answers given by using ICDSW were significantly better than the paper-based approach (p <  0.001). However, there was no significant difference in terms of the time needed to answer the questions (p =  0.138). The usability score of the website was 85.6 ±  8.89. The study demonstrated the successful implementation of an ICDSW within intensive care units.

  19. Renegotiating inter-professional boundaries in maternity care: implementing a clinical pathway for normal labour

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Billie; Segrott, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of a clinical pathway for normal labour (Normal Labour Pathway) implemented in Wales, UK. The study was conducted between 2004 and 2006. The pathway aimed to support normal childbirth and reduce unnecessary childbirth interventions by promoting midwife-led care. This article focuses on how the pathway influenced the inter-professional relationships and boundaries between midwives and doctors. Data are drawn from semi-participant observation, focus groups and semi-structured interviews with 41 midwives, and semi-structured interviews with five midwifery managers and six doctors, working in two research sites. Whereas some studies have shown how clinical pathways may act as ‘boundary objects’, dissolving professional boundaries, promoting interdisciplinary care and de-differentiating professional identities, the ‘normal labour pathway’ was employed by midwives as an object of demarcation, which legitimised a midwifery model of care, clarified professional boundaries and accentuated differences in professional identities and approaches to childbirth. The pathway represented key characteristics of a professional project: achieving occupational autonomy and closure. Stricter delineation of the boundary between midwifery and obstetric work increased the confidence and professional visibility of midwives but left doctors feeling excluded and undervalued, and paradoxically reduced the scope of midwifery practice through redefining what counted as normal. PMID:24640992

  20. Point-of-Care Testing for Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea: Implications for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Lisa; Maher, Lisa; Shephard, Mark; Hengel, Belinda; Tangey, Annie; Badman, Steven G.; Ward, James; Guy, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Point-of-care (POC) testing for chlamydia (CT) and gonorrhoea (NG) offers a new approach to the diagnosis and management of these sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in remote Australian communities and other similar settings. Diagnosis of STIs in remote communities is typically symptom driven, and for those who are asymptomatic, treatment is generally delayed until specimens can be transported to the reference laboratory, results returned and the patient recalled. The objective of this study was to explore the clinical implications of using CT/NG POC tests in routine clinical care in remote settings. Methods In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with a purposively selected group of 18 key informants with a range of sexual health and laboratory expertise. Results Participants highlighted the potential impact POC testing would have on different stages of the current STI management pathway in remote Aboriginal communities and how the pathway would change. They identified implications for offering a POC test, specimen collection, conducting the POC test, syndromic management of STIs, pelvic inflammatory disease diagnosis and management, interpretation and delivery of POC results, provision of treatment, contact tracing, management of client flow and wait time, and re-testing at 3 months after infection. Conclusions The introduction of POC testing to improve STI service delivery requires careful consideration of both its advantages and limitations. The findings of this study will inform protocols for the implementation of CT/NG POC testing, and also STI testing and management guidelines. PMID:24956111

  1. Using visual and narrative methods to achieve fair process in clinical care.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Laura S; Chilingerian, Jon A

    2011-02-16

    The Institute of Medicine has targeted patient-centeredness as an important area of quality improvement. A major dimension of patient-centeredness is respect for patient's values, preferences, and expressed needs. Yet specific approaches to gaining this understanding and translating it to quality care in the clinical setting are lacking. From a patient perspective quality is not a simple concept but is best understood in terms of five dimensions: technical outcomes; decision-making efficiency; amenities and convenience; information and emotional support; and overall patient satisfaction. Failure to consider quality from this five-pronged perspective results in a focus on medical outcomes, without considering the processes central to quality from the patient's perspective and vital to achieving good outcomes. In this paper, we argue for applying the concept of fair process in clinical settings. Fair process involves using a collaborative approach to exploring diagnostic issues and treatments with patients, explaining the rationale for decisions, setting expectations about roles and responsibilities, and implementing a core plan and ongoing evaluation. Fair process opens the door to bringing patient expertise into the clinical setting and the work of developing health care goals and strategies. This paper provides a step by step illustration of an innovative visual approach, called photovoice or photo-elicitation, to achieve fair process in clinical work with acquired brain injury survivors and others living with chronic health conditions. Applying this visual tool and methodology in the clinical setting will enhance patient-provider communication; engage patients as partners in identifying challenges, strengths, goals, and strategies; and support evaluation of progress over time. Asking patients to bring visuals of their lives into the clinical interaction can help to illuminate gaps in clinical knowledge, forge better therapeutic relationships with patients living

  2. Using visual and narrative methods to achieve fair process in clinical care.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Laura S; Chilingerian, Jon A

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has targeted patient-centeredness as an important area of quality improvement. A major dimension of patient-centeredness is respect for patient's values, preferences, and expressed needs. Yet specific approaches to gaining this understanding and translating it to quality care in the clinical setting are lacking. From a patient perspective quality is not a simple concept but is best understood in terms of five dimensions: technical outcomes; decision-making efficiency; amenities and convenience; information and emotional support; and overall patient satisfaction. Failure to consider quality from this five-pronged perspective results in a focus on medical outcomes, without considering the processes central to quality from the patient's perspective and vital to achieving good outcomes. In this paper, we argue for applying the concept of fair process in clinical settings. Fair process involves using a collaborative approach to exploring diagnostic issues and treatments with patients, explaining the rationale for decisions, setting expectations about roles and responsibilities, and implementing a core plan and ongoing evaluation. Fair process opens the door to bringing patient expertise into the clinical setting and the work of developing health care goals and strategies. This paper provides a step by step illustration of an innovative visual approach, called photovoice or photo-elicitation, to achieve fair process in clinical work with acquired brain injury survivors and others living with chronic health conditions. Applying this visual tool and methodology in the clinical setting will enhance patient-provider communication; engage patients as partners in identifying challenges, strengths, goals, and strategies; and support evaluation of progress over time. Asking patients to bring visuals of their lives into the clinical interaction can help to illuminate gaps in clinical knowledge, forge better therapeutic relationships with patients living

  3. Patient and provider priorities for self-reported domains of HIV clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Todd; Crane, Heidi M.; Crane, Paul K.; Merlin, Jessica; Gibbons, Laura E.; Rao, Deepa; Batey, D. Scott; Dant, Lydia; Páez, Edgar; Church, Anna; Patrick, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to understand how HIV-infected patients, their providers, and HIV care researchers prioritize self-reported domains of clinical care. Participants rank-ordered two lists of domains. A modified Delphi process was used for providers and researchers. Approximately 25% of patients were interviewed to discuss rationale for rank order choices. List 1 included anger, anxiety, depression, fatigue, physical function, pain, and sleep disturbance. List 2 included alcohol abuse, cognitive function, HIV stigma, HIV and treatment symptoms, medication adherence, positive affect, sexual risk behavior, sexual function, social roles, spirituality/meaning of life, and substance abuse. Seventy-four providers, 80 HIV care researchers and 66 patients participated. Patients ranked context-based domains, such as HIV stigma, more highly than providers, while health behaviors, such as drug or alcohol use, ranked lower. Patients described a need to address wider-context challenges such as HIV stigma in order to positively impact health behaviors. Divergent patient and provider priorities highlights the importance of incorporating views from all stakeholders and suggests the need for a care approach that more effectively addresses contextual barriers to adverse health behaviors. PMID:26304263

  4. Patient and provider priorities for self-reported domains of HIV clinical care.

    PubMed

    Fredericksen, Rob J; Edwards, Todd C; Merlin, Jessica S; Gibbons, Laura E; Rao, Deepa; Batey, D Scott; Dant, Lydia; Páez, Edgar; Church, Anna; Crane, Paul K; Crane, Heidi M; Patrick, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    We sought to understand how HIV-infected patients, their providers, and HIV care researchers prioritize self-reported domains of clinical care. Participants rank-ordered two lists of domains. A modified Delphi process was used for providers and researchers. Approximately 25% of patients were interviewed to discuss rationale for rank order choices. List 1 included anger, anxiety, depression, fatigue, physical function, pain, and sleep disturbance. List 2 included alcohol abuse, cognitive function, HIV stigma, HIV and treatment symptoms, medication adherence, positive affect, sexual risk behavior, sexual function, social roles, spirituality/meaning of life, and substance abuse. Seventy-four providers, 80 HIV care researchers, and 66 patients participated. Patients ranked context-based domains, such as HIV stigma, more highly than providers, while health behaviors, such as drug or alcohol use, ranked lower. Patients described a need to address wider-context challenges such as HIV stigma in order to positively impact health behaviors. Divergent patient and provider priorities highlight the importance of incorporating views from all stakeholders and suggests the need for a care approach that more effectively addresses contextual barriers to adverse health behaviors. PMID:26304263

  5. [Pertussis as health care workers infectious disease--the clinical case with a commentary].

    PubMed

    Kuchar, Ernest; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Szenborn, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the changing epidemiological situation of pertussis observed in recent years, with a focus on the shift of cases from young children to older age groups, teenagers and adults. Whooping cough may affect healthcare workers who belong to a high-risk group and cause hospital infections. We present a case report of pertussis in a nurse and the recommended prophylactic measures in healthcare workers. The current definition and diagnosis of pertussis is also discussed. The clinical course of pertussis can be significantly alleviated and highly non-specific, with no typical coughing and vomiting in people vaccinated against whooping cough a few years earlier. Pertussis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cough lasting more than fourteen days. Improvement of the epidemiological situation requires, besides immunization of infants, regular and universal booster immunization for adolescents and adults. Vaccinations for health care workers of neonatal and pediatric wards are recommended in the National Program of Immunization for 2013. It seems that booster vaccination of health care workers with a triple vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (dTpa) of the reduced quantity of antigens, particularly of health workers caring for infants, children and the elderly, may be the most effective way to reduce the risk of pertussis transmission in the health care environment. PMID:24502135

  6. Military family physicians' perceptions of a pocket point-of-care ultrasound device in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Paul; Bornemann, Gina

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography with a pocket ultrasound device, General Electric Medical Systems Vscan (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), has been shown to be effective and easy to learn. However, no studies to date have evaluated its use in the military primary care setting where its portability and value in bedside diagnosis would be especially beneficial. We tested the feasibility of the Vscan in the day-to-day care of patients by family physicians in their clinic, inpatient wards, and its potential for use in the military-deployed setting. Participants were trained and credentialed in the use of the point-of-care ultrasonography. Then, participants were provided with a pocket ultrasound device to use in their normal day-to-day practice. Additionally, participants completed surveys and provided ratings on their perceptions regarding the use of the device. According to the survey analysis, participants found the devices to be easy to use, valuable in discerning a diagnosis, and were not prohibitively time consuming. Moreover, patients were perceived by the participants to have been satisfied with the use of the device. Overall, participants had high satisfaction with the Vscan and perceived that the device would be highly valuable in the military-deployed setting.

  7. International student nurses' experiences of clinical practice in the Finnish health care system.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Pitkäjärvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe international student nurses' experiences of their clinical practice in the Finnish health care system. The data were collected by semi-structured interviews. Fourteen international student nurses of African and Asian origin were interviewed, and the data were then analysed by qualitative content analysis. The results indicated that appreciative orientation, sense of belonging to the team, enhancing independent working, growing towards professionalism and working as a member of the team were descriptions of positive experiences. Descriptions of negative experiences were related to restricted learning and compromised human dignity, which lead to negative feelings of being an outsider, decreased self-esteem, sense of giving up and anticipation of difficulties. Despite the small sample size, the results indicate a need to develop clinical practice arrangements when the language of the learning environment is other than that of the student nurse. As the number of international students has increased in the Finnish health care sector and in nursing education, it is important to recognise the factors related to positive and negative experiences in clinical practice.

  8. Suboptimal Clinical Documentation in Young Children with Severe Obesity at Tertiary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Cassandra C.; Lingren, Todd; Woo, Jessica G.; Kennebeck, Stephanie S.; Namjou-Khales, Bahram; Roach, Ashton; Bickel, Jonathan P.; Patibandla, Nandan; Savova, Guergana K.; Solti, Imre; Holm, Ingrid A.; Harley, John B.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Crimmins, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The prevalence of severe obesity in children has doubled in the past decade. The objective of this study is to identify the clinical documentation of obesity in young children with a BMI ≥ 99th percentile at two large tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Methods. We used a standardized algorithm utilizing data from electronic health records to identify children with severe early onset obesity (BMI ≥ 99th percentile at age <6 years). We extracted descriptive terms and ICD-9 codes to evaluate documentation of obesity at Boston Children's Hospital and Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center between 2007 and 2014. Results. A total of 9887 visit records of 2588 children with severe early onset obesity were identified. Based on predefined criteria for documentation of obesity, 21.5% of children (13.5% of visits) had positive documentation, which varied by institution. Documentation in children first seen under 2 years of age was lower than in older children (15% versus 26%). Documentation was significantly higher in girls (29% versus 17%, p < 0.001), African American children (27% versus 19% in whites, p < 0.001), and the obesity focused specialty clinics (70% versus 15% in primary care and 9% in other subspecialty clinics, p < 0.001). Conclusions. There is significant opportunity for improvement in documentation of obesity in young children, even years after the 2007 AAP guidelines for management of obesity.

  9. Changes in the American health care system: crisis in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Conn, R B; Snyder, J W

    1997-11-01

    American medicine is undergoing unprecedented changes, and the resulting distortions are affecting the economics, organization and operations of all clinical laboratories. Professionals who work in these laboratories are facing administrative and economic pressures to reduce costs, to increase productivity, and to comply with proliferating new statutes and regulations. The medical 'cottage industry' in which the patient was the focus of the medical professionals' attention and endeavours is being replaced by the corporate management of many health care activities in which financial profits are being given first priority. Medical facilities, including clinical laboratories, are being bought and sold, being consolidated, or simply being closed. The clinical laboratories may be at the vortex of the maelstrom affecting American medicine. Cost pressures are encouraging further automation and retraining of laboratory staffs. If the leaders in laboratory medicine are unable to accomplish the necessary tasks to meet the new challenges, there inevitably is a non-medical, non-scientific financial manager at hand who is willing to define the changes and the desired outcome. Because of the rapidity of the changes taking place, it is not possible to predict with any confidence the modifications that will achieve a permanent status or the degree to which medical professionals will remain masters of their fates. The evolving health care system will become less costly, more technologically advanced, and a more challenging system in which to work.

  10. Prevalence of outsourcing and perception of clinical nutrition managers on performance of health care dietetics services.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junehee; Yoon, Barbara J H

    2003-08-01

    A nationwide survey of clinical dietitians and clinical nutrition managers was conducted to assess the prevalence of outsourcing in health care dietetics services and to evaluate perceived performance of dietetics services. A questionnaire was developed, validated by an expert panel, and pilot tested prior to data collection. Members of the Clinical Nutrition Management Dietetic Practice Group (N=1,668) were selected as the study sample. Of 431 respondents, 152 (35.3%) indicated that management of both patient and cafeteria foodservices was outsourced. When mean scores of perceived performance ratings were compared using t test, respondents from self-operated facilities rated several items related to patient and cafeteria food quality and material and human resource utilization higher than respondents at contract-managed facilities. No significant differences were found in performance related to decision-making process, buying power, or training programs. Results suggest that careful weighing of advantages and disadvantages of outsourcing is needed before making decisions regarding outsourcing dietetics services.

  11. Suboptimal Clinical Documentation in Young Children with Severe Obesity at Tertiary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Cassandra C.; Lingren, Todd; Woo, Jessica G.; Kennebeck, Stephanie S.; Namjou-Khales, Bahram; Roach, Ashton; Bickel, Jonathan P.; Patibandla, Nandan; Savova, Guergana K.; Solti, Imre; Holm, Ingrid A.; Harley, John B.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Crimmins, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The prevalence of severe obesity in children has doubled in the past decade. The objective of this study is to identify the clinical documentation of obesity in young children with a BMI ≥ 99th percentile at two large tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Methods. We used a standardized algorithm utilizing data from electronic health records to identify children with severe early onset obesity (BMI ≥ 99th percentile at age <6 years). We extracted descriptive terms and ICD-9 codes to evaluate documentation of obesity at Boston Children's Hospital and Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center between 2007 and 2014. Results. A total of 9887 visit records of 2588 children with severe early onset obesity were identified. Based on predefined criteria for documentation of obesity, 21.5% of children (13.5% of visits) had positive documentation, which varied by institution. Documentation in children first seen under 2 years of age was lower than in older children (15% versus 26%). Documentation was significantly higher in girls (29% versus 17%, p < 0.001), African American children (27% versus 19% in whites, p < 0.001), and the obesity focused specialty clinics (70% versus 15% in primary care and 9% in other subspecialty clinics, p < 0.001). Conclusions. There is significant opportunity for improvement in documentation of obesity in young children, even years after the 2007 AAP guidelines for management of obesity. PMID:27698673

  12. Evaluation of clinical pharmacy services offered for palliative care patients in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Wilby, Kyle John; Mohamad, Alaa Adil; AlYafei, Sumaya AlSaadi

    2014-09-01

    Palliative care is an emerging concept in the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council, a political and economic union of Arab states bordering the Persian Gulf, namely Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Clinical pharmacy services have not yet been evaluated in this region. The objectives of this study were to create a baseline inventory of clinical pharmacy interventions in palliative care and to assess the perceived importance of interventions made. This was a prospective, single-center characterization study. Interventions were documented from September 30 to December 1, 2013. They were characterized into predetermined categories and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Physician acceptance rate and intervention rate per patient were calculated. Classification categories were sent to 10 practicing pharmacists in each of Qatar and Canada, who ranked the categories on the basis of perceived importance. A total of 96 interventions were documented, giving 3 interventions per patient and an acceptance rate of 81%. Discontinuing therapy (29%), initiating therapy (25%), and provision of education/counseling (13.5%) were most common. No differences were found between rankings from pharmacists in Qatar or Canada. Clinical pharmacy interventions are frequent, and those relating to alterations in drug therapy are most common. Interventions align with the perceived importance from pharmacists in both Qatar and Canada.

  13. Community-based free clinics: opportunities for interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, and complex care management

    PubMed Central

    Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle L.; Reinhardt, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Free or outreach clinics offer students the opportunity to work with diverse patient populations. The objective of this study was to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of a sample of chiropractic patients at a free community-based clinic to assess clinical and educational opportunities for students to work with diverse populations, collaborate with other professions and practice health promotion through patient education. Methods: This was a prospective, descriptive cross-sectional study conducted over 2 months. Data on demographics, health status, and health risks were collected from patients and their interns. Results: Of the 158 patients, 50.6% were women and 50.6% African-American, while only 20.9% were employed full-time. Of the 24.7% tobacco users, 48.7% expressed interest in cessation. Of 80.0% overweight or obese patients, 48.8% expressed interest in weight loss. By self-report, 16.5% were diabetic, 10.1% took hypertension medication, 36.7% used prescription pain medication (9.4% opiate use), 33.5% used nonprescription pain medication, and 9.4% were under the care of a mental health professional. Conclusion: This patient population is demographically diverse. A high proportion of patients who used tobacco, or were overweight or obese expressed interest in information on those topics. A substantial proportion reported being under care with a mental health professional. This clinic provides opportunities for students to work with diverse populations, collaborate with other professions, and practice health promotion. PMID:26241702

  14. Who Enrolls Onto Clinical Oncology Trials? A Radiation Patterns of Care Study Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Movsas, Benjamin . E-mail: bmovsas1@hfhs.org; Moughan, Jennifer; Owen, Jean; Coia, Lawrence R.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hanks, Gerald; Wilson, J. Frank

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To identify factors significantly influencing accrual to clinical protocols by analyzing radiation Patterns of Care Study (PCS) surveys of 3,047 randomly selected radiotherapy (RT) patients. Methods and Materials: Patterns of Care Study surveys from disease sites studied for the periods 1992-1994 and 1996-1999 (breast cancer, n = 1,080; prostate cancer, n = 1,149; esophageal cancer, n = 818) were analyzed. The PCS is a National Cancer Institute-funded national survey of randomly selected RT institutions in the United States. Patients with nonmetastatic disease who received RT as definitive or adjuvant therapy were randomly selected from eligible patients at each institution. To determine national estimates, individual patient records were weighted by the relative contribution of each institution and patients within each institution. Data regarding participation in clinical trials were recorded. The factors age, gender, race, type of insurance, and practice type of treating institution (academic or not) were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Overall, only 2.7% of all patients were accrued to clinical protocols. Of these, 57% were enrolled on institutional review board-approved institutional trials, and 43% on National Cancer Institute collaborative group studies. On multivariate analysis, patients treated at academic facilities (p = 0.0001) and white patients (vs. African Americans, p = 0.0002) were significantly more likely to participate in clinical oncology trials. Age, gender, type of cancer, and type of insurance were not predictive. Conclusions: Practice type and race significantly influence enrollment onto clinical oncology trials. This suggests that increased communication and education regarding protocols, particularly focusing on physicians in nonacademic settings and minority patients, will be essential to enhance accrual.

  15. Current facts on pacemaker electromagnetic interference and their application to clinical care

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, D.P.

    1987-03-01

    The development of the sensing demand cardiac pacemaker brought with it the problem of interference as a result of extraneous electric current and electromagnetic fields. This problem still deserves consideration, not only because harmful disruption of pacemaker function, while infrequent, can occur but also because myths and misunderstandings have flourished on the subject. Misinformation has often led to needless patient anxiety and unnecessary restrictions in activities of daily living. Similarly, when health care practitioners are misinformed about pacemaker interference, potentially hazardous situations can occur in the clinical environment. This article is a review of current information on the sources and effects of electromagnetic interference (EMI) on pacemakers and includes a discussion of their application to patient care.

  16. Clinical considerations for the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in the managed care setting.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Peter S

    2009-05-01

    Although symptoms of attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are certainly most visible in children, the syndrome persists into adolescence in 40% to 70% of cases and into adulthood in 50% or more of cases. Accurate recognition of the disorder is clouded by the frequent presence of psychiatric comorbidities. Contributing to these challenges, managed care providers in primary care are often inexperienced in identifying and treating ADHD in adults because of a lack of formalized training. As such, special consideration must be given to each individual age group and includes identifying common clinical presentations, characterizing the disorder and its comorbidities, applying validated rating scales as screening and treatment outcome measures, and individually assessing patients' optimal response to determine the best course of therapy. Pharmacotherapy is often initiated to target ADHD symptoms with either a stimulant medication or nonstimulants. In addition, behavioral interventions are often applied to treat comorbidities and associated impairments of ADHD. PMID:19601688

  17. The Quality of Clinical Maternal and Neonatal Healthcare – A Strategy for Identifying ‘Routine Care Signal Functions’

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Stephan; De Allegri, Manuela; Gabrysch, Sabine; Chinkhumba, Jobiba; Sarker, Malabika; Muula, Adamson S.

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of clinical process indicators exists to measure the quality of care provided by maternal and neonatal health (MNH) programs. To allow comparison across MNH programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a core set of essential process indicators is needed. Although such a core set is available for emergency obstetric care (EmOC), the ‘EmOC signal functions’, a similar approach is currently missing for MNH routine care evaluation. We describe a strategy for identifying core process indicators for routine care and illustrate their usefulness in a field example. Methods We first developed an indicator selection strategy by combining epidemiological and programmatic aspects relevant to MNH in LMICs. We then identified routine care process indicators meeting our selection criteria by reviewing existing quality of care assessment protocols. We grouped these indicators into three categories based on their main function in addressing risk factors of maternal or neonatal complications. We then tested this indicator set in a study assessing MNH quality of clinical care in 33 health facilities in Malawi. Results Our strategy identified 51 routine care processes: 23 related to initial patient risk assessment, 17 to risk monitoring, 11 to risk prevention. During the clinical performance assessment a total of 82 cases were observed. Birth attendants’ adherence to clinical standards was lowest in relation to risk monitoring processes. In relation to major complications, routine care processes addressing fetal and newborn distress were performed relatively consistently, but there were major gaps in the performance of routine care processes addressing bleeding, infection, and pre-eclampsia risks. Conclusion The identified set of process indicators could identify major gaps in the quality of obstetric and neonatal care provided during the intra- and immediate postpartum period. We hope our suggested indicators for essential routine care processes

  18. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primar