Science.gov

Sample records for actual clinical reporting

  1. [Method for direct generation data for formatted case report forms based on requirement for data authenticity in actual clinical conditions].

    PubMed

    Shao, Ming-Yi; Liu, Bao-Yan; He, Li-Yun; Zhang, Run-Shun

    2013-04-01

    Data authenticity is the basic requirement of clinical studies. In actual clinical conditions how to establish formatted case report forms (CRF) in line with the requirement for data authenticity is the key to ensure clinical data quality. On the basis of the characteristics of clinical data in actual clinical conditions, we determined elements for establishing formatted case report forms by comparing differences in data characteristics of CRFs in traditional clinical studies and in actual clinical conditions, and then generated formatted case report forms in line with the requirement for data authenticity in actual clinical conditions. The data of formatted CRFs generated in this study could not only meet the requirement for data authenticity of clinical studies in actual clinical conditions, but also comply with data management practices for clinical studies, thus it is deemed as a progress in technical methods.

  2. Reported vs. Actual Job Search by Unemployment Insurance Claimants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Robert D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Compares self-reported job search contacts of unemployment insurance recipients with independently verified job-search contacts. The separate equations estimated for reported and actual job contacts suggest that systematic misreporting may distort the conclusions. Some implications of the findings for reported unemployment rates also are explored.…

  3. Optimal maintenance and consolidation therapy for multiple myeloma in actual clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Sup; Min, Chang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant plasma cell-originating cancer. Although its treatment outcomes have improved with the use of glucocorticoids, alkylating drugs, and novel agents, including proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib) and immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide), relapse remains a serious problem. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation and frontline treatments in non-transplant patients include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve the depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Many clinical trials have reported increased progression-free and overall survival rates after consolidation and maintenance therapy. The role of consolidation/maintenance therapy has been assessed in patients eligible and ineligible for transplantation and is a valuable option in clinical trial settings. However, the decision to use consolidation and/or maintenance therapy needs to be guided by the individual patient situation in actual clinical practice. This review analyzes the currently available evidence from several reported clinical trials to determine the optimal consolidation and maintenance therapy in clinical practice. PMID:27604793

  4. Optimal maintenance and consolidation therapy for multiple myeloma in actual clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Sup; Min, Chang-Ki

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant plasma cell-originating cancer. Although its treatment outcomes have improved with the use of glucocorticoids, alkylating drugs, and novel agents, including proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib) and immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide), relapse remains a serious problem. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation and frontline treatments in non-transplant patients include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve the depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Many clinical trials have reported increased progression-free and overall survival rates after consolidation and maintenance therapy. The role of consolidation/maintenance therapy has been assessed in patients eligible and ineligible for transplantation and is a valuable option in clinical trial settings. However, the decision to use consolidation and/or maintenance therapy needs to be guided by the individual patient situation in actual clinical practice. This review analyzes the currently available evidence from several reported clinical trials to determine the optimal consolidation and maintenance therapy in clinical practice. PMID:27604793

  5. Optimal maintenance and consolidation therapy for multiple myeloma in actual clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Sup; Min, Chang-Ki

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant plasma cell-originating cancer. Although its treatment outcomes have improved with the use of glucocorticoids, alkylating drugs, and novel agents, including proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib) and immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide), relapse remains a serious problem. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation and frontline treatments in non-transplant patients include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve the depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Many clinical trials have reported increased progression-free and overall survival rates after consolidation and maintenance therapy. The role of consolidation/maintenance therapy has been assessed in patients eligible and ineligible for transplantation and is a valuable option in clinical trial settings. However, the decision to use consolidation and/or maintenance therapy needs to be guided by the individual patient situation in actual clinical practice. This review analyzes the currently available evidence from several reported clinical trials to determine the optimal consolidation and maintenance therapy in clinical practice.

  6. Clinical learning environments (actual and expected): perceptions of Iran University of Medical Sciences nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Pakpour, Vahid; Aalaa, Maryam; Shekarabi, Robabeh; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Haghani, Hamid; Mehrdad, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educational clinical environment has an important role in nursing students' learning. Any difference between actual and expected clinical environment will decrease nursing students’ interest in clinical environments and has a negative correlation with their clinical performance. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study is an attempt to compare nursing students' perception of the actual and expected status of clinical environments in medical-surgical wards. Participants of the study were 127 bachelor nursing students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in the internship period. Data gathering instruments were a demographic questionnaire (including sex, age, and grade point average), and the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) originally developed by Professor Chan (2001), in which its modified Farsi version (Actual and Preferred forms) consisting 42 items, 6 scales and 7 items per scale was used. Descriptive and inferential statistics (t-test, paired t-test, ANOVA) were used for data analysis through SPSS version 16. Results: The results indicated that there were significant differences between the preferred and actual form in all six scales. In other word, comparing with the actual form, the mean scores of all items in the preferred form were higher. The maximum mean difference was in innovation and the highest mean difference was in involvement scale. Conclusion: It is concluded that nursing students do not have a positive perception of their actual clinical teaching environment and this perception is significantly different from their perception of their expected environment. PMID:26034726

  7. Virologic response and haematologic toxicity of boceprevir- and telaprevir-containing regimens in actual clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Butt, A. A.; Yan, P.; Shaikh, O. S.; Freiberg, M. S.; Re, V. Lo; Justice, A. C.; Sherman, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Effectiveness, safety and tolerability of boceprevir (BOC) and telaprevir (TPV) in actual clinical settings remain unknown. We determined rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) and haematologic adverse effects among persons treated with BOC- or TPV-containing regimens, compared with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PEG/RBV). Using an established cohort of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons, Electronically Retrieved Cohort of HCV Infected Veterans (ERCHIVES), we identified those treated with a BOC- or TPV-containing regimen and HCV genotype 1-infected controls treated with PEG/RBV. We excluded those with HIV co-infection and missing HCV RNA values to determine SVR. Primary endpoints were SVR (undetectable HCV RNA ≥12 weeks after treatment completion) and haematologic toxicity (grade 3/4 anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia). We evaluated 2288 persons on BOC-, 409 on TPV-containing regimen and 6308 on PEG/RBV. Among these groups, respectively, 31%, 43% and 9% were treatment-experienced; 17%, 37% and 14% had baseline cirrhosis; 63%, 54% and 48% were genotype 1a. SVR rates among noncirrhotics were as follows: treatment naïve: 65% (BOC), 67% (TPV) and 31% (PEG/RBV); treatment experienced: 57% (BOC), 54% (TPV) and 13% (PEG/RBV); (P-value not significant for BOC vs TPV; P < 0.0001 for BOC or TPV vs PEG/RBV). Haematologic toxicities among BOC-, TPV- and PEG/RBV-treated groups were as follows: grade 3/4 anaemia 7%, 11% and 3%; grade 4 thrombocytopenia 2.2%, 5.4% and 1.7%; grade 4 neutropenia 8.2%, 5.6% and 3.4%. SVR rates are higher and closer to those reported in pivotal clinical trials among BOC- and TPV-treated persons compared with PEG/RBV-treated persons. Haematologic adverse events are frequent, but severe toxicity is uncommon. PMID:25524834

  8. What actually makes bullying stop? Reports from former victims.

    PubMed

    Frisén, Ann; Hasselblad, Tove; Holmqvist, Kristina

    2012-08-01

    School bullying is a serious, worldwide problem which is not easily counteracted. The present study focuses on the perspective of former victims, asking them what it was that made the bullying stop in their case. Participants were 273 18-year-old former victims in Sweden, a country in which schools are doing extensive work against bullying and the bullying prevalence is relatively low. Results showed that although support from school personnel was the most common reason that the former victims gave to why the bullying had ended, it was only mentioned by a fourth of them. In fact, it was almost equally as common that the bullying had ended in that the victims transitioned to a new school level or changed their way of coping with the bullying. Very few of the adolescents reported that the bullying had stopped due to support from peers.

  9. Does medical students’ clinical performance affect their actual performance during medical internship?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eui-Ryoung; Chung, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study examines the relationship between the clinical performance of medical students and their performance as doctors during their internships. METHODS This retrospective study involved 63 applicants of a residency programme conducted at Chonnam National University Hospital, South Korea, in November 2012. We compared the performance of the applicants during their internship with their clinical performance during their fourth year of medical school. The performance of the applicants as interns was periodically evaluated by the faculty of each department, while their clinical performance as fourth-year medical students was assessed using the Clinical Performance Examination (CPX) and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). RESULTS The performance of the applicants as interns was positively correlated with their clinical performance as fourth-year medical students, as measured by the CPX and OSCE. The performance of the applicants as interns was moderately correlated with the patient-physician interaction items addressing communication and interpersonal skills in the CPX. CONCLUSION The clinical performance of medical students during their fourth year in medical school was related to their performance as medical interns. Medical students should be trained to develop good clinical skills through actual encounters with patients or simulated encounters using manikins, to enable them to become more competent doctors. PMID:26768172

  10. Providers' Reported and Actual Use of Coaching Strategies in Natural Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Christine; Cambray-Engstrom, Elizabeth; Woods, Juliann

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined the agreement between reported and actual use of coaching strategies based on home visit data collected on a diverse sample of providers and families. Paired videotape and contact note data of and from providers during home visits were collected over a six month period and analyzed using structured protocols. Results of…

  11. Urban rail transit projects: Forecast versus actual ridership and costs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, D.H.

    1989-10-01

    Substantial errors in forecasting ridership and costs for the ten rail transit projects reviewed in the report put forth the possibility that more accurate forecasts would have led decision-makers to select projects other than those reviewed. The study examines the accuracy of forecasts prepared for ten major capital improvement projects in nine urban areas during 1971-1987. Each project includes construction of a fixed transit guideway: Rapid Rail or Metrorail (Washington DC, Atlanta, Baltimore, Miami); Light Rail Transit (Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Portland, Sacramento); and Downtown Peoplemover (Miami and Detroit). The study examines why actual costs and ridership differed so markedly from their forecast values. It focuses on the accuracy of projections made available to local decision-makers at the time when the choice among alternative projects was actually made. The study compares forecast and actual values for four types of measures: ridership, capital costs and financing, operating and maintenance costs, and cost-effectiveness. The report is organized into 6 chapters, numerous tables, and an appendix that documents the sources of all data appearing in the tables presented in the report.

  12. Changes In Actual And Perceived Physical Abilities In Clinically Obese Children: A 9-Month Multi-Component Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Milena; Colella, Dario; Rutigliano, Irene; Fiore, Pietro; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Campanozzi, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives (1) To examine relationships among changes in physical activity, physical fitness and some psychosocial determinants of activity behavior in a clinical sample of obese children involved in a multi-component program; (2) to investigate the causal relationship over time between physical activity and one of its strongest correlates (i.e. perceived physical ability). Methods Self-reported physical activity and health-related fitness tests were administered before and after a 9-month intervention in 24 boys and 20 girls aged 8 to 11 years. Individuals’ perceptions of strength, speed and agility were assessed using the Perceived Physical Ability Scale, while body image was measured using Collins’ Child Figure Drawings. Results Findings showed that body mass index, physical activity, performances on throwing and weight-bearing tasks, perceived physical ability and body image significantly improved after treatment among obese children. Gender differences were found in the correlational analyses, showing a link between actual and perceived physical abilities in boys, but not in girls. For the specific measurement interval of this study, perception of physical ability was an antecedent and not a potential consequence of physical activity. Conclusions Results indicate that a multi-component activity program not based merely on a dose-effect approach enhances adherence of the participants and has the potential to increase the lifelong exercise skills of obese children. Rather than focusing entirely on diet and weight loss, findings support the inclusion of interventions directed toward improving perceived physical ability that is predictive of subsequent physical activity. PMID:23239985

  13. Self-reported versus Actual Energy Intake in Youth with and without Loss of Control Eating

    PubMed Central

    Wolkoff, Laura E.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Kozlosky, Merel; Columbo, Kelli M.; Elliott, Camden A.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Osborn, Robyn L.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2010-01-01

    Episodes of loss of control over eating (LOC) in children and adolescents —often characterized by the consumption of highly palatable dessert and snack-type foods—have been associated with a lack of awareness while eating that could lead to under- or over-estimation of how much food is consumed. However, little is known about the reporting accuracy of food intake in youth with and without LOC eating. One-hundred-fifty-six girls and boys were administered the Eating Disorder Examination to assess for the presence of LOC eating. Youth were queried regarding the amounts of foods consumed directly following a multi-item, laboratory buffet test meal. Children with LOC (n=42) did not differ significantly from youth without LOC (n=114) in reporting accuracy of total food intake (reported minus actual energy intake: 153.0 ± 59.6 v. 96.9 ± 36.0 kcal; p=0.42). However, compared to those without LOC, children with LOC were less accurate at reporting percentage of energy intake from carbohydrate (p=0.01). Youth with LOC were also less accurate at reporting their intake of desserts (p=0.04). Findings point to the possibility that youth with LOC may have poorer recall of sweet food consumption. Future research is required to examine whether poorer recall reflects a lack of awareness while eating palatable, sweet foods. PMID:21184968

  14. Self-reported vs. actual energy intake in youth with and without loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, Laura E; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Shomaker, Lauren B; Kozlosky, Merel; Columbo, Kelli M; Elliott, Camden A; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Osborn, Robyn L; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2011-01-01

    Episodes of loss of control over eating (LOC) in children and adolescents--often characterized by the consumption of highly palatable dessert and snack-type foods--have been associated with a lack of awareness while eating that could lead to under- or over-estimation of how much food is consumed. However, little is known about the reporting accuracy of food intake in youth with and without LOC eating. One hundred fifty-six girls and boys were administered the Eating Disorder Examination to assess for the presence of LOC eating. Youth were queried regarding the amounts of foods consumed directly following a multi-item, laboratory buffet test meal. Children with LOC (n=42) did not differ significantly from youth without LOC (n=114) in reporting accuracy of total food intake (reported minus actual energy intake: 153.0 ± 59.6 vs. 96.9 ± 36.0 kcal; p=0.42). However, compared to those without LOC, children with LOC were less accurate at reporting percentage of energy intake from carbohydrate (p=0.01). Youth with LOC were also less accurate at reporting their intake of desserts (p=0.04). Findings point to the possibility that youth with LOC may have poorer recall of sweet food consumption. Future research is required to examine whether poorer recall reflects a lack of awareness while eating palatable, sweet foods.

  15. Would Socrates Have Actually Used the "Socratic Method" for Clinical Teaching?

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Hugh A; O'Dell, David V

    2016-09-01

    Medical students and residents are familiar with clinical teaching methods in which a faculty member poses a series of questions to them. This technique is often called the "Socratic method," but it is frequently perceived by learners as an attempt to demean them, a practice that is colloquially known as "pimping." The distinction between Socratic teaching and pimping lies in the perception of "psychological safety." Psychological safety allows learners to answer questions or ask for help without threats to their dignity or worthiness. In a psychologically safe clinical teaching context, learners recognize that questions posed by attending physicians probe their current understanding and guide them to expand their knowledge. In pimping, questions are posed to embarrass the learner and to reinforce the teacher's position of power over them. Absent a threat of disparagement or condemnation, learners are able to focus on building schema for knowledge, skills, and attitudes, rather than worrying about shielding their self-worth. This article presents the proper Socratic method, as intended by Socrates, and contrasts it with pimping. This perspective defines psychological safety as the pivotal factor distinguishing Socratic teaching from pimping, and establishes the foundation for empirical studies of these common practices in medical education.

  16. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This summary report discusses the results of each of the four major tasks of the study. Task 1 compared airline flight plans based on operational forecasts to plans based on the verifying analyses and found that average fuel savings of 1.2 to 2.5 percent are possible with improved forecasts. Task 2 consisted of similar comparisons but used a model developed for the FAA by SRI International that simulated the impact of ATc diversions on the flight plans. While parts of Task 2 confirm the Task I findings, inconsistency with other data and the known impact of ATC suggests that other Task 2 findings are the result of errors in the model. Task 3 compares segment weather data from operational flight plans with the weather actually observed by the aircraft and finds the average error could result in fuel burn penalties (or savings) of up to 3.6 percent for the average 8747 flight. In Task 4 an in-depth analysis of the weather forecast for the 33 days included in the study finds that significant errors exist on 15 days. Wind speeds in the area of maximum winds are underestimated by 20 to 50 kts., a finding confirmed in the other three tasks.

  17. Relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rates in teenagers

    SciTech Connect

    Terblanche, A.P.S.; Ozkaynak, H.; Spengler, J.D.; Butler, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    A study was designed to explore the relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rate (HR) as measured by a portable heart rate monitor. Twenty-two teenagers (8 boys, 14 girls, median age of 16) from Watertown High School, Massachusetts participated in this pilot study which involved continuous monitoring of HR during normal daily activities and simultaneous completion of a time-activity diary. There were 31 successful monitoring sessions ranging from 1.9 to 17 hours with a median monitoring time of 12.6 hours. Four unsuccessful monitoring sessions were experienced due to equipment failure. Apart from participant cooperation, the single most important factor affecting the feasibility of continuous heart rate monitoring was found to be equipment design. Th overall average heart rate observed was 88.4 bpm (SD = 24.3). An individual's correlation coefficient for perceived activity level (documented in half-hour intervals) and heart rate (averaged over the half-hour intervals) varied from 0.24 to 0.89. More than half of the correlation coefficients were below 0.40. There was a significant difference between average heart rate for time spent indoors (90 bpm) versus outdoors (103 bpm) even after correcting for sleeping time. It is concluded that continuous HR monitoring with simultaneous completion of a time/activity dairy is feasible and is a promising source of information for studies on exposure to air pollutants.

  18. Flammable Gas Safety Program: actual waste organic analysis FY 1996 progress report; Flammable Gas Safety Program: actual waste organic analysis FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.; Hoopes, V.; Mong, G.M.; Rau, J.; Steele, R.; Wahl, K.H.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the status of optimizing analytical methods to account for the organic components in Hanford waste tanks, with emphasis on tanks assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. The methods developed are illustrated by their application to samples from Tanks 241-SY-103 and 241-S-102. Capability to account for organic carbon in Tank SY-101 was improved significantly by improving techniques for isolating organic constituents relatively free from radioactive contamination and by improving derivatization methodology. The methodology was extended to samples from Tank SY-103 and results documented in this report. Results from analyzing heated and irradiated SY-103 samples (Gas Generation Task) and evaluating methods for analyzing tank waste directly for chelators and chelator fragments are also discussed.

  19. Measurements of Flammable Gas Generation from Saltstone Containing Actual Tank 48H Waste (Interim Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A. D.; Crowley, D. A.; Duffey, J. M.; Eibling, R. E.; Jones, T. M.; Marinik, A. R.; Marra, J. C.; Zamecnik, J. R

    2005-06-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the benzene release rates in saltstone prepared with tetraphenylborate (TPB) concentrations ranging from 30 mg/L to 3000 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. Defense Waste Processing Facility Engineering (DWPF-E) provided a rate of benzene evolution from saltstone of 2.5 {micro}g/L/h saltstone (0.9 {micro}g/kg saltstone/h [1.5 {micro}g/kg saltstone/h x 60%]) to use as a Target Rate of Concern (TRC). The evolution of benzene, toluene, and xylenes from saltstone containing actual Tank 48H salt solution has been measured as a function of time at several temperatures and concentrations of TPB. The Tank 48H salt solution was aggregated with a DWPF recycle simulant to obtain the desired TPB concentrations in the saltstone slurry. The purpose of this interim report is to provide DWPF-E with an indication of the trends of benzene evolution. The data presented are preliminary; more data are being collected and may alter the preliminary results. A more complete description of the methods and materials will be included in the final report. The benzene evolution rates approximately follow an increasing trend with both increasing temperature and TPB concentration. The benzene release rates from 1000 mg/L TPB at 95 C and 3000 mg/L TPB at 75 C and 95 C exceeded the recovery-adjusted 0.9 mg/kg saltstone/h TRC (2.5 {micro}g/L saltstone/h), while all other conditions resulted in benzene release rates below this TRC. The toluene evolution rates for several samples exceeded the TRC initially, but all dropped below the TRC within 2-5 days. The toluene emissions appear to be mainly dependent on the fly ash and are independent of the TPB level, indicating that toluene is not generated from TPB.

  20. Clinical examples of 3D dose distribution reconstruction, based on the actual MLC leaves movement, for dynamic treatment techniques

    PubMed Central

    Osewski, Wojciech; Dolla, Łukasz; Radwan, Michał; Szlag, Marta; Rutkowski, Roman; Smolińska, Barbara; Ślosarek, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Aim To present practical examples of our new algorithm for reconstruction of 3D dose distribution, based on the actual MLC leaf movement. Background DynaLog and RTplan files were used by DDcon software to prepare a new RTplan file for dose distribution reconstruction. Materials and methods Four different clinically relevant scenarios were used to assess the feasibility of the proposed new approach: (1) Reconstruction of whole treatment sessions for prostate cancer; (2) Reconstruction of IMRT verification treatment plan; (3) Dose reconstruction in breast cancer; (4) Reconstruction of interrupted arc and complementary plan for an interrupted VMAT treatment session of prostate cancer. The applied reconstruction method was validated by comparing reconstructed and measured fluence maps. For all statistical analysis, the U Mann–Whitney test was used. Results In the first two and the fourth cases, there were no statistically significant differences between the planned and reconstructed dose distribution (p = 0.910, p = 0.975, p = 0.893, respectively). In the third case the differences were statistically significant (p = 0.015). Treatment plan had to be reconstructed. Conclusion Developed dose distribution reconstruction algorithm presents a very useful QA tool. It provides means for 3D dose distribution verification in patient volume and allows to evaluate the influence of actual MLC leaf motion on the dose distribution. PMID:25337416

  1. Evidence supporting primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases with statins: Gaps between updated clinical results and actual practice.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The use of pharmacological lipid-lowering intervention in individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and known cardiovascular disease or diabetes/chronic kidney disease is well established. Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend immediate initiation of drugs in adjunct to lifestyle intervention in these patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk. In these clinical settings, statins are generally chosen as the first-choice drug intervention, in consideration of the robust evidence showing a reduction in all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In contrast, primary prevention with statins, even in the subset of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events, is not well implemented. This might be related to a lack of public awareness regarding the actual risk associated with prolonged exposure to high concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and uncertainties in the clinical evidence coming from the earliest trials in this patient subset. However, recent observational studies suggest that lowering LDL-C earlier in life and for a longer duration can substantially decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Moreover, results from recent well-conducted large meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that primary prevention with statins reduced all-cause mortality by 14% and MACE by > 20% - findings similar to those observed for the use of statins in secondary prevention. Recently published American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol emphasize that primary prevention using high-dose statins in individuals with LDL-C ≥ 190 mg/dL induces a benefit in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk reduction that clearly exceeds the potential for adverse effects. We aim in this review to discuss the new data that advocate the use of statins in primary prevention earlier and more frequently, putting the efficacy evidence into

  2. Perception makes the difference: the association of actual and perceived weight status with self-reported and parent-reported personal resources and well-being in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Tanja; Eschenbeck, Heike; Krug, Susanne; Schlaud, Martin; Kohlmann, Carl-Walter

    2012-11-01

    The study analyzed associations between actual weight status and weight perceptions with personal resources, physical and psychological health, as well as physical performance among adolescents (N = 5,518; age: 11-17 years). Analyses are based on data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS). Self-report measures, parental reports, as well as objective test data were considered. Results indicate that weight perceptions, rather than actual weight status, were associated with personal resources, health, and perceived physical performance. Comparing groups, we found that adolescents who felt they had "just the right weight" achieved more favourable results than those who perceived themselves as "too fat", regardless of their actual weight status. However, actual physical performance was predicted better by actual weight status. Furthermore, weight perceptions were found to mediate the link between actual weight status and all the assessed outcomes (personal resources, health, and physical performance). With respect to self-reports, the mediational effect was consistently stronger for girls, whereas the reverse was true regarding physical performance. Parental reports were not moderated by sex. Findings provide further evidence that among overweight adolescents there are subgroups that differ significantly with regard to risks and resources. Implications for practice are discussed.

  3. 48 CFR 252.225-7006 - Quarterly reporting of actual contract performance outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...), OUSD(AT&L) DPAP/CPIC, Washington, DC 20301-3060. (e) Report format. The Contractor— (1) Shall submit..., construction, ores, natural gases, utilities, petroleum products and crudes, timber (logs), or subsistence;...

  4. Did Garin and Bujadoux Actually Report a Case of Lyme Radiculoneuritis?

    PubMed

    Wormser, Gary P; Wormser, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    A 1922 report by Garin and Bujadoux is widely regarded as describing the first case of neurologic Lyme borreliosis. Although the patient reported had a tick bite followed by the development of a rash and radiculoneuritis, there were a number of highly atypical features, raising the question of whether the patient, in fact, had neurologic Lyme borreliosis. The paper may not deserve the historic recognition that it has received. PMID:27419161

  5. Whom Do Employers Actually Hire? The Educating Systems Librarian Research Project Report 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Hong; Chen, Hsin-liang

    2000-01-01

    This follow-up report of 133 job advertisements for systems librarians in "American Libraries" during 1996-97 compares results of a content analysis of advertisements and a survey of employers and newly hired librarians. Results show gaps in regard to education requirements, work experience, job responsibilities, and areas of knowledge and skills.…

  6. Congruence of actual and retrospective reports of precompetition affect and anxiety for young volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Rikberg, Alar; Raudsepp, Lennart; Kais, Kristjan

    2011-02-01

    The current study examined the accuracy of retrospective recall of affect and competitive anxiety in 38 youth beach volleyball players, who were randomly assigned into two equal groups: participants who watched a video of their precompetition preparation before responding to the items, and players who did not watch a videotape. All completed the modified competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 1 hr., and the affect grid 5 min., before a competition and again 2 days later. Accuracy in recalling anxiety and affect by these players was significant in both conditions (rs = .59-.76 and .41-.59, respectively). However, in the video condition, item responses showed markedly higher percentages of agreement for the Somatic and Cognitive Anxiety subscales and the affect grid than those for the no-video condition (52.6-78.9% and 36.8-52.6%, respectively). Analysis of variance indicated that watching a video for precompetition preparation improved the accuracy of retrospective recall of anxiety and arousal. Video feedback of performance increased the accuracy of retrospective report of affect and anxiety in these young athletes.

  7. Clinical Investigation program report. Annual report for FY83

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This report identifies the research activities conducted by Letterman Army Medical Center investigators through protocols approved by the Clinical Investigation, Human and Animal Use Committees during FY 1983.

  8. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme.

  9. Expert systems for clinical pathology reporting.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Glenn A

    2008-08-01

    * Conventional automated interpretative reporting systems use standard or "canned" comments for patient reports. These are result-specific and do not generally refer to the patient context. * Laboratory information systems (LIS) are limited in their application of patient-specific content of reporting. * Patient-specific interpretation requires extensive cross-referencing to other information contained in the LIS such as previous test results, other related tests, and clinical notes, both current and previous. * Expert systems have the potential to improve reporting quality by enabling patient-specific reporting in clinical laboratories.

  10. [Needle implantations--clinical report].

    PubMed

    Esswein, W

    1977-04-01

    In the last four years 27 patients with edentulous lower jaw were treated with implantation of rows of tantalum needles; 25 of them were followed up clinically and radiologically. After an average of two years and seven months where the success rate was found to be 72%. Reasons for failure were thought to be mistakes in operative technique, insufficient oral hygiene of the patients and less than optimal aftercare. These needle implants have proved their value also in cases with marked atrophy of the lower jaw where other prosthetic-surgical methods aimed at improving the prosthesis site have failed.

  11. How do clinicians actually use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in clinical practice and why we need to know more.

    PubMed

    First, Michael B; Bhat, Venkat; Adler, David; Dixon, Lisa; Goldman, Beth; Koh, Steve; Levine, Bruce; Oslin, David; Siris, Sam

    2014-12-01

    The clinical use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is explicitly stated as a goal for both the DSM Fourth Edition and DSM Fifth Edition (DSM-5) revisions. Many uses assume a relatively faithful application of the DSM diagnostic definitions. However, studies demonstrate significant discrepancies between clinical psychiatric diagnoses with those made using structured interviews suggesting that clinicians do not systematically apply the diagnostic criteria. The limited information regarding how clinicians actually use the DSM raises important questions: a) How can the clinical use be improved without first having a baseline assessment? b) How can potentially significant shifts in practice patterns based on wording changes be assessed without knowing the extent to which the criteria are used as written? Given the American Psychiatric Association's plans for interim revisions to the DSM-5, the value of a detailed exploration of its actual use in clinical practice remains a significant ongoing concern and deserves further study including a number of survey and in vivo studies.

  12. Clinical report writing: Process and perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewald, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    Clinical report writing in psychology and psychiatry is addressed. Audience/use analysis and the basic procedures of information gathering, diagnosis, and prognosis are described. Two interlinking processes are involved: the process of creation and the process of communication. Techniques for good report writing are presented.

  13. Annual Statistical Report of the Public Schools of Arkansas, Public Charter Schools, and Education Service Cooperatives, 2013-2014 Actual and 2014-2015 Budgeted, (ASR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In compliance with the provisions of A.C.A.§§6-20-2201 et seq., the Annual Statistical Report of the Public Schools of Arkansas, Public Charter Schools, and Education Service Cooperatives, 2013-2014 Actual and 2014-2015 Budgeted, (ASR) is presented here. The Rankings of Selected Items of the Public Schools of Arkansas, 2013-2014 Actual, (Rankings)…

  14. Copy number variants in a sample of patients with psychotic disorders: is standard screening relevant for actual clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Kerkhof, Noortje WA; Feenstra, Ilse; van der Heijden, Frank MMA; de Leeuw, Nicole; Pfundt, Rolph; Stöber, Gerald; Egger, Jos IM; Verhoeven, Willem MA

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of new genetic techniques such as genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization, studies on the putative genetic etiology of schizophrenia have focused on the detection of copy number variants (CNVs), ie, microdeletions and/or microduplications, that are estimated to be present in up to 3% of patients with schizophrenia. In this study, out of a sample of 100 patients with psychotic disorders, 80 were investigated by array for the presence of CNVs. The assessment of the severity of psychiatric symptoms was performed using standardized instruments and ICD-10 was applied for diagnostic classification. In three patients, a submicroscopic CNV was demonstrated, one with a loss in 1q21.1 and two with a gain in 1p13.3 and 7q11.2, respectively. The association between these or other CNVs and schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses and their clinical implications still remain equivocal. While the CNV affected genes may enhance the vulnerability for psychiatric disorders via effects on neuronal architecture, these insights have not resulted in major changes in clinical practice as yet. Therefore, genome-wide array analysis should presently be restricted to those patients in whom psychotic symptoms are paired with other signs, particularly dysmorphisms and intellectual impairment. PMID:22848183

  15. How accurately does the VIVO Harvester reflect actual Clinical and Translational Sciences Award–affiliated faculty member publications?*

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan D.; Kroth, Philip J.; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Hantak, Chad M.; Weagel, Edward F.; Hannigan, Gale G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The research tested the accuracy of the VIVO Harvester software in identifying publications authored by faculty members affiliated with a National Institutes of Health Clinical and Translational Sciences Award (CTSA) site. Methods: Health sciences librarians created “gold standard” lists of references for the years 2001 to 2011 from PubMed for twenty-five randomly selected investigators from one CTSA site. These gold standard lists were compared to the same twenty-five investigators' reference lists produced by VIVO Harvester. The authors subjected the discrepancies between the lists to sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results: The VIVO Harvester correctly identified only about 65% of the total eligible PubMed references for the years 2001–2011 for the CTSA-affiliated investigators. The identified references produced by VIVO Harvester were precise yet incomplete. The sensitivity rate was 0.65, and the specificity rate was 1.00. Conclusion: While the references produced by VIVO Harvester could be confirmed in PubMed, the VIVO Harvester retrieved only two-thirds of the required references from PubMed. National Institutes of Health CTSA sites will need to supplement VIVO Harvester–produced references with the expert searching skills of health sciences librarians. Implications: Health sciences librarians with searching skills need to alert their CTSA sites about these deficiencies and offer their skills to advance their sites' missions. PMID:25552940

  16. Assessing clinical competency: reports from discussion groups.

    PubMed

    Turnwald, Grant; Stone, Elizabeth; Bristol, David; Fuentealba, Carmen; Hardie, Lizette; Hellyer, Peter; Jaeger, Laurie; Kerwin, Sharon; Kochevar, Deborah; Lissemore, Kerry; Olsen, Christopher; Rogers, Kenita; Sabin, Beth; Swanson, Cliff; Warner, Angeline

    2008-01-01

    This report describes proposed new models for assessment of eight of the nine clinical competencies the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requires for accreditation. The models were developed by discussion groups at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges' Clinical Competency Symposium. Clinical competencies and proposed models (in parentheses) are described. Competency 1: comprehensive patient diagnosis (neurologic examination on a dog, clinical reasoning skills); Competency 2: comprehensive treatment planning (concept mapping, computerized case studies); Competency 3: anesthesia, pain management (student portfolio); Competency 4: surgery skills (objective structured clinical examination, cased-based examination, "super dog" model); Competency 5: medicine skills (clinical reasoning and case management, skills checklist); Competency 6: emergency and intensive care case management (computerized case study or scenario); Competency 7: health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity (360 degrees evaluation, case-based computer simulation); Competency 8: client communications and ethical conduct (Web-based evaluation forms, client survey, communicating with stakeholders, telephone conversation, written scenario-based cases). The report also describes faculty recognition for participating in clinical competency assessments.

  17. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, I. S.; Pegg, I. L.; Rielley, Elizabeth; Carranza, Isidro; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan-Tao T.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Cecil, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  18. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED). PMID:26807087

  19. Implications of Self-Deception for Self-Reported Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivational Dispositions and Actual Learning Performance: A Higher Order Structural Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschfeld, Robert R.; Thomas, Christopher H.; McNatt, D. Brian

    2008-01-01

    The authors explored implications of individuals' self-deception (a trait) for their self-reported intrinsic and extrinsic motivational dispositions and their actual learning performance. In doing so, a higher order structural model was developed and tested in which intrinsic and extrinsic motivational dispositions were underlying factors that…

  20. Self-Reported and Actual Use of Proactive and Reactive Classroom Management Strategies and Their Relationship with Teacher Stress and Student Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clunies-Ross, Penny; Little, Emma; Kienhuis, Mandy

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between primary school teachers' self-reported and actual use of classroom management strategies, and examined how the use of proactive and reactive strategies is related to teacher stress and student behaviour. The total sample consisted of 97 teachers from primary schools within Melbourne. Teachers…

  1. Advance modern medicine with clinical case reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) can fail to demonstrate the richness of individual patient characteristics. Given the unpredictable nature of medicine, a patient may present in an unusual way, have a strange new pathology, or react to a medical intervention in a manner not seen before. The publication of these novelties as case reports is a fundamental way of conveying medical knowledge. Throughout history there have been famous case studies that shaped the way we view health and disease. Case reports can have the following functions: (I) descriptions of new diseases; (II) study of mechanisms; (III) discovery new therapies; (IV) recognition of side effects; and (V) education. Before submitting a case report, it is worthwhile to refer to the Case Report Check Sheet described by Green and Johnson [2006]. PMID:25525572

  2. Clinical presentation of pili torti - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Cade, Karine Valentim; Rezende, Flavia Cury; Pereira, José Marcos; Pegas, José Roberto Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Pili torti also known as ‘twisted hairs’ (Latin: pili=hair; torti=twisted) is a rare, congenital or acquired clinical presentation, in which the hair shaft is flattened at irregular intervals and twisted 180º along its axis. It is clinically characterized by fragile, brittle, coarse and lusterless hairs, due to uneven light reflection on the twisted hair surface. Pili torti may be associated with neurological abnormalities and ectodermal dysplasias. There is no specifi c treatment for this condition, but it may improve spontaneously after puberty. We report a case of pili torti in a child who presented fragile, brittle, diffi cult to comb hair. The patient had no comorbidities. PMID:26312667

  3. Tetrasomy Y by structural rearrangement: clinical report.

    PubMed

    DesGroseilliers, Martin; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Dallaire, Louis; Lemieux, Nicole

    2002-09-01

    Poly-Y karyotypes, except for 47,XYY, are rare events in humans. For instance, Y chromosome tetrasomy has been reported 10 times, 2 of which were by structural rearrangement. We present a 2-year-and-4-month-old boy who was referred for cytogenetic assessment because of global psychomotor delay. The GTG- and CBG-banded karyotypes on PHA-stimulated lymphocytes showed two cell populations, one of them contained two identical isodicentric Y chromosomes, which was seen in 93% of metaphases analyzed, and a 45,X cell line (7%). This was confirmed by FISH with probes DYZ3 (recognizing the centromeric region of the Y chromosome), 91H4.5 (recognizing Yp11.2), and DYZ1 (recognizing Y heterochromatin in Yq12). The breakpoint has occurred near the telomeric end of the heterochromatic region. Therefore, the karyotype is mos 47,X,idic(Y)(q12)x2[123]/45,X[9]. This is the second time that such a karyotype has been reported. This chromosomal anomaly was formed most likely by a U-type exchange. Clinical features included speech delay, short stature, brachycephaly, large ears, bilateral epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, delayed teeth eruption, bilateral radio-ulnar synostosis, bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly, normal external genitalia, and impulsive behavior. The father had normal phenotype and karyotype. A review of the tetrasomy Y patients is presented. All patients with Y chromosome tetrasomy exhibit some degree of mental retardation, various skeletal abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Nevertheless, the correlation between karyotype and phenotype is not yet well defined since few cases have been reported. This clinical report will be helpful in defining the phenotypic range associated with tetrasomy Y. PMID:12210299

  4. Cleidocranial dysplasia: report of six clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rosemary Baptista; de Souza, Ricardo Salgado; Giovani, Elcio Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that occurs due to mutations in the Cbfa 1 gene, also called Runx 2, located on the short arm of chromosome 6, affecting osteoblast skeletal-specific bones that have intramembranous ossification. This condition is characterized by hypoplastic clavicles, short stature, and great clinical significance in the stomatognathic complex, with involvement of facial bones, changes in the eruption patterns, including multiple supernumerary and retained teeth. This study reports six subjects of the same family with CCD identified in the Dentistry Clinic of Oral Diagnosis Department, Universidade Paulista, Campus Sorocaba, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. All cases had clinical and radiographic aspects of this important condition, such as short stature, hypertelorism, severe mobility of the shoulders, and supernumerary and retained teeth. Due to the rare incidence and phenotypic manifestations, CCD can be easily misdiagnosed. The oral commitments are one of the main (functional and aesthetic) causes of complaints in these subjects; and a dentist must establish the diagnosis as early as possible, followed by behaviors and practices that can minimize harmful manifestations of the syndrome and improve health associated with oral and multidisciplinary integration offering improvements in quality of life of these subjects. PMID:24712510

  5. [Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Gallesio, C; Tagliabue, M; Mazzeo, R; De Gioanni, P P

    1996-11-01

    The authors present a severe case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in which there was considerable involvement of cranial bone and facial skeleton. Numerous lesions were present at the level of the long bones of limbs. Endocrine dysfunction was also present in the form of a hypophyseal adenoma secreting prolactin and ACTH. The concomitance of acromegaly or gigantism and/or hyperprolactinemia and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia has only been reported to date in a few cases in literature. The authors describe the appearance of the subject, correlating clinical photographs with X-rays. They report the clinical excursus of the patient characterised by the gradual increase in deformities which seriously jeopardized the patient's relational life, in particular the appearance of a bulk on the forehead and checks and the deformation of the symphyseal portion of the mandible with presence of interdental diastemata. The patient also complained diplopia, difficulty in chewing owing to the mobilisation of teeth, and increasing bone pain probably due to nerve compression by exuberant bone. It was not possible to perform corrective surgery owing to the patient's overall poor health conditions. In fact, dilatative cardiomyopathy which continued to worsen in spite of numerous forms of medical treatment resulted in the patient's death owing to cardiac decompensation. Even the attempt to treat the patient's primary endocrine dysfunction using bromocryptine and subsequently octreotide failed to produce positive results owing to the onset of collateral effects which led to the early suspension of treatment.

  6. [Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Gallesio, C; Tagliabue, M; Mazzeo, R; De Gioanni, P P

    1996-11-01

    The authors present a severe case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in which there was considerable involvement of cranial bone and facial skeleton. Numerous lesions were present at the level of the long bones of limbs. Endocrine dysfunction was also present in the form of a hypophyseal adenoma secreting prolactin and ACTH. The concomitance of acromegaly or gigantism and/or hyperprolactinemia and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia has only been reported to date in a few cases in literature. The authors describe the appearance of the subject, correlating clinical photographs with X-rays. They report the clinical excursus of the patient characterised by the gradual increase in deformities which seriously jeopardized the patient's relational life, in particular the appearance of a bulk on the forehead and checks and the deformation of the symphyseal portion of the mandible with presence of interdental diastemata. The patient also complained diplopia, difficulty in chewing owing to the mobilisation of teeth, and increasing bone pain probably due to nerve compression by exuberant bone. It was not possible to perform corrective surgery owing to the patient's overall poor health conditions. In fact, dilatative cardiomyopathy which continued to worsen in spite of numerous forms of medical treatment resulted in the patient's death owing to cardiac decompensation. Even the attempt to treat the patient's primary endocrine dysfunction using bromocryptine and subsequently octreotide failed to produce positive results owing to the onset of collateral effects which led to the early suspension of treatment. PMID:9026699

  7. Elevated serum CA 19-9 level associated with a splenic cyst: which is the actual clinical management? Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bresadola, Vittorio; Pravisani, Riccardo; Terrosu, Giovanni; Risaliti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Splenic cysts are relatively rare entities. The differential diagnosis for these lesions includes parasite infections, results of previous trauma or infarction, congenital forms, primitive splenic neoplasm or cystic metastasis. They can be either symptomatic, causing mainly abdominal pain, or asymptomatic, thus being diagnosed as in incidental finding during radiological examination for other clinical reasons: among these a raised serum level of CA 19-9 can be a case. It has been demonstrated that epidermoid and mesothelial congenital cyst can be associated with a pathological level of this tumor marker which is usually correlated to biliopancreatic and colonic carcinomas. The aim of the present study is to present the case of an asymptomatic epidermoid splenic cyst associated with a continuous increase of CA 19-9 and to describe the applied clinical workup and surgical management by laparoscopic total splenectomy. Moreover, to analyze the demographics, clinical and pathological features of these infrequent lesions and to confront our therapeutic management with that of the other reported cases, we conducted a systematic review of the literature.

  8. Does Simulator-Based Clinical Performance Correlate with Actual Hospital Behavior? The Effect of Extended Work Hours on Patient Care Provided by Medical Interns

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, James A.; Alexander, Erik K.; Lockley, Steven W.; Flynn-Evans, Erin; Venkatan, Suresh K.; Landrigan, Christopher P.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The correlation between simulator-based medical performance and real-world behavior remains unclear. The authors conducted this study to explore whether the effects of extended work hours on clinical performance, as reported in prior hospital-based studies, could be observed in a simulator-based testing environment. Method Intern volunteers reported to the simulator laboratory in a rested state and again in a sleep-deprived state (after a traditional 24–30 hour overnight shift [n=17]). A subset also presented after a shortened overnight shift (maximum of 16 scheduled hours [n=8]). During each laboratory visit, participants managed two critically ill patients. An on-site physician scored each case, as did a blinded rater later watching videotapes of the performances (score=1 [worst] to 8 [best]; average of both cases = session score). Results Among all participants, the average simulator session score was 6.0 (95% CI: 5.6–6.4) in the rested state, and declined to 5.0 (95% CI: 4.6–5.4) after the traditional overnight shift (P<0.001). Among those who completed the shortened overnight shift, the average post-shift simulator session score was 5.8 (95% CI: 5.0–6.6) compared to 4.3 [95%CI: 3.8–4.9]) after a traditional extended shift (P<0.001). Conclusions In a clinical simulation test, medical interns performed significantly better after working a shortened overnight shift compared to a traditional extended shift. These findings are consistent with real-time hospital studies using the same shift schedule. Such an independent correlation not only confirms the detrimental impact of extended work hours on medical performance, but also supports the validity of simulation as a clinical performance assessment tool. PMID:20881679

  9. [Complicated jejunoileal diverticulosis. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Rogati, L; Bosco, A; Destradis, E; Ciaccio, V; Pucciarini, L G; Tristaino, B

    1991-01-01

    The diverticulosis of jejunum ileum is an uncommon pathology, that is often revealed just from the complications which it presents. The clinical case reported by the Authors describes a woman who reached to admission for a serious condition of shock secondary to a jejunum bleeding diverticulosis and who underwent an intestinal resection. The patient was discharged home on IX p.o. day. From the review of literature results that the incidence of the diverticulosis of jejunum ileum consists of 0.1%-0.11% of all the gastrointestinal's diverticula and the predominance is for the female, especially in the middle age. The diverticulosis of jejunum ileum can be congenital or acquired; the first one came to the antimesenteric side of the intestines, the second one to the mesenteric side of the same. The diverticulosis is generally asymptomatic, but often produces many complications as the intestinal occlusion, secondary to a bridle, a volvulus, an invagination, also if the peritonitis caused by a diverticulosis's perforation represents the most frequent complication of them. Others rarest complications are the massive haemorrhage of diverticula, the stagnant loop syndrome, the malabsorption's syndrome due to lack of B12 vitamin and growth of bacteria within them, the diverticulitis caused by infection. The therapy of all complicated cases of jejunum ileum diverticula is necessarily the surgery only and exactly the intestinal resection.

  10. The effect of communicating the genetic risk of cardiometabolic disorders on motivation and actual engagement in preventative lifestyle modification and clinical outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Sherly X; Ye, Zheng; Whelan, Kevin; Truby, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Genetic risk prediction of chronic conditions including obesity, diabetes and CVD currently has limited predictive power but its potential to engage healthy behaviour change has been of immense research interest. We aimed to understand whether the latter is indeed true by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating whether genetic risk communication affects motivation and actual behaviour change towards preventative lifestyle modification. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCT) since 2003 investigating the impact of genetic risk communication on health behaviour to prevent cardiometabolic disease, without restrictions on age, duration of intervention or language. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses for perceived motivation for behaviour change and clinical changes (weight loss) and a narrative analysis for other outcomes. Within the thirteen studies reviewed, five were vignette studies (hypothetical RCT) and seven were clinical RCT. There was no consistent effect of genetic risk on actual motivation for weight loss, perceived motivation for dietary change (control v. genetic risk group standardised mean difference (smd) -0·15; 95 % CI -1·03, 0·73, P=0·74) or actual change in dietary behaviour. Similar results were observed for actual weight loss (control v. high genetic risk SMD 0·29 kg; 95 % CI -0·74, 1·31, P=0·58). This review found no clear or consistent evidence that genetic risk communication alone either raises motivation or translates into actual change in dietary intake or physical activity to reduce the risk of cardiometabolic disorders in adults. Of thirteen studies, eight were at high or unclear risk of bias. Additional larger-scale, high-quality clinical RCT are warranted. PMID:27405704

  11. The effect of communicating the genetic risk of cardiometabolic disorders on motivation and actual engagement in preventative lifestyle modification and clinical outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Sherly X; Ye, Zheng; Whelan, Kevin; Truby, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Genetic risk prediction of chronic conditions including obesity, diabetes and CVD currently has limited predictive power but its potential to engage healthy behaviour change has been of immense research interest. We aimed to understand whether the latter is indeed true by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating whether genetic risk communication affects motivation and actual behaviour change towards preventative lifestyle modification. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCT) since 2003 investigating the impact of genetic risk communication on health behaviour to prevent cardiometabolic disease, without restrictions on age, duration of intervention or language. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses for perceived motivation for behaviour change and clinical changes (weight loss) and a narrative analysis for other outcomes. Within the thirteen studies reviewed, five were vignette studies (hypothetical RCT) and seven were clinical RCT. There was no consistent effect of genetic risk on actual motivation for weight loss, perceived motivation for dietary change (control v. genetic risk group standardised mean difference (smd) -0·15; 95 % CI -1·03, 0·73, P=0·74) or actual change in dietary behaviour. Similar results were observed for actual weight loss (control v. high genetic risk SMD 0·29 kg; 95 % CI -0·74, 1·31, P=0·58). This review found no clear or consistent evidence that genetic risk communication alone either raises motivation or translates into actual change in dietary intake or physical activity to reduce the risk of cardiometabolic disorders in adults. Of thirteen studies, eight were at high or unclear risk of bias. Additional larger-scale, high-quality clinical RCT are warranted.

  12. An intervention to improve notifiable disease reporting using ambulatory clinics.

    PubMed

    Trepka, M J; Zhang, G; Leguen, F

    2009-01-01

    Strong notifiable disease surveillance systems are essential for disease control. We sought to determine if a brief informational session between clinic and health department employees followed by reminder faxes and a newsletter would improve reporting rates and timeliness in a notifiable disease surveillance system. Ambulatory clinics were randomized to an intervention group which received the informational session, a faxed reporting reminder and newsletter, or to a control group. Among intervention and control clinics, there were improvements in the number of cases reported and the timeliness of reporting. However, there were no statistically significant changes in either group. Despite improved communication between the health department and clinics, this intervention did not significantly improve the level or the timeliness of reporting. Other types of interventions should be considered to improve reporting such as simplifying the reporting process.

  13. Clinical crown lengthening - a case report.

    PubMed

    Lipska, Weronika; Lipski, Marcin; Lisiewicz, Małgorzata; Gala, Andrzej; Gronkiewicz, Krzysztof; Darczuk, Dagmara; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining healthy parodontium during teeth restoration procedures is an indispensable condition for obtain- ing regular functionning and esthetics. Thus, the knowledge of correct anatomy and the influence of filling and complement on paradontium tissue is vital. Difficulty in maintaining appropriate gingival biological width (GBW) is a frequent problem encountered in this type of reconstruction. Preservation of unchanged biological width conditions predictible treatment result and, what is more, lack of inflammatory lesions in marginal parodontium. The ideal situation for parodontium is localizing the filling/complement border supragingivaly, which is at least 3 mm from alveolar process edge. In the case, when the above conditions are impossible to fulfil, elongation of clinical crown is a metod of choice. The effect is possible to achieve by surgical treatment or combined orthodontic - surgical treatment. Surgical treatment is faster and preferred procedure for indirect reconstruction, where achieving high clinical crown is necessary. Three clinical cases of performing method of surgical clinical crown elongation were presented in the article. Performing the described procedure enables correct tooth crown reconstruction and, what is most important, keeping individual toothing.

  14. Report from the ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Arthur G

    2004-01-01

    The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists 2003 annual Midyear Clinical meeting in December 2003 was attended by nearly 18,000 individuals and had increased content and networking opportunities of Pharmacists involved in pain management. Initiatives, awards and services presented and announced at the meeting are described. PMID:15257976

  15. Perceived accessibility versus actual physical accessibility of healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J; Byfield, G; Brown, T T; LaFavor, K; Murphy, D; Laud, P

    2000-01-01

    This study addressed how healthcare clinics perceive themselves in regard to accessibility for persons with spinal cord injuries (SCI). All 40 of the clinics surveyed reported that they were wheelchair accessible; however, there was significant variability in the number of sites that actually met the guidelines of the Americans with Disability Act. In general, a person using a wheelchair could enter the building, the examination room, and the bathroom. The majority of sites did not have an examination table that could be lowered to wheelchair level. Most reported limited experience in working with persons with (SCI), yet they claimed to be able to assist with difficult transfers. Only one site knew about autonomic dysreflexia. Problems of accessibility appeared to be seriously compounded by the clinics' perception of how they met physical accessibility guidelines without consideration of the actual needs of persons with SCI. This study addressed the perception of accessibility as reported by clinic managers versus actual accessibility in healthcare clinics in a Midwestern metropolitan area for persons using wheelchairs. PMID:10754921

  16. EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS IN DEPRESSION: A CLINICAL REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Rajul; Singh, Anand Pratap; Sinha, P.K.; Trivedi, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty patients of depression and thirty normal subjects were assessed using clinical rating scales and also for the executive functions by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The depressed subjects demonstrated poor performance on WCST suggesting cognitive inflexibility and prefrontal dysfunction. More severe illness was associated with greater impairment in the executive functioning. This pattern of result in conjunction with previous studies supported the idea that depressed patients may have fixed frontally based dysfunction and calls for the use of cognitive assessment and rehabilitation in the patients with depression. PMID:21206597

  17. Residential accessibility to information technology retailers and self reported computer use among patients attending community clinics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul; Shaheen, Madga; Smith, James; Ryan, Daniel; Baker, Richard

    2009-11-14

    The actual mechanisms that maintain the individual disparities in home computer use and internet access that are collectively termed "the digital divide" remain unclear. We hypothesized that geographic accessibility to IT retailers would independently influence community clinic patients self reported use of computers at home thus limiting their ability to access health related information via the internet. To test this we obtained information on the locations of IT retailers in Los Angeles County, California and generated accessibility scores for the patient's home residence. Geographic measures of accessibility to IT retailers independently predicted clinic patient's self reported use of computers at home, and this effect was driven by low income individuals. Our results indicate that the causes of the digital divide are influenced by less commonly considered factors such as local IT retailer availability.

  18. Refining the Structure and Content of Clinical Genomic Reports

    PubMed Central

    DORSCHNER, MICHAEL O.; AMENDOLA, LAURA M.; SHIRTS, BRIAN H.; KIEDROWSKI, LESLI; SALAMA, JOSEPH; GORDON, ADAM S.; FULLERTON, STEPHANIE M.; TARCZY-HORNOCH, PETER; BYERS, PETER H.; JARVIK, GAIL P.

    2014-01-01

    To effectively articulate the results of exome and genome sequencing we refined the structure and content of molecular test reports. To communicate results of a randomized control trial aimed at the evaluation of exome sequencing for clinical medicine, we developed a structured narrative report. With feedback from genetics and non-genetics professionals, we developed separate indication-specific and incidental findings reports. Standard test report elements were supplemented with research study-specific language, which highlighted the limitations of exome sequencing and provided detailed, structured results, and interpretations. The report format we developed to communicate research results can easily be transformed for clinical use by removal of research-specific statements and disclaimers. The development of clinical reports for exome sequencing has shown that accurate and open communication between the clinician and laboratory is ideally an ongoing process to address the increasing complexity of molecular genetic testing. PMID:24616401

  19. [The oral aspects of osteogenesis imperfecta. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Moniaci, D; Migliario, M; Flecchia, G; Re, G

    1989-10-01

    The oral symptoms observable in patients with imperfect osteogenesis are described and a clinical case that makes a contribution to our knowledge of a rarely encountered pathology is reported. PMID:2615733

  20. [Paraffinomas: history, clinical features and treatment. A case report].

    PubMed

    Mounios-Perchenet, A S; Le Fourn, B; Hepner-Lavergne, D; Pannier, M

    1997-02-01

    One case of paraffinoma is reported on a 60 years old man following injections of paraffin fourty years ago. The authors recalled with this observation history of paraffin, clinical aspect and surgical treatment of the paraffinoma.

  1. Electronic patient-reported outcome systems in oncology clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Antonia V; Jensen, Roxanne E; Basch, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires assess topics a patient can report about his or her own health. This includes symptoms (eg, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, pain, or frequent urination), physical functioning (eg, difficulty climbing stairs or difficulty fastening buttons), and mental health (eg, anxiety, fear, or worry). Electronic PRO (ePRO) systems are used in oncology clinical care because of 1) their ability to enhance clinical care by flagging important symptoms and saving clinicians time; 2) the availability of standardized methods for creating and implementing PROs in clinics; and 3) the existence of user-friendly platforms for patient self-reporting like tablet computers and automated telephone surveys. Many ePRO systems can provide actionable links to clinical care such as summary reports in a patient's electronic medical record and real-time e-mail alerts to providers when patients report acute needs. This review presents 5 examples of ePRO systems currently in use in oncology practice. These systems support multiple clinical activities, including assessment of symptoms and toxicities related to chemotherapy and radiation, postoperative surveillance, and symptom management during palliative care and hospice. Patient self-reporting is possible both at clinical visits and between visits over the Internet or by telephone. The implementation of an ePRO system requires significant resources and expertise, as well as user training. ePRO systems enable regular monitoring of patient symptoms, function, and needs, and can enhance the efficiency and quality of care as well as communication with patients.

  2. Form and Actuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Michel

    A basic choice underlies physics. It consists of banishing actual situations from theoretical descriptions, in order to reach a universal formal construct. Actualities are then thought of as mere local appearances of a transcendent reality supposedly described by the formal construct. Despite its impressive success, this method has left major loopholes in the foundations of science. In this paper, I document two of these loopholes. One is the problem of time asymmetry in statistical thermodynamics, and the other is the measurement problem of quantum mechanics. Then, adopting a broader philosophical standpoint, I try to turn the whole picture upside down. Here, full priority is given to actuality (construed as a mode of the immanent reality self-reflectively being itself) over formal constructs. The characteristic aporias of this variety of "Copernican revolution" are discussed.

  3. Developing Clinical Information Needs and Systems. Final Grant Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noback, Richardson K.; Byrd, Gary D.

    This report represents the extended research following an initial three-year grant reported on in 1975. Goals were: (1) to enact, observe, and assess the results of a program in which medical librarians become integral members of multi-disciplinary patient care and educational teams; and (2) to test the ability of these Clinical Medical Librarians…

  4. [Gluten--mechanisms of intolerance, symptoms and treatment possibilities of IgE-related allergy for gluten in the light of actual clinical and immunological studies].

    PubMed

    Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Waga, Jacek; Dyga, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Gluten is the product of a chemical bond of wheat prolamin proteins (glia- dins and glutenins) in an aqueous me- dium. IgE mediated gluten allergy can be induced either by gluten as an in- gredient in foods or wheat prolamines present in the air. The aim of the study was clinical analysis of 13 patients, who demonstrated elevated levels of gluten specific IgE and identification of the most allergenic protein fractions from several samples of wheat using serum of examined subjects. Clinical analysis showed the occupational allergy to gluten in the form of rhinitis, asthma and airborne dermatistis in 9 subjects, whose symptoms disappeared during isolation from occupational exposure despite the use of a normal diet. In case of 4 patients with severe forms of chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis, who are also allergic to grass pollen at the same time, the introduction of a gluten-free diet resulted in improvement of health conditions. The study of wheat protein fractions revealed a significant polymorphism dependent on the wheat sample. In the protein fractions, low and high molecular glutenin fractions, and alpha, beta, gamma, and omega-gliadins were separated. It has been shown that the strongest immunogenic effect causes omega-5 gliadin fraction. The removal of this fraction resulted in reduction of skin reactivity evaluated by skin prick test in the studied patients.

  5. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 7: Guidelines for EEG Reporting.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Olga, Selioutski; Ochoa, Juan G; Munger Clary, Heidi; Cheek, Janna; Drislane, Frank; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-08-01

    This EEG Guideline incorporates the practice of structuring a report of results obtained during routine adult electroencephalography. It is intended to reflect one of the current practices in reporting an EEG and serves as a revision of the previous guideline entitled "Writing an EEG Report." The goal of this guideline is not only to convey clinically relevant information, but also to improve interrater reliability for clinical and research use by standardizing the format of EEG reports. With this in mind, there is expanded documentation of the patient history to include more relevant clinical information that can affect the EEG recording and interpretation. Recommendations for the technical conditions of the recording are also enhanced to include post hoc review parameters and type of EEG recording. Sleep feature documentation is also expanded upon. More descriptive terms are included for background features and interictal discharges that are concordant with efforts to standardize terminology. In the clinical correlation section, examples of common clinical scenarios are now provided that encourages uniformity in reporting. Including digital samples of abnormal waveforms is now readily available with current EEG recording systems and may be beneficial in augmenting reports when controversial waveforms or important features are encountered.

  6. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 7: Guidelines for EEG Reporting.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Olga, Selioutski; Ochoa, Juan G; Munger Clary, Heidi; Cheek, Janna; Drislane, Frank; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-08-01

    This EEG Guideline incorporates the practice of structuring a report of results obtained during routine adult electroencephalography. It is intended to reflect one of the current practices in reporting an EEG and serves as a revision of the previous guideline entitled "Writing an EEG Report." The goal of this guideline is not only to convey clinically relevant information, but also to improve interrater reliability for clinical and research use by standardizing the format of EEG reports. With this in mind, there is expanded documentation of the patient history to include more relevant clinical information that can affect the EEG recording and interpretation. Recommendations for the technical conditions of the recording are also enhanced to include post hoc review parameters and type of EEG recording. Sleep feature documentation is also expanded upon. More descriptive terms are included for background features and interictal discharges that are concordant with efforts to standardize terminology. In the clinical correlation section, examples of common clinical scenarios are now provided that encourages uniformity in reporting. Including digital samples of abnormal waveforms is now readily available with current EEG recording systems and may be beneficial in augmenting reports when controversial waveforms or important features are encountered. PMID:27482790

  7. Utilization and utility of clinical laboratory reports with graphical elements

    PubMed Central

    Shirts, Brian H.; Larsen, Nichole; Jackson, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Graphical reports that contain charts, images, and tables have potential to convey information more effectively than text-based reports; however, studies have not measured how much clinicians value such features. We sought to identify factors that might influence the utilization of reports with graphical elements postulating that this is a surrogate for relative clinical utility of these graphical elements. Materials and Methods: We implemented a pilot project at ARUP laboratories to develop online enhanced laboratory test reports that contained graphical elements. We monitored on-demand clinician access to reports generated for 48 reportable tests over 22 months. We evaluated utilization of reports with graphical elements by clinicians at all institutions that use ARUP as a reference laboratory using descriptive statistics, regression, and meta-analysis tools to evaluate groups of similar test reports. Results: Median download rate by test was 8.6% with high heterogeneity in download rates between tests. Test reports with additional graphical elements were not necessarily downloaded more often than reports without these elements. Recently implemented tests and tests reporting abnormal results were associated with higher download rates (P < 0.01). Higher volume tests were associated with lower download rates (P = 0.03). Conclusions: In select cases graphical information may be clinically useful, particularly for less frequently ordered tests and in on reports of abnormal results. The utilization data presented could be used as a reference point for other laboratories planning on implementing graphical reporting. However, between-test heterogeneity was high and in many cases graphical elements may add little clinical utility, particularly if these merely reinforce information already contained in text based reports. PMID:23024885

  8. Fat embolism syndrome: Case report of a clinical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Roneeta; Venkategowda, Pradeep Marur; Mutkule, Dnyaneshwar; Rao, Surath Manimala

    2014-07-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is a rare clinical condition associated with trauma, particularly of long bones. FES after fracture of neck of femur or head of humerus is uncommon. We report a case of FES following fracture in neck of femur and head of humerus in a man with history of mitral valve replacement, on long-term oral anticoagulant therapy, with an alleged history of convulsions. Our dilemma in clinical diagnosis is discussed. PMID:25190956

  9. Oral rehabilitation of severe dentoalveolar trauma: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Fonda G; Cunningham, Larry L

    2012-12-01

    This clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an adult male who suffered severe dentoalveolar trauma as a result of a motor vehicle accident. The specific objectives of this treatment were to restore esthetics and masticatory function. Treatment included removal of fractured roots, placement of multiple endosseous implants, and placement of anterior and posterior metal-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. Three year clinical examination revealed no pathology associated with the rehabilitation. The patient's esthetic and functional expectations were successfully achieved.

  10. Assessment of University Gynaecology Clinics Based on Quality Reports.

    PubMed

    Solomayer, E F; Rody, A; Wallwiener, D; Beckmann, M W

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: Quality reporting was initially implemented to offer a better means of assessing hospitals and to provide patients with information to help them when choosing their hospital. Quality reports are published every 2 years and include parameters describing the hospital's structure and general infrastructure together with specific data on individual specialised departments or clinics. Method: This study investigated the 2010 quality reports of German university hospitals published online, focussing on the following data: number of inpatients treated by the hospital, focus of care provided by the unit/department, range of medical services and care provided by the unit/department, non-medical services provided by the unit/department, number of cases treated in the unit/department, ICD diagnoses, OPS procedures, number of outpatient procedures, day surgeries as defined by Section 115b SGB V, presence of an accident insurance consultant and number of staff employed. Results: University gynaecology clinics (UGCs) treat 10 % (range: 6-17 %) of all inpatients of their respective university hospital. There were no important differences in infrastructure between clinics. All UGCs offered full medical care and were specialist clinics for gynaecology (surgery, breast centres, genital cancer, urogynaecology, endoscopy), obstetrics (prenatal diagnostics, high-risk obstetrics); many were also specialist clinics for endocrinology and reproductive medicine. On average, each clinic employs 32 physicians (range: 16-78). Half of them (30-77 %) are specialists. Around 171 (117-289) inpatients are treated on average per physician. The most common ICD coded treatments were deliveries and treatment of infants. Gynaecological diagnoses are underrepresented. Summary: UGCs treat 10 % of all inpatients treated in university hospitals, making them important ports of entry for their respective university hospital. Around half of the physicians are specialists. Quality reports

  11. On-time clinical phenotype prediction based on narrative reports

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, Cosmin A.; Vanderwende, Lucy; Evans, Heather L.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a natural language processing system which is able to predict whether or not a patient exhibits a specific phenotype using the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with the patient. Furthermore, the phenotypic annotations from our report dataset were performed at the report level which allows us to perform the prediction of the clinical phenotype at any point in time during the patient hospitalization period. Our experiments indicate that an important factor in achieving better results for this problem is to determine how much information to extract from the patient reports in the time interval between the patient admission time and the current prediction time. PMID:24551325

  12. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care: reporting standards.

    PubMed

    Brölmann, Fleur E; Eskes, Anne M; Sumpio, Bauer E; Mayer, Dieter O; Moore, Zena; Agren, Magnus S; Hermans, Michel; Cutting, Keith; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2013-01-01

    In wound care research, available high-level evidence according to the evidence pyramid is rare, and is threatened by a poor study design and reporting. Without comprehensive and transparent reporting, readers will not be able to assess the strengths and limitations of the research performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are universally acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects. To give high-level evidence the appreciation it deserves in wound care, we propose a step-by-step reporting standard for comprehensive and transparent reporting of RCTs in wound care. Critical reporting issues (e.g., wound care terminology, blinding, predefined outcome measures, and a priori sample size calculation) and wound-specific barriers (e.g., large diversity of etiologies and comorbidities of patients with wounds) that may prevent uniform implementation of reporting standards in wound care research are addressed in this article. The proposed reporting standards can be used as guidance for authors who write their RCT, as well as for peer reviewers of journals. Endorsement and application of these reporting standards may help achieve a higher standard of evidence and allow meta-analysis of reported wound care data. The ultimate goal is to help wound care professionals make better decisions for their patients in clinical practice.

  13. The frontline clinical manager identifying direct reports' level of practice.

    PubMed

    Longo, M Anne; Roussel, Linda; Pennington, Sandra L; Hoying, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Patricia Benner applied the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to describe and interpret skill acquisition and clinical judgment in nursing practice. Operational definitions for the 5 levels of her original Novice to Expert Theory were used by the study participants in a large Midwestern pediatric hospital to self-identify their level of practice. The frontline clinical managers of these direct care registered nurses (RNs) used the same tool to rate their direct reports. The aim of this portion of a larger study was to determine if the clinical manager's perception of their direct reports was the same as that of the RNs. The results of this study are being used by one study unit's clinical managers as the basis for implementing the Hersey and Blanchard Situational Leadership Model. The clinical managers work with their direct reports depending on the level of practice and the details of the task to be performed. One example is creating therapeutic relationships with each other and with families to ensure a safe environment for all.

  14. The 2-implant maxillary overdenture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Dudley, James

    2014-08-01

    Maxillary implant overdentures present a number of different challenges in comparison to the established and predictable benefits of mandibular implant overdentures. This report highlights the lack of evidence and conflicting findings in the maxillary implant overdenture literature and presents a clinical treatment of a 2-implant and subsequently 1-implant maxillary overdenture with reduced palatal coverage.

  15. Automated clinical data collection for national quality measurement reporting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Noirot, Laura A; Reichley, Richard M; Storey, Patricia; Traynor, Patrick; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Bailey, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data for the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) ORYX Core Measurement Reporting can be automated using an object-oriented, client-developed program that extracts data from a clinical data repository and utilizes an MHA vendor upload process. The process eliminated 39% of the manual data collection efforts. PMID:18694244

  16. Incidental findings from clinical sequencing in Greece: reporting experts' attitudes.

    PubMed

    Gourna, E G; Armstrong, N; Wallace, S E

    2014-10-01

    Unprecedented progress in sequencing technologies and decreasing cost have brought genomic testing into the clinical setting. At the same time, the debate in the literature concerning the return of incidental findings (IFs) has made this an important issue internationally. These developments reflect a shift in genetics that will also affect smaller countries, such as Greece, that are just starting to implement these technologies and may look to other countries for examples of good practice. Ten in-depth interviews were conducted with Greek experts in clinical sequencing. Previous experiences and attitudes toward IFs and clinical sequencing were investigated as well as views on the existing policy regarding managing genetic information generated through testing. . Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. All participants reported the lack of any legal or other supportive mechanism. IFs are currently managed at a "local" level, i.e. within the clinic or the laboratory in an ad hoc way. All participants thought that clinically valid and actionable IFs should be returned, but always with caution and in respect to patients' wishes, although several experts reported returning IFs according to their clinical discretion. Experts reported that most patients ask for all tests available but they felt that more counselling is needed to understand and manage genetic information. Due to the lack of any supporting mechanisms, professionals in Greece, even those with established experience in the field of genetic and genomic testing, have difficulties dealing with IFs. All experts agreed that it is now time, before the full integration of genomic testing into everyday clinical practice, for guidance to help Greek physicians work with patients and their families when IFs are discovered. PMID:25048384

  17. Bayesian methods in reporting and managing Australian clinical indicators

    PubMed Central

    Howley, Peter P; Hancock, Stephen J; Gibberd, Robert W; Chuang, Sheuwen; Tuyl, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Sustained clinical improvement is unlikely without appropriate measuring and reporting techniques. Clinical indicators are tools to help assess whether a standard of care is being met. They are used to evaluate the potential to improve the care provided by healthcare organisations (HCOs). The analysis and reporting of these indicators for the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards have used a methodology which estimates, for each of the 338 clinical indicators, the gains in the system that would result from shifting the mean proportion to the 20th centile. The results are used to provide a relative measure to help prioritise quality improvement activity within clinical areas, rather than simply focus on “poorer performing” HCOs. The method draws attention to clinical areas exhibiting larger between-HCO variation and affecting larger numbers of patients. HCOs report data in six-month periods, resulting in estimated clinical indicator proportions which may be affected by small samples and sampling variation. Failing to address such issues would result in HCOs exhibiting extremely small and large estimated proportions and inflated estimates of the potential gains in the system. This paper describes the 20th centile method of calculating potential gains for the healthcare system by using Bayesian hierarchical models and shrinkage estimators to correct for the effects of sampling variation, and provides an example case in Emergency Medicine as well as example expert commentary from colleges based upon the reports. The application of these Bayesian methods enables all collated data to be used, irrespective of an HCO’s size, and facilitates more realistic estimates of potential system gains. PMID:26244154

  18. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports.

    PubMed

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection. PMID:27252814

  19. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection. PMID:27252814

  20. Semirigid Cantilever Extension System for Splinting Implants: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Raissa Micaella Marcello; Pinto, Luciana de Rezende; Chagas Júnior, Otacílio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    In mandibular edentulous patients, treatment based on immediate loading with rigid splinting in the mandible is well accepted; however, it is cost and time dependent, which sometimes limits this type of rehabilitation. To overcome these problems, the technique of immediate loading using a semirigid splinting extension system has been developed. Its advantages include low cost, technical feasibility, and reduced clinic time. This clinical report presents the applicability and the predictability of semirigid splinting of implants in the mandibular arch of an edentulous patient using a distal extension bar prosthesis system. PMID:25161775

  1. Clinical presentation of pili torti--Case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Cade, Karine Valentim; Rezende, Flavia Cury; Pereira, José Marcos; Pegas, José Roberto Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Pili torti also known as 'twisted hairs' (Latin: pili=hair; torti=twisted) is a rare, congenital or acquired clinical presentation, in which the hair shaft is flattened at irregular intervals and twisted 180º along its axis. It is clinically characterized by fragile, brittle, coarse and lusterless hairs, due to uneven light reflection on the twisted hair surface. Pili torti may be associated with neurological abnormalities and ectodermal dysplasias. There is no specific treatment for this condition, but it may improve spontaneously after puberty. We report a case of pili torti in a child who presented fragile, brittle, difficult to comb hair. The patient had no comorbidities. PMID:26312667

  2. A unified approach to the design of clinical reporting systems.

    PubMed

    Gouveia-Oliveira, A; Salgado, N C; Azevedo, A P; Lopes, L; Raposo, V D; Almeida, I; de Melo, F G

    1994-12-01

    Computer-based Clinical Reporting Systems (CRS) for diagnostic departments that use structured data entry have a number of functional and structural affinities suggesting that a common software architecture for CRS may be defined. Such an architecture should allow easy expandability and reusability of a CRS. We report the development methodology and the architecture of SISCOPE, a CRS originally designed for gastrointestinal endoscopy that is expandable and reusable. Its main components are a patient database, a knowledge base, a reports base, and screen and reporting engines. The knowledge base contains the description of the controlled vocabulary and all the information necessary to control the menu system, and is easily accessed and modified with a conventional text editor. The structure of the controlled vocabulary is formally presented as an entity-relationship diagram. The screen engine drives a dynamic user interface and the reporting engine automatically creates a medical report; both engines operate by following a set of rules and the information contained in the knowledge base. Clinical experience has shown this architecture to be highly flexible and to allow frequent modifications of both the vocabulary and the menu system. This structure provided increased collaboration among development teams, insulating the domain expert from the details of the database, and enabling him to modify the system as necessary and to test the changes immediately. The system has also been reused in several different domains.

  3. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    McAlindon, T E; Driban, J B; Henrotin, Y; Hunter, D J; Jiang, G-L; Skou, S T; Wang, S; Schnitzer, T

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials for knee OA we initially drafted recommendations through an iterative process. Members of the working group included representatives from industry and academia. After the working group members reviewed a final draft, they scored the appropriateness for recommendations. After the members voted we calculated the median score among the nine members of the working group who completed the score. The document includes 25 recommendations regarding randomization, blocking and stratification, blinding, enhancing accuracy of patient-reported outcomes (PRO), selecting a study population and index knee, describing interventions, patient-reported and physical performance measures, structural outcome measures, biochemical biomarkers, and reporting recommendations. In summary, the working group identified 25 recommendations that represent the current best practices regarding clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee OA. These updated recommendations incorporate novel technologies (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and strategies to address the heterogeneity of knee OA. PMID:25952346

  4. Outcome Measures for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Castle, Jessica R; Cinar, Ali; Damiano, Edward R; Dassau, Eyal; DeVries, J Hans; Doyle, Francis J; Griffen, Steven C; Haidar, Ahmad; Heinemann, Lutz; Hovorka, Roman; Jones, Timothy W; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris; Levy, Brian L; Nimri, Revital; O'Neal, David N; Philip, Moshe; Renard, Eric; Russell, Steven J; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Zisser, Howard; Lum, John W

    2016-07-01

    Research on and commercial development of the artificial pancreas (AP) continue to progress rapidly, and the AP promises to become a part of clinical care. In this report, members of the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project Consortium in collaboration with the wider AP community 1) advocate for the use of continuous glucose monitoring glucose metrics as outcome measures in AP trials, in addition to HbA1c, and 2) identify a short set of basic, easily interpreted outcome measures to be reported in AP studies whenever feasible. Consensus on a broader range of measures remains challenging; therefore, reporting of additional metrics is encouraged as appropriate for individual AP studies or study groups. Greater consistency in reporting of basic outcome measures may facilitate the interpretation of study results by investigators, regulatory bodies, health care providers, payers, and patients themselves, thereby accelerating the widespread adoption of AP technology to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27330126

  5. A wide variation of the quality of colonoscopy reporting system in the real clinical practice in southeastern area of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Min; Kang, Yu Jin; Lee, Yoo Jin; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jeon, Seong Woo; Jung, Min Kyu; Lee, Hyun Seok; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Jin Tae; Jang, Byung Ik; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Chung, Yun Jin; Yang, Chang Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Establishment of a colonoscopy reporting system is a prerequisite to determining and improving quality. This study aimed to investigate colonoscopists' opinions and the actual situation of a colonoscopy reporting system in a clinical practice in southeastern area of Korea and to assess the factors predictive of an inadequate reporting system. Methods Physicians who performed colonoscopies in the Daegu-Gyeongbuk province of Korea and were registered with the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) were interviewed via mail about colonoscopy reporting systems using a standardized questionnaire. Results Of 181 endoscopists invited to participate, 125 responded to the questionnaires (response rate, 69%). Most responders were internists (105/125, 84%) and worked in primary clinics (88/125, 70.4%). Seventy-one specialists (56.8%) held board certifications for endoscopy from the KSGE. A median of 20 colonoscopies (interquartile range, 10–47) was performed per month. Although 88.8% of responders agreed that a colonoscopy reporting system is necessary, only 18.4% (23/125) had achieved the optimal reporting system level recommended by the Quality Assurance Task Group of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. One-third of endoscopists replied that they did not use a reporting document for the main reasons of "too busy" and "inconvenience." Non-endoscopy specialists and primary care centers were independent predictive factors for failure to use a colonoscopy reporting system. Conclusions The quality of colonoscopy reporting systems varies widely and is considerably suboptimal in actual clinical practice settings in southeastern Korea, indicating considerable room for quality improvements in this field. PMID:27799886

  6. [Juvenile vascular pathology due to homocystinuria. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Stio, F; Battisti, G; Felici, A; Marigliani, M; De Vita, M; Finizio, R; Fabrizio, G; Porcelli, C; Granai, A V

    1993-01-01

    The authors report a case of juvenile vasculopathy in a homocystinuria patient. They point out that thromboembolism may be the only symptomatic expression of this genetically determined metabolic disease. Diagnostic approach and surgical therapy of the vascular lesions as well as medical therapy to prevent further complications are analysed. The opportunity to perform clinical tests for the diagnosis of homocystinuria in all those young patients presenting vascular lesions without other risk factors is finally stressed.

  7. Clinical case reports using a novel calcium-based cement.

    PubMed

    Bachoo, I K; Seymour, D; Brunton, P

    2013-01-01

    A novel calcium-based cement was launched in 2009 claiming to be a revolutionary material capable of offering a bioactive and biocompatible replacement for dentine. The calcium-based cement has been reported to encourage the repair and regeneration of lost dental tissue, preserve pulp vitality, promote pulp healing and provide a bioactive substitute for natural dentine. This article looks at two clinical cases using this new material for endodontic purposes.

  8. Clinical case reports using a novel calcium-based cement.

    PubMed

    Bachoo, I K; Seymour, D; Brunton, P

    2013-01-01

    A novel calcium-based cement was launched in 2009 claiming to be a revolutionary material capable of offering a bioactive and biocompatible replacement for dentine. The calcium-based cement has been reported to encourage the repair and regeneration of lost dental tissue, preserve pulp vitality, promote pulp healing and provide a bioactive substitute for natural dentine. This article looks at two clinical cases using this new material for endodontic purposes. PMID:23348450

  9. Patients reporting ritual abuse in childhood: a clinical syndrome. Report of 37 cases.

    PubMed

    Young, W C; Sachs, R G; Braun, B G; Watkins, R T

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-seven adult dissociative disorder patients who reported ritual abuse in childhood by satanic cults are described. Patients came from a variety of separate clinical settings and geographical locations and reported a number of similar abuses. The most frequently reported types of ritual abuse are outlined, and a clinical syndrome is presented which includes dissociative states with satanic overtones, severe post-traumatic stress disorder, survivor guilt, bizarre self abuse, unusual fears, sexualization of sadistic impulses, indoctrinated beliefs, and substance abuse. Questions relating to issues of reliability, credibility and verifiability are addressed in depth, and the findings and implications are discussed. PMID:2043970

  10. Discordance between presumed standard of care and actual clinical practice: the example of rubber dam use during root canal treatment in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Riley, Joseph L; Eleazer, Paul D; Benjamin, Paul L; Funkhouser, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Use of a rubber dam during root canal treatment is considered the standard of care because it enhances patient safety and optimises the odds of successful treatment. Nonetheless, not all dentists use a rubber dam, creating disconnect between presumed standard of care and what is actually done in clinical practice. Little is known about dentists’ attitudes towards use of the rubber dam in their practices. The objectives were to: (1) quantify these attitudes and (2) test the hypothesis that specific attitudes are significantly associated with rubber dam use. Setting National Dental Practice-Based Research Network (NationalDentalPBRN.org). Participants 1490 network dentists. Outcome measures Dentists completed a questionnaire about their attitudes towards rubber dam use during root canal treatment. Three attitude scales comprised 33 items that used a 5-point ordinal scale to measure beliefs about effectiveness, inconvenience, ease of placement, comparison to other isolation techniques and patient factors. Factor analysis, cluster analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysed the relationship between attitudes and rubber dam use. Results All items had responses at each point on the 5-point scale, with an overall pattern of substantial variation across dentists. Five attitudinal factors (rubber dam effectiveness; inconvenient/time-consuming; ease of placement; effectiveness compared to Isolite; patient factors) and 4 clusters of practitioners were identified. Each factor and cluster was independently and strongly associated with rubber dam use. Conclusions General dentists have substantial variation in attitudes about rubber dam use. Beliefs that rubber dam use is not effective, inconvenient, time-consuming, not easy to place or affected by patient factors, were independently and significantly associated with lower rubber dam use. These attitudes explain why there is substantial discordance between presumed standard of care and actual practice

  11. A Clinical Report of Nonsyndromic Concomitant Hypo-Hyperdontia

    PubMed Central

    Popat, Hashmat

    2013-01-01

    Although hypodontia and supernumerary teeth are often considered as mutually exclusive conditions, this case report presents an unusual case of hypodontia and a supernumerary tooth occurring simultaneously. An adolescent male was referred to the local hospital department regarding upper arch crowding. Plain film radiographs confirmed the congenital absence of both lower lateral incisors in addition to an unerupted conical supernumerary tooth in the maxillary midline. This condition has been called hypo-hyperdontia and in this paper, we discuss the clinical findings and treatment planning considerations in relation to the limited number of previously reported cases. The case report raises awareness of concomitant hypo-hyperdontia and serves to highlight that concomitant anomalies should be excluded when hypodontia or supernumerary teeth are diagnosed. PMID:24191202

  12. Bilateral Chondroepitrochlearis Muscle: Case Report, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Clinical Significance.

    PubMed

    Palagama, Sujeewa P W; Tedman, Raymond A; Barton, Matthew J; Forwood, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous muscular variants of pectoralis major have been reported on several occasions in the medical literature. Among them, chondroepitrochlearis is one of the rarest. Therefore, this study aims to provide a comprehensive description of its anatomy and subsequent clinical significance, along with its phylogenetic importance in pectoral muscle evolution with regard to primate posture. The authors suggest a more appropriate name to better reflect its proximal attachment to the costochondral junction and distal attachment to the epicondyle of humerus, as "chondroepicondylaris"; in addition, we suggest a new theory of phylogenetic significance to explain the twisting of pectoralis major tendon in primates that may have occurred with their adoption to bipedalism and arboreal lifestyle. Finally, the clinical significance of this aberrant muscle is elaborated as a cause of potential neurovascular entrapment and as a possible hurdle during axillary surgeries (i.e., mastectomy). PMID:27242928

  13. Bilateral Chondroepitrochlearis Muscle: Case Report, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Palagama, Sujeewa P. W.; Tedman, Raymond A.; Barton, Matthew J.; Forwood, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous muscular variants of pectoralis major have been reported on several occasions in the medical literature. Among them, chondroepitrochlearis is one of the rarest. Therefore, this study aims to provide a comprehensive description of its anatomy and subsequent clinical significance, along with its phylogenetic importance in pectoral muscle evolution with regard to primate posture. The authors suggest a more appropriate name to better reflect its proximal attachment to the costochondral junction and distal attachment to the epicondyle of humerus, as “chondroepicondylaris”; in addition, we suggest a new theory of phylogenetic significance to explain the twisting of pectoralis major tendon in primates that may have occurred with their adoption to bipedalism and arboreal lifestyle. Finally, the clinical significance of this aberrant muscle is elaborated as a cause of potential neurovascular entrapment and as a possible hurdle during axillary surgeries (i.e., mastectomy). PMID:27242928

  14. Developments in clinical trials: a Pharma Matters report.

    PubMed

    Arjona, A; Nuskey, B; Rabasseda, X; Arias, E

    2014-08-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry strives to meet the ever-increasing complexity of drug development, new technology in clinical trials has become a beacon of hope. With big data comes the promise of accelerated patient recruitment, real-time monitoring of clinical trials, bioinformatics empowerment of quicker phase progression, and the overwhelming benefits of precision medicine for select trials. Risk-based monitoring stands to benefit as well. With a strengthening focus on centralized data by the FDA and industry's transformative initiative, TransCelerate, a new era in trial risk mitigation has begun. The traditional method of intensive on-site monitoring is becoming a thing of the past as statistical, real-time analysis of site and trial-wide data provides the means to monitor with greater efficiency and effectiveness from afar. However, when it comes to big data, there are challenges that lie ahead. Patient privacy, commercial investment protection, technology woes and data variability are all limitations to be met with considerable thought. At the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology this year, clinical trials on psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases were discussed in detail. This review of clinical research reports on novel therapies for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis reveals the impact of these diseases and the drug candidates that have been successful in phase II and III studies. Data-focused highlights of novel dermatological trials, as well as real-life big data approaches and an insight on the new methodology of risk-based monitoring, are all discussed in this edition of Developments in Clinical Trials. PMID:25187907

  15. Developments in clinical trials: a Pharma Matters report.

    PubMed

    Arjona, A; Nuskey, B; Rabasseda, X; Arias, E

    2014-08-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry strives to meet the ever-increasing complexity of drug development, new technology in clinical trials has become a beacon of hope. With big data comes the promise of accelerated patient recruitment, real-time monitoring of clinical trials, bioinformatics empowerment of quicker phase progression, and the overwhelming benefits of precision medicine for select trials. Risk-based monitoring stands to benefit as well. With a strengthening focus on centralized data by the FDA and industry's transformative initiative, TransCelerate, a new era in trial risk mitigation has begun. The traditional method of intensive on-site monitoring is becoming a thing of the past as statistical, real-time analysis of site and trial-wide data provides the means to monitor with greater efficiency and effectiveness from afar. However, when it comes to big data, there are challenges that lie ahead. Patient privacy, commercial investment protection, technology woes and data variability are all limitations to be met with considerable thought. At the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology this year, clinical trials on psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases were discussed in detail. This review of clinical research reports on novel therapies for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis reveals the impact of these diseases and the drug candidates that have been successful in phase II and III studies. Data-focused highlights of novel dermatological trials, as well as real-life big data approaches and an insight on the new methodology of risk-based monitoring, are all discussed in this edition of Developments in Clinical Trials.

  16. Hollow dentures: treatment option for atrophic ridges. a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Caculo, Shweta Pandurang; Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya

    2013-04-01

    Severely atrophic ridges provide decreased retention, support, and stability and pose a clinical challenge to the success of complete denture prostheses. Extreme ridge resorption also increases the interridge distance. Restoration of the vertical dimension and esthetics thus demands increased height of the prosthesis and in turn leads to an increase in prosthesis weight. Reducing the weight of the denture enhances stability and retention and reduces further resorption of the jaw, thereby favoring the prognosis of the denture. This report describes the rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with resorbed maxillary and mandibular ridges and an increased interridge distance using simplified techniques of fabricating hollow dentures.

  17. Predictable Outcomes with Porcelain Laminate Veneers: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Welson; Teixeira, Marcelo Lucchesi; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Jorge, Mônica Zacharias; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    This clinical report describes how to achieve predictable outcomes for anterior teeth esthetic restorations with porcelain laminate veneers by associating the digital planning and design of the restoration with interim restorations. The previous digital smile design of the restoration eliminates the communication barrier with the patient and assists the clinician throughout patient treatment. Interim restorations (diagnostic mock-ups) further enhance communication with the patient and prevent unnecessary tooth reduction for conservative tooth preparation. Adequate communication between patient and clinician contributes to successful definitive restorations and patient satisfaction with the final esthetic outcome. PMID:26633080

  18. Predictable Outcomes with Porcelain Laminate Veneers: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Welson; Teixeira, Marcelo Lucchesi; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Jorge, Mônica Zacharias; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    This clinical report describes how to achieve predictable outcomes for anterior teeth esthetic restorations with porcelain laminate veneers by associating the digital planning and design of the restoration with interim restorations. The previous digital smile design of the restoration eliminates the communication barrier with the patient and assists the clinician throughout patient treatment. Interim restorations (diagnostic mock-ups) further enhance communication with the patient and prevent unnecessary tooth reduction for conservative tooth preparation. Adequate communication between patient and clinician contributes to successful definitive restorations and patient satisfaction with the final esthetic outcome.

  19. The reporting of clinical signs in laboratory animals: FELASA Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Fentener van Vlissingen, J M; Borrens, M; Girod, A; Lelovas, P; Morrison, F; Torres, Y Saavedra

    2015-10-01

    Observing and reporting clinical signs in laboratory animals is necessary for many reasons: the assessment of animal welfare, compliance with the principle of refinement (e.g. humane endpoints), regulatory compliance (e.g. reporting severity) and, importantly, as a scientific outcome, e.g. in animal models of disease or safety studies. Developments in the reporting of clinical signs will enhance the scientific value gained from animal experiments and further address the ethical cost. This paper discusses systematic approaches to the observation and reporting of clinical signs in animals (to be) used for research. Glossaries from public and corporate institutions have been consulted and a reference glossary has been set up, providing terminology to be tailored for institutional or project-specific use. The clinical examination of animals must be carried out by competent and specifically trained staff in a systematic way and repeated at adequate intervals and clinical observations must be registered effectively to allow this information to be used. The development of institutional or project-specific glossaries and the use of handwritten records or automated databases are discussed in detail. Among the users are animal care staff, veterinarians and researchers who will need to agree on a given set of clinical signs to be monitored routinely or as a scientific read-out and to train for the proper application. The paper introduces a long list of clinical signs with scientific terminology, descriptions and explanations as a reference glossary to be published and maintained online as a living document supported by the authors as an editorial committee. PMID:25957286

  20. The reporting of clinical signs in laboratory animals: FELASA Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Fentener van Vlissingen, J M; Borrens, M; Girod, A; Lelovas, P; Morrison, F; Torres, Y Saavedra

    2015-10-01

    Observing and reporting clinical signs in laboratory animals is necessary for many reasons: the assessment of animal welfare, compliance with the principle of refinement (e.g. humane endpoints), regulatory compliance (e.g. reporting severity) and, importantly, as a scientific outcome, e.g. in animal models of disease or safety studies. Developments in the reporting of clinical signs will enhance the scientific value gained from animal experiments and further address the ethical cost. This paper discusses systematic approaches to the observation and reporting of clinical signs in animals (to be) used for research. Glossaries from public and corporate institutions have been consulted and a reference glossary has been set up, providing terminology to be tailored for institutional or project-specific use. The clinical examination of animals must be carried out by competent and specifically trained staff in a systematic way and repeated at adequate intervals and clinical observations must be registered effectively to allow this information to be used. The development of institutional or project-specific glossaries and the use of handwritten records or automated databases are discussed in detail. Among the users are animal care staff, veterinarians and researchers who will need to agree on a given set of clinical signs to be monitored routinely or as a scientific read-out and to train for the proper application. The paper introduces a long list of clinical signs with scientific terminology, descriptions and explanations as a reference glossary to be published and maintained online as a living document supported by the authors as an editorial committee.

  1. Management of a fractured implant abutment screw: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Canpolat, Ceyhun; Ozkurt-Kayahan, Zeynep; Kazazoğlu, Ender

    2014-07-01

    In an abutment screw fracture, it is generally a challenge for the clinician to remove fractured fragments. In some cases, the screw cannot be removed, and alternative solutions should be considered. This clinical report describes the replacement of a ball attachment with a fractured screw, which was impossible to retrieve, with a cast dowel with ball attachment. The patient who presented to the Department of Prosthodontics, Yeditepe University, Faculty of Dentistry was a 65-year-old woman, wearing a mandibular complete denture supported by two implants for 4 years. She complained about the loss of retention of the denture because of the fractured abutment screw, and it was found that another dentist had previously tried to retrieve the fractured screw with no success. It was decided to construct a cast dowel with ball attachment to improve retention without sacrificing the implant. The interior of the implant and the fractured screw were machined with a rotating instrument. An impression was taken with a metal strip and silicone-based materials. In the laboratory, a stone die was generated from the impression, and a custom-made cast dowel with ball attachment was constructed. It was then cemented with glass ionomer cement and connected to the denture with the direct method. The alternative procedure described in this clinical report was successful for the removal of the fractured abutment screw and use of the existing denture.

  2. 78 FR 7437 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN); The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of... publication. Proposed Collection: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database, 0925-0600, Expiration... and Use of Information Collection: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) is an...

  3. Eventual situations for timeline extraction from clinical reports

    PubMed Central

    Grouin, Cyril; Grabar, Natalia; Hamon, Thierry; Rosset, Sophie; Tannier, Xavier; Zweigenbaum, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the temporal relations between clinical events and temporal expressions in clinical reports, as defined in the i2b2/VA 2012 challenge. Design To detect clinical events, we used rules and Conditional Random Fields. We built Random Forest models to identify event modality and polarity. To identify temporal expressions we built on the HeidelTime system. To detect temporal relations, we systematically studied their breakdown into distinct situations; we designed an oracle method to determine the most prominent situations and the most suitable associated classifiers, and combined their results. Results We achieved F-measures of 0.8307 for event identification, based on rules, and 0.8385 for temporal expression identification. In the temporal relation task, we identified nine main situations in three groups, experimentally confirming shared intuitions: within-sentence relations, section-related time, and across-sentence relations. Logistic regression and Naïve Bayes performed best on the first and third groups, and decision trees on the second. We reached a 0.6231 global F-measure, improving by 7.5 points our official submission. Conclusions Carefully hand-crafted rules obtained good results for the detection of events and temporal expressions, while a combination of classifiers improved temporal link prediction. The characterization of the oracle recall of situations allowed us to point at directions where further work would be most useful for temporal relation detection: within-sentence relations and linking History of Present Illness events to the admission date. We suggest that the systematic situation breakdown proposed in this paper could also help improve other systems addressing this task. PMID:23571851

  4. Nasal Prosthesis Rehabilitation after Partial Rhinectomy: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Seçilmiş, Aslı; Öztürk, A. Nilgün

    2007-01-01

    Facial defects resulting from neoplasms, congenital malformations, or trauma can be restorated with facial prostheses using different materials and retention methods to achieve a lifelike look and function. For the successful result, a lot of factors as harmony, texture, color matching, and blending of tissue interface of prosthesis is important. This clinical report describes treatment using a silicone prosthesis with a mechanical - retentined design for a patient who received a partial rhinectomy. Defects resulting from diseases as squamous cell carcinoma can be managed with the prosthetic rehabilitation so that the patient more comfortably and confidently resumed regular daily activity. Mechanical retention alone was sufficient to retain the prosthesis; thus, prosthetic adhesives were not necessary. PMID:19212487

  5. Odontogenic calcificant cystic tumor: a report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Daniel; Villanueva, Julio; Espinosa, Sebastián; Cornejo, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Odontogenic Calcificant Cystic Tumor (OCCT) is an infrequent injury. It arises from odontogenic epithelial rests present in the maxilla, jaw or gum. Gorlin and col. described the OCCT for first time as an own pathological entity in 1962. Clinically, the OCCT represents 1% of the odontogenic injuries. It is possible to be found from the first decade to the eighth decade. It affects in same proportion the maxilla and the jaw, being the most common in the dented zones, with greater incidence in the first molar area. Two case reports of OCCT in two different ages, both in female individuals, one at 5 years old and the other at 35 years old are presented. Enucleation of the tumor was the treatment chosen. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature related to these two cases of OCCT and its treatment, putting an emphasis on its aetiology, biological behaviour and treatment.

  6. Basics of case report form designing in clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Bellary, Shantala; Krishnankutty, Binny; Latha, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Case report form (CRF) is a specialized document in clinical research. It should be study protocol driven, robust in content and have material to collect the study specific data. Though paper CRFs are still used largely, use of electronic CRFs (eCRFS) are gaining popularity due to the advantages they offer such as improved data quality, online discrepancy management and faster database lock etc. Main objectives behind CRF development are preserving and maintaining quality and integrity of data. CRF design should be standardized to address the needs of all users such as investigator, site coordinator, study monitor, data entry personnel, medical coder and statistician. Data should be organized in a format that facilitates and simplifies data analysis. Collection of large amount of data will result in wasted resources in collecting and processing it and in many circumstances, will not be utilized for analysis. Apart from that, standard guidelines should be followed while designing the CRF. CRF completion manual should be provided to the site personnel to promote accurate data entry by them. These measures will result in reduced query generations and improved data integrity. It is recommended to establish and maintain a library of templates of standard CRF modules as they are time saving and cost-effective. This article is an attempt to describe the methods of CRF designing in clinical research and discusses the challenges encountered in this process. PMID:25276625

  7. Right Homonymous Hemianopia: A Clinical Case Report of Schizencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Arminda; Carvalheira, Fausto; Campos, Joana; Alfaiate, Pedro; Campos, António; Paulo, João; Sousa, Castro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a 56-year-old male with right homonymous hemianopia. Methods Retrospective descriptive study of a case report based on information from clinical records, patient observation and analysis of complementary diagnostic tests. Results An asymptomatic 56-year-old male presented to our hospital for a routine ophthalmic examination. The best-corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in the right eye (RE) and in the left eye (LE). Pupillary function, intraocular pressure, external segment examinations and slit-lamp biomicroscopy were normal, bilaterally. Fundoscopy showed a cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio in the RE of 0.3 and of 0.4 in the LE. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed thinning of the superior, temporal and nasal RNFL in the RE and thinning of the superior, inferior and temporal RNFL in the LE. Automated static perimetry showed right homonymous hemianopia. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed an open-lip schizencephaly with a significant reduction of the left brain parenchyma. Conclusions Despite the large visual defect, the patient was unaware of it and had an active professional life. This is an interesting case because despite the extensive morphological abnormalities seen on brain CT there is a relatively small functional repercussion. PMID:26889154

  8. JAK INHIBITOR CLINICAL RESPONSE IN POLYARTHRITIS: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Stipić-Marković, Asja; Ferček, Iva; Čubela, Marta; Artuković, Marinko; Radončić, Ksenija Maštrović; Lugović-Mihić, Liborija

    2015-06-01

    The heterogeneity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) presentation and molecular signature of RA subclasses in patients with early changes of small peripheral joints still remains a challenging problem. In clinical setting, classification of the disease subtypes is not possible and treatment adjustment is based on the continuous Disease Activity Score for disease severity recognition. A new approach in the treatment appears with the novel non biologic targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs from the group of Janus kinase 1 and 3 (JAKI and JAK3), blocking interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15 and IL-21. We report a case of a 48-year-old patient who had suffered from polyarthritis from his age 40. Initial laboratory tests showed low inflammatory parameters and magnetic resonance imaging of both hands indicated an early stage of RA. Methylprednisolone and methotrexate therapy was initiated. The patient underwent additional tests, but there was not sufficient evidence for a precise diagnosis. According to the European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology score-based algorithm, the patient was classified as seronegative RA based on joint involvement, duration of the disease, and synovitis not better explained by another disease. A partial clinical effect of the administered therapy (steroids as monotherapy and in combination, methotrexate and leflunomide) was noticed with the use of systemic steroids, but dramatic improvement was only achieved with a JAK inhibitor targeted therapy. Although the use of anti TNF-α blocker is a proposed procedure and the drug has not yet been registered in Europe, we took the opportunity to apply this new medication option. The patient, a construction worker, was treated for 20 months, which led to complete remission of the disease, without the need of basic or corticosteroid therapy. Full functional capacity necessary in his demanding job was also achieved. This result raised a question of timely

  9. Reporting for duty: the paternal function and clinical formulations.

    PubMed

    Davies, Nick

    2015-02-01

    The author highlights some developments in the theory of the preoedipal paternal function and paternal functionary and incorporates these ideas in developing clinical formulations for four clinical cases that privilege the preoedipal paternal function. In particular, four aspects of the preoedipal paternal function are identified, and for each a clinical case is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the necessity of widening clinical formulations to ensure clinicians have the widest possible set of clinical ideas and hence interventions and techniques at their fingertips. PMID:25688683

  10. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst: A Report of Three Clinical Cases

    PubMed Central

    González Galván, María del Carmen; García-García, Abel; Anitua-Aldecoa, Eduardo; Martinez-Conde Llamosas, Rafael; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) until Wright (1981) defined it as a different entity. Surgery is the usual treatment, and recurrence or association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been described. In this report, we presented three cases of this pathology, and we review the principal clinical, histological, radiological, and therapeutic aspects. Case 1. A 73-year-old female presents with a slight swelling on the right mandible, associated with an unilocular well-defined radiolucent lesion. Case 2. A 27-year-old female presents with a painful mandibular swelling associated with an unilocular radiolucent lesion posterior to the 4.8. Case 3. A 61-year-old male was casually detected presents with an unilocular radiolucent lesion distal to the 4.8. Conclusion. The OOC is a specific odontogenic clinicopathological entity that should be differentiated from the KCOT as it presents a completely different biological behaviour. PMID:24191203

  11. Hemineglect and seizures in Binswanger's disease: clinical-pathological report.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, S A; Tatemichi, T K; Hair, L S; Goldman, J E; Camac, A; Mohr, J P

    1993-01-01

    The range of clinical effects from ischaemic damage to white matter in Binswanger's disease has not been fully characterised. Although focal deficits and seizures occur frequently, superficial infarcts often coexist, making the cause of these symptoms unclear. The case of a 69 year old woman is described who presented with acute left sided weakness and hemispatial neglect, followed a year later by electrographically documented seizures originating from the right hemisphere. Interim examinations showed bilateral pyramidal signs and mild intellectual decline. Serial CT and MRI studies showed bilateral diffuse ischaemic lesions of the cerebral white matter and old left sided lacunar infarcts but no evidence of acute infarction. Post-mortem examination showed gliosis and demyelination of the deep white matter which spared the subcortical arcuate fibres; this is consistent with Binswanger's disease. The neocortex was normal. This case and previous reports indicate that focal symptoms typically referable to the grey matter, including hemineglect and seizures, may occur as a manifestation of subcortical ischaemic injury to white matter in Binswanger's disease. Images PMID:8331360

  12. Quality management tools: facilitating clinical research data integrity by utilizing specialized reports with electronic case report forms.

    PubMed

    Trocky, N M; Fontinha, M

    2005-01-01

    Data collected throughout the course of a clinical research trial must be reviewed for accuracy and completeness continually. The Oracle Clinical (OC) data management application utilized to capture clinical data facilitates data integrity through pre-programmed validations, edit and range checks, and discrepancy management modules. These functions were not enough. Coupled with the use of specially created reports in Oracle Discoverer and Integrated Review, both ad-hoc query and reporting tools, research staff have enhanced their ability to clean, analyze and report more accurate data captured within and among Case Report Forms (eCRFs) by individual study or across multiple studies.

  13. Quality Management Tools: Facilitating Clinical Research Data Integrity by Utilizing Specialized Reports with Electronic Case Report Forms

    PubMed Central

    Trocky, NM; Fontinha, M

    2005-01-01

    Data collected throughout the course of a clinical research trial must be reviewed for accuracy and completeness continually. The Oracle Clinical® (OC) data management application utilized to capture clinical data facilitates data integrity through pre-programmed validations, edit and range checks, and discrepancy management modules. These functions were not enough. Coupled with the use of specially created reports in Oracle Discoverer® and Integrated Review TM, both ad-hoc query and reporting tools, research staff have enhanced their ability to clean, analyze and report more accurate data captured within and among Case Report Forms (eCRFs) by individual study or across multiple studies. PMID:16779428

  14. Rationale for tilted implants: FEA considerations and clinical reports.

    PubMed

    DE Vico, G; Bonino, M; Spinelli, D; Schiavetti, R; Sannino, G; Pozzi, A; Ottria, L

    2011-07-01

    The prevalence of the elderly population, as well as life expectancy, increased in the final decades of the 20th century, as described in the World Health Organization 2004 Annual Report. The edentulous condition therefore has a negative impact on the oral health-related quality of life. Patients wearing complete dentures for many years infact, and especially in the mandible, are often unsatisfied because of the instability of the prosthesis during speaking and eating. To date dental implant treatment is well documented as a predictable treatment for partial or complete edentulism. On the other hand the rehabilitation of atrophied edentulous arches with endosseous implants (> 10 mm) in the posterior regions is often associated with anatomic problems such as bone resorption, poor bone quality, mandibular canal, and the presence of maxillary sinuses. Different procedures have been proposed to overcome these anatomic limitations. The use of tilted implants parallel to the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus or the mental foramen/inferior alveolar nerve has been proposed as a conservative solution for the treatment of the atrophic edentulous maxilla. Aim of this study was to describe, through a detailed literature review, the clinical and biomechanical rationale for tilting implants and to evaluate the long-term prognosis of immediately loaded full fixed prostheses for the treatment of edentulous patients (#35) with extreme bone atrophy rehabilited with both axial (#70) and tilted (#70) implants from 2008 to 2010. The results of the present study would suggest that this new surgical technique may reduce patient morbidity and extend the indications for immediate loading full fixed rehabilitations. This improves the predictability of treatment goal, allows for a better risk management, and provides more individual information for the patient. These are the most important aspects of this technology, which may contribute to establish higher-quality standards in

  15. Rationale for tilted implants: FEA considerations and clinical reports

    PubMed Central

    DE VICO, G.; BONINO, M.; SPINELLI, D.; SCHIAVETTI, R.; SANNINO, G.; POZZI, A.; OTTRIA, L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The prevalence of the elderly population, as well as life expectancy, increased in the final decades of the 20th century, as described in the World Health Organization 2004 Annual Report. The edentulous condition therefore has a negative impact on the oral health–related quality of life. Patients wearing complete dentures for many years infact, and especially in the mandible, are often unsatisfied because of the instability of the prosthesis during speaking and eating. To date dental implant treatment is well documented as a predictable treatment for partial or complete edentulism. On the other hand the rehabilitation of atrophied edentulous arches with endosseous implants (> 10 mm) in the posterior regions is often associated with anatomic problems such as bone resorption, poor bone quality, mandibular canal, and the presence of maxillary sinuses. Different procedures have been proposed to overcome these anatomic limitations. The use of tilted implants parallel to the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus or the mental foramen/inferior alveolar nerve has been proposed as a conservative solution for the treatment of the atrophic edentulous maxilla. Aim of this study was to describe, through a detailed literature review, the clinical and biomechanical rationale for tilting implants and to evaluate the long-term prognosis of immediately loaded full fixed prostheses for the treatment of edentulous patients (#35) with extreme bone atrophy rehabilited with both axial (#70) and tilted (#70) implants from 2008 to 2010. The results of the present study would suggest that this new surgical technique may reduce patient morbidity and extend the indications for immediate loading full fixed rehabilitations. This improves the predictability of treatment goal, allows for a better risk management, and provides more individual information for the patient. These are the most important aspects of this technology, which may contribute to establish higher-quality standards in

  16. Statistical Controversies in Reporting of Clinical Trials: Part 2 of a 4-Part Series on Statistics for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Stuart J; McMurray, John J V; Collier, Tim J

    2015-12-15

    This paper tackles several statistical controversies that are commonly faced when reporting a major clinical trial. Topics covered include: multiplicity of data, interpreting secondary endpoints and composite endpoints, the value of covariate adjustment, the traumas of subgroup analysis, assessing individual benefits and risks, alternatives to analysis by intention to treat, interpreting surprise findings (good and bad), and the overall quality of clinical trial reports. All is put in the context of topical cardiology trial examples and is geared to help trialists steer a wise course in their statistical reporting, thereby giving readers a balanced account of trial findings. PMID:26670066

  17. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  18. El Observatorio Gemini - Status actual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.

    Se hace una breve descripción de la situación actual del Observatorio Gemini y de las últimas decisiones del Board para incrementar la eficiencia operativa. Se hace también una breve referencia al uso argentino del observatorio.

  19. Comparing written and oral approaches to clinical reporting in nursing.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Diana; Johnson, Maree; Nicholls, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Patient safety is compromised if vital clinical information is not available to all members of the healthcare team. Therefore, it is important to understand the differences between patient information found in nursing documentation and information presented at clinical nursing handover. Content and textual analyses of two data sets were undertaken: one containing 67 examples of nursing documentation and the other containing 195 transcripts of clinical handover to understand the scope and construction of patient information found in each communication system. Clinical handover produced a comprehensive picture of the patient's condition and care whereas nursing documentation tended to present a series of descriptions of tasks performed by nurses. There is a need to investigate new systems of communication promoting congruence between clinical handover and nursing documentation to ensure that all patient information can be accessed by all interested parties. PMID:23050579

  20. 'Cloud computing' and clinical trials: report from an ECRIN workshop.

    PubMed

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Danielyan, Edgar; Robertshaw, Steve; Legré, Yannick; Clivio, Luca; Demotes, Jacques

    2015-07-29

    Growing use of cloud computing in clinical trials prompted the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network, a European non-profit organisation established to support multinational clinical research, to organise a one-day workshop on the topic to clarify potential benefits and risks. The issues that arose in that workshop are summarised and include the following: the nature of cloud computing and the cloud computing industry; the risks in using cloud computing services now; the lack of explicit guidance on this subject, both generally and with reference to clinical trials; and some possible ways of reducing risks. There was particular interest in developing and using a European 'community cloud' specifically for academic clinical trial data. It was recognised that the day-long workshop was only the start of an ongoing process. Future discussion needs to include clarification of trial-specific regulatory requirements for cloud computing and involve representatives from the relevant regulatory bodies.

  1. 'Cloud computing' and clinical trials: report from an ECRIN workshop.

    PubMed

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Danielyan, Edgar; Robertshaw, Steve; Legré, Yannick; Clivio, Luca; Demotes, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Growing use of cloud computing in clinical trials prompted the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network, a European non-profit organisation established to support multinational clinical research, to organise a one-day workshop on the topic to clarify potential benefits and risks. The issues that arose in that workshop are summarised and include the following: the nature of cloud computing and the cloud computing industry; the risks in using cloud computing services now; the lack of explicit guidance on this subject, both generally and with reference to clinical trials; and some possible ways of reducing risks. There was particular interest in developing and using a European 'community cloud' specifically for academic clinical trial data. It was recognised that the day-long workshop was only the start of an ongoing process. Future discussion needs to include clarification of trial-specific regulatory requirements for cloud computing and involve representatives from the relevant regulatory bodies. PMID:26220186

  2. High School Students' Self-Reported Use of School Clinics and Nurses.

    PubMed

    Harper, Christopher R; Liddon, Nicole; Dunville, Richard; Habel, Melissa A

    2016-10-01

    Access to school health clinics and nurses has been linked with improved student achievement and health. Unfortunately, no studies have examined how many students report using school clinics or nurses and for which services. This study addressed this gap with data from a nationally representative sample of 15- to 25-year-olds. Respondents who reported being in high school were provided a list of services and asked whether they had gone to a school nurse or clinic for any of the listed services. Nearly 90% reported having access to a school clinic or nurse. Among students with access, 65.6% reported using at least one service. Non-White students and younger students were more likely to report having access to a clinic or nurse. These results show many students have access to clinics or nurses and are using these services, although not uniformly for all services. PMID:27302959

  3. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  4. Current practices in clinical analytics: a hospital survey report.

    PubMed

    Womack, Dana M; Kennedy, Rosemary; Bria, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Clinical analytics must become a pervasive activity in healthcare settings to achieve the global vision for timely, effective, equitable, and excellent care. Global adoption of the Electronic Health Record (EHR) has increased the volume of data available for performance measurement and healthcare organizational capacity for continuous quality improvement. However, EHR adoption does not automatically result in optimal use of clinical data for performance improvement. In order to understand organizational factors related to use of data for clinical analytics, a survey was conducted of hospitals and hospital-based clinics. The survey revealed sub-optimal use of data captured as a byproduct of care delivery, the need for tools and methodologies to assist with data analytics, and the need for disciplined organizational structure and strategies. Informatics nurse professionals are well-positioned to lead analytical efforts and serve as a catalyst in their facility's transformations into a data-driven organization.

  5. Symposium on research advances in clinical PET. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael McGehee

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Clinical PET and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) co-sponsored a symposium entitled 'Research in PET: International and Institutional Perspectives' that highlighted the activities of many leading investigators in the U.S. and throughout the world. Research programs at the DOE were discussed as were potential directions of PET research. International as well as institutional perspectives on PET research were presented. This symposium was successful in reaching those interested in research advances of clinical PET.

  6. Workshop report: Schistosomiasis vaccine clinical development and product characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mo, Annie X; Colley, Daniel G

    2016-02-17

    A schistosomiasis vaccine meeting was organized to evaluate the utility of a vaccine in public health programs, to discuss clinical development paths, and to define basic product characteristics for desirable vaccines to be used in the context of schistosomiasis control and elimination programs. It was concluded that clinical evaluation of a schistosomiasis vaccine is feasible with appropriate trial design and tools. Some basic Preferred Product Characteristics (PPC) for a human schistosomiasis vaccine and for a veterinary vaccine for bovine use were also proposed.

  7. Final Report on a Faculty Workshop on Clinical Instruction for Optometric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lee W.; And Others

    Report of a four-day workshop on optometric clinical education for clinical administration and faculty is presented. The workshop addressed the following four issues: (1) the objectives of present and future clinical education in the light of public needs and professional responsibilities; (2) the nature, types, setting, and extent of clinical…

  8. Clinical Characteristics of Adults Reporting Repressed, Recovered, or Continuous Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Richard J.; Perlman, Carol A.; Ristuccia, Carel S.; Clancy, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors assessed women and men who either reported continuous memories of their childhood sexual abuse (CSA, n = 92), reported recovering memories of CSA (n = 38), reported believing they harbored repressed memories of CSA (n = 42), or reported never having been sexually abused (n = 36). Men and women were indistinguishable on all clinical and…

  9. SELF-ACTUALIZATION AND THE UTILIZATION OF TALENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRENCH, JOHN R.P.; MILLER, DANIEL R.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED (1) TO DEVELOP A THEORY OF THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION AS RELATED TO THE UTILIZATION OF TALENT, (2) TO FIT THE THEORY TO EXISTING DATA, AND (3) TO PLAN ONE OR MORE RESEARCH PROJECTS TO TEST THE THEORY. TWO ARTICLES ON IDENTITY AND MOTIVATION AND SELF-ACTUALIZATION AND SELF-IDENTITY THEORY REPORTED THE…

  10. Facebook as a Library Tool: Perceived vs. Actual Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Terra B.

    2011-01-01

    As Facebook has come to dominate the social networking site arena, more libraries have created their own library pages on Facebook to create library awareness and to function as a marketing tool. This paper examines reported versus actual use of Facebook in libraries to identify discrepancies between intended goals and actual use. The results of a…

  11. Clinical Research Careers: Reports from a NHLBI Pediatric Heart Network Clinical Research Skills Development Conference

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wyman W.; Richmond, Marc; Li, Jennifer S.; Saul, J. Philip; Mital, Seema; Colan, Steven D.; Newburger, Jane W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; McCrindle, Brain W.; Minich, L. LuAnn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Marino, Bradley S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Pearson, Gail D.; Evans, Frank; Scott, Jane D.; Cohen, Meryl S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Wyman W. Lai, MD, MPH, and Victoria L. Vetter, MD, MPH. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), funded under the U.S. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH–NHLBI), includes two Clinical Research Skills Development (CRSD) Cores, which were awarded to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and to the Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York–Presbyterian. To provide information on how to develop a clinical research career to a larger number of potential young investigators in pediatric cardiology, the directors of these two CRSD Cores jointly organized a one-day seminar for fellows and junior faculty from all of the PHN Core sites. The participants included faculty members from the PHN and the NHLBI. The day-long seminar was held on April 29, 2009, at the NHLBI site, immediately preceding the PHN Steering Committee meeting in Bethesda, MD. Methods The goals of the seminar were 1) to provide fellows and early investigators with basic skills in clinical research 2) to provide a forum for discussion of important research career choices 3) to introduce attendees to each other and to established clinical researchers in pediatric cardiology, and 4) to publish a commentary on the future of clinical research in pediatric cardiology. Results The following chapters are compilations of the talks given at the 2009 PHN Clinical Research Skills Development Seminar, published to share the information provided with a broader audience of those interested in learning how to develop a clinical research career in pediatric cardiology. The discussions of types of clinical research, research skills, career development strategies, funding, and career management are applicable to research careers in other areas of clinical medicine as well. Conclusions The aim of this compilation is to stimulate those who might be interested in the research career options available to investigators. PMID:21167335

  12. Consistency between Self-Reported and Recorded Values for Clinical Measures

    PubMed Central

    III, Joseph Thomas; Paulet, Mindy; Rajpura, Jigar R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated consistency between self-reported values for clinical measures and recorded clinical measures. Methods. Self-reported values were collected for the clinical measures: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, glucose level, height, weight, and cholesterol from health risk assessments completed by enrollees in a privately insured cohort. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from reported height and weight. Practitioner recorded values for the clinical measures were obtained from health screenings. We used bivariate Pearson correlation analysis and descriptive statistics to evaluate consistency between self-reported data and recorded clinic measurements. Results. There was high correlation between self-reported clinical values and recorded clinical measures for diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.91, P = <0.0001), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.93, P = <0.0001), cholesterol (r = 0.97, P = <0.0001), body mass index (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), glucose (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), weight (r = 0.98, P = <0.0001), and height (r = 0.89, P = <0.0001). Conclusions. Self-reported clinical values for each of the eight clinical measures examined had good consistency with practitioner recorded data. PMID:26942034

  13. Crown lengthening: basic principles, indications, techniques and clinical case reports.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Simon; Andreana, Sebastiano

    2004-11-01

    Sometimes, in order to properly restore teeth, surgical intervention in the form of a crown-lengthening procedure is required. Crown lengthening is a periodontal resective procedure, aimed at removing supporting periodontal structures to gain sound tooth structure above the alveolar crest level. Periodontal health is of paramount importance for all teeth, both sound and restored. For the restorative dentist to utilize crown lengthening, it is important to understand the concept of biologic width, indications, techniques and other principles. This article reviews these basic concepts of clinical crown lengthening and presents four clinical cases utilizing crown lengthening as an integral part of treatments, to restore teeth and their surrounding tissues to health.

  14. Transient epileptic amnesia: clinical report of a cohort of patients.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Quaranta, Davide; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-07-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia is a seizure disorder, usually with onset in the middle-elderly and good response to low dosages of antiepileptic drugs. We describe the clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and neuroimaging features of 11 patients with a temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by amnesic seizures as the sole or the main symptom. We outline the relevance of a detailed clinical history to recognize amnesic seizures and to avoid the more frequent misdiagnoses. Moreover, the response to monotherapy was usually good, although the epileptic disorder was symptomatic of acquired lesions in the majority of patients.

  15. Clinical Case Reporting in the Peer-Reviewed Physical Therapy Literature: Time to Move Toward Functioning.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Todd E

    2015-12-01

    Physical therapists increasingly are contributing clinical case reports to the health literature, which form the basis for higher quality evidence that has been incorporated into clinical practice guidelines. Yet, few resources exist to assist physical therapists with the basic mechanics and quality standards of producing a clinical case report. This situation is further complicated by the absence of uniform standards for quality in case reporting. The importance of including a concise yet comprehensive description of patient functioning in all physical therapy case reports suggest the potential appropriateness of basing quality guidelines on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) model. The purpose of this paper is to assist physical therapists in creating high-quality clinical case reports for the peer-reviewed literature using the ICF model as a guiding framework. Along these lines, current recommendations related to the basic mechanics of writing a successful clinical case report are reviewed, as well and a proposal for uniform clinical case reporting requirements is introduced with the aim to improve the quality and feasibility of clinical case reporting in physical therapy that are informed by the ICF model.

  16. A formal representation for numerical data presented in published clinical trial reports.

    PubMed

    Tong, Maurine; Hsu, William; Taira, Ricky K

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the quality of and integrating clinical trial reports are necessary to practice evidence-based medicine. In particular, the numerical data is essential to understanding the strength and quality of the clinical trial study. In this paper, we present a formal representation for standardizing numerical data in published clinical trial reports, and our efforts towards developing computational tools to capture and visualize this representation. The approach includes two aspects: a process model used to precisely define experimental context behind the numerical value; and a spreadsheet, an intuitive and familiar tool used to organize numerical data. We demonstrated this representation using clinical trial reports on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed a preliminary evaluation to determine the usefulness of this formalism for identifying the characteristics, quality and significance of a clinical trial. Our initial results demonstrate that the representation is sufficiently expressive to capture reported numerical information in published papers.

  17. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  18. Case report medical eponyms: an applied clinical informatics opportunity.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, L N Guptha Munugoor; Greco, P J; Kaelber, D C

    2012-01-01

    Medical eponyms are medical words derived from people's names. Eponyms, especially similar sounding eponyms, may be confusing to people trying to use them because the terms themselves do not contain physiologically descriptive words about the condition they refer to. Through the use of electronic health records (EHRs), embedded applied clinical informatics tools including synonyms and pick lists that include physiologically descriptive terms associated with any eponym appearing in the EHR can significantly enhance the correct use of medical eponyms. Here we describe a case example of two similar sounding medical eponyms--Wegener's disease and Wegner's disease-- which were confused in our EHR. We describe our solution to address this specific example and our suggestions and accomplishments developing more generalized approaches to dealing with medical eponyms in EHRs. Integrating brief physiologically descriptive terms with medical eponyms provides an applied clinical informatics opportunity to improve patient care.

  19. ACTH adenomas transforming their clinical expression: report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Faustini-Fustini, Marco; Mazzatenta, Diego; Marucci, Gianluca; De Carlo, Eugenio; Bacci, Antonella; Pasquini, Ernesto; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Frank, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) adenomas have been recognized as a more aggressive and invasive subtype of pituitary adenomas. An additional and clinically relevant peculiarity of these tumors is their ability to modify their clinical expression from a silent form to Cushing disease or vice versa. The aim of this study was to review a series of patients with pituitary adenomas and analyze the clinical implications of the transformation of clinical expression in 5 cases that showed this phenomenon. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed a series of patients with pituitary adenoma and collected clinical, biohumoral, and neuroradiological data of those who presented with a transformation from silent ACTH adenomas to functioning tumors or vice versa. In all the cases, preoperative assessment consisted of brain MRI, ophthalmological examination, and complete baseline endocrinological investigation. In patients with clinical and/or biochemical findings suspicious for Cushing syndrome, a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test was performed to rule in or out this diagnosis. Endocrinological evaluations were repeated 1 month after surgery, 3 months after surgery, and every 6 months or annually thereafter. Ophthalmological evaluations and brain MRIs were repeated after 3 months and then every 6 or 12 months thereafter. RESULTS Five patients (2 men and 3 women) included in this series had corticotropic tumors that showed transformation from an endocrinologically silent form to manifest Cushing disease and vice versa. The mean age at presentation was 40 years (range 18-51 years). In 3 of these patients, a transformation from silent to functioning ACTH adenoma with manifest Cushing disease occurred. In 1 patient, the authors observed the transition from a functioning to a silent adenoma with spontaneous resolution of hypercortisolism. Another patient's silent adenoma "shifted" to a functioning adenoma and then regressed back to a silent form with spontaneous

  20. Digital immediate dentures treatment: A clinical report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Neumeier, Toni Tien; Neumeier, Harold

    2016-09-01

    The use of computer-aided engineering (CAE) and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology to fabricate complete dentures was introduced in 2011. Clinical procedures for digital immediate dentures can be identical to those for conventional immediate dentures and can be simplified by leaving all remaining dentition until the time of extraction and denture placement. Through the digital process, a single digital design and a definitive digital record are created which can be used to fabricate the immediate digital denture and surgical reduction guide for alveoloplasty. Digital immediate dentures can be relined using the same process as for conventional dentures. The definitive digital dentures can be fabricated with a reline impression and new centric relation record, using the existing digital immediate denture without additional clinical procedures. Providing patients with digital immediate dentures is a viable trend.

  1. A national clinical quality program for Veterans Affairs catheterization laboratories (from the Veterans Affairs clinical assessment, reporting, and tracking program).

    PubMed

    Maddox, Thomas M; Plomondon, Mary E; Petrich, Megan; Tsai, Thomas T; Gethoffer, Hans; Noonan, Gregory; Gillespie, Brian; Box, Tamara; Fihn, Stephen D; Jesse, Robert L; Rumsfeld, John S

    2014-12-01

    A "learning health care system", as outlined in a recent Institute of Medicine report, harnesses real-time clinical data to continuously measure and improve clinical care. However, most current efforts to understand and improve the quality of care rely on retrospective chart abstractions complied long after the provision of clinical care. To align more closely with the goals of a learning health care system, we present the novel design and initial results of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Clinical Assessment, Reporting, and Tracking (CART) program-a national clinical quality program for VA cardiac catheterization laboratories that harnesses real-time clinical data to support clinical care and quality-monitoring efforts. Integrated within the VA electronic health record, the CART program uses a specialized software platform to collect real-time patient and procedural data for all VA patients undergoing coronary procedures in VA catheterization laboratories. The program began in 2005 and currently contains data on 434,967 catheterization laboratory procedures, including 272,097 coronary angiograms and 86,481 percutaneous coronary interventions, performed by 801 clinicians on 246,967 patients. We present the initial data from the CART program and describe 3 quality-monitoring programs that use its unique characteristics-procedural and complications feedback to individual labs, coronary device surveillance, and major adverse event peer review. The VA CART program is a novel approach to electronic health record design that supports clinical care, quality, and safety in VA catheterization laboratories. Its approach holds promise in achieving the goals of a learning health care system.

  2. [Quality of the clinical reports: observational study in Sassari].

    PubMed

    Virdis, A; Licheri, N; Ruiu, A

    2009-01-01

    Within the program of clinical risk management, and in particular in the phase of the "knowledge" of company reality, the work deals with the topic of the case history in Sassari' local health authority. A study is treated where, on a sample of about 400 cases history, four definite aspects are considered, in particular those that are regarded as the most important in the risk management and about medical responsability: 1) formal consent; 2) daily clinical allowance; 3) therapeutic card; 4) operating card. The results we got show the presence of a formal consent filled in correctly in 36 cases (9%), completed a daily allowance in 36 cases (9%), therapeutic card in 14 (3.5%) cases, operation card in 21 cases (19% su 116 surgical cases). These data, that have permitted to estimate the specific company reality as from pointed out critical states, show the necessity of working, with involvement of professional doctors, to build a history case model with clear and shared rules where you can clearly find the clinical path of a patient, where everything made is quoted and easily readable when necessary.

  3. SeqReporter: automating next-generation sequencing result interpretation and reporting workflow in a clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somak; Durso, Mary Beth; Wald, Abigail; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2014-01-01

    A wide repertoire of bioinformatics applications exist for next-generation sequencing data analysis; however, certain requirements of the clinical molecular laboratory limit their use: i) comprehensive report generation, ii) compatibility with existing laboratory information systems and computer operating system, iii) knowledgebase development, iv) quality management, and v) data security. SeqReporter is a web-based application developed using ASP.NET framework version 4.0. The client-side was designed using HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript. The server-side processing (VB.NET) relied on interaction with a customized SQL server 2008 R2 database. Overall, 104 cases (1062 variant calls) were analyzed by SeqReporter. Each variant call was classified into one of five report levels: i) known clinical significance, ii) uncertain clinical significance, iii) pending pathologists' review, iv) synonymous and deep intronic, and v) platform and panel-specific sequence errors. SeqReporter correctly annotated and classified 99.9% (859 of 860) of sequence variants, including 68.7% synonymous single-nucleotide variants, 28.3% nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants, 1.7% insertions, and 1.3% deletions. One variant of potential clinical significance was re-classified after pathologist review. Laboratory information system-compatible clinical reports were generated automatically. SeqReporter also facilitated quality management activities. SeqReporter is an example of a customized and well-designed informatics solution to optimize and automate the downstream analysis of clinical next-generation sequencing data. We propose it as a model that may envisage the development of a comprehensive clinical informatics solution.

  4. SeqReporter: automating next-generation sequencing result interpretation and reporting workflow in a clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somak; Durso, Mary Beth; Wald, Abigail; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2014-01-01

    A wide repertoire of bioinformatics applications exist for next-generation sequencing data analysis; however, certain requirements of the clinical molecular laboratory limit their use: i) comprehensive report generation, ii) compatibility with existing laboratory information systems and computer operating system, iii) knowledgebase development, iv) quality management, and v) data security. SeqReporter is a web-based application developed using ASP.NET framework version 4.0. The client-side was designed using HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript. The server-side processing (VB.NET) relied on interaction with a customized SQL server 2008 R2 database. Overall, 104 cases (1062 variant calls) were analyzed by SeqReporter. Each variant call was classified into one of five report levels: i) known clinical significance, ii) uncertain clinical significance, iii) pending pathologists' review, iv) synonymous and deep intronic, and v) platform and panel-specific sequence errors. SeqReporter correctly annotated and classified 99.9% (859 of 860) of sequence variants, including 68.7% synonymous single-nucleotide variants, 28.3% nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants, 1.7% insertions, and 1.3% deletions. One variant of potential clinical significance was re-classified after pathologist review. Laboratory information system-compatible clinical reports were generated automatically. SeqReporter also facilitated quality management activities. SeqReporter is an example of a customized and well-designed informatics solution to optimize and automate the downstream analysis of clinical next-generation sequencing data. We propose it as a model that may envisage the development of a comprehensive clinical informatics solution. PMID:24220144

  5. Safety of patients--actual problem of modern medicine (review).

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, Neriman; Samnidze, L; Beridze, T; Tsintsadze, M; Tsintsadze, Nino

    2011-09-01

    Safety of patients is actual problem of up-to-date medicine. The current successful treatment of various sicknesses is achieved by implementation in clinical practice such medical preparations (medications), which are characterized with the high therapeutic activity, low toxicity and prolonged effects. In spite of evidence of the pharmacotherapeutical advances, the frequency of complications after medication has grown - that is why the safety of patients is the acute actual problem of medicine and ecological state of human population today. PMID:22156680

  6. Explosive Percolation Transition is Actually Continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recently a discontinuous percolation transition was reported in a new “explosive percolation” problem for irreversible systems [D. Achlioptas, R. M. D’Souza, and J. Spencer, Science 323, 1453 (2009)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1167782] in striking contrast to ordinary percolation. We consider a representative model which shows that the explosive percolation transition is actually a continuous, second order phase transition though with a uniquely small critical exponent of the percolation cluster size. We describe the unusual scaling properties of this transition and find its critical exponents and dimensions.

  7. Refsum disease. Clinical and morphological report on a case.

    PubMed

    Savettieri, G; Camarda, R; Galatioto, S; Bonavita, V

    1982-10-01

    An atypical case of Refsum disease is reported together with the peripheral nerve morphological data. The body fluids must be assayed for phytanic acid whenever an atypical chronic peripheral neuropathy is observed.

  8. Clinical Validation of Percutaneous Cochlear Implant Surgery: Initial Report

    PubMed Central

    Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Balachandran, Ramya; Majdani, Omid; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective Percutaneous cochlear implant surgery consists of a single drill path from the lateral mastoid cortex to the cochlea via the facial recess. We sought to clinically validate this technique in patients undergoing traditional cochlear implant surgery. Study Design Prospective clinical trial. Methods After institutional regulatory board approved protocols, five ears were studied via the following steps. 1) In the clinic under local anesthesia, bone-implanted anchors were placed surrounding each mastoid. 2) Temporal-bone computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained. 3) On the CT scans, paths were planned from the lateral mastoid cortex, through the facial recess, to the basal turn of the cochlea both “manually” and “automatically” using computer software. 4) Customized microstereotactic frames were rapid-prototyped to serve as drill guides constraining the drill to follow the appropriate path. 5) During cochlear implant surgery, after drilling of the facial recess, drill guides were mounted on the bone-implanted anchors. 6) Accuracy of paths was assessed via intraoperative photodocumentation. Results All surgical paths successfully traversed the facial recess and hit the basal turn of the cochlea. Distance in millimeters (average SD) from the midpoint of the drill to the facial nerve was 1.18 ± 0.68 for the “manual” path and 1.24 ± 0.44 mm for the “automatic” path and for the chorda tympani 0.986 ± 0.48 for the “manual” path and 1.22 ± 0.62 for the “automatic” path. Conclusions Percutaneous cochlear implant access using customized drill guides based on preoperative CT scans and image-guided surgery technology can be safely accomplished. PMID:18401279

  9. A Qualitative Study of School Social Workers' Clinical and Professional Relationships when Reporting Child Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chanmugam, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study explored school social workers' relationships during instances of abuse and neglect reporting, focusing on reports made for children and adolescents already receiving school social work services. Although school social workers frequently file abuse and neglect reports, little is known about how they manage clinical and…

  10. The accuracy of clinical malaria case reporting at primary health care facilities in Honiara, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Kunimitsu, Ayano

    2009-01-01

    Background The accuracy of malaria case reporting is challenging due to restricted human and material resources in many countries. The reporting often depends on the clinical diagnosis because of the scarcity of microscopic examinations. Particularly, clinical malaria case reporting by primary health care facilities (local clinics), which constitutes the baseline data of surveillance, has never previously been sufficiently evaluated. In order to improve the malaria reporting system to the level required to eventually eliminate this disease, this study estimates the gaps between the records of clinics and government statistics regarding the incidence of clinical malaria, and then also examines some factors that might explain the data discrepancy, including such variables as clinic staffing and record keeping. Methods All medical records for outpatients in 2007, handwritten by nurses, were collected from local clinics in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands. The all-monthly clinical malaria cases were then recalculated. The corresponding monthly data in official statistics were provided by the government. Next, in order to estimate any data discrepancy, the ratio of the cases recorded at clinics to the cases reported to the government was determined on the monthly basis. Finally, the associations between the monthly discrepancy and other variables were evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. Results The mean data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics was 21.2% (n = 96). Significant associations were observed between the discrepancy and the average number of patients (coefficient: 0.05, 95%CI: 0.31, 0.07), illegible handwriting (coefficient: 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.15), the use of tally sheets (coefficient:-0.38, 95%CI: -0.54, -0.22), and the clinic level (coefficient:-0.48, 95%CI:-0.89,-0.06). Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the huge data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics in

  11. Yoga & cancer interventions: a review of the clinical significance of patient reported outcomes for cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Culos-Reed, S Nicole; Mackenzie, Michael J; Sohl, Stephanie J; Jesse, Michelle T; Zahavich, Ashley N Ross; Danhauer, Suzanne C

    2012-01-01

    Limited research suggests yoga may be a viable gentle physical activity option with a variety of health-related quality of life, psychosocial and symptom management benefits. The purpose of this review was to determine the clinical significance of patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions conducted with cancer survivors. A total of 25 published yoga intervention studies for cancer survivors from 2004-2011 had patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, psychosocial or symptom measures. Thirteen of these studies met the necessary criteria to assess clinical significance. Clinical significance for each of the outcomes of interest was examined based on 1 standard error of the measurement, 0.5 standard deviation, and relative comparative effect sizes and their respective confidence intervals. This review describes in detail these patient-reported outcomes, how they were obtained, their relative clinical significance and implications for both clinical and research settings. Overall, clinically significant changes in patient-reported outcomes suggest that yoga interventions hold promise for improving cancer survivors' well-being. This research overview provides new directions for examining how clinical significance can provide a unique context for describing changes in patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions. Researchers are encouraged to employ indices of clinical significance in the interpretation and discussion of results from yoga studies. PMID:23125870

  12. Yoga & Cancer Interventions: A Review of the Clinical Significance of Patient Reported Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Culos-Reed, S. Nicole; Mackenzie, Michael J.; Sohl, Stephanie J.; Jesse, Michelle T.; Zahavich, Ashley N. Ross; Danhauer, Suzanne C.

    2012-01-01

    Limited research suggests yoga may be a viable gentle physical activity option with a variety of health-related quality of life, psychosocial and symptom management benefits. The purpose of this review was to determine the clinical significance of patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions conducted with cancer survivors. A total of 25 published yoga intervention studies for cancer survivors from 2004–2011 had patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, psychosocial or symptom measures. Thirteen of these studies met the necessary criteria to assess clinical significance. Clinical significance for each of the outcomes of interest was examined based on 1 standard error of the measurement, 0.5 standard deviation, and relative comparative effect sizes and their respective confidence intervals. This review describes in detail these patient-reported outcomes, how they were obtained, their relative clinical significance and implications for both clinical and research settings. Overall, clinically significant changes in patient-reported outcomes suggest that yoga interventions hold promise for improving cancer survivors' well-being. This research overview provides new directions for examining how clinical significance can provide a unique context for describing changes in patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions. Researchers are encouraged to employ indices of clinical significance in the interpretation and discussion of results from yoga studies. PMID:23125870

  13. [Melanotic neurofibroma, clinical and histopathologic diagnosis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Zbranca, Anca; Stefan, Raluca; Grigorovici, Mirela; Cherciu, Mirela

    2004-01-01

    Melanotic neurofibroma is a rare benign tumor, derived from peripheral nerve sheath, whose originality consists in the presence of melanic pigment. The clinical diagnosis is difficult to establish, requiring the histopathological exam to make the difference between melanotic neurofibroma and the other pigmented tumors. Although, sometimes neither the anatomopathological exam can establish the final diagnosis, requiring supplementary studies. Melanotic neurofibroma has a good prognosis and the malignization is rare. The elective treatment is surgical, represented by the complete excision of the tumor. PMID:15832981

  14. [Clinical diagnosis and standardized evaluation of borderline personality: preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Chaine, F; Guelfi, J D; Monier, C; Brun, A; Seunevel, F

    1995-01-01

    A sample of 36 patients considered by French clinicians as suffering from a borderline personality disorder was evaluated using the International Personality Disorder Examination, the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline-Revised, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. First, global descriptive analysis of the sample elicited the socio-demographic and standard clinical characteristics of the borderline individuals. After diagnostic evaluation, the sample appeared to be quite homogeneous with 25 of the 36 patients evaluated (69.5%) being defined as borderline by two of the three diagnostic systems: ICD 10, DSM III-R and Gunderson (15/36 = 41.5% of patients were defined as borderline by all three systems). It is the types of BL personality co-diagnoses which differentiated the BL subjects in the sample from those classically described in the international literature, since the most frequent personalities were the Dependent and Avoiding ones, not the Antisocial, Histrionic, Narcissistic or Schizotypic personalities of the DSM III-R. ICD 10 elicited the same significant prevalence of Anxious and Dependent personalities. Lastly, the patients diagnosed as borderline both by clinicians and by all diagnostic systems (forming the sample "core") were compared with the rest of the sample with regard to socio-demographic, clinical and diagnostic characteristics. A few hypotheses are proposed on the type of variables that may permit to discriminate between these two types of patients.

  15. Methodological quality and reporting of ethical requirements in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Canela, M.; de Irala-Estevez, J.; Martinez-Gonzalez, M. A.; Gomez-Gracia, E.; Fernandez-Crehuet, J.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To assess the relationship between the approval of trials by a research ethics committee (REC) and the fact that informed consent from participants (ICP) was obtained, with the quality of study design and methods. Design—Systematic review using a standardised checklist. Main measures—Methodological and ethical issues of all trials published between 1993 and 1995 in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association and the British Medical Journal were studied. In addition, clinical trials conducted in Spain and published by at least one Spanish author during the same period in any other journal were also included. Results—We studied the published articles of 767 trials and found the following indicators of lower methodological quality to be independent predictors for failure to disclose REC approval or ICP: absence of concealment of allocation, lack of justification for unblinded trials, not using a treatment for the patients in the control group, absent information on statistical methods, not including sample size estimation, not establishing the rules to stop the trial, and omitting the presentation of a baseline comparison of groups Conclusion—Trials of higher methodological and scientific quality were more likely to provide information about their ethical aspects. Key Words: Clinical trials • informed consent • research ethics committees • research design PMID:11417024

  16. 38 CFR 46.4 - Clinical privileges actions reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... action report with the National Practitioner Data Bank in accordance with regulations at 45 CFR part 60... dentist relating to possible incompetence or improper professional conduct. (2) Acceptance of the... known; (iv) Social Security number, if known (and if obtained in accordance with section 7 of...

  17. 38 CFR 46.4 - Clinical privileges actions reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... action report with the National Practitioner Data Bank in accordance with regulations at 45 CFR part 60... known; (iv) Social Security number, if known (and if obtained in accordance with section 7 of the... applicable and known; (ix) A description of the acts or omissions or other reasons for privilege loss, or,...

  18. [The clinical application of zirconium-dioxide-ceramics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Somfai, Dóra; Zsigmond, Ágnes; Károlyházy, Katalin; Kispély, Barbara; Hermann, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Due to its outstanding physical, mechanical and esthetic properties, zirconium-dioxide is one of the most popular non-metal denture, capable of surpassing PFM in most cases. The recent advances of CAD/CAM technology makes it a good alternitve. Here we show the usefulness of zirconium-dioxide in everyday dental practice through three case reports. PMID:26863816

  19. Female genital mutilation and reporting duties for all clinical personnel.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Gabrielle; Armstrong, Jane

    2016-07-01

    Female genital mutilation is illegal. It is now mandatory for health-care professionals to report female genital mutilation to the police. Professionals caring for women and girls of all ages must understand how female genital mutilation presents, and what action to take. PMID:27388382

  20. Female genital mutilation and reporting duties for all clinical personnel.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Gabrielle; Armstrong, Jane

    2016-07-01

    Female genital mutilation is illegal. It is now mandatory for health-care professionals to report female genital mutilation to the police. Professionals caring for women and girls of all ages must understand how female genital mutilation presents, and what action to take.

  1. [The clinical application of zirconium-dioxide-ceramics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Somfai, Dóra; Zsigmond, Ágnes; Károlyházy, Katalin; Kispély, Barbara; Hermann, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Due to its outstanding physical, mechanical and esthetic properties, zirconium-dioxide is one of the most popular non-metal denture, capable of surpassing PFM in most cases. The recent advances of CAD/CAM technology makes it a good alternitve. Here we show the usefulness of zirconium-dioxide in everyday dental practice through three case reports.

  2. Evaluation of gingival bleeding awareness by comparison of self-reports and clinical measurements of freshman dental students

    PubMed Central

    Baser, Ulku; Germen, Meliha; Erdem, Yelda; Issever, Halim; Yalcin, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this descriptive, cross-sectional investigation were to evaluate the gingival health awareness of dental students by comparing their clinical gingival bleeding scores and self-reports, and to compare differences in awareness between males and females. Methods: In total, 100 (51 males, 49 females) freshman dental students were included in the study. Periodontal indices recorded were: Presence of plaque percentage (plaque index [PI], %), percentage of sites of bleeding on probing (BOP, %), probing depth, and community periodontal index (CPI). Percent agreement, kappa agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated by comparing their self-reported gingival bleeding and BOP%. Results: The self-reports of gingival bleeding exhibited statistically significant correlations with BOP% in females (r = 0.42, P = 0.003). Female students showed a higher degree of awareness when kappa agreement, 0.23 (males: 0.16, females: 0.39), sensitivity, 48% (males: 42%, females: 51%), and specificity, 95% (males: 90%, females: 100%) were calculated. Although male dental students had higher PI and CPI scores, there was no significant difference by gender in the clinical measurements. Conclusions: According to our results, the validity of self-reported gingival bleeding was higher among dental students than in previous population-based studies. Female dental students showed a higher degree of awareness than males of their gingival health. Half of the included dental students could not differentiate whether they had gingival bleeding when there was actual bleeding. More emphasis should be given to the education of dental students regarding the relationship between gingival bleeding and active periodontal disease. PMID:25202217

  3. Diagnostic considerations and prosthetic rehabilitation of a cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Hofstede, Theresa M; Jacob, Rhonda F

    2010-01-01

    The intranasal inhalation of cocaine has numerous complications. In addition to its systemic effects, cocaine can cause extensive destruction of the osteocartilaginous midline structures of the palate, nose, and sinuses. Without an accurate social and clinical history, a cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion can cause diagnostic difficulties, because its clinical presentation closely mimics other diseases. This clinical report describes an oronasal defect caused by cocaine use, the diagnostic considerations of these lesions, and prosthetic management of the defect. PMID:20105673

  4. Clinical Applications of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Battepati, Prashant M

    2010-01-01

    The greatest threats to developing teeth are dental caries and traumatic injuries. The primary goal of all restorative treatment is to maintain pulp vitality so that normal root development or apexogenesis can occur. If pulpal exposure occurs, then a pulpotomy procedure aims to preserve pulp vitality to allow for normal root development. Historically, calcium hydroxide has been the material of choice for pulpotomy procedures. Recently, an alternative material called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has demonstrated the ability to induce hard-tissue formation in pulpal tissue. This article describes the clinical and radiographic outcome of a series of cases involving the use of MTA in pulpotomy, apexogenesis and apexification procedures and root perforations repair.

  5. [Buschke-Löwenstein tumor: report of 2 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Meli, S; Sebastio, N; Azzolini, N; Ferri, E; Cortellini, P

    2000-01-01

    In our department two cases of Buschke-Löwenstein tumor were up to day observed. The first case, a man 51 years old, showed a big exophytic growth all over the glans, plus some similar lesions all along the shaft of the penis, besides a bilateral inguinal lymphoadenopathy. The second case was that of a man 70 years old, presenting a single exophytic growth on the glans. Both cases underwent a surgical excision of the lesions. The first patient had a local relapse after one year and a second one after further four months, which were both surgically exsected. Today, both patients are disease-free, being elapsed twelve years and sixteen months respectively. Surgical excision seems therefore to answer well the clinical problem, as for as the rarity of distant spread, the feasibility of conservative removal or reiteration, should it the case, are concerned. PMID:11450120

  6. Clinical case report of a large antrochoanal polyp.

    PubMed

    Spadijer-Mirković, Cveta; Perić, Aleksandar; Vukomanović-Đurđević, Biserka; Stanojević, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Antrochoanal polyps are benign lesions originating from the mucosa of the maxillary sinus. Nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea are their main symptoms. Their endoscopical and radiological appearance makes them relatively easy to diagnose. These polyps are usually presented unilaterally, although bilateral presentation is also possible. We described two cases of atypically giant antrochoanal polyps: in a 15-year-old child and in a 38-year-old man. In both cases, the diagnosis was done by nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) of the paranasal sinuses and supported by histopathological analysis. In the first patient, the excised polyp had the histological characteristic of an angiomatous antrochoanal polyp. Because of their unusual dimension, the combined transoral and endonasal endoscopic approach was performed for complete polyp excision. We discussed the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of choanal polyps in comparison to inflammatory nasal polyps, and the applicable surgical techniques for treatment of these polyps.

  7. [Clinical features of tetanus: a review with case reports].

    PubMed

    Fukutake, Toshio; Miyamoto, Ryosuke

    2011-10-01

    Tetanus is a CNS disorder characterized by muscle spasms that is caused by the exotoxin of an anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium tetani. This disease is killing tens of thousands of neonates in developing countries. Although the incidence and mortality of tetanus has dramatically dropped in developed countries due to effective vaccination, appropriate wound management, and recent advances in intensive care, treatments remain difficult. From among developed countries, Japan has had a relatively high incidence of tetanus, and prevention is the problem especially in the elderly. We analyzed the data from 12 patients admitted to our hospital during 1997-2010. Their age ranged from 50-82 years; median 72 years with male to female ratio 5: 7, and all patients lacked a reliable history of toxoid immunization. Five patients out of 12 had history of cancer and one each had diabetes mellitus, pulmonary emphysema and Sjogren syndrome. In some cases, the patients had been initially misdiagnosed with ENT disorders, dental problems, or psychosis. Therefore to date, observation of clinical symptoms such as difficulty in mouth opening is considered the most crucial for diagnosis. The shorter was a period from onset to generalized convulsion (onset time), the longer was a duration of hospital stay. A notable complication was intramuscular hemorrhage in the lumbar muscles, which occurred in 2 patients. No patients died due to ICU managements, in which the most useful were propofol for spasm control and sedation, and magnesium sulfate for autonomic overactivity. Retrospectively, the Tetanus Severity Score (TSS) for mortality proposed by Thwaites et al (2006) is considered a useful tool also for predicting the clinical outcome at discharge. Although tetanus has been traditionally classified into the generalized, local, and cephalic types, a simpler severity-based classification into "severe", "moderate", and "mild" types may be more practical with regard to disease management.

  8. Replacing worn overdenture abutments of an unknown implant system by using laser welding: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Mohunta, Vrinda V; Stevenson, James A; Lee, Damian J

    2014-09-01

    This clinical report describes a procedure for replacing worn ball abutments with low-profile resilient abutments by using laser welding when the implant system for a mandibular implant-supported overdenture could not be identified.

  9. Implant therapy for a patient with Down syndrome and oral habits: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Paola C; Deguchi, Toru; Lee, Damian J

    2016-09-01

    This clinical report describes prosthodontic therapy with an implant-supported partial fixed dental prosthesis for a patient with Down syndrome and concomitant oral habits, including tongue thrusting and thumb sucking.

  10. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: Reports of clinical laboratory isolation in a three county area, North Carolina, 2006 -2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Laboratory reports of mycobacteria isolation and identification are created during the clinical diagnostic process to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM isolation rates are expected to exceed rates of true NTM infectio...

  11. Ancient popular tradition as a cause of serious maxillofacial trauma: brief clinical report from Siberia.

    PubMed

    Salagay, Oleg O; Evdokimov, Oleg V; Karpova, Lubov V

    2007-07-01

    This brief clinical report demonstrates the necessity of supplementary examination methods for precise maxillofacial trauma diagnostics, especially in patients with combined injury. It describes the unusual case of mandibular fracture in a young lady on the day of her wedding.

  12. Toward Improved Statistical Reporting in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Fiona; Cumming, Geoff; Thomason, Neil; Pannuzzo, Dominique; Smith, Julian; Fyffe, Penny; Edmonds, Holly; Harrington, Claire; Schmitt, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    Philip Kendall's (1997) editorial encouraged authors in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) to report effect sizes and clinical significance. The present authors assessed the influence of that editorial--and other American Psychological Association initiatives to improve statistical practices--by examining 239 JCCP articles…

  13. Development and Use of Challenge Exams for Clinical Laboratory Nursing 2: Part 2 Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattstaedt, Mary Jane; Isaac, Margaret M.

    The report describes the development of a set of equivalency tests for students in Nursing 2 who have had prior clinical laboratory training or experience in pediatrics, obstetrics, or geriatrics. For each of the three areas the examination packet includes: the course clinical objectives, the challenge examination objectives, a self-study guide, a…

  14. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  15. Clinical Management of Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Varkey, Indu; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M; Vijaya, Mangalpady Shenoy; Oommen, Vinod Idicula

    2014-03-01

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare, genetically inherited platelet disorder in which the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa) complex is either deficient or, dysfunctional. The incidence is about 1 in 1,000,000. This case report deals with a 4 year-old girl diagnosed with GT presenting with dental caries and periapical lesions in the primary mandibular first molars. To provide the best care, an interdisciplinary approach was followed by a team consisting of pediatric dentists, pediatricians and anesthesiologists. Complete oral rehabilitation was planned under general anesthesia which included extractions, multiple esthetic restorations and space maintainers with the utmost care to prevent unwarranted bleeding.

  16. Clinical Report: Cognitive decline in a patient with Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Sergio; Morel, Chantal; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2016-05-01

    Cardiofaciocutaneous Syndrome (CFCS) is a rare genetic syndrome caused by mutations in one of four genes: BRAF, MAP2K1, MAP2K2, and KRAS. There is tremendous phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with CFCS and so confirmation of diagnosis requires genetic testing. Neurologic and/or cognitive symptoms are present in almost all CFCS individuals. Little is known about cognitive function in older patients with CFCS. In this report, we present the cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and imaging findings of a patient diagnosed with CFCS who after having remained stable developed progressive cognitive/behavioral and motor decline.

  17. Inlay fixed partial denture as a conservative approach for restoring posterior missing teeth: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Iglesia-Puig, Miguel A; Arellano-Cabornero, Alfonso

    2003-05-01

    Inlay fixed partial dentures luted by use of adhesive procedures offer a clinical alternative for the restoration of single missing posterior teeth. The introduction of ceromers and fiber-reinforced composites and the continuous improvement of adhesive systems and luting agents make this type of restoration possible, offering good aesthetic and functional results. The procedure is minimally invasive and conservative. This clinical report reviews the factors influencing the diagnosis and the clinical indications for an inlay fixed partial denture. In addition, a patient treatment is presented to illustrate the clinical procedures involved.

  18. 78 FR 21130 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1... writing. Proposed Collection: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database, 0925-0600, Expiration... Health (NIH). Need and Use of Information Collection: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) is...

  19. Clinical Management of Glanzmann’s Thrombasthenia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Varkey, Indu; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M.; Vijaya, Mangalpady Shenoy; Oommen, Vinod Idicula

    2014-01-01

    Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare, genetically inherited platelet disorder in which the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa) complex is either deficient or, dysfunctional. The incidence is about 1 in 1,000,000. This case report deals with a 4 year-old girl diagnosed with GT presenting with dental caries and periapical lesions in the primary mandibular first molars. To provide the best care, an interdisciplinary approach was followed by a team consisting of pediatric dentists, pediatricians and anesthesiologists. Complete oral rehabilitation was planned under general anesthesia which included extractions, multiple esthetic restorations and space maintainers with the utmost care to prevent unwarranted bleeding. PMID:24910701

  20. Recommendations for improving the quality of reporting clinical electrochemotherapy studies based on qualitative systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Luca G.; Clover, A. James P.; Valpione, Sara; Quaglino, Pietro; Gehl, Julie; Kunte, Christian; Snoj, Marko; Cemazar, Maja; Rossi, Carlo R.; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy is becoming a well-established treatment for malignancies of skin and non-skin origin and its use is widening across Europe. The technique was developed and optimized from solid experimental and clinical evidence. A consensus document is now warranted to formalize reporting results, which should strengthen evidence-based practice recommendations. This consensus should be derived from high quality clinical data collection, clinical expertise and summarizing patient feedback. The first step, which is addressed in this paper, aims to critically analyze the quality of published studies and to provide the recommendations for reporting clinical trials on electrochemotherapy. Methods The quality of reporting in published studies on electrochemotherapy was analyzed in order to produce procedure specific reporting recommendations. A comprehensive literature search of studies published from 2006 to 2015 was performed followed by qualitative analysis of manuscripts assessing for 47 quality criteria grouped into four major clusters: (1) trial design, (2) description of patient population, (3) description of treatment delivery and patient outcome, (4) analysis of results and their interpretation. The summary measure during literature assessment was the proportion of studies fulfilling each manuscript quality criteria. Results A total of 56 studies were screened, from the period 2006 to 2015, of which 33 were included in the qualitative analysis, with a total of 1215 patients. Overall, the quality of reporting was highly variable. Twenty-four reports (73%) were single-center, non-comparative studies, and only 15 (45%) were prospective in nature (only 2 of them were entered into a clinical trials registry). Electrochemotherapy technique was consistently reported, with most studies (31/33) adhering closely to published standard operating procedures. The quality of reporting the patient population was variable among the analyzed studies, with only

  1. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  2. Advancing medicine one research note at a time: the educational value in clinical case reports

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A case report—a brief written note that describes unique aspects of a clinical case—provides a significant function in medicine given its rapid, succinct, and educational contributions to scientific literature and clinical practice. Despite the growth of, and emphasis on, randomized clinical trials and evidenced-based medicine, case reports continue to provide novel and exceptional knowledge in medical education. The journal BMC Research Notes introduces a new “case reports” section to provide the busy clinician with a forum in which to document any authentic clinical case that provide educational value to current clinical practice. The aim is for this article type to be reviewed, wherever possible, by specialized Associate Editors for the journal, in order to provide rapid but thorough decision making. New ideas often garnered by and documented in case reports will support the advancement of medical science — one research note at a time. PMID:22697904

  3. [Cough and hypoxemia as clinical manifestation of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Nieto, Mary; Dicembrino, Manuela; Ferraz, Rubén; Romagnoli, Fernando; Giugno, Hilda; Ernst, Glenda; Siminovich, Monica; Botto, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Alveolar proteinosis is a rare chronic lung disease, especially in children, characterized by abnormal accumulation of lipoproteins and derived surfactant in the intra-alveolar space that generates a severe reduction of gas exchange. Idiopathic presentation form constitutes over 90% of cases, a phenomenon associated with production of autoimmune antibodies directed at the receptor for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. A case of a girl of 5 years of age treated because of atypical pneumonia with unfavorable evolution due to persistent hypoxemia is presented. The diagnosis is obtained through pathologic examination of lung biopsy by thoracotomy, as treatment is carried out by 17bronchopulmonary bronchoscopy lavages and the patient evidences marked clinical improvement. PMID:27164343

  4. [Cough and hypoxemia as clinical manifestation of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Nieto, Mary; Dicembrino, Manuela; Ferraz, Rubén; Romagnoli, Fernando; Giugno, Hilda; Ernst, Glenda; Siminovich, Monica; Botto, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Alveolar proteinosis is a rare chronic lung disease, especially in children, characterized by abnormal accumulation of lipoproteins and derived surfactant in the intra-alveolar space that generates a severe reduction of gas exchange. Idiopathic presentation form constitutes over 90% of cases, a phenomenon associated with production of autoimmune antibodies directed at the receptor for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. A case of a girl of 5 years of age treated because of atypical pneumonia with unfavorable evolution due to persistent hypoxemia is presented. The diagnosis is obtained through pathologic examination of lung biopsy by thoracotomy, as treatment is carried out by 17bronchopulmonary bronchoscopy lavages and the patient evidences marked clinical improvement.

  5. Compliance with clinical trial registration and reporting guidelines by Latin American and Caribbean journals.

    PubMed

    Reveiz, Ludovic; Villanueva, Eleana; Iko, Chimaraoke; Simera, Iveta

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine to what extent Latin American and Caribbean biomedical journals have endorsed and complied with clinical trial registration and reporting guidelines. A search of randomized clinical trials was carried out using the LILACS database. The randomized clinical trials identified through the search were assessed to determine whether trial registration and CONSORT guidance was mentioned. Information regarding endorsement of the ICMJE, trial registration and other reporting guidelines was extracted from the online instructions for authors of the journals included in the study. The search identified 477 references. We assessed a random sample of 240 titles of which 101 were randomized clinical trials published in 56 journals. Trial registration was reported in 19.8% of the randomized clinical trials, 6.9% were prospectively registered and 3% mentioned CONSORT. The ICMJE was mentioned by 68% of the journals and 36% of journals required trial registration. Fewer journals provided advice on reporting guidelines: CONSORT (13%), PRISMA (1.8%), STROBE (1.8%), and the EQUATOR network (3.6%). Wider endorsement of trial registration and adherence to reporting guidelines is necessary in clinical trials conducted in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  6. Using phrases and document metadata to improve topic modeling of clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Speier, William; Ong, Michael K; Arnold, Corey W

    2016-06-01

    Probabilistic topic models provide an unsupervised method for analyzing unstructured text, which have the potential to be integrated into clinical automatic summarization systems. Clinical documents are accompanied by metadata in a patient's medical history and frequently contains multiword concepts that can be valuable for accurately interpreting the included text. While existing methods have attempted to address these problems individually, we present a unified model for free-text clinical documents that integrates contextual patient- and document-level data, and discovers multi-word concepts. In the proposed model, phrases are represented by chained n-grams and a Dirichlet hyper-parameter is weighted by both document-level and patient-level context. This method and three other Latent Dirichlet allocation models were fit to a large collection of clinical reports. Examples of resulting topics demonstrate the results of the new model and the quality of the representations are evaluated using empirical log likelihood. The proposed model was able to create informative prior probabilities based on patient and document information, and captured phrases that represented various clinical concepts. The representation using the proposed model had a significantly higher empirical log likelihood than the compared methods. Integrating document metadata and capturing phrases in clinical text greatly improves the topic representation of clinical documents. The resulting clinically informative topics may effectively serve as the basis for an automatic summarization system for clinical reports. PMID:27109931

  7. Reporting incidental findings in genomic scale clinical sequencing--a clinical laboratory perspective: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Madhuri; Bale, Sherri; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Gibson, Jane; Jeng, Linda Jo Bone; Joseph, Loren; Laser, Jordan; Lubin, Ira M; Miller, Christine E; Ross, Lainie F; Rothberg, Paul G; Tanner, Alice K; Vitazka, Patrik; Mao, Rong

    2015-03-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies have facilitated concurrent testing for many disorders, and the results generated may provide information about a patient's health that is unrelated to the clinical indication, commonly referred to as incidental findings. This is a paradigm shift from traditional genetic testing in which testing and reporting are tailored to a patient's specific clinical condition. Clinical laboratories and physicians are wrestling with this increased complexity in genomic testing and reporting of the incidental findings to patients. An enormous amount of discussion has taken place since the release of a set of recommendations from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. This discussion has largely focused on the content of the incidental findings, but the laboratory perspective and patient autonomy have been overlooked. This report by the Association of Molecular Pathology workgroup discusses the pros and cons of next-generation sequencing technology, potential benefits, and harms for reporting of incidental findings, including the effect on both the laboratory and the patient, and compares those with other areas of medicine. The importance of genetic counseling to preserve patient autonomy is also reviewed. The discussion and recommendations presented by the workgroup underline the need for continued research and discussion among all stakeholders to improve our understanding of the effect of different policies on patients, providers, and laboratories.

  8. [Intra-graft balloon pumping--a clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Nagata, M; Tashiro, T; Tanaka, K; Haruta, Y; Todo, K

    1991-12-01

    A 29-year-old female underwent tube graft replacement of distal aortic arch and descending aorta for dissecting aneurysm. After 42 minutes of aortic cross-clamping the patient was initially weaned satisfactorily from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, cardiac arrhythmia and cardiac arrest necessitated reestablishment of CPB. Electro-cardiography showed inferior myocardial infarction. To wean CPB intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) was mandatory. But because of dissecting aortic aneurysm IABP in conventional method was contra-indicated. Intra graft balloon pumping (IGBP) was initiated while the patient was on full CPB. A low-porosity woven Dacron tube graft (22 mm) was anastomosed end-to-side to ascending aorta. A balloon was inserted into the tube graft to establish IGBP. This IGBP provided effective circulatory assist. The patient was weaned from CPB 1 hours after reestablishment of IGBP. Postoperative course was stable. The patient was returned to the operating room for removal of the balloon 3 days postoperatively. We reported the case for whom IGBP was effective. IGBP was effective circulatory support for the patient when conventional use of IABP was contra-indicated. PMID:1774515

  9. Mercury sensitisation: review, relevance and a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bains, V K; Loomba, K; Loomba, A; Bains, R

    2008-10-11

    Eczematous eruptions may be produced through topical contact with mercury and by systemic absorption in mercury sensitive individuals. Mercury is considered a weak sensitiser and contact with mercury salts such as chloride or ammonium chloride may cause hypersensitivity leading to contact dermatitis or Coomb's Type IV hypersensitivity reactions. The typical manifestation is an urticarial or erythematous rash, and pruritus on the face and flexural aspects of limbs, followed by progression to dermatitis. True allergy to mercury is rare but is more common in females. Exposure to mercury vapour produced in operating rooms is the main concern for dentists. Every effort should be made to avoid contact with mercury vapour if possible by using barrier techniques, reducing the temperature of the operating room and of the amalgam restoration. Air conditioning and proper ventilation of the operating room, the use of coolant sprays, good suction and proper handling of amalgam waste is recommended. Various reports show the use of MELISA (memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay) and patch tests in determining mercury sensitivity. Topical application of glucocorticoids and dimethisone is helpful. PMID:18849934

  10. Ocular manifestation of congenital toxoplasmosis, clinical implication - case report.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewska, Monika; Patalan, Jacek; Kulik, Urszula; Czeszyńska, Maria Beata

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to present extremely severe, ophthalmic complications in form of rare, congenital toxoplasmatic bilateral defect of eye-balls concomitant with advanced uveitis, microphthalmia and eye-multistructural developmental abnormalities leading to irreversible visual disability. The ocular diagnosis was confirmed in Ret-Cam II and ultrasonography and it was accompanied with congenital multiorgan lesions including hepato-splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, leukomalacia, hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly with neurological symptoms. Serology, PCR of cerebro-spinal fluid and cord blood confirmed the presence of congenital Toxoplasma gondii infection in the infant. The authors took the effort of insightful analysis for the causes of applied treatment failure in mother during pregnancy, analyzing the inefficacy of Spiromycin therapy in pregnant woman and evaluating false-negative result of amniocentesis for Toxoplasma gondii presence. Among many issues concerning anti-toxoplasmatic treatment in mother and infant presented in this article, the need for multiple repetition of toxoplasmatic tests should be underlined including amniotic fluid PCR and ultrasonography which can add much important data for correct diagnosis. The authors indicate that the lack of benefits from conservative therapy in case of suspected Toxopalsma gondii suggestion lead to dramatic multiorgan complications, especially ophthalmo-neurologic, leading to irreversible visual disability. PMID:27306134

  11. Canine guidance via Biogeneric Copy: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Thomas C; Engelmeier, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    The advent of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology in dentistry has enabled a wide range of applications. The Cerec Acquisition Center (Cerec AC, Sirona Dental Systems Inc., Charlotte, NC) allows for the construction of all-porcelain restorations, either in-office or through a remote dental laboratory. One feature of the Cerec AC is its ability to duplicate the dental morphology of an existing tooth onto a new CAD/CAM ceramic restoration designed for that tooth. This design mode capability of the Cerec AC is termed Biogeneric Copy. This function has been discussed in the literature where it has been utilized to fabricate a CAD/CAM ceramic crown to fit an existing removable partial denture (RPD).1-3 There are occasions in dentistry where the exact anatomy and position of an existing tooth, not associated with an RPD, should ideally be replicated in a definitive restoration. This case report describes such an occasion. PMID:27027104

  12. The Workforce Task Force report: clinical implications for neurology.

    PubMed

    Freeman, William D; Vatz, Kenneth A; Griggs, Robert C; Pedley, Timothy

    2013-07-30

    The American Academy of Neurology Workforce Task Force (WFTF) report predicts a future shortfall of neurologists in the United States. The WFTF data also suggest that for most states, the current demand for neurologist services already exceeds the supply, and by 2025 the demand for neurologists will be even higher. This future demand is fueled by the aging of the US population, the higher health care utilization rates of neurologic services, and by a greater number of patients gaining access to the health care system due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Uncertainties in health care delivery and patient access exist due to looming concerns about further Medicare reimbursement cuts. This uncertainty is set against a backdrop of Congressional volatility on a variety of issues, including the repeal of the sustainable growth rate for physician reimbursement. The impact of these US health care changes on the neurology workforce, future increasing demands, reimbursement, and alternative health care delivery models including accountable care organizations, nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and teleneurology for both stroke and general neurology are discussed. The data lead to the conclusion that neurologists will need to play an even larger role in caring for the aging US population by 2025. We propose solutions to increase the availability of neurologic services in the future and provide other ways of meeting the anticipated increased demand for neurologic care.

  13. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1993-1994, No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakai, Kunio, Ed.; Chen, Shing-jen, Ed.

    This annual report discusses several topics related to the work of the Research and Clinical Center for Child Development. Six topics are covered in the report. The articles are: (1) "Development of Intentional Behavior in Early Infancy" (Hongtu Chen); (2) "An Investigation of the Differences of Social Space in the Playroom: Through Analysis by…

  14. Complete mouth implant rehabilitation with a zirconia ceramic system: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mamta; Vahidi, Farhad

    2014-07-01

    Currently available ceramic systems offer a wide array of prosthetic advantages, including superior esthetics and enhanced physical and mechanical properties. The dental ceramic with the highest reported mechanical properties is zirconia. This clinical report describes a complete mouth implant rehabilitation with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and monolithic zirconia.

  15. Radix entomolaris: 2 case reports and clinical guidelines for endodontic management.

    PubMed

    Latha, S Jothi; Velmurugan, N; Kavitha, M; Kumar, A R Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Variations in dental anatomy and root canal systems are often reported in the dental literature. Among them, Radix entomolaris (RE) is the presence of an additional lingual root in mandibular molars. Though RE appears relatively infrequently, knowledge of the condition will aid in its management. This article presents 2 case reports of RE and clinical guidelines for endodontic management.

  16. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1994-1995, No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakai, Kunio, Ed.; Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.

    This annual report discusses several topics related to the work of the Research and Clinical Center for Child Development. Seven topics are covered in the report. The articles are: (1) "Fathers' Participation in the Lives of Their 4-Month-Old Infants: The United States and Japan" (Marguerite Stevenson Barratt, Koichi Negayama and Tetsuhiro…

  17. Resident's morning report: an opportunity to reinforce principles of biomedical science in a clinical context.

    PubMed

    Brass, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    The principles of biochemistry are core to understanding cellular and tissue function, as well as the pathophysiology of disease. However, the clinical utility of biochemical principles is often obscure to clinical trainees. Resident's Morning Report is a common teaching conference in which residents present clinical cases of interest to a faculty member for discussion. This venue provides an opportunity to illustrate how basic biomedical principles facilitate an understanding of the clinical presentation, the relevant pathophysiology, and the rationale for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. A discussion of biochemical principles can easily be incorporated into these case discussions, with the potential to reinforce these concepts and to illustrate their application to clinical decision making. This approach maintains the effort to teach basic biomedical sciences in the context of clinical application across the educational continuum.

  18. Borderline personality disorder: patterns of self-harm, reported childhood trauma and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Rebecca; Gavin, Victoria; Levita, Liat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consecutive admissions of 214 women with borderline personality disorder were investigated for patterns of specific forms of self-harm and reported developmental experiences. Systematic examination of clinical notes found that 75% had previously reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. These women were more likely to self-harm, and in specific ways that may reflect their past experiences. Despite this, treatment within a dialectical behaviour therapy-informed therapeutic community leads to relatively greater clinical gains than for those without a reported sexual abuse trauma history. Notably, greater behavioural and self-reported distress and dissociation were not found to predict poor clinical outcome. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  19. Student Exposure to Actual Patients in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Marie A.; McCall, Charles Y.; Francisco, George E., Jr.; Poirier, Sylvie

    1997-01-01

    Two clinical courses for first-year dental students were designed to develop students' interaction skills through actual patient case presentations and discussions and an interdisciplinary teaching approach. Results indicate students preferred the case presentations, with or without lecture, to the lecture-only approach and felt they learned more…

  20. From days to hours: reporting clinically actionable variants from whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Middha, Sumit; Baheti, Saurabh; Hart, Steven N; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A

    2014-01-01

    As the cost of whole genome sequencing (WGS) decreases, clinical laboratories will be looking at broadly adopting this technology to screen for variants of clinical significance. To fully leverage this technology in a clinical setting, results need to be reported quickly, as the turnaround rate could potentially impact patient care. The latest sequencers can sequence a whole human genome in about 24 hours. However, depending on the computing infrastructure available, the processing of data can take several days, with the majority of computing time devoted to aligning reads to genomics regions that are to date not clinically interpretable. In an attempt to accelerate the reporting of clinically actionable variants, we have investigated the utility of a multi-step alignment algorithm focused on aligning reads and calling variants in genomic regions of clinical relevance prior to processing the remaining reads on the whole genome. This iterative workflow significantly accelerates the reporting of clinically actionable variants with no loss of accuracy when compared to genotypes obtained with the OMNI SNP platform or to variants detected with a standard workflow that combines Novoalign and GATK. PMID:24505267

  1. Clinical compliance of viewing conditions in radiology reporting environments against current guidelines and standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, S.; Rainford, L.; Butler, M. L.

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the importance of environmental conditions in the radiology reporting environment, with many indicating that incorrect parameters could lead to error and misinterpretation. Literature is available with recommendations as to the levels that should be achieved in clinical practice, but evidence of adherence to these guidelines in radiology reporting environments is absent. This study audited the reporting environments of four teleradiologist and eight hospital based radiology reporting areas. This audit aimed to quantify adherence to guidelines and identify differences in the locations with respect to layout and design, monitor distance and angle as well as the ambient factors of the reporting environments. In line with international recommendations, an audit tool was designed to enquire in relation to the layout and design of reporting environments, monitor angle and distances used by radiologists when reporting, as well as the ambient factors such as noise, light and temperature. The review of conditions were carried out by the same independent auditor for consistency. The results obtained were compared against international standards and current research. Each radiology environment was given an overall compliance score to establish whether or not their environments were in line with recommended guidelines. Poor compliance to international recommendations and standards among radiology reporting environments was identified. Teleradiology reporting environments demonstrated greater compliance than hospital environments. The findings of this study identified a need for greater awareness of environmental and perceptual issues in the clinical setting. Further work involving a larger number of clinical centres is recommended.

  2. Commitment to Change Statements Can Predict Actual Change in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Jacqueline; Herbert, Carol P.; Maclure, Malcolm; Dormuth, Colin; Wright, James M.; Legare, Jeanne; Brett-MacLean, Pamela; Premi, John

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Statements of commitment to change are advocated both to promote and to assess continuing education interventions. However, most studies of commitment to change have used self-reported outcomes, and self-reports may significantly overestimate actual performance. As part of an educational randomized controlled trial, this study…

  3. The Reporting of Observational Clinical Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Parlar, Melissa; Truong, Wanda; Hall, Geoffrey; Thabane, Lehana; McKinnon, Margaret; Goeree, Ron; Pullenayegum, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Complete reporting assists readers in confirming the methodological rigor and validity of findings and allows replication. The reporting quality of observational functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies involving clinical participants is unclear. Objectives We sought to determine the quality of reporting in observational fMRI studies involving clinical participants. Methods We searched OVID MEDLINE for fMRI studies in six leading journals between January 2010 and December 2011.Three independent reviewers abstracted data from articles using an 83-item checklist adapted from the guidelines proposed by Poldrack et al. (Neuroimage 2008; 40: 409–14). We calculated the percentage of articles reporting each item of the checklist and the percentage of reported items per article. Results A random sample of 100 eligible articles was included in the study. Thirty-one items were reported by fewer than 50% of the articles and 13 items were reported by fewer than 20% of the articles. The median percentage of reported items per article was 51% (ranging from 30% to 78%). Although most articles reported statistical methods for within-subject modeling (92%) and for between-subject group modeling (97%), none of the articles reported observed effect sizes for any negative finding (0%). Few articles reported justifications for fixed-effect inferences used for group modeling (3%) and temporal autocorrelations used to account for within-subject variances and correlations (18%). Other under-reported areas included whether and how the task design was optimized for efficiency (22%) and distributions of inter-trial intervals (23%). Conclusions This study indicates that substantial improvement in the reporting of observational clinical fMRI studies is required. Poldrack et al.'s guidelines provide a means of improving overall reporting quality. Nonetheless, these guidelines are lengthy and may be at odds with strict word limits for publication; creation of a

  4. A review on reporting guidelines of clinical research in evidence based medicine.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xing; Wang, Gui-qian; Xie, Yan-ming

    2015-07-01

    Good clinical practice should be based on evidence. Evidence quality should be based on critical appraisal in evidence based medicine (EBM). Evaluation of evidence quality plays an important role in evidence level clarifying, which is the core of EBM. Different recommendations for clinical practice often derive from evidence levels. Thus evidence quality evaluation is the first and most important step in EBM. There are lots of standards to evaluate evidence quality in the world. However there are two aspects of the evaluation, one is methodological evaluation and the other is reporting evaluation. This article collected a series of standards for clinical trials quality evaluation according to different research designs. It is hoped that the resource and introduction about the quality evaluation of clinical trials be helpful for medical researchers in China. Only being familiar with all kinds of standards of methodology and reporting, researchers could publish high quality scientific papers.

  5. Conservative Approach for Restoring Posterior Missing Tooth with Fiber Reinforcement Materials: Four Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Emine Sirin; Ertas, Ertan; Ozsevik, Semih; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Adhesively luted, fiber-reinforced, composite-inlay, retained fixed-partial dentures can be a clinical alternative for the replacement of missing posterior teeth in selective situations. This type of restoration allows for satisfactory esthetics and reduced tooth preparation compared to a conventional, fixed-partial denture. This clinical report describes the use of a fiber-reinforced, composite-inlay, retained fixed-partial denture as a conservative alternative for the replacement of missing posterior teeth. PMID:21912503

  6. Clinical and instrumental treatment of a patient with dysfunction of the stomatognathic system: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Summary This article details a case report of a subject chosen from among patients treated in the author’s clinic in the Posturology and Gnathology Section of the University Milano-Bicocca. It shows how the indispensable clinical analysis of the stomatognathic system and the connections between posture can be supported by instrumental analysis, such as the computerized occlusal analysis system and the force platform, to diagnose and treat dysfunctional patients. PMID:22238703

  7. Adverse Symptom Event Reporting by Patients vs Clinicians: Relationships With Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Heller, Glenn; Barz, Allison; Sit, Laura; Fruscione, Michael; Appawu, Mark; Iasonos, Alexia; Atkinson, Thomas; Goldfarb, Shari; Culkin, Ann; Kris, Mark G.; Schrag, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Background In cancer treatment trials, the standard source of adverse symptom data is clinician reporting by use of items from the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient self-reporting has been proposed as an additional data source, but the implications of such a shift are not understood. Methods Patients with lung cancer receiving chemotherapy and their clinicians independently reported six CTCAE symptoms and Karnofsky Performance Status longitudinally at sequential office visits. To compare how patient's vs clinician's reports relate to sentinel clinical events, a time-dependent Cox regression model was used to measure associations between reaching particular CTCAE grade severity thresholds with the risk of death and emergency room visits. To measure concordance of CTCAE reports with indices of daily health status, Kendall tau rank correlation coefficients were calculated for each symptom with EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire and global question scores. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results A total of 163 patients were enrolled for an average of 12 months (range = 1–28 months), with a mean of 11 visits and 67 (41%) deaths. CTCAE reports were submitted by clinicians at 95% of visits and by patients at 80% of visits. Patients generally reported symptoms earlier and more frequently than clinicians. Statistically significant associations with death and emergency room admissions were seen for clinician reports of fatigue (P < .001), nausea (P = .01), constipation (P = .038), and Karnofsky Performance Status (P < .001) but not for patient reports of these items. Higher concordance with EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire and global question scores was observed for patient-reported symptoms than for clinician-reported symptoms. Conclusions Longitudinally collected clinician CTCAE assessments better predict unfavorable clinical events, whereas patient reports better reflect daily health status. These perspectives are

  8. [Report of four clinical cases of filariasis in Alto Nanay, Loreto].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Herrera, Javier; Arróspide-Velasco, Nancy; Gutierrez-González, Sonia; Celis-Salinas, Juan C; Huamaní-Solano, Daniel; Loza-Hermenegildo, Luis; Elgegren-Lao, Julio; Armas-Montes, José; Baca-Pérez, Juan; Cabezas, César

    2013-07-01

    This study describes the clinical, parasitological and laboratory findings of four patients who lived in the district of Alto Nanay, Maynas, Loreto, Peru and were infected with Mansonella ozzardi microfilariae. Clinical examinations by ophthalmologists, cardiologists and nephrologists were performed. In case 1, the presence of 2 subcutaneous lumps was the most important finding, one at dorsal level and the other in the lower third of the left leg; in case 2, there was a sensation of tingling or coldness in the legs; in case 3, an associated chronic hepatitis B infection was found, and in case 4, a large lump was detected in the left lumbar region. All 4 patients were infected with Mansonella ozzardi and had eosinophilia, 3 of them in percentages of 20%. The lump found in case 4 was due to a herniation of bowel content. Further clinical studies and an evaluation of the actual pathogenic effect of microfilariae are to be performed. A study of the genetic diversity of filariae in the Peruvian Amazon would also be important. PMID:24100830

  9. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    -time information that can inform the care of every patient with cancer as well as connect patients with their entire medical teams. The rapid learning system will form a continuous cycle of learning: securely capturing data from every patient at the point of care, drawing on evidence-based guidelines, and evaluating quality of care against those standards and the outcomes of other patients. Clinical trials are another area in which collaboration is critical. Increasing clinical trial participation will require commitment across the cancer community from physicians, patients, insurers, hospitals, and industry. A 2010 report by the Institute of Medicine described challenges to participation in trials by both physicians and patients and provided recommendations for revitalizing clinical trials conducted through the National Cancer Institute's Cooperative Group Program. ASCO has pledged its support for the full implementation of these recommendations. More broadly, ASCO recently outlined a bold vision for translational and clinical cancer research for the next decade and made recommendations to achieve that vision. Accelerating Progress Against Cancer: ASCO's Blueprint for Transforming Clinical and Translational Research, released in November, calls for a research system that takes full advantage of today's scientific and technologic opportunities and sets a high-level agenda for policy makers, regulators, and advocates. Cancer research has transformed cancer care in the past forty years, and this year's Clinical Cancer Advances illustrates how far we have come in the past year alone. We now have a tremendous opportunity to use today's knowledge and collaborate across all facets of cancer care to conquer this deadly disease. Michael P. Link, MD President American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Minimum reporting standards for clinical research on groin pain in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Thorborg, Kristian; Khan, Karim M; Robinson, Philip; Hölmich, Per; Weir, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Groin pain in athletes is a priority area for sports physiotherapy and sports medicine research. Heterogeneous studies with low methodological quality dominate research related to groin pain in athletes. Low-quality studies undermine the external validity of research findings and limit the ability to generalise findings to the target patient population. Minimum reporting standards for research on groin pain in athletes are overdue. We propose a set of minimum reporting standards based on best available evidence to be utilised in future research on groin pain in athletes. Minimum reporting standards are provided in relation to: (1) study methodology, (2) study participants and injury history, (3) clinical examination, (4) clinical assessment and (5) radiology. Adherence to these minimum reporting standards will strengthen the quality and transparency of research conducted on groin pain in athletes. This will allow an easier comparison of outcomes across studies in the future. PMID:26031644

  11. Minimum reporting standards for clinical research on groin pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Thorborg, Kristian; Khan, Karim M; Robinson, Philip; Hölmich, Per; Weir, Adam

    2015-06-01

    Groin pain in athletes is a priority area for sports physiotherapy and sports medicine research. Heterogeneous studies with low methodological quality dominate research related to groin pain in athletes. Low-quality studies undermine the external validity of research findings and limit the ability to generalise findings to the target patient population. Minimum reporting standards for research on groin pain in athletes are overdue. We propose a set of minimum reporting standards based on best available evidence to be utilised in future research on groin pain in athletes. Minimum reporting standards are provided in relation to: (1) study methodology, (2) study participants and injury history, (3) clinical examination, (4) clinical assessment and (5) radiology. Adherence to these minimum reporting standards will strengthen the quality and transparency of research conducted on groin pain in athletes. This will allow an easier comparison of outcomes across studies in the future.

  12. [Epidemiologic studies on nutrition role in develomeat of osteoarthrosis. Report 1. Analysis of actual intake of nutrients and energy in depend on financial position and in come patients osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Khodyrev, V N; Martinchik, A N

    2010-01-01

    The study gives the characteristic of the social situation of patients with osteoarthrosis (OA), among which is dominated by people with disabilities and senior citizens (60%), most of which belongs to the poor. The actual nutrition of patients with OA is characterized by low energy intake and macronutrients. Feeding low-income patients with OA was characterized by inadequate intake of ascorbic acid and calcium, whereas the intake of vitamin A, E and beta-carotene was higher in patients with OA compared with the control group.

  13. Complete oral rehabilitation of a patient with hereditary gingival fibromatosis: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Zandinejad, Amirali; Atarodi, Merila; Abdel-Azim, Tamer; Leonhart, Ryan M; Morton, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a rare disease that has several debilitating oral and psychological manifestations, especially with young children and adolescents. The complexity of the treatment as well as the timing relative to the growth and maturation of the patient present a challenge. Few treatment options have been reported in the literature. This clinical report presents a multidisciplinary approach to treating a young patient with hereditary gingival fibromatosis by using implant-supported prostheses. The treatment steps and its outcome are discussed.

  14. The reliability of manual reporting of clinical events in an anesthesia information management system (AIMS).

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Pruitt, Eric Y; Cook-Sather, Scott D; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    Manual incident reports significantly under-report adverse clinical events when compared with automated recordings of intraoperative data. Our goal was to determine the reliability of AIMS and CQI reports of adverse clinical events that had been witnessed and recorded by research assistants. The AIMS and CQI records of 995 patients aged 2-12 years were analyzed to determine if anesthesia providers had properly documented the emesis events that were observed and recorded by research assistants who were present in the operating room at the time of induction. Research assistants recorded eight cases of emesis during induction that were confirmed with the attending anesthesiologist at the time of induction. AIMS yielded a sensitivity of 38 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.5-75.5 %), while the sensitivity of CQI reporting was 13 % (95 % CI 0.3-52.7 %). The low sensitivities of the AIMS and CQI reports suggest that user-reported AIMS and CQI data do not reliably include significant clinical events. PMID:22618299

  15. The reliability of manual reporting of clinical events in an anesthesia information management system (AIMS).

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Pruitt, Eric Y; Cook-Sather, Scott D; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    Manual incident reports significantly under-report adverse clinical events when compared with automated recordings of intraoperative data. Our goal was to determine the reliability of AIMS and CQI reports of adverse clinical events that had been witnessed and recorded by research assistants. The AIMS and CQI records of 995 patients aged 2-12 years were analyzed to determine if anesthesia providers had properly documented the emesis events that were observed and recorded by research assistants who were present in the operating room at the time of induction. Research assistants recorded eight cases of emesis during induction that were confirmed with the attending anesthesiologist at the time of induction. AIMS yielded a sensitivity of 38 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.5-75.5 %), while the sensitivity of CQI reporting was 13 % (95 % CI 0.3-52.7 %). The low sensitivities of the AIMS and CQI reports suggest that user-reported AIMS and CQI data do not reliably include significant clinical events.

  16. Wilson's disease: A Clinical autopsy case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Raju, Kalyani; Bangalore, Gayathri Nagaraj; Thuruvekere, Suresh Nagaraj; Pathavanalli, Venkatarathnamma Narayanappa

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disease resulting in defective copper metabolism, which is usually seen in young adults, predominantly affecting liver and brain. Although it is not uncommon in India, variation in epidemiology, clinical presentation and course are reported. However, community-based incidence and prevalence rates are not available in India and incidences are limited to hospital based reports. Most often, the diagnosis is delayed. We present a clinical autopsy case in a 39 year-old female who had presented with clinical symptoms at 18 years of age. The duration of illness was 21 years. Patient's parent had consanguineous marriage and the younger sibling had died at 5 years of age with similar complaints.

  17. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Murohashi, Harumitsu, Ed.; Fujino, Yuki, Ed.

    This annual report presents several articles related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "The Functional Uses of Infant-Directed Speech of Fathers and Mothers: A Comparison Study" (Katsuko Niwano); (2) "Are Children 'Among the Gods'?: Parental Images of Children…

  18. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Murohashi, Harumitsu, Ed.; Fujino, Yuki, Ed.

    This annual report presents several articles related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "Joint Attention as a System Property of the Infant-Caregiver Interaction System"(Tsuneda Miho and Shing-Jen Chen); (2) "Age-Related Change in Japanese Maternal…

  19. Posterior open occlusion management by registration of overlay removable partial denture: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Davoudi, Amin; Derhami, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This clinical report describes prosthetic rehabilitation of posterior open bite relationship in a patient with several missing teeth and skeletal Class III malocclusion. Primary diagnostic esthetic evaluations were performed by mounting casts in centric relation and estimating lost vertical dimension of occlusion. Exclusive treatments were designated by applying overlay removable partial denture with external attachment systems for higher retentions.

  20. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1995-1996, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakai, Kunio, Ed.; Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Furutsuka, Takashi, Ed.; Shirotani, Yukari, Ed.

    This annual report discusses several topics related to the work of the Research and Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Japan. The articles are: (1) "Heart to Heart (Inter "Jo") Resonance: Taking Japanese Concept of Intersubjectivity Out of Everyday Life" (Shigeru Nakano); (2) "Intersubjectivity and Infant-Interaction:…

  1. Mandibular fibular graft reconstruction with CAD/CAM technology: A clinical report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mamta; Somohano, Tanya; Choi, Mijin

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment of a partially dentate patient who presented with dental implants placed in a reconstructed fibula graft in the mandible. A complete mouth rehabilitation with a maxillary complete denture and a mandibular implant-supported fixed complete denture was fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided machining technology.

  2. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1999-2000, No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Fujino, Yuki, Ed.

    This annual report presents several articles related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "Intrinsic Musicality: Rhythm and Prosody in Infant-Directed Voices" (Niki Powers); (2) "Movable Cognitive Studies with a Portable, Telemetric Near-Infrared Spectroscopy…

  3. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1998-1999. No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Furutsuka, Takashi, Ed.; Shirotani, Yukari, Ed.

    This annual report presents several articles related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "Maternal Speech and Behavior during Mother-Infant Play: Comparison between the United States and Japan" (Sueko Toda, Marc H. Bornstein, and Hiroshi Azuma); (2) "The Effects…

  4. Implant assisted ortho-surgery in edentulous jaws: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Khojasteh, Arash; Payaminia, Leila; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The severely atrophy of jaws often complicates ideally oral reconstruction of esthetics and functionality, and necessitates different preprosthetic surgeries including bone grafting, ortho-surgery, and implant insertion. The mentioned procedures could be done within different approaches. This report describes the management of an edentulous case by implant insertion before orthognathic correction. PMID:26576273

  5. Posterior open occlusion management by registration of overlay removable partial denture: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Davoudi, Amin; Derhami, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This clinical report describes prosthetic rehabilitation of posterior open bite relationship in a patient with several missing teeth and skeletal Class III malocclusion. Primary diagnostic esthetic evaluations were performed by mounting casts in centric relation and estimating lost vertical dimension of occlusion. Exclusive treatments were designated by applying overlay removable partial denture with external attachment systems for higher retentions. PMID:26929544

  6. The Clinical Teacher for Special Education. Final Report: Volume I; Establishing the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Oseroff, Andrew

    Volume I of the final report of the Florida State University clinical teacher model, a diagnostic prescriptive approach to instruction of the mildly handicapped, describes the project's overview, background, objectives, and products. Reviewed are the historical trends toward individualized instruction and illustrated is the management network for…

  7. The Clinical Teacher for Special Education. Final Report: Volume II; Evaluating the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Oseroff, Andrew

    Effectiveness of the clinical teaching model (CTM) developed at Florida State University is documented in Volume II of the project's final report. Reviewed is literature related to teacher effectiveness and conceptual changes, conceptual models and instructional systems, and evaluation research in education. Research design and procedures are…

  8. In support of clinical case reports: a system of causality assessment.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Helmut; Hamre, Harald J; Kienle, Gunver S

    2013-03-01

    The usefulness of clinical research depends on an assessment of causality. This assessment determines what constitutes clinical evidence. Case reports are an example of evidence that is frequently overlooked because it is believed they cannot address causal links between treatment and outcomes. This may be a mistake. Clarity on the topic of causality and its assessment will be of benefit for researchers and clinicians. This article outlines an overall system of causality and causality assessment. The system proposed involves two dimensions: horizontal and vertical; each of these dimensions consists of three different types of causality and three corresponding types of causality assessment. Included in this system are diverse forms of case causality illustrated with examples from everyday life and clinical medicine. Assessing case causality can complement conventional clinical research in an era of personalized medicine.

  9. In Support of Clinical Case Reports: A System of Causality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hamre, Harald J.; Kienle, Gunver S.

    2013-01-01

    The usefulness of clinical research depends on an assessment of causality. This assessment determines what constitutes clinical evidence. Case reports are an example of evidence that is frequently overlooked because it is believed they cannot address causal links between treatment and outcomes. This may be a mistake. Clarity on the topic of causality and its assessment will be of benefit for researchers and clinicians. This article outlines an overall system of causality and causality assessment. The system proposed involves two dimensions: horizontal and vertical; each of these dimensions consists of three different types of causality and three corresponding types of causality assessment. Included in this system are diverse forms of case causality illustrated with examples from everyday life and clinical medicine. Assessing case causality can complement conventional clinical research in an era of personalized medicine. PMID:24416665

  10. 45 CFR 73.735-904 - Resolution of apparent or actual conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resolution of apparent or actual conflicts of... ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Reporting Financial Interests § 73.735-904 Resolution of apparent or actual... disqualification is employed to resolve an apparent or actual conflict of interest, the disqualified employee...

  11. Benefits and harms in clinical trials of duloxetine for treatment of major depressive disorder: comparison of clinical study reports, trial registries, and publications

    PubMed Central

    Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Lundh, Andreas; Schroll, Jeppe; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine, using research on duloxetine for major depressive disorder as an example, if there are inconsistencies between protocols, clinical study reports, and main publicly available sources (journal articles and trial registries), and within clinical study reports themselves, with respect to benefits and major harms. Design Data on primary efficacy analysis and major harms extracted from each data source and compared. Setting Nine randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine (total 2878 patients) submitted to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for marketing approval for major depressive disorder. Data sources Clinical study reports, including protocols as appendices (total 13 729 pages), were obtained from the EMA in May 2011. Journal articles were identified through relevant literature databases and contacting the manufacturer, Eli Lilly. Clinicaltrials.gov and the manufacturer’s online clinical trial registry were searched for trial results. Results Clinical study reports fully described the primary efficacy analysis and major harms (deaths (including suicides), suicide attempts, serious adverse events, and discontinuations because of adverse events). There were minor inconsistencies in the population in the primary efficacy analysis between the protocol and clinical study report and within the clinical study report for one trial. Furthermore, we found contradictory information within the reports for seven serious adverse events and eight adverse events that led to discontinuation but with no apparent bias. In each trial, a median of 406 (range 177-645) and 166 (100-241) treatment emergent adverse events (adverse events that emerged or worsened after study drug was started) in the randomised phase were not reported in journal articles and Lilly trial registry reports, respectively. We also found publication bias in relation to beneficial effects. Conclusion Clinical study reports contained extensive data on major harms that were

  12. Interconnecting smartphone, image analysis server, and case report forms in clinical trials for automatic skin lesion tracking in clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haak, Daniel; Doma, Aliaa; Gombert, Alexander; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2016-03-01

    Today, subject's medical data in controlled clinical trials is captured digitally in electronic case report forms (eCRFs). However, eCRFs only insufficiently support integration of subject's image data, although medical imaging is looming large in studies today. For bed-side image integration, we present a mobile application (App) that utilizes the smartphone-integrated camera. To ensure high image quality with this inexpensive consumer hardware, color reference cards are placed in the camera's field of view next to the lesion. The cards are used for automatic calibration of geometry, color, and contrast. In addition, a personalized code is read from the cards that allows subject identification. For data integration, the App is connected to an communication and image analysis server that also holds the code-study-subject relation. In a second system interconnection, web services are used to connect the smartphone with OpenClinica, an open-source, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved electronic data capture (EDC) system in clinical trials. Once the photographs have been securely stored on the server, they are released automatically from the mobile device. The workflow of the system is demonstrated by an ongoing clinical trial, in which photographic documentation is frequently performed to measure the effect of wound incision management systems. All 205 images, which have been collected in the study so far, have been correctly identified and successfully integrated into the corresponding subject's eCRF. Using this system, manual steps for the study personnel are reduced, and, therefore, errors, latency and costs decreased. Our approach also increases data security and privacy.

  13. Silicosis with Various Clinical Courses in a Tunnel Worker: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Jung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Author reports a case of 67- years- old men referred to Donga University Hospital silicosis who had worked in tunnel drilling where presumably had been exposed to high concentration free silica for almost 20 yr. This report is considered the first in Korea to the best of our knowledge since no cases on silicosis could be reported in this occupation in reviewing various literature sources in Korea. The physician’s first impression was lung cancer since the CT findings. However, it turned out to be pneumonia and silicosis. It was eventually diagnosed with silicosis and pneumonia, and tuberculosis. The patient is suffering from various clinical courses for long time. PMID:27517002

  14. Silicosis with Various Clinical Courses in a Tunnel Worker: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Il

    2016-07-01

    Author reports a case of 67- years- old men referred to Donga University Hospital silicosis who had worked in tunnel drilling where presumably had been exposed to high concentration free silica for almost 20 yr. This report is considered the first in Korea to the best of our knowledge since no cases on silicosis could be reported in this occupation in reviewing various literature sources in Korea. The physician's first impression was lung cancer since the CT findings. However, it turned out to be pneumonia and silicosis. It was eventually diagnosed with silicosis and pneumonia, and tuberculosis. The patient is suffering from various clinical courses for long time. PMID:27517002

  15. Clinical features of pulmonary artery sarcoma: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guangfa; Pu, Xin; Guo, Hongjuang; Huang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dong; Gan, Huili

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and highly malignant tumor of pulmonary artery origin. Since 1923, when the first case was reported, <300 cases have been reported worldwide. PAS has a poor prognosis, and early diagnosis with radical surgical resection offers patients with PAS the only chance of survival. However, due to its rarity and the non-specificity of its clinical manifestations and imaging presentation, PAS is frequently misdiagnosed as a pulmonary thromboembolic disease, including pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The present study reports three cases of PAS that were initially misdiagnosed as PTE or CTEPH, and were later shown to be PAS following surgery. In addition, the clinical features of these patients are examined in order to improve the differential diagnosis of PAS during the early stages of the disease, when the prognosis of patients with PAS is at its optimum. PMID:27446344

  16. Capturing and Incorporating Patient-Reported Outcomes into Clinical Trials: Practical Considerations for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Botero, Juliana Perez; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Warsame, Rahma

    2016-10-01

    Patient centeredness as the focus of healthcare delivery requires the incorporation of patient-reported outcomes into clinical trials. Clearly defining measurable outcomes as well as selecting the most appropriate validated collection tool to use is imperative for success. Creating and validating one's own instrument is also possible, albeit more cumbersome. Meticulous data collection to avoid missing data is key, as is limiting the number of data collection points to prevent survey fatigue and using electronic systems to facilitate data gathering and analysis. Working in a multidisciplinary team that includes statisticians with expertise in patient reported outcomes is essential to navigate the complexities of statistical analysis of these variables. Use of available and emerging technologies for data collection and analysis as well as data sharing will greatly facilitate the process of incorporating patient-reported outcomes into trials and routine clinical practice. PMID:27525737

  17. Actual Leisure Participation of Norwegian Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolva, Anne-Stine; Kleiven, Jo; Kollstad, Marit

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the actual participation in leisure activities by a sample of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome aged 14. Representing a first generation to grow up in a relatively inclusive context, they live with their families, attend mainstream schools, and are part of common community life. Leisure information was obtained in…

  18. Stability Tests with Actual Savannah River Site Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    2002-09-09

    solutions in two laboratory experiments. The first experiment tested four waste solutions for supersaturation of aluminum by monitoring the aluminum concentration after seeding with gibbsite. The second experiment tested two waste samples for precipitation of aluminosilicates by heating the solutions to accelerate solids formation. The results of the experiments with actual waste solutions are supported in this report.

  19. A Researcher's Dilemma: A Comparison of Estimated versus Actual College G.P.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, William E.; Nelson, Gena C.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared college student reported grade point averages (GPA) with actual GPA as recorded at the Registrar's Office to determine the accuracy of student reported GPA. Results indicated that, on average, students reported slightly higher GPA than their actual GPA. Additionally, females were virtually as accurate as males and students with…

  20. Correlation between self-reported and clinically based diagnoses of bruxism in temporomandibular disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Paesani, D A; Lobbezoo, F; Gelos, C; Guarda-Nardini, L; Ahlberg, J; Manfredini, D

    2013-11-01

    The present investigation was performed in a population of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and it was designed to assess the correlation between self-reported questionnaire-based bruxism diagnosis and a diagnosis based on history taking plus clinical examination. One-hundred-fifty-nine patients with TMD underwent an assessment including a questionnaire investigating five bruxism-related items (i.e. sleep grinding, sleep grinding referral by bed partner, sleep clenching, awake clenching, awake grinding) and an interview (i.e. oral history taking with specific focus on bruxism habits) plus a clinical examination to evaluate bruxism signs and symptoms. The correlation between findings of the questionnaire, viz., patients' report, and findings of the interview/oral history taking plus clinical examination, viz., clinicians' diagnosis, was assessed by means of φ coefficient. The highest correlations were achieved for the sleep grinding referral item (φ = 0·932) and for the awake clenching item (φ = 0·811), whilst lower correlation values were found for the other items (φ values ranging from 0·363 to 0·641). The percentage of disagreement between the two diagnostic approaches ranged between 1·8% and 18·2%. Within the limits of the present investigation, it can be suggested that a strong positive correlation between a self-reported and a clinically based approach to bruxism diagnosis can be achieved as for awake clenching, whilst lower levels of correlation were detected for sleep-time activities.

  1. Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis with Clinically Evident Splenomegaly in an Immunocompetent Host, First Case Reported in the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Garrett R.; Libke, Robert D.; Billelo, John F.; Parks, Nancy A.; Pollard, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a dimorphic fungus endemic to the southwestern United States, Central and South America. We report a case of a previously healthy person who presented with respiratory failure and disseminated Coccidioidomycosis who eventually had a fatal outcome. Coccidioidomycosis, or “Valley Fever” has been called the “great imitator” (1) as it can have a wide variety of clinical presentations. This case is unique as it represents the first described case of an immunocompetent host with rapidly progressing, disseminated coccidioidomycosis with clinically apparent splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. PMID:21264046

  2. Reporting of research quality characteristics of studies published in 6 major clinical dental specialty journals.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Madianos, Phoebus; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this article was to record reporting characteristics related to study quality of research published in major specialty dental journals with the highest impact factor (Journal of Endodontics, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics; Pediatric Dentistry, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, and International Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry). The included articles were classified into the following 3 broad subject categories: (1) cross-sectional (snap-shot), (2) observational, and (3) interventional. Multinomial logistic regression was conducted for effect estimation using the journal as the response and randomization, sample calculation, confounding discussed, multivariate analysis, effect measurement, and confidence intervals as the explanatory variables. The results showed that cross-sectional studies were the dominant design (55%), whereas observational investigations accounted for 13%, and interventions/clinical trials for 32%. Reporting on quality characteristics was low for all variables: random allocation (15%), sample size calculation (7%), confounding issues/possible confounders (38%), effect measurements (16%), and multivariate analysis (21%). Eighty-four percent of the published articles reported a statistically significant main finding and only 13% presented confidence intervals. The Journal of Clinical Periodontology showed the highest probability of including quality characteristics in reporting results among all dental journals. PMID:21605830

  3. ClinicalTrials.gov reporting: strategies for success at an academic health center.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Erin K; Hassell, Nancy J; Snyder, Denise C; Natoli, Susan; Liu, Irwin; Rimmler, Jackie; Amspacher, Valerie; Burnett, Bruce K; Parrish, Amanda B; Berglund, Jelena P; Stacy, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA 2007, US Public Law 110-98) mandated registration and reporting of results for applicable clinical trials. Meeting these registration and results reporting requirements has proven to be a challenge for the academic research community. Duke Medicine has made compliance with registration and results reporting a high priority. In order to create uniformity across a large institution, a written policy was created describing requirements for clinical trials disclosure. Furthermore, a centralized resource group was formed with three full time staff members. The group not only ensures compliance with FDAAA 2007, it also acts as a resource for study teams providing hands-on support, reporting, training, and ongoing education. Intensive resourcing for results reporting has been crucial for success. Due to implementation of the institutional policy and creation of centralized resources, compliance with FDAAA 2007 has increased dramatically at Duke Medicine for both registration and results reporting. A consistent centralized approach has enabled success in the face of changing agency rules and new legislation.

  4. Meditation and college students' self-actualization and rated stress.

    PubMed

    Janowiak, J J; Hackman, R

    1994-10-01

    This paper concerns the efficacy of meditation and relaxation in promoting self-actualization and changes in self-reported stress among 62 college students. Two groups were given mantra meditation and a yogic relaxation technique referred to as Shavasana. Pre- and posttest measures were taken on the Personal Orientation Inventory and the Behavioral Relaxation Scale. Both groups showed significant increases in scores on self-actualization; however, no differences were found between groups. Meditation training was associated with larger gains in scores on measures of systematic relaxed behavior than of the relaxation training.

  5. Resident's Morning Report: An Opportunity to Reinforce Principles of Biomedical Science in a Clinical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brass, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    The principles of biochemistry are core to understanding cellular and tissue function, as well as the pathophysiology of disease. However, the clinical utility of biochemical principles is often obscure to clinical trainees. Resident's Morning Report is a common teaching conference in which residents present clinical cases of interest to a…

  6. Individual lithium disilicate crowns in a full-arch, implant-supported rehabilitation: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Maló, Paulo; de Sousa, Sérgio Tavares; De Araújo Nobre, Miguel; Moura Guedes, Carlos; Almeida, Ricardo; Roma Torres, António; Legatheaux, João; Silva, António

    2014-08-01

    This clinical report presents the clinical outcome of a maxillary full-arch implant-supported fixed rehabilitation with lithium disilicate reinforced glass ceramic monolithic crowns opposing a mandibular metal-acrylic implant-supported fixed rehabilitation in a 62-year-old woman. Eight implants were successfully placed (four maxillary, four mandibular), and no complications occurred in the postoperative or maintenance periods. Six months after delivery, the maxillary and mandibular prostheses were found to be clinically, biologically, and mechanically stable, and the patient was satisfied with the esthetics and her ability to function. Although the present indications for the use of lithium disilicate are still restricted to tooth-borne restorations, it is possible to successfully rehabilitate edentulous patients through implant-supported fixed prostheses using lithium disilicate reinforced glass ceramic monolithic crowns.

  7. Recommendations for clinical laboratory science reports regarding properties, units, and symbols: the NPU format.

    PubMed

    Férard, Georges; Dybkaer, René

    2013-05-01

    The document describes the Nomenclature for Properties and Units (NPU) format developed by the joint committee on Nomenclature for Properties and Units of the IFCC and IUPAC. Basic concepts, in particular system, component, kind-of-property, and unit are defined. Generalities concerning quantities and units, and terminological rules are recalled. A constant format is structured for reporting clinical laboratory information. It is adapted for examinations, including measurements, performed in the clinical laboratories. The NPU format follows international recommendations. Using this format, more than 16,000 properties examined in the clinical laboratories have been described. A regularly updated version of the descriptions is available from the IFCC. Examples from different disciplines are given to promote the dissemination of the format. The object of the NPU format is the transfer of examination data without loss of accuracy between the laboratory personnel and the clinicians. The format is well-adapted for comparative and epidemiological studies.

  8. When rheumatologists report that they agree with a guideline, does this mean that they practise the guideline in clinical practice? Results of the International Recommendation Implementation Study (IRIS)

    PubMed Central

    Gvozdenović, Emilia; Allaart, Cornelia F; van der Heijde, Désirée; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Smolen, Josef S; Huizinga, Tom W J; Landewé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the treat-to-target (T2T) principles have been developed in order to improve the treatment outcome of patients with RA, and have received broad attention. It is not clear, though, whether these recommendations are indeed followed up in clinical practice. Objective To investigate if rheumatologists that report to agree with existing guidelines indeed follow them up in clinical practice. Methods The International Recommendation Implementation Study (IRIS) included 132 participating rheumatologists from 14 countries. Participating rheumatologists received a questionnaire measuring their awareness/commitment with the EULAR/T2T recommendations and followed a dedicated educational programme. Subsequently, they were asked to enrol 5–10 patients with new-onset RA in the online IRIS database and monitor disease activity and treatment for a period of 1–2 years. Four recommendations (3 from the EULAR recommendations and one from the T2T recommendations) were selected on the basis of testability, and analysed with regard to compliance by participating rheumatologists. Results In total, 72 of the 132 participating rheumatologists contributed 378 patients to the database. Of these participants, 70 (98%) agreed upfront with the recommendation that disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy should be started as soon as possible after diagnosis in every patient; 69 (96%) of the rheumatologists agreed with the recommendation that methotrexate (MTX) should be part of the first treatment strategy. When measuring the actual performance, it was found that the recommendation on early DMARD start was met in 253 (67%) of the recorded patients, and the recommendation on MTX in 225 (60%) of the recorded patients. Of the participants, 60 (83%) agreed that composite measures should be recorded regularly, but only in 134(54%) of the patients were

  9. Self-Actualization, Liberalism, and Humanistic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Charles Mack

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between personality factors and political orientation has long been of interest to psychologists. This study tests the hypothesis that there is no significant relationship between self-actualization and liberalism-conservatism. The hypothesis is supported. (Author)

  10. Improving the reporting of clinical trials of infertility treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement†‡.

    PubMed

    Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiaoke; Barnhart, Kurt T; Farquhar, Cynthia; Fauser, Bart C J M; Mol, Ben

    2014-10-10

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and result in a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which create a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant ≥20 weeks gestations) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and during the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and

  11. Improving the Reporting of Clinical Trials of Infertility Treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which creates a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant after ≥20 weeks' gestation) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and couples.

  12. Revised STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA): extending the CONSORT statement

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Hugh; Altman, Douglas G; Hammerschlag, Richard; Li, Youping; Wu, Taixiang; White, Adrian; Moher, David

    2010-01-01

    The STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) were published in five journals in 2001 and 2002. These guidelines, in the form of a checklist and explanations for use by authors and journal editors, were designed to improve reporting of acupuncture trials, particularly the interventions, thereby facilitating their interpretation and replication. Subsequent reviews of the application and impact of STRICTA have highlighted the value of STRICTA as well as scope for improvements and revision. To manage the revision process a collaboration between the STRICTA Group, the CONSORT Group and the Chinese Cochrane Centre was developed in 2008. An expert panel with 47 participants was convened that provided electronic feedback on a revised draft of the checklist. At a subsequent face-to-face meeting in Freiburg, a group of 21 participants further revised the STRICTA checklist and planned dissemination. The new STRICTA checklist, which is an official extension of CONSORT, includes 6 items and 17 subitems. These set out reporting guidelines for the acupuncture rationale, the details of needling, the treatment regimen, other components of treatment, the practitioner background and the control or comparator interventions. In addition, and as part of this revision process, the explanations for each item have been elaborated, and examples of good reporting for each item are provided. In addition, the word ‘controlled’ in STRICTA is replaced by ‘clinical’, to indicate that STRICTA is applicable to a broad range of clinical evaluation designs, including uncontrolled outcome studies and case reports. It is intended that the revised STRICTA checklist, in conjunction with both the main CONSORT statement and extension for non-pharmacological treatment, will raise the quality of reporting of clinical trials of acupuncture. PMID:20615861

  13. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Moslehifard, Elnaz; Farid, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD). The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure. PMID:24910683

  14. Reporting Device Observations for semantic interoperability of surgical devices and clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Björn; Ulrich, Hannes; Rehmann, Daniel; Kock, Ann-Kristin; Wrage, Jan-Hinrich; Ingenerf, Josef

    2015-08-01

    Service-oriented medical device architectures make the progress from interdisciplinary research projects to international standardisation: A new set of IEEE 11073 proposals shall pave the way to industry acceptance. This expected availability of device observations in a standardised representation enables secondary usage if interoperability with clinical information systems can be achieved. The Device Observation Reporter (DOR) described in this work is a gateway that connects these realms. After a user chooses a selection of signals from different devices in the digital operating room, the DOR records these semantically described values for a specified duration. Upon completion, the signals descriptions and values are transformed to Health Level Seven version 2 messages and sent to a hospital information system/electronic health record system within the clinical IT network. The successful integration of device data for documentation and usage in clinical information systems can further leverage the novel device communication standard proposals. Complementing these, an Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise profile will aid commercial implementers in achieving interoperability. Their solutions could incorporate clinical knowledge to autonomously select signal combinations and generate reports of diagnostic and interventional procedures, thus saving time and effort for surgical documentation.

  15. Systematic collection of patient reported outcome research data: A checklist for clinical research professionals.

    PubMed

    Wehrlen, Leslie; Krumlauf, Mike; Ness, Elizabeth; Maloof, Damiana; Bevans, Margaret

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the human experience is no longer an outcome explored strictly by social and behavioral researchers. Increasingly, biomedical researchers are also including patient reported outcomes (PROs) in their clinical research studies not only due to calls for increased patient engagement in research but also healthcare. Collecting PROs in clinical research studies offers a lens into the patient's unique perspective providing important information to industry sponsors and the FDA. Approximately 30% of trials include PROs as primary or secondary endpoints and a quarter of FDA new drug, device and biologic applications include PRO data to support labeling claims. In this paper PRO, represents any information obtained directly from the patient or their proxy, without interpretation by another individual to ascertain their health, evaluate symptoms or conditions and extends the reference of PRO, as defined by the FDA, to include other sources such as patient diaries. Consumers and clinicians consistently report that PRO data are valued, and can aide when deciding between treatment options; therefore an integral part of clinical research. However, little guidance exists for clinical research professionals (CRPs) responsible for collecting PRO data on the best practices to ensure quality data collection so that an accurate assessment of the patient's view is collected. Therefore the purpose of this work was to develop and validate a checklist to guide quality collection of PRO data. The checklist synthesizes best practices from published literature and expert opinions addressing practical and methodological challenges CRPs often encounter when collecting PRO data in research settings. PMID:27002223

  16. Assessing and reporting heterogeneity in treatment effects in clinical trials: a proposal.

    PubMed

    Kent, David M; Rothwell, Peter M; Ioannidis, John P A; Altman, Doug G; Hayward, Rodney A

    2010-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that there is frequently considerable variation in the risk of the outcome of interest in clinical trial populations. These differences in risk will often cause clinically important heterogeneity in treatment effects (HTE) across the trial population, such that the balance between treatment risks and benefits may differ substantially between large identifiable patient subgroups; the "average" benefit observed in the summary result may even be non-representative of the treatment effect for a typical patient in the trial. Conventional subgroup analyses, which examine whether specific patient characteristics modify the effects of treatment, are usually unable to detect even large variations in treatment benefit (and harm) across risk groups because they do not account for the fact that patients have multiple characteristics simultaneously that affect the likelihood of treatment benefit. Based upon recent evidence on optimal statistical approaches to assessing HTE, we propose a framework that prioritizes the analysis and reporting of multivariate risk-based HTE and suggests that other subgroup analyses should be explicitly labeled either as primary subgroup analyses (well-motivated by prior evidence and intended to produce clinically actionable results) or secondary (exploratory) subgroup analyses (performed to inform future research). A standardized and transparent approach to HTE assessment and reporting could substantially improve clinical trial utility and interpretability. PMID:20704705

  17. De-identification of Address, Date, and Alphanumeric Identifiers in Narrative Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, Mehmet; Browne, Allen C.; Dodd, Zeyno A.; Sagan, Pamela; McDonald, Clement J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Privacy Rule of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requires that clinical documents be stripped of personally identifying information before they can be released to researchers and others. We have been developing a software application, NLM Scrubber, to de-identify narrative clinical reports. Methods We compared NLM Scrubber with MIT’s and MITRE’s de-identification systems on 3,093 clinical reports about 1,636 patients. The performance of each system was analyzed on address, date, and alphanumeric identifier recognition separately. Their overall performance on de-identification and on conservation of the remaining clinical text was analyzed as well. Results NLM Scrubber’s sensitivity on de-identifying these identifiers was 99%. It’s specificity on conserving the text with no personal identifiers was 99% as well. Conclusion The current version of the system recognizes and redacts patient names, alphanumeric identifiers, addresses and dates. We plan to make the system available prior to the AMIA Annual Symposium in 2014. PMID:25954383

  18. Subtle clinical signs of a meningioma in an adult: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most common brain tumor in the adult population. This case report describes the epidemiology, the clinical presentation as well as the current treatment options for this condition. Case presentation A 49 year-old man attended a chiropractic clinic with non-specific chronic low back pain. Upon the history taking and the systems review, he reported a loss of both smell and taste for which investigations conducted by two different otolaryngologists did not yield a specific diagnosis. The patient was referred to a neurologist who ordered a computer tomography scan that eventually revealed a compression brain tumor. Brain tumors can produce a large variety of clinical presentations, such as upper motor neuron lesion symptoms, altered consciousness or vital functions which are easy to identify. However, subtle signs, such as those presented in this case, can be neglected. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of uncommon clinical presentations including cranial nerve or neurological dysfunction and refer their patient to a specialist when detected. PMID:24490991

  19. Clinically lesser known entity in India: A Report of two cases of Melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Barman, Purabi; Kaur, Ravneet; Kumar, Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is endemic in the South Asian regions, like Thailand, Singapore Malaysia and Australia. The disease is more pronounced in the southern part of the country. It is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei which causes systemic involvement, morbidity and mortality associated with the disease is high. Due to highly varied clinical presentation, and low general awareness this infection is largely underdiagnosed and under reported in our country. Most laboratories in the country still rely on conventional culturing methods with their low sensitivity, adding to the under reporting. To enhance physician awareness we describe here two cases who presented to our institute after months of misdiagnosis.

  20. Maxillary cement retained implant supported monolithic zirconia prosthesis in a full mouth rehabilitation: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Perng-Ru; Aponte-Wesson, Ruth; O'Neal, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report presents the reconstruction of a maxillary arch with a cement retained implant supported fixed prosthesis using a monolithic zirconia generated by CAD/CAM system on eight osseointegrated implants. The prosthesis was copy milled from an interim prosthesis minimizing occlusal adjustments on the definitive prosthesis at the time of delivery. Monolithic zirconia provides high esthetics and reduces the number of metal alloys used in the oral cavity. PMID:23755349

  1. Maxillary cement retained implant supported monolithic zirconia prosthesis in a full mouth rehabilitation: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Sadid-Zadeh, Ramtin; Liu, Perng-Ru; Aponte-Wesson, Ruth; O'Neal, Sandra J

    2013-05-01

    This clinical report presents the reconstruction of a maxillary arch with a cement retained implant supported fixed prosthesis using a monolithic zirconia generated by CAD/CAM system on eight osseointegrated implants. The prosthesis was copy milled from an interim prosthesis minimizing occlusal adjustments on the definitive prosthesis at the time of delivery. Monolithic zirconia provides high esthetics and reduces the number of metal alloys used in the oral cavity.

  2. Esthetic Restoration with Artificial Gingiva in an Atrophied Alveolar Ridge: Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, Antonio; Sánchez, Eric; Guizar, J Manuel; Del Campo, Carlos Martin; Fandiño, L Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Management of the anterior maxilla is a challenge in compromised clinical situations such as loss of teeth or soft tissues, alveolar ridge defects, or loss of all three. This report shows the systematic sequence of surgical and prosthetic management in a case of Seibert Class III alveolar atrophy where the patient refused a removable prosthesis. This was resolved with a hybrid metal/porcelain prosthesis with 17-degree multiunit abutments, leading to totally satisfactory esthetic and functional results. PMID:27333015

  3. Prosthodontic treatment and medical considerations for a patient with Turner syndrome: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Caroline T; Hofstede, Theresa M

    2012-10-01

    This clinical report describes a multidisciplinary approach in the rehabilitation of a 23-year-old Caucasian woman affected with Turner's syndrome and subsequently diagnosed with T4 Giant cell reparative granuloma of the right maxillary sinus. The surgical treatment included a maxillectomy and infratemporal fossa dissection followed by a free fibula palatal reconstruction, fibula bone graft of the orbital floor, dental implant placement, and prosthodontic rehabilitation. Prosthodontic planning and treatment considerations in an adult patient with Turner Syndrome are discussed. PMID:22672559

  4. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with a unilateral cleft palate: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Balkaya, Mehmet Cudi; Sultan, Huseyin; Erdem, Seda; Mutlu, Deniz

    2014-04-01

    Cleft palate is a congenital disorder characterized by maxillary growth defect and dental anomalies. Its correction requires an interdisciplinary approach, which includes surgical, orthodontic, and prosthetic treatments. This clinical report describes the prosthetic management of a 19-year-old woman with a unilateral cleft palate defect that had not been closed completely with surgical repair. The deficient maxillary residual anterior ridge was restored with a tooth-supported overdenture that improved her facial appearance, speech, and masticatory functions. PMID:24388721

  5. Prosthetic rehabilitation of edentulous patient with limited oral access: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Arora, Aman; Yadav, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Microstomia may result from surgical treatment of orofacial neoplasms, cleft lips, maxillofacial trauma, burns, radiotherapy or scleroderma. A maximal oral opening that is smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. This clinical report presents the prosthodontic management of a total edentulous patient with microstomia. Sectional mandibular and maxillary trays and foldable mandibular and maxillary denture were fabricated for the total edentulous patient. PMID:23293498

  6. Fixation of a severely resorbed mandible for complete arch screw-retained rehabilitation: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Vinicius; Bacchi, Atais

    2016-05-01

    Severely resorbed mandibles with placed endosteal dental implants can fracture. Therefore, techniques to reduce the risk or minimize the consequences of these fractures are needed. This clinical report presents a technique for placing a titanium plate in a severely resorbed mandible subjected to complete-arch implant therapy. The titanium plate is placed in the same surgical procedure as the implants, allowing immediate implant loading. This technique provides safe implant-supported treatment for patients with severe mandibular resorption.

  7. Chondroid syringoma of the scalp: case report and discussion of clinical features, histopathology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Paik, Young S; Liess, Benjamin D

    2011-04-01

    Chondroid syringoma is a generally benign, adnexal tumor most commonly found in the head and neck. It is typically diagnosed retrospectively from histopathology, and careful evaluation must differentiate it from tumors of salivary gland origin. It presents as a slowly growing, subcutaneous or intradermal nodule. Treatment consists of wide local excision with a margin of normal tissue. We report a case involving a 51-year-old man with a chondroid syringoma arising from the scalp. Clinical features, histopathology, and treatment are discussed.

  8. [Reflections on the clinical reports «minimum data set»].

    PubMed

    Prieto de Paula, J M; Franco Hidalgo, S

    2012-02-01

    Royal Decree 1093/2010 (3 September 2010) establishes the minimum data set that the clinical reports of discharges and outpatient visits elaborated in the facilities of the National Health System should contain, among others. Until then, the Ministerial Order 221/1984, that only required the drawing up of a discharge report for patients seen in a hospital-regime health care establishment, was in force. In spite of the importance of these documents, their quality is far from that desired, especially that of the reports on visits, which, among other things, are not performed in a high percentage of the cases. Recently the Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI) (Spanish Society of Internal Medicine), in collaboration with other scientific societies, issued some recommendations for the drawing up of the discharge reports. In this present work, a series of thoughts are made on the implications of the new decree, especially in the case of the reports of the outpatient clinics.

  9. Reporting unit size and measurement uncertainty: current Australian practice in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert C; Badrick, Tony

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to compare the reporting unit size used by Australian laboratories for routine chemistry and haematology tests to the unit size used by learned authorities and in standard laboratory textbooks and to the justified unit size based on measurement uncertainty (MU) estimates from quality assurance program data. MU was determined from Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) - Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) and RCPA Haematology Quality Assurance Program survey reports. The reporting unit size implicitly suggested in authoritative textbooks, the RCPA Manual, and the General Serum Chemistry program itself was noted. We also used published data on Australian laboratory practices.The best performing laboratories could justify their chemistry unit size for 55% of analytes while comparable figures for the 50% and 90% laboratories were 14% and 8%, respectively. Reporting unit size was justifiable for all laboratories for red cell count, >50% for haemoglobin but only the top 10% for haematocrit. Few, if any, could justify their mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) reporting unit sizes.The reporting unit size used by many laboratories is not justified by present analytical performance. Using MU estimates to determine the reporting interval for quantitative laboratory results ensures reporting practices match local analytical performance and recognises the inherent error of the measurement process.

  10. Summarizing polygenic risks for complex diseases in a clinical whole genome report

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Sek Won; Lee, In-Hee; Leschiner, Ignaty; Krier, Joel; Kraft, Peter; Rehm, Heidi L.; Green, Robert C.; Kohane, Isaac S.; MacRae, Calum A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Disease-causing mutations and pharmacogenomic variants are of primary interest for clinical whole-genome sequencing. However, estimating genetic liability for common complex diseases using established risk alleles might one day prove clinically useful. Methods We compared polygenic scoring methods using a case-control data set with independently discovered risk alleles in the MedSeq Project. For eight traits of clinical relevance in both the primary-care and cardiomyopathy study cohorts, we estimated multiplicative polygenic risk scores using 161 published risk alleles and then normalized using the population median estimated from the 1000 Genomes Project. Results Our polygenic score approach identified the overrepresentation of independently discovered risk alleles in cases as compared with controls using a large-scale genome-wide association study data set. In addition to normalized multiplicative polygenic risk scores and rank in a population, the disease prevalence and proportion of heritability explained by known common risk variants provide important context in the interpretation of modern multilocus disease risk models. Conclusion Our approach in the MedSeq Project demonstrates how complex trait risk variants from an individual genome can be summarized and reported for the general clinician and also highlights the need for definitive clinical studies to obtain reference data for such estimates and to establish clinical utility. PMID:25341114

  11. Mosaic 18q21.2 deletions including the TCF4 gene: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Labalme, Audrey; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Till, Marianne; Blanchard, Gaëlle; Dubois, Remi; Guibaud, Laurent; Heissat, Sophie; Javouhey, Etienne; Lachaux, Alain; Mure, Pierre-Yves; Ville, Dorothée; Edery, Patrick; Sanlaville, Damien

    2012-12-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) is characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphism, profound intellectual disability, and the possible occurrence of epilepsy and breathing anomalies. It is caused by haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 gene. No significant difference in clinical severity has been reported to date between PTHS patients carrying 18q21 deletions including the TCF4 gene, and those harboring TCF4 point mutations, suggesting a lack of genotype/phenotype correlation. Moreover, the size of 18q21 deletions including the TCF4 gene does not appear to have a significant effect on the phenotypic severity, suggesting that TCF4 haploinsufficiency is the most important prognostic factor in 18q deletions. We describe two unrelated patients presenting with clinical features reminiscent of PTHS and carrying mosaic interstitial 18q21 deletions characterized by array comparative genomic hybridization. One of the patients presented the lowest level of mosaic 18q21 deletion reported to date (5-10%). Our report and a review of the literature show that the mosaic status does not appear to have a significant effect on the clinical severity of 18q21 deletions, which are associated with a poor neurological outcome, whereas a mosaic TCF4 point mutation can result in a significantly milder phenotype. Malformations of internal organs are currently considered to be rare in PTHS. The patients described here had visceral anomalies, suggesting that a full morphological assessment, including heart and abdominal ultrasound scans, should be performed systematically in PTHS patients. PMID:23165966

  12. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  13. Occurrence and determinants of selective reporting of clinical drug trials: design of an inception cohort study

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogert, Cornelis A; Souverein, Patrick C; Brekelmans, Cecile T M; Janssen, Susan W J; van Hunnik, Manon; Koëter, Gerard H; Leufkens, Hubertus G M; Bouter, Lex M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Responsible conduct of research implies that results of clinical trials should be completely and adequately reported. This article describes the design of a cohort study that aims to investigate the occurrence and the determinants of selective reporting in an inception cohort of all clinical drug trials that were reviewed by the Dutch Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) in 2007. It also describes the characteristics of the study cohort. Methods and analysis In 2007, Dutch IRBs reviewed 622 clinical drug trials. For each trial, we assessed the stages of progress. We discriminated five intermediate stages and five definite stages. Intermediate stages of progress are: approved by an IRB; started inclusion; completed as planned; terminated early; published as article. The definite stages of progress are: rejected by an IRB; never started inclusion; not published as article; completely reported; selectively reported. We will use univariate and multivariate Cox regression models to identify trial characteristics associated with non-publication. We will identify seven trial-specific discrepancy items, including the objectives, inclusion and exclusion criteria, end points, sample size, additional analyses, type of population analysis and sponsor acknowledgement. The percentage of trials with discrepancies between the protocol and the publication will be scored. We will investigate the association between trial characteristics and the occurrence of discrepancies. Ethics and dissemination No IRB-approval is required for this study. Access to confidential research protocols was provided by the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects. We plan to finish data collection in June 2015, and expect to complete data cleaning, analysis and manuscript preparation within the next 3 months. Hence, a first draft of an article containing the results is expected before the end of October 2015. PMID:26152325

  14. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports.

    PubMed

    Park, Brian Y; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Traditional factors that once explained men's sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography's unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth. PMID:27527226

  15. The 7q11.23 Microduplication Syndrome: A Clinical Report with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Elham; Cox, Devin M; Smith, Teri; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-09-01

    We report a 14-year-old adolescent girl with selective mutism (SM) and a 7q11.23 microduplication detected by chromosomal microarray (CMA) analysis and reviewed the literature from 18 published clinical reports. Our patient had specific phobias, SM, extreme anxiety, obesity, cutis marmorata, and a round appearing face with a short neck and over folded ears. We reviewed the published clinical, cognitive, behavioral, and cytogenetic findings grouped by speech and language delay, growth and development, craniofacial, clinical, and behavior and cognitive features due to the 7q11.23 microduplication. This microduplication syndrome is characterized by speech delay (91%), social anxiety (42%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, 37%), autism spectrum disorder (29%), and separation anxiety (13%). Other findings include abnormal brain imaging (80%), congenital heart and vascular defects (54%), and mild intellectual disability (38%). We then compared the phenotype with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) which is due to a deletion of the same chromosome region. Both syndromes have abnormal brain imaging, hypotonia, delayed motor development, joint laxity, mild intellectual disability, ADHD, autism, and poor visuospatial skills but opposite or dissimilar findings regarding speech and behavioral patterns, cardiovascular problems, and social interaction. Those with WBS are prone to have hyperverbal speech, lack of stranger anxiety, and supravalvular aortic stenosis while those with the 7q11.23 microduplication have speech delay, SM, social anxiety, and are prone to aortic dilatation. PMID:27617154

  16. The 7q11.23 Microduplication Syndrome: A Clinical Report with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Elham; Cox, Devin M; Smith, Teri; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-09-01

    We report a 14-year-old adolescent girl with selective mutism (SM) and a 7q11.23 microduplication detected by chromosomal microarray (CMA) analysis and reviewed the literature from 18 published clinical reports. Our patient had specific phobias, SM, extreme anxiety, obesity, cutis marmorata, and a round appearing face with a short neck and over folded ears. We reviewed the published clinical, cognitive, behavioral, and cytogenetic findings grouped by speech and language delay, growth and development, craniofacial, clinical, and behavior and cognitive features due to the 7q11.23 microduplication. This microduplication syndrome is characterized by speech delay (91%), social anxiety (42%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, 37%), autism spectrum disorder (29%), and separation anxiety (13%). Other findings include abnormal brain imaging (80%), congenital heart and vascular defects (54%), and mild intellectual disability (38%). We then compared the phenotype with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) which is due to a deletion of the same chromosome region. Both syndromes have abnormal brain imaging, hypotonia, delayed motor development, joint laxity, mild intellectual disability, ADHD, autism, and poor visuospatial skills but opposite or dissimilar findings regarding speech and behavioral patterns, cardiovascular problems, and social interaction. Those with WBS are prone to have hyperverbal speech, lack of stranger anxiety, and supravalvular aortic stenosis while those with the 7q11.23 microduplication have speech delay, SM, social anxiety, and are prone to aortic dilatation.

  17. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports.

    PubMed

    Park, Brian Y; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2016-08-05

    Traditional factors that once explained men's sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography's unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth.

  18. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Park, Brian Y.; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P.; Doan, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional factors that once explained men’s sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography’s unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth. PMID:27527226

  19. Pragmatic Characteristics of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures are Important for Use in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kroenke, Kurt; Monahan, Patrick O.; Kean, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Objective Measures for assessing patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that may have initially been developed for research are increasingly being recommended for use in clinical practice as well. While psychometric rigor is essential, this paper focuses on pragmatic characteristics of PROs that may enhance uptake into clinical practice. Methods Three sources were drawn upon in identifying pragmatic criteria for PROs: 1) selected literature review including recommendations by other expert groups; 2) key features of several model public domain PROs; 3) the author' experience in developing practical PROs. Results Eight characteristics of a practical PRO include: 1) actionability (i.e., scores guide diagnostic or therapeutic actions/decision-making); 2) appropriateness for the relevant clinical setting; 3) universality (i.e., for screening, severity assessment, and monitoring across multiple conditions); 4) self-administration; 5) item features (number of items and bundling issues); 6) response options (option number and dimensions, uniform vs. varying options, timeframe, intervals between options); 7) scoring (simplicity, interpretability); and 8) accessibility (nonproprietary, downloadable, available in different languages and for vulnerable groups, incorporated into electronic health records) Conclusion Balancing psychometric and pragmatic factors in the development of PROs is important for accelerating the incorporation of PROs into clinical practice. PMID:25962972

  20. Surgical extrusion technique for clinical crown lengthening: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Sung; Choi, Seong-Ho; Chai, Jung-Kiu; Kim, Chong-Kwan; Cho, Kyoo-Sung

    2004-10-01

    Although a number of techniques have been proposed for clinical crown lengthening procedures, all have some limitation in terms of function and esthetics. This report presents the clinical and radiographic results of a surgical extrusion technique for clinical crown lengthening. Atraumatic surgical extrusion using a specially designed instrument (Periotome) was performed in three cases in which it was expected that extensive resective osseous surgery would have to be used for crown lengthening. Full-thickness mucoperiosteal flaps were raised both labially and palatally. The tooth was carefully luxated and extruded to the desired position without damaging the marginal bone area or root apex. No rigid splint was applied. Clinical examinations performed for more than 1 year after surgery revealed probing depths < or = 3 mm around the teeth at all sites, without bleeding on probing. The teeth functioned normally, with near-normal mobility. Radiographs showed normal periodontal contour consistent with new bone formation in the periapical area. Radiographic analysis did not show any evidence of root or crestal bone resorption or endodontic problems. The technique presented could constitute an alternative surgical approach to performing crown lengthening; it does not induce functional or esthetic deformities, especially in the anterior region.

  1. Acute unintentional intoxication with paraffin in a 25-year old patient - clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Chibishev, Andon; Simonovska, Natasa

    2014-08-01

    "Fire-breathing" or "fire-eating" is a special kind of street art where the acts are always stunning, spectacular and amazing. People exhibiting this kind of show are professionals, not rare amateurs, who use different kind of fuels, usually hydrocarbons, in order to produce a pillar of fire. Intoxications caused by ingestion or inhalation of liquid paraffin, used as a fuel while performing, are numerous and various. We present a clinical case report of a 25-year old, previously healthy, amateur "fire-breather". During October, 2010 this young men arrived at the Emergency Unit of the University Clinic for toxicology and Urgent Internal Medicine in a severe clinical condition, after his unsuccessful attempt to perform real "fire-breathing". He had fever, strong headaches, mild abdominal and chest pain and he also had difficulties breathing and persistent dry cough. The patient was extremely dyspneic with peripheral cyanosis and shortness of breath. "Fire-breathers" must be viewed as a population at risk of paraffin-induced pneumonia, which has low mortality rate, but still is related with numerous and various chronic complications. Our patient was first in a life threatening, extremely serious clinical condition which was urgently treated with appropriate vigorous and effective therapy. This therapeutic protocol led to successful full recovery of these young men, who luckily didn't exhibit any chronic complications.

  2. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  3. Fractures related to occlusal overload with single posterior implants: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Heather J; Schulte, John K; Vallee, Mark C

    2008-04-01

    This clinical report describes 2 patient situations in which fractures related to occlusal overload occurred with a single posterior implants. The initial clinical presentation of both patients appeared to be screw loosening, but upon further examination, implant and abutment fractures were identified. Several factors are described that have been implicated in the etiology of implant fractures, including occlusal overload, implant location, inadequate fit of the prosthesis, design of the prosthesis, progressive bone loss, metal fatigue, implant diameter, manufacturing defects, and galvanic activity. This article describes the management of implant and abutment fractures and discusses possible mechanisms of failure for the patient situations presented. Careful treatment planning and execution of implant therapy is necessary to minimize the risk of implant and component fractures. PMID:18395533

  4. Adjusting dento-alveolar morphology with orthodontic mini-implants (miniscrews). A clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Bratu, Cristina Dana; Pop, R V; Pop, Silvia-Izabella; Bratu, Em A

    2011-01-01

    Mini-implants are increasingly popular for creating skeletal anchorage in clinical orthodontics. The aim of this article is to present and discuss the clinical uses, benefits and drawbacks of the miniscrew implants used to reorder and adjust the dento-alveolar morphology of the overerupted maxillary molars. The loss of the lower premolars and molars very often leads to overeruption of the opposing maxillary teeth, combined with insufficient space for prosthetic restorations. The available treatment options are either a significant reduction of the maxillary teeth, often associated with endodontic treatment, or a complex orthodontic treatment. In the previous years, different cases of orthodontic intrusion with mini-implants were described. In this report, the authors describe a case of a young patient who needed a maxillary molar intrusion in order to get sufficient prosthetic space for an implant supported fixed restoration in the third quadrant. This treatment type preserved maximum tooth structures and allowed a successful mandibular restoration. PMID:22119837

  5. Er:YAG laser in the clinical management of severe peri-implantitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Badran, Zahi; Bories, Céline; Struillou, Xavier; Saffarzadeh, Afchine; Verner, Christian; Soueidan, Assem

    2011-03-01

    Peri-implantitis is bacterial infections of peri-implant supporting tissues, involving the peri-implant bone. Several treatment protocols have been tested in clinical practice with variable efficacy. The clinical management of peri-implantitis aims for elimination of plaque and calculus, decontamination of the failing implant surface, and regeneration of lost bone tissue. Surface decontamination is an important part of all suggested treatments. This can be accomplished with the use of chemical agents (eg, chlorhexidine) or mechanical (eg, ultrasonic) or photonic (eg, laser) devices. In this report, we present a case of severe peri-implantitis that was successfully managed with a combined nonsurgical and surgical approach. Implant surface debridement/decontamination of the implant surface was achieved with an erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser device.

  6. Cauda equina syndrome as the initial presenting clinical feature of medulloblastoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medulloblastoma is one of the most common pediatric brain malignancies. The usual presenting clinical features are related to posterior fossa syndrome or/and hydrocephalus. Cauda equina syndrome is a very rare presentation for this disease. Case presentation We describe the case of a three-year-old boy with cauda equina syndrome as the initial presenting clinical feature for medulloblastoma. He was initially diagnosed as having a spinal tumor by magnetic resonance imaging scan. Subsequently, a cranial magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a posterior fossa tumor with features of dissemination. He had substantial improvement after treatment. This case report is complemented by a literature review related to this unusual presentation. Conclusions Medulloblastoma primarily presenting with cauda equina syndrome is very rare. However, spinal drop metastasis should be considered in the pediatric age group to avoid suboptimal management. PMID:22620685

  7. Tetrasomy 18p: report of the molecular and clinical findings of 43 individuals.

    PubMed

    Sebold, Courtney; Roeder, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Marsha; Soileau, Bridgette; Heard, Patricia; Carter, Erika; Schatz, Martha; White, W Abraham; Perry, Brian; Reinker, Kent; O'Donnell, Louise; Lancaster, Jack; Li, John; Hasi, Minire; Hill, Annice; Pankratz, Lauren; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2010-09-01

    Thus far, the phenotype of tetrasomy 18p has been primarily delineated by published case series and reports. Findings reported in more than 25% of these cases include neonatal feeding problems, growth retardation, microcephaly, strabismus, muscle tone abnormalities, scoliosis/kyphosis, and variants on brain MRI. Developmental delays and cognitive impairment are universally present. The purpose of this study was to more fully describe tetrasomy 18p at both the genotypic and the phenotypic levels. Array CGH was performed on 43 samples from individuals with tetrasomy 18p diagnosed via routine karyotype. The medical records of 42 of these 43 individuals were reviewed. In order to gain additional phenotypic data, 31 individuals with tetrasomy 18p underwent a series of clinical evaluations at the Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center. Results from the molecular analysis indicated that 42 of 43 samples analyzed had 4 copies of the entire p arm of chromosome 18; one individual was also trisomic for a section of proximal 18q. The results of the medical records review and clinical evaluations expand the phenotypic description of tetrasomy 18p to include neonatal jaundice and respiratory distress; recurrent otitis media; hearing loss; seizures; refractive errors; constipation and gastroesophageal reflux; cryptorchidism; heart defects; and foot anomalies. Additional findings identified in a small number of individuals include hernias, myelomeningocele, kidney defects, short stature, and failure to respond to growth hormone stimulation testing. Additionally, a profile of dysmorphic features is described. Lastly, a series of clinical evaluations to be considered for individuals with tetrasomy 18p is suggested. PMID:20803640

  8. Let's not, and say we would: imagined and actual responses to witnessing homophobia.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Jennifer Randall; Wilson, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We compared imagined versus actual affective and behavioral responses to witnessing a homophobic slur. Participants (N = 72) witnessed a confederate using a homophobic slur, imagined the same scenario, or were not exposed to the slur. Those who imagined hearing the slur reported significantly higher levels of negative affect than those who actually witnessed the slur, and nearly one half of them reported that they would confront the slur, whereas no participants who actually heard the slur confronted it. These findings reveal a discrepancy between imagined and real responses to homophobic remarks, and they have implications for the likelihood that heterosexuals will actually confront homophobic remarks.

  9. Opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Schrijver, Iris; Aziz, Nazneen; Farkas, Daniel H; Furtado, Manohar; Gonzalez, Andrea Ferreira; Greiner, Timothy C; Grody, Wayne W; Hambuch, Tina; Kalman, Lisa; Kant, Jeffrey A; Klein, Roger D; Leonard, Debra G B; Lubin, Ira M; Mao, Rong; Nagan, Narasimhan; Pratt, Victoria M; Sobel, Mark E; Voelkerding, Karl V; Gibson, Jane S

    2012-11-01

    This report of the Whole Genome Analysis group of the Association for Molecular Pathology illuminates the opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing. With the reality of clinical application of next-generation sequencing, technical aspects of molecular testing can be accomplished at greater speed and with higher volume, while much information is obtained. Although this testing is a next logical step for molecular pathology laboratories, the potential impact on the diagnostic process and clinical correlations is extraordinary and clinical interpretation will be challenging. We review the rapidly evolving technologies; provide application examples; discuss aspects of clinical utility, ethics, and consent; and address the analytic, postanalytic, and professional implications.

  10. Importance of reporting segmental bowel preparation scores during colonoscopy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Momeni, Mojdeh; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Anand, Sury; Singhal, Shashideep

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of reporting bowel preparation using Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) in clinical practice. METHODS: The study was a prospective observational cohort study which enrolled subjects reporting for screening colonoscopy. All subjects received a gallon of polyethylene glycol as bowel preparation regimen. After colonoscopy the endoscopists determined quality of bowel preparation using BBPS. Segmental scores were combined to calculate composite BBPS. Site and size of the polyps detected was recorded. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine advanced adenoma detection rates (AADR). Segmental AADR’s were calculated and categorized based on the segmental BBPS to determine the differential impact of bowel prep on AADR. RESULTS: Three hundred and sixty subjects were enrolled in the study with a mean age of 59.2 years, 36.3% males and 63.8% females. Four subjects with incomplete colonoscopy due BBPS of 0 in any segment were excluded. Based on composite BBPS subjects were divided into 3 groups; Group-0 (poor bowel prep, BBPS 0-3) n = 26 (7.3%), Group-1 (Suboptimal bowel prep, BBPS 4-6) n = 121 (34%) and Group-2 (Adequate bowel prep, BBPS 7-9) n = 209 (58.7%). AADR showed a linear trend through Group-1 to 3; with an AADR of 3.8%, 14.8% and 16.7% respectively. Also seen was a linear increasing trend in segmental AADR with improvement in segmental BBPS. There was statistical significant difference between AADR among Group 0 and 2 (3.8% vs 16.7%, P < 0.05), Group 1 and 2 (14.8% vs 16.7%, P < 0.05) and Group 0 and 1 (3.8% vs 14.8%, P < 0.05). χ2 method was used to compute P value for determining statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Segmental AADRs correlate with segmental BBPS. It is thus valuable to report segmental BBPS in colonoscopy reports in clinical practice. PMID:25852286

  11. Risk Factors for Reporting Poor Cultural Competency Among Patients with Diabetes in Safety-Net Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Fernandez, Alicia; Stern, Rachel J.; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Quan, Judy; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competency (CAHPS-CC) Item Set assesses patient perceptions of aspects of the cultural competence of their health care. Objective To determine characteristics of patients who identify the care they receive as less culturally competent Research Design Cross-sectional survey consisting of face-to-face interviews Subjects Safety-net population of patients with type 2 diabetes (n=600) receiving ongoing primary care Measures Participants completed the CAHPS-CC and answered questions about their race/ethnicity, gender, age, education, health status, depressive symptoms, insurance coverage, English proficiency, duration of relationship with primary care provider, and co-morbidities. Results In adjusted models, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with poor cultural competency in the Doctor Communication – Positive Behaviors domain (OR 1.73, 95%CI 1.11, 2.69). African-Americans were less likely than Whites to report poor cultural competence in the Doctor Communication – Positive Behaviors domain (OR 0.52, 0.28–0.97). Participants who reported a longer relationship (≥3 years) with their primary care provider were less likely to report poor cultural competence in the Doctor Communication – Health Promotion (OR 0.35, 0.21–0.60) and Trust domains (OR 0.4, 0.24–0.67), while participants with lower educational attainment were less likely to report poor cultural competence in the Trust domain (OR 0.51, 0.30–0.86). Overall, however, sociodemographic and clinical differences in reports of poor cultural competence were insignificant or inconsistent across the various domains of cultural competence examined. Conclusions Cultural competence interventions in safety-net settings should be implemented across populations, rather than being narrowly focused on specific sociodemographic or clinical groups. PMID:22895232

  12. Development of EULAR recommendations for the reporting of clinical trial extension studies in rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Maya H; Silva-Fernandez, Lucia; Carmona, Loreto; Aletaha, Daniel; Christensen, Robin; Combe, Bernard; Emery, Paul; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Guillemin, Francis; Kvien, Tore K; Landewe, Robert; Pavelka, Karel; Saag, Kenneth; Smolen, Josef S; Symmons, Deborah; van der Heijde, Désirée; Welling, Joep; Wells, George; Westhovens, Rene; Zink, Angela; Boers, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our initiative aimed to produce recommendations on post-randomised controlled trial (RCT) trial extension studies (TES) reporting using European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) standard operating procedures in order to achieve more meaningful output and standardisation of reports. Methods We formed a task force of 22 participants comprising RCT experts, clinical epidemiologists and patient representatives. A two-stage Delphi survey was conducted to discuss the domains of evaluation of a TES and definitions. A ‘0–10’ agreement scale assessed each domain and definition. The resulting set of recommendations was further refined and a final vote taken for task force acceptance. Results Seven key domains and individual components were evaluated and led to agreed recommendations including definition of a TES (100% agreement), minimal data necessary (100% agreement), method of data analysis (agreement mean (SD) scores ranging between 7.9 (0.84) and 9.0 (2.16)) and reporting of results as well as ethical issues. Key recommendations included reporting of absolute numbers at each stage from the RCT to TES with reasons given for drop-out at each stage, and inclusion of a flowchart detailing change in numbers at each stage and focus (mean (SD) agreement 9.9 (0.36)). A final vote accepted the set of recommendations. Conclusions This EULAR task force provides recommendations for implementation in future TES to ensure a standardised approach to reporting. Use of this document should provide the rheumatology community with a more accurate and meaningful output from future TES, enabling better understanding and more confident application in clinical practice towards improving patient outcomes. PMID:24827533

  13. A Real-Time Safety and Quality Reporting System: Assessment of Clinical Data and Staff Participation

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, Douglas A.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the use of an incident learning system in a radiation oncology clinic, along with a review of staff participation. Methods and Materials: On September 24, 2010, our department initiated an online real-time voluntary reporting system for safety issues, called the Radiation Oncology Quality Reporting System (ROQRS). We reviewed these reports from the program's inception through January 18, 2013 (2 years, 3 months, 25 days) to assess error reports (defined as both near-misses and incidents of inaccurate treatment). Results: During the study interval, there were 60,168 fractions of external beam radiation therapy and 955 brachytherapy procedures. There were 298 entries in the ROQRS system, among which 108 errors were reported. There were 31 patients with near-misses reported and 27 patients with incidents of inaccurate treatment reported. These incidents of inaccurate treatment occurred in 68 total treatment fractions (0.11% of treatments delivered during the study interval). None of these incidents of inaccurate treatment resulted in deviation from the prescription by 5% or more. A solution to the errors was documented in ROQRS in 65% of the cases. Errors occurred as repeated errors in 22% of the cases. A disproportionate number of the incidents of inaccurate treatment were due to improper patient setup at the linear accelerator (P<.001). Physician participation in ROQRS was nonexistent initially, but improved after an education program. Conclusions: Incident learning systems are a useful and practical means of improving safety and quality in patient care.

  14. Reported Rates of Diarrhea Following Oral Penicillin Therapy in Pediatric Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Jemima; Ismael, Zareen; Long, Paul F.; Barker, Charlotte I.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) is a well-recognized adverse reaction to oral penicillins. This review analyzed the literature to determine the incidence of AAD following amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, and penicillin V oral therapy in pediatric clinical trials. METHODS: An advanced search was conducted in MEDLINE and Embase databases for articles in any language reporting the incidence of AAD following oral penicillin therapy for any indicated infection in children (0–17 years). The search was limited to clinical trials. Articles were excluded if treatment was related to chronic conditions, involved concomitant antimicrobials, or if the dose or number of patients was not specified. RESULTS: Four hundred thirty-five articles relating to clinical trials were identified (307 from Embase; 128 from MEDLINE). Thirty-five articles reporting on 42 studies were included for analysis. The indications included acute otitis media, sinusitis, pharyngitis, and pneumonia. Thirty-three trials reported on amoxicillin/clavulanate, 6 on amoxicillin, and 3 on penicillin V. In total, the 42 trials included 7729 children who were treated with an oral penicillin. On average, 17.2% had AAD. Data were pooled for each penicillin. The AAD incidence was 19.8% for amoxicillin/clavulanate, 8.1% for amoxicillin, and 1.2% for penicillin V. The amoxicillin/clavulanate data were analyzed according to formulation: pooled-average. The incidence of ADD was 24.6% for the 4:1 formulation, 12.8% for the 7:1 formulation, 19.0% for the 8:1 formulation, and 20.2% for the 14:1 formulation. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate substantially increased incidence of AAD following use of amoxicillin/clavulanate, compared to use of amoxicillin and penicillin V, as well as varying AAD rates with diffierent amoxicillin/clavulanate formulations. These findings warrant consideration when prescribing. The underlying mechanisms of AAD in children remain unclear. PMID:25964726

  15. Coracoclavicular joint, an osteological study with clinical implications: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakas, Marios-Efstathios; Stoltidou, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The presence of an anomalous coracoclavicular joint was studied in a human male skeleton aged 73 years old from the Osteology Collection of our Department. Case presentation We describe the exact morphology of this variation that is occasionally reported as an anatomical or radiological curiosity in the literature (0.55-21%). Conclusion Although coracoclavicular diarthrosis is of no significance other than academic, it is important to recognize this variation and the clinical symptoms that may occur, as it is a cause of shoulder pain and arthritis in this or the adjacent sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joint. Consequently, it is vital to apply the appropriate treatment. PMID:19918399

  16. Clinical and Histopathologic Investigation of Periapical Actinomycosis with Cutaneous Lesion: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Davood; Moazami, Fariborz; Sobhnamayan, Fereshteh; Taheri, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Management of an extra-radicular infection is a challenging procedure that requires surgical intervention. This report describes a patient with discharging cutaneous lesion that required apical surgery. A 40-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Endodontics, Shiraz Dental School with chief complaint of a cutaneous sinus tract. She had been treated by a dermatologist and an otolaryngologist. The patient had also received orthograde root canal treatment of tooth #16. Yet, the lesion was still discharging and the patient was scheduled for surgery. Histopathologic analysis of the lesion showed actinomycosis infection. A 36-month follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic healing. PMID:26535411

  17. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-12-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case. PMID:27559354

  18. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-01-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case. PMID:27559354

  19. Gingival pigmentation by Ni-Cr-based metal ceramic crowns: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Tian, Min; Ma, Sai; Niu, Lina; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes treatment of a patient with gingival pigmentation after the restoration of the right maxillary canine and first premolar with Ni-Cr-based metal ceramic crowns and investigation of mechanisms of gingival discoloration. Histopathological observation and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis of the retrieved pigmented gingiva revealed brown deposits both in the epithelial cells and along the basement membranes but no trace of Ni or Cr elements in the pigmented particles, indicating that the gingival pigmentation adjacent to the Ni-Cr-based metal ceramic prosthesis may not be caused by direct deposition of the released ions. PMID:26548874

  20. [Ethical issues in a market dispute between clinical laboratories and a health plan: case report].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Malone Santos; de Brito, Ana Maria Guedes; Jeraldo, Verônica de Lourdes Sierpe; Pinheiro, Kariny Souza

    2011-01-01

    In Brazil the private health plans appear as an alternative to the public health assistance. This segment suffered great intensification in the seventies and eighties, culminating in the entry of large insurance company in the scenario of supplementary medicine. Quickly, the service providers associated with these insurance companies, consolidating them in the market and triggering a relationship of dependency. This article analyzed, in the form of a case report, a marketing dispute between clinical laboratories and a health plan, emphasizing the moral and ethical aspects involved in this episode.

  1. A novel speech prosthesis for mandibular guidance therapy in hemimandibulectomy patient: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Adaki, Raghavendra; Shigli, Kamal; Hormuzdi, Dinshaw M.; Gali, Sivaranjani

    2016-01-01

    Treating diverse maxillofacial patients poses a challenge to the maxillofacial prosthodontist. Rehabilitation of hemimandibulectomy patients must aim at restoring mastication and other functions such as intelligible speech, swallowing, and esthetics. Prosthetic methods such as palatal ramp and mandibular guiding flange reposition the deviated mandible. Such prosthesis can also be used to restore speech in case of patients with debilitating speech following surgical resection. This clinical report gives detail of a hemimandibulectomy patient provided with an interim removable dental speech prosthesis with composite resin flange for mandibular guidance therapy. PMID:27041917

  2. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-12-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case.

  3. Energy engineering analysis program, Ainsworth Clinic, Fort Hamilton, New York: executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1986-01-01

    This report reflects a joint effort between the field investigation team and the Clinic staff. The scope of this study included the following objectives: (1) Perform a complete energy audit and analysis of the entire facility. (2) Identify all energy conservation opportunities, including low cost/no cost items and perform complete evaluations of each. (3) Prepare programming documentation for all energy conservation investment program projects including DD Form 1391, a life cycle cost analysis summary sheet with backup calculations and a Project Development Brochure. (4) Prepare implementation documentation for all justifiable energy conservation opportunities. (5) List and prioritize all recommended energy conservation opportunities.

  4. Unicystic Ameloblastoma of Mandible Treated with an Innovative Approach: A Clinical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Narendra; Charles, Nsc; Rai, Raj; Mathur, Smita; Runwal, Sameer Hemant

    2015-07-01

    Ameloblastoma is a true benign neoplasm with its origin from remnants of odontogenic epithelium. Unicystic ameloblastoma presents as a cystic lesion which clinically, radiographically, and macroscopically mimics a mandibular cyst, but microscopically exhibits ameloblastic epithelium lining part of the cyst cavity, with or without intraluminal growth and tumour infiltration into the fibrous connective tissue wall. An important and perplexing aspect associated with ameloblastoma is its management. We hereby present a case of unicystic ameloblastoma in a 63-year-old female and report an innovative technique of treating the case with split iliac crest graft.

  5. Unicystic Ameloblastoma of Mandible Treated with an Innovative Approach: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Charles, NSC; Rai, Raj; Mathur, Smita; Runwal, Sameer Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a true benign neoplasm with its origin from remnants of odontogenic epithelium. Unicystic ameloblastoma presents as a cystic lesion which clinically, radiographically, and macroscopically mimics a mandibular cyst, but microscopically exhibits ameloblastic epithelium lining part of the cyst cavity, with or without intraluminal growth and tumour infiltration into the fibrous connective tissue wall. An important and perplexing aspect associated with ameloblastoma is its management. We hereby present a case of unicystic ameloblastoma in a 63-year-old female and report an innovative technique of treating the case with split iliac crest graft. PMID:26393220

  6. Full Mouth Rehabilitation of an Ectodermal Dysplasia Patient with Implant-Supported Prostheses: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghoveizi, Rahab; Siadat, Hakimeh; Nikzad, Sakineh; Ommati Shabestari, Ghasem; Soleimani Shayesteh, Yadolah

    2013-01-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation in patients with ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is difficult to manage, especially because the afflicted individuals are quite young when they are evaluated for treatment; therefore, esthetics is an important concern. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a 19-year-old girl diagnosed with ectodermal dysplasia. Eleven implants were placed in the maxilla and mandible along with bone grafting to the upper jaw and both arches were constructed by metal-ceramic implant-supported fixed prostheses. This treatment plan seems to be favorable for ED patients. PMID:25512756

  7. Full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Guo, Juanli; Reside, Glenn; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2011-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic condition caused by stomach acid regurgitating into the esophagus or oral cavity, often causing heartburn. Tooth erosion and wear are common oral manifestations of GERD. This clinical report describes the full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with over 30 years of GERD, causing wear of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth, along with complications associated with past restorations. Full-mouth rehabilitation of natural teeth in conjunction with dental implants was selected as the treatment option. Ideal occlusal design and optimal esthetics, along with reinforcement of oral hygiene, ensure a favorable prognosis.

  8. Reinforcement of thin-walled root canal structures for placement of esthetic dowels: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2011-01-01

    Thin-walled root canals always present a challenge to dentists to select a restorative treatment that does not further weaken the thin tooth structure. The prognosis of dowel and core restorations can be unpredictable. This clinical report describes the treatment of a patient with extensive caries extending into the root canal of an endodontically treated maxillary central incisor. The use of a flowable composite resin in combination with a quartz fiber reinforced post is described, resulting in the rehabilitation of a structurally compromised root canal with satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes.

  9. Clinical and Histopathologic Investigation of Periapical Actinomycosis with Cutaneous Lesion: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Davood; Moazami, Fariborz; Sobhnamayan, Fereshteh; Taheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Management of an extra-radicular infection is a challenging procedure that requires surgical intervention. This report describes a patient with discharging cutaneous lesion that required apical surgery. A 40-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Endodontics, Shiraz Dental School with chief complaint of a cutaneous sinus tract. She had been treated by a dermatologist and an otolaryngologist. The patient had also received orthograde root canal treatment of tooth #16. Yet, the lesion was still discharging and the patient was scheduled for surgery. Histopathologic analysis of the lesion showed actinomycosis infection. A 36-month follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic healing. PMID:26535411

  10. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  11. [Actual diet of patients with gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Loranskaia, T I; Shakhovskaia, A K; Pavliuchkova, M S

    2000-01-01

    The study of actual nutrition of patients with erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal zone and of patients with operated ulcer has revealed defects in intake of essential nutrients by these patients: overeating of animal fat and refined carbohydrates, deficiency of oil, vitamins A, B2, C, D and food fibers.

  12. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  13. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  14. Teenagers' Perceived and Actual Probabilities of Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namerow, Pearila Brickner; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Explored adolescent females' (N=425) actual and perceived probabilities of pregnancy. Subjects estimated their likelihood of becoming pregnant the last time they had intercourse, and indicated the dates of last intercourse and last menstrual period. Found that the distributions of perceived probability of pregnancy were nearly identical for both…

  15. Clinical and laboratory features of Streptococcus salivarius meningitis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Features of Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T.; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  17. Reporting of allocation method and statistical analyses that deal with bilaterally affected wrists in clinical trials for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Page, Matthew J; O'Connor, Denise A; Pitt, Veronica; Massy-Westropp, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    The authors aimed to describe how often the allocation method and the statistical analyses that deal with bilateral involvement are reported in clinical trials for carpal tunnel syndrome and to determine whether reporting has improved over time. Forty-two trials identified from recently published systematic reviews were assessed. Information about allocation method and statistical analyses was obtained from published reports and trialists. Only 15 trialists (36%) reported the method of random sequence generation used, and 6 trialists (14%) reported the method of allocation concealment used. Of 25 trials including participants with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, 17 (68%) reported the method used to allocate the wrists, whereas only 1 (4%) reported using a statistical analysis that appropriately dealt with bilateral involvement. There was no clear trend of improved reporting over time. Interventions are needed to improve reporting quality and statistical analyses of these trials so that these can provide more reliable evidence to inform clinical practice.

  18. An approach to biomimetics: the natural CAD/CAM restoration: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Schlichting, Kathryn Klemz; Stanley, Kyle; Magne, Michel; Magne, Pascal

    2014-02-01

    Those in the dental field have always pursued the perfect dental material for the treatment of compromised teeth. Gold, amalgam, composite resin, glass ionomer, and porcelain have been used. Tooth-like restorative materials (composite resin and porcelain) combined with an effective hard tissue bond have met the growing demand for esthetic or metal-free restorations in the past 15 to 20 years. However, none of those materials can fully mimic the unique properties of dentin (compliance and crack-stopping behavior) and enamel (wear resistance, function). The aim of this article is to report the restoration of an extensively damaged tooth with a natural restoration obtained by milling an extracted third molar tooth with a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. The main benefit of this novel technique is the replacement of lost tissues by actual enamel and dentin, with the potential to recover mechanical, esthetic, and biologic properties. The indication for extracting third molars and premolars because of impaction or for orthodontic reasons makes these posterior teeth readily available. The innovation of the method presented here is the optimal use of the extracted tooth substrate thanks to its positioning technique in the CAD/CAM milling chamber.

  19. Extensible Stylesheet Language Formatting Objects (XSL-FO): a tool to transform patient data into attractive clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Simonaitis, Linas; Belsito, Anne; Warvel, Jeff; Hui, Siu; McDonald, Clement J

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians at Wishard Hospital in Indianapolis print and carry clinical reports called "Pocket Rounds". This paper describes a new process we developed to improve these clinical reports. The heart of our new process is a World Wide Web Consortium standard: Extensible Stylesheet Language Formatting Objects (XSL-FO). Using XSL-FO stylesheets we generated Portable Document Format (PDF) and PostScript reports with complex formatting: columns, tables, borders, shading, indents, dividing lines. We observed patterns of clinical report printing during a eight month study period on three Medicine wards. Usage statistics indicated that clinicians accepted the new system enthusiastically: 78% of 26,418 reports were printed using the new system. We surveyed 67 clinical users. Respondents gave the new reports a rating of 4.2 (on a 5 point scale); they gave the old reports a rating of 3.4. The primary complaint was that it took longer to print the new reports. We believe that XSL-FO is a promising way to transform text data into functional and attractive clinical reports: relatively easy to implement and modify.

  20. Photoallergic contact dermatitis to musk ambrette. Clinical report of two patients with persistent light reactor patterns.

    PubMed

    Giovinazzo, V J; Harber, L C; Armstrong, R B; Kochevar, I E

    1980-10-01

    Two male patients with photoallergic contact dermatitis to musk ambrette, 2-methoxy-3,5-dinitro-4-methyl-t-butylbenzene, are reported. Musk ambrette is a synthetic fragrance material commonly used in foods and cosmetics. The clinical distribution of lesions presented by these patients strongly suggested an adverse reaction to light. Over a period of several years no etiology had been determined in these cases despite extensive testing and hospitalization. Photopatch tests to musk ambrette were positive. No other etiology for photosensitivity was found. This report emphasizes that exposure to household or cosmetic products represents a potential source of contact photosensitivity. Patients presenting with dermatoses of unknown origin confined to the light-exposed areas should have fragrances considered as possible etiologic agents.

  1. Clinical Assessment of Affective Instability: Comparing EMA indices, questionnaire reports, and retrospective recall

    PubMed Central

    Solhan, Marika B.; Trull, Timothy J.; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional self-report measures of psychopathology may be influenced by a variety of recall biases. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) reduces these biases by assessing individuals' experiences as they occur in their natural environments. This study examines the discrepancy between trait questionnaire, retrospective report, and EMA measures of affective instability in psychiatric outpatients either with a borderline personality diagnosis (BPD; n=58) or with a current major depressive episode or dysthymia (MDD/DYS; n=42). We examined the agreement of three trait measures of affective instability (Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features scale – Affective Instability scale, Affect Intensity Measure, and the Affect Lability Scales) and one retrospective mood recall task with EMA indices of mood and mood instability. Results indicate only modest to moderate agreement between momentary and questionnaire assessments of trait affective instability; agreement between recalled mood changes and EMA indices was poor. Implications for clinical research and practice and possible applications of EMA methodology are discussed. PMID:19719353

  2. Prosthetic improvement of pronounced buccally positioned zygomatic implants: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Ataís; Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes dos; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio de Arruda; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2014-08-01

    This report presents a prosthetic technique for the improvement of surgically positioned, buccally placed zygomatic implants with the use of custom abutments for improved retention screw position and an esthetic implant reconstruction. The patient presented four zygomatic implants with pronounced buccal inclination. The anterior implants were inclined toward the location where the anterior artificial teeth should be placed during rehabilitation. As the manufacturer does not provide angulated abutments, we attempted the waxing and overcasting of a prosthetic abutment, repositioning the access holes of the prosthetic screws to a more palatal position. This clinical report demonstrates that abutment customization could be an interesting way to relocate the access holes of the prosthetic screws in cases of zygomatic implants with pronounced buccal inclination.

  3. A Case Report of IgG4-Related Disease Clinically Mimicking Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In Ho; Jang, Si-Hyong; Lee, Seungeun; Kim, Tae-Sung; Chung, Man-Pyo

    2014-01-01

    An immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is a recently emerging entity, and a few cases of IgG4-related disease in lung and pleura have been reported. Herein, we report the case of a 74-year-old man with IgG4-related disease of lung and pleura, clinically suspicious of malignant mesothelioma. Chest computed tomography showed diffuse nodular pleural thickening, and microscopic finding disclosed diffuse thickening of visceral pleura with infiltrations of many lymphoplasma cells with increased number of IgG4-positive plasma cells and a few multinucleated giant cells. It is important for pathologists and clinicians to recognize this rare entity and its histologic finding, because it can be confused with malignant tumors on the radiologic examination although it can be treated with steroid therapy. PMID:24523818

  4. Oral Lesion as the first Clinical Presentation in Sarcoidosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Al-Azri, Abdul Rahman S; Logan, Richard M; Goss, Alastair N

    2012-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a common multi-system disease characterized histolopathologically by the formation of non-caseating granulomas in the affected tissues. The oral involvement of sarcoidosis is relatively rare with less than 70 reported cases in literature while an oral lesion as the initial presenting sign is even less common. Oral lesions of sarcoidosis may mimic the lesions of other serious systemic diseases including Crohn's disease and tuberculosis as well as lesions localized to the orofacial region such as orofacial granulomatosis. This report presents a case of non-progressive sarcoidosis where the initial presenting symptom was a lesion in the buccal vestibule attached to the gingivae. A brief review of the pathology and clinical features is also presented.

  5. ‘Trial Exegesis’: Methods for Synthesizing Clinical and Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) Data in Trials to Inform Clinical Practice. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Rhiannon C.; Blencowe, Natalie S.; Brookes, Sara T.; Blazeby, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The CONSORT extension for patient reported outcomes (PROs) aims to improve reporting, but guidance on the optimal integration with clinical data is lacking. This study examines in detail the reporting of PROs and clinical data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in gastro-intestinal cancer to inform design and reporting of combined PRO and clinical data from trials to improve the ‘take home’ message for clinicians to use in practice. Materials and Methods The case study was undertaken in gastro-intestinal cancer trials. Well-conducted RCTs reporting PROs with validated instruments were identified and categorized into those combining PRO and clinical data in a single paper, or those separating data into linked primary and supplemental papers. Qualitative methods were developed to examine reporting of the critical interpretation of the trial results (trial exegesis) in the papers in relation of the PRO and clinical outcomes and applied to each publication category. Results were used to inform recommendations for practice. Results From 1917 screened abstracts, 49 high quality RCTs were identified reported in 36 combined and 15 linked primary and supplemental papers. In-depth analysis of manuscript text identified three categories for understanding trial exegesis: where authors reported a “detailed”, “general”, or absent PRO rationale and integrated interpretation of clinical and PRO results. A total of 11 (30%) and 6 (16%) combined papers reported “detailed” PRO rationale and integrated interpretation of results although only 2 (14%) and 1 (7%) primary papers achieved the same standard respectively. Supplemental papers provide better information with 11 (73%) and 3 (20%) achieving “detailed” rationale and integrated interpretation of results. Supplemental papers, however, were published a median of 20 months after the primary RCT data in lower impact factor journals (median 16.8 versus 5.2). Conclusion It is recommended that single

  6. Quality of Reporting of Randomized Clinical Trials in Tai Chi Interventions—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Yuan-Fen; Smith, Gordon S.; Xue, Chuan-Jiang; Luo, Yan-Nan; Chen, Wei-Heng; Skinner, Craig J.; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the reporting quality of published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in the Tai Chi literature following the publication of the CONSORT guidelines in 2001. Data Sources. The OVID MEDLINE and PUBMED databases. Review Methods. To survey the general characteristics of Tai Chi RCTs in the literature, we included any report if (i) it was an original report of the trial; (ii) its design was RCT; (iii) one of the treatments being tested was Tai Chi; and (iv) it was in English. In addition, we assessed the reporting quality of RCTs that were published between 2002 and 2007, using a modified CONSORT checklist of 40 items. The adequate description of Tai Chi interventions in these trials was examined against a 10-item checklist adapted from previous reviews. Results. The search yielded 31 Tai Chi RCTs published from 2002 to 2007 and only 11 for 1992–2001. Among trials published during 2002–2007, the most adequately reported criteria were related to background, participant eligibility and interpretation of the study results. Nonetheless, the most poorly reported items were associated with randomization allocation concealment, implementation of randomization and the definitions of period of recruitment and follow-up. In addition, only 23% of RCTs provided adequate details of Tai Chi intervention used in the trials. Conclusion. The findings in this review indicated that the reporting quality of Tai Chi intervention trials is sub-optimal. Substantial improvement is required to meet the CONSORT guidelines and allow assessment of the quality of evidence. We believe that not only investigators, but also journal editors, reviewers and funding agencies need to follow the CONSORT guidelines to improve the standards of research and strengthen the evidence base for Tai Chi and for complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:19351709

  7. Correlating clinical manifestations with factor levels in rare bleeding disorders: a report from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Viswabandya, A; Baidya, S; Nair, S C; Abraham, A; George, B; Mathews, V; Chandy, M; Srivastava, A

    2012-05-01

    Data on the clinical manifestations of patients with clotting factor defects other than Haemophilia A, B and von Willebrand disease are limited because of their rarity. Due to their autosomal recessive nature of inheritance, these diseases are more common in areas where there is higher prevalence of consanguinity. There is no previous large series reported from southern India where consanguinity is common. Our aim was to analyze clinical manifestations of patients with rare bleeding disorders and correlate their bleeding symptoms with corresponding factor level. Data were collected in a standardized format from our centre over three decades on 281 patients who were diagnosed with rare bleeding disorders (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V (FV), FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV or FVIII deficiency). Patients with liver dysfunction or those on medications which can affect factor level were excluded. All patients with <50% factor levels were included in this analysis. Patients were analysed for their salient clinical manifestations and it was correlated with their factor levels. The data shows that FXIII deficiency is the commonest and FXI deficiency is the rarest in Southern India. There was no significant difference in bleeding symptoms among those who were < or >1% factor coagulant activities among all disorders, except for few symptoms in FVII and FX deficiency. An international collaborative study is essential to find out the best way of classifying severity in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

  8. Full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with severe deep bite: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Gulfem; Yucel, Ayse Seda

    2014-07-01

    Increasing the vertical dimension is essential to resolving problems associated with deep bite. Restorative dentistry, orthodontia, and oral surgery are the three disciplines that can help to gain the vertical dimension necessary in these patients. This clinical report presents the results of increasing vertical dimension with a full-mouth restorative treatment procedure for a 40-year-old male patient who exhibited severe deep bite. After clinical evaluation, extraoral examination showed a reduction of the lower facial height and protuberant lips, wrinkles, drooping, and overclosed commissures. In addition, intraoral examination showed a severe anterior deep-bite articulation, and upper incisors were in contact with the lower incisor labial tissue. A removable partial denture was made at increased occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) to use in the first stage of rehabilitation. Diagnostic wax-up was performed at the increased vertical dimension. Then, provisional crowns were fabricated according to this increased vertical dimension. Interim prostheses were used for 3 months as a guide for preparing the definitive restorations. The adaptation of the patient to the increased OVD was evaluated. During this period, he was asymptomatic. Following the evaluation period, definitive restorations were completed, and routine clinical assessments were made after 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, then after 1 and 2 years with visual and radiographic examinations.

  9. Extension of the clinical range of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: report of six cases

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooi, A J; Visser, M; Rosenberg, N; van den Berg-Vos, R; Wokke, J; Bakker, E; de Visser, M

    2000-01-01

    Consensual diagnostic criteria for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) include onset of the disease in facial or shoulder girdle muscles, facial weakness in more than 50% of affected family members, autosomal dominant inheritance in familial cases, and evidence of myopathic disease in at least one affected member without biopsy features specific to alternative diagnoses.
 Six patients did not meet most of these criteria but were diagnosed as FSHD by DNA testing, which showed small EcoRI fragments on chromosome 4q.
 Their clinical signs and symptoms and results of auxiliary investigations are reported. The patients presented with foot extensor, thigh, or calf muscle weakness. None of them had apparent facial weakness, only one complained of weakness in the shoulders, none had a positive family history. Expert physical examination, however, showed a typical facial expression, an abnormal shoulder configuration on lifting the arms, or scapular winging. This raised the suspicion of FSHD, whereupon DNA analysis was done. In conclusion, the clinical expression of FSHD is much broader than indicated by the nomenclature. The possibility to perform DNA tests is likely to greatly expand the clinical range of FSHD.

 PMID:10864616

  10. Allergic proctocolitis: the clinical evolution of a transitory disease with a familial trend. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Fagundes-Neto, Ulysses; Ganc, Arnaldo José

    2013-01-01

    Allergic colitis is a clinical manifestation of food allergy during the first months of life. It is estimated that genetic factors play a role in the expression of this allergic disease. This case report described the clinical progress of infants who were cousins from two distinct family groups with allergic colitis. Five infants under six months of age and of both sexes were studied, with a diagnosis of allergic colitis characterized clinically and histologically by (1) rectal bleeding; (2) exclusion of infectious causes of colitis; (3) disappearance of symptoms after elimination of cow's milk and dairy products from the child's and/or the mother's diet. Patients were submitted to the following diagnostic investigation: complete blood count; stool culture; parasitologic examination of stools; rectoscopy or colonoscopy; and rectal biopsy. Patient age varied from 40 days to six months; three were males. All patients presented with complaints of intense colic and rectal bleeding. The colonoscopy showed presence of hyperemia of the mucosa with microerosions and spontaneous bleeding upon the procedure. Microscopy revealed the existence of colitis with eosinophilia > 20 e/HPF. Patients were treated with a hypoallergenic formula and showed remission of symptoms. After one year of age, all were submitted to an oral challenge with a milk formula and presented food tolerance. Allergic colitis is a disease with evident genetic inheritance and a temporary character. PMID:23843067

  11. First Report of an Extensively Drug-Resistant VIM-2 Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Brevundimonas diminuta Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Almuzara, Marisa N.; Barberis, Claudia M.; Rodríguez, Carlos H.; Famiglietti, Angela M. R.; Ramirez, Maria S.

    2012-01-01

    In the literature, only three Brevundimonas diminuta environmental isolates carrying metallo-β-lactamase genes were recently published. However, so far, no B. diminuta clinical isolates carrying these carbapenem resistance genes have been described. Here we report the first VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamase-producing B. diminuta clinical isolate obtained from an immunocompromised patient. PMID:22692741

  12. [Hemolytic thrombectomy and stenting of the superior mesenteric artery in acute mesenteric thrombosis (a clinical case report)].

    PubMed

    Shipovskiĭ, V N; Tsitsiashvili, M Sh; Khuan, Ch; Piliposian, E A

    2010-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report concerning successful rheolytic thrombectomy (using the AngioJet catheter) followed by stenting and having yielded a good angiographic and clinical outcome in a female patient suffering from thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery.

  13. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  14. Malignant infiltrating intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with internal fistula: one case report and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Liang; Meng, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Wen-Ce; Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a rare tumor that originates in the pancreatic duct. The diagnosis of benign, borderline or malignant to IPMN is significant in terms of making an appropriate treatment plan and prognosis. This article summarizes our clinical experience of a case report and discussion by literature review. Methods and case report: A 73 year old male patient was admitted for an occupying lesion of the pancreas. The magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) scan considered IPMN, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) also confirmed diagnosis of IPMN. Both the biliary and pancreatic duct stents were replaced, but we did not obtain any evidence by cytological evaluation. One month later, ERCP and intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) showed infiltrating growth of the tumor. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided fine-needle aspiration was performed at the same time, and pathological diagnosis was suggested as borderline IPMN. Results: In the absence of pathological support, the patient presented with the clinical diagnosis of infiltrating intraductal papillary mucinous adenocarcinoma (IPMC) and was recommended for surgery. However, the patient and his family refused surgery, and were discharged. Subsequently, the patient died 6.5 months (197 days) following first diagnosis. Conclusions: Currently, the definition and classification of IPMN is done by specification, although there remain some difficulties in diagnosing its subtypes. For diagnostic purposes, CT, MRCP, ERCP, IDUS, EUS and EUS-FNA can all be applied. Cytological negative pathology might not completely rule out malignancy, and would still require further examination and follow-up. PMID:26885135

  15. The Importance of Medication Errors Reporting in Improving the Quality of Clinical Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Elden, Nesreen Mohamed Kamal; Ismail, Amira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medication errors have significant implications on patient safety. Error detection through an active management and effective reporting system discloses medication errors and encourages safe practices. Objectives: To improve patient safety through determining and reducing the major causes of medication errors (MEs), after applying tailored preventive strategies. Methodology: A pre-test, post-test study was conducted on all inpatients at a 177 bed hospital where all medication procedures in each ward were monitored by a clinical pharmacist. The patient files were reviewed, as well. Error reports were submitted to a hospital multidisciplinary committee to identify major causes of errors. Accordingly, corrective interventions that consisted of targeted training programs for nurses and physicians were conducted. Results: Medication errors were higher during ordering/prescription stage (38.1%), followed by administration phase (20.9%). About 45% of errors reached the patients: 43.5% were harmless and 1.4% harmful. 7.7% were potential errors and more than 47% could be prevented. After the intervention, error rates decreased from (6.7%) to (3.6%) (P≤0.001). Conclusion: The role of a ward based clinical pharmacist with a hospital multidisciplinary committee was effective in recognizing, designing and implementing tailored interventions for reduction of medication errors. A systematic approach is urgently needed to decrease organizational susceptibility to errors, through providing required resources to monitor, analyze and implement effective interventions. PMID:27045415

  16. Hand hygiene-related clinical trials reported since 2010: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kingston, L; O'Connell, N H; Dunne, C P

    2016-04-01

    Considerable emphasis is currently placed on reducing healthcare-associated infection through improving hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals. There is also increasing discussion in the lay media of perceived poor hand hygiene compliance among healthcare staff. Our aim was to report the outcomes of a systematic search for peer-reviewed, published studies - especially clinical trials - that focused on hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals. Literature published between December 2009, after publication of the World Health Organization (WHO) hand hygiene guidelines, and February 2014, which was indexed in PubMed and CINAHL on the topic of hand hygiene compliance, was searched. Following examination of relevance and methodology of the 57 publications initially retrieved, 16 clinical trials were finally included in the review. The majority of studies were conducted in the USA and Europe. The intensive care unit emerged as the predominant focus of studies followed by facilities for care of the elderly. The category of healthcare worker most often the focus of the research was the nurse, followed by the healthcare assistant and the doctor. The unit of analysis reported for hand hygiene compliance was 'hand hygiene opportunity'; four studies adopted the 'my five moments for hand hygiene' framework, as set out in the WHO guidelines, whereas other papers focused on unique multimodal strategies of varying design. We concluded that adopting a multimodal approach to hand hygiene improvement intervention strategies, whether guided by the WHO framework or by another tested multimodal framework, results in moderate improvements in hand hygiene compliance. PMID:26853369

  17. Hand hygiene-related clinical trials reported since 2010: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kingston, L; O'Connell, N H; Dunne, C P

    2016-04-01

    Considerable emphasis is currently placed on reducing healthcare-associated infection through improving hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals. There is also increasing discussion in the lay media of perceived poor hand hygiene compliance among healthcare staff. Our aim was to report the outcomes of a systematic search for peer-reviewed, published studies - especially clinical trials - that focused on hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals. Literature published between December 2009, after publication of the World Health Organization (WHO) hand hygiene guidelines, and February 2014, which was indexed in PubMed and CINAHL on the topic of hand hygiene compliance, was searched. Following examination of relevance and methodology of the 57 publications initially retrieved, 16 clinical trials were finally included in the review. The majority of studies were conducted in the USA and Europe. The intensive care unit emerged as the predominant focus of studies followed by facilities for care of the elderly. The category of healthcare worker most often the focus of the research was the nurse, followed by the healthcare assistant and the doctor. The unit of analysis reported for hand hygiene compliance was 'hand hygiene opportunity'; four studies adopted the 'my five moments for hand hygiene' framework, as set out in the WHO guidelines, whereas other papers focused on unique multimodal strategies of varying design. We concluded that adopting a multimodal approach to hand hygiene improvement intervention strategies, whether guided by the WHO framework or by another tested multimodal framework, results in moderate improvements in hand hygiene compliance.

  18. Extracting PICO Sentences from Clinical Trial Reports using Supervised Distant Supervision

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Byron C.; Kuiper, Joël; Sharma, Aakash; Zhu, Mingxi (Brian); Marshall, Iain J.

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews underpin Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) by addressing precise clinical questions via comprehensive synthesis of all relevant published evidence. Authors of systematic reviews typically define a Population/Problem, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (a PICO criteria) of interest, and then retrieve, appraise and synthesize results from all reports of clinical trials that meet these criteria. Identifying PICO elements in the full-texts of trial reports is thus a critical yet time-consuming step in the systematic review process. We seek to expedite evidence synthesis by developing machine learning models to automatically extract sentences from articles relevant to PICO elements. Collecting a large corpus of training data for this task would be prohibitively expensive. Therefore, we derive distant supervision (DS) with which to train models using previously conducted reviews. DS entails heuristically deriving ‘soft’ labels from an available structured resource. However, we have access only to unstructured, free-text summaries of PICO elements for corresponding articles; we must derive from these the desired sentence-level annotations. To this end, we propose a novel method – supervised distant supervision (SDS) – that uses a small amount of direct supervision to better exploit a large corpus of distantly labeled instances by learning to pseudo-annotate articles using the available DS. We show that this approach tends to outperform existing methods with respect to automated PICO extraction. PMID:27746703

  19. Surgical Treatment of Peri-Implantitis: A 17-Year Follow-Up Clinical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Fabrizio; Poli, Pier Paolo; Rancitelli, Davide; Signorino, Fabrizio; Maiorana, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present case report was to describe the surgical treatment of a peri-implantitis lesion associated with a regenerative approach. A 48-year-old patient came to authors' attention 36 months after the placement of a dental implant (ITI-Bonefit Straumann, Waldenburg, Switzerland) in position 46. A swelling of the peri-implant soft tissues was observed, associated with bleeding on probing and probing depth > 10 mm. A significant peri-implant bone loss was clearly visible on the periapical radiograph. A nonsurgical periodontal supportive therapy was firstly conducted to reduce the inflammation, followed by the surgical treatment of the defect. After mechanical and chemical decontamination with tetracycline solution, a regenerative approach consisting in the application of deproteinized bovine bone mineral (Bio-Oss, Geistlich Pharma AG, Wolhusen, Switzerland) and a collagen membrane (Bio-Gide, Geistlich Pharma AG, Wolhusen, Switzerland) was performed. An antibiotic therapy was associated with the treatment. The 17-year follow-up showed a physiological probing depth with no clinical signs of peri-implant inflammation and bleeding on probing. No further radiographic bone loss was observed. The treatment described in the present case report seemed to show improved clinical results up to a relevant follow-up period. PMID:26064700

  20. Report of a new case with pentasomy X and novel clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    Demirhan, O; Tanriverdi, N; Yilmaz, MB; Kocaturk-Sel, S; Inandiklioglu, N; Luleyap, U; Akbal, E; Comertpay, G; Tufan, T; Dur, O

    2015-01-01

    Pentasomy X is an extremely rare sex chromosome abnormality, a condition that only affects females, in which three more X chromosomes are added to the normally present two chromosomes in females. We investigated the novel clinical findings in a 1-year-old female baby with pentasomy X, and determined the parental origins of the X chromosomes. Our case had thenar atrophy, postnatal growth deficiency, developmental delay, mongoloid slant, microcephaly, ear anomalies, micrognathia and congenital heart disease. A conventional cytogenetic technique was applied for the diagnosis of the polysomy X, and quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) using 11 inherited short tandem repeat (STR) alleles specific to the chromosome X for the determination of parental origin of X chromosomes. A cytogenetic evaluation revealed that the karyotype of the infant was 49,XXXXX. Comparison of the infant’s features with previously reported cases indicated a clinically recognizable specific pattern of malformations referred to as the pentasomy X syndrome. However, to the best of our know-ledge, this is the first report of thenar atrophy in a patient with 49,XXXXX. The molecular analysis suggested that four X chromosomes of the infant originated from the mother as a result of the non disjunction events in meiosis I and meiosis II. We here state that the clinical manifestations seen in our case were consistent with those described previously in patients with pentasomy X. The degree of early hypotonia constitutes an important early prognostic feature in this syndrome. The pathogenesis of pentasomy X is not clear at present, but it is thought to be caused by successive maternal non disjunctions. PMID:26929910

  1. Report on the RCDS-CDHSRU workshop on developing clinical guidelines/standards of practice.

    PubMed

    Leake, J L; Main, P A; Woodward, G L

    1996-07-01

    Investigators from the Community Dental Health Services Research Unit (CDHSRU) held a workshop to test a model for developing clinical guidelines/standards of practice, which are required under the Regulated Health Professions Legislation. Forty-two individuals from Ontario and Canada, including dentists, representatives of the public, and professionals, participated in the three-day workshop, held under the auspices of the quality assurance committee of the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario (RCDS). Through direct experience, workshop participants sought to learn each of the steps, as defined by the literature, involved in clinical guideline development. Ultimately, they hoped to recommend steps for RCDS to follow in developing standards of practice. To ensure that a realistic and valid model emerged from the workshop, a real topic, namely the management of smooth surface enamel lesions in permanent teeth, was used to develop and test clinical guidelines. Prior to the workshop, participants were sent literature on one of five aspects of the topic, as well as papers describing the methodology of critically appraising the literature, and partially-completed templates outlining the basic steps to be followed. During the first evening and first morning of the workshop, participants listened to presentations on the development of clinical guidelines, the prevalence of smooth surface lesions, the role of economics in guideline development, and the necessary considerations in writing clinical guidelines. Under the leadership of trained facilitators, they then worked in small groups to write evidence-based recommendations and report them to the other workshop participants for feedback. Using this feedback, they returned to their groups to revise their recommendations and work on the workshop's overall recommendations to the RCDS. The day concluded in the evening, when the workshop facilitators and coordinators met to edit the groups' recommendations into a

  2. Comparison of two data collection processes in clinical studies: electronic and paper case report forms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic Case Report Forms (eCRFs) are increasingly chosen by investigators and sponsors of clinical research instead of the traditional pen-and-paper data collection (pCRFs). Previous studies suggested that eCRFs avoided mistakes, shortened the duration of clinical studies and reduced data collection costs. Methods Our objectives were to describe and contrast both objective and subjective efficiency of pCRF and eCRF use in clinical studies. A total of 27 studies (11 eCRF, 16 pCRF) sponsored by the Paris hospital consortium, conducted and completed between 2001 and 2011 were included. Questionnaires were emailed to investigators of those studies, as well as clinical research associates and data managers working in Paris hospitals, soliciting their level of satisfaction and preferences for eCRFs and pCRFs. Mean costs and timeframes were compared using bootstrap methods, linear and logistic regression. Results The total cost per patient was 374€ ±351 with eCRFs vs. 1,135€ ±1,234 with pCRFs. Time between the opening of the first center and the database lock was 31.7 months Q1 = 24.6; Q3 = 42.8 using eCRFs, vs. 39.8 months Q1 = 31.7; Q3 = 52.2 with pCRFs (p = 0.11). Electronic CRFs were globally preferred by all (31/72 vs. 15/72 for paper) for easier monitoring and improved data quality. Conclusions This study found that eCRFs and pCRFs are used in studies with different patient numbers, center numbers and risk. The first ones are more advantageous in large, low–risk studies and gain support from a majority of stakeholders. PMID:24438227

  3. Reproducing Actual Morphology of Planetary Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Sasaki, S.

    1996-03-01

    Assuming that lava flows behave as non-isothermal laminar Bingham fluids, we developed a numerical code of lava flows. We take the self gravity effects and cooling mechanisms into account. The calculation method is a kind of cellular automata using a reduced random space method, which can eliminate the mesh shape dependence. We can calculate large scale lava flows precisely without numerical instability and reproduce morphology of actual lava flows.

  4. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  5. Essentials and guidelines for clinical medical physics residency training programs: executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Joann I; Willis, Charles E; Burmeister, Jay W; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Das, Rupak K; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Gerbi, Bruce J; Harkness, Beth A; Patton, James A; Peck, Donald J; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Sandison, George A; White, Sharon L; Wichman, Brian D; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Both, Stefan

    2014-05-08

    There is a clear need for established standards for medical physics residency training. The complexity of techniques in imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology continues to increase with each passing year. It is therefore imperative that training requirements and competencies are routinely reviewed and updated to reflect the changing environment in hospitals and clinics across the country. In 2010, the AAPM Work Group on Periodic Review of Medical Physics Residency Training was formed and charged with updating AAPM Report Number 90. This work group includes AAPM members with extensive experience in clinical, professional, and educational aspects of medical physics. The resulting report, AAPM Report Number 249, concentrates on the clinical and professional knowledge needed to function independently as a practicing medical physicist in the areas of radiation oncology, imaging, and nuclear medicine, and constitutes a revision to AAPM Report Number 90. This manuscript presents an executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

  6. Detecting psychological distress among patients attending secondary health care clinics. Self-report and physician rating.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D; Rabinowitz, J; Ben Yehuda, Y

    1995-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of psychological distress, as reported by patients and their physicians, in orthopedic, neurology, dermatology, and ophthalmology clinics; to study their accuracy in detecting psychological distress; and to determine if there is any connection among psychological distress, accuracy of detecting distress, and use of mental health and primary health care physicians' prognosis for the somatic complaints. Five hundred and fifty-six patients, ages 18-21, responded to the Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Demoralization Scale (PERI-D), a measure of psychological distress, and to questions about their mental health and use of mental health and primary health services. Physicians, who were blind to patients' responses, were asked to what extent they thought the cause of patients' complaints was physical and to what extent they thought it was psychological in nature, and to prognosticate. Based on the PERI-D, about 25% of patients were distressed, this was less for females than males and varied between clinics. Based on self-reporting, about 14% of patients (males and females) were distressed. Based on physician reporting, about 17% (males less) were distressed. Physicians identified 35% of the PERI-D-distressed cases and 79% of nondistressed cases. About 66% of patients identified their distress and 83% their lack of distress. Increased use of primary health care and mental health care was related to distress. The prognosis was negatively related to distress. Based on this study, there is a need for more attention to psychological distress among secondary health care patients. Patients' ability to identify their distress suggests the importance of involving the patient in the diagnostic process. Correct detection of distress alone does not appear to decrease the use of primary medical and mental health services. PMID:8714802

  7. Clinical characteristics of mephedrone toxicity reported to the UK National Poisons Information Service

    PubMed Central

    James, D; Adams, R D; Spears, R; Cooper, G; Lupton, D J; Thompson, J P

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe the patterns and clinical features of toxicity related to recreational use of mephedrone and other cathinones in the UK using data collected by the National Poisons Information Service (NPIS). Methods The number of accesses to TOXBASE, the NPIS online poisons information database, details of consecutive cases uploaded onto TOXBASE and the number and details of telephone enquiries made to the NPIS by health professionals in the UK were collected for the period March 2009 to February 2010. Results Over the year of study there were 2901 TOXBASE accesses and 188 telephone enquiries relating to cathinones, the majority relating to mephedrone (TOXBASE 1664, telephone 157), with a month-on-month increase in numbers. In 131 telephone enquiries concerning mephedrone, alone or in combination with alcohol, common clinical features reported included agitation or aggression (n=32, 24%, 95% CI 18% to 33%), tachycardia (n=29, 22%, 95% CI 16% to 30%), confusion or psychosis (n=18, 14%, 95% CI 9% to 21%), chest pain (n=17, 13%, 95% CI 8% to 20%), nausea (n=15, 11%, 95% CI 7% to 18%), palpitations (n=14, 11%, 95% CI 6% to 18%), peripheral vasoconstriction (n=10, 8%, 95% CI 4% to 14%) and headache (n=7, 5%, 95% CI 2% to 11%). Convulsions were reported in four cases (3%, 95% CI 1% to 8%). One exposed person died following cardiac arrest (1%, 95% CI 0% to 4%), although subsequent investigation suggested that mephedrone was not responsible. Conclusions Toxicity associated with recreational mephedrone use is increasingly common in the UK. Sympathomimetic adverse effects are common and severe effects are also reported. Structured data collected by the NPIS may be of use in identifying trends in poisoning and in establishing toxidromes for new drugs of abuse. PMID:20798084

  8. Measuring Disability in Population Based Surveys: The Interrelationship between Clinical Impairments and Reported Functional Limitations in Cameroon and India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between two distinct measures of disability: self-reported functional limitations and objectively-screened clinical impairments. Methods We undertook an all age population-based survey of disability in two areas: North-West Cameroon (August/October 2013) and Telangana State, India (Feb/April 2014). Participants were selected for inclusion via two-stage cluster randomised sampling (probability proportionate to size cluster selection and compact segment sampling within clusters). Disability was defined as the presence of self-reported functional limitations across eight domains, or presence of moderate or greater clinical impairments. Clinical impairment screening comprised of visual acuity testing for vision impairment, pure tone audiometry for hearing impairment, musculoskeletal functioning assessment for musculoskeletal impairment, reported seizure history for epilepsy and reported symptoms of clinical depression (depression adults only). Information was collected using structured questionnaires, observations and examinations. Results Self-reported disability prevalence was 5.9% (95% CI 4.7–7.4) and 7.5% (5.9–9.4) in Cameroon and India respectively. The prevalence of moderate or greater clinical impairments in the same populations were 8.4% (7.5–9.4) in Cameroon and 10.5% (9.4–11.7) in India. Overall disability prevalence (self-report and/or screened positive to a moderate or greater clinical impairment) was 10.5% in Cameroon and 12.2% in India, with limited overlap between the sub-populations identified using the two types of tools. 33% of participants in Cameroon identified to have a disability, and 45% in India, both reported functional limitations and screened positive to objectively-screened impairments, whilst the remainder were identified via one or other tool only. A large proportion of people with moderate or severe clinical impairments did not self-report functional difficulties despite reporting

  9. 45 CFR 73.735-904 - Resolution of apparent or actual conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Resolution of apparent or actual conflicts of... ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Reporting Financial Interests § 73.735-904 Resolution of apparent or actual conflicts of interest. (a) Disqualification from participating in a particular matter or category of...

  10. Seizure reporting technologies for epilepsy treatment: A review of clinical information needs and supporting technologies.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Jonathan; Khuwatsamrit, Thanin; Askew, Brittain; Ehrenberg, Joshua Andrew; Helmers, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    This review surveys current seizure detection and classification technologies as they relate to aiding clinical decision-making during epilepsy treatment. Interviews and data collected from neurologists and a literature review highlighted a strong need for better distinguishing between patients exhibiting generalized and partial seizure types as well as achieving more accurate seizure counts. This information is critical for enabling neurologists to select the correct class of antiepileptic drugs (AED) for their patients and evaluating AED efficiency during long-term treatment. In our questionnaire, 100% of neurologists reported they would like to have video from patients prior to selecting an AED during an initial consultation. Presently, only 30% have access to video. In our technology review we identified that only a subset of available technologies surpassed patient self-reporting performance due to high false positive rates. Inertial seizure detection devices coupled with video capture for recording seizures at night could stand to address collecting seizure counts that are more accurate than current patient self-reporting during day and night time use.

  11. DOOR syndrome: clinical report, literature review and discussion of natural history.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Miranda, Suzette G; Culver, Kathy; Hall, Bryan D; Golabi, Mahin

    2007-12-01

    DOOR syndrome (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, and mental retardation) is a rarely described disorder with less than 35 reports in the literature. The hallmarks of the syndrome, represented in the DOOR acronym, include sensorineural hearing loss, hypoplastic or absent nails on the hands and feet, small or absent distal phalanges of the hands and feet, and mental retardation. The purpose of our communication is to report on an additional patient with DOOR syndrome, delineate common as well as less frequent manifestations of DOOR syndrome, bring attention to the under appreciated facial features in DOOR syndrome, document the natural history of this disorder, and propose a suggested workup of those suspected of DOOR syndrome. DOOR syndrome is associated with characteristic, coarse facial features with large nose with wide nasal bridge, bulbous tip and anteverted nares, a long prominent philtrum and downturned corners of the mouth. The natural history is one of a deteriorative course, with progressive neurological manifestations including sensorineural deafness, seizures from infancy, optic atrophy, and a peripheral polyneuropathy. The majority of patients with DOOR syndrome have elevated levels of 2-oxoglutarate in the urine and plasma. In this report, we present a newborn with manifestations consistent with DOOR syndrome and a progressive clinical course. A comprehensive literature review reveals 32 patients with DOOR syndrome. In conclusion, DOOR syndrome is a neurometabolic disorder with recognizable facial features and a progressive natural history.

  12. Radiologist-initiated double reading of abdominal CT: retrospective analysis of the clinical importance of changes to radiology reports

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Aamodt, Rolf; Heggelund, Thomas; Dahl, Fredrik A; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Hurlen, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Background Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals frequently request second reads by colleagues in real time. Our objective was to estimate the frequency of clinically important changes to radiology reports produced by these prospectively obtained double readings. Methods We retrospectively compared the preliminary and final reports from 1071 consecutive double-read abdominal CT examinations of surgical patients at five public hospitals in Norway. Experienced gastrointestinal surgeons rated the clinical importance of changes from the preliminary to final report. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged or decreased. Results Changes were classified as clinically important in 146 of 1071 reports (14%). Changes to 3 reports (0.3%) were critical (demanding immediate action), 35 (3%) were major (implying a change in treatment) and 108 (10%) were intermediate (requiring further investigations). The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 118 (81%) of the clinically important changes. Important changes were made less frequently when abdominal radiologists were first readers, more frequently when they were second readers, and more frequently to urgent examinations. Conclusion A 14% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and a targeted selection of urgent cases and radiologists reading outside their specialty may increase the yield of discrepant cases. PMID:27013638

  13. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: What is the actual risk of liver damage?

    PubMed Central

    Bessone, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) constitute a family of drugs, which taken as a group, represents one of the most frequently prescribed around the world. Thus, not surprisingly NSAIDs, along with anti-infectious agents, list on the top for causes of Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI). The incidence of liver disease induced by NSAIDs reported in clinical studies is fairly uniform ranging from 0.29/100 000 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.17-051] to 9/100 000 (95% CI: 6-15). However, compared with these results, a higher risk of liver-related hospitalizations was reported (3-23 per 100 000 patients). NSAIDs exhibit a broad spectrum of liver damage ranging from asymptomatic, transient, hyper-transaminasemia to fulminant hepatic failure. However, under-reporting of asymptomatic, mild cases, as well as of those with transient liver-tests alteration, in conjunction with reports non-compliant with pharmacovigilance criteria to ascertain DILI and flawed epidemiological studies, jeopardize the chance to ascertain the actual risk of NSAIDs hepatotoxicity. Several NSAIDs, namely bromfenac, ibufenac and benoxaprofen, have been withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity; others like nimesulide were never marketed in some countries and withdrawn in others. Indeed, the controversy concerning the actual risk of severe liver disease persists within NSAIDs research. The present work intends (1) to provide a critical analysis of the dissimilar results currently available in the literature concerning the epidemiology of NSAIDS hepatotoxicity; and (2) to review the risk of hepatotoxicity for each one of the most commonly employed compounds of the NSAIDs family, based on past and recently published data. PMID:21128314

  14. Evolution of the clinical review station for enterprise-wide multimedia radiology reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, William B.; Valtchinov, Vladimir I.; Davis, Scott D.; Lester, James; Khorasani, Ramin; Carrino, John A.; Benfield, Andrew

    2000-05-01

    Efforts to develop Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) for the last ten years have concentrated mainly on developing systems for primary interpretation of digital radiological images. Much less attention has been paid to the clinical aspects of the radiology process. Clinical radiology services are an important component of the overall care delivery process, providing information and consultation services to referring physicians, the customers of radiology, in a timely fashion to aid in care decisions. Information management systems (IMS) are playing an increasingly central role in the care delivery process. No suitable commercial PACS or IMS products were available that could effectively provide for the requirements of the clinicians. We endeavored to fill this void at our institution by developing a system to deliver images and text reports electronically on-demand to the referring physicians. This system has evolved substantially since initial deployment eight years ago. As new technologies become available they are evaluated and integrated as appropriate to improve system performance and manageability. Not surprisingly, the internet and World Wide Web (WWW) technology has had the greatest impact on system design in recent years. Additional features have been added over time to provide services for teleradiology, teaching, and research needs. We also discovered that these value-added services give us a competitive edge in attracting new business to our department. Commercial web-based products are now becoming available which do a satisfactory job of providing many of these clinical services. These products are evaluated for integration into our system as they mature. The result is a system that impacts positively on patient care.

  15. Communicating the results of randomized clinical trials: do patients understand multidimensional patient-reported outcomes?

    PubMed

    McNair, Angus G K; Brookes, Sara T; Davis, Christopher R; Argyropoulos, Miltiadis; Blazeby, Jane M

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE Evidence suggests that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) from randomized trials in oncology may not influence clinical decision making and patient choice. Reasons for this are currently unclear and little is known about patients' interpretation of PROs. This study assessed patients' understanding of multidimensional PROs in a graphical format. PATIENTS AND METHODS Semistructured interviews in which patients interpreted a series of graphs depicting simple, then multiple different hypothetical PROs associated with two treatments with identical chances of survival were audio recorded. The interviewer and a blinded observer (listening to audio recordings) scored patients' understanding of the graphs. Logistic regression examined the associations between patient understanding of the graphs and clinical and sociodemographic details. Results One hundred thirty-two patients with esophageal and gastric cancer were interviewed and 115 understood the first two graphs depicting different PROs of two treatments (87%; 95% CI,81 to 93). Simultaneous interpretation of adverse and beneficial treatment effects was achieved by 74 (66%; 95% CI, 57 to 75). Graphs showing complex, longitudinal data were correctly interpreted by 97 (73%; 95% CI, 66 to 81) and 108 (81%; 95% CI, 75 to 88), respectively. Univariable analyses demonstrated associations between patient understanding and patient age, educational level, and cancer site (P < or = .02 for all); however, in a multivariable model each of these associations was attenuated. CONCLUSION Most patients understand graphical multidimensional PROs, although a smaller majority were able to interpret more complex, or simultaneous, presentations. Additional work is needed to define methods for communicating clinical and PRO data from trials to allow patients to make informed treatment choices. PMID:20065187

  16. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM)

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. PMID:26188274

  17. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. PMID:26188274

  18. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard.

  19. Chronic Pulmonary Histoplasmosis and its Clinical Significance: an Under-reported Systemic Fungal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaish, Ritu; Palange, Padmavali; Bhoomagiri, Mohan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum. It is a dimorphic fungus which lives as a saprophyte in the environment and occasionally infects immunosuppressed people. H capsulatum is a ubiquitous fungus present throughout the globe and is more common in the temperate world. Human infection with H capsulatum occurs through respiratory route by inhalation of spores present in the air as droplet nuclei. Pulmonary histoplasmosis is difficult to diagnose, more so in the regions where tuberculosis is endemic, and many infected patients remain asymptomatic. In the case of immunosuppression, clinical symptoms of pulmonary infection may be seen along with chances of dissemination. We report a case of chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual. PMID:27688988

  20. Pharmacogenetics informed decision making in adolescent psychiatric treatment: a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  1. Passive archwires for intermaxillary fixation in surgical cases: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Alessandri Bonetti, Giulio; Incerti Parenti, Serena; Gracco, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    In intraoperative intermaxillary fixation (IMF), bonding a minimally adapted, rectangular, stainless steel, preformed archwire directly to the teeth with a light-cured composite resin can offer many benefits to clinicians and patients. The procedure is easier and less time-consuming than conventional bracket placement, the risk of occlusal interference is reduced and the patient's comfort is increased. With the use of composite resin, the wire fits buccal tooth surfaces accurately, thus creating a completely passive anchor unit. Crimpable hooks can be easily adjusted along the archwire, thus establishing different directions of postoperative elastic traction. Furthermore, this technique eliminates soft tissue injuries and tooth root damage, which are risks associated with the use of miniscrews for IMF. In this clinical report, we describe the case of a 50-year-old man, who required a passive anchor unit to assist IMF before undergoing maxillomandibular advancement to treat severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  2. Penile self-harm: a case report and concise clinical review.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Mutie; Donaldson, James; Royle, Justine

    2015-01-01

    Male genital self-mutilation is extremely rare and may be associated with severe psychopathology. This study reports the case of a 26-year-old man who presented after incising his prepuce with a knife and placing a rubber band around his foreskin. A plastic ring was also found underneath the prepuce. Clinical examination revealed a lateral preputial laceration with gross preputial oedema and dark red discoloration with a clear demarcation where the elastic band had been placed. A pelvic X-ray revealed no other foreign bodies. Following 72 h of observation he developed signs of preputial necrosis, which prompted urgent circumcision; this revealed a healthy underlying glans. In conclusion, male genital self-harm requires urgent urological and psychiatric assessments to prevent surgical and psychiatric sequelae including necrotizing fasciitis and suicide.

  3. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type II: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Priyanka; Sharda, Neelkamal; Bhowate, Rahul R.

    2013-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited genetic disease characterized by sclerosis of the skeleton caused by the absence or malfunction of osteoclasts. Three distinct forms of the disease have been recognized, autosomal dominant osteopetrosis being the most common. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis exhibits a heterogeneous trait with milder symptoms, often at later childhood or adulthood. The aim of this case report is to present the clinical and radiographic features of a 35-year-old female patient with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II who exhibited features of chronic generalised periodontitis, and the radiographs revealed generalised osteosclerosis and hallmark radiographic features of ADO type II, that is, “bone-within-bone appearance” and “Erlenmeyer-flask deformity.” PMID:24260721

  4. A clinical report of Type III dens invaginatus: relevant aspects of a combined therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Silva E Souza, Patricia de Almeida Rodrigues; de Almeida, Bruno Vila Nova; Tartari, Talita; Alves, Ana Claudia Braga Amoras; Tuji, Farbicio Mesquita; Silva E Souza, Mario Honorato

    2013-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental abnormality that alters dental morphology; as a result, treating this condition is a challenge for endodontic practices. This article describes how a combination of nonsurgical and surgical therapies was utilized to treat a maxillary central incisor with Type III dens invaginatus and vital pulp. The treatment plan included using computed tomography (CT) for a detailed analysis of the dental anatomy and periapical area, endodontic and surgical procedures, and a 4-year follow-up period that included periodic clinical and radiographic examinations. The follow-up examinations revealed a regression of the apical lesion and no other signs or symptoms. Based on the present case report, the authors concluded that this combination of surgical and nonsurgical approaches was effective and that CT is a valuable auxiliary tool for the study of dental anatomy.

  5. Dental management of early childhood caries in spastic quadriparesis: a case report and clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hotwani, Kavita; Sharma, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain. The motor disorders of CP are often accompanied by epilepsy, secondary musculoskeletal problems, and disturbances of sensation, perception, cognition, communication, and behavior. Spastic quadriparesis is the most severe form of spastic cerebral palsy. The present report describes the management of a 5-year-old patient with early childhood caries and spastic quadriparesis. The oral manifestations and clinical guidelines are discussed considering the special health care needs in these patients so as to provide comprehensive dental care. PMID:24705660

  6. Pharmacogenetics Informed Decision Making in Adolescent Psychiatric Treatment: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  7. A nonsurgical approach to treating aggressive inflammatory papillary hyperplasia: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, Noah P; Taylor, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Preprosthetic interventions in patients with aggressive forms of inflammatory papillary hyperplasia have historically involved surgery. These procedures often involve significant postoperative discomfort and morbidity. Additionally, some patients who present with dental phobias, aversions to surgery, or underlying systemic disease may not be amenable to this type of surgical intervention. In this report, a patient with severe inflammatory papillary hyperplasia and phobias regarding the dentist and dental surgery was treated nonsurgically, following strict adherence to a clinical protocol. The methodology involved greater patient comfort during treatment, encouraged positive reinforcement to visiting the dentist for recall appointments, and effectively eliminated the underlying inflammatory papillary hyperplasia, allowing for the successful fabrication of the definitive removable prostheses. PMID:24360006

  8. Clinical benefits of alpharadin in castrate-chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Croke, Jennifer; Leung, Eugene; Segal, Roanne; Malone, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer has the second-highest mortality worldwide in men. The most common site of metastasis is bone. Bone metastases and their resulting complications represent a significant source of morbidity. Radioisotopes have been used for treatment of painful bony metastases. Although shown to decrease pain and analgesia use, this has not improved outcomes. The following case report describes a patient with castrate-resistant prostate cancer who was treated with the radioisotope radium-223 as part of the phase III clinical trial Alpharadin in Patients with Symptomatic Hormone Refractory Prostate Cancer with Skeletal Metastases (ALSYMPCA). He responded to radium-223 with pain relief, bone scan response, stabilisation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and normalisation of alkaline phosphatase. Interim analysis of this trial has shown that radium-223 significantly prolongs overall survival, time to first skeletal-related event and is well tolerated. Alpharadin is a new treatment option for men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. PMID:23125297

  9. [Epidemiological and clinical findings in congenital heart diseases during the neonatal period. Report on personal cases].

    PubMed

    Distefano, G; Sciacca, P; Parisi, M G; Marletta, M; Mattia, C; Tornambene, G; Romeo, M G

    1997-01-01

    Cardiovascular impairment is frequent in the neonatal period and can be linked to malformative and non malformative pathologies. The Authors performed a retrospective study on the incidence of these two types of pathologies in a population of 3326 newborns who underwent cardiological examination. Malformative cardiopathy was observed in 779 (23.4%) of them, while non malformative cardiopathy was present in 316 (9.5%). Acyanogen forms (86.7%) were more common than cyanogen forms (13.2%) in malformative, while cyanogen forms (64.8%) were more frequent than acyanogen ones (35.1%) in non malformative cardiopathies. The Authors reviewed the incidence of the single cardiac defects and report some clinical and physiopathological considerations that underline the need for prompt differential diagnosis and the validity of echocardiography in achieving this aim.

  10. Chronic Pulmonary Histoplasmosis and its Clinical Significance: an Under-reported Systemic Fungal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kandi, Venkataramana; Vaish, Ritu; Palange, Padmavali; Bhoomagiri, Mohan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum. It is a dimorphic fungus which lives as a saprophyte in the environment and occasionally infects immunosuppressed people. H capsulatum is a ubiquitous fungus present throughout the globe and is more common in the temperate world. Human infection with H capsulatum occurs through respiratory route by inhalation of spores present in the air as droplet nuclei. Pulmonary histoplasmosis is difficult to diagnose, more so in the regions where tuberculosis is endemic, and many infected patients remain asymptomatic. In the case of immunosuppression, clinical symptoms of pulmonary infection may be seen along with chances of dissemination. We report a case of chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual. PMID:27688988

  11. [Dengue imported from Paraguay to Buenos Aires. Clinical and epidemiological report of 38 cases].

    PubMed

    Seijo, A; Cernigoi, B; Deodato, B

    2001-01-01

    Thirty eight patients with classic dengue fever, were studied from December 1999 up to April 2000. All of them acquired the infection in Paraguay; 66% of patients arrived at Buenos Aires metropolitan area within the viremia period. Given Aedes aegypti abundance in the region they represent a high risk for local transmission. Unusual clinical findings in these patients were diarrhea (29%), transitory rise of seric aspartate aminotransferase (52%) and pruritic rash in all cases. Only 15.7% showed a biphasic course and none of the five patients with hemorrhages had a positive loop test. These observations show that dengue fever could be misdiagnosed as gastroenteritis or flue-like illness. These patients remain at risk of suffering hemorrhagic dengue. DEN 1 has not been reported in Buenos Aires. This fact and the unusual number of imported cases, represent a serious public health problem.

  12. Fabrication of a screw-retained restoration avoiding the facial access hole: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gazaui, Sabrina; Razzoog, Michael; Sierraalta, Marianella; Saglik, Berna

    2015-11-01

    Dental implant restorations may be either screw-retained or cemented onto an abutment. While each method has its advantages and disadvantages, cemented restorations are commonly used in the maxillary arch, usually because of esthetic concerns. Available bone in the anterior maxilla dictates the placement of the implant, which may result in a facially positioned screw-access opening. Still, a growing volume of literature states that periimplant soft tissues respond more favorably to screw-retained crowns than cement-retained crowns. This clinical report outlines a treatment with a new method of fabricating a custom abutment-crown combination for a screw-retained restoration. The technique allows the channel for the screw to be placed at an angle other than parallel to the implant body. In this case, the practitioner may choose either a screw-retained or cement-retained implant restoration, where previously only a cemented restoration was possible. PMID:26344192

  13. A clinical report of Type III dens invaginatus: relevant aspects of a combined therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Silva E Souza, Patricia de Almeida Rodrigues; de Almeida, Bruno Vila Nova; Tartari, Talita; Alves, Ana Claudia Braga Amoras; Tuji, Farbicio Mesquita; Silva E Souza, Mario Honorato

    2013-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental abnormality that alters dental morphology; as a result, treating this condition is a challenge for endodontic practices. This article describes how a combination of nonsurgical and surgical therapies was utilized to treat a maxillary central incisor with Type III dens invaginatus and vital pulp. The treatment plan included using computed tomography (CT) for a detailed analysis of the dental anatomy and periapical area, endodontic and surgical procedures, and a 4-year follow-up period that included periodic clinical and radiographic examinations. The follow-up examinations revealed a regression of the apical lesion and no other signs or symptoms. Based on the present case report, the authors concluded that this combination of surgical and nonsurgical approaches was effective and that CT is a valuable auxiliary tool for the study of dental anatomy. PMID:23302365

  14. Chronic Pulmonary Histoplasmosis and its Clinical Significance: an Under-reported Systemic Fungal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaish, Ritu; Palange, Padmavali; Bhoomagiri, Mohan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum. It is a dimorphic fungus which lives as a saprophyte in the environment and occasionally infects immunosuppressed people. H capsulatum is a ubiquitous fungus present throughout the globe and is more common in the temperate world. Human infection with H capsulatum occurs through respiratory route by inhalation of spores present in the air as droplet nuclei. Pulmonary histoplasmosis is difficult to diagnose, more so in the regions where tuberculosis is endemic, and many infected patients remain asymptomatic. In the case of immunosuppression, clinical symptoms of pulmonary infection may be seen along with chances of dissemination. We report a case of chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual.

  15. Oral myofibromas: report of two cases and review of clinical and histopathologic differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Rebeca de Souza; Pires, Fábio Ramôa; Della Coletta, Ricardo; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte

    2008-06-01

    Myofibroma is a benign mesenchymal neoplasm composed of myofibroblasts which has been described with different synonyms since the first report in 1951. It may show clinical and histologic features that may be misinterpreted as a malignancy. We describe 2 cases of oral myofibromas affecting infants; the first one showed a rapid growth with teeth displacement and ulceration; the second one presented a relatively slow growth with an indolent course. Differential diagnosis included benign and malignant mesenchymal neoplasms, salivary gland tumors, and reactive processes. Microscopic analysis of both lesions revealed a spindle cell tumor with immunoreactivity for vimentin, muscle-specific actin, and specific smooth muscle isoform alpha-actin, rendering the diagnoses of myofibroma. The patients were treated with surgical excision, and both are in follow-up without any signs of recurrence. Myofibroma presents a wide range of differential diagnosis, including benign and malignant neoplasms. Therefore, accurate diagnosis may avoid an unnecessary aggressive therapy.

  16. Sacral chordoma in an adult showing an aggressive clinical course: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ENDO, KOJI; YAMASHITA, HIDEKI; NAGASHIMA, HIDEKI; TESHIMA, RYOTA

    2014-01-01

    The current report presents a case of a 78-year-old male with sacral chordoma, showing an aggressive clinical course. The patient underwent sacral resection, however, nine months later, multiple metastases were detected by magnetic resonance imaging. The metastases progressed rapidly and 15 months following surgery the patient succumbed to respiratory dysfunction. An autopsy revealed multiple metastases of the lung, liver, heart, kidneys and vertebrae. Pathologically, the tumors did not show proliferation of anaplastic cells or dedifferentiation; however, the metastatic tumor cells were smaller than the primary tumor cells. The Ki-67 labeling indices were <5% in all of the patient’s tumors, therefore, the capacity for cellular proliferation of the tumors was considered to be low. Chordoma in adults are generally slow-growing tumors and are associated with a relatively prolonged course and frequent local recurrences. Therefore, it must be recognized that chordoma may grow rapidly and show an aggressive clinical course, even when the Ki-67 labeling index is low. PMID:24765153

  17. Fabrication of an implant-supported overdenture using CAD/CAM technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Sven; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    This case report describes a new method for the fabrication of implant-supported overdentures that are rigidly retained by custom tapered abutments milled from commercially pure titanium using CAD/CAM technology. The dentition of a 60-year-old woman was restored with six implants in the edentulous maxilla. An implant-supported overdenture retained by custom tapered abutments was fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. Screw-retained abutments were designed and milled with a taper of 6 degrees. The reinforcing metallic denture base with integrated secondary crowns, exactly fitting on the tapered abutments, was fabricated from the same data set. The secondary structures could be seated tensionfree on the six abutments, creating friction in the final position. No clinical complications were observed at the 12-month follow-up examination, and the patient remained satisfied with the function and esthetics of the restoration. This case demonstrates the practicality of a fully CAD/CAM fabrication of an implant-supported overdenture retained by friction only. Controlled clinical studies are needed to evaluate the long-term performance of this type of restoration.

  18. Clinical delineation of the PACS1-related syndrome--Report on 19 patients.

    PubMed

    Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H M; Landsverk, Megan L; Foulds, Nicola; Kukolich, Mary K; Gavrilova, Ralitza H; Greville-Heygate, Stephanie; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Glass, Jennifer; Chitayat, David; Burrow, Thomas A; Husami, Ammar; Collins, Kathleen; Wusik, Katie; van der Aa, Nathalie; Kooy, Frank; Brown, Kate Tatton; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kini, Usha; Alvarez, Sara; Fernández-Jaén, Alberto; McGehee, Frank; Selby, Katherine; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Van Allen, Margot; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Marshall, Christian R; Merico, Daniele; Gregor, Anne; Zweier, Christiane; Hopkin, Robert J; Chu, Yoyo Wing-Yiu; Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; de Vries, Bert B A; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hurles, Matthew E; Brunner, Han G

    2016-03-01

    We report on 19 individuals with a recurrent de novo c.607C>T mutation in PACS1. This specific mutation gives rise to a recognizable intellectual disability syndrome. There is a distinctive facial appearance (19/19), characterized by full and arched eyebrows, hypertelorism with downslanting palpebral fissures, long eye lashes, ptosis, low set and simple ears, bulbous nasal tip, wide mouth with downturned corners and a thin upper lip with an unusual "wavy" profile, flat philtrum, and diastema of the teeth. Intellectual disability, ranging from mild to moderate, was present in all. Hypotonia is common in infancy (8/19). Seizures are frequent (12/19) and respond well to anticonvulsive medication. Structural malformations are common, including heart (10/19), brain (12/16), eye (10/19), kidney (3/19), and cryptorchidism (6/12 males). Feeding dysfunction is presenting in infancy with failure to thrive (5/19), gastroesophageal reflux (6/19), and gastrostomy tube placement (4/19). There is persistence of oral motor dysfunction. We provide suggestions for clinical work-up and management and hope that the present study will facilitate clinical recognition of further cases.

  19. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yepishin, Ilya V; Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-07-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG).

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Review of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Krohe, Meaghan; Hao, Yanni; Lamoureux, Roger E.; Galipeau, Nina; Globe, Denise; Foley, Catherine; Mazar, Iyar; Solomon, Jeffrey; Shields, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures serve to capture vital patient information not otherwise obtained by primary study endpoints. This paper examines how PROs are utilized as endpoints in industry-sponsored metastatic breast cancer clinical trials. METHODS A search was conducted in the clinicaltrials.gov web site for trials involving common treatments for metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-eight clinical trials were identified which included a PRO endpoint in the study, and data were extracted and summarized. RESULTS Overall, 17 unique PRO questionnaires and 14 concepts of measurement were identified as secondary or exploratory endpoints. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—Breast was the most frequently utilized questionnaire, commonly implemented to assess quality of life. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was also frequently used to measure quality of life or pain. CONCLUSION This review shares insights into the role of PROs in trials for metastatic breast cancer from which treatment developers and other stakeholders can enhance successful implementation of the patient voice into future trials. PMID:27441001

  1. Report on a Delphi process and workshop to improve accrual to cancer clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J.A.H.; Balneaves, L.G.; Kelly, M.T.; Richardson, H.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials (ccts) are essential for furthering knowledge and developing effective interventions to improve the lives of people living with cancer in Canada. Randomized controlled trials are particularly important for developing evidence-based health care interventions. To produce robust and relevant research conclusions, timely and sufficient accrual to ccts is essential. The present report delivers the key recommendations emerging from a workshop meeting, Improve Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials, that was hosted by the Canadian Cancer Trials Group and funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The meeting, which took place in Toronto, Ontario, in April 2012 before the Canadian Cancer Trials Group annual spring meeting, brought together key stakeholders from across Canada to explore creative strategies for improving accrual to ccts. The objectives of the workshop were to provide an opportunity for knowledge exchange with respect to the research evidence and the ethics theory related to cct accrual and to promote discussion of best practices and policies related to enhancing cct access and accrual in Canada. The workshop provided the foundation for establishing new interdisciplinary research collaborations to overcome the identified barriers to cct participation in Canada. Meeting participants also supported the development of evidence-based policies and practices to make trials more accessible to Canadians living with cancer.

  2. Internal Watershed Infarction as an Imaging and Clinical Challenge: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Marčić, Marino; Marčić, Ljiljana; Kolić, Krešimir; Titilić, Marina

    2016-03-01

    We presented the case of a patient with internal watershed infarction with a nonspecific clinical presentation including hemiplegia, hemisensory deficit, and speech disturbance. Neuroimaging and ultrasound diagnostic procedure are important tools for diagnosis of these rare ischemic events that count for about 6% of all strokes.  Specific therapy is mandatory for the diagnosis of watershed infarction and different from the therapeutical measures than can be taken for embolic and atherothrombotic strokes. Our patient was a 69-year-old, right-handed Caucasian woman who presented to our facility with acute right side weakness and speech disturbance. He had hypothyroidism, permanent atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus and she was hypotensive. She reported dizziness few days before the accident. Imaging studies revealed internal watershed infarction. Therapeutic procedures were taken to restore low cerebral blood flow. Internal watershed infarction is rare (less than 10% of all strokes) but well recognized a clinical feature of stroke. Specific pathophysiology generally is connected with hypoperfusion and hemodynamic mechanisms. Specific therapy is mandatory for these conditions.

  3. Clinical delineation of the PACS1-related syndrome--Report on 19 patients.

    PubMed

    Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H M; Landsverk, Megan L; Foulds, Nicola; Kukolich, Mary K; Gavrilova, Ralitza H; Greville-Heygate, Stephanie; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Glass, Jennifer; Chitayat, David; Burrow, Thomas A; Husami, Ammar; Collins, Kathleen; Wusik, Katie; van der Aa, Nathalie; Kooy, Frank; Brown, Kate Tatton; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kini, Usha; Alvarez, Sara; Fernández-Jaén, Alberto; McGehee, Frank; Selby, Katherine; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Van Allen, Margot; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Marshall, Christian R; Merico, Daniele; Gregor, Anne; Zweier, Christiane; Hopkin, Robert J; Chu, Yoyo Wing-Yiu; Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; de Vries, Bert B A; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hurles, Matthew E; Brunner, Han G

    2016-03-01

    We report on 19 individuals with a recurrent de novo c.607C>T mutation in PACS1. This specific mutation gives rise to a recognizable intellectual disability syndrome. There is a distinctive facial appearance (19/19), characterized by full and arched eyebrows, hypertelorism with downslanting palpebral fissures, long eye lashes, ptosis, low set and simple ears, bulbous nasal tip, wide mouth with downturned corners and a thin upper lip with an unusual "wavy" profile, flat philtrum, and diastema of the teeth. Intellectual disability, ranging from mild to moderate, was present in all. Hypotonia is common in infancy (8/19). Seizures are frequent (12/19) and respond well to anticonvulsive medication. Structural malformations are common, including heart (10/19), brain (12/16), eye (10/19), kidney (3/19), and cryptorchidism (6/12 males). Feeding dysfunction is presenting in infancy with failure to thrive (5/19), gastroesophageal reflux (6/19), and gastrostomy tube placement (4/19). There is persistence of oral motor dysfunction. We provide suggestions for clinical work-up and management and hope that the present study will facilitate clinical recognition of further cases. PMID:26842493

  4. Renal Vein Thrombosis in a Newborn With Abnormal Factor VIII Level: Clinical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Szafranska, Agnieszka; Pajak, Agata; Kilis-Pstrusinska, Katarzyna; Królak-Olejnik, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) in neonates is a rare condition of low mortality but significant morbidity due to renal impairment.We report the case of a male term newborn with left RVT and elevated serum factor VIII (FVIII).The main symptoms of the patient and the important clinical findings: prompt diagnosis of RVT was possible because the classic clinical presentation of macroscopic hematuria, thrombocytopenia, and palpable flank mass were present in this newborn infant.The main diagnoses: finally, the reason of RVT was established when the infant was 3 months of age: the increased level of FVIII was confirmed. We discuss the diagnosis, therapy, and outcome of the patient and compare with the literature.Therapeutics interventions: however, despite anticoagulant therapy the left kidney developed areas of scarring and then atrophy.Conclusions and outcomes: Prothrombotic defects should be considered in all patients with perinatal RVT. Elevated factor VIII as a reason of RVT in neonatal period is particularly rare. Given a poor renal outcome in children associated with elevated levels of factor VIII, consideration could be given to more aggressive antithrombotic therapy in such cases.

  5. Clinical repair of an osseous defect associated with a cemental tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Paulo M; Pirih, Flavia Q M; Wolinsky, Lawrence E; Lekovic, Vojislav; Kamrath, Heidi; White, Shane N

    2003-02-01

    Cemental tears have been described as detachment of cementum caused by trauma or aging. They often result in severe periodontal lesions that may necessitate the extraction of the affected tooth. This case report describes the clinical resolution of a periodontal lesion associated with a cemental tear. A maxillary central incisor was subjected to endodontic treatment twice with no resolution of a deep distobuccal pocket and a palatal sinus tract from its apical region. The preoperative differential diagnosis for the condition present on the tooth included a vertical fracture and a combined periodontal-endodontic lesion. Surgical exploration of the area revealed a cemental tear on the apical third of the tooth. The cementum fragments were removed, root-end resection was performed, and the osseous lesion was treated with an osseous graft and guided tissue regeneration. Clinical examination of the area 1 year after surgery revealed resolution of both the prior pocket and sinus tract. Radiographic examination of the area showed increased radiopacity in the area of the original lesion, suggesting bone fill.

  6. Multidisciplinary Approach for Restoring Function and Esthetics in a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Vaibhav D; Parkhedkar, Rambhau D

    2013-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is a genetically determined and enamel mineralization defect reported, depicted as “Hereditary brown teeth.” AI is characterized as a clinical entity and its clinical manifestations, histological appearance, and genetic pattern are characterized by their heterogeneity. The need for prosthodontic management of this group of patients varies. Some patients need oral hygiene instructions only, whereas others need extensive dental treatment that includes composite restorations, metal ceramic crowns, all ceramic crowns, porcelain veneers. A 20-year-old male patient presented with sensitive, discoloured, and mutilated teeth, with a decreased vertical dimension of occlusion. The 4-year recall examination revealed no pathology associated with the full mouth rehabilitation, and the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations were satisfied. The rehabilitation included all-ceramic crowns on anterior teeth and metal-ceramic crowns on posterior teeth following endodontic treatment and a crown-lengthening procedure for eliminating tooth sensitivity, improving the aesthetics and occlusion, and for restoring function. PMID:24551735

  7. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yepishin, Ilya V; Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-07-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). PMID:27437164

  8. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-01-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). PMID:27437164

  9. What Actually Makes Bullying Stop? Reports from Former Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisen, Ann; Hasselblad, Tove; Holmqvist, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    School bullying is a serious, worldwide problem which is not easily counteracted. The present study focuses on the perspective of former victims, asking them what it was that made the bullying stop in their case. Participants were 273 18-year-old former victims in Sweden, a country in which schools are doing extensive work against bullying and the…

  10. Patient-reported outcomes as primary end points in clinical trials of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Williet, Nicolas; Sandborn, William J; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is moving from the Crohn's Disease Activity Index to patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and objective measures of disease, such as findings from endoscopy. PROs will become an important aspect of assessing activity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and for labeling specific drugs for this disease. PROs always have been considered in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis, and have included measurements of quality of life, disability, or fatigue. Several disease-specific scales have been developed to assess these PROs and commonly are used in clinical trials. Outcomes reported by patients in clinical trials of IBD initially focused on quality of life, measured by the Short-Form 36 questionnaire or disease-specific scales such as the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire or its shorter version. Recently considered factors include fatigue, depression and anxiety, and work productivity, as measured by the Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue, the Hospital Anxiety Depression, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment Questionnaire, respectively. However, few data are available on how treatment affects these factors in patients with IBD. Although disability generally is recognized in patients with IBD, it is not measured. The international IBD disability index currently is being validated. None of the PROs currently used in IBD were developed according to FDA guidance for PRO development. PROs will be a major primary end point of future trials. FDA guidance is needed to develop additional PROs for IBD that can be incorporated into trials, to better compare patients' experience with different therapies. PMID:24534550

  11. Clinical Spectrum of Stiff Person Syndrome: A Review of Recent Reports

    PubMed Central

    Sarva, Harini; Deik, Andres; Ullah, Aman; Severt, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Background “Classic” stiff person syndrome (SPS) features stiffness, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) antibodies, and other findings. Anti-GAD antibodies are also detected in some neurological syndromes (such as ataxia) in which stiffness is inconsistently present. Patients with otherwise “classic” SPS may either lack anti-GAD antibodies or be seropositive for others. Hence, SPS cases appear to fall within a clinical spectrum that includes conditions such as progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), which exhibits brainstem and autonomic features. We have compiled herein SPS-spectrum cases reported since 2010, and have segregated them on the basis of likely disease mechanism (autoimmune, paraneoplastic, or cryptogenic) for analysis. Methods The phrases “stiff person syndrome”, “PERM”, “anti-GAD antibody syndrome”, and “glycine receptor antibody neurological disorders” were searched for in PubMed in January 2015. The results were narrowed to 72 citations after excluding non-English and duplicate reports. Clinical descriptions, laboratory data, management, and outcomes were categorized, tabulated, and analyzed. Results Sixty-nine autoimmune, 19 paraneoplastic, and 13 cryptogenic SPS-spectrum cases were identified. SPS was the predominant diagnosis among the groups. Roughly two-thirds of autoimmune and paraneoplastic cases were female. Anti-GAD antibodies were most frequently identified, followed by anti-amphiphysin among paraneoplastic cases and by anti-glycine receptor antibodies among autoimmune cases. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly used medications. Prognosis seemed best for cryptogenic cases; malignancy worsened that of paraneoplastic cases. Discussion Grouping SPS-spectrum cases by pathophysiology provided insights into work-up, treatment, and prognosis. Ample phenotypic and serologic variations are present within the categories. Ruling out malignancy and autoimmunity is appropriate for suspected

  12. How to apply case reports in clinical practice using surrogate models via example of the trigeminocardiac reflex.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Nora; Chowdhury, Tumul; Schaller, Bernhard J

    2016-04-06

    Case reports are an increasing source of evidence in clinical medicine. Until a few years ago, such case reports were emerged into systematic reviews and nowadays they are often fitted to the development of clinical (thinking) models. We describe this modern progress of knowledge creation by the example of the trigeminocardiac reflex that was first described in 1999 by a case series and was developed over the cause-and-effect relationship, triangulation to systematic reviews and finally to thinking models. Therefore, this editorial not only underlines the increasing and outstanding importance of (unique) case reports in current science, but also in current clinical decision-making and therefore also that of specific journals like the Journal of Medical Case Reports.

  13. Systematic Review of Outcome Measures Reported in Clinical Canine Osteoarthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Lucy; Dean, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To record and categorize the outcome measures used in dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA) by systematically reviewing the peer reviewed publications on OA in dogs. Study Design Systematic literature review. Study Population Peer reviewed literature on canine OA. Methods A computer‐based bibliographic search was performed on PubMed and CAB Abstracts in August 2013 to find peer reviewed publications relevant to canine OA. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The outcome measures reported within each publication were recorded and categorized for comparison. Adequately described outcome measures were assessed for uniqueness and evidence of prior validation. Results Of 3,697 publications identified and screened, 117 were deemed eligible for inclusion. Within eligible publications, outcome measures were used 618 times (median of 4 outcome measures per publication). Outcomes measured were divided into 5 groups containing 65 categories. The most frequently assessed outcomes were lameness assessment with no stated gait/mixed gaits (66 outcomes), radiography (58), and lameness single gait/lateral motion (55). Of 618 outcome measures reported, 491 were assessed for uniqueness and 348 (71%) were unique to a single publication. Ten outcome measures were reported to have been validated. Conclusion Many outcome measures have been used to assess canine OA. There is no consensus on which are the most useful outcomes or by which method they should be assessed. There is a pressing need for agreement on outcomes reporting in canine OA and for validation of outcome measures used for these assessments. Until consensus is reached, we recommend at least one validated outcome measure be used in every clinical study. PMID:27120270

  14. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  15. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation-Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force.

    PubMed

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan; Burke, Laurie B

    2015-09-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient's health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment's benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is on the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a COA is to

  16. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation-Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force.

    PubMed

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan; Burke, Laurie B

    2015-09-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient's health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment's benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is on the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a COA is to

  17. [The current clinical approach in puerperal endometritis].

    PubMed

    Pranchev, N; Istatkov, M; Mekhandzhieva, V

    1993-01-01

    The authors report a study on clinical and microbiological aspects of endometritis in 50 parturients. The analysis of results shows that major risk factors for the development of puerperal endometritis are urgent Caesarean section, premature rupture of membranes for more than 15 hours and surgical vaginal delivery. In conclusion the authors propose their actual clinical view on diagnosis and treatment of puerperal endometritis. PMID:8172336

  18. Hepatitis C infection: A multi-faceted systemic disease with clinical, patient reported and economic consequences.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; Birerdinc, Aybike; Henry, Linda

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) affects approximately 170-200 million individuals globally. HCV is one of the primary causes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cirrhosis and has been identified as the leading indication for liver transplantation in most Western countries. Because HCV is a systemic disease with hepatic, extrahepatic, economic and patient reported consequences, it is important for healthcare practitioners to understand the comprehensive and multi-faceted picture of this disease. In this context, it is important to fully appreciate the impact of HCV on the individual patient and the society. With the recent advent of the new generation of direct antiviral agents, the long standing goal of eradicating HCV in most infected patients has been accomplished. Therefore, now more than ever, it is critical to assess the total benefits of sustained virological response in a comprehensive manner. This should not be limited to the clinical benefits of HCV cure, but also to account for the improvement of patient reported health and economic outcomes of HCV cure. It is only through this comprehensive approach to HCV and its treatment that we will understand the full impact of this disease and the tremendous gains that have been achieved with the new antiviral regimens. PMID:27641981

  19. Clinical management of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Seda; Ozel, Emre; Arukaslan, Goze; Tekce, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth with a follow-up for 18-months. A 35-year-old female patient was referred to our clinic with an extraoral sinus tract in the chin. The intraoral diagnosis revealed the fusion of her mandibular lateral incisors. Vitality pulp tests were negative for mandibular right central and lateral incisors. Radiographic examinations showed a fused tooth with two separate pulp chambers, two distinct roots, and two separate root canals. There were also periapical lesion of fused teeth and mandibular right central incisor, so endodontic treatment was carried out the related teeth. Radiographic examination revealed a complete healing of the lesion postoperatively at the end of 18-months. This paper reports the successful endodontic and restorative treatment of unilateral fused incisors. Because of the abnormal morphology of the crown and the complexity of the root canal system in fused teeth, treatment protocols require special attention. PMID:26962321

  20. Hepatitis C infection: A multi-faceted systemic disease with clinical, patient reported and economic consequences.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; Birerdinc, Aybike; Henry, Linda

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) affects approximately 170-200 million individuals globally. HCV is one of the primary causes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cirrhosis and has been identified as the leading indication for liver transplantation in most Western countries. Because HCV is a systemic disease with hepatic, extrahepatic, economic and patient reported consequences, it is important for healthcare practitioners to understand the comprehensive and multi-faceted picture of this disease. In this context, it is important to fully appreciate the impact of HCV on the individual patient and the society. With the recent advent of the new generation of direct antiviral agents, the long standing goal of eradicating HCV in most infected patients has been accomplished. Therefore, now more than ever, it is critical to assess the total benefits of sustained virological response in a comprehensive manner. This should not be limited to the clinical benefits of HCV cure, but also to account for the improvement of patient reported health and economic outcomes of HCV cure. It is only through this comprehensive approach to HCV and its treatment that we will understand the full impact of this disease and the tremendous gains that have been achieved with the new antiviral regimens.

  1. Clinical management of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth: A case report.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Seda; Ozel, Emre; Arukaslan, Goze; Tekce, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth with a follow-up for 18-months. A 35-year-old female patient was referred to our clinic with an extraoral sinus tract in the chin. The intraoral diagnosis revealed the fusion of her mandibular lateral incisors. Vitality pulp tests were negative for mandibular right central and lateral incisors. Radiographic examinations showed a fused tooth with two separate pulp chambers, two distinct roots, and two separate root canals. There were also periapical lesion of fused teeth and mandibular right central incisor, so endodontic treatment was carried out the related teeth. Radiographic examination revealed a complete healing of the lesion postoperatively at the end of 18-months. This paper reports the successful endodontic and restorative treatment of unilateral fused incisors. Because of the abnormal morphology of the crown and the complexity of the root canal system in fused teeth, treatment protocols require special attention. PMID:26962321

  2. Clinical assessment of affective instability: comparing EMA indices, questionnaire reports, and retrospective recall.

    PubMed

    Solhan, Marika B; Trull, Timothy J; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K

    2009-09-01

    Traditional self-report measures of psychopathology may be influenced by a variety of recall biases. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) reduces these biases by assessing individuals' experiences as they occur in their natural environments. This study examines the discrepancy between trait questionnaire, retrospective report, and EMA measures of affective instability in psychiatric outpatients either with a borderline personality diagnosis (n = 58) or with a current episode of major depressive disorder or dysthymia (n = 42). The authors examined the agreement of 3 trait measures of affective instability-the Affective Instability subscale of the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features scale (L. C. Morey, 1991), the Affect Intensity Measure (R. J. Larsen, E. Diener, & R. Emmons, 1986), and the Affect Lability Scales (P. D. Harvey, B. R. Greenberg, & M. R. Serper, 1989)-and 1 retrospective mood recall task with EMA indices of mood and mood instability. Results indicate only modest to moderate agreement between momentary and questionnaire assessments of trait affective instability; agreement between recalled mood changes and EMA indices was poor. Implications for clinical research and practice and possible applications of EMA methodology are discussed.

  3. A Method for Detecting and Characterizing Outbreaks of Infectious Disease from Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Gregory F.; Villamarin, Ricardo; Tsui, Fu-Chiang (Rich); Millett, Nicholas; Espino, Jeremy U.; Wagner, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious disease can pose a significant threat to human health. Thus, detecting and characterizing outbreaks quickly and accurately remains an important problem. This paper describes a Bayesian framework that links clinical diagnosis of individuals in a population to epidemiological modeling of disease outbreaks in the population. Computer-based diagnosis of individuals who seek healthcare is used to guide the search for epidemiological models of population disease that explain the pattern of diagnoses well. We applied this framework to develop a system that detects influenza outbreaks from emergency department (ED) reports. The system diagnoses influenza in individuals probabilistically from evidence in ED reports that are extracted using natural language processing. These diagnoses guide the search for epidemiological models of influenza that explain the pattern of diagnoses well. Those epidemiological models with a high posterior probability determine the most likely outbreaks of specific diseases; the models are also used to characterize properties of an outbreak, such as its expected peak day and estimated size. We evaluated the method using both simulated data and data from a real influenza outbreak. The results provide support that the approach can detect and characterize outbreaks early and well enough to be valuable. We describe several extensions to the approach that appear promising. PMID:25181466

  4. Inductive creation of an annotation schema for manually indexing clinical conditions from emergency department reports

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Wendy W.; Dowling, John N.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluating automated indexing applications requires comparing automatically indexed terms against manual reference standard annotations. However, there are no standard guidelines for determining which words from a textual document to include in manual annotations, and the vague task can result in substantial variation among manual indexers. We applied grounded theory to emergency department reports to create an annotation schema representing syntactic and semantic variables that could be annotated when indexing clinical conditions. We describe the annotation schema, which includes variables representing medical concepts (e.g., symptom, demographics), linguistic form (e.g., noun, adjective), and modifier types (e.g., anatomic location, severity). We measured the schema’s quality and found: (1) the schema was comprehensive enough to be applied to 20 unseen reports without changes to the schema; (2) agreement between author annotators applying the schema was high, with an F measure of 93%; and (3) an error analysis showed that the authors made complementary errors when applying the schema, demonstrating that the schema incorporates both linguistic and medical expertise. PMID:16230050

  5. [Rosai-Dorfman disease with spinal and cranial tumors. A clinical case reported].

    PubMed

    Molina-Carrión, Luis Enrique; Mendoza-Álvarez, Sergio Alberto; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia; Caldera-Duarte, Agustín; Lara-Torres, Héctor; Hernández-González, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease, known as well as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy, is a histiocytic proliferative disorder which may affect, with an extranodal presentation, the central nervous system, in 5 % of cases with exceptional reports of simultaneous development of spinal and cranial tumors. When it affects the central nervous system it appears more in men and it is shown as a mass in the cranial dura mater or in the spinal cord. The clinical symptoms of Rosai-Dorfman disease are fever, general malayse, weight loss, and nocturnal diaphoresis. Also, when Rosai-Dorfman disease affects the spinal cord, it has an impact on the thoracic spine, which causes paraparesis, quadriparesis, and sensory disorder. Histopathologically, the lymph nodes show emperipolesis. The diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease is usually good, since 40 % of the patients present a spontaneous remission if they are treated with oral corticosteroids, even though the lesion can be managed with fractionated radiotherapy or with radical surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old male who started with spinal injuries, and a year later showed intracranial lesions.

  6. A method for detecting and characterizing outbreaks of infectious disease from clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gregory F; Villamarin, Ricardo; Rich Tsui, Fu-Chiang; Millett, Nicholas; Espino, Jeremy U; Wagner, Michael M

    2015-02-01

    Outbreaks of infectious disease can pose a significant threat to human health. Thus, detecting and characterizing outbreaks quickly and accurately remains an important problem. This paper describes a Bayesian framework that links clinical diagnosis of individuals in a population to epidemiological modeling of disease outbreaks in the population. Computer-based diagnosis of individuals who seek healthcare is used to guide the search for epidemiological models of population disease that explain the pattern of diagnoses well. We applied this framework to develop a system that detects influenza outbreaks from emergency department (ED) reports. The system diagnoses influenza in individuals probabilistically from evidence in ED reports that are extracted using natural language processing. These diagnoses guide the search for epidemiological models of influenza that explain the pattern of diagnoses well. Those epidemiological models with a high posterior probability determine the most likely outbreaks of specific diseases; the models are also used to characterize properties of an outbreak, such as its expected peak day and estimated size. We evaluated the method using both simulated data and data from a real influenza outbreak. The results provide support that the approach can detect and characterize outbreaks early and well enough to be valuable. We describe several extensions to the approach that appear promising. PMID:25181466

  7. The Role of Technical Advances in the Adoption and Integration of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Roxanne E.; Rothrock, Nan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Spiegel, Brennan; Tucker, Carole A.; Crane, Heidi M.; Forrest, Christopher B.; Patrick, Donald L.; Fredericksen, Rob; Shulman, Lisa M.; Cella, David; Crane, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are gaining recognition as key measures for improving the quality of patient care in clinical care settings. Three factors have made the implementation of PROs in clinical care more feasible: increased use of modern measurement methods in PRO design and validation, rapid progression of technology (e.g., touch screen tablets, Internet accessibility, and electronic health records (EHRs)), and greater demand for measurement and monitoring of PROs by regulators, payers, accreditors, and professional organizations. As electronic PRO collection and reporting capabilities have improved, the challenges of collecting PRO data have changed. Objectives To update information on PRO adoption considerations in clinical care, highlighting electronic and technical advances with respect to measure selection, clinical workflow, data infrastructure, and outcomes reporting. Methods Five practical case studies across diverse healthcare settings and patient populations are used to explore how implementation barriers were addressed to promote the successful integration of PRO collection into the clinical workflow. The case studies address selecting and reporting of relevant content, workflow integration, pre-visit screening, effective evaluation, and EHR integration. Conclusions These case studies exemplify elements of well-designed electronic systems, including response automation, tailoring of item selection and reporting algorithms, flexibility of collection location, and integration with patient health care data elements. They also highlight emerging logistical barriers in this area, such as the need for specialized technological and methodological expertise, and design limitations of current electronic data capture systems. PMID:25588135

  8. Power Delivery from an Actual Thermoelectric Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaibe, Hiromasa; Kajihara, Takeshi; Nagano, Kouji; Makino, Kazuya; Hachiuma, Hirokuni; Natsuume, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Similar to photovoltaic (PV) and fuel cells, thermoelectric generators (TEGs) supply direct-current (DC) power, essentially requiring DC/alternating current (AC) conversion for delivery as electricity into the grid network. Use of PVs is already well established through power conditioning systems (PCSs) that enable DC/AC conversion with maximum-power-point tracking, which enables commercial use by customers. From the economic, legal, and regulatory perspectives, a commercial PCS for PVs should also be available for TEGs, preferably as is or with just simple adjustment. Herein, we report use of a PV PCS with an actual TEG. The results are analyzed, and proper application for TEGs is proposed.

  9. Differences Between the Perceived and Actual Age of Overweight Onset in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Rahimi, Amanda M.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Roberts, Mary D.; Theim, Kelly R.; Menzie, Carolyn M.; Mirch, Margaret C.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Little is known about whether children or their parents can accurately recall the age at which they became overweight. Design, Subjects and Main Outcome Measures We interviewed 64 overweight children (7–18 years old) about their weight history and compared reported age of overweight onset with actual onset, as determined by the age at which the child's measured BMI first exceeded the 95th percentile. Results Only 28% of children reported overweight onset within 1 year of actual overweight onset. Reported overweight onset age (7.6 ± 2.5y) and actual onset age (5.3 ± 2.5y; P < .001) were not significantly correlated (r2 = .03, P = .22). Children who became overweight before 8 years of age tended to report becoming overweight at a later age than actual onset, whereas children who became overweight after 8 years of age tended to report becoming overweight at an earlier age than actual onset (P < .001), with 27% of children either underreporting or overreporting their overweight onset by at least 5 years. Similar results were found when analyzing parent reports of their children's overweight onset. Conclusions Reported and actual overweight onset ages were uncorrelated in our sample, suggesting that families may not be cognizant of children's growth trajectories. Greater efforts should be made to help parents and children understand and track growth patterns with the aim of preventing excessive weight gain. PMID:17406158

  10. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: VI. The 2014 Clinical Trial Design Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul J; Lee, Stephanie J; Przepiorka, Donna; Horowitz, Mary M; Koreth, John; Vogelsang, Georgia B; Walker, Irwin; Carpenter, Paul A; Griffith, Linda M; Akpek, Gorgun; Mohty, Mohamad; Wolff, Daniel; Pavletic, Steven Z; Cutler, Corey S

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease is intended to produce a sustainable benefit by reducing symptom burden, controlling objective manifestations of disease activity, preventing damage and impairment, and improving overall survival without causing disproportionate harms related to the treatment itself. Successful management can control the disease until systemic treatment is no longer needed. The complexity of the disease, the extended duration of follow-up needed to observe disease resolution and withdrawal of immunosuppressive treatment, and the lack of fully developed shorter term endpoints impede progress in the field. Identification and characterization of primary endpoints demonstrating clinical benefit without requiring years of follow-up is urgently needed, with the understanding that clinical benefit encompasses not only the self-evident benefit of the primary endpoint but also any other associated benefits. This report discusses regulatory considerations, eligibility criteria, the value of controlled trial designs, the merits of proposed primary endpoints, and key considerations elaborated from experience and progress during the past decade. The report concludes by mapping an overall approach that could support and lead to maximally informative clinical trials, especially those that seek to demonstrate clinical benefit along a pathway to regulatory review and approval.

  11. [Current biosafety in clinical laboratories in Japan: report of questionnaires' data obtained from clinical laboratory personnel in Japan].

    PubMed

    Goto, Mieko; Yamashita, Tomonari; Misawa, Shigeki; Komori, Toshiaki; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Takahashi, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    To determine the status of biosafety in clinical laboratories in Japan, we conducted a survey using questionnaires on the biosafety of laboratory personnel in 2004. We obtained data from 431 hospitals (response: 59.5%). Respondents were 301 institutions (70%) having biological safety cabinets (BSCs). BSCs were held in 78% of microbiological laboratories, 7.9% of genetic laboratories, 2.7% of histopathological laboratories, and 1% or less at other laboratories. A clean bench in examination rooms for acid-fast bacilli was applied at 20 hospitals. We found 28 cases of possible laboratory-associated tuberculosis infection, 25 of which were associated with lack of BSC. Other risk factors were immature skills and insufficiently skilled eguipment operation. The frequency of rupture accidents during specimen centrifugation was 67% in dealing with blood and 9.7% in collecting acid-fast bacilli. Half or more accidents were related to inadequate sample tube materials. Technologists were shown to be working on blood collection in many hospitals (75%), and 1,534 events of self-inflicted needle puncture developed in the last 5 years. These results suggest that biosafety systems are woefully lacking or inadequate in clinical laboratories in Japan and must be established at the earliest possible opportunity.

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside clinical trials II-An ISPOR Good Research Practices Task Force report.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Scott D; Willke, Richard J; Glick, Henry; Reed, Shelby D; Augustovski, Federico; Jonsson, Bengt; Briggs, Andrew; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-03-01

    Clinical trials evaluating medicines, medical devices, and procedures now commonly assess the economic value of these interventions. The growing number of prospective clinical/economic trials reflects both widespread interest in economic information for new technologies and the regulatory and reimbursement requirements of many countries that now consider evidence of economic value along with clinical efficacy. As decision makers increasingly demand evidence of economic value for health care interventions, conducting high-quality economic analyses alongside clinical studies is desirable because they broaden the scope of information available on a particular intervention, and can efficiently provide timely information with high internal and, when designed and analyzed properly, reasonable external validity. In 2005, ISPOR published the Good Research Practices for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Alongside Clinical Trials: The ISPOR RCT-CEA Task Force report. ISPOR initiated an update of the report in 2014 to include the methodological developments over the last 9 years. This report provides updated recommendations reflecting advances in several areas related to trial design, selecting data elements, database design and management, analysis, and reporting of results. Task force members note that trials should be designed to evaluate effectiveness (rather than efficacy) when possible, should include clinical outcome measures, and should obtain health resource use and health state utilities directly from study subjects. Collection of economic data should be fully integrated into the study. An incremental analysis should be conducted with an intention-to-treat approach, complemented by relevant subgroup analyses. Uncertainty should be characterized. Articles should adhere to established standards for reporting results of cost-effectiveness analyses. Economic studies alongside trials are complementary to other evaluations (e.g., modeling studies) as information for decision

  13. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  14. MODIS Solar Diffuser: Modelled and Actual Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xiong, Xiao-Xiong; Esposito, Joe; Wang, Xin-Dong; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument's solar diffuser is used in its radiometric calibration for the reflective solar bands (VIS, NTR, and SWIR) ranging from 0.41 to 2.1 micron. The sun illuminates the solar diffuser either directly or through a attenuation screen. The attenuation screen consists of a regular array of pin holes. The attenuated illumination pattern on the solar diffuser is not uniform, but consists of a multitude of pin-hole images of the sun. This non-uniform illumination produces small, but noticeable radiometric effects. A description of the computer model used to simulate the effects of the attenuation screen is given and the predictions of the model are compared with actual, on-orbit, calibration measurements.

  15. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  16. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  17. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  18. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  19. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  20. Adjunctive naturopathic care for type 2 diabetes: patient-reported and clinical outcomes after one year

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several small, uncontrolled studies have found improvements in self-care behaviors and reductions in clinical risk in persons with type 2 diabetes who received care from licensed naturopathic physicians. To extend these findings and determine the feasibility and promise of a randomized clinical trial, we conducted a prospective study to measure the effects of adjunctive naturopathic care (ANC) in primary care patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods Forty patients with type 2 diabetes were invited from a large integrated health care system to receive up to eight ANC visits for up to one year. Participants were required to have hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values between 7.5-9.5 % and at least one additional cardiovascular risk factor (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia or overweight). Standardized instruments were administered by telephone to collect outcome data on self-care, self-efficacy, diabetes problem areas, perceived stress, motivation, and mood. Changes from baseline scores were calculated at 6- and 12-months after entry into the study. Six and 12-month changes in clinical risk factors (i.e., HbA1c, lipid and blood pressure) were calculated for the ANC cohort, and compared to changes in a cohort of 329 eligible, non-participating patients constructed using electronic medical records data. Between-cohort comparisons were adjusted for age, gender, baseline HbA1c, and diabetes medications. Six months was pre-specified as the primary endpoint for outcome assessment. Results Participants made 3.9 ANC visits on average during the year, 78 % of which occurred within six months of entry into the study. At 6-months, significant improvements were found in most patient-reported measures, including glucose testing (P = 0.001), diet (P = 0.001), physical activity (P = 0.02), mood (P = 0.001), self-efficacy (P = 0.0001) and motivation to change lifestyle (P = 0.003). Improvements in glucose testing, mood, self-efficacy and motivation to change

  1. Restorative management using hybrid ceramic of a patient with severe tooth erosion from swimming: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report presents the clinical appearance and treatment approach in a case of excessive anterior teeth erosion resulted from swimming in a poorly-chlorinated swimming pool. Clinical findings revealed tooth sensitivity, severe enamel erosion resembling veneer preparations, and the presence of anterior open bite. A novel hybrid ceramic (Vita Enamic) was chosen for fabricating full-coverage crowns for this patient. After 6-months follow-up, the tooth sensitivity disappeared and the patient was satisfied with esthetic outcome. The hybrid ceramic restorations can be recommended with no complications. PMID:25352965

  2. Patterns of Technology Use in Patients Attending a Cardiopulmonary Outpatient Clinic: A Self-Report Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-management education for cardiopulmonary diseases is primarily provided through time-limited, face-to-face programs, with access limited to a small percentage of patients. Telecommunication tools will increasingly be an important component of future health care delivery. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of technology use in patients attending a cardiopulmonary clinic in an academic medical center. Methods A prevalence survey was developed to collect data on participant demographics (age in years, sex, and socioeconomic status); access to computers, Internet, and mobile phones; and use of current online health support sites or programs. Surveys were offered by reception staff to all patients attending the outpatient clinic. Results A total of 123 surveys were collected between March and April 2014. Technological devices were a pervasive part of everyday life with respondents engaged in regular computer (102/123, 82.9%), mobile telephone (115/117, 98.3%), and Internet (104/121, 86.0%) use. Emailing (101/121, 83.4%), researching and reading news articles (93/121, 76.9%), social media (71/121, 58.7%), and day-to-day activities (65/121, 53.7%) were the most common telecommunication activities. The majority of respondents reported that access to health support programs and assistance through the Internet (82/111, 73.9%) would be of use, with benefits reported as better understanding of health information (16/111, 22.5%), avoidance of difficult travel requirements and time-consuming face-to-face appointments (13/111, 18.3%), convenient and easily accessible help and information (12/111, 16.9%), and access to peer support and sharing (9/111, 12.7%). The majority of patients did not have concerns over participating in the online environment (87/111, 78.4%); the few concerns noted related to privacy and security (10/15), information accuracy (2/15), and computer literacy and access (2/15). Conclusions Chronic disease burden and

  3. The importance of patient-reported outcomes: a call for their comprehensive integration in cardiovascular clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Agewall, Stefan; Borggrefe, Martin; Calvert, Melanie; Jaime Caro, J; Cowie, Martin R; Ford, Ian; Paty, Jean A; Riley, Jillian P; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi; Wiklund, Ingela; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2014-08-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), or patient perceived health status, are reported directly by the patient and are powerful tools to inform patients, clinicians, and policy-makers about morbidity and 'patient suffering', especially in chronic diseases. Patient-reported outcomes provide information on the patient experience and can be the target of therapeutic intervention. Patient-reported outcomes can improve the quality of patient care by creating a holistic approach to clinical decision-making; however, PROs are not routinely used as key outcome measures in major cardiovascular clinical trials. Thus, limited information is available on the impact of cardiovascular therapeutics on PROs to guide patient-level clinical decision-making or policy-level decision-making. Cardiovascular clinical research should shift its focus to include PROs when evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, and PRO assessments should be scientifically rigorous. The European Society of Cardiology and other professional societies can take action to influence the uptake of PRO data in the research and clinical communities. This process of integrating PRO data into comprehensive efficacy evaluations will ultimately improve the quality of care for patients across the spectrum of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Computerization of Procedural Requests and Reports of Clinical Laboratory Data: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Nowlin, T.A.; Webster, G.Y.

    1983-01-01

    A case study describing the use of a computer system in handling clinical laboratory data is presented. Effective coordination between clinical laboratory personnel and the nursing staff is emphasized as being essential for success of the system. PMID:6864819

  5. Cemento-osseous dysplasia in African-American men: a report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    DiFiore, Peter M; Bowen, Sarah Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Two clinical cases of the unusual occurrence of cemento-osseous dysplasia in men and the clinical, radiographic and demographic findings that formed the basis for their diagnosis and management are presented.

  6. Rational basis for the use of a new clinical procedure in immediately loaded implant rehabilitations: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garocchio, Santo; Camaioni, Emanuele; Di Felice, Roberto; De Dominicis, Alessandro; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Giannoni, Mario

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a new clinical protocol that facilitates the diagnostic, surgical, and prosthetic phases of immediately loaded implant rehabilitations. The proposed technique aims to simplify recording of the centric relation, which is usually done immediately after surgery, during the surgical impression phase. This shortens operative time while meeting requirements for an accurate impression and is thus simple and cost effective. The case report of a maxillary full-arch immediately loaded implant rehabilitation in a 45-year-old patient illustrates the clinical steps in the proposed procedure and confirms its repeatability.

  7. Clinical Characteristics of Adults with Asperger's Syndrome Assessed with Self-Report Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanai, Chieko; Iwanami, Akira; Ota, Haruhisa; Yamasue, Hidenori; Matsushima, Eisuke; Yokoi, Hideki; Shinohara, Kazuyuki; Kato, Nobumasa

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome (AS) in adults is difficult, and clinical sample-based studies that systematically illustrate the clinical characteristics of adult AS patients are needed so that appropriate treatment can be provided. Here we examined the clinical characteristics of AS in 112 adults (median age, 28.0 years [range, 18-52]; 71 men…

  8. 75 FR 4827 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials... purpose and safety of clinical trials conducted outside of the United States. An e-mail response was sent... of the NCI's clinical trials portfolio, which is global in nature. The response further stated...

  9. Reporting of Ethical Considerations Associated with Clinical Trials Published in Iranian Dental Journals between 2001 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    NAVABI, Nader; SHAHRAVAN, Arash; MODABERI, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethical consideration is a basic requirement for design of randomized clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to assess whether reports of Iranian dental clinical trials complied with the requirements of the ethical principles of human research. Methods: In this retrospective observational study electronic search was performed to identify all dental clinical trials published between 2001 and 2011. Each trial report was assessed for inclusion of a statement that 17 items about research ethics. Results: Totally 242 papers were identified, of which 15.3%, stated that ethical approval had been obtained and 50.4% of the trial reports indicated that informed consent had been obtained. The mean ethical score for the mentioned studies was 7/68 out of 17. Conclusions: Most Iranian dental clinical trial reports failed to consider important ethical principles. The reporting of the ethical issues associated with these trials could be improved further not only by the instructions to authors, but also by Journal editors refusing to publish trials that do not comply. PMID:23967427

  10. Self-reported illness from chemical odors in young adults without clinical syndromes or occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Bell, I R; Schwartz, G E; Peterson, J M; Amend, D

    1993-01-01

    The present survey of young adult college students investigated the prevalence of self-reported illness from the smell of the five following common environmental chemicals (cacosmia): (1) pesticide, (2) automobile exhaust, (3) paint, (4) new carpet, and (5) perfume. Sixty-six percent of 643 students reported feeling ill from one or more of the five chemicals; 15% identified the smell of at least four chemicals as making them ill. Ratings of illness from pesticide correlated weakly but significantly with ratings for the largest number of individual symptoms (9 of 11); daytime tiredness and daytime grogginess both correlated at high levels of significance with illness ratings (on a 5-point scale) for four of the five chemicals. The most cacosmic group (CS) included significantly more women (79%) than the noncacosmic group (NS) (49%); women overall were more cacosmic than men (p < .001), even with the significant covariate of depression. Ratings of cacosmia correlated only weakly with scores for depression (r = 0.16), anxiety (r = 0.08), and trait shyness (r = 0.18) in the total sample. On stepwise multiple regression with cacosmia score as the dependent measure, shyness accounted for 5.8% of the variance, while depression, anxiety, sense of mastery, and repression did not enter the equation. Histories of physician-diagnosed hay fever, but not asthma, were more frequent in the CS (16%) than in the NS group (5%). Without the confounds of chronic illness or specific treatment programs, these data are similar to patterns described clinically for a subset of patients with multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS), including previous data on increased nasal resistance in MCS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Gastrointestinal dysfunction in autism: parental report, clinical evaluation, and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Gorrindo, Phillip; Williams, Kent C; Lee, Evon B; Walker, Lynn S; McGrew, Susan G; Levitt, Pat

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize gastrointestinal dysfunction (GID) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), to examine parental reports of GID relative to evaluations by pediatric gastroenterologists, and to explore factors associated with GID in ASD. One hundred twenty-one children were recruited into three groups: co-occurring ASD and GID, ASD without GID, and GID without ASD. A pediatric gastroenterologist evaluated both GID groups. Parents in all three groups completed questionnaires about their child's behavior and GI symptoms, and a dietary journal. Functional constipation was the most common type of GID in children with ASD (85.0%). Parental report of any GID was highly concordant with a clinical diagnosis of any GID (92.1%). Presence of GID in children with ASD was not associated with distinct dietary habits or medication status. Odds of constipation were associated with younger age, increased social impairment, and lack of expressive language (adjusted odds ratio in nonverbal children: 11.98, 95% confidence interval 2.54-56.57). This study validates parental concerns for GID in children with ASD, as parents were sensitive to the existence, although not necessarily the nature, of GID. The strong association between constipation and language impairment highlights the need for vigilance by health-care providers to detect and treat GID in children with ASD. Medications and diet, commonly thought to contribute to GID in ASD, were not associated with GID status. These findings are consistent with a hypothesis that GID in ASD represents pleiotropic expression of genetic risk factors. PMID:22511450

  12. Digital workflow for virtually designing and milling ceramic lithium disilicate veneers: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Zandinejad, A; Lin, W S; Atarodi, M; Abdel-Azim, T; Metz, M J; Morton, D

    2015-01-01

    Laminate veneers have been routinely used to restore and enhance the appearance of natural dentition. The traditional pathway for fabricating veneers consisted of making conventional polyvinyl siloxane impressions, producing stone casts, and fabricating final porcelain prostheses on stone dies. Pressed ceramics have successfully been used for laminate veneer fabrication for several years. Recently, digital computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing scanning has become commercially available to make a digital impression that is sent electronically to a dental laboratory or a chairside milling machine. However, technology has been developed to allow digital data acquisition in conjunction with electronically transmitted data that enables virtual design of restorations and milling at a remote production center. Following the aforementioned workflow will provide the opportunity to fabricate a physical cast-free restoration. This new technique has been reported recently for all-ceramic IPS e.max full-coverage pressed-ceramic restorations. However, laminate veneers are very delicate and technique-sensitive restorations when compared with all-ceramic full-coverage ones made from the same material. Complete digital design and fabrication of multiple consecutive laminate veneers seems to be very challenging. This clinical report presents the digital workflow for the virtual design and fabrication of multiple laminate veneers in a patient for enhancing the esthetics of his maxillary anterior teeth. A step-by-step process is presented with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this novel technique. Additionally, the use of lithium disilicate ceramic as the material of choice and the rationale for such a decision is discussed.

  13. Clinical manifestations and dental management of dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta: Case report.

    PubMed

    Abukabbos, Halima; Al-Sineedi, Faisal

    2013-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects the connective tissues and results in dentine dysplasia. This case report discusses the systemic and dental manifestations of OI and DI in a 4-year-old child, with moderate presentation of both disorders, who was treated at King Fahd Military Medical Complex in Dhahran. Dental treatment included the use of strip and stainless-steel crowns under local anesthesia, as well as behavior modification techniques. Rigorous home care instructions, including reinforcement of the oral hygiene practice and avoidance of any episode that may lead to bone fracture, were discussed with the parents. The case was reevaluated at 3-month follow-up visits, wherein the medical and dental histories were updated, the child's growth was monitored, periodic clinical and radiographic examinations were performed, and the oral hygiene was evaluated via the debris index score and caries risk assessment. Further treatment of the permanent dentition may be needed in the future.

  14. Patient and provider priorities for self-reported domains of HIV clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Todd; Crane, Heidi M.; Crane, Paul K.; Merlin, Jessica; Gibbons, Laura E.; Rao, Deepa; Batey, D. Scott; Dant, Lydia; Páez, Edgar; Church, Anna; Patrick, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to understand how HIV-infected patients, their providers, and HIV care researchers prioritize self-reported domains of clinical care. Participants rank-ordered two lists of domains. A modified Delphi process was used for providers and researchers. Approximately 25% of patients were interviewed to discuss rationale for rank order choices. List 1 included anger, anxiety, depression, fatigue, physical function, pain, and sleep disturbance. List 2 included alcohol abuse, cognitive function, HIV stigma, HIV and treatment symptoms, medication adherence, positive affect, sexual risk behavior, sexual function, social roles, spirituality/meaning of life, and substance abuse. Seventy-four providers, 80 HIV care researchers and 66 patients participated. Patients ranked context-based domains, such as HIV stigma, more highly than providers, while health behaviors, such as drug or alcohol use, ranked lower. Patients described a need to address wider-context challenges such as HIV stigma in order to positively impact health behaviors. Divergent patient and provider priorities highlights the importance of incorporating views from all stakeholders and suggests the need for a care approach that more effectively addresses contextual barriers to adverse health behaviors. PMID:26304263

  15. Patient and provider priorities for self-reported domains of HIV clinical care.

    PubMed

    Fredericksen, Rob J; Edwards, Todd C; Merlin, Jessica S; Gibbons, Laura E; Rao, Deepa; Batey, D Scott; Dant, Lydia; Páez, Edgar; Church, Anna; Crane, Paul K; Crane, Heidi M; Patrick, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    We sought to understand how HIV-infected patients, their providers, and HIV care researchers prioritize self-reported domains of clinical care. Participants rank-ordered two lists of domains. A modified Delphi process was used for providers and researchers. Approximately 25% of patients were interviewed to discuss rationale for rank order choices. List 1 included anger, anxiety, depression, fatigue, physical function, pain, and sleep disturbance. List 2 included alcohol abuse, cognitive function, HIV stigma, HIV and treatment symptoms, medication adherence, positive affect, sexual risk behavior, sexual function, social roles, spirituality/meaning of life, and substance abuse. Seventy-four providers, 80 HIV care researchers, and 66 patients participated. Patients ranked context-based domains, such as HIV stigma, more highly than providers, while health behaviors, such as drug or alcohol use, ranked lower. Patients described a need to address wider-context challenges such as HIV stigma in order to positively impact health behaviors. Divergent patient and provider priorities highlight the importance of incorporating views from all stakeholders and suggests the need for a care approach that more effectively addresses contextual barriers to adverse health behaviors. PMID:26304263

  16. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5-29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10-15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  17. Effect of complete dentures on craniofacial growth of an ectodermal dysplasia patient: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Gaurav; Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor; Chand, Pooran; Singh, Kamleshwar; Singh, Balandra Pratap; Goel, Prachi; Alvi, Habib Ahmed

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this clinical report was to observe the effect of complete dentures on craniofacial growth and development of an ectodermal dysplasia (ED) patient. A complete anodontia patient diagnosed with ED was successfully rehabilitated with conventional complete dentures at the ages of 5, 8, and 10 years. Three sets of complete dentures were made with age-appropriate denture teeth and a bilaterally balanced lingualized occlusal scheme. Periodic follow-up and adjustment when needed was done to maintain proper oral function and esthetics. Serial cephalometric analysis exhibited a marked restriction of forward growth at the anterior nasal spine (ANS) point between 5 and 10 years of age, although there was little change from average in the anteroposterior length of the mandibular body and the height of the mandibular ramus. So, while maxillary growth was reduced, mandibular growth did not significantly change. Cast analysis showed that the increase in arch length was greater than in arch width for both the maxilla and mandible. There was little increase in alveolar ridge height in the anterior region but a considerable increase in the height of the alveolar ridge in the middle and the posterior region. Our findings concluded that the absence of teeth did not affect the growth of the jaws, and it is probable that the denture flange did not arrest the jaw growth, but rather improved the masticatory function by providing good denture stability and retention.

  18. Functional ambulation velocity and distance requirements in rural and urban communities. A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Robinett, C S; Vondran, M A

    1988-09-01

    The purposes of this clinical report are 1) to document the distances and velocities that individuals must ambulate to function independently in their community and 2) to demonstrate the differences in travel distances and velocities among communities of various sizes. In seven communities of different sizes, we measured distances from a designated parking space to commonly frequented sites (eg, stores, post offices, banks, and medical buildings). We also measured street widths and the time allowed by crossing signals to cross streets safely. From these data, we calculated the velocities needed to safely cross streets in each community. The study results showed that ambulation distances and velocities vary depending on the size of the community and that for individuals to function independently within their community, they must ambulate at velocities and distances much greater than the ambulation objectives that may be set at most rehabilitation settings. Based on the results of this study, we suggest that they receive the majority of their patients to more accurately prepare patients for functional independence after rehabilitation discharge.

  19. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5–29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10–15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  20. Full-mouth rehabilitation for a patient with dentinogenesis imperfecta: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bencharit, Sompop; Border, Michael B; Mack, C Russell; Byrd, Warren C; Wright, John T

    2014-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is a genetic disorder affecting the structural integrity of the dentin that can result in weakened dentin. The affected teeth, especially posterior teeth, often need to be extracted due to severe wear or fracture. This frequently yields a loss of posterior occlusion and occlusal vertical dimension. Besides wear and fracture, anterior teeth often have an unesthetic appearance because of discoloration. Current treatments of choice, including composite bonding restorations and, more recently, all-ceramic restorations, are typically suggested to preserve the remaining teeth and tooth structure. However, there are a limited number of studies on dental implants in patients with DI. The effectiveness of dentin bonding and dental implants in patients with DI is not known. This clinical report describes a 32-year-old Asian woman with DI who underwent full-mouth rehabilitation. The posterior occlusion, mostly in the molar areas, was restored with dental implants and ceramometal restorations. The anterior teeth and premolars were restored with bonded lithium disilicate glass-ceramic pressed veneers and crowns made with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing. This case demonstrates that restoring functional occlusion and esthetics for a patient with DI can be completed successfully using contemporary implant therapy and adhesive dentistry.

  1. Clinical manifestations and dental management of dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Abukabbos, Halima; Al-Sineedi, Faisal

    2013-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects the connective tissues and results in dentine dysplasia. This case report discusses the systemic and dental manifestations of OI and DI in a 4-year-old child, with moderate presentation of both disorders, who was treated at King Fahd Military Medical Complex in Dhahran. Dental treatment included the use of strip and stainless-steel crowns under local anesthesia, as well as behavior modification techniques. Rigorous home care instructions, including reinforcement of the oral hygiene practice and avoidance of any episode that may lead to bone fracture, were discussed with the parents. The case was reevaluated at 3-month follow-up visits, wherein the medical and dental histories were updated, the child’s growth was monitored, periodic clinical and radiographic examinations were performed, and the oral hygiene was evaluated via the debris index score and caries risk assessment. Further treatment of the permanent dentition may be needed in the future. PMID:24371383

  2. Clinical Features of Reported Ethylene Glycol Exposures in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jobson, Meghan A.; Hogan, Susan L.; Maxwell, Colin S.; Hu, Yichun; Hladik, Gerald A.; Falk, Ronald J.; Beuhler, Michael C.; Pendergraft, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethylene glycol is highly toxic and represents an important cause of poisonings worldwide. Toxicity can result in central nervous system dysfunction, cardiovascular compromise, elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis and acute kidney injury. Many states have passed laws requiring addition of the bittering agent, denatonium benzoate, to ethylene glycol solutions to reduce severity of exposures. The objectives of this study were to identify differences between unintentional and intentional exposures and to evaluate the utility of denatonium benzoate as a deterrent. Methods and Findings Using the National Poison Data System, we performed a retrospective analysis of reported cases of ethylene glycol exposures from January 2006 to December 2013. Outcome classification was summed for intentionality and used as a basis for comparison of effect groups. There were 45,097 cases of ethylene glycol exposures resulting in 154 deaths. Individuals more likely to experience major effects or death were older, male, and presented with more severe symptoms requiring higher levels of care. Latitude and season did not correlate with increased exposures; however, there were more exposures in rural areas. Denatonium benzoate use appeared to have no effect on exposure severity or number. Conclusion Deaths due to ethylene glycol exposure were uncommon; however, there were major clinical effects and more exposures in rural areas. Addition of denatonium benzoate was not associated with a reduction in exposures. Alternative means to deter ingestion are needed. These findings suggest the need to consider replacing ethylene glycol with alternative and less toxic agents. PMID:26566024

  3. Aspartame and seizure susceptibility: results of a clinical study in reportedly sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A J; Shaywitz, B A; Tuchman, L; French, J A; Luciano, D; Sullivan, C M

    1995-03-01

    The high intensity sweetener aspartame has been implicated anecdotally in seizure provocation. This possibility was investigated with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. After an extensive search, 18 individuals (16 adults and 2 children) who had seizures allegedly related to aspartame consumption were admitted to adult or pediatric epilepsy monitoring units where their EEG was monitored continuously for 5 days. Aspartame (50 mg/kg) or identically enpackaged placebo was administered in divided doses at 0800, 1000, and 1200 h on study days 2 and 4. All meals were uniformly standardized on treatment days. No clinical seizures or other adverse experiences were observed after aspartame ingestion. Mean plasma phenylalanine (Phe) concentrations increased significantly after aspartame ingestion (83.6 microM) as compared with placebo (52.3 microM). Results suggest that aspartame, in acute dosage of approximately 50 mg/kg, is no more likely than placebo to cause seizures in individuals who reported that their seizures were provoked by aspartame consumption.

  4. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2): a clinical report with review of previous cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Faruq, Mohammed; Mukerji, Mitali; Dwivedi, Manish Kumar; Pruthi, Sumit; Kapoor, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I is a heterogeneous group of spinocerebellar ataxias with variable neurologic presentations, with age of onset varying from infancy to adulthood. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I is composed mainly of 3 prevalent spinocerebellar ataxia types with different pathogenic loci, specifically spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (6p24-p23), spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (12q24.1), and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (14q32.1). The shared pathogenic mutational event is the expansion of the CAG repeat that results in polyglutamine extended stretches in the encoded proteins. CAG repeat disorders generally show the phenomenon of anticipation, which is more often associated with paternal transmission. In this report, we describe a patient with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (~320 CAG repeat) who inherited the disease from his father (47 CAG repeats). We have summarized the clinical, neuroimaging, electroencephalographic (EEG), and molecular data of previous cases and attempt to highlight the most consistent findings. Our intent is to help treating clinicians to suspect this disorder and to offer timely genetic counseling for a currently potentially untreatable disorder.

  5. Parapharyngeal ectopic thyroid: the possible persistence of the lateral thyroid anlage. Clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Soscia, A; Guerra, G; Cinelli, M-P; Testa, D; Galli, V; Macchi, V; De Caro, R

    2004-08-01

    The accessory midline thyroids are ascribed to an arrest of migration of the median thyroid anlage, while the lateral ectopic thyroids have induced a hypothesis of the presence of lateral thyroid anlage. We report the case of a 67-year-old man who presented with dyspnea and dysphagia of 1 year's duration. The clinical examination and radiological investigations (CT and MRI) showed a solid heterogeneous mass in the right parapharyngeal space. The fine needle aspiration biopsy was inconsistent. The mass (3x2.5x3.5 cm) was excised via a transoral approach. It was capsulated with an elastic consistency and showed a nodular appearance on the cut surface. Histological examination revealed thyroid tissue with the characteristics of colloid goiter. The postoperative (99m)Tc-pertechnetate scan showed the normal thyroid gland located in the usual pretracheal site. The absence of malignancy, at histology and immunohistochemistry, allows a metastatic nature of the mass to be ruled out, and accounts for a supernumerary thyroid. The occurrence of a parapharyngeal thyroid, although extremely rare, is worth bearing in mind as a possible ectopic location. This case also supports the hypothesized role of the lateral thyroid anlage in man deriving from the ultimo-branchial body in the morphogenesis of the lateral lobe of the thyroid gland.

  6. Mother and father self-reports of corporal punishment and severe physical aggression toward clinic-referred youth.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, A; Donnelly, W O; Lewis, T; Maynard, C

    2000-06-01

    Examined the extent to which 359 mothers and 140 fathers of clinic-referred youth (ages 2 to 17) reported using corporal punishment and severe physical aggression when asked directly via intake screening questionnaires at a community mental health center; higher prevalence rates emerged compared to families in the general population. Clinic-referred parents reported greater use of corporal punishment for younger relative to older youth, sons relative to daughters, and by single relative to married mothers. In cases with reports from both parents, mothers used corporal punishment more frequently than fathers. Demographic factors were not linked to severe physical aggression, except for mothers' treatment of sons versus daughters. After controlling for demographic factors, maternal and paternal reports of child externalizing behavior accounted for significant variance in their own and their partner's use of corporal punishment, and in mothers' use of severe physical aggression.

  7. What Writing Represents What Scientists Actually Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Often the writing that students in elementary school do in connection with science is their final report of a science fair project. They diligently file a report in the form of the scientific method--introduction, hypothesis, materials, procedure, results, and conclusion. This form of science writing persists through college courses in science,…

  8. Clinical review: Consensus recommendations on measurement of blood glucose and reporting glycemic control in critically ill adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The management reporting and assessment of glycemic control lacks standardization. The use of different methods to measure the blood glucose concentration and to report the performance of insulin treatment yields major disparities and complicates the interpretation and comparison of clinical trials. We convened a meeting of 16 experts plus invited observers from industry to discuss and where possible reach consensus on the most appropriate methods to measure and monitor blood glucose in critically ill patients and on how glycemic control should be assessed and reported. Where consensus could not be reached, recommendations on further research and data needed to reach consensus in the future were suggested. Recognizing their clear conflict of interest, industry observers played no role in developing the consensus or recommendations from the meeting. Consensus recommendations were agreed for the measurement and reporting of glycemic control in clinical trials and for the measurement of blood glucose in clinical practice. Recommendations covered the following areas: How should we measure and report glucose control when intermittent blood glucose measurements are used? What are the appropriate performance standards for intermittent blood glucose monitors in the ICU? Continuous or automated intermittent glucose monitoring - methods and technology: can we use the same measures for assessment of glucose control with continuous and intermittent monitoring? What is acceptable performance for continuous glucose monitoring systems? If implemented, these recommendations have the potential to minimize the discrepancies in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials and to improve glucose control in clinical practice. Furthermore, to be fit for use, glucose meters and continuous monitoring systems must match their performance to fit the needs of patients and clinicians in the intensive care setting. See related commentary by Soto-Rivera and Agus, http://ccforum.com/content/17

  9. Bone pain from granulocyte colony stimulating factor: does clinical trial sponsorship by a pharmaceutical company influence its reporting?

    PubMed

    Aldairy, Y; Nguyen, P L; Jatoi, A

    2011-01-01

    It is alleged that pharmaceutical companies sometimes unfairly present clinical trial results. To our knowledge, studies have not explored whether such alleged unfair reporting also occurs in the testing of palliative care agents in cancer patients, a particularly vulnerable group. Therefore, a systematic search was conducted to retrieve all published, prospective clinical trials that used granulocyte colony stimulating factor starting in 2003. Because granulocyte colony stimulating factor can cause severe bone pain - a concerning but historically under-reported symptom in cancer patients - this symptom was assessed to determine whether differences in reporting occurred based on pharmaceutical company-sponsorship. A total of 239 published clinical trials met the present study's eligibility criteria and were retrievable. Within this entire group of studies, 65 (27%) were pharmaceutical company-sponsored, and only 31 (13%) reported on bone pain. However, pharmaceutical company-sponsored trials reported on bone pain at a higher rate compared with other studies: 23% versus 9% (P= 0.005), and this conclusion did not change after adjusting for dose, use of the slow release formulation and year of publication. The reporting of adverse events from cancer symptom control and palliative care interventions should be improved - especially in trials not sponsored by pharmaceutical companies.

  10. Food-borne botulism: still actual topic.

    PubMed

    Brola, Waldemar; Fudala, Malgorzata; Gacek, Szymon; Gruenpeter, Pawel

    2013-02-06

    Even though since the mid-1990s the number of food-borne botulism cases has systematically decreased and it now occurs in Poland relatively rarely, it is still a real epidemiological problem. There are about 30 cases of botulism in Poland a year, which ranks Poland the first among the European Union. In most cases the symptomatology of botulism is typical, however it does not always fully coincide with the one described in medical manuals which emphasise the dramatic clinical course of botulism with its frequent fatal consequences. Diagnosis of botulism may be difficult because of its rare prevalence and a variable clinical course, especially in old patients. Authors of this paper describe two cases of botulism and diagnostic problems associated with it.

  11. Radioactive Doses - Predicted and Actual - and Likely Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, S; Takamura, N

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations on 11 March 2011. Here we refer to reports from international organisations as sources of predicted values obtained from environmental monitoring and dose estimation models, and reports from various institutes in Japan are used as sources of individual actual values. The World Health Organization, based on information available up to 11 September 2011 (and published in 2012), reported that characteristic effective doses in the first year after the accident, to all age groups, were estimated to be in the 10-50 mSv dose band in example locations in evacuation areas. Estimated characteristic thyroid doses to infants in Namie Town were within the 100-200 mSv dose band. A report from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation published in 2014 shows that the effective dose received by adults in evacuation areas during the first year after the accident was 1.1-13 mSv. The absorbed dose to the thyroid in evacuated settlements was 7.2-35 mSv in adults and 15-83 mSv in 1-year-old infants. Individual external radiation exposure in the initial 4 months after the accident, estimated by superimposing individual behaviour data on to a daily dose rate map, was less than 3 mSv in 93.9% of residents (maximum 15 mSv) in evacuation areas. Actual individual thyroid equivalent doses were less than 15 mSv in 98.8% of children (maximum 25 mSv) in evacuation areas. When uncertainty exists in dose estimation models, it may be sensible to err on the side of caution, and final estimated doses are often much greater than actual radiation doses. However, overestimation of the dose at the time of an accident has a great influence on the psychology of residents. More than 100 000 residents have not returned to the evacuation areas 5 years after the Fukushima accident because of the social and mental effects during the initial period of the disaster. Estimates of

  12. Radioactive Doses - Predicted and Actual - and Likely Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, S; Takamura, N

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations on 11 March 2011. Here we refer to reports from international organisations as sources of predicted values obtained from environmental monitoring and dose estimation models, and reports from various institutes in Japan are used as sources of individual actual values. The World Health Organization, based on information available up to 11 September 2011 (and published in 2012), reported that characteristic effective doses in the first year after the accident, to all age groups, were estimated to be in the 10-50 mSv dose band in example locations in evacuation areas. Estimated characteristic thyroid doses to infants in Namie Town were within the 100-200 mSv dose band. A report from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation published in 2014 shows that the effective dose received by adults in evacuation areas during the first year after the accident was 1.1-13 mSv. The absorbed dose to the thyroid in evacuated settlements was 7.2-35 mSv in adults and 15-83 mSv in 1-year-old infants. Individual external radiation exposure in the initial 4 months after the accident, estimated by superimposing individual behaviour data on to a daily dose rate map, was less than 3 mSv in 93.9% of residents (maximum 15 mSv) in evacuation areas. Actual individual thyroid equivalent doses were less than 15 mSv in 98.8% of children (maximum 25 mSv) in evacuation areas. When uncertainty exists in dose estimation models, it may be sensible to err on the side of caution, and final estimated doses are often much greater than actual radiation doses. However, overestimation of the dose at the time of an accident has a great influence on the psychology of residents. More than 100 000 residents have not returned to the evacuation areas 5 years after the Fukushima accident because of the social and mental effects during the initial period of the disaster. Estimates of

  13. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were…

  14. Cantharidin Poisoning due to Blister Beetle Ingestion in Children: Two case reports and a review of clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Al-Binali, Ali M; Shabana, Medhat; Al-Fifi, Suliman; Dawood, Sami; Shehri, Amer A; Al-Barki, Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Cantharidin is an intoxicant found in beetles in the Meloidae (Coleoptera) family. Ingestion may result in haematemesis, impaired level of consciousness, electrolyte disturbance, haematurea and renal impairment. Here, we report two paediatric cases of meloid beetle ingestion resulting in cantharidin poisoning and the clinical presentation of the ensuing intoxication.

  15. A Comparison of Three Self-Report Measures of the Broader Autism Phenotype in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Wainer, Allison; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2011-01-01

    Three self-report measures of the broader autism phenotype (BAP) were evaluated in terms of their internal consistency, distribution of scores, factor structure, and criterion-related validity in a non-clinical sample. All measures showed a continuous distribution. The SRS-A and BAPQ showed expected sex differences and were superior to the AQ in…

  16. Removable partial denture design using milled abutment surfaces and minimal soft tissue coverage for periodontally compromised teeth: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Brudvik, James S

    2008-04-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment of a partially edentulous patient with periodontally compromised teeth using a combination of single crowns and a removable partial denture (RPD). The RPD was designed to combine the benefits of milled surfaces and hygienic principles while allowing modification and addition of artificial teeth, should natural teeth be lost.

  17. Transmyocardial laser revascularization with a high-power (800 W) CO2 laser: clinical report with 50 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zheng; Zhang, Zhaoguang; Ye, Jianguang; Yu, Jianbo

    1999-09-01

    This paper reports the clinical experience in transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) with high power CO2 laser and evaluates the preliminary results of TMLR. TMLR may improve angina pectoris and myocardial perfusion significantly. To switch on the laser in proper order may be helpful to shorten duration of surgery. A gentle removal of fat on the apex may increase the successful transmyocardial penetration.

  18. Cantharidin Poisoning due to Blister Beetle Ingestion in Children: Two case reports and a review of clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Al-Binali, Ali M; Shabana, Medhat; Al-Fifi, Suliman; Dawood, Sami; Shehri, Amer A; Al-Barki, Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Cantharidin is an intoxicant found in beetles in the Meloidae (Coleoptera) family. Ingestion may result in haematemesis, impaired level of consciousness, electrolyte disturbance, haematurea and renal impairment. Here, we report two paediatric cases of meloid beetle ingestion resulting in cantharidin poisoning and the clinical presentation of the ensuing intoxication. PMID:21509239

  19. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Shokouhinejad, Noushin

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic intervention in necrotic immature permanent teeth is usually a clinical challenge. With appropriate case selection, regenerative treatment can be effective, providing a desirable outcome. However, there is still no consensus on the optimal disinfection protocol or the method to achieve predictable clinical outcome. This article presents two cases of regenerative treatment in necrotic immature teeth, using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and BiodentineTM as coronal barriers and different irrigants, which led to different clinical outcomes. PMID:26884781

  20. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Management and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Pirmoazen, Salma

    2015-06-01

    Endodontic intervention in necrotic immature permanent teeth is usually a clinical challenge. With appropriate case selection, regenerative treatment can be effective, providing a desirable outcome. However, there is still no consensus on the optimal disinfection protocol or the method to achieve predictable clinical outcome. This article presents two cases of regenerative treatment in necrotic immature teeth, using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine(TM) as coronal barriers and different irrigants, which led to different clinical outcomes.

  1. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Management and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Pirmoazen, Salma

    2015-06-01

    Endodontic intervention in necrotic immature permanent teeth is usually a clinical challenge. With appropriate case selection, regenerative treatment can be effective, providing a desirable outcome. However, there is still no consensus on the optimal disinfection protocol or the method to achieve predictable clinical outcome. This article presents two cases of regenerative treatment in necrotic immature teeth, using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine(TM) as coronal barriers and different irrigants, which led to different clinical outcomes. PMID:26884781

  2. The future of clinical chemistry and its role in healthcare: a report of the Athena Society.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Given the omnipresent cost-containment environment in which clinical chemists now work, they must adapt to a host of changed conditions and new pressures. Much of the onus of adapting is on the individual who must assume a different attitude to his or her work. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry can, and should, take a leadership role in developing a new type of laboratory director by working with other professional organizations in the clinical laboratory field to create training programs and retraining programs for existing clinical laboratory scientists, which will equip them for broader scientific and managerial responsibilities than hitherto. AACC needs to develop alliances with its sister organizations so that the common issues are addressed collectively rather than competitively. The scope of clinical chemistry must expand into areas other than traditional clinical chemistry, e.g., microbiology, immunology, certain aspects of hematology (including coagulation), and even aspects of blood banking. The former clinical chemist needs to become a clinical laboratory scientist and promote him- or herself as having cross-disciplinary expertise in analytical techniques and automation, which are the common threads linking all branches of clinical laboratory science.

  3. Adherence to CONSORT harms-reporting recommendations in publications of recent analgesic clinical trials: an ACTTION systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon M; Chang, R Daniel; Pereira, Anthony; Shah, Nirupa; Gilron, Ian; Katz, Nathaniel P; Lin, Allison H; McDermott, Michael P; Rappaport, Bob A; Rowbotham, Michael C; Sampaio, Cristina; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2012-12-01

    Recommendations for harms (ie, adverse events) reporting in randomized clinical trial publications were presented in a 2004 extension of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. Our objectives were to assess harms reporting in 3 major pain journals (European Journal of Pain, Journal of Pain, and PAIN®) to determine whether harms reporting improved following publication of the 2004 CONSORT recommendations, and to examine study factors associated with adequacy of harms reporting. A total of 101 randomized, double-blind, noninvasive pharmacologic trials were identified in the 2000-2003 (epoch 1) and 2008-2011 (epoch 2) issues of these journals. Out of 10 reporting recommendations, the mean number fulfilled was 6.08 (SD2.65). Although more harms recommendations were fulfilled in epoch 2 (m(2)=6.49, SD2.66) than in epoch 1 (m(1)=5.39, SD2.52; P=0.04), only the recommendation to report harms per arm was satisfied by >90% of trials in epoch 2, whereas <60% reported withdrawals due to harms. Several trial characteristics (study design, participant type, pain type, frequency of treatment administration, treatment administration method, sponsor, and number of randomized participants) were significantly associated with harms reporting. However, when trial characteristics and epoch were entered into a multiple regression analysis, only trials studying pain patients, those using oral treatments, and industry-sponsored trials were associated with better harms reporting. Despite some improvement in harms reporting, greater improvement is needed to provide informative, consistent reporting of adverse events and safety in analgesic clinical trials.

  4. An integrated framework for reporting clinically relevant biomarkers from paired tumor/normal genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data in support of clinical trials in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Sara; Kurdolgu, Ahmet A; Izatt, Tyler; Aldrich, Jessica; Russell, Megan L; Christoforides, Alexis; Tembe, Wiabhav; Keifer, Jeffery A; Corneveaux, Jason J; Byron, Sara A; Forman, Karen M; Zuccaro, Clarice; Keats, Jonathan J; Lorusso, Patricia M; Carpten, John D; Trent, Jeffrey M; Craig, David W

    2015-01-01

    The ability to rapidly sequence the tumor and germline DNA of an individual holds the eventual promise of revolutionizing our ability to match targeted therapies to tumors harboring the associated genetic biomarkers. Analyzing high throughput genomic data consisting of millions of base pairs and discovering alterations in clinically actionable genes in a structured and real time manner is at the crux of personalized testing. This requires a computational architecture that can monitor and track a system within a regulated environment as terabytes of data are reduced to a small number of therapeutically relevant variants, delivered as a diagnostic laboratory developed test. These high complexity assays require data structures that enable real-time and retrospective ad-hoc analysis, with a capability of updating to keep up with the rapidly changing genomic and therapeutic options, all under a regulated environment that is relevant under both CMS and FDA depending on application. We describe a flexible computational framework that uses a paired tumor/normal sample allowing for complete analysis and reporting in approximately 24 hours, providing identification of single nucleotide changes, small insertions and deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, gene fusions and gene expression with positive predictive values over 90%. In this paper we present the challenges in integrating clinical, genomic and annotation databases to provide interpreted draft reports which we utilize within ongoing clinical research protocols. We demonstrate the need to retire from existing performance measurements of accuracy and specificity and measure metrics that are meaningful to a genomic diagnostic environment. This paper presents a three-tier infrastructure that is currently being used to analyze an individual genome and provide available therapeutic options via a clinical report. Our framework utilizes a non-relational variant-centric database that is scaleable to a large amount of data and

  5. Proposed best practice for statisticians in the reporting and publication of pharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Matcham, James; Julious, Steven; Pyke, Stephen; O'Kelly, Michael; Todd, Susan; Seldrup, Jorgen; Day, Simon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we set out what we consider to be a set of best practices for statisticians in the reporting of pharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials. We make eight recommendations covering: author responsibilities and recognition; publication timing; conflicts of interest; freedom to act; full author access to data; trial registration and independent review. These recommendations are made in the context of the prominent role played by statisticians in the design, conduct, analysis and reporting of pharmaceutical sponsored trials and the perception of the reporting of these trials in the wider community.

  6. Actual Body Weight and the Parent's Perspective of Child's Body Weight among Rural Canadian Children.

    PubMed

    Karunanayake, Chandima P; Rennie, Donna C; Hildebrand, Carole; Lawson, Joshua A; Hagel, Louise; Dosman, James A; Pahwa, Punam; The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study Team

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of being overweight during childhood continues to increase in the USA and Canada and children living in rural areas are more at risk than their urban counterparts. The objectives of this study were to evaluate how well the parent's perception of their child's weight status correlated with objectively measured weight status among a group of rural children and to identify predictors of inaccurate parental perceptions of child's weight status. Participants were children from the Saskatchewan Rural Health Study conducted in 2010. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed through rural schools to parents of children in grades one to eight. Parents reported their child's height and weight and rated their child's weight status (underweight, just about the right weight, or overweight). Standardized body mass index (BMI) categories were calculated for clinically measured height and weight and for parental report of height and weight for 584 children. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of misclassification of the parent's perception of child's weight status adjusting for potential confounders. Clinically measured overweight was much higher (26.5%) compared to parental perceived overweight (7.9%). The misclassification of the child's BMI was more likely to occur if the child was a boy (odds ratio (OR) = 1.58) or non-Caucasian (OR = 2.03). Overweight was high in this group of rural children and parental perception of weight status underestimated the actual weight status of overweight school-age children. Parental reporting of child weight status has implications for public health policy and prevention strategies. Future research should focus on assessing longitudinal effects of parental misperceptions of child's weight status. PMID:27527235

  7. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Research Clinical Advisory Panel (RCAP) Meeting. [Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) Research and Clinical Advisory Panel convened on December 1, 2014 at the ISS Conference Facility in Houston. The panel members were provided updates to the current clinical cases and treatment plans along with the latest research activities (http://humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/Risks/?i=105) and preliminary study results. The following is a summary of this meeting.

  8. Tessier 3 cleft with clinical anophthalmia: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wenbin, Zhang; Hanjiang, Wu; Xiaoli, Chen; Zhonglin, Li

    2007-01-01

    Tessier 3 cleft with clinical anophthalmia is one of the rarest craniofacial clefts, and hence little has been published about its management and treatment. This article presents two cases of Tessier 3 cleft with clinical anophthalmia. A review of the literature helps to diagnose these complex facial deformities. The treatment and etiopathogenesis are discussed.

  9. Reliability of Diagnosing Clinical Hypothyroidism in Adults with Down Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V. P.

    1995-01-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing hypothyroidism in 160 adults with Down syndrome was examined. A significant association between a clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism and increasing age was found but no significant association was found between a clinical and a biochemical diagnosis. Regular biochemical screening is recommended. (Author/SW)

  10. The Clinical Practice of Traditional and Nontraditional Dental Hygienists. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, E. Marcia

    Information is presented on a study designed to gather details about the services provided by clinical dental hygienists in traditional and nontraditional settings. The 10 research topics addressed include: services provided by the clinical RDH in the traditional and nontraditional setting; time allocated for such services; how patients are…

  11. Provider perceptions of the value of same-day, electronic patient-reported measures for use in clinical HIV care.

    PubMed

    Fredericksen, R J; Tufano, J; Ralston, J; McReynolds, J; Stewart, M; Lober, W B; Mayer, K H; Mathews, W C; Mugavero, M J; Crane, P K; Crane, H M

    2016-11-01

    Strong evidence suggests that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) aid in managing chronic conditions, reduce omissions in care, and improve patient-provider communication. However, provider acceptability of PROs and their use in clinical HIV care is not well known. We interviewed providers (n = 27) from four geographically diverse HIV and community care clinics in the US that have integrated PROs into routine HIV care, querying perceived value, challenges, and use of PRO data. Perceived benefits included the ability of PROs to identify less-observable behaviors and conditions, particularly suicidal ideation, depression, and substance use; usefulness in agenda setting prior to a visit; and reduction of social desirability bias in patient-provider communication. Challenges included initial flow integration issues and ease of interpretation of PRO feedback. Providers value same-day, electronic patient-reported measures for use in clinical HIV care with the condition that PROs are (1) tailored to be the most clinically relevant to their population; (2) well integrated into clinic flow; and (3) easy to interpret, highlighting chief patient concerns and changes over time. PMID:27237187

  12. Provider perceptions of the value of same-day, electronic patient-reported measures for use in clinical HIV care.

    PubMed

    Fredericksen, R J; Tufano, J; Ralston, J; McReynolds, J; Stewart, M; Lober, W B; Mayer, K H; Mathews, W C; Mugavero, M J; Crane, P K; Crane, H M

    2016-11-01

    Strong evidence suggests that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) aid in managing chronic conditions, reduce omissions in care, and improve patient-provider communication. However, provider acceptability of PROs and their use in clinical HIV care is not well known. We interviewed providers (n = 27) from four geographically diverse HIV and community care clinics in the US that have integrated PROs into routine HIV care, querying perceived value, challenges, and use of PRO data. Perceived benefits included the ability of PROs to identify less-observable behaviors and conditions, particularly suicidal ideation, depression, and substance use; usefulness in agenda setting prior to a visit; and reduction of social desirability bias in patient-provider communication. Challenges included initial flow integration issues and ease of interpretation of PRO feedback. Providers value same-day, electronic patient-reported measures for use in clinical HIV care with the condition that PROs are (1) tailored to be the most clinically relevant to their population; (2) well integrated into clinic flow; and (3) easy to interpret, highlighting chief patient concerns and changes over time.

  13. Clinically Determined and Self-Reported Dental Caries Status During and After Pregnancy Among Low-Income Hispanic Women

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Jane A.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Santo, William; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This analysis assessed, during and one-year after pregnancy: 1) the prevalence of and relationship between self-reported and clinically determined dental caries and oral health status, and whether self-reports are a potential proxy for professional determination; 2) factors associated with high levels of professionally determined or self-reported oral disease. Methods Data are from a randomized clinical trial of 301 pregnant, low-income Hispanic women at the California-Mexico border to compare two interventions to prevent early childhood caries. Interviews and dental examinations were conducted at enrollment (second trimester) and one-year post-partum (PP). Results During pregnancy and PP, 93% had untreated caries and most had gingival inflammation. Sensitivity and specificity of self-reported measures compared to dentists’ determinations were modest (ranging from 45–80% for sensitivity and 41–77% for specificity at both time points); positive predictive values for women reporting current tooth decay or fair/poor oral health were high (>94%), but negative predictive values were low (<23%). In a bivariate GEE model, factors associated with fair/poor self-reported oral health during and after pregnancy included self-reported dental symptoms (current tooth decay, bleeding gums without brushing), dental behaviors (not flossing) and number of decayed tooth surfaces. In a logistic regression model, the only significant factor PP associated with less extensive untreated disease was if women ever had their teeth cleaned professionally (OR=0.44). Conclusions There is a great need for dental treatment in this underserved population both during pregnancy and PP. Women may not be able to accurately recognize or act on their treatment needs. At baseline and PP, few demographic or behavioral factors were associated with either self-reported or clinically-determined oral disease (e.g., being less educated or acculturated and not flossing) in the bivariate

  14. Programa Actual 1991 (Current Programme 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This annual report for the Bernard van Leer Foundation describes the foundation's activities during 1990. The foundation seeks to promote the development of human resources in communities with social, economic, and cultural problems, focusing its efforts on the needs of young children. The first part of the publication contains a general…

  15. Can Some Marine-Derived Fungal Metabolites Become Actual Anticancer Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Lefranc, Florence; Kijjoa, Anake; Kiss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Marine fungi are known to produce structurally unique secondary metabolites, and more than 1000 marine fungal-derived metabolites have already been reported. Despite the absence of marine fungal-derived metabolites in the current clinical pipeline, dozens of them have been classified as potential chemotherapy candidates because of their anticancer activity. Over the last decade, several comprehensive reviews have covered the potential anticancer activity of marine fungal-derived metabolites. However, these reviews consider the term “cytotoxicity” to be synonymous with “anticancer agent”, which is not actually true. Indeed, a cytotoxic compound is by definition a poisonous compound. To become a potential anticancer agent, a cytotoxic compound must at least display (i) selectivity between normal and cancer cells (ii) activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells; and (iii) a preferentially non-apoptotic cell death mechanism, as it is now well known that a high proportion of cancer cells that resist chemotherapy are in fact apoptosis-resistant cancer cells against which pro-apoptotic drugs have more than limited efficacy. The present review thus focuses on the cytotoxic marine fungal-derived metabolites whose ability to kill cancer cells has been reported in the literature. Particular attention is paid to the compounds that kill cancer cells through non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms. PMID:26090846

  16. Can Some Marine-Derived Fungal Metabolites Become Actual Anticancer Agents?

    PubMed

    Gomes, Nelson G M; Lefranc, Florence; Kijjoa, Anake; Kiss, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Marine fungi are known to produce structurally unique secondary metabolites, and more than 1000 marine fungal-derived metabolites have already been reported. Despite the absence of marine fungal-derived metabolites in the current clinical pipeline, dozens of them have been classified as potential chemotherapy candidates because of their anticancer activity. Over the last decade, several comprehensive reviews have covered the potential anticancer activity of marine fungal-derived metabolites. However, these reviews consider the term "cytotoxicity" to be synonymous with "anticancer agent", which is not actually true. Indeed, a cytotoxic compound is by definition a poisonous compound. To become a potential anticancer agent, a cytotoxic compound must at least display (i) selectivity between normal and cancer cells (ii) activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells; and (iii) a preferentially non-apoptotic cell death mechanism, as it is now well known that a high proportion of cancer cells that resist chemotherapy are in fact apoptosis-resistant cancer cells against which pro-apoptotic drugs have more than limited efficacy. The present review thus focuses on the cytotoxic marine fungal-derived metabolites whose ability to kill cancer cells has been reported in the literature. Particular attention is paid to the compounds that kill cancer cells through non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms. PMID:26090846

  17. Can the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - Self-Report Version Be Used to Differentiate Clinical and Non-Clinical SAD Groups among Brazilians?

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Larissa F.; Loureiro, Sonia R.; Crippa, José A. S.; Osório, Flávia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) was the first evaluation instrument developed for screening for the signs and symptoms of Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and is currently still the most used worldwide. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of the LSAS - self-report version (LSAS-SR) to discriminate different Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) clinical groups. Method The sample was composed of Brazilians university students, allocated into three different groups, i.e., cases (C=118), non-cases (NC=95) and subclinical cases (SC=39). To achieve the aim, calculations of the ROC Curve and ANOVA were performed. Results The results found were excellent regardless of the technique used, highlighting the discriminatory capacity of the LSAS-SR. The score equal to or greater than 32 is suggested as a cutoff score for the Brazilian population, since this presented balance between the standards evaluated and the ability to differentiate both clinical and subclinical SAD cases from non-cases. Conclusion Despite the specific sample used in this study being composed only of university students, the use of the LSAS-SR can be indicated, in the Brazilian setting, for SAD screening in both clinical and research contexts. PMID:25811489

  18. Fixed full-arch implant-supported prostheses in a patient with epidermolysis bullosa: a clinical case history report.

    PubMed

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Guzmán-Letelier, Marcelo; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare skin disorder characterized by blister formation in response to minor trauma and accompanied by extracutaneous manifestations. The use of endosseous implants to support fixed prostheses for the rehabilitation of patients with recessive dystrophic EB might provide a considerably better clinical treatment outcome than traditional prosthodontic interventions. This case history report describes the clinical management of such an afflicted patient. Implants were placed immediately following teeth extractions and subsequently loaded with fixed full-arch prostheses. This treatment option is proposed for patients with recessive dystrophic EB to preclude mucosal irritation associated with wearing removable prostheses.

  19. 40 CFR 74.22 - Actual SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Actual SO2 emissions rate. 74.22... (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.22 Actual SO2 emissions... actual SO2 emissions rate shall be 1985. (2) For combustion sources that commenced operation...

  20. Actualization and the Fear of Death: Retesting an Existential Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Keith; Robinson, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    Demonstrates that within a group of highly actualized individuals, the degree to which "own death" is integrated into constructs of self is a far more powerful predictor of fear of death than actualization. Findings suggest that actualization and integration are independent in their overall effect on fear of death. (Author)

  1. Design of clinical trials in acute kidney injury: report from an NIDDK workshop on trial methodology.

    PubMed

    Palevsky, Paul M; Molitoris, Bruce A; Okusa, Mark D; Levin, Adeera; Waikar, Sushrut S; Wald, Ron; Chertow, Glenn M; Murray, Patrick T; Parikh, Chirag R; Shaw, Andrew D; Go, Alan S; Faubel, Sarah G; Kellum, John A; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Liu, Kathleen D; Cheung, Alfred K; Weisbord, Steven D; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kaufman, James S; Devarajan, Prasad; Toto, Robert M; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Greene, Tom; Mehta, Ravindra L; Stokes, John B; Thompson, Aliza M; Thompson, B Taylor; Westenfelder, Christof S; Tumlin, James A; Warnock, David G; Shah, Sudhir V; Xie, Yining; Duggan, Emily G; Kimmel, Paul L; Star, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a complex clinical problem associated with significant short-term morbidity and mortality and lacking effective pharmacologic interventions. Patients with AKI experience longer-term risks for progressive chronic ESRD, which diminish patients' health-related quality of life and create a larger burden on the healthcare system. Although experimental models have yielded numerous promising agents, translation into clinical practice has been unsuccessful, possibly because of issues in clinical trial design, such as delayed drug administration, masking of therapeutic benefit by adverse events, and inadequate sample size. To address issues of clinical trial design, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases sponsored a workshop titled "Clinical Trials in Acute Kidney Injury: Current Opportunities and Barriers" in December 2010. Workshop participants included representatives from academia, industry, and government agencies whose areas of expertise spanned basic science, clinical nephrology, critical care medicine, biostatistics, pharmacology, and drug development. This document summarizes the discussions of collaborative workgroups that addressed issues related to patient selection, study endpoints, the role of novel biomarkers, sample size and power calculations, and adverse events and pilot/feasibility studies in prevention and treatment of AKI. Companion articles outline the discussions of workgroups for model trials related to prevention or treatment of established AKI in different clinical settings, such as in patients with sepsis.

  2. Actual leisure participation of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dolva, Anne-Stine; Kleiven, Jo; Kollstad, Marit

    2014-02-01

    This article reports the actual participation in leisure activities by a sample of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome aged 14. Representing a first generation to grow up in a relatively inclusive context, they live with their families, attend mainstream schools, and are part of common community life. Leisure information was obtained in individual, structured parent interviews, and added to existing longitudinal data from a project following the sample. Generally, the leisure activity may be viewed as varying along a continuum-reaching from formal, organized, and assisted activity participation outside home, to informal, self-organized, and independent participation at home. Formal leisure activities were either organized "for all" or "adapted for disabled." The adolescents' leisure appears as active and social. However, social participation largely involved parents and family, while socializing with other adolescents mainly took place within formal activities adapted for disabled. Clearly, formal and informal activities provide rather different opportunities for social encounters and assistance. PMID:24515503

  3. Aesthetic Treatment Related to Clinical Need--An Illustrated Case Report.

    PubMed

    Worskett, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Aesthetic treatment may be patient driven and usually by a 'want', rather than a 'need'. This paper describes the management of a patient who presented with aesthetic wants and clinical needs, both of which were caused as a result of unsuccessful aesthetic treatment which the patient had received previously. The diagnostic process, discussion of the treatment plan and clinical procedures, which produced a satisfactory result, are described and illustrated. Clinical Relevance: This case demonstrates that aesthetic treatment may commit the patient to future dental treatment needs, particularly if treatment provided is poorly planned and carried out to an unsatisfactory standard. PMID:26076548

  4. Problems in the reporting of acne clinical trials: a spot check from the 2009 Annual Evidence Update on Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ingram, John R; Grindlay, Douglas J C; Williams, Hywel C

    2010-07-12

    In the course of producing the 2009 NHS Evidence--skin disorders Annual Evidence Update on Acne Vulgaris, 25 randomised controlled trials were examined. From these, at least 12 potentially serious problems of trial reporting were identified. Several trials concluded no effect of a treatment yet they were insufficiently powered to exclude potentially useful benefits. There were examples of duplicate publication and "salami publication", as well as two trials being combined and reported as one. In some cases, an incorrect "within-groups" statistical comparison was made and one trial report omitted original efficacy data and included only P values. Both of the non-inferiority studies examined failed to pre-specify a non-inferiority margin. Trials reported as "double-blind" compared treatments that were dissimilar in appearance or had differing adverse effect profiles. In one case an intention-to-treat analysis was not performed and there was a failure to account for all of the randomized participants. Trial results were made to sound more impressive by selective outcome reporting, emphasizing the statistical significance of treatment effects that were clinically insignificant, and by the use of larger-sounding odds ratios rather than rate ratios for common events. Most of the reporting problems could have been avoided by use of the CONSORT guidelines and prospective trial registration on a public clinical trials database.

  5. 45 CFR 60.11 - Reporting adverse actions on clinical privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... clinical privileges of a physician or dentist for a period longer than 30 days; (ii) Acceptance of the...) Social Security Number, if known, and if obtained in accordance with section 7 of the Privacy Act of...

  6. [Diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: clinical, anatomopathologic, and therapeutic features. Report ot 9 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Dahami, Z; Dakir, M; Aboutaieb, R; Sarf, I; Elattar, H; Azzouzi, S; Bennani, S; Elmrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-11-01

    Diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is a rare chronic pyelonephritis. This study permitted us to notice the various histological, clinical, radiological, and the different means diagnoses of this affection. Retrospectively series of nine patients is reported. The median age was 43 years. The commonest clinical presentation was urinary tract infection, and lumbar pain. Urine culture identified a bacteria in seven cases (77%). Intravenous urography recovers silent kidney (five cases), hydronephrosis (two cases), chronic pyelonephritis (one case) and renal stones in six cases (67%). Treatment consisted of nephrectomy. No specific biological or radiological signs of this affection can be identifying this lesion in preoperative. The diagnosis was revealed by the histological examination of the removed kidney. The outcome is favorable after a follow-up of six months to four years. The clinical features of the pyelonephritis xanthogranulomatous is not specific. Magnetic resonance imaging can give a specificity to this affection. Only histological examination is able to established the definitive diagnosis.

  7. Self-reported hand hygiene perceptions and barriers among companion animal veterinary clinic personnel in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Maureen E C; Weese, J Scott

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the perceived importance of and barriers to hand hygiene among companion animal clinic staff. An anonymous, voluntary written questionnaire was completed by 356 of approximately 578 individuals (62%) from 49/51 clinics. On a scale of 1 (not important) to 7 (very important), the percentage of respondents who rated hand hygiene as a 5 or higher was at least 82% in all clinical scenarios queried. The most frequently reported reason for not performing hand hygiene was forgetting to do so (40%, 141/353). Specific discussion of hand hygiene practices at work was recalled by 32% (114/354) of respondents. Although veterinary staff seem to recognize the importance of hand hygiene, it should be emphasized more during staff training. Other barriers including time constraints and skin irritation should also be addressed, possibly through increased access to and use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. PMID:26933265

  8. Self-reported hand hygiene perceptions and barriers among companion animal veterinary clinic personnel in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Maureen E.C.; Weese, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the perceived importance of and barriers to hand hygiene among companion animal clinic staff. An anonymous, voluntary written questionnaire was completed by 356 of approximately 578 individuals (62%) from 49/51 clinics. On a scale of 1 (not important) to 7 (very important), the percentage of respondents who rated hand hygiene as a 5 or higher was at least 82% in all clinical scenarios queried. The most frequently reported reason for not performing hand hygiene was forgetting to do so (40%, 141/353). Specific discussion of hand hygiene practices at work was recalled by 32% (114/354) of respondents. Although veterinary staff seem to recognize the importance of hand hygiene, it should be emphasized more during staff training. Other barriers including time constraints and skin irritation should also be addressed, possibly through increased access to and use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. PMID:26933265

  9. Public reporting of clinical quality data: an update for cardiovascular specialists.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Gregory J; Drozda, Joseph P; Brindis, Ralph G; Masoudi, Frederick A; Rumsfeld, John S; Slattery, Lara E; Oetgen, William J

    2014-04-01

    Public reporting of hospital and individual provider quality of care measures is not a new concept. In the United States, the first national public reports of hospital mortality data occurred in 1986, and detailed physician-level data for cardiac surgery are now reported in 4 states. The development of the "Hospital Compare," and more recently, the "Physician Compare" websites has further expanded public reporting for hospitals and providers. Several professional organizations, including the American Medical Association, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American College of Cardiology, have published policy statements articulating key principles to guide the public reporting process. Despite the rapid proliferation of public reporting efforts, more research is needed to better define meaningful measures to report and fully understand the impact of public reporting on healthcare delivery.

  10. [Dogs babesiosis--still actually problem].

    PubMed

    Adaszek, Łukasz; Winiarczyk, Stanisław

    2008-01-01

    Babesiosis (piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease with a symptoms of hemolytic anemia. For the first time babesiosis was described in dogs in United States in 1934. The etiological factor of this disease in Poland is protozoa Babesia canis, and its vector--Dermacentor-tick. The most common symptoms of babesiosis are: icterus, hemoglobinuria, occasionally vomits and diarrhea. The biochemical examination of blood serum from sick animals can reveal the increase of activity of AST, ALT, the increase of total bilirubine, urea and creatynine concentrations. The results of hematological examinations can show anemia, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis of babesiosis bases on anamnesis, clinical examinations of dogs, microscopical examinations of blood smears from sick animals; IF-assay and PCR can also be helpful for the diagnosis of babesiosis. Till now does not exist the effective immunoprophylaxis against this disease. Babesiosis is well-known disease, however there are still problems with therapy of infected animals. Most effective drug in therapy of dog piroplasmosis is imidocarb, but sometimes can be observed side effects after it application. It is possible that the genetically differences which are detected in subspecies may have an influence on the severity of disease and the effectiveness of therapy.

  11. Oral rehabilitation of a patient with bruxism and cluster implant failures in the edentulous maxilla: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Ercoli, Carlo; Lowenguth, Roxanne; Yerke, Lisa M; Morton, Dean

    2012-07-01

    For most patients with failed dental implants, the placement of new implants is the only option that allows for retreatment with a fixed dental prosthesis. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a history of bruxism and cluster implant failures in the edentulous maxilla 10 years after the insertion of a milled bar overdenture. Seven failed implants were removed and simultaneous bone grafting was performed. After an 8-month healing period, 8 dental implants with new surfaces were placed. These supported a metal ceramic fixed complete denture with a metal occlusal surface. The prosthesis was retained with 3 sections of milled bars and 3 set screws. This clinical report describes the details of the treatment with an emphasis on prosthetics. PMID:22765983

  12. Recommendations for standardizing glucose reporting and analysis to optimize clinical decision making in diabetes: the ambulatory glucose profile.

    PubMed

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Ahmann, Andrew J; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H; Garg, Satish K; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B; Klonoff, David C; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S; Olson, Beth A; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients.

  13. Recommendations for standardizing glucose reporting and analysis to optimize clinical decision making in diabetes: the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP).

    PubMed

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Ahmann, Andrew J; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H; Garg, Satish K; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B; Klonoff, David C; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S; Olson, Beth A; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardization of analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from CGM systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP), and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This paper provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients.

  14. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F.; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.; Olson, Beth A.; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A.; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  15. Impaired Physical Performance and Clinical Responses after a Recreational Bodybuilder's Self-Administration of Steroids: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Veras, Katherine; Silva-Junior, Fernando Lopes; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; De-Oliveira, Fernando Roberto; Pires, Flávio Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    We reported clinical and physical responses to 7 weeks of anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) self-administration in a male recreational bodybuilder. He was self-administrating a total of 3,250 mg of testosterone when his previous and current clinical and physical trials records were revisited. Body shape, performance, and biochemistry results were clustered into three phases labeled PRE (before the self-use), POST I (immediately at the cessation of the 7-week administration), and POST II (12 weeks after the cessation). Elevated testosterone and estradiol levels were observed in the POST I phase, while hepatic and renal functions remained altered in the POST II phase. Body mass and body fat percentages increased throughout the three phases. When adjusted according to body mass, drops in aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity (2.1% to 12.9%) were observed across the phases. This case report shows that overall performance decreased when a bodybuilding practitioner self-administered AAS.

  16. Guidance from an NIH Workshop on Designing, Implementing, and Reporting Clinical Studies of Soy Interventions1–4

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marguerite A.; Nahin, Richard L.; Messina, Mark J.; Rader, Jeanne I.; Thompson, Lilian U.; Badger, Thomas M.; Dwyer, Johanna T.; Kim, Young S.; Pontzer, Carol H.; Starke-Reed, Pamela E.; Weaver, Connie M.

    2010-01-01

    The NIH sponsored a scientific workshop, “Soy Protein/Isoflavone Research: Challenges in Designing and Evaluating Intervention Studies,” July 28–29, 2009. The workshop goal was to provide guidance for the next generation of soy protein/isoflavone human research. Session topics included population exposure to soy; the variability of the human response to soy; product composition; methods, tools, and resources available to estimate exposure and protocol adherence; and analytical methods to assess soy in foods and supplements and analytes in biologic fluids and other tissues. The intent of the workshop was to address the quality of soy studies, not the efficacy or safety of soy. Prior NIH workshops and an evidence-based review questioned the quality of data from human soy studies. If clinical studies are pursued, investigators need to ensure that the experimental designs are optimal and the studies properly executed. The workshop participants identified methodological issues that may confound study results and interpretation. Scientifically sound and useful options for dealing with these issues were discussed. The resulting guidance is presented in this document with a brief rationale. The guidance is specific to soy clinical research and does not address nonsoy-related factors that should also be considered in designing and reporting clinical studies. This guidance may be used by investigators, journal editors, study sponsors, and protocol reviewers for a variety of purposes, including designing and implementing trials, reporting results, and interpreting published epidemiological and clinical studies. PMID:20392880

  17. Management of ingested foreign bodies in children: a clinical report of the NASPGHAN Endoscopy Committee.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Robert E; Lerner, Diana G; Lin, Tom; Manfredi, Michael; Shah, Manoj; Stephen, Thomas C; Gibbons, Troy E; Pall, Harpreet; Sahn, Ben; McOmber, Mark; Zacur, George; Friedlander, Joel; Quiros, Antonio J; Fishman, Douglas S; Mamula, Petar

    2015-04-01

    Foreign body ingestions in children are some of the most challenging clinical scenarios facing pediatric gastroenterologists. Determining the indications and timing for intervention requires assessment of patient size, type of object ingested, location, clinical symptoms, time since ingestion, and myriad other factors. Often the easiest and least anxiety-producing decision is the one to proceed to endoscopic removal, instead of observation alone. Because of variability in pediatric patient size, there are less firm guidelines available to determine which type of object will safely pass, as opposed to the clearer guidelines in the adult population. In addition, the imprecise nature of the histories often leaves the clinician to question the timing and nature of the ingestion. Furthermore, changes in the types of ingestions encountered, specifically button batteries and high-powered magnet ingestions, create an even greater potential for severe morbidity and mortality among children. As a result, clinical guidelines regarding management of these ingestions in children remain varied and sporadic, with little in the way of prospective data to guide their development. An expert panel of pediatric endoscopists was convened and produced the present article that outlines practical clinical approaches to the pediatric patient with a variety of foreign body ingestions. This guideline is intended as an educational tool that may help inform pediatric endoscopists in managing foreign body ingestions in children. Medical decision making, however, remains a complex process requiring integration of clinical data beyond the scope of these guidelines. These guidelines should therefore not be considered to be a rule or to be establishing a legal standard of care. Caregivers may well choose a course of action outside of those represented in these guidelines because of specific patient circumstances. Furthermore, additional clinical studies may be necessary to clarify aspects based on

  18. The Assessment of Grammatical Development in Children and the Clinical Presentation of Grammatical Structure to Children with Language Problems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenigsknecht, Roy A.; Lee, Laura L.

    This document reports on three years of clinical research involving the development of effective clinical intervention procedures for children with slow language development. The assessment and treatment approaches discussed in the report are based upon the developmental model of grammar described in Developmental Sentence Analysis (DSA), a…

  19. Two Years Later: Journals Are Not Yet Enforcing the ARRIVE Guidelines on Reporting Standards for Pre-Clinical Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David; Lidster, Katie; Sottomayor, Ana; Amor, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern that poor experimental design and lack of transparent reporting contribute to the frequent failure of pre-clinical animal studies to translate into treatments for human disease. In 2010, the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines were introduced to help improve reporting standards. They were published in PLOS Biology and endorsed by funding agencies and publishers and their journals, including PLOS, Nature research journals, and other top-tier journals. Yet our analysis of papers published in PLOS and Nature journals indicates that there has been very little improvement in reporting standards since then. This suggests that authors, referees, and editors generally are ignoring guidelines, and the editorial endorsement is yet to be effectively implemented. PMID:24409096

  20. Two years later: journals are not yet enforcing the ARRIVE guidelines on reporting standards for pre-clinical animal studies.

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Lidster, Katie; Sottomayor, Ana; Amor, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern that poor experimental design and lack of transparent reporting contribute to the frequent failure of pre-clinical animal studies to translate into treatments for human disease. In 2010, the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines were introduced to help improve reporting standards. They were published in PLOS Biology and endorsed by funding agencies and publishers and their journals, including PLOS, Nature research journals, and other top-tier journals. Yet our analysis of papers published in PLOS and Nature journals indicates that there has been very little improvement in reporting standards since then. This suggests that authors, referees, and editors generally are ignoring guidelines, and the editorial endorsement is yet to be effectively implemented.