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Sample records for actual clinical reporting

  1. Clinical equipoise: actual or hypothetical disagreement?

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Scott

    2013-12-01

    In his influential 1987 essay, "Equipoise and The Ethics of Randomized Clinical Research," Benjamin Freedman argued that Charles Fried's theoretical equipoise requirement threatened clinical research because it was overwhelmingly fragile and rendered unethical too many randomized clinical trials. Freedman, therefore, proposed an alternative requirement, the clinical equipoise requirement, which is now considered to be the fundamental or guiding principle concerning the ethics of enrolling patients in randomized clinical trials. In this essay I argue that Freedman's clinical equipoise requirement is ambiguous and can be interpreted in (at least) two different ways. I furthermore claim that, ironically, the best interpretation of the clinical equipoise requirement opens Freedman to the same objection that he leveled against Fried twenty-five years ago; namely, that it (Freedman's clinical equipoise requirement) renders unethical too many randomized clinical trials.

  2. Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Lindsay; Tartaglia, Nicole; Hagerman, Randi; Riley, Karen

    2013-01-01

    A case of a 14-year-old boy with both fragile X syndrome and Down syndrome is described. This is the third reported case of a patient with fragile X syndrome plus Down syndrome and the first reported case in a male. Facial features are generally consistent with Down syndrome; however, a prominent forehead and jaw and maccroorchidism were consistent with fragile X syndrome. Joint laxity is also present, which is consistent with both disorders. Cognitive impairment is more significant than in his siblings with fragile X syndrome, and he meets criteria for autistic disorder. Ongoing behavioral dysregulation has been significant, leading to disruption of home and school environments despite many attempted psychopharmacologic and behavioral strategies and a supportive family. Identification and treatment of underlying medical problems (esophagitis) led to improvements in sleep and behavior. We emphasize discussion of challenges in his behavioral management and present a collaborative approach to behavioral management. PMID:20453578

  3. Optimal maintenance and consolidation therapy for multiple myeloma in actual clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Sup; Min, Chang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant plasma cell-originating cancer. Although its treatment outcomes have improved with the use of glucocorticoids, alkylating drugs, and novel agents, including proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib) and immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide), relapse remains a serious problem. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation and frontline treatments in non-transplant patients include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve the depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Many clinical trials have reported increased progression-free and overall survival rates after consolidation and maintenance therapy. The role of consolidation/maintenance therapy has been assessed in patients eligible and ineligible for transplantation and is a valuable option in clinical trial settings. However, the decision to use consolidation and/or maintenance therapy needs to be guided by the individual patient situation in actual clinical practice. This review analyzes the currently available evidence from several reported clinical trials to determine the optimal consolidation and maintenance therapy in clinical practice. PMID:27604793

  4. The Lived-Experience of Novice Nurse's Actualizing Clinical Reasoning in Academic Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinker, Mary Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this existential-phenomenological study was to address the first-person perspective of what it is like to experience clinical reasoning during a simulation. It was not known how a novice nurse would describe the experience of actualizing clinical reasoning during the academic simulation experience. In order to maintain the…

  5. Effect of Supervisor Actually Writing Performance Reports, Sex, and Communication between Workers on Organizational Effectiveness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    SUPERVISOR ACTUALLY WRITING PERFORMANCE AU-APIT-LS Technical REPORTS, SEX, AND COMUNICATION BETWEEN WORKERS Report ON ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS 6...Technolcy (ATC Interpersonal comunication flterwfl A L 4.... Supervisory performance evalaution 20. ABSTRACT (Continue an reverse aide It necesry and

  6. Does medical students’ clinical performance affect their actual performance during medical internship?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eui-Ryoung; Chung, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study examines the relationship between the clinical performance of medical students and their performance as doctors during their internships. METHODS This retrospective study involved 63 applicants of a residency programme conducted at Chonnam National University Hospital, South Korea, in November 2012. We compared the performance of the applicants during their internship with their clinical performance during their fourth year of medical school. The performance of the applicants as interns was periodically evaluated by the faculty of each department, while their clinical performance as fourth-year medical students was assessed using the Clinical Performance Examination (CPX) and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). RESULTS The performance of the applicants as interns was positively correlated with their clinical performance as fourth-year medical students, as measured by the CPX and OSCE. The performance of the applicants as interns was moderately correlated with the patient-physician interaction items addressing communication and interpersonal skills in the CPX. CONCLUSION The clinical performance of medical students during their fourth year in medical school was related to their performance as medical interns. Medical students should be trained to develop good clinical skills through actual encounters with patients or simulated encounters using manikins, to enable them to become more competent doctors. PMID:26768172

  7. Urban rail transit projects: Forecast versus actual ridership and costs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, D.H.

    1989-10-01

    Substantial errors in forecasting ridership and costs for the ten rail transit projects reviewed in the report put forth the possibility that more accurate forecasts would have led decision-makers to select projects other than those reviewed. The study examines the accuracy of forecasts prepared for ten major capital improvement projects in nine urban areas during 1971-1987. Each project includes construction of a fixed transit guideway: Rapid Rail or Metrorail (Washington DC, Atlanta, Baltimore, Miami); Light Rail Transit (Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Portland, Sacramento); and Downtown Peoplemover (Miami and Detroit). The study examines why actual costs and ridership differed so markedly from their forecast values. It focuses on the accuracy of projections made available to local decision-makers at the time when the choice among alternative projects was actually made. The study compares forecast and actual values for four types of measures: ridership, capital costs and financing, operating and maintenance costs, and cost-effectiveness. The report is organized into 6 chapters, numerous tables, and an appendix that documents the sources of all data appearing in the tables presented in the report.

  8. Actual concepts in rhinosinusitis: a review of clinical presentations, inflammatory pathways, cytokine profiles, remodeling, and management.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Philippe; Poirrier, Anne Lise; De Dorlodot, Clotilde; Van Zele, Thibaut; Watelet, Jean Baptiste; Bertrand, Bernard

    2011-04-01

    Rhinosinusitis (RS) is a heterogeneous group of diseases. It is a significant and increasing health problem that affects about 15% of the population in Western countries. It has a substantial impact on patients' health-related quality of life and daily functioning and represents a huge financial burden to society and the health care system as a result of the direct and indirect costs. In addition, RS is not well-understood, and little is known about the etiology and pathophysiology. In the past decade, many papers have been published that have changed our understanding of RS. RS is commonly classified into acute and chronic RS based on symptom duration. In acute RS, an inflammatory reaction initiated by a viral infection characterizes most uncomplicated, mild to moderate cases. Therefore, the first line of treatment for these cases are intranasal steroids and not antibiotics. In severe and complicated cases, antibiotics combined with topical steroids remain the treatment of choice. On the other hand, chronic RS is actually subdivided into two distinct entities (chronic rhinosinusitis with and without polyps), as growing evidence indicates that these entities have specific inflammatory pathways and cytokine profiles. The authors review recent data regarding the clinical presentations, cytokine profiles, tissue remodeling, and modalities of treatment for each form of RS.

  9. Self-reported vs. actual energy intake in youth with and without loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, Laura E; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Shomaker, Lauren B; Kozlosky, Merel; Columbo, Kelli M; Elliott, Camden A; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Osborn, Robyn L; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2011-01-01

    Episodes of loss of control over eating (LOC) in children and adolescents--often characterized by the consumption of highly palatable dessert and snack-type foods--have been associated with a lack of awareness while eating that could lead to under- or over-estimation of how much food is consumed. However, little is known about the reporting accuracy of food intake in youth with and without LOC eating. One hundred fifty-six girls and boys were administered the Eating Disorder Examination to assess for the presence of LOC eating. Youth were queried regarding the amounts of foods consumed directly following a multi-item, laboratory buffet test meal. Children with LOC (n=42) did not differ significantly from youth without LOC (n=114) in reporting accuracy of total food intake (reported minus actual energy intake: 153.0 ± 59.6 vs. 96.9 ± 36.0 kcal; p=0.42). However, compared to those without LOC, children with LOC were less accurate at reporting percentage of energy intake from carbohydrate (p=0.01). Youth with LOC were also less accurate at reporting their intake of desserts (p=0.04). Findings point to the possibility that youth with LOC may have poorer recall of sweet food consumption. Future research is required to examine whether poorer recall reflects a lack of awareness while eating palatable, sweet foods.

  10. Clinical Investigation Program Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Arousal Correlates of Psycho- therapy and Behavior Treatment. (0) 26 1981 Environmental Stress and Electromyographic Correlates of Chronic Posterior Trunk...Studies. Univ of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Vol 2, Jun 1981. ACCEPTED Armstrong, R.D.: Stress in the Military Family. Accepted by Fan Prac J. DENTAL...Chief Clinical Management Conference, Ft Sam Houston, TX, Jan 1981. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY & NEUROLOGY Armitage, D.T.: Physical Activity and Stress

  11. Management of Graves' disease: an overview and comparison of clinical practice guidelines with actual practice trends.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Becky T; Mai, Vinh Q; Burch, Henry B

    2014-06-01

    Over the last century, much has been learned about the pathogenesis, manifestations, and management of Graves' disease leading to the establishment of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The joint clinical practice guidelines from the American Thyroid Association and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists give recommendations on both the diagnosis and treatment of hyperthyroidism. A survey of clinicians performed that same year, however, revealed that current practices diverge from these recently published guidelines in multiple areas. These differences will need to be assessed serially to determine the impact of the guidelines on future clinical practice and perhaps vice versa.

  12. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This summary report discusses the results of each of the four major tasks of the study. Task 1 compared airline flight plans based on operational forecasts to plans based on the verifying analyses and found that average fuel savings of 1.2 to 2.5 percent are possible with improved forecasts. Task 2 consisted of similar comparisons but used a model developed for the FAA by SRI International that simulated the impact of ATc diversions on the flight plans. While parts of Task 2 confirm the Task I findings, inconsistency with other data and the known impact of ATC suggests that other Task 2 findings are the result of errors in the model. Task 3 compares segment weather data from operational flight plans with the weather actually observed by the aircraft and finds the average error could result in fuel burn penalties (or savings) of up to 3.6 percent for the average 8747 flight. In Task 4 an in-depth analysis of the weather forecast for the 33 days included in the study finds that significant errors exist on 15 days. Wind speeds in the area of maximum winds are underestimated by 20 to 50 kts., a finding confirmed in the other three tasks.

  13. Relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rates in teenagers

    SciTech Connect

    Terblanche, A.P.S.; Ozkaynak, H.; Spengler, J.D.; Butler, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    A study was designed to explore the relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rate (HR) as measured by a portable heart rate monitor. Twenty-two teenagers (8 boys, 14 girls, median age of 16) from Watertown High School, Massachusetts participated in this pilot study which involved continuous monitoring of HR during normal daily activities and simultaneous completion of a time-activity diary. There were 31 successful monitoring sessions ranging from 1.9 to 17 hours with a median monitoring time of 12.6 hours. Four unsuccessful monitoring sessions were experienced due to equipment failure. Apart from participant cooperation, the single most important factor affecting the feasibility of continuous heart rate monitoring was found to be equipment design. Th overall average heart rate observed was 88.4 bpm (SD = 24.3). An individual's correlation coefficient for perceived activity level (documented in half-hour intervals) and heart rate (averaged over the half-hour intervals) varied from 0.24 to 0.89. More than half of the correlation coefficients were below 0.40. There was a significant difference between average heart rate for time spent indoors (90 bpm) versus outdoors (103 bpm) even after correcting for sleeping time. It is concluded that continuous HR monitoring with simultaneous completion of a time/activity dairy is feasible and is a promising source of information for studies on exposure to air pollutants.

  14. Comparing Perceptions with Actual Reports of Close Friend's HIV Testing Behavior Among Urban Tanzanian Men.

    PubMed

    Mulawa, Marta; Yamanis, Thespina J; Balvanz, Peter; Kajula, Lusajo J; Maman, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Men have lower rates of HIV testing and higher rates of AIDS-related mortality compared to women in sub-Saharan Africa. To assess whether there is an opportunity to increase men's uptake of testing by correcting misperceptions about testing norms, we compare men's perceptions of their closest friend's HIV testing behaviors with the friend's actual testing self-report using a unique dataset of men sampled within their social networks (n = 59) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We examine the accuracy and bias of perceptions among men who have tested for HIV (n = 391) and compare them to the perceptions among men who never tested (n = 432). We found that testers and non-testers did not differ in the accuracy of their perceptions, though non-testers were strongly biased towards assuming that their closest friends had not tested. Our results lend support to social norms approaches designed to correct the biased misperceptions of non-testers to promote men's HIV testing.

  15. Flammable Gas Safety Program: actual waste organic analysis FY 1996 progress report; Flammable Gas Safety Program: actual waste organic analysis FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.; Hoopes, V.; Mong, G.M.; Rau, J.; Steele, R.; Wahl, K.H.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the status of optimizing analytical methods to account for the organic components in Hanford waste tanks, with emphasis on tanks assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. The methods developed are illustrated by their application to samples from Tanks 241-SY-103 and 241-S-102. Capability to account for organic carbon in Tank SY-101 was improved significantly by improving techniques for isolating organic constituents relatively free from radioactive contamination and by improving derivatization methodology. The methodology was extended to samples from Tank SY-103 and results documented in this report. Results from analyzing heated and irradiated SY-103 samples (Gas Generation Task) and evaluating methods for analyzing tank waste directly for chelators and chelator fragments are also discussed.

  16. Would Socrates Have Actually Used the "Socratic Method" for Clinical Teaching?

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Hugh A; O'Dell, David V

    2016-09-01

    Medical students and residents are familiar with clinical teaching methods in which a faculty member poses a series of questions to them. This technique is often called the "Socratic method," but it is frequently perceived by learners as an attempt to demean them, a practice that is colloquially known as "pimping." The distinction between Socratic teaching and pimping lies in the perception of "psychological safety." Psychological safety allows learners to answer questions or ask for help without threats to their dignity or worthiness. In a psychologically safe clinical teaching context, learners recognize that questions posed by attending physicians probe their current understanding and guide them to expand their knowledge. In pimping, questions are posed to embarrass the learner and to reinforce the teacher's position of power over them. Absent a threat of disparagement or condemnation, learners are able to focus on building schema for knowledge, skills, and attitudes, rather than worrying about shielding their self-worth. This article presents the proper Socratic method, as intended by Socrates, and contrasts it with pimping. This perspective defines psychological safety as the pivotal factor distinguishing Socratic teaching from pimping, and establishes the foundation for empirical studies of these common practices in medical education.

  17. Research in Nursing and Nutrition: Is Randomized Clinical Trial the Actual Gold Standard?

    PubMed

    Baldi, Ileana; Soriani, Nicola; Lorenzoni, Giulia; Azzolina, Danila; Dal Lago, Elisa; De Bardi, Sara; Verduci, Elvira; Zanotti, Renzo; Gregori, Dario

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of reporting of nurse-driven randomized controlled trials involving a direct nutritional intervention. A bibliometric search for randomized controlled trials involving a direct nutritional intervention from 1991 to 2011 in nursing research was conducted. Both quality of the study and design aspects were evaluated. The prevalent randomized controlled trial design used is 2-arm parallel, individual, and randomized with a continuous primary endpoint. Global numbers of randomized controlled trials and the proportion of good-quality randomized controlled trials began a steady and marked rise, more than doubling, from the 1990s to about 2001 and increased slowly thereafter. Studies are overall sufficiently well designed, although there is still room for quality improvement. Additionally, implementation of new randomized controlled trial designs exists and should be advocated.

  18. [Reading a clinical trial report].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, J F; Chassany, O

    2000-04-15

    To improve medical knowledge by reading clinical trial reports it is necessary to check for the respect of the methodological rules, and to analyze and criticize the results. A control group and a randomisation are always necessary. Double blind assessment, sample size calculation, intention to treat analysis, a unique primary end point are also important. The conclusions of the trial are valid only for the population included and the clinical signification of the results, depending on the control treatment, has to be evaluated. Respect of the reading rules is necessary to assess the reliability of the conclusions, in order to promote evidence-based practice.

  19. Flexible Reporting of Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    Two prototype methods have been developed to aid in the presentation of relevant clinical data: 1) an integrated report that displays results from a patient's computer-stored data and also allows manual entry of data, and 2) a graph program that plots results of multiple kinds of tests. These reports provide a flexible means of displaying data to help evaluate patient treatment. The two methods also explore ways of integrating the display of data from multiple components of the Veterans Administration's (VA) Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP) database.

  20. Perception makes the difference: the association of actual and perceived weight status with self-reported and parent-reported personal resources and well-being in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Tanja; Eschenbeck, Heike; Krug, Susanne; Schlaud, Martin; Kohlmann, Carl-Walter

    2012-11-01

    The study analyzed associations between actual weight status and weight perceptions with personal resources, physical and psychological health, as well as physical performance among adolescents (N = 5,518; age: 11-17 years). Analyses are based on data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS). Self-report measures, parental reports, as well as objective test data were considered. Results indicate that weight perceptions, rather than actual weight status, were associated with personal resources, health, and perceived physical performance. Comparing groups, we found that adolescents who felt they had "just the right weight" achieved more favourable results than those who perceived themselves as "too fat", regardless of their actual weight status. However, actual physical performance was predicted better by actual weight status. Furthermore, weight perceptions were found to mediate the link between actual weight status and all the assessed outcomes (personal resources, health, and physical performance). With respect to self-reports, the mediational effect was consistently stronger for girls, whereas the reverse was true regarding physical performance. Parental reports were not moderated by sex. Findings provide further evidence that among overweight adolescents there are subgroups that differ significantly with regard to risks and resources. Implications for practice are discussed.

  1. Evidence supporting primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases with statins: Gaps between updated clinical results and actual practice.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The use of pharmacological lipid-lowering intervention in individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and known cardiovascular disease or diabetes/chronic kidney disease is well established. Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend immediate initiation of drugs in adjunct to lifestyle intervention in these patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk. In these clinical settings, statins are generally chosen as the first-choice drug intervention, in consideration of the robust evidence showing a reduction in all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In contrast, primary prevention with statins, even in the subset of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events, is not well implemented. This might be related to a lack of public awareness regarding the actual risk associated with prolonged exposure to high concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and uncertainties in the clinical evidence coming from the earliest trials in this patient subset. However, recent observational studies suggest that lowering LDL-C earlier in life and for a longer duration can substantially decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Moreover, results from recent well-conducted large meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that primary prevention with statins reduced all-cause mortality by 14% and MACE by > 20% - findings similar to those observed for the use of statins in secondary prevention. Recently published American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol emphasize that primary prevention using high-dose statins in individuals with LDL-C ≥ 190 mg/dL induces a benefit in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk reduction that clearly exceeds the potential for adverse effects. We aim in this review to discuss the new data that advocate the use of statins in primary prevention earlier and more frequently, putting the efficacy evidence into

  2. Clinical narrative and clinical organisation: properties of radiology reports.

    PubMed

    Rooksby, J; Kay, S

    2001-01-01

    Radiology reports, as a form of clinical narrative, are more than a repository of patient information but are active in patient care. They are not unique and individual to each patient but have structured content suitable for supporting the activities of care. We consider these activities of care and how they manifest in the report. This recognition of the infusion of clinical organisation in clinical narrative leads to the recognition of seven properties of radiology reports: labels, concepts, genre, structure, author, subject, reader. These properties exist across two relationships: the intertextual relationship between radiology reports and the interpersonal relationship between a radiology report and people.

  3. The Thurgood Marshall School of Law Empirical Findings: A Report of the 2012 Friday Academy Attendance and Statistical Comparisons of 1L GPA (Predicted and Actual)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadhi, T.; Rudley, D.; Holley, D.; Krishna, K.; Ogolla, C.; Rene, E.; Green, T.

    2010-01-01

    The following report of descriptive statistics addresses the attendance of the 2012 class and the average Actual and Predicted 1L Grade Point Averages (GPAs). Correlational and Inferential statistics are also run on the variables of Attendance (Y/N), Attendance Number of Times, Actual GPA, and Predictive GPA (Predictive GPA is defined as the Index…

  4. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme.

  5. Annual Statistical Report of the Public Schools of Arkansas, Public Charter Schools, and Education Service Cooperatives, 2013-2014 Actual and 2014-2015 Budgeted, (ASR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In compliance with the provisions of A.C.A.§§6-20-2201 et seq., the Annual Statistical Report of the Public Schools of Arkansas, Public Charter Schools, and Education Service Cooperatives, 2013-2014 Actual and 2014-2015 Budgeted, (ASR) is presented here. The Rankings of Selected Items of the Public Schools of Arkansas, 2013-2014 Actual, (Rankings)…

  6. Criteria for critiquing clinical nursing research reports.

    PubMed

    Grant, J S; Davis, L L; Kinney, M R

    1993-06-01

    The primary goal of nursing research is to develop a scientific knowledge base for practice. Postanesthesia nurses are expected to critique nursing research before applying findings to clinical practice. As consumers of research, postanesthesia nurses must be able to employ critical evaluation skills to judge the merit and relevance of research to their clinical practice. This article presents criteria for critiquing clinical nursing research reports to determine their relevance to practice.

  7. How do clinicians actually use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in clinical practice and why we need to know more.

    PubMed

    First, Michael B; Bhat, Venkat; Adler, David; Dixon, Lisa; Goldman, Beth; Koh, Steve; Levine, Bruce; Oslin, David; Siris, Sam

    2014-12-01

    The clinical use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is explicitly stated as a goal for both the DSM Fourth Edition and DSM Fifth Edition (DSM-5) revisions. Many uses assume a relatively faithful application of the DSM diagnostic definitions. However, studies demonstrate significant discrepancies between clinical psychiatric diagnoses with those made using structured interviews suggesting that clinicians do not systematically apply the diagnostic criteria. The limited information regarding how clinicians actually use the DSM raises important questions: a) How can the clinical use be improved without first having a baseline assessment? b) How can potentially significant shifts in practice patterns based on wording changes be assessed without knowing the extent to which the criteria are used as written? Given the American Psychiatric Association's plans for interim revisions to the DSM-5, the value of a detailed exploration of its actual use in clinical practice remains a significant ongoing concern and deserves further study including a number of survey and in vivo studies.

  8. Clinical report writing: Process and perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewald, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    Clinical report writing in psychology and psychiatry is addressed. Audience/use analysis and the basic procedures of information gathering, diagnosis, and prognosis are described. Two interlinking processes are involved: the process of creation and the process of communication. Techniques for good report writing are presented.

  9. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, I. S.; Pegg, I. L.; Rielley, Elizabeth; Carranza, Isidro; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan-Tao T.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Cecil, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  10. Hybrid quantitative simulation on the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional samples under actual clinic imaging parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hong; Han Shensheng; Ding Jianhui; Jiang Zhaoxia; Peng Weijun

    2009-07-06

    A hybrid model combining Monte Carlo method with diffraction theory of wave optics has been developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the in-line diffractive phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional tissue samples under actual clinic imaging parameters. The primary microcosmic interactions of medical-energy x-ray within matter including photoabsorption, Compton scattering, and coherent scattering, have been taken into account in the Monte Carlo simulation. A diffraction processing based on Fresnel diffraction theory is carried out to simulate the macroscopic diffraction effect. A comparison with experiment results has also been performed.

  11. [Legal repercussions of Clinical Ethics Committees reports].

    PubMed

    Couceiro V, Azucena; Beca I, Juan Pablo

    2006-04-01

    Clinical Ethics Committees and Research Ethics Committees have their own specific roles. The Clinical Ethics Committee's pronouncements have an advisory function, whereas Research Ethics Committees' decisions are binding. This article analyzes the legal impact of the Clinical Ethics Committees' reports. Legal and medical reasoning share the same practical nature. Both can have several correct answers to the same situation. Clinical Ethics Committees deliberate about these alternatives and analyze the involved values. Their conclusions are non-compulsory recommendations. They do not replace nor diminish the doctor's personal responsibility. Even though the Clinical Ethics Committees' reports are not binding, they constitute a sort of "expert's opinion", expressed by qualified professionals, who assume their own professional responsibility as advisors. The members' behavior is necessarily subject to constitutional and legal regulations. When judges review the Clinical Ethics Committee's reports, they must realize that their nature is advisory, and also consider them an essential element to reduce the gap between the medical and legal fields. In this way, the problem of increasingly transforming medicine into a legal issue can be prevented.

  12. Self-Reported and Actual Use of Proactive and Reactive Classroom Management Strategies and Their Relationship with Teacher Stress and Student Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clunies-Ross, Penny; Little, Emma; Kienhuis, Mandy

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between primary school teachers' self-reported and actual use of classroom management strategies, and examined how the use of proactive and reactive strategies is related to teacher stress and student behaviour. The total sample consisted of 97 teachers from primary schools within Melbourne. Teachers…

  13. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Michael, O S

    2015-06-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED).

  14. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED). PMID:26807087

  15. Advance modern medicine with clinical case reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) can fail to demonstrate the richness of individual patient characteristics. Given the unpredictable nature of medicine, a patient may present in an unusual way, have a strange new pathology, or react to a medical intervention in a manner not seen before. The publication of these novelties as case reports is a fundamental way of conveying medical knowledge. Throughout history there have been famous case studies that shaped the way we view health and disease. Case reports can have the following functions: (I) descriptions of new diseases; (II) study of mechanisms; (III) discovery new therapies; (IV) recognition of side effects; and (V) education. Before submitting a case report, it is worthwhile to refer to the Case Report Check Sheet described by Green and Johnson [2006]. PMID:25525572

  16. Cost Reporting at a Navy Branch Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    focusing on fundamental cost ingredients . D. EVALUATING ACTIVITIES An activity is a process or workload pattern that can be quantified. Once the...Field [Group ISubgroup Activity Based Costing, James Brimson, Navy Branch Medical Clinic, Full Cost I I - Reporting, Fixed and Variable Costs 19...model, costs are disaggregated into fixed and variable components. Using the Brimson approach, the thesis further explores the application of activity

  17. Clinical Investigation Program Report FY90

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    samples were obtained and clinical evaluation was performed again. Two animals were then treated with apically- positioned mucoperiosteal flaps... false positive skin tets to WBE, suggesting that fire ant venom may be more specific in the diagnosis of fire ant allergy. 78 Detail Summary Sheet Date...this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. Approved for

  18. Xanthogranulomatous epididymitis: clinical report and immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Persec, Zoran; Bulimbasic, Stela; Persec, Jasminka; Ljubanovic, Danica; Bartolin, Zeljko; Patrlj, Leonardo; Hrgovic, Zlatko

    2008-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous epididymitis is an uncommon non-neoplastic process with destruction of tissue and replacement by striking cellular infiltration of foamy macrophages, dense lymphocytes and plasma cells. We report on a 72-year-old man with a clinical history of inadequately treated arterial hypertension, who presented with a right scrotal mass associated with right scrotal pain for 10 days. Physical examination revealed pyogenic discharge from the hyperemic and edematous scrotum, with normal body temperature. Testicular tumor markers were normal. Ultrasonography (US) of the right testis showed edematous scrotal layers and a heterogeneous area of poorly defined margins within the testis and epididymis. There was minimal hydrocele, and the right funiculus was of normal diameter with no edema or pathologic formation. The progression of clinical findings, inflammatory parameters, US and color Doppler US findings with negative testicular tumor markers indicated surgical treatment. After preoperative treatment, right orchiepididymectomy was performed. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of xanthogranulomatous epididymitis.

  19. Large discrepancies between planned and actually delivered dose in IMRT of head and neck cancer. A case report.

    PubMed

    Piermattei, Angelo; Cilla, Savino; D'Onofrio, Guido; Grimaldi, Luca; Digesù, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Morganti, Alessio G

    2007-01-01

    The case is reported of a patient with locally recurrent carcinoma of the tongue treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) (simultaneous integrated boost) plus concurrent chemotherapy, who during the third week of radiotherapy developed grade 3 mucositis. Treatment was interrupted for 10 days until significant resolution of the symptoms. At the time of treatment resumption the patient showed 8% weight loss, and in vivo portal dose verification revealed large discrepancies between the computed and measured doses. A new CT scan showed marked tumor shrinkage and modifications to the critical structures. The comparison between the original plan and the hybrid IMRT showed a minimal dose increase in the new target volumes and a marked dose increase in the organs at risk. This case confirms the need for a robust quality assurance program when using IMRT, the feasibility and efficacy of in vivo dosimetry to detect significant discrepancies between planned and delivered dose, and the need to combine IMRT with 4-dimensional radiotherapy, at least for head and neck cancer.

  20. Tonsillolith: a report of three clinical cases.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Mariela Dura Gontijo; Madureira, Davidson Fróis; Noman-Ferreira, Luiz Cláudio; Abdo, Evandro Neves; de Aguiar, Evandro Guimarães; Freire, Addah Regina da Silva

    2007-03-01

    Tonsillolith is a rare dystrophic calcification as a result of chronic inflammation of the tonsils. Three asymptomatic cases of tonsillolith are reported, incidentally discovered through panoramic radiographs, which showed different sizes of radiopaque images, varying from 2 to 5 mm; cases I and III images did not overlap the mandible ramus, which led to a probable diagnosis of soft tissue calcification. Case II had radiopaque unilateral images, with osseous tissue density, overlapping the mandibular ramus, leading to a benign intra-osseous lesion, which was considered as differential diagnosis. No symptoms were reported in any case. Only case I had clinical characteristics, showing highly consistent white plaques partially visible through the mucosa. Computed tomography of the maxillofacial region/head and neck were requested to find out the exact location of these images, since most of the overlapping radiopaque images in the mandibular ramus were very similar to intra-osseous abnormalities. The computed tomography showed hyperdense images in the palatine tonsils, confirming the diagnosis of tonsillolith. The patients are currently under follow-up. No treatment is required if there is no symptom. In conclusion, tonsillolith might show images on panoramic radiographs similar to intra osseous abnormalities. The diagnosis is relatively easy when computed tomography is requested, although the images are not pathognomonic. Therefore, clinicians should consider other pathologies as differential diagnosis.

  1. 38 CFR 46.4 - Clinical privileges actions reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clinical privileges... Practitioner Data Bank Reporting § 46.4 Clinical privileges actions reporting. (a) VA will file an adverse... reducing, restricting, suspending, revoking, or failing to renew) the clinical privileges of a physician...

  2. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Research Task Force report.

    PubMed

    Erkan, D; Derksen, R; Levy, R; Machin, S; Ortel, T; Pierangeli, S; Roubey, R; Lockshin, M

    2011-02-01

    The Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) Clinical Research Task Force (CRTF) was one of six Task Forces developed by the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) organization committee with the purpose of: a) evaluating the limitations of APS clinical research and developing guidelines for researchers to help improve the quality of APS research; and b) prioritizing the ideas for a well-designed multicenter clinical trial and discussing the pragmatics of getting such a trial done. Following a systematic working algorithm, the Task Force identified five major issues that impede APS clinical research and the ability to develop evidence-based recommendations for the management of aPL-positive patients: (1) aPL detection has been based on partially or non-standardized tests, and clinical (and basic) APS research studies have included patients with heterogeneous aPL profiles with different clinical event risks; (2) clinical (and basic) APS research studies have included a heterogeneous group of patients with different aPL-related manifestations (some controversial); (3) thrombosis and/or pregnancy risk stratification and quantification are rarely incorporated in APS clinical research; (4) most APS clinical studies include patients with single positive aPL results and/or low-titer aPL ELISA results; furthermore, study designs are mostly retrospective and not population based, with limited number of prospective and/or controlled population studies; and (5) lack of the understanding the particular mechanisms of aPL-mediated clinical events limits the optimal clinical study design. The Task Force recommended that there is an urgent need for a truly international collaborative approach to design and conduct well-designed prospective large-scale multi-center clinical trials of patients with persistent and clinically significant aPL profiles. An international collaborative meeting to formulate a good research question using 'FINER' (Feasible; Interesting

  3. Statistical reporting of clinical pharmacology research.

    PubMed

    Ring, Arne; Schall, Robert; Loke, Yoon K; Day, Simon

    2017-03-21

    Research in clinical pharmacology covers a wide range of experiments, trials and investigations: clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of drug usage after market approval, the investigation of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships, the search for mechanisms of action or for potential signals for efficacy and safety using biomarkers. Often these investigations are exploratory in nature, which has implications for the way the data should be analysed and presented. Here we summarize some of the statistical issues that are of particular importance in clinical pharmacology research.

  4. The effect of communicating the genetic risk of cardiometabolic disorders on motivation and actual engagement in preventative lifestyle modification and clinical outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Sherly X; Ye, Zheng; Whelan, Kevin; Truby, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Genetic risk prediction of chronic conditions including obesity, diabetes and CVD currently has limited predictive power but its potential to engage healthy behaviour change has been of immense research interest. We aimed to understand whether the latter is indeed true by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating whether genetic risk communication affects motivation and actual behaviour change towards preventative lifestyle modification. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCT) since 2003 investigating the impact of genetic risk communication on health behaviour to prevent cardiometabolic disease, without restrictions on age, duration of intervention or language. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses for perceived motivation for behaviour change and clinical changes (weight loss) and a narrative analysis for other outcomes. Within the thirteen studies reviewed, five were vignette studies (hypothetical RCT) and seven were clinical RCT. There was no consistent effect of genetic risk on actual motivation for weight loss, perceived motivation for dietary change (control v. genetic risk group standardised mean difference (smd) -0·15; 95 % CI -1·03, 0·73, P=0·74) or actual change in dietary behaviour. Similar results were observed for actual weight loss (control v. high genetic risk SMD 0·29 kg; 95 % CI -0·74, 1·31, P=0·58). This review found no clear or consistent evidence that genetic risk communication alone either raises motivation or translates into actual change in dietary intake or physical activity to reduce the risk of cardiometabolic disorders in adults. Of thirteen studies, eight were at high or unclear risk of bias. Additional larger-scale, high-quality clinical RCT are warranted.

  5. Clinical Investigation Program. Annual Progress Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Adult Pigs (0) 54H89 Claybaugh, J. R. 27 Responses of Water and Electrolyte Regulating Hormones During a Saturation Dive to 450M (C) 56A89 Dice, M. S...28 Mechanism of Cold Induced Diuresis (0) 39H88 Freund, B. J. 29 Hormonal and Renal Responses to Exercise: Effects of Exercise Intensity (C) (SP) 4A88...Disturbances of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone, Antidiuretic Hormone , and Atrial Natriuretic Hormone Axes (0) 43H89 Kortepeter, M. G. 49 Clinical Utility

  6. Residential accessibility to information technology retailers and self reported computer use among patients attending community clinics

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paul; Shaheen, Madga; Smith, James; Ryan, Daniel; Baker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The actual mechanisms that maintain the individual disparities in home computer use and internet access that are collectively termed “the digital divide” remain unclear. We hypothesized that geographic accessibility to IT retailers would independently influence community clinic patients self reported use of computers at home thus limiting their ability to access health related information via the internet. To test this we obtained information on the locations of IT retailers in Los Angeles County, California and generated accessibility scores for the patient’s home residence. Geographic measures of accessibility to IT retailers independently predicted clinic patient’s self reported use of computers at home, and this effect was driven by low income individuals. Our results indicate that the causes of the digital divide are influenced by less commonly considered factors such as local IT retailer availability. PMID:20351914

  7. Clinical Investigation Program Annual Progress Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-30

    Pulmonary Disease Service %* Hendrix, C.: Bronchoalveolar Lavage Analysis in Sarcoidosis . Presented: 36th Annual Carl Tempel Symposium, Denver, CO, January...1984. (C). Hendrix, C.: Bronchoalveolar Lavage in Analysis in Sarcoidosis . Presented: American College of Physicians Associates Meeting, Denver, CO... Sarcoidosis Alveolitis I (12) Accumulative MEDCASE:’ (13) Est Accum OMA Cost:* *Refer to Unit Summary Sheet of this report. (14) a. Date, Latest HUC

  8. Quality of Reporting in Clinical Pharmacy Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilersich, A. Lane; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Original research articles from three major pharmacy journals were reviewed to determine the quality of reporting research. Articles were evaluated for method of recruitment and/or randomization; statistical analysis; inclusion/exclusion criteria; subject blinding; objective assessment; treatment complications; loss to followup; number of…

  9. Country report: Clinical chemistry in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Satyawirawan, F S; Silman, E

    1999-01-01

    Seven hundred clinical laboratories in all over 27 provinces in Indonesia participated the Indonesian External Quality Assurance Scheme (Program Nasional Pemantapan Kualitas Laboratorium Kesehatan bidang Kimia Klinik). Among those laboratories, the government laboratory account for 288 (41%), and the rest 412 (59%) are private laboratories. Automatic analyzer was used by approximately 22% of the participating laboratories. Seventeen analytes were included in the program: bilirubin, cholesterol, creatinine, glucose, total protein, urea, uric acid, triglycerides, AST, ALT, calcium, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-GT, sodium, potassium, and chloride. Using WHO scoring system, median overall VIS of 128 was obtained. It means that the all over performance was fairly good . Bilirubin got the best median VIS (33). Sodium (median VIS 177), potassium (162) and chloride (209) got the worst VIS compared to the other parameters.

  10. [Whipple's disease: A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Krums, L M; Bodunova, N A; Sabel'nikova, E A; Khomeriki, S G; Mirzoev, K M; Sokolova, M S; Parfenov, A I

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a 56-year-old female patient who in December 2015 lost her appetite and 20 kg of weight, had diarrhea, rapidly increasing weakness, dizziness, joint pains, fever, swelling of the feet, and convulsions. Blood tests revealed anemia, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and hypoproteinemia. Computed tomography showed enlarged mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The doctor suspected lymphoma and referred her to the Moscow Clinical Research Center. The diagnosis of Whipple's disease was established by carrying out a small intestinal (duodenal) mucosal biopsy with the PAS reaction. A fat-free diet and antibiotic therapy with co-trimoxazole 2.0 g/day and ciprolen 0.3 g/day were prescribed for the patient. Fever and diarrhea disappeared, appetite appeared, weight gained, and blood counts normalized over 1 month of treatment. The patient was discharged with a recommendation to continue antibiotic treatment until the histopathological signs of the disease ceased.

  11. Clinical Investigation Program: Annual Progress Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-30

    Diagnosis and Tracing of Disorders Marked by Altered Patterns of Peripheral Blood Flow (PR) .................. 232 87/204 0 Mechanism Based Treatment of...resolution follow-up: Frostbite, Charcot Joints, Carpel Tunnel Syndrome, Fibrositis, Sympathetic Distrophy and Peripheral Neuropathy , Pre-amputation...awarded IND. May be continued on a separate sheet, and designated as "(14)e" Peripheral neuropathy , which developed in one subj ect, was reported to the

  12. DICOM Structured Reporting and Cancer Clinical Trials Results

    PubMed Central

    Clunie, David A

    2007-01-01

    The use of biomarkers derived from radiological images as surrogate end-points in therapeutic cancer clinical trials is well established. DICOM is the ubiquitous standard for the interchange of images for both clinical use as well as research. It also has capabilities for the exchange of image-related information, including categorical and quantitative information derived from images. The use of DICOM Structured Reporting for the encoding and interchange of clinical trial results in a standard manner is reviewed. PMID:19390663

  13. Chorangiocarcinoma: a case report and clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Yuan, Dan-Fang; Yang, Rui; Wang, Chun; Wu, Rui-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We describe a case of chorangiocarcinoma, a chorangioma covered by an abnormal trophoblastic proliferation, presenting in a term placenta and in an asymptomatic pregnancy. Evidence of metastasis was found on follow-up of the mother. Materials and methods: The lesion Was diagnosed by pathologic examination after cesarian section at term for fetal macrosomia, performed because of the abnormal gross findings in the placenta. After uncomplicated delivery, a thealthy child was born and the placent was expelled completely. There was follow-up in the mother and the child, up to 19 months after delivery. Results: Gross examination of the placenta showed a well-demarcated and grayish yellow-white mass, bulging paracentrally from the fetal surface. Histology revealed a trophoblastic proliferation inside a chorangioma, consisting of extensive central necrosis and high mitotic activity. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong intensity for hCG, PLAP, CK, CD31 (+) and CD34 (+); Ki67 showed a high proliferation index. Follow-up revealed metastasis in the mother and chemotherapy were performed at 3 months postpartum. Conclusion: This is only the sixth reported case of chorangiocarcinoma of the placenta in the literature. However, no metastasis were discovered in the reported case, which was not identical to ours. Follow-up revealed metastasis at lung in the mother. Chorangiocarcinoma should be carefully examined and followed-up. PMID:26629223

  14. The Course of Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smet, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Actualization is traditionally seen as the process following syntactic reanalysis whereby an item's new syntactic status manifests itself in new syntactic behavior. The process is gradual in that some new uses of the reanalyzed item appear earlier or more readily than others. This article accounts for the order in which new uses appear during…

  15. [Implementation of Guidelines on Conflict of Interest in Clinical Research of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology: actual status and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mikuni, Masahiko; Kurihara, Chieko; Miyaoka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    In May 2011, the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology released their Guidelines on Conflict of Interest (COI) in Clinical Research and detailed regulations. These guidelines cover clinical research, although each committee of the society may have a policy to cover basic research as well as clinical research. The COI Committee implemented the guidelines, including a one-year trial period. According to the guidelines, members of the society have to disclose their COIs at the time of presentations, manuscript submissions, and publications; the board and committees members have to submit their COIs to the president of the society. During the trial period, the latter was limited to the four committees involved in the development of the guidelines: Conflict of Interest; Pharmaceutical Affairs; Research Ethics; and Editorial Committees. The COI Committee reviewed the COIs submitted by the board and committee members. The COI Committee found that, among the 382 board and committee members, 298 were without COI; 31 COIs were regarded by one committee member as not necessary to be circulated to all the attending members (total of these 2 categories: 329, 87%); 31 COIs (8%) were regarded as necessary to be circulated; and 18 cases (4.7%) were problematic: not submitted or explicit rejection of submission. Considering the seriousness of scientific misconduct by a researcher in another disease area who resigned his professorship and is now under investigation, we should further discuss the implementation of our COI guidelines.

  16. Mathematical and Computer Skills and Workplace Literacy in Labor Markets: An Analysis of Their Actual and Potential Effect on the Economic Status of Women. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joel Popkin and Co., Washington, DC.

    Data from the Current Population Surveys of October 1984, October 1989, and January 1991 were used to examine the role of computer and mathematical skills in the U.S. labor market from 1984-91. Particular attention was given to their actual and potential effect on the economic status of women. Data confirmed the overall increase in the education…

  17. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 7: Guidelines for EEG Reporting.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Olga, Selioutski; Ochoa, Juan G; Munger Clary, Heidi; Cheek, Janna; Drislane, Frank; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-08-01

    This EEG Guideline incorporates the practice of structuring a report of results obtained during routine adult electroencephalography. It is intended to reflect one of the current practices in reporting an EEG and serves as a revision of the previous guideline entitled "Writing an EEG Report." The goal of this guideline is not only to convey clinically relevant information, but also to improve interrater reliability for clinical and research use by standardizing the format of EEG reports. With this in mind, there is expanded documentation of the patient history to include more relevant clinical information that can affect the EEG recording and interpretation. Recommendations for the technical conditions of the recording are also enhanced to include post hoc review parameters and type of EEG recording. Sleep feature documentation is also expanded upon. More descriptive terms are included for background features and interictal discharges that are concordant with efforts to standardize terminology. In the clinical correlation section, examples of common clinical scenarios are now provided that encourages uniformity in reporting. Including digital samples of abnormal waveforms is now readily available with current EEG recording systems and may be beneficial in augmenting reports when controversial waveforms or important features are encountered.

  18. [Gluten--mechanisms of intolerance, symptoms and treatment possibilities of IgE-related allergy for gluten in the light of actual clinical and immunological studies].

    PubMed

    Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Waga, Jacek; Dyga, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Gluten is the product of a chemical bond of wheat prolamin proteins (glia- dins and glutenins) in an aqueous me- dium. IgE mediated gluten allergy can be induced either by gluten as an in- gredient in foods or wheat prolamines present in the air. The aim of the study was clinical analysis of 13 patients, who demonstrated elevated levels of gluten specific IgE and identification of the most allergenic protein fractions from several samples of wheat using serum of examined subjects. Clinical analysis showed the occupational allergy to gluten in the form of rhinitis, asthma and airborne dermatistis in 9 subjects, whose symptoms disappeared during isolation from occupational exposure despite the use of a normal diet. In case of 4 patients with severe forms of chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis, who are also allergic to grass pollen at the same time, the introduction of a gluten-free diet resulted in improvement of health conditions. The study of wheat protein fractions revealed a significant polymorphism dependent on the wheat sample. In the protein fractions, low and high molecular glutenin fractions, and alpha, beta, gamma, and omega-gliadins were separated. It has been shown that the strongest immunogenic effect causes omega-5 gliadin fraction. The removal of this fraction resulted in reduction of skin reactivity evaluated by skin prick test in the studied patients.

  19. Utilization and utility of clinical laboratory reports with graphical elements

    PubMed Central

    Shirts, Brian H.; Larsen, Nichole; Jackson, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Graphical reports that contain charts, images, and tables have potential to convey information more effectively than text-based reports; however, studies have not measured how much clinicians value such features. We sought to identify factors that might influence the utilization of reports with graphical elements postulating that this is a surrogate for relative clinical utility of these graphical elements. Materials and Methods: We implemented a pilot project at ARUP laboratories to develop online enhanced laboratory test reports that contained graphical elements. We monitored on-demand clinician access to reports generated for 48 reportable tests over 22 months. We evaluated utilization of reports with graphical elements by clinicians at all institutions that use ARUP as a reference laboratory using descriptive statistics, regression, and meta-analysis tools to evaluate groups of similar test reports. Results: Median download rate by test was 8.6% with high heterogeneity in download rates between tests. Test reports with additional graphical elements were not necessarily downloaded more often than reports without these elements. Recently implemented tests and tests reporting abnormal results were associated with higher download rates (P < 0.01). Higher volume tests were associated with lower download rates (P = 0.03). Conclusions: In select cases graphical information may be clinically useful, particularly for less frequently ordered tests and in on reports of abnormal results. The utilization data presented could be used as a reference point for other laboratories planning on implementing graphical reporting. However, between-test heterogeneity was high and in many cases graphical elements may add little clinical utility, particularly if these merely reinforce information already contained in text based reports. PMID:23024885

  20. [Epidemiologic studies on role of nutrition in development of osteoarthrosis. Report 2. Actual consumption of food and risk assessment of their influence in development of osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Martinchik, A N; Khodyrev, V N; Peskova, E V

    2010-01-01

    We studied the actual consumption of specific food groups of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and analyzed the nutritional risk factors for OA in case-control study. Level of consumption of all types of dairy products was significantly lower in the group of patients with OA compared with controls. The relative risk of developing OA in the consumption of less than 573 g (median) of dairy products in terms of milk increases by 5-6 times.

  1. Clinical pearls: factors affecting reported contraceptive efficacy rates in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Burkman, Ronald T

    2002-01-01

    Current combination oral contraceptives (OCs) are among the most popular, safe, and effective methods of reversible contraception. There are, however, many factors that can affect contraceptive failure rates as reported in clinical trials, including subject characteristics, factors related to study methodology and data analysis, and publication biases. The variability of these factors among clinical trials makes meaningful comparisons of contraceptive efficacy data across studies difficult, if not misleading or erroneous. It is even more difficult to reconcile the differences between clinical trial efficacy rates and everyday use rates; for instance, the National Survey of Family Growth reported that the rate of OC failure is close to 8% in the United States, which is higher than rates reported in clinical trials. Thus, it is important for the clinician to consider the many factors that can influence reporting of contraceptive failure rates in clinical trials and be aware of the limitations in differentiating OCs on the basis of contraceptive efficacy derived from clinical trial data. Furthermore, clinical trial data may not accurately predict contraceptive efficacy in everyday use.

  2. Retrieval of a stripped abutment screw: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Jacobs, Leyvee Cabanilla

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical complications, such as loosening or damaging of the prosthetic components of an osseointegrated implant, may occur. Stripping of the implant abutment screw head can be a serious problem which can render an implant unusable. This report describes a clinical situation involving a patient who presented with a fractured screw-retained interim crown. Upon further examination, it was determined that the abutment screw head was stripped. There was limited access and visibility in this situation since the implant was a bone-level implant. The procedure used for the removal of the stripped abutment screw head is described in detail in this clinical report.

  3. Electronic Clinical Safety Reporting System: A Benefits Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Desmond; Neville, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Background Eastern Health, a large health care organization in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), started a staged implementation of an electronic occurrence reporting system (used interchangeably with “clinical safety reporting system”) in 2008, completing Phase One in 2009. The electronic clinical safety reporting system (CSRS) was designed to replace a paper-based system. The CSRS involves reporting on occurrences such as falls, safety/security issues, medication errors, treatment and procedural mishaps, medical equipment malfunctions, and close calls. The electronic system was purchased from a vendor in the United Kingdom that had implemented the system in the United Kingdom and other places, such as British Columbia. The main objective of the new system was to improve the reporting process with the goal of improving clinical safety. The project was funded jointly by Eastern Health and Canada Health Infoway. Objective The objectives of the evaluation were to: (1) assess the CSRS on achieving its stated objectives (particularly, the benefits realized and lessons learned), and (2) identify contributions, if any, that can be made to the emerging field of electronic clinical safety reporting. Methods The evaluation involved mixed methods, including extensive stakeholder participation, pre/post comparative study design, and triangulation of data where possible. The data were collected from several sources, such as project documentation, occurrence reporting records, stakeholder workshops, surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews. Results The findings provided evidence that frontline staff and managers support the CSRS, identifying both benefits and areas for improvement. Many benefits were realized, such as increases in the number of occurrences reported, in occurrences reported within 48 hours, in occurrences reported by staff other than registered nurses, in close calls reported, and improved timelines for notification. There was also user satisfaction

  4. Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Progress Report: Fiscal Year 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Bacterially Synthetized b Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (hg-CSF) Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE Allergy ...C-01) A Clinical Trial to Evaluate Postoperative 30 Immunotherapy and Postoperative Systemic Chemotherapy in the Management of Resectable Colon...Publications/Presentations: None to date. -6- Annual Progress Report DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE Allergy and Immunology Service Date: 1 October 1989 Protocol

  5. Immediate occlusal loading in edentulous jaws, CT-guided surgery and fixed provisional prosthesis: a maxillary arch clinical report.

    PubMed

    Drago, Carl; del Castillo, Robert; Peterson, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Immediate occlusal loading (IOL) in edentulous jaws has been reported in numerous publications with implant cumulative survival rates consistent with conventional, unloaded healing protocols. Computed Tomography (CT)-guided surgery has more recently been developed and accepted as an additional treatment modality for maxillary and mandibular implant placement, with or without IOL. Reports as to the accuracy of planned versus actual implant placement in CT-guided surgeries have indicated that CT-guided surgery is not 100% accurate; standard deviations have been reported with values between 1 and 2 mm in terms of actual versus planned placement. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical parameters associated with IOL, and CT-guided surgery in edentulous jaws; and to present a clinical case illustrating the clinical and laboratory phases of treatment. The illustrated treatment was accomplished with an IOL protocol and includes fabrication and placement of a laboratory-processed provisional maxillary prosthesis. This particular protocol had slightly increased costs relative to conventional implant placement; however, the clinicians and patient benefited from improved accuracy of the provisional prostheses and decreased chairtime for the clinical procedures. The benefits and limitations of this treatment protocol are also discussed.

  6. Development of an Evaluation System for Vertical Vibration of Railway Vehicles with Field-Portable Actuators (2nd Report, Excitation Tests of an Actual Commuter Vehicle)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigami, Tadao; Tomioka, Takahiro

    Bending vibration characteristics of railway vehicles have been investigated in general under excitation tests, in which a carbody was directly excited by a shaker. It is however very difficult with their results to evaluate the ride quality of passengers under conditions that the vehicle runs on a certain track. The authors are therefore developing an evaluation system for vertical vibration of railway vehicles. This system consists of an excitation system equipped with linear actuators, the elastic supporting device installed between wheels and rails, and analytical techniques to estimate the power spectral density (PSD) and the ride quality level (LT) which feature the ride quality. In this paper, we describe the excitation tests performed using an actual commuter car and the estimated PSD and LT are compared with what substantially measured under the running conditions.

  7. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection. PMID:27252814

  8. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports.

    PubMed

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection.

  9. An official American thoracic society workshop report: developing performance measures from clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Wilson, Kevin C; Au, David H; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Feemster, Laura C; Mularski, Richard A; Slatore, Christopher G; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-05-01

    Many health care performance measures are either not based on high-quality clinical evidence or not tightly linked to patient-centered outcomes, limiting their usefulness in quality improvement. In this report we summarize the proceedings of an American Thoracic Society workshop convened to address this problem by reviewing current approaches to performance measure development and creating a framework for developing high-quality performance measures by basing them directly on recommendations from well-constructed clinical practice guidelines. Workshop participants concluded that ideally performance measures addressing care processes should be linked to clinical practice guidelines that explicitly rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, such as the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. Under this framework, process-based performance measures would only be developed from strong recommendations based on high- or moderate-quality evidence. This approach would help ensure that clinical processes specified in performance measures are both of clear benefit to patients and supported by strong evidence. Although this approach may result in fewer performance measures, it would substantially increase the likelihood that quality-improvement programs based on these measures actually improve patient care.

  10. Porcelain veneers as an alternative for esthetic treatment: clinical report.

    PubMed

    Rotoli, B T; Lima, D A N L; Pini, N P; Aguiar, F H B; Pereira, G D S; Paulillo, L A M S

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the restoration of the anterior dentition with porcelain laminate veneers. The advances in bonding of porcelain to tooth structure make this treatment a feasible alternative to restore teeth with alteration in shape and position in cases in which the esthetic demand is high. The rationale for various choices in this treatment protocol is detailed with reference to the pertinent literature. Thus, the clinical success of the technique depends on the correct identification of a case for which this treatment is appropriate and the successful execution of the clinical steps involved.

  11. Narrativizing errors of care: critical incident reporting in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Iedema, Rick; Flabouris, Arthas; Grant, Susan; Jorm, Christine

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers the rise across acute care settings in the industrialized world of techniques that encourage clinicians to record their experiences about adverse events they are personally involved in; that is, to share narratives about errors, mishaps or 'critical incidents'. The paper proposes that critical incident reporting and the 'root cause' investigations it affords, are both central to the effort to involve clinicians in managing and organizing their work, and a departure from established methods and approaches to achieve clinicians' involvement in these non-clinical domains of health care. We argue that critical incident narratives render visible details of the clinical work that have thus far only been discussed in closed, paperless meetings, and that, as narratives, they incite individuals to share personal experiences with parties previously excluded from knowledge about failure. Drawing on a study of 124 medical retrieval incident reports, the paper provides illustrations and interpretations of both the narrative and the meta-discursive dimensions of critical incident reporting. We suggest that, as a new and complex genre, critical incident reporting achieves three important objectives. First, it provides clinicians with a channel for dealing with incidents in a way that brings problems to light in a non-blaming way and that might therefore be morally satisfying and perhaps even therapeutic. Second, these narrations make available new spaces for the apprehension, identification and performance of self. Here, the incident report becomes a space where clinicians publicly perform concern about what happened. Third, incident reporting becomes the basis for radically altering the clinician-organization relationship. As a complex expression of clinical failure and its re-articulation into organizational meta-discourse, incident reporting puts doctors' selves and feelings at risk not just within the relative safety of personal or intra

  12. [A report on clinical PET activities in Germany].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, M; Kubota, K; Itoh, M; Sasaki, H; Moser, E

    1999-09-01

    Clinical diagnostic procedure using positron emission tomography (PET) requires high costs. To promote clinical use of PET, sociomedical evaluation is necessary. In this paper, sociomedical situations concerning clinical use of PET in Germany is reported. Some comparisons are made between Japan and this country putting emphases on several points such as 1) number of cyclotron and PET facilities, 2) social restriction to transportation of radioisotopes, 3) activities of satellite PET facilities, and 4) clinical indications for PET studies. Number of cyclotron was larger in Japan (29) than in Germany (17), but number of PET facilities was larger in Germany (47) than in Japan (29). The reason seems that in Germany transportation and buying of radioisotopes is less restricted. Hence, more than half of PET facilities in Germany are "satellite facilities" which do not have their own cyclotrons. Radioisotope distribution seems to serve as a backbone of "satellite concept." Additionally in Germany, list of clinical indications for PET study is almost completed and now is widely in applied to most cases. To promote clinical use of PET in Japan, the German system might serve as an important socioeconomic model in Europe instead of the United States.

  13. Athletic Training Approved Clinical Instructors' Reports of Real-Time Opportunities for Evaluating Clinical Proficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Weidner, Thomas G.; Walker, Stacy E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Context: Appropriate methods for evaluating clinical proficiencies are essential to ensuring entry-level competence in athletic training. Objective: To identify the methods Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) use to evaluate student performance of clinical proficiencies. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: Public and private institutions in National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) District 4. Patients or Other Participants: Approved Clinical Instructors from accredited athletic training education programs in the Great Lakes Athletic Trainers' Association, which is NATA District 4 (N  =  135). Data Collection and Analysis: Participants completed a previously validated survey instrument, Methods of Clinical Proficiency Evaluation in Athletic Training, that consisted of 15 items, including demographic characteristics of the respondents and Likert-scale items (1  =  strongly disagree to 5  =  strongly agree) regarding methods of clinical proficiency evaluation, barriers, educational content areas, and clinical experience settings. We used analyses of variance and 2-tailed, independent-samples t tests to assess differences among ACI demographic characteristics and the methods, barriers, educational content areas, settings, and opportunities for feedback regarding clinical proficiency evaluation. Qualitative analysis of respondents' comments was completed. Results: The ACIs (n  =  106 of 133 respondents, 79.7%) most often used simulations to evaluate clinical proficiencies. Only 59 (55.1%) of the 107 ACIs responding to a follow-up question reported that they feel students engage in a sufficient number of real-time evaluations to prepare them for entry-level practice. An independent-samples t test revealed that no particular clinical experience setting provided more opportunities than another for real-time evaluations (t119 range, −0.909 to 1.796, P ≥ .05). The occurrence of injuries not coinciding with the clinical proficiency

  14. Varied clinical presentation of os odontoideum: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chrobak, Karen; Larson, Ryan; Stern, Paula J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of an os odontoideum and to provide insight into the varied clinical presentations. Clinical Features: A 54 year old man presented with chronic neck pain without headache. A clinical examination was performed and the chiropractor viewed his AP and lateral radiographs. Previous flexion/ extension radiographs and MRI imaging from 2009 were requested for review. The patient was diagnosed with grade II mechanical neck pain. Treatment was rendered that day which included spinal manipulation/ mobilization. Several days later the requested imaging reports were received and described the presence of an os odontoideum. Conclusion: In the presence of os odontoideum, familiarity with the signs and symptoms of potential cervical instability is imperative. Health care providers must remain diligent in their patient histories, physical exams, and imaging. This case highlights the importance of following up on imaging studies to rule out diagnoses that would involve treatment contraindications thus ensuring safe and effective treatment. PMID:25202154

  15. Outcome Measures for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Castle, Jessica R; Cinar, Ali; Damiano, Edward R; Dassau, Eyal; DeVries, J Hans; Doyle, Francis J; Griffen, Steven C; Haidar, Ahmad; Heinemann, Lutz; Hovorka, Roman; Jones, Timothy W; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris; Levy, Brian L; Nimri, Revital; O'Neal, David N; Philip, Moshe; Renard, Eric; Russell, Steven J; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Zisser, Howard; Lum, John W

    2016-07-01

    Research on and commercial development of the artificial pancreas (AP) continue to progress rapidly, and the AP promises to become a part of clinical care. In this report, members of the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project Consortium in collaboration with the wider AP community 1) advocate for the use of continuous glucose monitoring glucose metrics as outcome measures in AP trials, in addition to HbA1c, and 2) identify a short set of basic, easily interpreted outcome measures to be reported in AP studies whenever feasible. Consensus on a broader range of measures remains challenging; therefore, reporting of additional metrics is encouraged as appropriate for individual AP studies or study groups. Greater consistency in reporting of basic outcome measures may facilitate the interpretation of study results by investigators, regulatory bodies, health care providers, payers, and patients themselves, thereby accelerating the widespread adoption of AP technology to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes.

  16. Adenocarcinoma of the lung in Down syndrome: first clinical report.

    PubMed

    Satgé, Daniel; Salmeron, Sergio; Homsi, Toufik; Réthoré, Marie-Odile; Tredaniel, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is rare in persons with Down syndrome, and the clinical presentation of the disease has not been described in adults with intellectual disability. We report the first detailed clinical observation of a 33-year-old man with Down syndrome who developed an adenocarcinoma of the lung 30 years after an acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infancy. Despite advanced disease at initial presentation and extensive tumor spreading during the course of the disease, he presented with unusually mild symptoms. The scarcity of lung cancer in people with intellectual disability, and particularly those with Down syndrome, is due, in part, to reduced tobacco use. However, cytogenetic and molecular studies suggest that genes mapping to chromosome 21 may protect against lung cancer. Numerous reports also suggest that, in persons with Down syndrome and other intellectual disability, cancers are often discovered late, leading to loss of the chance of cure and recovery.

  17. Sonosurgery for atraumatic tooth extraction: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Dimitrios E V; Geminiani, Alessandro; Zahavi, Thomas; Ercoli, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The preservation of an intact labial plate during tooth extraction is a critical determinant of whether an immediate implant can be placed and is also an important predictor of the esthetic result. The purpose of this clinical report was to present a method for atraumatic tooth extraction by using an air-driven sonic instrument with specially designed inserts. This surgical technique provides the clinician with an efficient method for atraumatic tooth extraction and preservation of an intact labial plate.

  18. [Juvenile vascular pathology due to homocystinuria. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Stio, F; Battisti, G; Felici, A; Marigliani, M; De Vita, M; Finizio, R; Fabrizio, G; Porcelli, C; Granai, A V

    1993-01-01

    The authors report a case of juvenile vasculopathy in a homocystinuria patient. They point out that thromboembolism may be the only symptomatic expression of this genetically determined metabolic disease. Diagnostic approach and surgical therapy of the vascular lesions as well as medical therapy to prevent further complications are analysed. The opportunity to perform clinical tests for the diagnosis of homocystinuria in all those young patients presenting vascular lesions without other risk factors is finally stressed.

  19. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    McAlindon, T E; Driban, J B; Henrotin, Y; Hunter, D J; Jiang, G-L; Skou, S T; Wang, S; Schnitzer, T

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials for knee OA we initially drafted recommendations through an iterative process. Members of the working group included representatives from industry and academia. After the working group members reviewed a final draft, they scored the appropriateness for recommendations. After the members voted we calculated the median score among the nine members of the working group who completed the score. The document includes 25 recommendations regarding randomization, blocking and stratification, blinding, enhancing accuracy of patient-reported outcomes (PRO), selecting a study population and index knee, describing interventions, patient-reported and physical performance measures, structural outcome measures, biochemical biomarkers, and reporting recommendations. In summary, the working group identified 25 recommendations that represent the current best practices regarding clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee OA. These updated recommendations incorporate novel technologies (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and strategies to address the heterogeneity of knee OA.

  20. Discordance between presumed standard of care and actual clinical practice: the example of rubber dam use during root canal treatment in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Riley, Joseph L; Eleazer, Paul D; Benjamin, Paul L; Funkhouser, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Use of a rubber dam during root canal treatment is considered the standard of care because it enhances patient safety and optimises the odds of successful treatment. Nonetheless, not all dentists use a rubber dam, creating disconnect between presumed standard of care and what is actually done in clinical practice. Little is known about dentists’ attitudes towards use of the rubber dam in their practices. The objectives were to: (1) quantify these attitudes and (2) test the hypothesis that specific attitudes are significantly associated with rubber dam use. Setting National Dental Practice-Based Research Network (NationalDentalPBRN.org). Participants 1490 network dentists. Outcome measures Dentists completed a questionnaire about their attitudes towards rubber dam use during root canal treatment. Three attitude scales comprised 33 items that used a 5-point ordinal scale to measure beliefs about effectiveness, inconvenience, ease of placement, comparison to other isolation techniques and patient factors. Factor analysis, cluster analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysed the relationship between attitudes and rubber dam use. Results All items had responses at each point on the 5-point scale, with an overall pattern of substantial variation across dentists. Five attitudinal factors (rubber dam effectiveness; inconvenient/time-consuming; ease of placement; effectiveness compared to Isolite; patient factors) and 4 clusters of practitioners were identified. Each factor and cluster was independently and strongly associated with rubber dam use. Conclusions General dentists have substantial variation in attitudes about rubber dam use. Beliefs that rubber dam use is not effective, inconvenient, time-consuming, not easy to place or affected by patient factors, were independently and significantly associated with lower rubber dam use. These attitudes explain why there is substantial discordance between presumed standard of care and actual practice

  1. A Clinical Report of Nonsyndromic Concomitant Hypo-Hyperdontia

    PubMed Central

    Popat, Hashmat

    2013-01-01

    Although hypodontia and supernumerary teeth are often considered as mutually exclusive conditions, this case report presents an unusual case of hypodontia and a supernumerary tooth occurring simultaneously. An adolescent male was referred to the local hospital department regarding upper arch crowding. Plain film radiographs confirmed the congenital absence of both lower lateral incisors in addition to an unerupted conical supernumerary tooth in the maxillary midline. This condition has been called hypo-hyperdontia and in this paper, we discuss the clinical findings and treatment planning considerations in relation to the limited number of previously reported cases. The case report raises awareness of concomitant hypo-hyperdontia and serves to highlight that concomitant anomalies should be excluded when hypodontia or supernumerary teeth are diagnosed. PMID:24191202

  2. Clinical variability in KBG syndrome: report of three unrelated families.

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Gustavo Henrique Boff; Leite, Júlio Cesar Loguercio; Félix, Têmis Maria; da Silveira, Heraldo Luís Dias; da Silveira, Heloísa Emília

    2004-12-01

    The KBG syndrome is characterized by short stature, macrodontia, a specific combination of minor anomalies, developmental delay, and/or mental retardation. We reported on four patients from three unrelated families. The most frequent clinical findings were: atypical face, long/flat philtrum, thin upper lip, macrodontia, dental malposition, enamel hypoplasia, and cleft teeth. Skeletal anomalies such as cervical ribs and vertebral abnormalities were also noted. Hand anomalies were observed in three patients. Mental retardation and developmental delay were present in three of the four patients. There is wide clinical variability in the expression of this syndrome. The males are usually more severely affected then the females, suggesting possible X-linked inheritance in some cases.

  3. Clinical supervision: insider reports of a private world.

    PubMed

    White, E; Butterworth, T; Bishop, V; Carson, J; Jeacock, J; Clements, A

    1998-07-01

    An exploratory study, funded by the Department of Health, London and the Scottish Home and Health Department, Edinburgh, was conducted over an 18-month period to provide an informed view on possible assessment tools that could be used to assess the impact of clinical supervision (CS) in nursing and to report on the CS activities in 23 selected sites in England and Scotland. The study not only examined the utility of several standardized research instruments, to be reported separately, but also explored the experience of a small sub-sample of nurses (n = 34) engaged in CS, as supervisors and supervisees. Interviews were undertaken to help better understand some of the issues involved around the domains of structure, process and outcome. Respondents reported an enthusiasm for the opportunity to talk meaningfully to a trusted colleague about their personal circumstances at work. Such opportunities were particularly welcomed by nurses who wished to reflect upon their own practice with patients, especially when dealing with their clinical conditions which were upsetting, or otherwise challenging, and sometimes harrowing. Substantive and methodological areas of interest for future research are suggested.

  4. The reporting of clinical signs in laboratory animals: FELASA Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Fentener van Vlissingen, J M; Borrens, M; Girod, A; Lelovas, P; Morrison, F; Torres, Y Saavedra

    2015-10-01

    Observing and reporting clinical signs in laboratory animals is necessary for many reasons: the assessment of animal welfare, compliance with the principle of refinement (e.g. humane endpoints), regulatory compliance (e.g. reporting severity) and, importantly, as a scientific outcome, e.g. in animal models of disease or safety studies. Developments in the reporting of clinical signs will enhance the scientific value gained from animal experiments and further address the ethical cost. This paper discusses systematic approaches to the observation and reporting of clinical signs in animals (to be) used for research. Glossaries from public and corporate institutions have been consulted and a reference glossary has been set up, providing terminology to be tailored for institutional or project-specific use. The clinical examination of animals must be carried out by competent and specifically trained staff in a systematic way and repeated at adequate intervals and clinical observations must be registered effectively to allow this information to be used. The development of institutional or project-specific glossaries and the use of handwritten records or automated databases are discussed in detail. Among the users are animal care staff, veterinarians and researchers who will need to agree on a given set of clinical signs to be monitored routinely or as a scientific read-out and to train for the proper application. The paper introduces a long list of clinical signs with scientific terminology, descriptions and explanations as a reference glossary to be published and maintained online as a living document supported by the authors as an editorial committee.

  5. Developments in clinical trials: a Pharma Matters report.

    PubMed

    Arjona, A; Nuskey, B; Rabasseda, X; Arias, E

    2014-08-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry strives to meet the ever-increasing complexity of drug development, new technology in clinical trials has become a beacon of hope. With big data comes the promise of accelerated patient recruitment, real-time monitoring of clinical trials, bioinformatics empowerment of quicker phase progression, and the overwhelming benefits of precision medicine for select trials. Risk-based monitoring stands to benefit as well. With a strengthening focus on centralized data by the FDA and industry's transformative initiative, TransCelerate, a new era in trial risk mitigation has begun. The traditional method of intensive on-site monitoring is becoming a thing of the past as statistical, real-time analysis of site and trial-wide data provides the means to monitor with greater efficiency and effectiveness from afar. However, when it comes to big data, there are challenges that lie ahead. Patient privacy, commercial investment protection, technology woes and data variability are all limitations to be met with considerable thought. At the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology this year, clinical trials on psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases were discussed in detail. This review of clinical research reports on novel therapies for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis reveals the impact of these diseases and the drug candidates that have been successful in phase II and III studies. Data-focused highlights of novel dermatological trials, as well as real-life big data approaches and an insight on the new methodology of risk-based monitoring, are all discussed in this edition of Developments in Clinical Trials.

  6. Clinical manifestations of Kingella kingae infections: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Morrison, V A; Wagner, K F

    1989-01-01

    A patient with antecedent coccidioidal pulmonary cavitary disease who developed an empyema due to Kingella kingae prompted our analysis of the literature regarding this unusual bacterial pathogen. Formerly classified among other genera and considered a nonpathogen, K. kingae has been increasingly recognized as a cause of human infection. While the most commonly diagnosed infections due to this organism are endocarditis and septic arthritis, there have also been isolated reports of bacteremia, diskitis, abscesses, meningitis, and oropharyngeal infections. The treatment of choice is penicillin, to which K. kingae strains are uniformly susceptible. Recognition of the potential pathogenicity of this microorganism in appropriate clinical settings will probably result in more prompt and specific therapy.

  7. Case reports and clinical guidelines for managing radix entomolaris

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Bejoy J.; Nishad, A.; Paulaian, Benin; Sam, Jonathan Emil

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the external and internal anatomy of the tooth is essential for successful dental practice. Anomalies in the tooth are often encountered which poses difficulties in dental treatments. As like any other tooth, mandibular first molars are also prone for anatomic malformations. One such anatomic variation is the presence of extra root distolingually. This distolingual root is called radix entomolaris (RE). The presence of an additional root can lead to difficulties during endodontic therapy. This article is a report of two cases describing the management of the first mandibular molars with an RE and clinical guidelines for its management. PMID:27829770

  8. EX SAIF SEREEA II--the field hospital clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C M; Wright, L A

    2004-12-01

    This paper places on record the clinical activity of the hospital facilities run by 22 Field Hospital on Exercise SAIF SEREEA II in Oman from August to November 2001. There were 1322 episodes of illness resulting in a hospital admission. The mean rate of admission was 1.96 patients per thousand per day (SD 13.62). The main causes of admission were gastrointestinal illness, conditions related to the heat and injuries. The reporting of health service utilisation data is an important duty of medical personnel during overseas deployments in order to add to the dataset available for the estimation of medical workload for future operations.

  9. Patients Reporting Ritual Abuse in Childhood: A Clinical Syndrome. Report of 37 Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Walter C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-seven adult dissociative disorder patients who reported ritual abuse in childhood by satanic cults are described. A clinical syndrome is presented that includes dissociative states with satanic overtones, posttraumatic stress disorder, survivor guilt, unusual fears, and substance abuse. Questions concerning reliability, credibility, and…

  10. Reporting Items for Updated Clinical Guidelines: Checklist for the Reporting of Updated Guidelines (CheckUp)

    PubMed Central

    Vernooij, Robin W. M.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Brouwers, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Scientific knowledge is in constant development. Consequently, regular review to assure the trustworthiness of clinical guidelines is required. However, there is still a lack of preferred reporting items of the updating process in updated clinical guidelines. The present article describes the development process of the Checklist for the Reporting of Updated Guidelines (CheckUp). Methods and Findings We developed an initial list of items based on an overview of research evidence on clinical guideline updating, the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II Instrument, and the advice of the CheckUp panel (n = 33 professionals). A multistep process was used to refine this list, including an assessment of ten existing updated clinical guidelines, interviews with key informants (response rate: 54.2%; 13/24), a three-round Delphi consensus survey with the CheckUp panel (33 participants), and an external review with clinical guideline methodologists (response rate: 90%; 53/59) and users (response rate: 55.6%; 10/18). CheckUp includes 16 items that address (1) the presentation of an updated guideline, (2) editorial independence, and (3) the methodology of the updating process. In this article, we present the methodology to develop CheckUp and include as a supplementary file an explanation and elaboration document. Conclusions CheckUp can be used to evaluate the completeness of reporting in updated guidelines and as a tool to inform guideline developers about reporting requirements. Editors may request its completion from guideline authors when submitting updated guidelines for publication. Adherence to CheckUp will likely enhance the comprehensiveness and transparency of clinical guideline updating for the benefit of patients and the public, health care professionals, and other relevant stakeholders. PMID:28072838

  11. Clinical report of 28 patients with Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer; Kirim, Sinan; Kocak, Mustafa

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the clinical and hormonal characteristics with Sheehan's syndrome in 28 cases that we had diagnosed and followed in the last 20 years. Twenty-eight patients with Sheehan's syndrome, diagnosed and followed at our University Endocrinology Clinic in the last 20 years were reported in the study. Medical history, physical examination, routine laboratory examinations, pituitary hormone analysis, CT and/or MRI scan of the sella of the patients were reviewed. All patients had a history of massive hemorrhage at delivery and physical signs of Sheehan's syndrome. Twenty-six of them lacked postpartum milk production, followed by failure of resumption of menses. There were 9 subjects with disturbances in consciousness associated with hyponatremia on admittance. All 28 patients had secondary hypothyroidism, adrenal cortex failure, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency. Diabetes insipidus has not been found in any patient. Empty sellae were revealed in 8 patients by CT and/or MRI scan. Sheehan's syndrome is still encountered in clinical practice occasionally. If not diagnosed early, it could cause increased morbidity and mortality. The most important clues for diagnosis of Sheehan's syndrome are lack of lactation and failure of menstrual resumption after a delivery complicated with severe hemorrhage.

  12. 45 CFR 60.11 - Reporting adverse actions on clinical privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) of this section, the Secretary will designate another qualified entity for the reporting of this... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting adverse actions on clinical privileges... Reporting of Information § 60.11 Reporting adverse actions on clinical privileges. (a) Reporting to...

  13. Clinical features of trisomy 12 mosaicism-Report and review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bo; Zunich, Janice; Openshaw, Amanda; M Toydemir, Reha

    2017-03-27

    Trisomy 12 mosaicism is a rare condition. Herein, we report a patient with mosaic trisomy 12 who was conceived by in vitro fertilization. She presented with mild dysmorphic features at birth, including down-slanting palpebral fissures, a depressed and creased nasal bridge, and mild rhizomelic shortening of the limbs. She had age-appropriate development at 6 months of age, but displayed slightly more dysmorphic features than at birth. Chromosome analysis on peripheral blood revealed a normal female karyotype in 50 metaphases. A concurrent genomic microarray analysis showed trisomy 12 in about 25% of the specimen, which was also confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with the CEP12 probe. Our findings further delineate the clinical features in trisomy 12 mosaicism in liveborns and demonstrate the utility of genomic microarray analysis in identification of mosaic aneuploidies.

  14. Vallecular cysts in clinical practice: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A; Gheorghe, DC

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the two case reports was to discuss the pathogenesis, origin, and therapeutic options for vallecular cysts. Method of Study. 2 children diagnosed in our department were treated by transoral endoscopic surgery, using cold instruments, suspension laryngoscopy and the operating microscope. Results. Both cases presented breathing and deglutition problems at diagnosis. The surgery aimed the complete excision, with cold instruments, via transoral access. No complications occurred and the postoperative healing was uneventful. No recurrences were observed on the long-term follow-up. Conclusion. Clinical, imagistic, and surgical data support the thyroglossal duct origin of vallecular cysts (base of tongue variant) and the complete excision is required to obtain long lasting cure. PMID:27974936

  15. Multidisciplinary management of limited interocclusal space: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Geckili, Onur; Sakar, Olcay; Yurdakuloglu, Tugce; Firatli, Sonmez; Bilhan, Hakan; Katiboglu, Bulent

    2011-06-01

    Prosthetic management of partial edentulism can be challenging with the presence of limited interocclusal space. The extrusion of opposing teeth combined with the alveolar extrusion of the edentulous areas reduces the space needed for fabricating a removable or fixed prosthesis when edentulous areas are present in the maxilla. This clinical report describes the treatment provided to a patient who presented with a limited interocclusal space on the posterior right quadrant. Before prosthetic rehabilitation, mandibular right posterior teeth were intruded, and the maxillary right posterior alveolar crest was reduced by alveoloplasty. After gaining adequate space, prosthetic rehabilitation was completed with a maxillary removable partial denture. During the 2-year follow-up period, the patient's chewing functions and physical appearance improved, and no complications occurred.

  16. Vallecular cysts in clinical practice: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    A, Zamfir-Chiru-Anton; Dc, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the two case reports was to discuss the pathogenesis, origin, and therapeutic options for vallecular cysts. Method of Study. 2 children diagnosed in our department were treated by transoral endoscopic surgery, using cold instruments, suspension laryngoscopy and the operating microscope. Results. Both cases presented breathing and deglutition problems at diagnosis. The surgery aimed the complete excision, with cold instruments, via transoral access. No complications occurred and the postoperative healing was uneventful. No recurrences were observed on the long-term follow-up. Conclusion. Clinical, imagistic, and surgical data support the thyroglossal duct origin of vallecular cysts (base of tongue variant) and the complete excision is required to obtain long lasting cure.

  17. Odontogenic calcificant cystic tumor: a report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Daniel; Villanueva, Julio; Espinosa, Sebastián; Cornejo, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Odontogenic Calcificant Cystic Tumor (OCCT) is an infrequent injury. It arises from odontogenic epithelial rests present in the maxilla, jaw or gum. Gorlin and col. described the OCCT for first time as an own pathological entity in 1962. Clinically, the OCCT represents 1% of the odontogenic injuries. It is possible to be found from the first decade to the eighth decade. It affects in same proportion the maxilla and the jaw, being the most common in the dented zones, with greater incidence in the first molar area. Two case reports of OCCT in two different ages, both in female individuals, one at 5 years old and the other at 35 years old are presented. Enucleation of the tumor was the treatment chosen. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature related to these two cases of OCCT and its treatment, putting an emphasis on its aetiology, biological behaviour and treatment.

  18. Histopathological and clinical traps in lichen sclerosus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brănişteanu, Daciana Elena; Brănişteanu, Daniel Constantin; Stoleriu, Gabriela; Ferariu, Dan; Voicu, Cătălina Maria; Stoica, Loredana Elena; Căruntu, Constantin; Boda, Daniel; Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina Mihaela; Dimitriu, Andreea; Radu, Cezar Doru

    2016-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and limited systemic scleroderma (acrosclerosis) are inflammatory skin diseases that ultimately evolve into two distinct modes of atrophic scar formation, but which can easily be confused clinically. They are very rarely associated. The literature has reported cases in which lichen sclerosus was associated with various forms of scleroderma, but often with localized morphea. The characteristic histopathological picture of lichen sclerosus includes a thin epidermis, with orthohyperkeratosis and vascular degeneration in the basal layer, loss of elastic fibers, and band-like inflammatory infiltrate in the papillary dermis, while systemic sclerosis is characterized by excessive deposition of collagen in the dermis, accompanied by reduction in adnexal structures and their entrapment in collagen, and the presence of perivascular lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate. We present the case of a 40-year-old female patient clinically diagnosed with systemic scleroderma and lichen sclerosus involving the genital mucosa. Physical examination in conjunction with laboratory findings (elevated antinuclear, anti-Scl-70, anti-SSA antibodies and immunogram) induced the supposition of the coexistence of lichen sclerosus and systemic scleroderma, fact confirmed by pathological examination. Systemic therapy with corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and phlebotropic drugs, peripheral vasodilators and other tropic adjuvants and topically potent topical corticosteroids was initiated. The course was favorable under therapy, the hardened skin slightly regaining elasticity, relief of itching and disappearance of lichen sclerosus lesions. Our case reaffirms the uncommon association of these two disorders. The importance of history, physical and laboratory examinations in making a diagnosis of certainty in emphasized.

  19. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Breast: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kocaay, Akin Firat; Celik, Suleyman Utku; Hesimov, Ilkin; Eker, Tevfik; Percinel, Sibel; Demirer, Seher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an uncommon tumor of the breast, accounting for approximately 0.1% to 1% of all breast cancers. It is characterized by rare lymph node involvement and distant metastasis, and associated with a favorable prognosis with excellent survival, despite its triple-negative status. In the current state of knowledge, results of breast-conserving treatment with postoperative radiotherapy seem to be equivalent to mastectomy alone, with respect to survival for ACC of the breast. Due to its rarity, there is no consensus on optimal treatment for patients with ACC. Otherwise, the role of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy remains controversial. Further clinical studies are required to compare treatment options for ACC. But, a long-term follow-up is very important and mandatory for affected patients, due to the late onset of local relapse and occurrence of distant metastasis. Case report: Here, we report the case of a patient who presented with a palpable breast mass in the left breast that turned out to be an ACC of the breast. PMID:27994304

  20. Patient reported outcomes and patient empowerment in clinical genetics services.

    PubMed

    McAllister, M; Dearing, A

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of clinical genetics services (CGS), including genetic counseling and genetic testing, has been problematic. Patient mortality and morbidity are unlikely to be directly improved by interventions offered in CGS. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are not routinely measured in CGS evaluation, but this may change as patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) become a key part of how healthcare services are managed and funded across the world. However, there is no clear consensus about which PROMs are most useful for CGS evaluation. This review summarizes the published research on how PROs from CGS have been measured and how patients may benefit from using those services, with a focus on patient empowerment. Many patient benefits (PROs) identified repeatedly in the research literature can be re-interpreted within a patient empowerment framework. Other important PROs identified include family functioning, social functioning, altruism, sense of purpose, enabling development of future research and treatment/participating in research. Well-validated measures are available to capture (dimensions of) patient empowerment. Although generic measures of family functioning are available, suitable measures capturing social functioning, development of future treatments, and altruism were not identified in this review. Patient empowerment provides one useful approach to measuring PROs from CGS.

  1. [General anesthesia in Cohen syndrome. Report of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, F; Cormaci, S; Cormaci, M; Alberti, A

    1995-04-01

    The case of a 23 years old woman, affected by the Cohen syndrome, who underwent general anesthesia for extensive dental surgery, is reported. The Cohen syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome that causes mental retardation, obesity, short stature as well as oral, ocular, and limb anomalies. The problems the anesthesiologist could deal with include the capacity of the patient to cooperate; difficult intubation because of maxillary hypoplasia, micrognathia, narrow and high-arched palate, and prominent maxillary central incisors; generalized muscular hypotonia; moderate leukopenia, that could theoretically increase the risk of infection: and, finally, possible associated mitral valve prolapse or hiatus hernia. In the case reported the presence of mitral valve prolapse or hiatus hernia was ruled out echographically. The patient was premedicated with diazepam and atropine i.m.; general anesthesia was carried out by propofol-fentanyl association and myorelaxation was obtained with atracurium. Nasotracheal intubation was performed easily in spite of oral anomalies so that the usefulness of thyromental distance, which was 7 cm long, as a clinical test to evaluate a potentially difficult intubation was confirmed. Noteworthy, the thyromental distance was the only test which was suitable for the uncooperative patient. At the end of surgery muscular tone recovered promptly and the endotracheal tube could be regularly removed. No complication was registered postoperatively.

  2. Right Homonymous Hemianopia: A Clinical Case Report of Schizencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Arminda; Carvalheira, Fausto; Campos, Joana; Alfaiate, Pedro; Campos, António; Paulo, João; Sousa, Castro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a 56-year-old male with right homonymous hemianopia. Methods Retrospective descriptive study of a case report based on information from clinical records, patient observation and analysis of complementary diagnostic tests. Results An asymptomatic 56-year-old male presented to our hospital for a routine ophthalmic examination. The best-corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in the right eye (RE) and in the left eye (LE). Pupillary function, intraocular pressure, external segment examinations and slit-lamp biomicroscopy were normal, bilaterally. Fundoscopy showed a cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio in the RE of 0.3 and of 0.4 in the LE. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed thinning of the superior, temporal and nasal RNFL in the RE and thinning of the superior, inferior and temporal RNFL in the LE. Automated static perimetry showed right homonymous hemianopia. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed an open-lip schizencephaly with a significant reduction of the left brain parenchyma. Conclusions Despite the large visual defect, the patient was unaware of it and had an active professional life. This is an interesting case because despite the extensive morphological abnormalities seen on brain CT there is a relatively small functional repercussion. PMID:26889154

  3. Using the journal BMJ Case Reports to promote the publication of clinical case reports

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Blanca San José

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study updates and enhances clinicians' knowledge about clinical case reports (CCRs) and encourages publication of such articles. Methods The author developed and offered a session about BMJ Case Reports to medical and surgical departments in the University Hospital of Móstoles. The session reviewed the contents and add-on services of the journal, conventional and alternative indicators of journal quality, use of CCRs to share valuable clinical lessons, and manuscript preparation and submission. Results The main result of these sessions was submission of eight CCRs to BMJ Case Reports, of which four were accepted. One submitting author was invited to serve as peer reviewer for the journal. Other clinicians are preparing five new CCRs for submission to BMJ Case Reports or other journals. Conclusions The learning sessions were successful in promoting writing and publication of CCRs. Young staff and postgraduate residents seemed especially encouraged to publish CCRs that had already been presented in their departmental sessions. As a librarian, I gained experience in CCR publication and reinforced my position as an essential supporter of the hospital's teaching and publishing activity. PMID:27822158

  4. Clinical committee report: Recommendation for further clinical trials-patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, F.

    1986-01-01

    The Cf-252 (Cf) neutron brachytherapy (NT) trials should continue to explore the feasibility of Cf-NT treatment of a variety of bulky human cancers. Results hitherto from the USA (Lexington), Japan, USSR, and England justify trials on a research basis. The term ''bulky'' is imprecise and in future studies should be specified by measurement. U.S. Department of Energy and other suppliers need to be advised to fabricate Cf-252 sources in more appropriate sizes, strengths and configurations for clinical therapy. Study of facility design and development should continue with special attention to: 1) treatment centers, 2) afterloading devices, 3) automated/robotics and other specialized equipment for handling Cf-252, 4) shields and shielding material, 5) controlled duration treatments, 6) necessary specialized equipment for conducting Cf-NT trials and 7) safety for personnel. In addition to the aforementioned, the report makes recommendations in several other areas such as doses and schedules, randomized trials, and records.

  5. Brief clinical report: duplication of distal 17q: report of an observation.

    PubMed

    Naccache, N F; Vianna-Morgante, A M; Richieri-Costa, A

    1984-03-01

    We describe a boy with the syndrome due to dup(17q) resulting from a paternal balanced t(12;17) (q24;q23). The comparison of the clinical findings in our patient with those previously reported shows that the dup(17q23----qter) is associated with a clinically recognizable syndrome. Anomalies present in greater than or equal to 75% of the patients were severe psychomotor retardation; short stature; microcephaly; frontal bossing and temporal retraction; widow's peak; narrow palpebral fissures; flat nasal bridge; thin upper lip overlapping thin lower lip; downturned corners of the mouth; apparently low-set, posteriorly angulated and malformed ears; low posterior hairline; widely spaced nipples; cryptorchidism; proximal limb shortness; and hyperlaxity of limb joints. The translocation carrier father of our patient had a Poland anomaly.

  6. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst: A Report of Three Clinical Cases

    PubMed Central

    González Galván, María del Carmen; García-García, Abel; Anitua-Aldecoa, Eduardo; Martinez-Conde Llamosas, Rafael; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) until Wright (1981) defined it as a different entity. Surgery is the usual treatment, and recurrence or association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been described. In this report, we presented three cases of this pathology, and we review the principal clinical, histological, radiological, and therapeutic aspects. Case 1. A 73-year-old female presents with a slight swelling on the right mandible, associated with an unilocular well-defined radiolucent lesion. Case 2. A 27-year-old female presents with a painful mandibular swelling associated with an unilocular radiolucent lesion posterior to the 4.8. Case 3. A 61-year-old male was casually detected presents with an unilocular radiolucent lesion distal to the 4.8. Conclusion. The OOC is a specific odontogenic clinicopathological entity that should be differentiated from the KCOT as it presents a completely different biological behaviour. PMID:24191203

  7. Subretinal Visual Implant Alpha IMS--Clinical trial interim report.

    PubMed

    Stingl, Katarina; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Besch, Dorothea; Chee, Caroline K; Cottriall, Charles L; Gekeler, Florian; Groppe, Markus; Jackson, Timothy L; MacLaren, Robert E; Koitschev, Assen; Kusnyerik, Akos; Neffendorf, James; Nemeth, Janos; Naeem, Mohamed Adheem Naser; Peters, Tobias; Ramsden, James D; Sachs, Helmut; Simpson, Andrew; Singh, Mandeep S; Wilhelm, Barbara; Wong, David; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2015-06-01

    A subretinal visual implant (Alpha IMS, Retina Implant AG, Reutlingen, Germany) was implanted in 29 blind participants with outer retinal degeneration in an international multicenter clinical trial. Primary efficacy endpoints of the study protocol were a significant improvement of activities of daily living and mobility to be assessed by activities of daily living tasks, recognition tasks, mobility, or a combination thereof. Secondary efficacy endpoints were a significant improvement of visual acuity/light perception and/or object recognition (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01024803). During up to 12 months observation time twenty-one participants (72%) reached the primary endpoints, of which thirteen participants (45%) reported restoration of visual function which they use in daily life. Additionally, detection, localization, and identification of objects were significantly better with the implant power switched on in the first 3 months. Twenty-five participants (86%) reached the secondary endpoints. Measurable grating acuity was up to 3.3 cycles per degree, visual acuities using standardized Landolt C-rings were 20/2000, 20/2000, 20/606 and 20/546. Maximal correct motion perception ranged from 3 to 35 degrees per second. These results show that subretinal implants can restore very-low-vision or low vision in blind (light perception or less) patients with end-stage hereditary retinal degenerations.

  8. The clinical case report: a tool for hypothesis generation.

    PubMed

    Sniderman, A D

    1996-10-01

    The clinical case report is generally limited to a description of unusual examples of the complications of disease or responses to therapy. However, it can also be used to present novel hypotheses which have been derived from individual cases. Two examples of this latter genre are presented and updated. These are Syndrome X and the stiff left atrial syndrome. In both instances, general and novel formulations were derived from single cases. With respect to Syndrome X, a hypothesis was generated that the chest pain and ST abnormalities in these patients represent excess activation of adenosine A1 receptors in the absence of myocardial ischemia. With respect to the stiff left atrial syndrome, recognition of the first case led to the recognition of the problem in many others. Now, a variant of the syndrome has been recognized in which mitral regurgitation is also present. In addition, the possibility that tricuspid annuloplasty may rescue patients dying of cardiac cachexia due to right heart failure caused by combined pressure and volume overload of the right ventricle is outlined.

  9. Quality management tools: facilitating clinical research data integrity by utilizing specialized reports with electronic case report forms.

    PubMed

    Trocky, N M; Fontinha, M

    2005-01-01

    Data collected throughout the course of a clinical research trial must be reviewed for accuracy and completeness continually. The Oracle Clinical (OC) data management application utilized to capture clinical data facilitates data integrity through pre-programmed validations, edit and range checks, and discrepancy management modules. These functions were not enough. Coupled with the use of specially created reports in Oracle Discoverer and Integrated Review, both ad-hoc query and reporting tools, research staff have enhanced their ability to clean, analyze and report more accurate data captured within and among Case Report Forms (eCRFs) by individual study or across multiple studies.

  10. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central…

  11. Rationale for tilted implants: FEA considerations and clinical reports

    PubMed Central

    DE VICO, G.; BONINO, M.; SPINELLI, D.; SCHIAVETTI, R.; SANNINO, G.; POZZI, A.; OTTRIA, L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The prevalence of the elderly population, as well as life expectancy, increased in the final decades of the 20th century, as described in the World Health Organization 2004 Annual Report. The edentulous condition therefore has a negative impact on the oral health–related quality of life. Patients wearing complete dentures for many years infact, and especially in the mandible, are often unsatisfied because of the instability of the prosthesis during speaking and eating. To date dental implant treatment is well documented as a predictable treatment for partial or complete edentulism. On the other hand the rehabilitation of atrophied edentulous arches with endosseous implants (> 10 mm) in the posterior regions is often associated with anatomic problems such as bone resorption, poor bone quality, mandibular canal, and the presence of maxillary sinuses. Different procedures have been proposed to overcome these anatomic limitations. The use of tilted implants parallel to the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus or the mental foramen/inferior alveolar nerve has been proposed as a conservative solution for the treatment of the atrophic edentulous maxilla. Aim of this study was to describe, through a detailed literature review, the clinical and biomechanical rationale for tilting implants and to evaluate the long-term prognosis of immediately loaded full fixed prostheses for the treatment of edentulous patients (#35) with extreme bone atrophy rehabilited with both axial (#70) and tilted (#70) implants from 2008 to 2010. The results of the present study would suggest that this new surgical technique may reduce patient morbidity and extend the indications for immediate loading full fixed rehabilitations. This improves the predictability of treatment goal, allows for a better risk management, and provides more individual information for the patient. These are the most important aspects of this technology, which may contribute to establish higher-quality standards in

  12. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  13. 'Cloud computing' and clinical trials: report from an ECRIN workshop.

    PubMed

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Danielyan, Edgar; Robertshaw, Steve; Legré, Yannick; Clivio, Luca; Demotes, Jacques

    2015-07-29

    Growing use of cloud computing in clinical trials prompted the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network, a European non-profit organisation established to support multinational clinical research, to organise a one-day workshop on the topic to clarify potential benefits and risks. The issues that arose in that workshop are summarised and include the following: the nature of cloud computing and the cloud computing industry; the risks in using cloud computing services now; the lack of explicit guidance on this subject, both generally and with reference to clinical trials; and some possible ways of reducing risks. There was particular interest in developing and using a European 'community cloud' specifically for academic clinical trial data. It was recognised that the day-long workshop was only the start of an ongoing process. Future discussion needs to include clarification of trial-specific regulatory requirements for cloud computing and involve representatives from the relevant regulatory bodies.

  14. Statistical Controversies in Reporting of Clinical Trials: Part 2 of a 4-Part Series on Statistics for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Stuart J; McMurray, John J V; Collier, Tim J

    2015-12-15

    This paper tackles several statistical controversies that are commonly faced when reporting a major clinical trial. Topics covered include: multiplicity of data, interpreting secondary endpoints and composite endpoints, the value of covariate adjustment, the traumas of subgroup analysis, assessing individual benefits and risks, alternatives to analysis by intention to treat, interpreting surprise findings (good and bad), and the overall quality of clinical trial reports. All is put in the context of topical cardiology trial examples and is geared to help trialists steer a wise course in their statistical reporting, thereby giving readers a balanced account of trial findings.

  15. Facebook as a Library Tool: Perceived vs. Actual Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Terra B.

    2011-01-01

    As Facebook has come to dominate the social networking site arena, more libraries have created their own library pages on Facebook to create library awareness and to function as a marketing tool. This paper examines reported versus actual use of Facebook in libraries to identify discrepancies between intended goals and actual use. The results of a…

  16. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  17. Workshop report: Schistosomiasis vaccine clinical development and product characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mo, Annie X; Colley, Daniel G

    2016-02-17

    A schistosomiasis vaccine meeting was organized to evaluate the utility of a vaccine in public health programs, to discuss clinical development paths, and to define basic product characteristics for desirable vaccines to be used in the context of schistosomiasis control and elimination programs. It was concluded that clinical evaluation of a schistosomiasis vaccine is feasible with appropriate trial design and tools. Some basic Preferred Product Characteristics (PPC) for a human schistosomiasis vaccine and for a veterinary vaccine for bovine use were also proposed.

  18. Symposium on research advances in clinical PET. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael McGehee

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Clinical PET and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) co-sponsored a symposium entitled 'Research in PET: International and Institutional Perspectives' that highlighted the activities of many leading investigators in the U.S. and throughout the world. Research programs at the DOE were discussed as were potential directions of PET research. International as well as institutional perspectives on PET research were presented. This symposium was successful in reaching those interested in research advances of clinical PET.

  19. Final Report on a Faculty Workshop on Clinical Instruction for Optometric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lee W.; And Others

    Report of a four-day workshop on optometric clinical education for clinical administration and faculty is presented. The workshop addressed the following four issues: (1) the objectives of present and future clinical education in the light of public needs and professional responsibilities; (2) the nature, types, setting, and extent of clinical…

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Adults Reporting Repressed, Recovered, or Continuous Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Richard J.; Perlman, Carol A.; Ristuccia, Carel S.; Clancy, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors assessed women and men who either reported continuous memories of their childhood sexual abuse (CSA, n = 92), reported recovering memories of CSA (n = 38), reported believing they harbored repressed memories of CSA (n = 42), or reported never having been sexually abused (n = 36). Men and women were indistinguishable on all clinical and…

  1. 78 FR 7437 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN); The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of... collection plans and instruments, contact: Jose Galvez, Office of the Director, National Cancer Institute... publication. Proposed Collection: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database, 0925-0600,...

  2. Esthetic Restoration of Multiple Congenitally Missing Anterior Teeth with Oral Implants: A Clinical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiawei; Teng, Fangjun; He, Hong; Ding, Huifen; Li, Yong

    Having multiple congenitally missing anterior teeth heavily influences the patient's countenance and pronunciation. There are few reports on the esthetic restoration of such situations with oral implants. This clinical case history report presents a multidisciplinary approach to treat a young woman with multiple congenitally missing anterior teeth using implant-supported prostheses. The treatment steps and clinical implications are discussed.

  3. Media Reporting of Practice-Changing Clinical Trials in Oncology: A North American Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Michael M.; O’Connor, Stephen; Valdes, Mario; Tang, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Media reporting of clinical trials impacts patient-oncologist interactions. We sought to characterize the accuracy of media and Internet reporting of practice-changing clinical trials in oncology. Materials and Methods. The first media articles referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials were collected from 4 media outlets: newspapers, cable news, cancer websites, and industry websites. Measured outcomes were media reporting score, social media score, and academic citation score. The media reporting score was a measure of completeness of information detailed in media articles as scored by a 15-point scoring instrument. The social media score represented the ubiquity of social media presence referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials in cancer as determined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology in its annual report, entitled Clinical Cancer Advances 2012; social media score was calculated from Twitter, Facebook, and Google searches. The academic citation score comprised total citations from Google Scholar plus the Scopus database, which represented the academic impact per clinical cancer advance. Results. From 170 media articles, 107 (63%) had sufficient data for analysis. Cohen’s κ coefficient demonstrated reliability of the media reporting score instrument with a coefficient of determination of 94%. Per the media reporting score, information was most complete from industry, followed by cancer websites, newspapers, and cable news. The most commonly omitted items, in descending order, were study limitations, exclusion criteria, conflict of interest, and other. The social media score was weakly correlated with academic citation score. Conclusion. Media outlets appear to have set a low bar for coverage of many practice-changing advances in oncology, with reports of scientific breakthroughs often omitting basic study facts and cautions, which may mislead the public. The media should be encouraged to use a standardized reporting

  4. Transient epileptic amnesia: clinical report of a cohort of patients.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Quaranta, Davide; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-07-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia is a seizure disorder, usually with onset in the middle-elderly and good response to low dosages of antiepileptic drugs. We describe the clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and neuroimaging features of 11 patients with a temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by amnesic seizures as the sole or the main symptom. We outline the relevance of a detailed clinical history to recognize amnesic seizures and to avoid the more frequent misdiagnoses. Moreover, the response to monotherapy was usually good, although the epileptic disorder was symptomatic of acquired lesions in the majority of patients.

  5. Consistency between Self-Reported and Recorded Values for Clinical Measures

    PubMed Central

    III, Joseph Thomas; Paulet, Mindy; Rajpura, Jigar R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated consistency between self-reported values for clinical measures and recorded clinical measures. Methods. Self-reported values were collected for the clinical measures: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, glucose level, height, weight, and cholesterol from health risk assessments completed by enrollees in a privately insured cohort. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from reported height and weight. Practitioner recorded values for the clinical measures were obtained from health screenings. We used bivariate Pearson correlation analysis and descriptive statistics to evaluate consistency between self-reported data and recorded clinic measurements. Results. There was high correlation between self-reported clinical values and recorded clinical measures for diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.91, P = <0.0001), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.93, P = <0.0001), cholesterol (r = 0.97, P = <0.0001), body mass index (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), glucose (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), weight (r = 0.98, P = <0.0001), and height (r = 0.89, P = <0.0001). Conclusions. Self-reported clinical values for each of the eight clinical measures examined had good consistency with practitioner recorded data. PMID:26942034

  6. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  7. Explosive Percolation Transition is Actually Continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recently a discontinuous percolation transition was reported in a new “explosive percolation” problem for irreversible systems [D. Achlioptas, R. M. D’Souza, and J. Spencer, Science 323, 1453 (2009)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1167782] in striking contrast to ordinary percolation. We consider a representative model which shows that the explosive percolation transition is actually a continuous, second order phase transition though with a uniquely small critical exponent of the percolation cluster size. We describe the unusual scaling properties of this transition and find its critical exponents and dimensions.

  8. The central giant cell granuloma in childhood: clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Adriano Mota; Fernandes, Alexandre Vieira; Magalhaes, Aparecido Onorio; Moreira, Marilia Rodrigues

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews the literature involving the central giant cell granuloma. Diagnosis and treatment are presented. The article reports the case of central giant cell granuloma, affecting the anterior region maxillary of a child, whom a conservative treatment, with cryotherapy, helped the preservation of anterior permanent teeth germs.

  9. Greater Utilization of Dental Technicians, II. Report of Clinical Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwick, William E.; And Others

    Following specialized training in which naval dental assistants were taught to insert restorations in cavities prepared by dental officers, clinical tests were applied to determine how much more a dental officer can accomplish when he delegates certain procedures to specially trained assistants, to evaluate the quality of the restorations, and to…

  10. Clinical Research Careers: Reports from a NHLBI Pediatric Heart Network Clinical Research Skills Development Conference

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wyman W.; Richmond, Marc; Li, Jennifer S.; Saul, J. Philip; Mital, Seema; Colan, Steven D.; Newburger, Jane W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; McCrindle, Brain W.; Minich, L. LuAnn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Marino, Bradley S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Pearson, Gail D.; Evans, Frank; Scott, Jane D.; Cohen, Meryl S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Wyman W. Lai, MD, MPH, and Victoria L. Vetter, MD, MPH. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), funded under the U.S. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH–NHLBI), includes two Clinical Research Skills Development (CRSD) Cores, which were awarded to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and to the Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York–Presbyterian. To provide information on how to develop a clinical research career to a larger number of potential young investigators in pediatric cardiology, the directors of these two CRSD Cores jointly organized a one-day seminar for fellows and junior faculty from all of the PHN Core sites. The participants included faculty members from the PHN and the NHLBI. The day-long seminar was held on April 29, 2009, at the NHLBI site, immediately preceding the PHN Steering Committee meeting in Bethesda, MD. Methods The goals of the seminar were 1) to provide fellows and early investigators with basic skills in clinical research 2) to provide a forum for discussion of important research career choices 3) to introduce attendees to each other and to established clinical researchers in pediatric cardiology, and 4) to publish a commentary on the future of clinical research in pediatric cardiology. Results The following chapters are compilations of the talks given at the 2009 PHN Clinical Research Skills Development Seminar, published to share the information provided with a broader audience of those interested in learning how to develop a clinical research career in pediatric cardiology. The discussions of types of clinical research, research skills, career development strategies, funding, and career management are applicable to research careers in other areas of clinical medicine as well. Conclusions The aim of this compilation is to stimulate those who might be interested in the research career options available to investigators. PMID:21167335

  11. SeqReporter: automating next-generation sequencing result interpretation and reporting workflow in a clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somak; Durso, Mary Beth; Wald, Abigail; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2014-01-01

    A wide repertoire of bioinformatics applications exist for next-generation sequencing data analysis; however, certain requirements of the clinical molecular laboratory limit their use: i) comprehensive report generation, ii) compatibility with existing laboratory information systems and computer operating system, iii) knowledgebase development, iv) quality management, and v) data security. SeqReporter is a web-based application developed using ASP.NET framework version 4.0. The client-side was designed using HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript. The server-side processing (VB.NET) relied on interaction with a customized SQL server 2008 R2 database. Overall, 104 cases (1062 variant calls) were analyzed by SeqReporter. Each variant call was classified into one of five report levels: i) known clinical significance, ii) uncertain clinical significance, iii) pending pathologists' review, iv) synonymous and deep intronic, and v) platform and panel-specific sequence errors. SeqReporter correctly annotated and classified 99.9% (859 of 860) of sequence variants, including 68.7% synonymous single-nucleotide variants, 28.3% nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants, 1.7% insertions, and 1.3% deletions. One variant of potential clinical significance was re-classified after pathologist review. Laboratory information system-compatible clinical reports were generated automatically. SeqReporter also facilitated quality management activities. SeqReporter is an example of a customized and well-designed informatics solution to optimize and automate the downstream analysis of clinical next-generation sequencing data. We propose it as a model that may envisage the development of a comprehensive clinical informatics solution.

  12. ACTH adenomas transforming their clinical expression: report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Faustini-Fustini, Marco; Mazzatenta, Diego; Marucci, Gianluca; De Carlo, Eugenio; Bacci, Antonella; Pasquini, Ernesto; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Frank, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) adenomas have been recognized as a more aggressive and invasive subtype of pituitary adenomas. An additional and clinically relevant peculiarity of these tumors is their ability to modify their clinical expression from a silent form to Cushing disease or vice versa. The aim of this study was to review a series of patients with pituitary adenomas and analyze the clinical implications of the transformation of clinical expression in 5 cases that showed this phenomenon. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed a series of patients with pituitary adenoma and collected clinical, biohumoral, and neuroradiological data of those who presented with a transformation from silent ACTH adenomas to functioning tumors or vice versa. In all the cases, preoperative assessment consisted of brain MRI, ophthalmological examination, and complete baseline endocrinological investigation. In patients with clinical and/or biochemical findings suspicious for Cushing syndrome, a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test was performed to rule in or out this diagnosis. Endocrinological evaluations were repeated 1 month after surgery, 3 months after surgery, and every 6 months or annually thereafter. Ophthalmological evaluations and brain MRIs were repeated after 3 months and then every 6 or 12 months thereafter. RESULTS Five patients (2 men and 3 women) included in this series had corticotropic tumors that showed transformation from an endocrinologically silent form to manifest Cushing disease and vice versa. The mean age at presentation was 40 years (range 18-51 years). In 3 of these patients, a transformation from silent to functioning ACTH adenoma with manifest Cushing disease occurred. In 1 patient, the authors observed the transition from a functioning to a silent adenoma with spontaneous resolution of hypercortisolism. Another patient's silent adenoma "shifted" to a functioning adenoma and then regressed back to a silent form with spontaneous

  13. Lyell's Syndrome and Antimalarials: A Case Report and Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Joana Miranda; Santareno, Sofia; Guerreiro, Lina; Margalho, Ana Filipa

    2017-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) or Lyell's syndrome is a rare, however, life-threatening mucocutaneous disorder with an epidermal detachment of a total body surface area (TBSA) of >30%. It is triggered by an idiosyncratic immune-allergic reaction to a drug, with many possible drugs implicated. Treatment success relies on early diagnosis and withdrawal of suspected/causative drug(s) and supportive care. Clinical evidence for specific therapies is still sparse. It is described a case of Lyell syndrome by sulfonamides for chemoprophylaxis of malaria. The patient presented with an extensive, rapidly evolving skin detachment, which progressed, despite supportive therapy, involving about 80% of TBSA. This led us to initiate a course of immunoglobulin with good clinical response. The aim of this work is to provide a discussion of the case and simultaneously make a practical literature review of TEN. PMID:28250622

  14. Clinical features of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia: report of 24 cases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Jianing; Zhu, Yulan; Yan, Xiaobo; Wang, Weizhi

    2012-12-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is the most common type of paroxysmal dyskinesia and is characterized by involuntary, intermittent movements induced by sudden movements. Here, we describe 24 patients with PKD, whose clinical data were analyzed. The attacks of involuntary movements were all short lasting, and could involve extremities, trunk, neck, or face without alteration of consciousness. The motor function was normal between attacks, and in some cases, attacks could be evoked during examination. Most patients had normal electroencephalogram (EEG) and neuroimaging results, but 2 cases had abnormal EEGs, and another 2 cases had bilateral calcification of basal ganglion on brain computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous history of misdiagnosis was a predominant feature, while treatments based on misdiagnosis sometimes did lead to improvement. Here, we discuss the clinical characteristics, especially the abnormalities of investigations and misdiagnosis, and recent insights into the pathophysiology of PKD.

  15. Digital immediate dentures treatment: A clinical report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Neumeier, Toni Tien; Neumeier, Harold

    2016-09-01

    The use of computer-aided engineering (CAE) and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology to fabricate complete dentures was introduced in 2011. Clinical procedures for digital immediate dentures can be identical to those for conventional immediate dentures and can be simplified by leaving all remaining dentition until the time of extraction and denture placement. Through the digital process, a single digital design and a definitive digital record are created which can be used to fabricate the immediate digital denture and surgical reduction guide for alveoloplasty. Digital immediate dentures can be relined using the same process as for conventional dentures. The definitive digital dentures can be fabricated with a reline impression and new centric relation record, using the existing digital immediate denture without additional clinical procedures. Providing patients with digital immediate dentures is a viable trend.

  16. Application of modeling and simulation to a long-term clinical trial: a direct comparison of simulated data and data actually observed in Japanese osteoporosis patients following 3-year ibandronate treatment.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kiyohiko; Iida, Satofumi; Tobinai, Masato; Hashimoto, Junko; Kawanishi, Takehiko

    2015-03-01

    Ibandronate, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, is a bone resorption inhibitor widely used to prevent and treat osteoporosis. To optimize the design for a long-term clinical study of ibandronate, modeling and simulation (M&S) was performed based on the result of population pharmacodynamic analysis using the data of a short-term clinical study. A population pharmacodynamic model was constructed by the urinary C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (uCTx) and the lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) data obtained in clinical studies, including a phase II study of Japanese osteoporosis patients treated with ibandronate for 6 months. Changes in BMD over a period of 3 years were simulated from the population pharmacodynamic parameters of the patients in this phase II study. The relationship between uCTx and BMD was well described by this modeling. The functions of disease progression and supplemental treatment were incorporated into the model to simulate a long-term clinical study with high accuracy. A long-term clinical study with a 3-year treatment was conducted after this M&S. The percentage change from baseline in observed BMD values were found to be similar to the prospectively simulated values. This study showed that M&S could be a useful and powerful tool for designing and conducting long-term clinical studies when carried out in the following sequence: (1) conduct a short-term clinical study; (2) perform M&S; and (3) conduct the long-term clinical study. Application of this procedure to various other treatment agents will establish the usefulness of M&S for long-term clinical studies and bring further efficiencies to drug development.

  17. Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Research Progress Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-30

    Cell Lysate with Subsequent Recovery of DNA Other nominees were: Adolescent Risk Behavior and the Influence of Parents and Education by MAJ Brent V... Adolescent Risk Behavior and the Influence of Parents and Education Start Date: 09/02/94 Est. Completion Date: Department: Clinical Investigation...activities, and parental involvement in providing students with information and guidance, have any effect on adolescent risk taking behavior. Technical

  18. [Quality of the clinical reports: observational study in Sassari].

    PubMed

    Virdis, A; Licheri, N; Ruiu, A

    2009-01-01

    Within the program of clinical risk management, and in particular in the phase of the "knowledge" of company reality, the work deals with the topic of the case history in Sassari' local health authority. A study is treated where, on a sample of about 400 cases history, four definite aspects are considered, in particular those that are regarded as the most important in the risk management and about medical responsability: 1) formal consent; 2) daily clinical allowance; 3) therapeutic card; 4) operating card. The results we got show the presence of a formal consent filled in correctly in 36 cases (9%), completed a daily allowance in 36 cases (9%), therapeutic card in 14 (3.5%) cases, operation card in 21 cases (19% su 116 surgical cases). These data, that have permitted to estimate the specific company reality as from pointed out critical states, show the necessity of working, with involvement of professional doctors, to build a history case model with clear and shared rules where you can clearly find the clinical path of a patient, where everything made is quoted and easily readable when necessary.

  19. The CARE guidelines: consensus-based clinical case reporting guideline development

    PubMed Central

    Gagnier, Joel J; Kienle, Gunver; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Sox, Harold; Riley, David

    2013-01-01

    A case report is a narrative that describes, for medical, scientific or educational purposes, a medical problem experienced by one or more patients. Case reports written without guidance from reporting standards are insufficiently rigorous to guide clinical practice or to inform clinical study design. Develop, disseminate and implement systematic reporting guidelines for case reports. We used a three-phase consensus process consisting of (1) premeeting literature review and interviews to generate items for the reporting guidelines, (2) a face-to-face consensus meeting to draft the reporting guidelines and (3) postmeeting feedback, review and pilot testing, followed by finalisation of the case report guidelines. This consensus process involved 27 participants and resulted in a 13-item checklist—a reporting guideline for case reports. The primary items of the checklist are title, key words, abstract, introduction, patient information, clinical findings, timeline, diagnostic assessment, therapeutic interventions, follow-up and outcomes, discussion, patient perspective and informed consent. We believe the implementation of the CARE (CAse REport) guidelines by medical journals will improve the completeness and transparency of published case reports and that the systematic aggregation of information from case reports will inform clinical study design, provide early signals of effectiveness and harms, and improve healthcare delivery. PMID:24155002

  20. A Qualitative Study of School Social Workers' Clinical and Professional Relationships when Reporting Child Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chanmugam, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study explored school social workers' relationships during instances of abuse and neglect reporting, focusing on reports made for children and adolescents already receiving school social work services. Although school social workers frequently file abuse and neglect reports, little is known about how they manage clinical and…

  1. Neurofibromatosis clinical presentations: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Robert G; Waddell, Brad M; Willson, Robert D

    1987-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NFT) is an autosomal dominant disorder. Several distinctive clinical features may be discovered in the presence of the disease, including ècafé au laité spots, cutaneous neurofibromas, axillary freckling, Lisch nodules, and a positive familial history. Chiropractic management of this condition should include early recognition, appropriate supportive referral and symptomatic treatment of accompanying biomechanical dysfunctions. Early diagnosis will not only permit appropriate assessment, but will allow for vital genetic counselling. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7

  2. [Hypothalamyc hamartomas: different ways of clinical debut. Cases report].

    PubMed

    Cemeli-Cano, Mercedes; López Úbeda, Marta; Muñoz, Antonio de Arriba; Ferrer Lozano, Marta; Labarta Aizpún, José I

    2015-12-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas are benign tumors of gray substance composed by hyperplasic neurons. They are usually asymptomatic small masses with extensions into the third ventricular cavity. In some instances they can cause cognitive behavioral alterations, seizures and/or central precocious puberty depending on the location. Here we present two cases of central precocious puberty due to hypothalamic hamartomas at 2(8/12) and 7 years of age. The younger patient also presents gelastic seizures, typically associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. After the clinical and radiological findings, they started treatment with GnRH analogues and a regression of the puberty signs without progression in the hamartomas size was observed.

  3. A national clinical quality program for Veterans Affairs catheterization laboratories (from the Veterans Affairs clinical assessment, reporting, and tracking program).

    PubMed

    Maddox, Thomas M; Plomondon, Mary E; Petrich, Megan; Tsai, Thomas T; Gethoffer, Hans; Noonan, Gregory; Gillespie, Brian; Box, Tamara; Fihn, Stephen D; Jesse, Robert L; Rumsfeld, John S

    2014-12-01

    A "learning health care system", as outlined in a recent Institute of Medicine report, harnesses real-time clinical data to continuously measure and improve clinical care. However, most current efforts to understand and improve the quality of care rely on retrospective chart abstractions complied long after the provision of clinical care. To align more closely with the goals of a learning health care system, we present the novel design and initial results of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Clinical Assessment, Reporting, and Tracking (CART) program-a national clinical quality program for VA cardiac catheterization laboratories that harnesses real-time clinical data to support clinical care and quality-monitoring efforts. Integrated within the VA electronic health record, the CART program uses a specialized software platform to collect real-time patient and procedural data for all VA patients undergoing coronary procedures in VA catheterization laboratories. The program began in 2005 and currently contains data on 434,967 catheterization laboratory procedures, including 272,097 coronary angiograms and 86,481 percutaneous coronary interventions, performed by 801 clinicians on 246,967 patients. We present the initial data from the CART program and describe 3 quality-monitoring programs that use its unique characteristics-procedural and complications feedback to individual labs, coronary device surveillance, and major adverse event peer review. The VA CART program is a novel approach to electronic health record design that supports clinical care, quality, and safety in VA catheterization laboratories. Its approach holds promise in achieving the goals of a learning health care system.

  4. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  5. Physical Conditions and Prisoner Deaths: A Clinical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neithercutt, M. G.; Zajac, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    The conditions under which prisoners are housed has long been the subject of scholarly discourse. Rare are opportunities to inquire into situations where the environment can clearly be seen to be a problem of fatal proportions. This report considers the deaths of three inmates at the California Medical Facility, Vacaville, spotlighting the…

  6. [The clinical application of zirconium-dioxide-ceramics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Somfai, Dóra; Zsigmond, Ágnes; Károlyházy, Katalin; Kispély, Barbara; Hermann, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Due to its outstanding physical, mechanical and esthetic properties, zirconium-dioxide is one of the most popular non-metal denture, capable of surpassing PFM in most cases. The recent advances of CAD/CAM technology makes it a good alternitve. Here we show the usefulness of zirconium-dioxide in everyday dental practice through three case reports.

  7. Historical Lassa fever reports and 30-year clinical update.

    PubMed

    Macher, Abe M; Wolfe, Martin S

    2006-05-01

    Five cases of Lassa fever have been imported from West Africa to the United States since 1969. We report symptoms of the patient with the second imported case and the symptoms and long-term follow-up on the patient with the third case. Vertigo in this patient has persisted for 30 years.

  8. Methodological quality and reporting of ethical requirements in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Canela, M.; de Irala-Estevez, J.; Martinez-Gonzalez, M. A.; Gomez-Gracia, E.; Fernandez-Crehuet, J.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To assess the relationship between the approval of trials by a research ethics committee (REC) and the fact that informed consent from participants (ICP) was obtained, with the quality of study design and methods. Design—Systematic review using a standardised checklist. Main measures—Methodological and ethical issues of all trials published between 1993 and 1995 in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association and the British Medical Journal were studied. In addition, clinical trials conducted in Spain and published by at least one Spanish author during the same period in any other journal were also included. Results—We studied the published articles of 767 trials and found the following indicators of lower methodological quality to be independent predictors for failure to disclose REC approval or ICP: absence of concealment of allocation, lack of justification for unblinded trials, not using a treatment for the patients in the control group, absent information on statistical methods, not including sample size estimation, not establishing the rules to stop the trial, and omitting the presentation of a baseline comparison of groups Conclusion—Trials of higher methodological and scientific quality were more likely to provide information about their ethical aspects. Key Words: Clinical trials • informed consent • research ethics committees • research design PMID:11417024

  9. Clinical Applications of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Battepati, Prashant M

    2010-01-01

    The greatest threats to developing teeth are dental caries and traumatic injuries. The primary goal of all restorative treatment is to maintain pulp vitality so that normal root development or apexogenesis can occur. If pulpal exposure occurs, then a pulpotomy procedure aims to preserve pulp vitality to allow for normal root development. Historically, calcium hydroxide has been the material of choice for pulpotomy procedures. Recently, an alternative material called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has demonstrated the ability to induce hard-tissue formation in pulpal tissue. This article describes the clinical and radiographic outcome of a series of cases involving the use of MTA in pulpotomy, apexogenesis and apexification procedures and root perforations repair. PMID:27625556

  10. INDICATIONS FOR DISTAL RADIOULNAR ARTHROPLASTY: REPORT ON THREE CLINICAL CASES

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Cláudia; Pereira, Alexandre; Sousa, Marco; Trigeuiros, Miguel; Silva, César

    2015-01-01

    Distal radioulnar arthroplasty is an attractive solution for treating various pathological conditions of the distal radioulnar joint because it allows restoration of stability, load transmission and function. The main indications are: radioulnar impingement after partial or complete resection of the distal ulna; and degenerative, inflammatory or post-traumatic arthritis of the distal radioulnar joint. The authors present three clinical cases of distal radioulnar pathological conditions: two patients with post-traumatic sequelae and one case of distal radioulnar impingement after a Sauvé-Kapandji operation. The three cases were treated surgically with a metallic prosthesis to replace the distal ulna (First Choice - Ascension®). The first two were treated with a resurfacing prosthesis and the last one with a modular prosthesis. All of the patients had achieved pain relief and increased movement of the distal radioulnar joint after one year of postoperative follow-up. PMID:27047827

  11. Preprosthetic minor tooth movement with thermoplastic appliances and interproximal stripping: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Hwan

    2014-11-01

    This clinical report describes preprosthodontic minor tooth movement with serial thermoplastic appliances and interproximal stripping. A patient with rotated and labially tipped anterior teeth sought care with a request for improved appearance. The prosthodontic planning and treatment approach are discussed.

  12. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: Reports of clinical laboratory isolation in a three county area, North Carolina, 2006 -2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Laboratory reports of mycobacteria isolation and identification are created during the clinical diagnostic process to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM isolation rates are expected to exceed rates of true NTM infectio...

  13. Treatment of a patient with severely worn dentition: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Thongthammachat-Thavornthanasarn, Sudsukh

    2007-01-01

    This clinical report documents the prosthodontic treatment of a Prosthodontic Diagnostic Index Class IV 63-year-old white male, referred to the prosthodontic clinic by his general dentist for evaluation and treatment. The patient was concerned about the severe wear on his teeth and understood the need for comprehensive (full-mouth) rehabilitation to restore his dental condition. The clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment plan, and sequence of treatment are presented.

  14. Clinical characteristics, patient-reported outcomes, and previous therapeutic management of patients with uncontrolled neuropathic pain referred to pain clinics.

    PubMed

    de Andrés, José; de la Calle, José-Luis; Pérez, María; López, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this report was to evaluate the clinical profile and previous management of patients with uncontrolled neuropathic pain who were referred to pain clinics. Methods. We included adult patients with uncontrolled pain who had a score of ≥4 in the DN4 questionnaire. In addition to sociodemographic and clinical data, we evaluated pain levels using a visual analog scale as well as anxiety, depression, sleep, disability, and treatment satisfaction employing validated tools. Results. A total of 755 patients were included in the study. The patients were predominantly referred to pain clinics by traumatologists (34.3%) and primary care physicians (16.7%). The most common diagnoses were radiculopathy (43%) and pain of oncological origin (14.3%). The major cause for uncontrolled pain was suboptimal treatment (88%). Fifty-three percent of the patients were depressed, 43% had clinical anxiety, 50% rated their overall health as bad or very bad, and 45% noted that their disease was severely or extremely interfering with their daily activities. Conclusions. Our results showed that uncontrolled neuropathic pain is a common phenomenon among the specialties that address these clinical entities and, regardless of its etiology, uncontrolled pain is associated with a dramatic impact on patient well-being.

  15. Clinical Characteristics, Patient-Reported Outcomes, and Previous Therapeutic Management of Patients with Uncontrolled Neuropathic Pain Referred to Pain Clinics

    PubMed Central

    de Andrés, José; de la Calle, José-Luis; Pérez, María; López, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this report was to evaluate the clinical profile and previous management of patients with uncontrolled neuropathic pain who were referred to pain clinics. Methods. We included adult patients with uncontrolled pain who had a score of ≥4 in the DN4 questionnaire. In addition to sociodemographic and clinical data, we evaluated pain levels using a visual analog scale as well as anxiety, depression, sleep, disability, and treatment satisfaction employing validated tools. Results. A total of 755 patients were included in the study. The patients were predominantly referred to pain clinics by traumatologists (34.3%) and primary care physicians (16.7%). The most common diagnoses were radiculopathy (43%) and pain of oncological origin (14.3%). The major cause for uncontrolled pain was suboptimal treatment (88%). Fifty-three percent of the patients were depressed, 43% had clinical anxiety, 50% rated their overall health as bad or very bad, and 45% noted that their disease was severely or extremely interfering with their daily activities. Conclusions. Our results showed that uncontrolled neuropathic pain is a common phenomenon among the specialties that address these clinical entities and, regardless of its etiology, uncontrolled pain is associated with a dramatic impact on patient well-being. PMID:24891950

  16. High School Students' Self-Reported Use of School Clinics and Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Christopher R.; Liddon, Nicole; Dunville, Richard; Habel, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Access to school health clinics and nurses has been linked with improved student achievement and health. Unfortunately, no studies have examined how many students report using school clinics or nurses and for which services. This study addressed this gap with data from a nationally representative sample of 15- to 25-year-olds. Respondents who…

  17. Restoration of a large class IV fracture using direct composite resin: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Romero, Mario F; Austin Grant, Jamie; Todd, Megan

    2017-04-03

    Restoration of anterior tooth fractures is a common dental procedure. Both direct and indirect options are clinically acceptable to repair fractured teeth. For a large class IV fracture, treatment planning is time consuming, and the artistic skills necessary to achieve optimal results can be daunting. This clinical report describes a step-by-step protocol for achieving highly esthetic direct anterior restorations.

  18. Development and Use of Challenge Exams for Clinical Laboratory Nursing 2: Part 2 Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattstaedt, Mary Jane; Isaac, Margaret M.

    The report describes the development of a set of equivalency tests for students in Nursing 2 who have had prior clinical laboratory training or experience in pediatrics, obstetrics, or geriatrics. For each of the three areas the examination packet includes: the course clinical objectives, the challenge examination objectives, a self-study guide, a…

  19. Adverse event reporting in nonpharmacologic, noninterventional pain clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hunsinger, Matthew; Smith, Shannon M; Rothstein, Daniel; McKeown, Andrew; Parkhurst, Melissa; Hertz, Sharon; Katz, Nathaniel P; Lin, Allison H; McDermott, Michael P; Rappaport, Bob A; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of treatment safety is 1 of the primary goals of clinical trials. Organizations and working groups have created reporting guidelines for adverse events (AEs). Previous research examining AE reporting for pharmacologic clinical trials of analgesics in major pain journals found many reporting inadequacies, suggesting that analgesic trials are not adhering to existing AE reporting guidelines. The present systematic review documented AE reporting in 3 main pain journals for nonpharmacologic, noninterventional (NP/NI) trials examining pain treatments. To broaden our pool of nonpharmacologic trials, we also included trials examining acupuncture, leech therapy, and noninvasive stimulation techniques (eg, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). We documented AE reporting at 2 levels of specificity using coding manuals based on the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) harms reporting standards and Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) AE reporting checklist. We identified a number of inadequacies in AE reporting across the 3 journals. For example, using the ACTTION coding manual, we found that less than one-half of the trials reported specific AE assessment methods; approximately one-third of the trials reported withdrawals due to AEs for each study arm; and about one-fourth of the trials reported all specific AEs. We also examined differences in AE reporting across several trial characteristics, finding that AE reporting was generally more detailed in trials with patients versus those using healthy volunteers undergoing experimentally evoked pain. These results suggest that investigators conducting and reporting NP/NI clinical trials are not adequately describing the assessment and occurrence of AEs.

  20. The CONSORT Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) extension: implications for clinical trials and practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    To inform clinical guidelines and patient care we need high quality evidence on the relative benefits and harms of intervention. Patient reported outcome (PRO) data from clinical trials can “empower patients to make decisions based on their values” and “level the playing field between physician and patient”. While clinicians have a good understanding of the concept of health-related quality of life and other PROs, evidence suggests that many do not feel comfortable in using the data from trials to inform discussions with patients and clinical practice. This may in part reflect concerns over the integrity of the data and difficulties in interpreting the results arising from poor reporting. The new CONSORT PRO extension aims to improve the reporting of PROs in trials to facilitate the use of results to inform clinical practice and health policy. While the CONSORT PRO extension is an important first step in the process, we need broader engagement with the guidance to facilitate optimal reporting and maximize use of PRO data in a clinical setting. Endorsement by journal editors, authors and peer reviewers are crucial steps. Improved design, implementation and transparent reporting of PROs in clinical trials are necessary to provide high quality evidence to inform evidence synthesis and clinical practice guidelines. PMID:24168680

  1. [Hereditary hemachromatosis: clinical case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ricardo; Tagle, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Hemachromatosis is a hereditary condition, producing progressive iron overload as a result of the mutation in proteins that regulate intestinal iron absorption. It is a systemic disease with several manifestations including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, joint disease and a proportion of asymptomatic patients. When it is diagnosed and treatment with phlebotomies is initiated before any organ damage is developed, the prognosis is very good, with normal survival free of manifestations. This condition is common in European populations. We report the case of a Peruvian patient of European ancestry who is asymptomatic, but has high levels of aminotransferases and elevated iron markers. Genetic testing confirmed the patient's diagnosis of hereditary hemachromatosis.

  2. Variable clinical presentation in primary lymphoedema: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, Abdullah; Sevinc, Eylem; Baykan, Ali; Arslan, Duran; Argun, Mustafa; Pamukcu, Ozge; Uzum, Kazim

    2014-07-01

    Lymphoedema is a condition of localized fluid retention and tissue swelling caused by a compromised lymphatic system. Lymphoedema may be primary or secondary and can be inherited. Primary lymphoedema (primary lymphatic dysplasia) is a chronic oedema caused by a developmental abnormality of the lymphatic system. Primary lymphoedema most commonly affects the lower limbs, but other body parts can also be affected. It can be associated with some specific syndromes (i.e. Hennekam syndrome) and genetic disorders. In this article, we report on two patients with congenital multisegmental lymphoedema and Hennekam syndrome, both primary lymphoedemas.

  3. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  4. Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: clinical report from an endemic region

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Kamil Y.; Balik, Ahmet A.; Celebi, Fehmi

    2002-01-01

    Objective To review the clinical management of alveolar echinococcosis. Design A retrospective analysis. Setting A university-affiliated hospital in Turkey. Patients Forty patients treated for alveolar echinococcosis between 1987 and 2000. Interventions Curative resection followed by chemotherapy, or medical palliation with chemotherapy only. Palliative procedures such as bilioenteric or external drainage were done for cholestatic jaundice and liver abscess. Outcome measures Results of medical and surgical treatment. Results Seventeen patients had a resectable tumour and all underwent curative resection. Of the other 23 patients with nonresectable tumour, 11 underwent palliative surgical procedures such as bilioenteric or external drainage for cholestatic jaundice or liver abscess. All patients received long-term albendazole therapy. Four patients with nonresectable tumour died because of chronic liver failure. In a 6.5-year follow-up, there was no recurrence in patients who underwent curative resection. The efficacy of chemotherapy is limited in nonresectable disease. Conclusions To increase the rate of early detection and curative resection, screening programs are essential. Research on new chemotherapeutic approaches should be made to improve survival in patients with nonresectable disease. PMID:12500915

  5. Clinical report of the treatment of locally advanced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Z; Mietlowski, W; Ohanian, M; Cox, J

    1977-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of the treatment of 345 patients entered in the Veterans Administration Lung Group Protocol 13L. The study was activated March 1972, and closed for the patient accesion March 1975. All patients had a histological diagnosis of primary lung cancer considered clinically non-resectable or inoperable. Patients were equally randomized into two groups, radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy with chemotherapy. The analysis of the data included: treatment regimen, radiation dose, initial performance status, performance status change, cell type, duration of survival, quality of survival and age. The strongest influence on median survival was the level of radiation dose. The small cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy showed significant improvement in the median survival (38.2 weeks) over the patients treated with radiotherapy alone (20.6 weeks). The patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy also showed improvement in performance status more frequently than the patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Other parameters of the analysis will be presented.

  6. 78 FR 21130 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1... writing. Proposed Collection: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database, 0925-0600,...

  7. Actuarial and actual analysis of surgical results: empirical validation.

    PubMed

    Grunkemeier, G L; Anderson, R P; Starr, A

    2001-06-01

    This report validates the use of the Kaplan-Meier (actuarial) method of computing survival curves by comparing 12-year estimates published in 1978 with current assessments. It also contrasts cumulative incidence curves, referred to as "actual" analysis in the cardiac-related literature with Kaplan-Meier curves for thromboembolism and demonstrates that with the former estimate the percentage of events that will actually occur.

  8. Maxillary peripheral keratocystic odontogenic tumor. A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Romero, María del Carmen; Serrera-Figallo, María de los Angeles; Alberdi-Navarro, Javier; Cabezas-Talavero, Javier; Romero-Ruiz, Manuel-María; Aguirre-Urizar, Jose-Manuel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Jose-Luis

    2017-01-01

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign odontogenic cystic neoplasia characterized by its thin, squamous epithelium with superficial parakeratosis. It has the potential for infiltration and local aggressiveness and has a high rate of recurrence. This neoplasia is predominantly found in males and people of white origin. The mandible is the most frequently involved site, in particular the third molar region, mandibular angle, and ramus. It has a mandible-maxilla ratio of 2:1. Only about twenty cases of peripheral keratocystic odontogenic tumors (PKCOT) have been reported in the international literature. This study presents a case of PKCOT localized in the anterior region of the maxilla, on the vestibular side of the upper left lateral incisor and the upper left canine. The diagnosis and treatment procedures, as based on the literature, are also discussed. Key words:Odontogenic cysts, odontogenic tumors, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:28149484

  9. Clinical Management of Glanzmann’s Thrombasthenia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Varkey, Indu; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M.; Vijaya, Mangalpady Shenoy; Oommen, Vinod Idicula

    2014-01-01

    Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare, genetically inherited platelet disorder in which the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa) complex is either deficient or, dysfunctional. The incidence is about 1 in 1,000,000. This case report deals with a 4 year-old girl diagnosed with GT presenting with dental caries and periapical lesions in the primary mandibular first molars. To provide the best care, an interdisciplinary approach was followed by a team consisting of pediatric dentists, pediatricians and anesthesiologists. Complete oral rehabilitation was planned under general anesthesia which included extractions, multiple esthetic restorations and space maintainers with the utmost care to prevent unwarranted bleeding. PMID:24910701

  10. [Supravalvular aortic stenosis. Report of clinical findings in 5 patients].

    PubMed

    Dumont, C R; Gil, M; Mispireta, J; Attié, F

    1975-01-01

    Five cases of supravalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) diagnosed by heart catheterization were studied in the Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia of Mexico. The clinic and laboratory data of interest of the differential diagnosis with other forms of obstruction of the left ventricle as follows: 1. Three cases had mental retardation and "elfin" face (SAS with specific psychophysical syndrome), the rest had a normal psyco-physical state without family antecedents (sporadic SAS). 2. The aortic focus was the epicenter of the expulsion murmur. In the phoncarodiographic study, two patients had protosistolic click and another had, in addition, a descending protodiastolic murmur (Int. I-IV). In the radial sphigmograms, one case had an amplitude difference in favor of the right side. 3. All had serum calcium figures within normal limits. 4. A chromosomatic analysis of preperipheral blood was performed on two patients, with normal results. 5. In the electrocardiogram, one case had right ventricular enlargement secondary to pulmonary arterial hypertension, due to stenosis of the main pulmonary arteries. 6. The radiologic study did not show dilatation of the ascending aorta and aortic bud in any case. 7. The angiocardiography showed: stenosis directly above the Valsalva sinuses; absence of dilatation or hypoplasia of the aorta above the stenosis; and the coronary network, indirectly opaqued, showed no abnormalities. One case had aortic coarctation and abnormal implantation of the right sublaviar artery, and another, stenosis of the right and left branch of its origen of the truncus of the pulmonary artery. The literature up to the present is reviewed and an anatomo-functional classification is proposed with the objective of including new varieties.

  11. Calibration of Self-Reported Oral Health to Clinically Determined Standards

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honghu; Maida, Carl A.; Spolsky, Vladimir W.; Shen, Jie; Li, Helen; Zhou, Xiaomeng; Marcus, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Objective Self-report of oral health is an inexpensive approach to assessing an individual’s oral health status, but it is heavily influenced by personal views and usually differs from that of clinically determined oral health status. To assist researchers and clinicians in estimating oral health self-report, we summarize clinically determined oral health measures that can objectively measure oral health and evaluate the discrepancies between self-reported and clinically determined oral health status. We test hypotheses of trends across covariates, thereby creating optimal calibration models and tools that can adjust self-reported oral health to clinically determined standards. Methods Using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, we examined the discrepancy between self-reported and clinically determined oral health. We evaluated the relationship between the degree of this discrepancy and possible factors contributing to this discrepancy, such as patient characteristics and general health condition. We used a regression approach to develop calibration models for self-reported oral health. Results The relationship between self-reported and clinically determined oral health is complex. Generally, there is a discrepancy between the two that can best be calibrated by a model that includes general health condition, number of times a person has received health care, gender, age, education, and income. Conclusion The model we developed can be used to calibrate and adjust self-reported oral health status to that of clinically determined standards and for oral health screening of large populations in federal, state, and local programs, enabling great savings in resources used in dental care. PMID:21054482

  12. [Followup of chicken pox keratitis. Anatomic-clinical case report].

    PubMed

    D'hermies, F; Ellies, P; Meyer, A; Halhal, M; Morel, X; Behar-Cohen, F; Renard, G; Dighiero, P

    2002-09-01

    Chicken pox is a very common infectious disease in children. Its corneal involvement is less serious than with measles, which may lead to blindness in numerous developing countries. However, with occasional cases occur. A case of a 59-year-old male patient whose left cornea was involved during a chicken pox infection at the age of 7 is reported. More recently, the vision of the right eye was normal at 20/20 and reduced to visual perception in the affected left eye. Corneal sensitivity was maintained in the left eye, which, however exhibited a central epithelial defect. A central round opacity of the left corneal stroma was believed to be the scar resulting from a previous disciform keratitis. The left central cornea was thinned and there was neither an anterior chamber flare nor new corneal vessels. This corneal condition required a corneal allograft, performed quickly because of the potential risk of perforation. Histopathological study of the corneal button showed a central corneal thinning with an increase in epithelial thickness. The corneal stroma was disorganized, with irregular collagen bundles. No inflammatory cells could be observed, however. All the histopathological changes observed were those of a corneal scar.

  13. The Workforce Task Force report: clinical implications for neurology.

    PubMed

    Freeman, William D; Vatz, Kenneth A; Griggs, Robert C; Pedley, Timothy

    2013-07-30

    The American Academy of Neurology Workforce Task Force (WFTF) report predicts a future shortfall of neurologists in the United States. The WFTF data also suggest that for most states, the current demand for neurologist services already exceeds the supply, and by 2025 the demand for neurologists will be even higher. This future demand is fueled by the aging of the US population, the higher health care utilization rates of neurologic services, and by a greater number of patients gaining access to the health care system due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Uncertainties in health care delivery and patient access exist due to looming concerns about further Medicare reimbursement cuts. This uncertainty is set against a backdrop of Congressional volatility on a variety of issues, including the repeal of the sustainable growth rate for physician reimbursement. The impact of these US health care changes on the neurology workforce, future increasing demands, reimbursement, and alternative health care delivery models including accountable care organizations, nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and teleneurology for both stroke and general neurology are discussed. The data lead to the conclusion that neurologists will need to play an even larger role in caring for the aging US population by 2025. We propose solutions to increase the availability of neurologic services in the future and provide other ways of meeting the anticipated increased demand for neurologic care.

  14. Reporting Incidental Findings in Genomic Scale Clinical Sequencing-A Clinical Laboratory Perspective: A Report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Madhuri; Bale, Sherri; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Gibson, Jane; Bone Jeng, Linda Jo; Joseph, Loren; Laser, Jordan; Lubin, Ira M; Miller, Christine E; Ross, Lainie F; Rothberg, Paul G; Tanner, Alice K; Vitazka, Patrik; Mao, Rong

    2015-02-11

    Advances in sequencing technologies have facilitated concurrent testing for many disorders, and the results generated may provide information about a patient's health that is unrelated to the clinical indication, commonly referred to as incidental findings. This is a paradigm shift from traditional genetic testing in which testing and reporting are tailored to a patient's specific clinical condition. Clinical laboratories and physicians are wrestling with this increased complexity in genomic testing and reporting of the incidental findings to patients. An enormous amount of discussion has taken place since the release of a set of recommendations from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. This discussion has largely focused on the content of the incidental findings, but the laboratory perspective and patient autonomy have been overlooked. This report by the Association of Molecular Pathology workgroup discusses the pros and cons of next-generation sequencing technology, potential benefits, and harms for reporting of incidental findings, including the effect on both the laboratory and the patient, and compares those with other areas of medicine. The importance of genetic counseling to preserve patient autonomy is also reviewed. The discussion and recommendations presented by the workgroup underline the need for continued research and discussion among all stakeholders to improve our understanding of the effect of different policies on patients, providers, and laboratories.

  15. Reporting incidental findings in genomic scale clinical sequencing--a clinical laboratory perspective: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Madhuri; Bale, Sherri; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Gibson, Jane; Jeng, Linda Jo Bone; Joseph, Loren; Laser, Jordan; Lubin, Ira M; Miller, Christine E; Ross, Lainie F; Rothberg, Paul G; Tanner, Alice K; Vitazka, Patrik; Mao, Rong

    2015-03-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies have facilitated concurrent testing for many disorders, and the results generated may provide information about a patient's health that is unrelated to the clinical indication, commonly referred to as incidental findings. This is a paradigm shift from traditional genetic testing in which testing and reporting are tailored to a patient's specific clinical condition. Clinical laboratories and physicians are wrestling with this increased complexity in genomic testing and reporting of the incidental findings to patients. An enormous amount of discussion has taken place since the release of a set of recommendations from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. This discussion has largely focused on the content of the incidental findings, but the laboratory perspective and patient autonomy have been overlooked. This report by the Association of Molecular Pathology workgroup discusses the pros and cons of next-generation sequencing technology, potential benefits, and harms for reporting of incidental findings, including the effect on both the laboratory and the patient, and compares those with other areas of medicine. The importance of genetic counseling to preserve patient autonomy is also reviewed. The discussion and recommendations presented by the workgroup underline the need for continued research and discussion among all stakeholders to improve our understanding of the effect of different policies on patients, providers, and laboratories.

  16. Student Exposure to Actual Patients in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Marie A.; McCall, Charles Y.; Francisco, George E., Jr.; Poirier, Sylvie

    1997-01-01

    Two clinical courses for first-year dental students were designed to develop students' interaction skills through actual patient case presentations and discussions and an interdisciplinary teaching approach. Results indicate students preferred the case presentations, with or without lecture, to the lecture-only approach and felt they learned more…

  17. Analyzing clinical trial outcomes based on incomplete daily diary reports.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Neal; Harel, Ofer; Little, Roderick J A

    2016-07-30

    A case study is presented assessing the impact of missing data on the analysis of daily diary data from a study evaluating the effect of a drug for the treatment of insomnia. The primary analysis averaged daily diary values for each patient into a weekly variable. Following the commonly used approach, missing daily values within a week were ignored provided there was a minimum number of diary reports (i.e., at least 4). A longitudinal model was then fit with treatment, time, and patient-specific effects. A treatment effect at a pre-specified landmark time was obtained from the model. Weekly values following dropout were regarded as missing, but intermittent daily missing values were obscured. Graphical summaries and tables are presented to characterize the complex missing data patterns. We use multiple imputation for daily diary data to create completed data sets so that exactly 7 daily diary values contribute to each weekly patient average. Standard analysis methods are then applied for landmark analysis of the completed data sets, and the resulting estimates are combined using the standard multiple imputation approach. The observed data are subject to digit heaping and patterned responses (e.g., identical values for several consecutive days), which makes accurate modeling of the response data difficult. Sensitivity analyses under different modeling assumptions for the data were performed, along with pattern mixture models assessing the sensitivity to the missing at random assumption. The emphasis is on graphical displays and computational methods that can be implemented with general-purpose software. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. What Information do School and Clinical Psychologists Give to Individuals Evaluated? A Report of a Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vane, Julia R.

    The author describes her success in reporting the results of psychological evaluations directly to the parents and individuals involved, but notes that some of her colleagues fear that such a practice might lead to misuse and misinterpretation. Her survey of 137 school and clinical psychologists, with regard to their practice of reporting test…

  19. Guidelines for reporting pre-clinical in vitro studies on dental materials.

    PubMed

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano

    2012-12-01

    In vitro pre-clinical research is an important aspect of the development of new dental materials and techniques, because it can provide essential information for further testing of therapeutic approaches in clinical trials. These pre-clinical experiments should therefore be reported with the same rigor as studies involving humans. The objectives of this paper were twofold: (a) to search and assess existing guidelines for reporting in vitro studies in dentistry, and (b) to present a methodology for reporting these studies, based on the CONSORT checklist for reporting randomized clinical trials. After a comprehensive search in PubMed database, no guidelines for reporting in vitro studies in dentistry were found. The proposed methodology is presented and the rationale for the choice of fourteen guidelines for producing the different sections of such papers is described in detail. The assessment of a sample of in vitro studies using the proposed guidelines showed that the standards of reporting should be improved. Good standards of reporting of studies are necessary for improvement of efficiency in dental research. The guidelines presented are the first standards for reporting in vitro studies in dentistry. As with the original CONSORT document, the modified checklist is evolving. It should, therefore, be further tested by researchers and the results of these assessments should be used for further improvement of this tool.

  20. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1994-1995, No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakai, Kunio, Ed.; Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.

    This annual report discusses several topics related to the work of the Research and Clinical Center for Child Development. Seven topics are covered in the report. The articles are: (1) "Fathers' Participation in the Lives of Their 4-Month-Old Infants: The United States and Japan" (Marguerite Stevenson Barratt, Koichi Negayama and…

  1. Using phrases and document metadata to improve topic modeling of clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Speier, William; Ong, Michael K; Arnold, Corey W

    2016-06-01

    Probabilistic topic models provide an unsupervised method for analyzing unstructured text, which have the potential to be integrated into clinical automatic summarization systems. Clinical documents are accompanied by metadata in a patient's medical history and frequently contains multiword concepts that can be valuable for accurately interpreting the included text. While existing methods have attempted to address these problems individually, we present a unified model for free-text clinical documents that integrates contextual patient- and document-level data, and discovers multi-word concepts. In the proposed model, phrases are represented by chained n-grams and a Dirichlet hyper-parameter is weighted by both document-level and patient-level context. This method and three other Latent Dirichlet allocation models were fit to a large collection of clinical reports. Examples of resulting topics demonstrate the results of the new model and the quality of the representations are evaluated using empirical log likelihood. The proposed model was able to create informative prior probabilities based on patient and document information, and captured phrases that represented various clinical concepts. The representation using the proposed model had a significantly higher empirical log likelihood than the compared methods. Integrating document metadata and capturing phrases in clinical text greatly improves the topic representation of clinical documents. The resulting clinically informative topics may effectively serve as the basis for an automatic summarization system for clinical reports.

  2. [Cough and hypoxemia as clinical manifestation of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Nieto, Mary; Dicembrino, Manuela; Ferraz, Rubén; Romagnoli, Fernando; Giugno, Hilda; Ernst, Glenda; Siminovich, Monica; Botto, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Alveolar proteinosis is a rare chronic lung disease, especially in children, characterized by abnormal accumulation of lipoproteins and derived surfactant in the intra-alveolar space that generates a severe reduction of gas exchange. Idiopathic presentation form constitutes over 90% of cases, a phenomenon associated with production of autoimmune antibodies directed at the receptor for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. A case of a girl of 5 years of age treated because of atypical pneumonia with unfavorable evolution due to persistent hypoxemia is presented. The diagnosis is obtained through pathologic examination of lung biopsy by thoracotomy, as treatment is carried out by 17bronchopulmonary bronchoscopy lavages and the patient evidences marked clinical improvement.

  3. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: reporting clinically relevant features.

    PubMed

    Del Chiaro, Marco; Verbeke, Caroline

    2016-11-22

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas can exhibit a wide spectrum of macroscopic and microscopic appearances. This not only causes occasional difficulties for the reporting pathologist in distinguishing these tumours from other lesions, but is also relevant clinically. As evidence accumulates, it becomes clear that multiple macroscopic and histological features of these neoplasms are relevant to the risk for malignant transformation and, consequently, of prime importance for clinical patient management. The need for detailed reporting is therefore increasing. This review discusses the panoply of gross and microscopic features of IPMN as well as the recommendations from recent consensus meetings regarding the pathology reporting on this tumour entity.

  4. Borderline personality disorder: patterns of self-harm, reported childhood trauma and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Rebecca; Gavin, Victoria; Levita, Liat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consecutive admissions of 214 women with borderline personality disorder were investigated for patterns of specific forms of self-harm and reported developmental experiences. Systematic examination of clinical notes found that 75% had previously reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. These women were more likely to self-harm, and in specific ways that may reflect their past experiences. Despite this, treatment within a dialectical behaviour therapy-informed therapeutic community leads to relatively greater clinical gains than for those without a reported sexual abuse trauma history. Notably, greater behavioural and self-reported distress and dissociation were not found to predict poor clinical outcome. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703718

  5. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Medication Error Reporting in Primary Care Clinics: A Qualitative Study in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Samsiah, A.; Othman, Noordin; Jamshed, Shazia; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore and understand participants’ perceptions and attitudes towards the reporting of medication errors (MEs). Methods A qualitative study using in-depth interviews of 31 healthcare practitioners from nine publicly funded, primary care clinics in three states in peninsular Malaysia was conducted for this study. The participants included family medicine specialists, doctors, pharmacists, pharmacist assistants, nurses and assistant medical officers. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the data was guided by the framework approach. Results Six themes and 28 codes were identified. Despite the availability of a reporting system, most of the participants agreed that MEs were underreported. The nature of the error plays an important role in determining the reporting. The reporting system, organisational factors, provider factors, reporter’s burden and benefit of reporting also were identified. Conclusions Healthcare practitioners in primary care clinics understood the importance of reporting MEs to improve patient safety. Their perceptions and attitudes towards reporting of MEs were influenced by many factors which affect the decision-making process of whether or not to report. Although the process is complex, it primarily is determined by the severity of the outcome of the errors. The participants voluntarily report the errors if they are familiar with the reporting system, what error to report, when to report and what form to use. PMID:27906960

  6. Clinical compliance of viewing conditions in radiology reporting environments against current guidelines and standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, S.; Rainford, L.; Butler, M. L.

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the importance of environmental conditions in the radiology reporting environment, with many indicating that incorrect parameters could lead to error and misinterpretation. Literature is available with recommendations as to the levels that should be achieved in clinical practice, but evidence of adherence to these guidelines in radiology reporting environments is absent. This study audited the reporting environments of four teleradiologist and eight hospital based radiology reporting areas. This audit aimed to quantify adherence to guidelines and identify differences in the locations with respect to layout and design, monitor distance and angle as well as the ambient factors of the reporting environments. In line with international recommendations, an audit tool was designed to enquire in relation to the layout and design of reporting environments, monitor angle and distances used by radiologists when reporting, as well as the ambient factors such as noise, light and temperature. The review of conditions were carried out by the same independent auditor for consistency. The results obtained were compared against international standards and current research. Each radiology environment was given an overall compliance score to establish whether or not their environments were in line with recommended guidelines. Poor compliance to international recommendations and standards among radiology reporting environments was identified. Teleradiology reporting environments demonstrated greater compliance than hospital environments. The findings of this study identified a need for greater awareness of environmental and perceptual issues in the clinical setting. Further work involving a larger number of clinical centres is recommended.

  7. Actual 10-Year Survivors Following Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Prescott, Jason D.; Wang, Tracy S.; Glenn, Jason; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Poultsides, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with limited therapeutic options beyond surgical resection. The characteristics of actual long-term survivors following surgical resection for ACC have not been previously reported. Method Patients who underwent resection for ACC at one of 13 academic institutions participating in the US Adrenocortical Carcinoma Group from 1993 to 2014 were analyzed. Patients were stratified into four groups: early mortality (died within 2 years), late mortality (died within 2–5 years), actual 5-year survivor (survived at least 5 years), and actual 10-year survivor (survived at least 10 years). Patients with less than 5 years of follow-up were excluded. Results Among the 180 patients available for analysis, there were 49 actual 5-year survivors (27%) and 12 actual 10-year survivors (7%). Patients who experienced early mortality had higher rates of cortisol-secreting tumors, nodal metastasis, synchronous distant metastasis, and R1 or R2 resections (all P < 0.05). The need for multi-visceral resection, perioperative blood transfusion, and adjuvant therapy correlated with early mortality. However, nodal involvement, distant metastasis, and R1 resection did not preclude patients from becoming actual 10-year survivors. Ten of twelve actual 10-year survivors were women, and of the seven 10-year survivors who experienced disease recurrence, five had undergone repeat surgery to resect the recurrence. Conclusion Surgery for ACC can offer a 1 in 4 chance of actual 5-year survival and a 1 in 15 chance of actual 10-year survival. Long-term survival was often achieved with repeat resection for local or distant recurrence, further underscoring the important role of surgery in managing patients with ACC. PMID:27633419

  8. [Epidemiologic studies on nutrition role in develomeat of osteoarthrosis. Report 1. Analysis of actual intake of nutrients and energy in depend on financial position and in come patients osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Khodyrev, V N; Martinchik, A N

    2010-01-01

    The study gives the characteristic of the social situation of patients with osteoarthrosis (OA), among which is dominated by people with disabilities and senior citizens (60%), most of which belongs to the poor. The actual nutrition of patients with OA is characterized by low energy intake and macronutrients. Feeding low-income patients with OA was characterized by inadequate intake of ascorbic acid and calcium, whereas the intake of vitamin A, E and beta-carotene was higher in patients with OA compared with the control group.

  9. Clinician-Reported Outcome Assessments of Treatment Benefit: Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcome Assessment Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Powers, John H.; Patrick, Donald L.; Walton, Marc K.; Marquis, Patrick; Cano, Stefan; Hobart, Jeremy; Isaac, Maria; Vamvakas, Spiros; Slagle, Ashley; Molsen, Elizabeth; Burke, Laurie B.

    2017-01-01

    A clinician-reported outcome (ClinRO) assessment is a type of clinical outcome assessment (COA). ClinRO assessments, like all COAs (patient-reported, observer-reported, or performance outcome assessments), are used to 1) measure patients’ health status and 2) define end points that can be interpreted as treatment benefits of medical interventions on how patients feel, function, or survive in clinical trials. Like other COAs, ClinRO assessments can be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. A ClinRO assessment is conducted and reported by a trained health care professional and requires specialized professional training to evaluate the patient’s health status. This is the second of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment—Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. The first report provided an overview of COAs including definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement practices. This report focuses specifically on issues related to ClinRO assessments. In this report, we define three types of ClinRO assessments (readings, ratings, and clinician global assessments) and describe emerging good measurement practices in their development and evaluation. The good measurement practices include 1) defining the context of use; 2) identifying the concept of interest measured; 3) defining the intended treatment benefit on how patients feel, function, or survive reflected by the ClinRO assessment and evaluating the relationship between that intended treatment benefit and the concept of interest; 4) documenting content validity; 5) evaluating other measurement properties once content validity is established (including intra- and inter-rater reliability); 6) defining study objectives and end point(s) objectives, and defining study end points and placing study end points within the hierarchy of end points; 7) establishing interpretability in trial results; and 8) evaluating operational considerations for the implementation

  10. The roles of funding source, clinical trial outcome, and quality of reporting in orthopedic surgery literature.

    PubMed

    Khan, Safdar N; Mermer, Matthew J; Myers, Elizabeth; Sandhu, Harvinder S

    2008-12-01

    Compared with nonfunded or peer-reviewed funded projects, industry-sponsored clinical trials have traditionally been associated with more positive results. This relationship has been extensively studied in the nonsurgical literature. Although a few authors have addressed specialties, little has been reported on orthopedic clinical trials and their association with funding, study outcome, and efforts to reduce bias after randomization across journals of multiple subspecialties. For the study reported here, we selected 5 major orthopedic subspecialty journals: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume), Spine, Journal of Arthroplasty, Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, and American Journal of Sports Medicine. We chose a 2-year limit for investigation (2002-2004); included all original randomized clinical trials reported in these 5 journals; and examined these trials for their study design, funding source, outcome, bias potential, and conclusion reached. Support for the 100 eligible orthopedic clinical trials was stated as coming from industry (26 trials, 26%), nonprofit sources (19 trials, 19%), and mixed sources (5 trials, 5%); no support was stated in 46 trials (46%), and support was not reported in 4 trials (4%). Of the 26 trials reporting industry support, 22 (85%) were graded as indicating an outcome favorable to the new treatment. The association between industry funding and favorable outcome was strong and significant (P<.001). In almost half of the studies reported in Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery and Spine, measures taken to reduce bias were not documented.

  11. Case report: imaging the clinical course of FOPE—a cause of adolescent knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Bochmann, Thomas; Forrester, Richard; Smith, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Focal periphyseal oedema (FOPE) is a rare MRI finding associated with pain in adolescent patients with very few reported cases. We present a case of FOPE in a 13-year-old girl and the only follow-up imaging available for an isolated presentation of this condition.This article describes a clinical course that correlates well with the imaging obtained. This article describes a clinical course that correlates well with the imaging obtained. PMID:27887018

  12. Clinical and instrumental treatment of a patient with dysfunction of the stomatognathic system: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Summary This article details a case report of a subject chosen from among patients treated in the author’s clinic in the Posturology and Gnathology Section of the University Milano-Bicocca. It shows how the indispensable clinical analysis of the stomatognathic system and the connections between posture can be supported by instrumental analysis, such as the computerized occlusal analysis system and the force platform, to diagnose and treat dysfunctional patients. PMID:22238703

  13. Mayo Clinic/Renal Pathology Society Consensus Report on Pathologic Classification, Diagnosis, and Reporting of GN.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Haas, Mark; Markowitz, Glen S; D'Agati, Vivette D; Rennke, Helmut G; Jennette, J Charles; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Alpers, Charles E; Chang, Anthony; Cornell, Lynn D; Cosio, Fernando G; Fogo, Agnes B; Glassock, Richard J; Hariharan, Sundaram; Kambham, Neeraja; Lager, Donna J; Leung, Nelson; Mengel, Michael; Nath, Karl A; Roberts, Ian S; Rovin, Brad H; Seshan, Surya V; Smith, Richard J H; Walker, Patrick D; Winearls, Christopher G; Appel, Gerald B; Alexander, Mariam P; Cattran, Daniel C; Casado, Carmen Avila; Cook, H Terence; De Vriese, An S; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Racusen, Lorraine C; Ronco, Pierre; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2016-05-01

    Renal pathologists and nephrologists met on February 20, 2015 to establish an etiology/pathogenesis-based system for classification and diagnosis of GN, with a major aim of standardizing the kidney biopsy report of GN. On the basis of etiology/pathogenesis, GN is classified into the following five pathogenic types, each with specific disease entities: immune-complex GN, pauci-immune GN, antiglomerular basement membrane GN, monoclonal Ig GN, and C3 glomerulopathy. The pathogenesis-based classification forms the basis of the kidney biopsy report. To standardize the report, the diagnosis consists of a primary diagnosis and a secondary diagnosis. The primary diagnosis should include the disease entity/pathogenic type (if disease entity is not known) followed in order by pattern of injury (mixed patterns may be present); score/grade/class for disease entities, such as IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and ANCA GN; and additional features as detailed herein. A pattern diagnosis as the sole primary diagnosis is not recommended. Secondary diagnoses should be reported separately and include coexisting lesions that do not form the primary diagnosis. Guidelines for the report format, light microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, and ancillary studies are also provided. In summary, this consensus report emphasizes a pathogenesis-based classification of GN and provides guidelines for the standardized reporting of GN.

  14. Context: An Algorithm for Determining Negation, Experiencer, and Temporal Status from Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, Henk; Dowling, John N.; Thornblade, Tyler; Chapman, Wendy W.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe an algorithm called ConText for determining whether clinical conditions mentioned in clinical reports are negated, hypothetical, historical, or experienced by someone other than the patient. The algorithm infers the status of a condition with regard to these properties from simple lexical clues occurring in the context of the condition. The discussion and evaluation of the algorithm presented in this paper address the questions of whether a simple surface-based approach which has been shown to work well for negation can be successfully transferred to other contextual properties of clinical conditions, and to what extent this approach is portable among different clinical report types. In our study we find that ConText obtains reasonable to good performance for negated, historical, and hypothetical conditions across all report types that contain such conditions. Conditions experienced by someone other than the patient are very rarely found in our report set. A comprehensive solution to the problem of determining whether a clinical condition is historical or recent requires knowledge above and beyond the surface clues picked up by ConText. PMID:19435614

  15. What do we know about pulmonary blastoma?: review of literature and clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Brodowska-Kania, Dorota; Kotwica, Ewa; Paturej, Aleksandra; Sośnicki, Witold; Patera, Janusz; Giżewska, Agnieszka; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary blastoma (PB) is a rare form of lung tumour and is accountable for 0.25-0.5% of primary pulmonary malignancies. Initially pulmonary blastoma was divided into three subtypes: biphasic pulmonary blastoma (BPB) consisting of an epithelial and mesenchymal component, well differentiated fetal adenocarcinoma (WDFA) built of well differentiated epithelium and a mesenchymal component and malignant pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). Prognosis in this type of cancer is really poor. We present a current review of literature and a clinical case report. Treatment of PB is very difficult. Data and recommendations about the treatment of pulmonary blastoma are still available therefore we should use only observations and clinical case reports.

  16. Minimum reporting standards for clinical research on groin pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Thorborg, Kristian; Khan, Karim M; Robinson, Philip; Hölmich, Per; Weir, Adam

    2015-06-01

    Groin pain in athletes is a priority area for sports physiotherapy and sports medicine research. Heterogeneous studies with low methodological quality dominate research related to groin pain in athletes. Low-quality studies undermine the external validity of research findings and limit the ability to generalise findings to the target patient population. Minimum reporting standards for research on groin pain in athletes are overdue. We propose a set of minimum reporting standards based on best available evidence to be utilised in future research on groin pain in athletes. Minimum reporting standards are provided in relation to: (1) study methodology, (2) study participants and injury history, (3) clinical examination, (4) clinical assessment and (5) radiology. Adherence to these minimum reporting standards will strengthen the quality and transparency of research conducted on groin pain in athletes. This will allow an easier comparison of outcomes across studies in the future.

  17. Failure to report protocol violations in clinical trials: a threat to internal validity?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Excessive protocol violations (PV), which can be defined as preventable mistakes in study conduct, may result in patient harm and introduce errors into a clinical trial's results leading to flawed trial conclusions. The purpose of this project was to gain a better understanding of reported PVs, to describe current practice with regards to the use of methods for the reduction of PVs and to investigate relationships between clinical trial characteristics and PVs. Methods We reviewed 80 clinical trials conducted across a broad range of medical specialties published in four major general medical journals (The Lancet, NEJM, JAMA, BMJ). Eligible papers were identified using a PubMed search. For each included trial, two authors independently abstracted information on trial characteristics, PV reporting and PV rates and interventions used to reduce PVs. PVs were categorised into one of five distinct types: enrolment, randomisation, study intervention, patient compliance and data collection errors. Associations between PVs and study characteristics were investigated using logistic regression. Results Eighty clinical trials (20 from each journal) were identified from 101 consecutive PubMed abstracts. The median number of participants was 701 (range: 20 to 162, 367) and the median number of participating sites was 15 (range: 1 to 701). Nineteen percent (15/80) of included trials were single centre trials. The median study duration was 24 months (range: 5.81 - 127 months) and 74% (59/80) of included trials were primarily academic funded. Thirty two percent (26/80) of included trials failed to provide explicit reporting of any type of PV and none (0/80) of the trials provided explicit reporting of all five types of PVs. Larger clinical trials (more patients, more sites, longer duration, more complex management structure) were more likely to have more complete reporting of PV's. Only 9% (7/80) of trials reported the use of a specific study method to prevent PVs. Use

  18. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    -time information that can inform the care of every patient with cancer as well as connect patients with their entire medical teams. The rapid learning system will form a continuous cycle of learning: securely capturing data from every patient at the point of care, drawing on evidence-based guidelines, and evaluating quality of care against those standards and the outcomes of other patients. Clinical trials are another area in which collaboration is critical. Increasing clinical trial participation will require commitment across the cancer community from physicians, patients, insurers, hospitals, and industry. A 2010 report by the Institute of Medicine described challenges to participation in trials by both physicians and patients and provided recommendations for revitalizing clinical trials conducted through the National Cancer Institute's Cooperative Group Program. ASCO has pledged its support for the full implementation of these recommendations. More broadly, ASCO recently outlined a bold vision for translational and clinical cancer research for the next decade and made recommendations to achieve that vision. Accelerating Progress Against Cancer: ASCO's Blueprint for Transforming Clinical and Translational Research, released in November, calls for a research system that takes full advantage of today's scientific and technologic opportunities and sets a high-level agenda for policy makers, regulators, and advocates. Cancer research has transformed cancer care in the past forty years, and this year's Clinical Cancer Advances illustrates how far we have come in the past year alone. We now have a tremendous opportunity to use today's knowledge and collaborate across all facets of cancer care to conquer this deadly disease. Michael P. Link, MD President American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. The reliability of manual reporting of clinical events in an anesthesia information management system (AIMS).

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Pruitt, Eric Y; Cook-Sather, Scott D; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    Manual incident reports significantly under-report adverse clinical events when compared with automated recordings of intraoperative data. Our goal was to determine the reliability of AIMS and CQI reports of adverse clinical events that had been witnessed and recorded by research assistants. The AIMS and CQI records of 995 patients aged 2-12 years were analyzed to determine if anesthesia providers had properly documented the emesis events that were observed and recorded by research assistants who were present in the operating room at the time of induction. Research assistants recorded eight cases of emesis during induction that were confirmed with the attending anesthesiologist at the time of induction. AIMS yielded a sensitivity of 38 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.5-75.5 %), while the sensitivity of CQI reporting was 13 % (95 % CI 0.3-52.7 %). The low sensitivities of the AIMS and CQI reports suggest that user-reported AIMS and CQI data do not reliably include significant clinical events.

  20. Computer/PERT technique monitors actual versus allocated costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houry, E.; Walker, J. D.

    1967-01-01

    A computer method measures the users performance in cost-type contracts utilizing the existing nasa program evaluation review technique without imposing any additional reporting requirements. progress is measured by comparing actual costs with a value of work performed in a specific period.

  1. Posterior open occlusion management by registration of overlay removable partial denture: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Davoudi, Amin; Derhami, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This clinical report describes prosthetic rehabilitation of posterior open bite relationship in a patient with several missing teeth and skeletal Class III malocclusion. Primary diagnostic esthetic evaluations were performed by mounting casts in centric relation and estimating lost vertical dimension of occlusion. Exclusive treatments were designated by applying overlay removable partial denture with external attachment systems for higher retentions. PMID:26929544

  2. Allergic contact stomatitis caused by a titanium nitride-coated implant abutment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Lee, Kwang-Min; Koh, Young-Il; Park, Sang-Won

    2012-10-01

    A patient developed contact mucositis after being treated with a titanium nitride implant abutment. Patch testing disclosed a positive reaction to titanium nitride. After removal of the titanium nitride-coated abutment and placement of an uncoated abutment, all signs and symptoms disappeared. This clinical report suggests that titanium nitride-coated abutments may be a potential allergen in some patients.

  3. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1996-1997, No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Furutsuka, Takashi, Ed.; Shirotani, Yukari

    This annual report discusses several topics related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "Other's Voice/Own Voice: (Re)production of Other's Voice and Its Apprenticeship in Japanese Young Children" (Shing-Jen Chen); (2) "Intersubjectivity during…

  4. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1995-1996, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakai, Kunio, Ed.; Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Furutsuka, Takashi, Ed.; Shirotani, Yukari, Ed.

    This annual report discusses several topics related to the work of the Research and Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Japan. The articles are: (1) "Heart to Heart (Inter "Jo") Resonance: Taking Japanese Concept of Intersubjectivity Out of Everyday Life" (Shigeru Nakano); (2) "Intersubjectivity…

  5. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Murohashi, Harumitsu, Ed.; Fujino, Yuki, Ed.

    This annual report presents several articles related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "The Functional Uses of Infant-Directed Speech of Fathers and Mothers: A Comparison Study" (Katsuko Niwano); (2) "Are Children 'Among the Gods'?: Parental…

  6. Rehabilitation of malpositioned implants with a CAD/CAM milled implant overdenture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Mauricio S; Duff, Renee E; Razzoog, Michael E

    2011-03-01

    Dentists may be faced with the challenge of restoring unfavorably placed implants. In some instances, previously integrated implants may be from different manufacturers. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a maxillary CAD/CAM implant bar-supported overdenture that presented with malpositioned implants, from different manufacturers, including one from a discontinued implant system.

  7. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1999-2000, No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Fujino, Yuki, Ed.

    This annual report presents several articles related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "Intrinsic Musicality: Rhythm and Prosody in Infant-Directed Voices" (Niki Powers); (2) "Movable Cognitive Studies with a Portable, Telemetric Near-Infrared…

  8. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Murohashi, Harumitsu, Ed.; Fujino, Yuki, Ed.

    This annual report presents several articles related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "Joint Attention as a System Property of the Infant-Caregiver Interaction System"(Tsuneda Miho and Shing-Jen Chen); (2) "Age-Related Change in Japanese Maternal…

  9. Implant assisted ortho-surgery in edentulous jaws: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Khojasteh, Arash; Payaminia, Leila; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The severely atrophy of jaws often complicates ideally oral reconstruction of esthetics and functionality, and necessitates different preprosthetic surgeries including bone grafting, ortho-surgery, and implant insertion. The mentioned procedures could be done within different approaches. This report describes the management of an edentulous case by implant insertion before orthognathic correction. PMID:26576273

  10. Frenectomy with anterior lingual sulcoplasty for an implant-supported overdenture: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Perri de Carvalho, Paulo Sergio; Janjacomo, Luiz Antonio; Ponzoni, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    This clinical report describes the deepening of a patient's anterior mandibular lingual sulcus in combination with frenectomy and the use of an acrylic resin guiding device fixed to an osseointegrated dental implant to maintain the patency of the new sulcular depth.

  11. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1990-1991, No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakai, Kunio, Ed.

    This annual report by the Research and Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan contains 10 articles by Japanese and American researchers on various aspects of children's cognitive and affective development. The following articles are presented: (1) "Making the Cut: Early Schooling and Cognitive…

  12. Department of Clinical Investigation, Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 2006 (Madigan Army Medical Center)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    Findings in Bariatric Surgery Specimens DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Cason RL #203014 T L Clinical Use of Reticulocyte Hemoglobin to Detect Iron...Status: Ongoing Title: Incidental Anatomic and Histologic Findings in Bariatric Surgery Specimens Principal Investigator: MAJ Anne L. Champeaux, MC...Collection, review and analysis of bariatric surgery specimen reports generated by the MAMC Anatomic Pathology service from 1994 through 2004 to

  13. The Clinical Teacher for Special Education. Final Report: Volume II; Evaluating the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Oseroff, Andrew

    Effectiveness of the clinical teaching model (CTM) developed at Florida State University is documented in Volume II of the project's final report. Reviewed is literature related to teacher effectiveness and conceptual changes, conceptual models and instructional systems, and evaluation research in education. Research design and procedures are…

  14. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for comorbid anxiety and depression: case report and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Hazlett-Stevens, Holly

    2012-11-01

    Growing research literature has documented the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for anxiety and depressive disorders. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) teaches a series of mindfulness meditation and yoga practices, delivered in a group format during eight weekly sessions plus one full-day session. This case report demonstrates how MBSR was associated with dramatic clinical improvement of an individual with symptoms of panic, generalized anxiety, and depression. Scores on clinical assessment measures suggested clinically severe levels of anxious arousal, generalized anxiety, worry, fear of negative evaluation, and depression at the beginning of the intervention. The scores on all these measures fell well within normal limits 7 weeks later at the end of the intervention, and no remaining symptoms were reported afterward. Increased life satisfaction and quality of life were documented as well. This case illustrates the potential benefit of MBSR as an alternative or adjunctive treatment for comorbid anxiety and depressive disorder symptoms.

  15. De Garengeot's hernia in an 82-year-old man: a case report and clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Túlio F.; Chagas, Carlos A.A.; Pires, Lucas A.S.; Cisne, Rafael; Babinski, Márcio A.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the appendix within a femoral hernia (FH) sac is known as Garengeot's hernia (GH). We report on current study a rare case of an elderly man with a combined inguinal and Garengeot's hernia and discuss the clinical aspects. An 82-year-old man clinically stable, presented history of pain at the right inguinal region for over a week, without vomit, nausea, fever or any alteration of intestinal or urinary eliminations. Clinical examination revealed a FH and the ultrasonography confirmed the hernia sac. During the surgery, the appendix was recognized within the sac, and then, the patient underwent appendectomy and hernia repair. In conclusion, the presence of the vermiform appendix in a FH sac is rare, thus, requiring knowledge of the surgeon regarding this clinical entity. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment is the key to avoid complications. PMID:27381019

  16. In Support of Clinical Case Reports: A System of Causality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hamre, Harald J.; Kienle, Gunver S.

    2013-01-01

    The usefulness of clinical research depends on an assessment of causality. This assessment determines what constitutes clinical evidence. Case reports are an example of evidence that is frequently overlooked because it is believed they cannot address causal links between treatment and outcomes. This may be a mistake. Clarity on the topic of causality and its assessment will be of benefit for researchers and clinicians. This article outlines an overall system of causality and causality assessment. The system proposed involves two dimensions: horizontal and vertical; each of these dimensions consists of three different types of causality and three corresponding types of causality assessment. Included in this system are diverse forms of case causality illustrated with examples from everyday life and clinical medicine. Assessing case causality can complement conventional clinical research in an era of personalized medicine. PMID:24416665

  17. In support of clinical case reports: a system of causality assessment.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Helmut; Hamre, Harald J; Kienle, Gunver S

    2013-03-01

    The usefulness of clinical research depends on an assessment of causality. This assessment determines what constitutes clinical evidence. Case reports are an example of evidence that is frequently overlooked because it is believed they cannot address causal links between treatment and outcomes. This may be a mistake. Clarity on the topic of causality and its assessment will be of benefit for researchers and clinicians. This article outlines an overall system of causality and causality assessment. The system proposed involves two dimensions: horizontal and vertical; each of these dimensions consists of three different types of causality and three corresponding types of causality assessment. Included in this system are diverse forms of case causality illustrated with examples from everyday life and clinical medicine. Assessing case causality can complement conventional clinical research in an era of personalized medicine.

  18. Clinical Cancer Advances 2017: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Harold J; Krilov, Lada; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Baxter, Nancy N; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Chow, Warren Allen; De Groot, John Frederick; Devine, Steven Michael; DuBois, Steven G; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Epstein, Andrew S; Heymach, John; Jones, Joshua Adam; Mayer, Deborah K; Miksad, Rebecca A; Pennell, Nathan A; Sabel, Michael S; Schilsky, Richard L; Schuchter, Lynn Mara; Tung, Nadine; Winkfield, Karen Marie; Wirth, Lori J; Dizon, Don S

    2017-02-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I am pleased to present Clinical Cancer Advances 2017, which highlights the most promising advances in patient-oriented cancer research over the past year. The report gives us an opportunity to reflect on what an exciting time it is for cancer research and how swiftly our understanding of cancer has improved. One year ago, the White House announced the national Cancer Moonshot program to accelerate progress against cancer. This shared vision of progress has reinvigorated the research community, identified new areas of scientific collaboration, and raised our ambitions regarding what may be possible beyond the progress we have already made. When I entered the field 35 years ago, I could not have imagined where we would be today. We can now detect cancer earlier, target treatments more effectively, and manage adverse effects more effectively to enable patients to live better, more fulfilling lives. Today, two of three people with cancer live at least 5 years after diagnosis, up from roughly one of two in the 1970s. This progress has resulted from decades of incremental advances that have collectively expanded our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of cancer. There is no better current example of this than ASCO's 2017 Advance of the Year: Immunotherapy 2.0. Over the last year, there has been a wave of new successes with immunotherapy. Research has proven this approach can be effective against a wide range of hard-to-treat advanced cancers previously considered intractable. Researchers are now working to identify biologic markers that can help increase the effectiveness of treatment and determine who is most likely to benefit from immunotherapy. This knowledge will enable oncologists to make evidence-based decisions so as many patients as possible might benefit from this new type of treatment. Each successive advance builds on the previous hard work of generations of basic, translational, and clinical cancer researchers

  19. The Official Positions of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry: body composition analysis reporting.

    PubMed

    Petak, Steven; Barbu, Carmen G; Yu, Elaine W; Fielding, Roger; Mulligan, Kathleen; Sabowitz, Brian; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Shepherd, John A

    2013-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements of body composition increasingly are used in the evaluation of clinical disorders, but there has been little guidance on how to effectively report these measures. Uniformity in reporting of body composition measures will aid in the diagnosis of clinical disorders such as obesity, sarcopenia, and lipodystrophy. At the 2013 International Society for Clinical Densitometry Position Development Conference on body composition, the reporting section recommended that all DXA body composition reports should contain parameters of body mass index, bone mineral density, BMC, total mass, total lean mass, total fat mass, and percent fat mass. The inclusion of additional measures of adiposity and lean mass are optional, including visceral adipose tissue, appendicular lean mass index, android/gynoid percent fat ratio, trunk to leg fat mass ratio, lean mass index, and fat mass index. Within the United States, we recommend the use of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 body composition dataset as an age-, gender-, and race-specific reference and to calibrate BMC in 4-compartment models. Z-scores and percentiles of body composition measures may be useful for clinical interpretation if methods are used to adjust for non-normality. In particular, DXA body composition measures may be useful for risk-stratification of obese and sarcopenic patients, but there needs to be validation of thresholds to define obesity and sarcopenia. To summarize, these guidelines provide evidence-based standards for the reporting and clinical application of DXA-based measures of body composition.

  20. Capturing and Incorporating Patient-Reported Outcomes into Clinical Trials: Practical Considerations for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Botero, Juliana Perez; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Warsame, Rahma

    2016-10-01

    Patient centeredness as the focus of healthcare delivery requires the incorporation of patient-reported outcomes into clinical trials. Clearly defining measurable outcomes as well as selecting the most appropriate validated collection tool to use is imperative for success. Creating and validating one's own instrument is also possible, albeit more cumbersome. Meticulous data collection to avoid missing data is key, as is limiting the number of data collection points to prevent survey fatigue and using electronic systems to facilitate data gathering and analysis. Working in a multidisciplinary team that includes statisticians with expertise in patient reported outcomes is essential to navigate the complexities of statistical analysis of these variables. Use of available and emerging technologies for data collection and analysis as well as data sharing will greatly facilitate the process of incorporating patient-reported outcomes into trials and routine clinical practice.

  1. Clinical features of pulmonary artery sarcoma: A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangfa; Pu, Xin; Guo, Hongjuang; Huang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dong; Gan, Huili

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and highly malignant tumor of pulmonary artery origin. Since 1923, when the first case was reported, <300 cases have been reported worldwide. PAS has a poor prognosis, and early diagnosis with radical surgical resection offers patients with PAS the only chance of survival. However, due to its rarity and the non-specificity of its clinical manifestations and imaging presentation, PAS is frequently misdiagnosed as a pulmonary thromboembolic disease, including pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The present study reports three cases of PAS that were initially misdiagnosed as PTE or CTEPH, and were later shown to be PAS following surgery. In addition, the clinical features of these patients are examined in order to improve the differential diagnosis of PAS during the early stages of the disease, when the prognosis of patients with PAS is at its optimum.

  2. Clinical features of pulmonary artery sarcoma: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guangfa; Pu, Xin; Guo, Hongjuang; Huang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dong; Gan, Huili

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and highly malignant tumor of pulmonary artery origin. Since 1923, when the first case was reported, <300 cases have been reported worldwide. PAS has a poor prognosis, and early diagnosis with radical surgical resection offers patients with PAS the only chance of survival. However, due to its rarity and the non-specificity of its clinical manifestations and imaging presentation, PAS is frequently misdiagnosed as a pulmonary thromboembolic disease, including pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The present study reports three cases of PAS that were initially misdiagnosed as PTE or CTEPH, and were later shown to be PAS following surgery. In addition, the clinical features of these patients are examined in order to improve the differential diagnosis of PAS during the early stages of the disease, when the prognosis of patients with PAS is at its optimum. PMID:27446344

  3. Correlation between clinical presentation, peroperative finding and histopathological report in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Gafur, M A; Islam, A; Rahman, M S

    2011-10-01

    Acute appendicitis is usually encountered clinically as acute abdomen. Typical cases are easy to diagnose, but sometimes it is very difficult to make a diagnosis in atypical cases. The objective of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy in patient of clinically diagnosed acute appendicitis. This prospective study conducted in Mymensingh medical college hospital on 1136 patients presented with acute abdomen and clinically diagnosed as acute appendicitis from July 2004 to June 2010. Emergency appendicectomy was done in all consecutive patients after relevant investigation. Intraoperative findings along with histopathological reports were compared with clinical diagnosis. On the basis of histopathological report, 85.65% were found to have acute appendicitis with misdiagnosis in rest of the subjects requiring unnecessary explorations. Negative exploration was more in emergency than office hour. This may be due to diagnostic inaccuracy and decision-making in the management of the acute appendicitis. Management errors can be significantly reduced by accurate preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis by improving clinical skill and appropriate investigations.

  4. Ethical issues and best practice in clinically based genomic research: Exeter Stakeholders Meeting Report

    PubMed Central

    Carrieri, D; Bewshea, C; Walker, G; Ahmad, T; Bowen, W; Hall, A; Kelly, S

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines on consenting individuals to participate in genomic research are diverse. This creates problems for participants and also for researchers, particularly for clinicians who provide both clinical care and research to their patients. A group of 14 stakeholders met on 7 October 2015 in Exeter to discuss the ethical issues and the best practice arising in clinically based genomic research, with particular emphasis on the issue of returning results to study participants/patients in light of research findings affecting research and clinical practices. The group was deliberately multidisciplinary to ensure that a diversity of views was represented. This report outlines the main ethical issues, areas of best practice and principles underlying ethical clinically based genomic research discussed during the meeting. The main point emerging from the discussion is that ethical principles, rather than being formulaic, should guide researchers/clinicians to identify who the main stakeholders are to consult with for a specific project and to incorporate their voices/views strategically throughout the lifecycle of each project. We believe that the mix of principles and practical guidelines outlined in this report can contribute to current debates on how to conduct ethical clinically based genomic research. PMID:27677925

  5. Restoration-Guided Implant Rehabilitation of the Complex Partial Edentulism: a Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Tzerbos, Fotios; Tzoras, Vasilios

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The hard and soft tissue deficiency is a limiting factor for the prosthetic restoration and any surgical attempt to correct the anatomic foundation needs to be precisely executed for optimal results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the clinical steps that are needed to confirm the treatment plan and allow its proper execution. Methods Team work and basic principles are emphasized in a step-by-step description of clinical methods and techniques. This clinical report describes the interdisciplinary approach in the rehabilitation of a partially edentulous patient. The importance of the transitional restoration which sets the guidelines for the proper execution of the treatment plan is especially emphasized along with all the steps that have to be followed. Results The clinical report describes the diagnostic arrangement of teeth, the ridge augmentation based on the diagnostic evaluation of the removable prosthesis, the implant placement with a surgical guide in the form of the removable partial denture duplicate and finally the special 2-piece design of the final fixed prosthesis. Conclusions Clinical approach and prosthesis design described above offers a predictable way to restore partial edentulism with a fixed yet retrievable prosthesis, restoring soft tissue and teeth and avoiding an implant supported overdenture. PMID:24421964

  6. Clinical evaluation of the rapid telephone access system for radiology reporting.

    PubMed

    Weibtraub, H D; Worcester, J; Resnic, A; Kolodny, G M

    1976-11-01

    The Rapid Telephone Access System (RTAS) for radiology reporting was evaluated clinically among patients undergoing fluoroscopy, excretory urography, or cholecystography at a community-based teaching hospital. After the radiologist has dictated his report in the customary manner, it can be heard by the referring physician using any telephone. Reports can be reduced to hard copy by a typist, or an automatic typewriter can be programmed to print normal or standard reports. Time between dictation and access of the report was significantly reduced after installation of the RTAS (p less than 0.001). There was also a trend toward reduced hospital stay (p less than 0.05) for patients in the study group. The system has been readily accepted by radiologists and referring physicians.

  7. Interconnecting smartphone, image analysis server, and case report forms in clinical trials for automatic skin lesion tracking in clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haak, Daniel; Doma, Aliaa; Gombert, Alexander; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2016-03-01

    Today, subject's medical data in controlled clinical trials is captured digitally in electronic case report forms (eCRFs). However, eCRFs only insufficiently support integration of subject's image data, although medical imaging is looming large in studies today. For bed-side image integration, we present a mobile application (App) that utilizes the smartphone-integrated camera. To ensure high image quality with this inexpensive consumer hardware, color reference cards are placed in the camera's field of view next to the lesion. The cards are used for automatic calibration of geometry, color, and contrast. In addition, a personalized code is read from the cards that allows subject identification. For data integration, the App is connected to an communication and image analysis server that also holds the code-study-subject relation. In a second system interconnection, web services are used to connect the smartphone with OpenClinica, an open-source, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved electronic data capture (EDC) system in clinical trials. Once the photographs have been securely stored on the server, they are released automatically from the mobile device. The workflow of the system is demonstrated by an ongoing clinical trial, in which photographic documentation is frequently performed to measure the effect of wound incision management systems. All 205 images, which have been collected in the study so far, have been correctly identified and successfully integrated into the corresponding subject's eCRF. Using this system, manual steps for the study personnel are reduced, and, therefore, errors, latency and costs decreased. Our approach also increases data security and privacy.

  8. Correlation between self-reported and clinically based diagnoses of bruxism in temporomandibular disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Paesani, D A; Lobbezoo, F; Gelos, C; Guarda-Nardini, L; Ahlberg, J; Manfredini, D

    2013-11-01

    The present investigation was performed in a population of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and it was designed to assess the correlation between self-reported questionnaire-based bruxism diagnosis and a diagnosis based on history taking plus clinical examination. One-hundred-fifty-nine patients with TMD underwent an assessment including a questionnaire investigating five bruxism-related items (i.e. sleep grinding, sleep grinding referral by bed partner, sleep clenching, awake clenching, awake grinding) and an interview (i.e. oral history taking with specific focus on bruxism habits) plus a clinical examination to evaluate bruxism signs and symptoms. The correlation between findings of the questionnaire, viz., patients' report, and findings of the interview/oral history taking plus clinical examination, viz., clinicians' diagnosis, was assessed by means of φ coefficient. The highest correlations were achieved for the sleep grinding referral item (φ = 0·932) and for the awake clenching item (φ = 0·811), whilst lower correlation values were found for the other items (φ values ranging from 0·363 to 0·641). The percentage of disagreement between the two diagnostic approaches ranged between 1·8% and 18·2%. Within the limits of the present investigation, it can be suggested that a strong positive correlation between a self-reported and a clinically based approach to bruxism diagnosis can be achieved as for awake clenching, whilst lower levels of correlation were detected for sleep-time activities.

  9. Actual questions raised by nanoparticle radiosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Emilie; Sicard-Roselli, Cécile

    2016-11-01

    Radiosensitization by metallic nanoparticles (NP) has been explored for more than a decade with promising results in vitro and in cellulo reported in a vast number of publications. Yet, few clinical trials are on-going. This could be related to the lack of selectivity of NP leading to massive quantities to be injected to observe an effect but also to the higher degree of complexity than first thought leading to an absence of consensus probably caused by the lack of standardization in pre-clinical studies. Given the wide panel of NP used, in terms of core nature, size, coating, not to mention of cell lines and irradiation modalities, cross-comparison of data is not a walk in the park. But only a thorough examination could help identifying the key parameters and the possible mechanisms involved. This step is crucial as it should provide guidance for designing the most efficient combination NP/radiation and rationally establishing clinical protocols. In this review, we will combine and confront cellular radiosensitization results with in vitro and numerical experiments in order to give the more recent vision of this complex phenomenon. We decided to address a few hot topics such as the influence of the incident radiation energy, the localization of NP or the so-called ;biological; effect. We will highlight that among the barriers to break down, some are not restricted to the ;nano; community: an incontestable support could be offered by the ;radiation; community in the broadest sense.

  10. Different clinical presentation of appendicolithiasis. The report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Bulent; Eris, Cengiz

    2011-03-30

    An appendicolith is composed of firm feces and some mineral deposits. After increased use of abdominal computed tomography, appendicoliths are more frequently detected. Most of the patients with appendicolith are asymptomatic. However, an appendicolith may be associated with complicated appendicitis with serious outcomes. We reported three patients who exhibited different clinical symptoms due to appendicolithiasis. While one of the patients was confused with urolithiasis, the other two patients presented with phlegmenous and perforated appendicitis. We submit that appendicoliths may present different clinical findings and can mimic several pathologies including urinary disorders.

  11. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease in Clinical Practice: An Illustration with 3 Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Slats, Diane; Spies, Petra E.; Sjögren, Magnus J.C.; Verhey, Frans R.J.; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the brain specific biomarkers amyloid β42 (Aβ42) and total tau (t-tau) protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has a sensitivity and specificity of more than 85% for differentiating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) from non-demented controls. International guidelines are contradictory in their advice on the use of CSF biomarkers in AD diagnostics, resulting in a lack of consistency in clinical practice. We present three case reports that illustrate clinical practice according to the Dutch and European guidelines and portray the value of CSF biomarker analysis as an add-on diagnostic to the standard diagnostic workup for AD. PMID:20689628

  12. Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis with Clinically Evident Splenomegaly in an Immunocompetent Host, First Case Reported in the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Garrett R.; Libke, Robert D.; Billelo, John F.; Parks, Nancy A.; Pollard, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a dimorphic fungus endemic to the southwestern United States, Central and South America. We report a case of a previously healthy person who presented with respiratory failure and disseminated Coccidioidomycosis who eventually had a fatal outcome. Coccidioidomycosis, or “Valley Fever” has been called the “great imitator” (1) as it can have a wide variety of clinical presentations. This case is unique as it represents the first described case of an immunocompetent host with rapidly progressing, disseminated coccidioidomycosis with clinically apparent splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. PMID:21264046

  13. Reporting of research quality characteristics of studies published in 6 major clinical dental specialty journals.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Madianos, Phoebus; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this article was to record reporting characteristics related to study quality of research published in major specialty dental journals with the highest impact factor (Journal of Endodontics, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics; Pediatric Dentistry, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, and International Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry). The included articles were classified into the following 3 broad subject categories: (1) cross-sectional (snap-shot), (2) observational, and (3) interventional. Multinomial logistic regression was conducted for effect estimation using the journal as the response and randomization, sample calculation, confounding discussed, multivariate analysis, effect measurement, and confidence intervals as the explanatory variables. The results showed that cross-sectional studies were the dominant design (55%), whereas observational investigations accounted for 13%, and interventions/clinical trials for 32%. Reporting on quality characteristics was low for all variables: random allocation (15%), sample size calculation (7%), confounding issues/possible confounders (38%), effect measurements (16%), and multivariate analysis (21%). Eighty-four percent of the published articles reported a statistically significant main finding and only 13% presented confidence intervals. The Journal of Clinical Periodontology showed the highest probability of including quality characteristics in reporting results among all dental journals.

  14. Morning stiffness and other patient-reported outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sokka, T

    2011-01-01

    Morning stiffness has been recognized in traditional approaches to assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although morning stiffness is not specific to RA, changes in morning stiffness for an individual patient are helpful when monitoring health status. Health professionals can ask about morning stiffness but the most accurate and consistent approach to assessment from one visit to the next appears to be a patient self-report questionnaire. However, quantitative measures of patient-reported data are not an integral part of clinical monitoring in most clinics. No single measure is adequate for all individual patients, so quantitative measurement of patient-reported data should include many elements such as pain, functional status, fatigue, sleep, morning stiffness, work capacity, and physical and emotional well-being. In daily clinical practice, patient-reported outcomes can be collected easily using a standard questionnaire that patients can complete with pencil and paper or electronically on a touch screen in the waiting room. The results are then immediately available to the rheumatologists, to facilitate doctor-patient communication to improve the quality of patient care, leading to better patient outcomes.

  15. Quality and consistency of outcome reporting in clinical trials of immunosuppression in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Samia; Knight, Simon R

    2016-11-01

    Interpretation, comparison, and combination of results of clinical trials are reliant on accurate and complete reporting of outcomes. This study aimed to assess the quality and variability in outcome reporting in immunosuppression trials following renal transplantation. All randomized controlled trials comparing immunosuppressive interventions in renal transplant recipients published over a 5-year period were included. Outcomes reported in these studies were extracted, along with data regarding completeness of reporting and whether a clear definition of the method used to measure the outcome was provided. A total of 4760 outcomes were identified from 182 studies. Overall, 90.3% outcomes were completely reported; the remainder had missing data that would preclude use in meta-analysis; 31.5% manuscripts did not define a primary endpoint. Efficacy outcomes were more likely to be clearly defined than safety outcomes (OR: 0.022, P<.001) or patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) (OR: 0.014, P<.001). PROMs were reported in less than half of manuscripts, and only five reported quality-of-life data using a validated tool. There was significant variability in the way that common efficacy and safety outcomes were defined. Variability in the way that endpoints are selected and reported in trials in renal transplantation makes interpretation and comparison between studies difficult.

  16. When rheumatologists report that they agree with a guideline, does this mean that they practise the guideline in clinical practice? Results of the International Recommendation Implementation Study (IRIS)

    PubMed Central

    Gvozdenović, Emilia; Allaart, Cornelia F; van der Heijde, Désirée; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Smolen, Josef S; Huizinga, Tom W J; Landewé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the treat-to-target (T2T) principles have been developed in order to improve the treatment outcome of patients with RA, and have received broad attention. It is not clear, though, whether these recommendations are indeed followed up in clinical practice. Objective To investigate if rheumatologists that report to agree with existing guidelines indeed follow them up in clinical practice. Methods The International Recommendation Implementation Study (IRIS) included 132 participating rheumatologists from 14 countries. Participating rheumatologists received a questionnaire measuring their awareness/commitment with the EULAR/T2T recommendations and followed a dedicated educational programme. Subsequently, they were asked to enrol 5–10 patients with new-onset RA in the online IRIS database and monitor disease activity and treatment for a period of 1–2 years. Four recommendations (3 from the EULAR recommendations and one from the T2T recommendations) were selected on the basis of testability, and analysed with regard to compliance by participating rheumatologists. Results In total, 72 of the 132 participating rheumatologists contributed 378 patients to the database. Of these participants, 70 (98%) agreed upfront with the recommendation that disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy should be started as soon as possible after diagnosis in every patient; 69 (96%) of the rheumatologists agreed with the recommendation that methotrexate (MTX) should be part of the first treatment strategy. When measuring the actual performance, it was found that the recommendation on early DMARD start was met in 253 (67%) of the recorded patients, and the recommendation on MTX in 225 (60%) of the recorded patients. Of the participants, 60 (83%) agreed that composite measures should be recorded regularly, but only in 134(54%) of the patients were

  17. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  18. Trichotillomania: a case report with clinical and dermatoscopic differential diagnosis with alopecia areata*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ana Cecília Versiani Duarte; de Andrade, Tatiana Cristina Pedro Cordeiro; de Brito, Fernanda Freitas; da Silva, Gardênia Viana; Cavalcante, Maria Lopes Lamenha Lins; Martelli, Antonio Carlos Ceribelli

    2017-01-01

    Trichotillomania is a psychodermatologic disorder characterized by uncontrollable urge to pull one's own hair. Differential diagnoses include the most common forms of alopecia such as alopecia areata. It is usually associated with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Trichotillomania treatment standardization is a gap in the medical literature. Recent studies demonstrated the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (a glutamate modulator) for the treatment of the disease. We report the clinical case of a 12-year-old female patient who received the initial diagnosis of alopecia areata, but presented with clinical and dermoscopic features of trichotillomania. She was treated with the combination of psychotropic drugs and N-acetylcysteine with good clinical response. Due to the chronic and recurring nature of trichotillomania, more studies need to be conducted for the establishment of a formal treatment algorithm. PMID:28225970

  19. Improving the reporting of clinical trials of infertility treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement†‡.

    PubMed

    Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiaoke; Barnhart, Kurt T; Farquhar, Cynthia; Fauser, Bart C J M; Mol, Ben

    2014-10-10

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and result in a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which create a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant ≥20 weeks gestations) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and during the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and

  20. Improving the Reporting of Clinical Trials of Infertility Treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which creates a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant after ≥20 weeks' gestation) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and couples.

  1. Revised STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA): extending the CONSORT statement

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Hugh; Altman, Douglas G; Hammerschlag, Richard; Li, Youping; Wu, Taixiang; White, Adrian; Moher, David

    2010-01-01

    The STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) were published in five journals in 2001 and 2002. These guidelines, in the form of a checklist and explanations for use by authors and journal editors, were designed to improve reporting of acupuncture trials, particularly the interventions, thereby facilitating their interpretation and replication. Subsequent reviews of the application and impact of STRICTA have highlighted the value of STRICTA as well as scope for improvements and revision. To manage the revision process a collaboration between the STRICTA Group, the CONSORT Group and the Chinese Cochrane Centre was developed in 2008. An expert panel with 47 participants was convened that provided electronic feedback on a revised draft of the checklist. At a subsequent face-to-face meeting in Freiburg, a group of 21 participants further revised the STRICTA checklist and planned dissemination. The new STRICTA checklist, which is an official extension of CONSORT, includes 6 items and 17 subitems. These set out reporting guidelines for the acupuncture rationale, the details of needling, the treatment regimen, other components of treatment, the practitioner background and the control or comparator interventions. In addition, and as part of this revision process, the explanations for each item have been elaborated, and examples of good reporting for each item are provided. In addition, the word ‘controlled’ in STRICTA is replaced by ‘clinical’, to indicate that STRICTA is applicable to a broad range of clinical evaluation designs, including uncontrolled outcome studies and case reports. It is intended that the revised STRICTA checklist, in conjunction with both the main CONSORT statement and extension for non-pharmacological treatment, will raise the quality of reporting of clinical trials of acupuncture. PMID:20615861

  2. Resident's Morning Report: An Opportunity to Reinforce Principles of Biomedical Science in a Clinical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brass, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    The principles of biochemistry are core to understanding cellular and tissue function, as well as the pathophysiology of disease. However, the clinical utility of biochemical principles is often obscure to clinical trainees. Resident's Morning Report is a common teaching conference in which residents present clinical cases of interest to a…

  3. Characteristic clinical features of Aspergillus appendicitis: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Amin, Mitual B; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-11-28

    This work aims to facilitate diagnosing Aspergillus appendicitis, which can be missed clinically due to its rarity, by proposing a clinical pentad for Aspergillus appendicitis based on literature review and one new case. The currently reported case of pathologically-proven Aspergillus appendicitis was identified by computerized search of pathology database at William Beaumont Hospital, 1999-2014. Prior cases were identified by computerized literature search. Among 10980 pathology reports of pathologically-proven appendicitis, one case of Aspergillus appendicitis was identified (rate = 0.01%). A young boy with profound neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute myelogenous leukemia presented with right lower quadrant pain, pyrexia, and generalized malaise. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed a thickened appendiceal wall and periappendiceal inflammation, suggesting appendicitis. Emergent laparotomy showed an inflamed, thickened appendix, which was resected. The patient did poorly postoperatively with low-grade-fevers while receiving antibacterial therapy, but rapidly improved after initiating amphotericin therapy. Microscopic examination of a silver stain of the appendectomy specimen revealed fungi with characteristic Aspergillus morphology, findings confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Primary Aspergillus appendicitis is exceptionally rare, with only 3 previously reported cases. All three cases presented with (1)-neutropenia, (2)-recent chemotherapy, (3)-acute leukemia, and (4)-suspected appendicitis; (5)-the two prior cases initially treated with antibacterial therapy, fared poorly before instituting anti-Aspergillus therapy. The current patient satisfied all these five criteria. Based on these four cases, a clinical pentad is proposed for Aspergillus appendicitis: clinically-suspected appendicitis, neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, acute leukemia, and poor clinical response if treated solely by antibacterial/anti-candidial therapy. Patients presenting with

  4. Characteristic clinical features of Aspergillus appendicitis: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Amin, Mitual B; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to facilitate diagnosing Aspergillus appendicitis, which can be missed clinically due to its rarity, by proposing a clinical pentad for Aspergillus appendicitis based on literature review and one new case. The currently reported case of pathologically-proven Aspergillus appendicitis was identified by computerized search of pathology database at William Beaumont Hospital, 1999-2014. Prior cases were identified by computerized literature search. Among 10980 pathology reports of pathologically-proven appendicitis, one case of Aspergillus appendicitis was identified (rate = 0.01%). A young boy with profound neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute myelogenous leukemia presented with right lower quadrant pain, pyrexia, and generalized malaise. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed a thickened appendiceal wall and periappendiceal inflammation, suggesting appendicitis. Emergent laparotomy showed an inflamed, thickened appendix, which was resected. The patient did poorly postoperatively with low-grade-fevers while receiving antibacterial therapy, but rapidly improved after initiating amphotericin therapy. Microscopic examination of a silver stain of the appendectomy specimen revealed fungi with characteristic Aspergillus morphology, findings confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Primary Aspergillus appendicitis is exceptionally rare, with only 3 previously reported cases. All three cases presented with (1)-neutropenia, (2)-recent chemotherapy, (3)-acute leukemia, and (4)-suspected appendicitis; (5)-the two prior cases initially treated with antibacterial therapy, fared poorly before instituting anti-Aspergillus therapy. The current patient satisfied all these five criteria. Based on these four cases, a clinical pentad is proposed for Aspergillus appendicitis: clinically-suspected appendicitis, neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, acute leukemia, and poor clinical response if treated solely by antibacterial/anti-candidial therapy. Patients presenting with

  5. Manual and computerized cumulative reporting systems for the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lupovitch, A; Memminger, J J; Corr, R M

    1979-11-01

    A manual and a computerized system that produce cumulative updated reports from the clinical microbiology laboratory are described. Each system gives the physician a report that is clearly formatted, cumulative, readily updated, and written in conversational terms with minimal abbreviations. The report formats and updating sequences are nearly identical, so that one system can easily replace or back up the other. The cost and complexity of the hardware and software for the computerized system are modest, so that these are suitable for the moderate-sized hospital laboratory processing fewer than 10,000 specimens per year. Also, the laboratory personnel in our community-based nonteaching hospital were able to develop, set up, and support these systems without external consultation or purchased services. Therefore, the improved quality of reporting based on these types of systems can now be available to all laboratories without regard to size or workload.

  6. Surveillance of vaccine safety: comparison of parental reports with routine surveillance and a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Netterlid, Eva; Månsson, Marie Edwinson; Håkansson, Anders

    2009-03-23

    One way to maintain confidence in vaccination programmes is to improve monitoring of immunisation safety. We studied active parental reporting of adverse events after a booster dose of diphtheria-tetanus toxoid (DT). 7193 children received the vaccine. Questionnaires were submitted by 84.2% of the parents, who reported reactions for 9.2% of the children. Four percent of events were classified as moderate/severe by interviews. Relative risk of redness and swelling reported was 0.24 (95% CI, 0.13-0.42) compared to a clinical trial, while it was 71.0 (44-114) compared to passive surveillance. Active surveillance by parental reports is a useful complement to passive surveillance of childhood immunisations to generate hypotheses for evaluation in controlled studies.

  7. Clinical importance of carbapenem hypersensitivity in patients with self-reported and documented penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Prescott, William A; Kusmierski, Kristen A

    2007-01-01

    The risk of carbapenem hypersensitivity in patients with self-reported or documented penicillin allergy needs to be determined so that practitioners can make better-informed decisions regarding antibiotic therapy for this patient population. The risk of cross-reactivity between penicillin and carbapenem antibiotics initially was reported to approach 50%. Recent retrospective studies have suggested that the clinical risk of cross-hypersensitivity between these two drug classes is 9.2-11%, which is significantly lower than initially reported. Patients whose history of penicillin allergy is self-reported and is not type 1 may be at moderate risk for hypersensitivity when treated with a carbapenem antibiotic. The risk of hypersensitivity appears to be higher in patients whose penicillin allergy was documented by a health care provider, those with several antibiotic allergies, and those with a positive penicillin skin test result or a history of type 1 penicillin hypersensitivity.

  8. What do we know about pulmonary blastoma?: review of literature and clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Brodowska-Kania, Dorota; Kotwica, Ewa; Paturej, Aleksandra; Sośnicki, Witold; Patera, Janusz; Giżewska, Agnieszka; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pulmonary blastoma (PB) is a rare form of lung tumour and is accountable for 0.25–0.5% of primary pulmonary malignancies. Initially pulmonary blastoma was divided into three subtypes: biphasic pulmonary blastoma (BPB) consisting of an epithelial and mesenchymal component, well differentiated fetal adenocarcinoma (WDFA) built of well differentiated epithelium and a mesenchymal component and malignant pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). Prognosis in this type of cancer is really poor. We present a current review of literature and a clinical case report. Treatment of PB is very difficult. Data and recommendations about the treatment of pulmonary blastoma are still available therefore we should use only observations and clinical case reports. PMID:28008207

  9. Brief clinical report: an infant with duplication of 17q21 lead to 17qter.

    PubMed

    Gallien, J U; Neu, R L; Wynn, R J; Steinberg-Warren, N; Bannerman, R M

    1981-01-01

    Duplication of the distal part of 17q has been reported in 4 patients [1,2]. We are reporting clinical, autopsy, and cytogenetic data on an additional patient whose condition was due to a familial translocation in which the patient's chromosome constitution is 46,XX, der(4),t(4;17)(p16;q21) pat. The phenotype of the five known patients with this duplication is very similar, and their manifestations are distinct enough to be clinically recognizable. Abnormalities common to all five patients are severe growth impairment, craniofacial anomalies with severe hypertelorism, frontal bossing and temporal narrowness, a widow's peak, narrow palpebral fissures, a thin upper lip overlapping a thin lower lip with down-turned corners of the mouth, micrognathia, apparently low-set and deformed ears, short webbed neck, and hyperlaxity of the limbs.

  10. Reporting unit size and measurement uncertainty: current Australian practice in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert C; Badrick, Tony

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to compare the reporting unit size used by Australian laboratories for routine chemistry and haematology tests to the unit size used by learned authorities and in standard laboratory textbooks and to the justified unit size based on measurement uncertainty (MU) estimates from quality assurance program data. MU was determined from Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) - Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) and RCPA Haematology Quality Assurance Program survey reports. The reporting unit size implicitly suggested in authoritative textbooks, the RCPA Manual, and the General Serum Chemistry program itself was noted. We also used published data on Australian laboratory practices.The best performing laboratories could justify their chemistry unit size for 55% of analytes while comparable figures for the 50% and 90% laboratories were 14% and 8%, respectively. Reporting unit size was justifiable for all laboratories for red cell count, >50% for haemoglobin but only the top 10% for haematocrit. Few, if any, could justify their mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) reporting unit sizes.The reporting unit size used by many laboratories is not justified by present analytical performance. Using MU estimates to determine the reporting interval for quantitative laboratory results ensures reporting practices match local analytical performance and recognises the inherent error of the measurement process.

  11. Clinical onset of celiac disease after duodenal switch: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pané, A; Orois, A; Careaga, M; Saco, A; Ortega, E; Vidal, J; Leyes, P; Amor, A J

    2016-09-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of clinical onset of celiac disease (CD) following duodenal switch surgery. A 61-year-old obese woman developed severe diarrhea soon after bariatric surgery (BS), which was unresponsive to standard medical treatment. After the most common diarrhea etiologies in the immediate postoperative period have been excluded, serological tests were performed. Final diagnosis was determined by anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody positivity. In light of this case report, we propose that CD should be ruled out in any patient presenting with typical or atypical symptoms after BS, regardless of the latency of onset.

  12. Clinically lesser known entity in India: A Report of two cases of Melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Barman, Purabi; Kaur, Ravneet; Kumar, Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is endemic in the South Asian regions, like Thailand, Singapore Malaysia and Australia. The disease is more pronounced in the southern part of the country. It is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei which causes systemic involvement, morbidity and mortality associated with the disease is high. Due to highly varied clinical presentation, and low general awareness this infection is largely underdiagnosed and under reported in our country. Most laboratories in the country still rely on conventional culturing methods with their low sensitivity, adding to the under reporting. To enhance physician awareness we describe here two cases who presented to our institute after months of misdiagnosis.

  13. [Report of the 10th Annual Meeting of the Chinese society of Clinical Oncology].

    PubMed

    Cho, William Chi-Shing

    2008-03-01

    The 10th Annual Meeting of the Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) was held on 19-23 September 2007 in Harbin. The theme of this conference was "putting standard multidisciplinary cancer management into practice" and special reports of standard multidisciplinary management on various cancers were presented. Over 3 500 clinical oncologists and scientists participated in the 2007 CSCO Annual Meeting where more than ten international top experts were invited to exchange valuable experiences with the delegates. The programs consisted of Education Session, Satellite Symposium and Meet the Professor Session. The latest research results were presented as oral presentations and posters at the congress. Several hotspots were particularly highlighted in this report, including innovative radiotherapy and chemotherapy methods, researches on molecular targets and clinical trials of targeted therapy, such as endostatin, volociximab, cetuximab, bevacizumab and temozolomide. The remarkable research results of anti-cancer Chinese medicine, cancer screening and prognosis were also introduced. This article tries to call the attention to some hot topics in the program that are both new and noteworthy, and it may serve as a highlight of this important international cancer research meeting for clinical oncologists and scientists.

  14. Assessing and reporting heterogeneity in treatment effects in clinical trials: a proposal

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that there is frequently considerable variation in the risk of the outcome of interest in clinical trial populations. These differences in risk will often cause clinically important heterogeneity in treatment effects (HTE) across the trial population, such that the balance between treatment risks and benefits may differ substantially between large identifiable patient subgroups; the "average" benefit observed in the summary result may even be non-representative of the treatment effect for a typical patient in the trial. Conventional subgroup analyses, which examine whether specific patient characteristics modify the effects of treatment, are usually unable to detect even large variations in treatment benefit (and harm) across risk groups because they do not account for the fact that patients have multiple characteristics simultaneously that affect the likelihood of treatment benefit. Based upon recent evidence on optimal statistical approaches to assessing HTE, we propose a framework that prioritizes the analysis and reporting of multivariate risk-based HTE and suggests that other subgroup analyses should be explicitly labeled either as primary subgroup analyses (well-motivated by prior evidence and intended to produce clinically actionable results) or secondary (exploratory) subgroup analyses (performed to inform future research). A standardized and transparent approach to HTE assessment and reporting could substantially improve clinical trial utility and interpretability. PMID:20704705

  15. Reporting Device Observations for semantic interoperability of surgical devices and clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Björn; Ulrich, Hannes; Rehmann, Daniel; Kock, Ann-Kristin; Wrage, Jan-Hinrich; Ingenerf, Josef

    2015-08-01

    Service-oriented medical device architectures make the progress from interdisciplinary research projects to international standardisation: A new set of IEEE 11073 proposals shall pave the way to industry acceptance. This expected availability of device observations in a standardised representation enables secondary usage if interoperability with clinical information systems can be achieved. The Device Observation Reporter (DOR) described in this work is a gateway that connects these realms. After a user chooses a selection of signals from different devices in the digital operating room, the DOR records these semantically described values for a specified duration. Upon completion, the signals descriptions and values are transformed to Health Level Seven version 2 messages and sent to a hospital information system/electronic health record system within the clinical IT network. The successful integration of device data for documentation and usage in clinical information systems can further leverage the novel device communication standard proposals. Complementing these, an Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise profile will aid commercial implementers in achieving interoperability. Their solutions could incorporate clinical knowledge to autonomously select signal combinations and generate reports of diagnostic and interventional procedures, thus saving time and effort for surgical documentation.

  16. Diagnostic subgroups of craniomandibular disorders. Part I: Self-report data and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo-Scholte, A M; De Leeuw, J R; Steenks, M H; Bosman, F; Buchner, R; Olthoff, L W

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the most commonly investigated signs and symptoms associated with craniomandibular disorders as detected in a population of patients with craniomandibular disorders and in four defined diagnostic subgroups. The information was collected with a questionnaire and during an extensive clinical examination. Comparison of self-report and clinical data indicated that these two methods reveal different aspects of the patient's complaints and should be interpreted in their own way. The results showed that no statistically significant differences could be found between the four diagnostic subgroups with respect to occlusal factors, trauma, and clinically assessed parafunctional habits. The groups differed considerably with respect to general characteristics, pain variables, signs of craniomandibular disorders, self-reported para-functional habits, psychosocial factors, and general health factors. However, despite the reduction in clinical characteristics of the four subgroups, there was little reduction in the diversity of factors associated with craniomandibular disorders. This implicates that almost all factors associated with craniomandibular disorders may influence the initiation and perpetuation of the different disorders in the individual patient, and therefore, remain of interest in future research.

  17. Subtle clinical signs of a meningioma in an adult: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most common brain tumor in the adult population. This case report describes the epidemiology, the clinical presentation as well as the current treatment options for this condition. Case presentation A 49 year-old man attended a chiropractic clinic with non-specific chronic low back pain. Upon the history taking and the systems review, he reported a loss of both smell and taste for which investigations conducted by two different otolaryngologists did not yield a specific diagnosis. The patient was referred to a neurologist who ordered a computer tomography scan that eventually revealed a compression brain tumor. Brain tumors can produce a large variety of clinical presentations, such as upper motor neuron lesion symptoms, altered consciousness or vital functions which are easy to identify. However, subtle signs, such as those presented in this case, can be neglected. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of uncommon clinical presentations including cranial nerve or neurological dysfunction and refer their patient to a specialist when detected. PMID:24490991

  18. Artifactual Hypoglycaemia in Systemic Sclerosis and Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Clinical Case Report and Short Review

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Artifactual hypoglycaemia, defined as a discrepancy between glucometer (capillary) and plasma glucose levels, may lead to overtreatment and costly investigations. It is not infrequently observed in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon due to vascular capillary distortion, yet this is clinically underappreciated. Case Report. We report a 76-year-old woman with systemic sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon, who presented with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and found to have concomitant persistent hypoglycaemia (1.0–2.7mmol/L) on a point-of-care glucometer in the absence hypoglycaemic symptoms. She underwent a 2-week hospital admission, repeated glucose monitoring, hydrocortisone replacement and dextrose infusions, with consequent hyperglycaemia on plasma measurements. Clinically, she did not satisfy Whipple's triad and radiological investigations failed to identify pituitary or pancreatic pathology. A 72-hour fast was negative for hyperinsulinaemia or exogenous insulin use and her sulphonylurea metabolite urinary screen was negative. Discussion. Treatment of low capillary blood glucose is usually met with clinical impetus to treat, even when hypoglycaemic symptoms are lacking. The correct diagnosis may have been achieved had there been an observation of her cold hands, scleroderma facies, and consideration of the likely distorted peripheral microvasculature. Early identification of this presumably rare clinical scenario may have prevented overtreatment, altered methods of monitoring, and avoided unnecessary investigations. PMID:28116181

  19. Artifactual Hypoglycaemia in Systemic Sclerosis and Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Clinical Case Report and Short Review.

    PubMed

    Bishay, R H; Suryawanshi, A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Artifactual hypoglycaemia, defined as a discrepancy between glucometer (capillary) and plasma glucose levels, may lead to overtreatment and costly investigations. It is not infrequently observed in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon due to vascular capillary distortion, yet this is clinically underappreciated. Case Report. We report a 76-year-old woman with systemic sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon, who presented with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and found to have concomitant persistent hypoglycaemia (1.0-2.7mmol/L) on a point-of-care glucometer in the absence hypoglycaemic symptoms. She underwent a 2-week hospital admission, repeated glucose monitoring, hydrocortisone replacement and dextrose infusions, with consequent hyperglycaemia on plasma measurements. Clinically, she did not satisfy Whipple's triad and radiological investigations failed to identify pituitary or pancreatic pathology. A 72-hour fast was negative for hyperinsulinaemia or exogenous insulin use and her sulphonylurea metabolite urinary screen was negative. Discussion. Treatment of low capillary blood glucose is usually met with clinical impetus to treat, even when hypoglycaemic symptoms are lacking. The correct diagnosis may have been achieved had there been an observation of her cold hands, scleroderma facies, and consideration of the likely distorted peripheral microvasculature. Early identification of this presumably rare clinical scenario may have prevented overtreatment, altered methods of monitoring, and avoided unnecessary investigations.

  20. Characterization of Change and Significance for Clinical Findings in Radiology Reports Through Natural Language Processing.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Saeed; Bay, Graham; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2017-01-03

    We built a natural language processing (NLP) method to automatically extract clinical findings in radiology reports and characterize their level of change and significance according to a radiology-specific information model. We utilized a combination of machine learning and rule-based approaches for this purpose. Our method is unique in capturing different features and levels of abstractions at surface, entity, and discourse levels in text analysis. This combination has enabled us to recognize the underlying semantics of radiology report narratives for this task. We evaluated our method on radiology reports from four major healthcare organizations. Our evaluation showed the efficacy of our method in highlighting important changes (accuracy 99.2%, precision 96.3%, recall 93.5%, and F1 score 94.7%) and identifying significant observations (accuracy 75.8%, precision 75.2%, recall 75.7%, and F1 score 75.3%) to characterize radiology reports. This method can help clinicians quickly understand the key observations in radiology reports and facilitate clinical decision support, review prioritization, and disease surveillance.

  1. [Reflections on the clinical reports «minimum data set»].

    PubMed

    Prieto de Paula, J M; Franco Hidalgo, S

    2012-02-01

    Royal Decree 1093/2010 (3 September 2010) establishes the minimum data set that the clinical reports of discharges and outpatient visits elaborated in the facilities of the National Health System should contain, among others. Until then, the Ministerial Order 221/1984, that only required the drawing up of a discharge report for patients seen in a hospital-regime health care establishment, was in force. In spite of the importance of these documents, their quality is far from that desired, especially that of the reports on visits, which, among other things, are not performed in a high percentage of the cases. Recently the Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI) (Spanish Society of Internal Medicine), in collaboration with other scientific societies, issued some recommendations for the drawing up of the discharge reports. In this present work, a series of thoughts are made on the implications of the new decree, especially in the case of the reports of the outpatient clinics.

  2. Prosthodontic treatment and medical considerations for a patient with Turner syndrome: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Caroline T; Hofstede, Theresa M

    2012-10-01

    This clinical report describes a multidisciplinary approach in the rehabilitation of a 23-year-old Caucasian woman affected with Turner's syndrome and subsequently diagnosed with T4 Giant cell reparative granuloma of the right maxillary sinus. The surgical treatment included a maxillectomy and infratemporal fossa dissection followed by a free fibula palatal reconstruction, fibula bone graft of the orbital floor, dental implant placement, and prosthodontic rehabilitation. Prosthodontic planning and treatment considerations in an adult patient with Turner Syndrome are discussed.

  3. An alternative treatment approach to gingival recession: gingiva-colored partial porcelain veneers: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Capa, Nuray

    2007-08-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment of excessive gingival recession involving maxillary right and left central incisors in a 30-year-old woman. The loss of the gingival soft tissue caused an increase in crown length. Gingiva-colored partial porcelain laminate veneers were applied to imitate the lost gingiva and to provide a natural anatomical tooth length. This method may be a minimally invasive alternative treatment method for gingival soft tissue loss, providing esthetic results and patient satisfaction.

  4. Interactions between voice clinics and singing teachers: a report on the British Voice Association questionnaire to voice clinics in the UK.

    PubMed

    Davies, J; Anderson, S; Huchison, L; Stewart, G

    2007-01-01

    Singers with vocal problems are among patients who present at multidisciplinary voice clinics led by Ear Nose and Throat consultants and laryngologists or speech and language therapists. However, the development and care of the singing voice are also important responsibilities of singing teachers. We report here on the current extent and nature of interactions between voice clinics and singing teachers, based on data from a recent survey undertaken on behalf of the British Voice Association. A questionnaire was sent to all 103 voice clinics at National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the UK. Responses were received and analysed from 42 currently active clinics. Eight (19%) clinics reported having a singing teacher as an active member of the team. They were all satisfied with the singing teacher's knowledge and expertise, which had been acquired by several different means. Of 32 clinics without a singing teacher regularly associated with the team, funding and difficulty of finding an appropriate singing voice expert (81% and 50%, respectively) were among the main reasons for their absence. There was an expressed requirement for more interaction between voice clinics and singing teachers, and 86% replied that they would find it useful to have a list of singing teachers in their area. On the matter of gaining expertise and training, 74% of the clinics replying would enable singing teachers to observe clinic sessions for experience and 21% were willing to assist in training them for clinic-associated work.

  5. Design and conduct of clinical trials: report of the Clinical Trials Subcommittee of the International Dry Eye WorkShop (2007).

    PubMed

    2007-04-01

    This report summarizes some universal concepts with regard to clinical trials in general and other issues pertaining to clinical trials specifically tailored to the study of therapeutic intervention in dry eye disease. The report also makes recommendations for logistical design and implementation of such trials. It identifies peculiarities of dry eye disease that complicate clinical trial design, such as the lack of correlation of signs and symptoms, as well as the likelihood of control interventions having a lubricant (placebo) effect. Strategies for environmental trials and controlled adverse environment trials are reviewed.

  6. Navigated Iso-C3D-based percutaneous osteoid osteoma resection: a preliminary clinical report.

    PubMed

    Kendoff, Daniel; Hüfner, Tobias; Citak, Musa; Geerling, Jens; Mössinger, Eckhard; Bastian, Leonhard; Krettek, Christian

    2005-05-01

    Minimally invasive osteoid osteoma resection under computer tomography (CT) guidance has yielded good results and has become a viable alternative to open surgical procedures. Limited visualization of the actual drill position under CT guidance can frequently result in inadequate and malpositioned drilling, especially at lesions located in less accessible anatomic regions. With the conventional CT-guided drilling technique, sterility and general operative management poorly correlate with standard operating room conditions, and are at risk of intra- and postoperative complications. The new Iso-C(3D) imaging device provides intraoperative multiplanar reconstructions. Adequate image quality and implementation in navigation systems were described for numerous indications. On the basis of multiplanar reconstructions, minimally invasive navigated techniques under three-dimensional surgical tool control become possible, which is not the case under fluoroscopic or CT-based navigation. We report on our first three cases of navigated Iso-C(3D) osteoid osteoma resection. A minimally invasive resection of the nidus was possible under permanent multiplanar image control. No complications were encountered and all patients reported successful outcomes. Minimally invasive-based navigation offered an effective and reproducible surgical approach. Dependence on CT imaging for proper positioning and complications associated with use away from the operating room environment can be avoided.

  7. Analysis of safety reporting requirements during medical device clinical trials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kentaro; Iseki, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Regulatory convergence in safety reporting requirements for medical device clinical trials has not yet been achieved. The Global Harmonization Task Force (GHTF) issued new guidance, GHTF/SG5/N5, on this topic in August 2012. First, we compared current reporting requirements for drug and medical devices in Japan with the international guidelines International Conference on Harmonization (ICH)-E2A/E2F and GHTF/SG5/N5. As a result, we confirmed that Japan's expedited reporting requirements are nearly the same for drugs and medical devices and that these requirements are similar to those described in ICH-E2A. We also found that GHTF/SG5/N5 differs from the ICH-E2A in several ways. We sorted these differences into three categories: reportable events, reporting time frame, and definitions of terms. Although there are several equivalent terms between the ICH and GHTF guidelines, the terms Serious Health Threat and Device Deficiency are only defined in GHTF/SG5/N5. The reporting time frame for a Serious Adverse Event is either 10 or 30 days for medical devices; expedited reporting is not required according to ICH-E2A, but it is covered in the annual Development Safety Update Report in ICH-E2F. GHTF/SG5/N5 recommends substantially stricter requirements than the current requirements in Japan. Therefore, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) seemed to have prioritized the introduction of consistent definitions of terms while maintaining the current reporting time frame, rather than introducing GHTF guidance as it is. This policy is in accordance with the draft proposal on the revision of safety reporting requirements issued by MHLW in October 2012.

  8. Let's not, and say we would: imagined and actual responses to witnessing homophobia.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Jennifer Randall; Wilson, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We compared imagined versus actual affective and behavioral responses to witnessing a homophobic slur. Participants (N = 72) witnessed a confederate using a homophobic slur, imagined the same scenario, or were not exposed to the slur. Those who imagined hearing the slur reported significantly higher levels of negative affect than those who actually witnessed the slur, and nearly one half of them reported that they would confront the slur, whereas no participants who actually heard the slur confronted it. These findings reveal a discrepancy between imagined and real responses to homophobic remarks, and they have implications for the likelihood that heterosexuals will actually confront homophobic remarks.

  9. Acute Methotrexate Ingestions in Adults: A Report of Serious Clinical Effects and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S.; Hensley, Matthew D.; Borys, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Limited reported data have reports effects after acute ingestion of methotrexate. Treatment recommendations do not differentiate between exposure routes. Our objective was to determine the frequency of significant toxicity effects and use of therapy after methotrexate ingestion in adults. Methods. We performed a retrospective study on adult cases reported to 6 poison centers over 6 years (2000–2005) which exceed 180,000 exposures/year. Variables collected included demographics, dosages ingested, coingestions, clinical effects, and therapies with outcomes. Results. Sixty-three patients examined over the 6-year period met inclusion criteria. No patient in the series received dialysis or died. The mean dose ingested for all patients was 24 mg (range 2.5–100 mg) and the mean dose for suicidal ingestions was 47.5 mg (12.5–100 mg). The most common clinical effects were abdominal pain, oral irritation, throat irritation, nausea, dizziness, and headache. Nine patients received folinic acid and 3 patients received sodium bicarbonate. No patient developed renal failure, bone marrow suppression, seizure, or coma. No patient died or received dialysis. Conclusion. In our series of patients from 6 poison centers over six years, 63 cases of acute adult methotrexate ingestions were reported. Methotrexate toxicity from ingestion in adults was uncommon and rarely toxic. PMID:24829573

  10. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  11. Analysis of, Continuation of, and Report on Data Gathered at Dover AFB Mortuary during Operation Desert Storm: ARO Short Term Analysis Service Program (STAS). Subtitle: Anticipated and Actual Stress of Deployment to the Dover AFB Mortuary during Operation Desert Storm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-30

    Final Report p. 11 Table 1 continued Duty Category Food Svcs Mortuary Workers Workers & MPs Escorts Children : Yes N: 250 50 121 %: 62.3% 55.6% 85.8% No N...152 40 20 37.8% 44.4% 14.2% Median number 1.4 1.8 2.5 (those w/ children ) Education Under G12 %: 1.0 1.1 o.7 High Sch %: 24.4 29.2 1a.0 Some Col...significant other 6. Other 1 8. Do you have children ? 1. Yes; number of children : (29) 2. No (30-31) B 9. Occupation: 1. With your military unit (32-33) 2

  12. Are clinical laboratories in California accurately reporting vancomycin-resistant enterococci?

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J; Tenover, F C; Wong, J; Jarvis, W; Vugia, D J

    1997-10-01

    In order to determine whether hospital-based clinical laboratories conducting active surveillance for vancomycin-resistant enterococci in three San Francisco Bay area counties (San Francisco, Alameda, and Contra Costa counties) were accurately reporting vancomycin resistance, five vancomycin-resistant enterococcal strains and one vancomycin-susceptible beta-lactamase-producing enterococcus were sent to 31 of 32 (97%) laboratories conducting surveillance. Each strain was tested by the laboratory's routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing method. An Enterococcus faecium strain with high-level resistance to vancomycin (MIC, 512 microg/ml) was correctly reported as resistant by 100% of laboratories; an E. faecium strain with moderate-level resistance (MIC, 64 microg/ml) was correctly reported as resistant by 91% of laboratories; two Enterococcus faecalis strains with low-level resistance (MICs, 32 microg/ml) were correctly reported as resistant by 97 and 56% of laboratories, respectively. An Enterococcus gallinarum strain with intrinsic low-level resistance (MIC, 8 microg/ml) was correctly reported as intermediate by 50% of laboratories. A beta-lactamase-producing E. faecalis isolate was correctly identified as susceptible to vancomycin by 100% of laboratories and as resistant to penicillin and ampicillin by 68 and 44% of laboratories, respectively; all 23 (74%) laboratories that tested for beta-lactamase recognized that it was a beta-lactamase producer. This survey indicated that for clinically significant enterococcal isolates, laboratories in the San Francisco Bay area have problems in detecting low- to moderate-level but not high-level vancomycin resistance. Increasing accuracy of detection and prompt reporting of these isolates and investigation of cases are the next steps in the battle for control of the spread of vancomycin resistance.

  13. Psychopathic-like traits in detained adolescents: clinical usefulness of self-report.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Pauline; Colins, Olivier F; Lodewijks, Henny P B; Markus, Monica T; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

    2014-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated that self-report tools can be used to reliably and validly examine psychopathic-like traits in adolescents. However, it is unclear if self-report instruments are still reliable and valid when confidentiality cannot be guaranteed, such as during routine assessments in juvenile detention centres. To address this issue, the current study used data from the routine mental health screening of 365 detained male adolescents (12-18 years) in two juvenile detention centres. With the intention of gaining insight in the clinical usefulness of self-reported psychopathic-like traits, we examined relations known from literature with emotional and behavioural features. Self-reported psychopathic-like traits, measured by the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short version (YPI-S), were uniquely associated with substance abuse, anger/irritability, conduct problems and hyperactivity, but not with internalizing problems. YPI-S-dimensions showed several specific relationships with variables of interest. For example, only the callous unemotional dimension was negatively related with prosocial behaviour and only the behavioural dimension was positively related with hyperactivity. In conclusion, self-reported psychopathic-like traits showed expected relations with relevant variables. These findings suggest that self-report can be used to identify detained youths with high levels of psychopathic-like traits outside a research context, thus, even when anonymity and confidentiality are not guaranteed.

  14. Enhancing Feedback On Case Reports To Third Year Medical Students On Clinical Attachment

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Preparation of case reports during student attachments has the attraction of reflecting real life clinical practice, but lacks standardisation when used in summative assessment. This study examined the occurrence and nature of feedback after the introduction of a new system of formative case reports in Third Year clinical attachments. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to compare the new system to previous practice. Comparison of questionnaire responses demonstrated more and earlier feedback in the New Third Year, which was likely to be delivered at a meeting rather than as written comment. In the New Third Year, the quality of feedback was better and several markers of high quality feedback were rated more highly. There was no difference, however, in students’ confidence in their ability to assess patients. The qualitative data from the New Third Year documented much excellent feedback but also examples of poor practice as well as inconsistency of advice. In conclusion, a relatively simple intervention effected radical changes to feedback practice and attitudes, although it is not known if the clinical skills of students improved. PMID:28298712

  15. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports.

    PubMed

    Park, Brian Y; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2016-08-05

    Traditional factors that once explained men's sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography's unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth.

  16. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Park, Brian Y.; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P.; Doan, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional factors that once explained men’s sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography’s unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth. PMID:27527226

  17. Acute unintentional intoxication with paraffin in a 25-year old patient - clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Chibishev, Andon; Simonovska, Natasa

    2014-08-01

    "Fire-breathing" or "fire-eating" is a special kind of street art where the acts are always stunning, spectacular and amazing. People exhibiting this kind of show are professionals, not rare amateurs, who use different kind of fuels, usually hydrocarbons, in order to produce a pillar of fire. Intoxications caused by ingestion or inhalation of liquid paraffin, used as a fuel while performing, are numerous and various. We present a clinical case report of a 25-year old, previously healthy, amateur "fire-breather". During October, 2010 this young men arrived at the Emergency Unit of the University Clinic for toxicology and Urgent Internal Medicine in a severe clinical condition, after his unsuccessful attempt to perform real "fire-breathing". He had fever, strong headaches, mild abdominal and chest pain and he also had difficulties breathing and persistent dry cough. The patient was extremely dyspneic with peripheral cyanosis and shortness of breath. "Fire-breathers" must be viewed as a population at risk of paraffin-induced pneumonia, which has low mortality rate, but still is related with numerous and various chronic complications. Our patient was first in a life threatening, extremely serious clinical condition which was urgently treated with appropriate vigorous and effective therapy. This therapeutic protocol led to successful full recovery of these young men, who luckily didn't exhibit any chronic complications.

  18. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  19. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  20. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  1. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  2. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  3. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  4. Presentation of Coronary Artery Disease in a Chiropractic Clinic: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this report is to describe 2 patients with coronary artery disease presenting with musculoskeletal symptoms to a chiropractic clinic. Clinical Features A 48-year-old male new patient had thoracic spine pain aggravated by physical exertion. A 61-year-old man under routine care for low back pain experienced a secondary complaint of acute chest pain during a reevaluation. Intervention and Outcome In both cases, the patients were strongly encouraged to consult their medical physician and were subsequently diagnosed with coronary artery disease. Following their diagnoses, each patient underwent surgical angioplasty procedures with stenting. Conclusion Patients may present for chiropractic care with what appears to be musculoskeletal chest pain when the pain may be generating from coronary artery disease necessitating medical and possibly emergency care. PMID:27069435

  5. Between Clinic and Experiment: Wilder Penfield's Stimulation Reports and the Search for Mind, 1929-55.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Katja

    2016-01-01

    In medicine, the realm of the clinic and the realm of experimentation often overlap and conflict, and physicians have to develop practices to negotiate their differences. The work of Canadian neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield (1891-1976) is a case in point. Engaging closely with the nearly 5,000 pages of unpublished and hitherto unconsidered reports of electrical cortical stimulation that Penfield compiled between 1929 and 1955, I trace how Penfield's interest shifted from the production of hospital-based records designed to help him navigate the brains of individual patients to the construction of universal brain maps to aid his search for an ever-elusive "mind." Reading the developments of Penfield's operation records over time, I examine the particular ways in which Penfield straddled the individual and the universal while attempting to align his clinical and scientific interests, thereby exposing his techniques to standardize and normalize his brain maps.

  6. Epidemiological and clinical description of the top three reportable parasitic diseases in a Canadian community.

    PubMed

    Ravel, A; Nesbitt, A; Pintar, K; Macarthur, A; Wang, H-L; Marshall, B; Pollari, F

    2013-02-01

    This study provides a comprehensive epidemio-clinical picture of sporadic, domestically acquired cases of amoebiasis, cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis in one Canadian community based on patient symptom, outcome and exposure data from an enhanced surveillance system. It yields valuable data for estimating the burden of those diseases including the proportion of bloody diarrhoea, hospitalization, and disease duration. Age differences were observed by incidence rate and for some clinical information and exposures to risk factors. For each of the three diseases, the animal/environment-to-person route was the most common possible main transmission route according to the exposure reported, whereas the person-to-person route was the least common. Exposure was higher for the 10-24 years age group of giardiasis cases for swimming in recreational waters (79%) and attending a barbeque (50%). Therefore, comparisons between groups of cases or extrapolation of results when estimating the burden of illness should be adjusted for age.

  7. Isolated Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava: A Case Report and its Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bisoyi, Samarjit; Jagannathan, Usha; Dash, Anjan Kumar; Tripathy, Sabyasachi; Mohapatra, Raghunath; Pattnaik, Naba Kumar; Sahu, Satyajit; Nayak, Debashish

    2017-01-01

    The venous anomaly of a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) affects 0.3%–0.5% of the general population. PLSVC with absent right superior vena cava, also termed as “isolated PLSVC,” is an extremely rare venous anomaly. Almost half of the patients with isolated PLSVC have cardiac anomalies in the form of atrial septal defect, endocardial cushion defects, or tetralogy of Fallot. Isolated PLSVC is usually innocuous. Its discovery, however, has important clinical implications. It can pose clinical difficulties with central venous access, cardiothoracic surgeries, and pacemaker implantation. When it drains to the left atrium, it may create a right to left shunt. In this case report, we present the incidental finding of isolated PLSVC in a patient who underwent aortic valve replacement. Awareness about this condition and its variations is important to avoid complications. PMID:28074807

  8. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  9. Evaluating a Novel Summary Visualization for Clinical Trial Reports: A Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Maurine; Hsu, William; Taira, Ricky K.

    2016-01-01

    Contributions of clinical trials are captured in published reports that are unstructured and often require extensive manual review to gain a deeper understanding of the study itself. Our goal is to increase comprehension and decrease the time necessary to understand these reports through the use of visualization tools. In this paper, we specify and evaluate the visualization of a previously developed representation as well as gain insight from user input for further development. The usability experiment consisted of a two-arm study with users either having or not having access to the visualization. A user questionnaire was used to measure time spent and accuracy in comprehension; intuitiveness and reproducibility of the visualization; and preferences. We found that having the visualization required on average 28.1% less time (25.8 min vs. 35.8 min, p=0.01) while maintaining similar accuracy (73.7% vs. 67.0%). Users were then asked to create their own visualizations, with their visualizations averaging 86.1% similar to the gold standard. All participants either preferred the visualization over the status quo or preferred both equally. These results demonstrate that novel visualizations for trial reports could provide time savings and achieve similar accuracy as reviewing the paper itself. Understanding the strength and quality of clinical trials can be alleviated with a visualization that makes content explicit. PMID:28269960

  10. Automatically correlating clinical findings and body locations in radiology reports using MedLEE.

    PubMed

    Sevenster, Merlijn; van Ommering, Rob; Qian, Yuechen

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a system that extracts clinical findings and body locations from radiology reports and correlates them. The system uses Medical Language Extraction and Encoding System (MedLEE) to map the reports' free text to structured semantic representations of their content. A lightweight reasoning engine extracts the clinical findings and body locations from MedLEE's semantic representation and correlates them. Our study is illustrative for research in which existing natural language processing software is embedded in a larger system. We manually created a standard reference based on a corpus of neuro and breast radiology reports. The standard reference was used to evaluate the precision and recall of the proposed system and its modules. Our results indicate that the precision of our system is considerably better than its recall (82.32-91.37% vs. 35.67-45.91%). We conducted an error analysis and discuss here the practical usability of the system given its recall and precision performance.

  11. Extraction of left ventricular ejection fraction information from various types of clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjun; Garvin, Jennifer H; Goldstein, Mary K; Hwang, Tammy S; Redd, Andrew; Bolton, Dan; Heidenreich, Paul A; Meystre, Stéphane M

    2017-03-01

    Efforts to improve the treatment of congestive heart failure, a common and serious medical condition, include the use of quality measures to assess guideline-concordant care. The goal of this study is to identify left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) information from various types of clinical notes, and to then use this information for heart failure quality measurement. We analyzed the annotation differences between a new corpus of clinical notes from the Echocardiography, Radiology, and Text Integrated Utility package and other corpora annotated for natural language processing (NLP) research in the Department of Veterans Affairs. These reports contain varying degrees of structure. To examine whether existing LVEF extraction modules we developed in prior research improve the accuracy of LVEF information extraction from the new corpus, we created two sequence-tagging NLP modules trained with a new data set, with or without predictions from the existing LVEF extraction modules. We also conducted a set of experiments to examine the impact of training data size on information extraction accuracy. We found that less training data is needed when reports are highly structured, and that combining predictions from existing LVEF extraction modules improves information extraction when reports have less structured formats and a rich set of vocabulary.

  12. A Real-Time Safety and Quality Reporting System: Assessment of Clinical Data and Staff Participation

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, Douglas A.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the use of an incident learning system in a radiation oncology clinic, along with a review of staff participation. Methods and Materials: On September 24, 2010, our department initiated an online real-time voluntary reporting system for safety issues, called the Radiation Oncology Quality Reporting System (ROQRS). We reviewed these reports from the program's inception through January 18, 2013 (2 years, 3 months, 25 days) to assess error reports (defined as both near-misses and incidents of inaccurate treatment). Results: During the study interval, there were 60,168 fractions of external beam radiation therapy and 955 brachytherapy procedures. There were 298 entries in the ROQRS system, among which 108 errors were reported. There were 31 patients with near-misses reported and 27 patients with incidents of inaccurate treatment reported. These incidents of inaccurate treatment occurred in 68 total treatment fractions (0.11% of treatments delivered during the study interval). None of these incidents of inaccurate treatment resulted in deviation from the prescription by 5% or more. A solution to the errors was documented in ROQRS in 65% of the cases. Errors occurred as repeated errors in 22% of the cases. A disproportionate number of the incidents of inaccurate treatment were due to improper patient setup at the linear accelerator (P<.001). Physician participation in ROQRS was nonexistent initially, but improved after an education program. Conclusions: Incident learning systems are a useful and practical means of improving safety and quality in patient care.

  13. Importance of reporting segmental bowel preparation scores during colonoscopy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Momeni, Mojdeh; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Anand, Sury; Singhal, Shashideep

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of reporting bowel preparation using Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) in clinical practice. METHODS: The study was a prospective observational cohort study which enrolled subjects reporting for screening colonoscopy. All subjects received a gallon of polyethylene glycol as bowel preparation regimen. After colonoscopy the endoscopists determined quality of bowel preparation using BBPS. Segmental scores were combined to calculate composite BBPS. Site and size of the polyps detected was recorded. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine advanced adenoma detection rates (AADR). Segmental AADR’s were calculated and categorized based on the segmental BBPS to determine the differential impact of bowel prep on AADR. RESULTS: Three hundred and sixty subjects were enrolled in the study with a mean age of 59.2 years, 36.3% males and 63.8% females. Four subjects with incomplete colonoscopy due BBPS of 0 in any segment were excluded. Based on composite BBPS subjects were divided into 3 groups; Group-0 (poor bowel prep, BBPS 0-3) n = 26 (7.3%), Group-1 (Suboptimal bowel prep, BBPS 4-6) n = 121 (34%) and Group-2 (Adequate bowel prep, BBPS 7-9) n = 209 (58.7%). AADR showed a linear trend through Group-1 to 3; with an AADR of 3.8%, 14.8% and 16.7% respectively. Also seen was a linear increasing trend in segmental AADR with improvement in segmental BBPS. There was statistical significant difference between AADR among Group 0 and 2 (3.8% vs 16.7%, P < 0.05), Group 1 and 2 (14.8% vs 16.7%, P < 0.05) and Group 0 and 1 (3.8% vs 14.8%, P < 0.05). χ2 method was used to compute P value for determining statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Segmental AADRs correlate with segmental BBPS. It is thus valuable to report segmental BBPS in colonoscopy reports in clinical practice. PMID:25852286

  14. Opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Schrijver, Iris; Aziz, Nazneen; Farkas, Daniel H; Furtado, Manohar; Gonzalez, Andrea Ferreira; Greiner, Timothy C; Grody, Wayne W; Hambuch, Tina; Kalman, Lisa; Kant, Jeffrey A; Klein, Roger D; Leonard, Debra G B; Lubin, Ira M; Mao, Rong; Nagan, Narasimhan; Pratt, Victoria M; Sobel, Mark E; Voelkerding, Karl V; Gibson, Jane S

    2012-11-01

    This report of the Whole Genome Analysis group of the Association for Molecular Pathology illuminates the opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing. With the reality of clinical application of next-generation sequencing, technical aspects of molecular testing can be accomplished at greater speed and with higher volume, while much information is obtained. Although this testing is a next logical step for molecular pathology laboratories, the potential impact on the diagnostic process and clinical correlations is extraordinary and clinical interpretation will be challenging. We review the rapidly evolving technologies; provide application examples; discuss aspects of clinical utility, ethics, and consent; and address the analytic, postanalytic, and professional implications.

  15. Moving toward the reduction of publication/reporting biases in clinical trials using a new international standard.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

     Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is fundamental to ensuring high-quality medical care. It requires systematic reviews and meta-analyses to synthesize diverse information available from individual clinical studies. However, the literature reviewed may represent an incomplete and selective set of research findings, which could lead to publication/reporting biases and distort the true picture of research as a whole. Prospective registry of all clinical trials in the world is mandatory to reduce the biases, which have been disclosed on the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) of the World Health Organization (WHO) since 2007. The Japan Primary Registries Network (JPRN) is included in the ICTRP. ClinicalTrials.gov, the U.S. clinical trial registry, reports the standardized data of registered trials and offers access to submitted outcomes online. However, the JPRN does not systematically include the outcomes. On April 14, 2015, the WHO published a new statement online on the public disclosure of clinical trial results, which requires researchers to define the timeframes of reporting main findings and key outcomes, to call for results-reporting older, but still unpublished trials, and to outline steps to improve linkages between clinical trial registry entries and their published results. The WHO's new position will facilitate global efforts to reduce publication/reporting biases in clinical trials. Japan will have to actively participate in these efforts as well.

  16. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-01-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case. PMID:27559354

  17. Brief strategic therapy in a child community clinic. A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, J; Wahrman, O

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the outcome of brief strategic therapy, practiced according to the model described by S. de Shazer, in an out-patient child psychiatry clinic during 4 years. Forty-two clients were interviewed in a span of 6 to 18 months after termination of therapy and asked about symptomatic improvement and satisfaction with the treatment. The results showed that brief strategic therapy achieved lasting complaint resolution in a high percentage of cases, high satisfaction rates with little relapse or need for additional interventions.

  18. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-12-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case.

  19. [Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis. Clinical diagnosis, evolution and complications: case report].

    PubMed

    Albuja Echeverría, Byron Orlando; Alvear Lozano, Mayra Bersabeth; Ordóñez Paredes, Carla Patricia

    2014-10-01

    The congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in NTRK1 gene (neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1) located in chromosome 1q21-22, encoding the tyrosinase domain receptor high affinity nerve growth factor. It is characterized by anhidrosis, insensitivity to painful stimuli and mental retardation. Given their low prevalence and the few reported cases, it is important to know its main features to be considered in the differential diagnosis in pediatric practice. We describe the clinical diagnosis, complications, sequelae and symptomatic treatment administered to a 3 years and 6 months old girl in the Hospital Asdrubal de la Torre, Cotacachi, Ecuador.

  20. Sciatic hernia clinically mimicking obturator hernia, missed by ultrasonography: case report.

    PubMed

    Rather, Shiraz Ahmad; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Parray, Fazal Q; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Asrar, Syed

    2011-05-01

    Sciatic hernia is a rare pelvic floor hernia that occurs through the greater or lesser sciatic foramen. Sciatic hernias often present as pelvic pain, particularly in women, and diagnosis can be difficult. Sciatic hernia is one of the rarest forms of internal hernia, which can present as signs and symptoms of small bowel obstruction, swelling in the respective gluteal region or pelvic pain. Transabdominal and transgluteal operative approaches, including laparoscopic repair, have been reported. We present a case of left-sided sciatic hernia with incarcerated small bowel as its contents. The hernia was missed by ultrasonography and plain abdominal radiography, but the clinical features were suggestive of an obturator hernia.

  1. [Ethical issues in a market dispute between clinical laboratories and a health plan: case report].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Malone Santos; de Brito, Ana Maria Guedes; Jeraldo, Verônica de Lourdes Sierpe; Pinheiro, Kariny Souza

    2011-01-01

    In Brazil the private health plans appear as an alternative to the public health assistance. This segment suffered great intensification in the seventies and eighties, culminating in the entry of large insurance company in the scenario of supplementary medicine. Quickly, the service providers associated with these insurance companies, consolidating them in the market and triggering a relationship of dependency. This article analyzed, in the form of a case report, a marketing dispute between clinical laboratories and a health plan, emphasizing the moral and ethical aspects involved in this episode.

  2. Dental management of early childhood caries in spastic quadriparesis: a case report and clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hotwani, Kavita; Sharma, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain. The motor disorders of CP are often accompanied by epilepsy, secondary musculoskeletal problems, and disturbances of sensation, perception, cognition, communication, and behavior. Spastic quadriparesis is the most severe form of spastic cerebral palsy. The present report describes the management of a 5-year-old patient with early childhood caries and spastic quadriparesis. The oral manifestations and clinical guidelines are discussed considering the special health care needs in these patients so as to provide comprehensive dental care.

  3. Clinical deterioration due to co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and glioblastoma: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Preziosa, Paolo; Sangalli, Francesca; Esposito, Federica; Moiola, Lucia; Martinelli, Vittorio; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    Clinical worsening during the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) might be secondary to not only an incomplete recovery after relapses, to progressive accumulation of deficits, but also to other etiologies, different from MS. This report discusses the cases of two MS patients showing a gradual and progressive deterioration of locomotor and cognitive functions which were due to the co-occurrence of MS and glioblastoma. Additional investigations (especially magnetic resonance imaging) are strongly recommended to exclude concomitant pathologies in MS patients suffering from new neurological symptoms over weeks to months, without remission, or an unexpected rapid and progressive accumulation of disability.

  4. A novel speech prosthesis for mandibular guidance therapy in hemimandibulectomy patient: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Adaki, Raghavendra; Shigli, Kamal; Hormuzdi, Dinshaw M.; Gali, Sivaranjani

    2016-01-01

    Treating diverse maxillofacial patients poses a challenge to the maxillofacial prosthodontist. Rehabilitation of hemimandibulectomy patients must aim at restoring mastication and other functions such as intelligible speech, swallowing, and esthetics. Prosthetic methods such as palatal ramp and mandibular guiding flange reposition the deviated mandible. Such prosthesis can also be used to restore speech in case of patients with debilitating speech following surgical resection. This clinical report gives detail of a hemimandibulectomy patient provided with an interim removable dental speech prosthesis with composite resin flange for mandibular guidance therapy. PMID:27041917

  5. Clinical and Histopathologic Investigation of Periapical Actinomycosis with Cutaneous Lesion: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Davood; Moazami, Fariborz; Sobhnamayan, Fereshteh; Taheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Management of an extra-radicular infection is a challenging procedure that requires surgical intervention. This report describes a patient with discharging cutaneous lesion that required apical surgery. A 40-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Endodontics, Shiraz Dental School with chief complaint of a cutaneous sinus tract. She had been treated by a dermatologist and an otolaryngologist. The patient had also received orthograde root canal treatment of tooth #16. Yet, the lesion was still discharging and the patient was scheduled for surgery. Histopathologic analysis of the lesion showed actinomycosis infection. A 36-month follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic healing. PMID:26535411

  6. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  7. Correlating clinical manifestations with factor levels in rare bleeding disorders: a report from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Viswabandya, A; Baidya, S; Nair, S C; Abraham, A; George, B; Mathews, V; Chandy, M; Srivastava, A

    2012-05-01

    Data on the clinical manifestations of patients with clotting factor defects other than Haemophilia A, B and von Willebrand disease are limited because of their rarity. Due to their autosomal recessive nature of inheritance, these diseases are more common in areas where there is higher prevalence of consanguinity. There is no previous large series reported from southern India where consanguinity is common. Our aim was to analyze clinical manifestations of patients with rare bleeding disorders and correlate their bleeding symptoms with corresponding factor level. Data were collected in a standardized format from our centre over three decades on 281 patients who were diagnosed with rare bleeding disorders (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V (FV), FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV or FVIII deficiency). Patients with liver dysfunction or those on medications which can affect factor level were excluded. All patients with <50% factor levels were included in this analysis. Patients were analysed for their salient clinical manifestations and it was correlated with their factor levels. The data shows that FXIII deficiency is the commonest and FXI deficiency is the rarest in Southern India. There was no significant difference in bleeding symptoms among those who were < or >1% factor coagulant activities among all disorders, except for few symptoms in FVII and FX deficiency. An international collaborative study is essential to find out the best way of classifying severity in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

  8. Sperm DNA: organization, protection and vulnerability: from basic science to clinical applications--a position report.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Christopher L R; Aitken, R John; Björndahl, Lars; Carrell, Douglas T; de Boer, Peter; Kvist, Ulrik; Lewis, Sheena E M; Perreault, Sally D; Perry, Melissa J; Ramos, Liliana; Robaire, Bernard; Ward, Steven; Zini, Armand

    2010-04-01

    This article reports the results of the most recent in a series of EHSRE workshops designed to synthesize the current state of the field in Andrology and provide recommendations for future work (for details see Appendix). Its focus is on methods for detecting sperm DNA damage and potential application of new knowledge about sperm chromatin organization, vulnerability and repair to improve the diagnosis and treatment of clinical infertility associated with that damage. Equally important is the use and reliability of these tests to identify the extent to which environmental contaminants or pharmaceutical agents may contribute to the incidence of sperm DNA damage and male fertility problems. A working group (for workshop details, see Appendix) under the auspices of ESHRE met in May 2009 to assess the current knowledgebase and suggest future basic and clinical research directions. This document presents a synthesis of the working group's understanding of the recent literature and collective discussions on the current state of knowledge of sperm chromatin structure and function during fertilization. It highlights the biological, assay and clinical uncertainties that require further research and ends with a series of 5 key recommendations.

  9. Extension of the clinical range of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: report of six cases

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooi, A J; Visser, M; Rosenberg, N; van den Berg-Vos, R; Wokke, J; Bakker, E; de Visser, M

    2000-01-01

    Consensual diagnostic criteria for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) include onset of the disease in facial or shoulder girdle muscles, facial weakness in more than 50% of affected family members, autosomal dominant inheritance in familial cases, and evidence of myopathic disease in at least one affected member without biopsy features specific to alternative diagnoses.
 Six patients did not meet most of these criteria but were diagnosed as FSHD by DNA testing, which showed small EcoRI fragments on chromosome 4q.
 Their clinical signs and symptoms and results of auxiliary investigations are reported. The patients presented with foot extensor, thigh, or calf muscle weakness. None of them had apparent facial weakness, only one complained of weakness in the shoulders, none had a positive family history. Expert physical examination, however, showed a typical facial expression, an abnormal shoulder configuration on lifting the arms, or scapular winging. This raised the suspicion of FSHD, whereupon DNA analysis was done. In conclusion, the clinical expression of FSHD is much broader than indicated by the nomenclature. The possibility to perform DNA tests is likely to greatly expand the clinical range of FSHD.

 PMID:10864616

  10. Interpersonal Communication Behaviors and Self-Actualizing Values: A Conceptual Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macklin, Thomas

    This report addresses the relationship between self-actualizing values and interpersonal communication behaviors. After a discussion of behavioristic and humanistic frameworks for social science research, the paper explains Abraham Maslow's and Carl Roger's concepts of self-actualization as the tendency toward completing and perfecting one's…

  11. 75 FR 28059 - Actual Effects of the Free Trade Agreements With Chile, Australia, and Singapore

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... COMMISSION Actual Effects of the Free Trade Agreements With Chile, Australia, and Singapore AGENCY: United...) instituted investigation No. 332-515, Actual Effects of the Free Trade Agreements with Chile, Australia, and...) concluded with Chile, Singapore, and Australia. In its report the Commission will-- (1) With respect to...

  12. Extracting PICO Sentences from Clinical Trial Reports using Supervised Distant Supervision.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Byron C; Kuiper, Joël; Sharma, Aakash; Zhu, Mingxi Brian; Marshall, Iain J

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews underpin Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) by addressing precise clinical questions via comprehensive synthesis of all relevant published evidence. Authors of systematic reviews typically define a Population/Problem, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (a PICO criteria) of interest, and then retrieve, appraise and synthesize results from all reports of clinical trials that meet these criteria. Identifying PICO elements in the full-texts of trial reports is thus a critical yet time-consuming step in the systematic review process. We seek to expedite evidence synthesis by developing machine learning models to automatically extract sentences from articles relevant to PICO elements. Collecting a large corpus of training data for this task would be prohibitively expensive. Therefore, we derive distant supervision (DS) with which to train models using previously conducted reviews. DS entails heuristically deriving 'soft' labels from an available structured resource. However, we have access only to unstructured, free-text summaries of PICO elements for corresponding articles; we must derive from these the desired sentence-level annotations. To this end, we propose a novel method - supervised distant supervision (SDS) - that uses a small amount of direct supervision to better exploit a large corpus of distantly labeled instances by learning to pseudo-annotate articles using the available DS. We show that this approach tends to outperform existing methods with respect to automated PICO extraction.

  13. Medical treatment in neurofibromatosis type 2. Review of the literature and presentation of clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Goutagny, S; Kalamarides, M

    2017-02-02

    The understanding of the molecular pathways underlying tumor development in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is increasing. Thus, repositioning drugs, drug therapies that are already clinically available for various cancers, appear potentially promising for NF2 patients. Based on preclinical data from in vitro or animal models, five different treatments have been proposed for selected NF2 cases. Evaluation of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF has mainly been reported in retrospective studies; it has been reported to induce hearing improvement and tumor shrinkage in more than 50% of progressive vestibular schwannomas (VS). In our experience with 16 patients, bevacizumab is associated with an increase of median time to tumor progression of VS from 5.6 months before bevacizumab onset, to more than 29.3 months. The need for intravenous injections and long term adverse events (hypertension, proteinuria, hemorrhage) are the main drawbacks. Lapatinib seemed promising in a single phase II trial with a volumetric response observed in 4/17 patients and a hearing response in 4/13, but is not currently used in clinical practice. Erlotinib has not been associated with radiographic or hearing responses in a phase II trial. Everolimus has been evaluated in 3 phase II trials. Everolimus did not induced tumor shrinkage, but seems to be able to increase time to tumor progression in selected cases. Currently, bevacizumab is the only drug proposed to selected NF2 patients.

  14. Nocardia caviae: a Report of 13 New Isolations with Clinical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Causey, William A.

    1974-01-01

    Thirteen isolates of Nocardia caviae from 12 different clinical sources were received and identified over a 5½-year period by the Mycology Division of the Center for Disease Control. The results of morphological, biochemical, and physiological studies on these isolates were compared with those obtained with four reference cultures of N. caviae received from the Institute of Microbiology, Rutgers University. Comparison showed that N. caviae isolates form a homogeneous group that is usually easily distinguished from N. asteroides, N. brasiliensis, and other pathogenic aerobic actinomycetes. The clinical sources included nine human and two animal infections and one human isolate apparently not associated with disease. Previous reports of N. caviae infections in man have been limited to rare cases of actinomycotic mycetoma. Among the human infections reported in this series are one case of mycetoma, one case of “mycotic” keratitis, one case of skin abscess, two cases of osteomyelitis, and four cases of serious pulmonary infection caused by N. caviae. PMID:4604822

  15. The Importance of Medication Errors Reporting in Improving the Quality of Clinical Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Elden, Nesreen Mohamed Kamal; Ismail, Amira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medication errors have significant implications on patient safety. Error detection through an active management and effective reporting system discloses medication errors and encourages safe practices. Objectives: To improve patient safety through determining and reducing the major causes of medication errors (MEs), after applying tailored preventive strategies. Methodology: A pre-test, post-test study was conducted on all inpatients at a 177 bed hospital where all medication procedures in each ward were monitored by a clinical pharmacist. The patient files were reviewed, as well. Error reports were submitted to a hospital multidisciplinary committee to identify major causes of errors. Accordingly, corrective interventions that consisted of targeted training programs for nurses and physicians were conducted. Results: Medication errors were higher during ordering/prescription stage (38.1%), followed by administration phase (20.9%). About 45% of errors reached the patients: 43.5% were harmless and 1.4% harmful. 7.7% were potential errors and more than 47% could be prevented. After the intervention, error rates decreased from (6.7%) to (3.6%) (P≤0.001). Conclusion: The role of a ward based clinical pharmacist with a hospital multidisciplinary committee was effective in recognizing, designing and implementing tailored interventions for reduction of medication errors. A systematic approach is urgently needed to decrease organizational susceptibility to errors, through providing required resources to monitor, analyze and implement effective interventions. PMID:27045415

  16. Hand hygiene-related clinical trials reported since 2010: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kingston, L; O'Connell, N H; Dunne, C P

    2016-04-01

    Considerable emphasis is currently placed on reducing healthcare-associated infection through improving hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals. There is also increasing discussion in the lay media of perceived poor hand hygiene compliance among healthcare staff. Our aim was to report the outcomes of a systematic search for peer-reviewed, published studies - especially clinical trials - that focused on hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals. Literature published between December 2009, after publication of the World Health Organization (WHO) hand hygiene guidelines, and February 2014, which was indexed in PubMed and CINAHL on the topic of hand hygiene compliance, was searched. Following examination of relevance and methodology of the 57 publications initially retrieved, 16 clinical trials were finally included in the review. The majority of studies were conducted in the USA and Europe. The intensive care unit emerged as the predominant focus of studies followed by facilities for care of the elderly. The category of healthcare worker most often the focus of the research was the nurse, followed by the healthcare assistant and the doctor. The unit of analysis reported for hand hygiene compliance was 'hand hygiene opportunity'; four studies adopted the 'my five moments for hand hygiene' framework, as set out in the WHO guidelines, whereas other papers focused on unique multimodal strategies of varying design. We concluded that adopting a multimodal approach to hand hygiene improvement intervention strategies, whether guided by the WHO framework or by another tested multimodal framework, results in moderate improvements in hand hygiene compliance.

  17. Neuropsychological and psychiatric complications in endoscopic third ventriculostomy: a clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Benabarre, A; Ibanez, J; Boget, T; Obiols, J; Martinez-Aran, A; Vieta, E

    2001-01-01

    The clinical case report of a patient who underwent an endoscopic third ventriculostomy for the treatment of a slit ventricle syndrome is presented. After surgery the patient developed a severe complication consisting of an organic personality disorder, characterised by impulsiveness, physical heteroaggressiveness, binge eating, hypersomnia and impairment of memory, and frontal-executive functions.
A frontal lobe lesion may explain some of the symptoms presented, such as the uncontrolled impulses, the aggressive behaviour, and even the binge eating. However, a longitudinal neuropsychological evaluation showed a severe deficit in immediate memory and difficulties in planning and consolidation of newly learned information, which may be best related to damage in the frontal basal structures of the brain: the fornix and its connection to the hippocampus and the mamillary bodies. Postoperative MR images confirmed the clinical hypothesis. The emergence of such a severe organic personality disorder and cognitive disturbances as a psychiatric complication of an endoscopic third ventriculostomy has not, it seems, been previously reported elsewhere. Clinicians should take these possible complications into account when recommending this so-called minimally invasive neuroendoscopic procedure.

 PMID:11459910

  18. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  19. Evaluating and Reporting the Immunogenicity Impacts for Biological Products--a Clinical Pharmacology Perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yow-Ming C; Wang, Jie; Hon, Yuen Yi; Zhou, Lin; Fang, Lanyan; Ahn, Hae Young

    2016-03-01

    Immunogenicity assessment is important for biological products due to potential impacts of immunogenicity on safety and efficacy. We reviewed the prescribing information and the FDA's clinical pharmacology review of 121 approved biological products for evaluating and reporting of immunogenicity data. Of the 121 products, 89% (n = 108) reported the incidence of immunogenicity and 49% (n = 59) reported immunogenicity impact on efficacy. However, only 26% (n = 31) reported whether the immunogenicity affected pharmacokinetics. A subset of 16 products reported effects of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) on both systemic clearance and efficacy; 8 of 16 products had increased systemic clearance coinciding with reduced efficacy, and 6 of 16 products had no changes in either clearance or efficacy. Factors contributing to infrequent reporting of the ADA effect on exposure and methods for determining the effect of ADA on exposure are summarized. Measuring ADA and drug concentrations concurrently over time enables the evaluation of ADA impact on pharmacokinetics. Within-subject comparison of concentration data (before vs. after ADA formation) is a useful alternative to between-subject (ADA+ vs. ADA-) comparison when sample size is limited or when the majority of subjects developed ADA. The biological complexity of immune responses presents challenges to quantifying the ADA impact on pharmacokinetics using model-based methods. Our findings support that pharmacokinetic exposure is more sensitive than efficacy endpoints for evaluating ADA effects. A decrease in drug concentration due to formation of ADA during treatment can serve as an early indicator for potential reduced efficacy occurring at a later time.

  20. Report of a new case with pentasomy X and novel clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    Demirhan, O; Tanriverdi, N; Yilmaz, MB; Kocaturk-Sel, S; Inandiklioglu, N; Luleyap, U; Akbal, E; Comertpay, G; Tufan, T; Dur, O

    2015-01-01

    Pentasomy X is an extremely rare sex chromosome abnormality, a condition that only affects females, in which three more X chromosomes are added to the normally present two chromosomes in females. We investigated the novel clinical findings in a 1-year-old female baby with pentasomy X, and determined the parental origins of the X chromosomes. Our case had thenar atrophy, postnatal growth deficiency, developmental delay, mongoloid slant, microcephaly, ear anomalies, micrognathia and congenital heart disease. A conventional cytogenetic technique was applied for the diagnosis of the polysomy X, and quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) using 11 inherited short tandem repeat (STR) alleles specific to the chromosome X for the determination of parental origin of X chromosomes. A cytogenetic evaluation revealed that the karyotype of the infant was 49,XXXXX. Comparison of the infant’s features with previously reported cases indicated a clinically recognizable specific pattern of malformations referred to as the pentasomy X syndrome. However, to the best of our know-ledge, this is the first report of thenar atrophy in a patient with 49,XXXXX. The molecular analysis suggested that four X chromosomes of the infant originated from the mother as a result of the non disjunction events in meiosis I and meiosis II. We here state that the clinical manifestations seen in our case were consistent with those described previously in patients with pentasomy X. The degree of early hypotonia constitutes an important early prognostic feature in this syndrome. The pathogenesis of pentasomy X is not clear at present, but it is thought to be caused by successive maternal non disjunctions. PMID:26929910

  1. Comparison of two data collection processes in clinical studies: electronic and paper case report forms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic Case Report Forms (eCRFs) are increasingly chosen by investigators and sponsors of clinical research instead of the traditional pen-and-paper data collection (pCRFs). Previous studies suggested that eCRFs avoided mistakes, shortened the duration of clinical studies and reduced data collection costs. Methods Our objectives were to describe and contrast both objective and subjective efficiency of pCRF and eCRF use in clinical studies. A total of 27 studies (11 eCRF, 16 pCRF) sponsored by the Paris hospital consortium, conducted and completed between 2001 and 2011 were included. Questionnaires were emailed to investigators of those studies, as well as clinical research associates and data managers working in Paris hospitals, soliciting their level of satisfaction and preferences for eCRFs and pCRFs. Mean costs and timeframes were compared using bootstrap methods, linear and logistic regression. Results The total cost per patient was 374€ ±351 with eCRFs vs. 1,135€ ±1,234 with pCRFs. Time between the opening of the first center and the database lock was 31.7 months Q1 = 24.6; Q3 = 42.8 using eCRFs, vs. 39.8 months Q1 = 31.7; Q3 = 52.2 with pCRFs (p = 0.11). Electronic CRFs were globally preferred by all (31/72 vs. 15/72 for paper) for easier monitoring and improved data quality. Conclusions This study found that eCRFs and pCRFs are used in studies with different patient numbers, center numbers and risk. The first ones are more advantageous in large, low–risk studies and gain support from a majority of stakeholders. PMID:24438227

  2. Clinical evaluation of a new, above-elbow, body-powered prosthetic arm: a final report.

    PubMed

    Cupo, M E; Sheredos, S J

    1998-10-01

    The AdVAntage Arm is an above-elbow (AE) body-powered arm designed to improve upon, and overcome, some of the major limitations of conventional prostheses. It is the result of research and development (R&D) accomplished at the Center for Engineering Design (CED), University of Utah and Sarcos Research Corporation (SRC), Salt Lake City, UT. The AdVAntage Arm was developed to provide the following main features: lightweight, independent elbow and terminal device (TD) control, and a cable recovery system for full TD actuation at any elbow position. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Rehab R&D Service's Technology Transfer Section (TTS), with collaboration from the VA National Prosthetic and Sensory Aids Service (PSAS), managed a multi-center clinical evaluation of the precommercial AdVAntage Arm (the Arm). The purpose was to objectively assess and affirm the Arm's functional advantages, reliability, clinical application, and commercial readiness. Eleven VA prosthetic services served as evaluation sites with a total of 16 subjects with amputation (14 unilateral and 2 bilateral). Fifteen prosthetists provided their comments. Overall, the results demonstrated that the Arm could be fit for use by persons with transhumeral, and even with forequarter, amputation. Once the learning curve was overcome, the majority of subjects reported that the Arm offered several functional advantages over their conventional prosthesis. Its overall light weight, separation of elbow and TD function, and cable recovery system allowed opening and closure of the TD at any elbow position; resulting in a more fluid manner of use and allowing subjects to perform more activities from waist level and above (especially in the outstretched and overhead positions). At the conclusion of clinical trials, 10 subjects elected to keep the Arm for continued use. The manufacturer is committed to the commercial marketing and technical support of the arm. Based upon the clinical findings, the AdVAntage Arm

  3. Report on the RCDS-CDHSRU workshop on developing clinical guidelines/standards of practice.

    PubMed

    Leake, J L; Main, P A; Woodward, G L

    1996-07-01

    Investigators from the Community Dental Health Services Research Unit (CDHSRU) held a workshop to test a model for developing clinical guidelines/standards of practice, which are required under the Regulated Health Professions Legislation. Forty-two individuals from Ontario and Canada, including dentists, representatives of the public, and professionals, participated in the three-day workshop, held under the auspices of the quality assurance committee of the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario (RCDS). Through direct experience, workshop participants sought to learn each of the steps, as defined by the literature, involved in clinical guideline development. Ultimately, they hoped to recommend steps for RCDS to follow in developing standards of practice. To ensure that a realistic and valid model emerged from the workshop, a real topic, namely the management of smooth surface enamel lesions in permanent teeth, was used to develop and test clinical guidelines. Prior to the workshop, participants were sent literature on one of five aspects of the topic, as well as papers describing the methodology of critically appraising the literature, and partially-completed templates outlining the basic steps to be followed. During the first evening and first morning of the workshop, participants listened to presentations on the development of clinical guidelines, the prevalence of smooth surface lesions, the role of economics in guideline development, and the necessary considerations in writing clinical guidelines. Under the leadership of trained facilitators, they then worked in small groups to write evidence-based recommendations and report them to the other workshop participants for feedback. Using this feedback, they returned to their groups to revise their recommendations and work on the workshop's overall recommendations to the RCDS. The day concluded in the evening, when the workshop facilitators and coordinators met to edit the groups' recommendations into a

  4. What Actually Makes Bullying Stop? Reports from Former Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisen, Ann; Hasselblad, Tove; Holmqvist, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    School bullying is a serious, worldwide problem which is not easily counteracted. The present study focuses on the perspective of former victims, asking them what it was that made the bullying stop in their case. Participants were 273 18-year-old former victims in Sweden, a country in which schools are doing extensive work against bullying and the…

  5. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: What is the actual risk of liver damage?

    PubMed Central

    Bessone, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) constitute a family of drugs, which taken as a group, represents one of the most frequently prescribed around the world. Thus, not surprisingly NSAIDs, along with anti-infectious agents, list on the top for causes of Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI). The incidence of liver disease induced by NSAIDs reported in clinical studies is fairly uniform ranging from 0.29/100 000 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.17-051] to 9/100 000 (95% CI: 6-15). However, compared with these results, a higher risk of liver-related hospitalizations was reported (3-23 per 100 000 patients). NSAIDs exhibit a broad spectrum of liver damage ranging from asymptomatic, transient, hyper-transaminasemia to fulminant hepatic failure. However, under-reporting of asymptomatic, mild cases, as well as of those with transient liver-tests alteration, in conjunction with reports non-compliant with pharmacovigilance criteria to ascertain DILI and flawed epidemiological studies, jeopardize the chance to ascertain the actual risk of NSAIDs hepatotoxicity. Several NSAIDs, namely bromfenac, ibufenac and benoxaprofen, have been withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity; others like nimesulide were never marketed in some countries and withdrawn in others. Indeed, the controversy concerning the actual risk of severe liver disease persists within NSAIDs research. The present work intends (1) to provide a critical analysis of the dissimilar results currently available in the literature concerning the epidemiology of NSAIDS hepatotoxicity; and (2) to review the risk of hepatotoxicity for each one of the most commonly employed compounds of the NSAIDs family, based on past and recently published data. PMID:21128314

  6. Essentials and guidelines for clinical medical physics residency training programs: executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Joann I; Willis, Charles E; Burmeister, Jay W; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Das, Rupak K; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Gerbi, Bruce J; Harkness, Beth A; Patton, James A; Peck, Donald J; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Sandison, George A; White, Sharon L; Wichman, Brian D; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Both, Stefan

    2014-05-08

    There is a clear need for established standards for medical physics residency training. The complexity of techniques in imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology continues to increase with each passing year. It is therefore imperative that training requirements and competencies are routinely reviewed and updated to reflect the changing environment in hospitals and clinics across the country. In 2010, the AAPM Work Group on Periodic Review of Medical Physics Residency Training was formed and charged with updating AAPM Report Number 90. This work group includes AAPM members with extensive experience in clinical, professional, and educational aspects of medical physics. The resulting report, AAPM Report Number 249, concentrates on the clinical and professional knowledge needed to function independently as a practicing medical physicist in the areas of radiation oncology, imaging, and nuclear medicine, and constitutes a revision to AAPM Report Number 90. This manuscript presents an executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

  7. Characteristics of Patients Who Report Confusion After Reading Their Primary Care Clinic Notes Online.

    PubMed

    Root, Joseph; Oster, Natalia V; Jackson, Sara L; Mejilla, Roanne; Walker, Jan; Elmore, Joann G

    2016-01-01

    Patient access to online electronic medical records (EMRs) is increasing and may offer benefits to patients. However, the inherent complexity of medicine may cause confusion. We elucidate characteristics and health behaviors of patients who report confusion after reading their doctors' notes online. We analyzed data from 4,528 patients in Boston, MA, central Pennsylvania, and Seattle, WA, who were granted online access to their primary care doctors' clinic notes and who viewed at least one note during the 1-year intervention. Three percent of patients reported confusion after reading their visit notes. These patients were more likely to be at least 70 years of age (p < .0001), have fewer years of education (p < .0017), be unemployed (p < .0001), have lower levels of self-reported health (p < .0043), and worry more after reading visit notes (relative risk [RR] 4.83; confidence interval [CI] 3.17, 7.36) compared to patients who were not confused. In adjusted analyses, they were less likely to report feeling more in control of their health (RR 0.42; CI 0.25, 0.71), remembering their care plan (RR 0.26; CI 0.17, 0.42), and understanding their medical conditions (RR 0.32; CI 0.19, 0.54) as a result of reading their doctors' notes compared to patients who were not confused. Patients who were confused by reading their doctors' notes were less likely to report benefits in health behaviors. Understanding this small subset of patients is a critical step in reducing gaps in provider-patient communication and in efforts to tailor educational approaches for patients.

  8. Tuberculous meningitis presenting with unusual clinical features in Nigerians: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Komolafe, Morenikeji A; Sunmonu, Taofiki A; Esan, Olufunmi A

    2008-01-01

    antituberculous drugs and intravenous steroids but despite this his clinical condition deteriorated and he died on the sixth day after admission. Conclusion Late presentation of tuberculous meningitis is not rare in Nigerians and we report two cases of tuberculous meningitis that presented late to our health care facility. This report is intended to make clinicians aware of the unusual clinical presentations of tuberculous meningitis. PMID:18816394

  9. Measuring Disability in Population Based Surveys: The Interrelationship between Clinical Impairments and Reported Functional Limitations in Cameroon and India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between two distinct measures of disability: self-reported functional limitations and objectively-screened clinical impairments. Methods We undertook an all age population-based survey of disability in two areas: North-West Cameroon (August/October 2013) and Telangana State, India (Feb/April 2014). Participants were selected for inclusion via two-stage cluster randomised sampling (probability proportionate to size cluster selection and compact segment sampling within clusters). Disability was defined as the presence of self-reported functional limitations across eight domains, or presence of moderate or greater clinical impairments. Clinical impairment screening comprised of visual acuity testing for vision impairment, pure tone audiometry for hearing impairment, musculoskeletal functioning assessment for musculoskeletal impairment, reported seizure history for epilepsy and reported symptoms of clinical depression (depression adults only). Information was collected using structured questionnaires, observations and examinations. Results Self-reported disability prevalence was 5.9% (95% CI 4.7–7.4) and 7.5% (5.9–9.4) in Cameroon and India respectively. The prevalence of moderate or greater clinical impairments in the same populations were 8.4% (7.5–9.4) in Cameroon and 10.5% (9.4–11.7) in India. Overall disability prevalence (self-report and/or screened positive to a moderate or greater clinical impairment) was 10.5% in Cameroon and 12.2% in India, with limited overlap between the sub-populations identified using the two types of tools. 33% of participants in Cameroon identified to have a disability, and 45% in India, both reported functional limitations and screened positive to objectively-screened impairments, whilst the remainder were identified via one or other tool only. A large proportion of people with moderate or severe clinical impairments did not self-report functional difficulties despite reporting

  10. Transforming Teacher Education through Clinical Practice: A National Strategy to Prepare Effective Teachers. Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Clinical Preparation and Partnerships for Improved Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The vision for transforming the education of the nation's nearly four million teacher workforce presented in this report comes not from any one group but from a diverse group representing a broad range of perspectives. The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) Blue Ribbon Panel on Clinical Preparation and Partnerships for…

  11. Seizure reporting technologies for epilepsy treatment: A review of clinical information needs and supporting technologies.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Jonathan; Khuwatsamrit, Thanin; Askew, Brittain; Ehrenberg, Joshua Andrew; Helmers, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    This review surveys current seizure detection and classification technologies as they relate to aiding clinical decision-making during epilepsy treatment. Interviews and data collected from neurologists and a literature review highlighted a strong need for better distinguishing between patients exhibiting generalized and partial seizure types as well as achieving more accurate seizure counts. This information is critical for enabling neurologists to select the correct class of antiepileptic drugs (AED) for their patients and evaluating AED efficiency during long-term treatment. In our questionnaire, 100% of neurologists reported they would like to have video from patients prior to selecting an AED during an initial consultation. Presently, only 30% have access to video. In our technology review we identified that only a subset of available technologies surpassed patient self-reporting performance due to high false positive rates. Inertial seizure detection devices coupled with video capture for recording seizures at night could stand to address collecting seizure counts that are more accurate than current patient self-reporting during day and night time use.

  12. EANM Dosimetry Committee guidance document: good practice of clinical dosimetry reporting.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, M; Chiesa, C; Flux, G; Bardiès, M

    2011-01-01

    Many recent publications in nuclear medicine contain data on dosimetric findings for existing and new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In many of these articles, however, a description of the methodology applied for dosimetry is lacking or important details are omitted. The intention of the EANM Dosimetry Committee is to guide the reader through a series of suggestions for reporting dosimetric approaches. The authors are aware of the large amount of data required to report the way a given clinical dosimetry procedure was implemented. Another aim of this guidance document is to provide comprehensive information for preparing and submitting publications and reports containing data on internal dosimetry. This guidance document also contains a checklist which could be useful for reviewers of manuscripts submitted to scientific journals or for grant applications. In addition, this document could be used to decide which data are useful for a documentation of dosimetry results in individual patient records. This may be of importance when the approval of a new radiopharmaceutical by official bodies such as EMA or FDA is envisaged.

  13. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  14. Report of the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition and FDA clinical trials clinical outcome assessment endpoints workshop (October 15, 2014, Bethesda MD)

    PubMed Central

    Helfer, Jennifer L.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Blakeley, Jaishri; Gilbert, Mark R.; Armstrong, Terri S.

    2016-01-01

    On October 15, 2014, a workshop was held on the use of clinical outcome assessments in clinical trials for high-grade glioma of the brain. This workshop was sponsored by the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition, consisting of the National Brain Tumor Society, the Society for Neuro-Oncology, the Musella Foundation for Brain Tumor Research and Information, and Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure. It was planned and carried out with participation from the US Food and Drug Administration. The workshop also included stakeholders from all aspects of the brain tumor community, including clinicians, researchers, industry, clinical research organizations, patients and patient advocates, and the National Cancer Institute. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of that workshop and the proposals that emerged to move the field forward and toward greater inclusion of these endpoints in future clinical trials for high-grade gliomas. PMID:26989130

  15. Report of the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition and FDA clinical trials clinical outcome assessment endpoints workshop (October 15, 2014, Bethesda MD).

    PubMed

    Helfer, Jennifer L; Wen, Patrick Y; Blakeley, Jaishri; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2016-03-01

    On October 15, 2014, a workshop was held on the use of clinical outcome assessments in clinical trials for high-grade glioma of the brain. This workshop was sponsored by the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition, consisting of the National Brain Tumor Society, the Society for Neuro-Oncology, the Musella Foundation for Brain Tumor Research and Information, and Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure. It was planned and carried out with participation from the US Food and Drug Administration. The workshop also included stakeholders from all aspects of the brain tumor community, including clinicians, researchers, industry, clinical research organizations, patients and patient advocates, and the National Cancer Institute. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of that workshop and the proposals that emerged to move the field forward and toward greater inclusion of these endpoints in future clinical trials for high-grade gliomas.

  16. The feasibility, perceived satisfaction, and value of using synchronous webinars to educate clinical research professionals on reporting adverse events in clinical trials: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Borgerson, Dawn; Dino, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research professionals are faced with decreased funding and increased workloads; innovative methods of professional development programs are necessary to accommodate these factors. This study evaluated the feasibility, perceived satisfaction, and value of using webinars to educate clinical research professionals on reporting adverse events commonly experienced in pediatric oncology clinical trials. The setting incorporated synchronous web-based educational technology. Constructivist learning provides the theoretical framework for this study. Participants evaluated the professional development program at 2 time points: (a) at the conclusion and (b) 4 to 6 weeks afterward, using survey method. Synchronous webinars were both economical and effective in educating clinical research professionals across institutional sites. Participants reported exceptionally high levels of satisfaction with the accessibility, scope, quality, and interactivity of the professional development program. The vast majority of participants reported that the education would assist with reporting adverse events in pediatric oncology clinical trials and this perception persisted into clinical practice. Although the results of this study were intended to guide future educational efforts of the Children's Oncology Group, they may also apply to other cooperative groups.

  17. Ruptured pediatric cerebellopontine angle epidermoid cyst: a case report detailing radiographic evolution and clinical course.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhe; Hollon, Todd; Bentley, J Nicole; Garton, Hugh J L

    2015-08-21

    Epidermoid cysts (ECs) are uncommon pediatric tumors that often occur in the cerebellopontine angle. Although cyst rupture is a recognized complication, the radiographic evolution of an EC following rupture and the resultant parenchymal brainstem edema have not been reported. The authors present the case of a 13-year-old female with a newly diagnosed cerebellopontine angle EC who presented with worsening headaches, photophobia, and emesis. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated significant pericystic brainstem edema and mass effect with effacement of the fourth ventricle. Refractory symptoms prompted repeat imaging, revealing cyst enlargement and dense rim enhancement. Resection of the EC resolved both her symptoms and the brainstem edema. This case documents the radiographic evolution of EC rupture and subsequent clinical course.

  18. Chronic Pulmonary Histoplasmosis and its Clinical Significance: an Under-reported Systemic Fungal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaish, Ritu; Palange, Padmavali; Bhoomagiri, Mohan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum. It is a dimorphic fungus which lives as a saprophyte in the environment and occasionally infects immunosuppressed people. H capsulatum is a ubiquitous fungus present throughout the globe and is more common in the temperate world. Human infection with H capsulatum occurs through respiratory route by inhalation of spores present in the air as droplet nuclei. Pulmonary histoplasmosis is difficult to diagnose, more so in the regions where tuberculosis is endemic, and many infected patients remain asymptomatic. In the case of immunosuppression, clinical symptoms of pulmonary infection may be seen along with chances of dissemination. We report a case of chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual. PMID:27688988

  19. Clinical benefits of alpharadin in castrate-chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Croke, Jennifer; Leung, Eugene; Segal, Roanne; Malone, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer has the second-highest mortality worldwide in men. The most common site of metastasis is bone. Bone metastases and their resulting complications represent a significant source of morbidity. Radioisotopes have been used for treatment of painful bony metastases. Although shown to decrease pain and analgesia use, this has not improved outcomes. The following case report describes a patient with castrate-resistant prostate cancer who was treated with the radioisotope radium-223 as part of the phase III clinical trial Alpharadin in Patients with Symptomatic Hormone Refractory Prostate Cancer with Skeletal Metastases (ALSYMPCA). He responded to radium-223 with pain relief, bone scan response, stabilisation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and normalisation of alkaline phosphatase. Interim analysis of this trial has shown that radium-223 significantly prolongs overall survival, time to first skeletal-related event and is well tolerated. Alpharadin is a new treatment option for men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. PMID:23125297

  20. Clinically Amyopathic Dermatomyositis Complicated by Pleural Effusion Case Report, Literature Review, and Proposed Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Chhaya, Sheetal; Hurowitz, Bert; Ardiles, Thomas; Carlson, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Polymyositis-dermatomyositis (PM-DM) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that mainly involves muscles and skin. Clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) is a unique subset of PM-DM with typical skin manifestations but little or no evidence of musculoskeletal involvement. Many cases of dermatomyositis and CADM are associated with internal malignancy, but pulmonary manifestations can also been seen; the most common of which is interstitial lung disease. Pleural effusion is a rare complication and may be difficult to differentiate from other causes, such as infections, heart failure, or malignancy. We report a patient with CADM complicated by rapidly progressive pleural effusions. Based on findings of this patient, as well as literature review, we suggest that the etiology of massive pleural effusion in this setting is most likely related to local immune pleuritis associated with underlying interstitial lung disease due to dermatomyositis. Optimal management should be individualized and may include immunosuppressive agents, as well as antimicrobials, and potentially other agents.

  1. Appendicitis-like clinical image elicited by Enterobius vermicularis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vleeschouwers, W; Hofman, Ph; Gillardin, J P; Meert, V; Van Slycke, S

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient presented with the clinical features of an acute appendicitis. During laparoscopic exploration a macroscopically normal appendix was found. Since there were no intra-abdominal abnormalities found, the appendix was resected. Anatomopathology demonstrated Enterobius vermicularis, a pinworm infecting only humans, and mostly living in the caecum. This parasite is responsible for possibly the most common helminthic infection in the developed world. Its role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis is controversial, but more recent studies indicate a stronger association between enterobiasis and appendicitis. Often, enterobius mimics appendicitis by obstructing the lumen of the appendix, thereby causing appendiceal colic. This case report stresses the importance of microscopic examination of all appendectomy resection specimens. In case of enterobius infestation, systemic therapy of patient and family is necessary.

  2. Full-mouth rehabilitation of severely worn dentition due to soda swishing: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Fawaz

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment planning of severely worn dentition are complex and complicated. Erosion is one of the common causes of lost tooth surface. Defining the etiology of the erosion is essential before proceeding with treatment to be able to provide the most predictable treatment outcome. Multiple specialists including psychologists, family medicine practioners, and social workers should be involved in the diagnosis and the prevention of a continuing erosion process. The treatment plan should be based on the severity of the tooth surface lost. It can range from simple direct restorations to a full-mouth rehabilitation. This clinical report is a detailed description of a complex prosthodontic diagnostic index class IV patient based on current evidence-based dentistry.

  3. Phonetics and tongue position to improve mandibular denture retention: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bohnenkamp, David M; Garcia, Lily T

    2007-11-01

    The fabrication, use, and wear instructions for complete dentures are often the factors determining success. The dentist must help guide the mental attitude of the skeptical patient to foster acceptance and success of complete dentures. A "feeling of looseness" may be a condition experienced while patients learn to wear a new mandibular complete denture. Some patients may not understand the reasons given by dentists for the lack of retention of a new mandibular denture. This type of patient requires more explanation, more advice, and more instruction. A phonetic training technique, to demonstrate to the patient how to retain and stabilize the mandibular denture, may be needed for some denture patients. This article reports the clinical use of phonetics and its effect on tongue position to improve the retention and stability of a mandibular complete denture.

  4. Are current standards of reporting quality for clinical trials sufficient in addressing important sources of bias?

    PubMed

    Mills, Edward J; Ayers, Dieter; Chou, Roger; Thorlund, Kristian

    2015-11-01

    Determining the quality of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) is necessary for decision-makers to determine the believability and applicability of the trial findings. Issues that are likely to affect the utility of RCT evidence include issues of bias, random error and applicability. In this article we focus primarily on issues of bias and examine the evidence for whether reporting methodological items, including allocation concealment, sequence generation, and blinding of participants can be relied upon as evidence of bias. We present the findings of a systematic review of meta-epidemiological studies and a simulation study demonstrating that commonly examined sources of bias likely play little role in treatment exaggeration. We discuss other issues that may additionally influence trial outcomes including sample size, publication bias, and expertise of trialists. We conclude by discussing strategies to moderate the effect of known biases in assessing overall estimates of treatment effects.

  5. Single-stage osseointegrated implants for nasal prosthodontic rehabilitation: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Bruna M D F; Freitas-Pontes, Karina M; de Negreiros, Wagner A; Verde, Marcus A R L

    2015-08-01

    Malignant tumors in the nasal region may be treated by means of invasive surgical procedures, with large facial losses. Nasal prostheses, retained by osseointegrated facial implants, instead of plastic surgery, will, in most patients, offer good biomechanical and cosmetic results. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with nasal cancer who had the entire nasal vestibule removed in a single-stage surgical procedure in order to shorten the rehabilitation time. The nasal prosthesis was built on a 3-magnet bar and was made of platinum silicone with intrinsic pigmentation, thereby restoring the patient's appearance and self-esteem. The authors concluded that single-stage implants may reduce the rehabilitation time to as little as 1 month, and the correct use of materials and techniques may significantly improve the nasal prosthesis.

  6. Pharmacogenetics Informed Decision Making in Adolescent Psychiatric Treatment: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  7. Interpreting patient-reported outcomes from clinical trials in COPD: a discussion.

    PubMed

    Jones, Paul W; Rennard, Stephen; Tabberer, Maggie; Riley, John H; Vahdati-Bolouri, Mitra; Barnes, Neil C

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges faced by the practising physician is the interpretation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials and the relevance of such data to their patients. This is especially true when caring for patients with progressive diseases such as COPD. In an attempt to incorporate the patient perspective, many clinical trials now include assessments of PROs. These are formalized methods of capturing patient-centered information. Given the importance of PROs in evaluating the potential utility of an intervention for a patient with COPD, it is important that physicians are able to critically interpret (and critique) the results derived from them. Therefore, in this paper, a series of questions is posed for the practising physician to consider when reviewing the treatment effectiveness as assessed by PROs. The focus is on the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire for worked examples, but the principles apply equally to other symptom-based questionnaires. A number of different ways of presenting PRO data are discussed, including the concept of the minimum clinically important difference, whether there is a ceiling effect to PRO results, and the strengths and weaknesses of responder analyses. Using a worked example, the value of including a placebo arm in a study is illustrated, and the influence of the study on PRO results is considered, in terms of the design, patient withdrawal, and the selection of the study population. For the practising clinician, the most important consideration is the importance of individualization of treatment (and of treatment goals). To inform such treatment, clinicians need to critically review PRO data. The hope is that the questions posed here will help to build a framework for this critical review.

  8. Systematic Evaluation of the Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) Content of Clinical Trial Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Kyte, Derek; Duffy, Helen; Fletcher, Benjamin; Gheorghe, Adrian; Mercieca-Bebber, Rebecca; King, Madeleine; Draper, Heather; Ives, Jonathan; Brundage, Michael; Blazeby, Jane; Calvert, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Background Qualitative evidence suggests patient-reported outcome (PRO) information is frequently absent from clinical trial protocols, potentially leading to inconsistent PRO data collection and risking bias. Direct evidence regarding PRO trial protocol content is lacking. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the PRO-specific content of UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment (HTA) programme trial protocols. Methods and Findings We conducted an electronic search of the NIHR HTA programme database (inception to August 2013) for protocols describing a randomised controlled trial including a primary/secondary PRO. Two investigators independently reviewed the content of each protocol, using a specially constructed PRO-specific protocol checklist, alongside the ‘Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials’ (SPIRIT) checklist. Disagreements were resolved through discussion with a third investigator. 75 trial protocols were included in the analysis. Protocols included a mean of 32/51 (63%) SPIRIT recommendations (range 16–41, SD 5.62) and 11/33 (33%) PRO-specific items (range 4–18, SD 3.56). Over half (61%) of the PRO items were incomplete. Protocols containing a primary PRO included slightly more PRO checklist items (mean 14/33 (43%)). PRO protocol content was not associated with general protocol completeness; thus, protocols judged as relatively ‘complete’ using SPIRIT were still likely to have omitted a large proportion of PRO checklist items. Conclusions The PRO components of HTA clinical trial protocols require improvement. Information on the PRO rationale/hypothesis, data collection methods, training and management was often absent. This low compliance is unsurprising; evidence shows existing PRO guidance for protocol developers remains difficult to access and lacks consistency. Study findings suggest there are a number of PRO protocol checklist items that are not fully

  9. Clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of a proximal positional fault of the radius. A case report.

    PubMed

    Malo-Urriés, Miguel; Hidalgo-García, César; Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Estébanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Lucha-López, Orosia; Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel

    2014-06-01

    Positional faults are considered a possible underlying mechanism mimicking the symptoms of a joint sprain. Despite numerous clinical studies indicating the presence of positional faults, there is limited evidence of imaging studies confirming positional faults. This case report is a preliminary study that offers clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of a proximal positional fault of the radius, treated successfully with manual therapy techniques. Three weeks after a bike fall on the outstretched hand, the patient in this study presented with right wrist pain and a lack of progress with conventional conservative treatment (NSAIDs, rest and immobilization). Clinical findings indicating a proximal positional fault of the radius included pain during active pronation increased by associating a passive movement of the radius in a proximal direction and it was reduced by associating a passive movement of the radius in a distal direction. Ultrasonographic (US) images showed a reduction of radio-capitellar distance on the right side (11.4 mm) compared to the left side (13.3 mm). A positive response with a distal mobilization of the radius supported the proximal positional fault of the radius. After two manual therapy sessions, the patient had recovered normal asymptomatic function. The outcomes used to assess function and pain were active pronation range of motion, the Spanish version of the DASH questionnaire and a 0-10 numeric pain rating scale. Each measure was conducted prior and after each treatment session and one week post treatment. The patient was re-examined at 6 months follow-up, during which US images, demonstrated a normalization of the right radio-capitellar distance.

  10. Meanings and political implications of "psychopathology" in a gender identity clinic: a report of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Levine, Stephen B; Solomon, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in August 2007, we committed ourselves to a clinical review the co-morbid diagnostic patterns of the last 10 patients interviewed by our Gender Identity Clinic. We found 90% of these diverse patients had at least one other significant form of psychopathology. This finding seems to be in marked contrast to the public, forensic, and professional rhetoric of many who care for transgendered adults. Much of this rhetoric sounds remarkably certain about the long-term value of gender transition, hormones, and sex reassignment surgery in improving the lives of those with Gender Identity Disorder (GID). Such clinical certainty would have to be based on carefully established sophisticated follow-up findings. These are lacking. The psychopathologies in this series included problems of mood and anxiety regulation and adapting in the world. Two of the 10 have had persistent significant regrets about their previous transitions. In discussing management decisions, civil rights, and ethics, we planned to separately briefly present the 10 patients. However, our decision to seek patients' permission proved so upsetting to three of the first six patients that we altered the structure of this report. Our attempt to follow the ethical principle of informed consent caused us to violate the principle of nonmalfiescence. This distressing experience only illustrates, however, the disadvantage of discussing professional concepts with lay audiences. Emphasis on civil rights is not a substitute for the recognition and treatment of associated psychopathology. Gender identity specialists, unlike the media, need to be concerned about the majority of patients, not just the ones who are apparently functioning well in transition.

  11. Interpreting patient-reported outcomes from clinical trials in COPD: a discussion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Paul W; Rennard, Stephen; Tabberer, Maggie; Riley, John H; Vahdati-Bolouri, Mitra; Barnes, Neil C

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges faced by the practising physician is the interpretation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials and the relevance of such data to their patients. This is especially true when caring for patients with progressive diseases such as COPD. In an attempt to incorporate the patient perspective, many clinical trials now include assessments of PROs. These are formalized methods of capturing patient-centered information. Given the importance of PROs in evaluating the potential utility of an intervention for a patient with COPD, it is important that physicians are able to critically interpret (and critique) the results derived from them. Therefore, in this paper, a series of questions is posed for the practising physician to consider when reviewing the treatment effectiveness as assessed by PROs. The focus is on the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire for worked examples, but the principles apply equally to other symptom-based questionnaires. A number of different ways of presenting PRO data are discussed, including the concept of the minimum clinically important difference, whether there is a ceiling effect to PRO results, and the strengths and weaknesses of responder analyses. Using a worked example, the value of including a placebo arm in a study is illustrated, and the influence of the study on PRO results is considered, in terms of the design, patient withdrawal, and the selection of the study population. For the practising clinician, the most important consideration is the importance of individualization of treatment (and of treatment goals). To inform such treatment, clinicians need to critically review PRO data. The hope is that the questions posed here will help to build a framework for this critical review. PMID:27994447

  12. Evolution of the clinical review station for enterprise-wide multimedia radiology reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, William B.; Valtchinov, Vladimir I.; Davis, Scott D.; Lester, James; Khorasani, Ramin; Carrino, John A.; Benfield, Andrew

    2000-05-01

    Efforts to develop Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) for the last ten years have concentrated mainly on developing systems for primary interpretation of digital radiological images. Much less attention has been paid to the clinical aspects of the radiology process. Clinical radiology services are an important component of the overall care delivery process, providing information and consultation services to referring physicians, the customers of radiology, in a timely fashion to aid in care decisions. Information management systems (IMS) are playing an increasingly central role in the care delivery process. No suitable commercial PACS or IMS products were available that could effectively provide for the requirements of the clinicians. We endeavored to fill this void at our institution by developing a system to deliver images and text reports electronically on-demand to the referring physicians. This system has evolved substantially since initial deployment eight years ago. As new technologies become available they are evaluated and integrated as appropriate to improve system performance and manageability. Not surprisingly, the internet and World Wide Web (WWW) technology has had the greatest impact on system design in recent years. Additional features have been added over time to provide services for teleradiology, teaching, and research needs. We also discovered that these value-added services give us a competitive edge in attracting new business to our department. Commercial web-based products are now becoming available which do a satisfactory job of providing many of these clinical services. These products are evaluated for integration into our system as they mature. The result is a system that impacts positively on patient care.

  13. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  14. Report on a Delphi process and workshop to improve accrual to cancer clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J.A.H.; Balneaves, L.G.; Kelly, M.T.; Richardson, H.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials (ccts) are essential for furthering knowledge and developing effective interventions to improve the lives of people living with cancer in Canada. Randomized controlled trials are particularly important for developing evidence-based health care interventions. To produce robust and relevant research conclusions, timely and sufficient accrual to ccts is essential. The present report delivers the key recommendations emerging from a workshop meeting, Improve Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials, that was hosted by the Canadian Cancer Trials Group and funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The meeting, which took place in Toronto, Ontario, in April 2012 before the Canadian Cancer Trials Group annual spring meeting, brought together key stakeholders from across Canada to explore creative strategies for improving accrual to ccts. The objectives of the workshop were to provide an opportunity for knowledge exchange with respect to the research evidence and the ethics theory related to cct accrual and to promote discussion of best practices and policies related to enhancing cct access and accrual in Canada. The workshop provided the foundation for establishing new interdisciplinary research collaborations to overcome the identified barriers to cct participation in Canada. Meeting participants also supported the development of evidence-based policies and practices to make trials more accessible to Canadians living with cancer.

  15. Maternal Reports of Play Dates of Clinic Referred and Community Children.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Fred; Mintz, Jim

    2011-10-01

    Recent interventions have focused upon play dates as a means to improve friendships. However, no measures have been published which quantify play date quality. An important characteristic of play dates in this regard may be the amount of conflict. We present the development of such a measure. We compare maternal reports of play dates for 112 community subjects with 48 subjects referred for peer problems (mean age = 8.7 years). We found that clinic-referred subjects had significantly fewer hosted and invited play dates than the community subjects. The mean conflict on play dates was significantly lower for the community subjects than for the clinic-referred subjects. We obtained significant correlations between conflict on play dates and measures of problem behaviors. Our results support the position that conflict on play dates is an important area to target in social skills training programs. The scale may prove useful to clinicians and researchers by facilitating screening and assessing interventions directed towards improving play dates.

  16. Gene-based association studies report genetic links for clinical subtypes of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aniket; Ferrari, Raffaele; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Posthuma, Danielle

    2017-04-05

    Genome-wide association studies in frontotemporal dementia showed limited success in identifying associated loci. This is possibly due to small sample size, allelic heterogeneity, small effect sizes of single genetic variants, and the necessity to statistically correct for testing millions of genetic variants. To overcome these issues, we performed gene-based association studies on 3348 clinically identified frontotemporal dementia cases and 9390 controls (discovery, replication and joint-cohort analyses). We report association of APOE and TOMM40 with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, and ARHGAP35 and SERPINA1 with progressive non-fluent aphasia. Further, we found the ɛ2 and ɛ4 alleles of APOE harbouring protective and risk increasing effects, respectively, in clinical subtypes of frontotemporal dementia against neurologically normal controls. The APOE-locus association with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia indicates its potential risk-increasing role across different neurodegenerative diseases, whereas the novel genetic associations of ARHGAP35 and SERPINA1 with progressive non-fluent aphasia point towards a potential role of the stress-signalling pathway in its pathophysiology.

  17. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure: Clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-07-01

    Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice.A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1.To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians' awareness of its possible onset.

  18. [Mediastinal teratoma with malignant transformation of the somatic component. Clinical report].

    PubMed

    Gerardo, Rita; Morgado, Carolina; Calvo, Dolores; Pinto, Eugénia; Bravio, Ivan; Castelão, Nelson; Martelo, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Mediastinal germ cell tumours (M-GCT) are rare forms of neoplasms compared with other tumours of the same location. They are classified in seminomas, malignant non-seminomatous GCT and teratomas. The malignant transformation of the somatic component of the teratoma, with sarcomatous or carcinomatous degeneration, is even more uncommon. We report the clinical case of a 32 year old man who presented with severe chest pain on the right hemithorax. The image exams revealed the existence of a large heterogeneous lesion with a diameter of 7.7 cm, with areas of lipomatous density and a calcic image with the appearance of a tooth, in the right projection of the anterior mediastinum, in the vicinity of the large vessels, compatible with teratoma. The transthoracic biopsy (CT guided) showed morphologic aspects of sarcoma. The patient was operated on with the en bloc resection of the mediastinal mass, right lung, a segment of the pericardium and the thymus. The pathological studies showed a teratoma with malignant transformation of the mesenquimatous component, with muscular differentiation into leiomiosarcoma and rabdomiosarcoma. After surgery, the patient was treated with a scheme of doxorubicin and ifosfamide. The most prominent concepts related to this clinical entity, as well as its treatment, are debated in this article, based on the most recent publications dedicated to the subject.

  19. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Review of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Krohe, Meaghan; Hao, Yanni; Lamoureux, Roger E.; Galipeau, Nina; Globe, Denise; Foley, Catherine; Mazar, Iyar; Solomon, Jeffrey; Shields, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures serve to capture vital patient information not otherwise obtained by primary study endpoints. This paper examines how PROs are utilized as endpoints in industry-sponsored metastatic breast cancer clinical trials. METHODS A search was conducted in the clinicaltrials.gov web site for trials involving common treatments for metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-eight clinical trials were identified which included a PRO endpoint in the study, and data were extracted and summarized. RESULTS Overall, 17 unique PRO questionnaires and 14 concepts of measurement were identified as secondary or exploratory endpoints. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—Breast was the most frequently utilized questionnaire, commonly implemented to assess quality of life. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was also frequently used to measure quality of life or pain. CONCLUSION This review shares insights into the role of PROs in trials for metastatic breast cancer from which treatment developers and other stakeholders can enhance successful implementation of the patient voice into future trials. PMID:27441001

  20. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-01-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). PMID:27437164

  1. Clinical and radiographic features of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alves, Daniel Berretta; Silva, Juliana Melo; Menezes, Tatiany Oliveira; Cavaleiro, Rosely Santos; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Coletta, Ricardo Della

    2014-03-16

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare dysmorphic syndrome characterized by several features of premature aging with clinical involvement of the skin, bones, and cardiovascular system. HGPS has an estimated incidence of one in four million to one in eight million births. The main clinical features of HGPS include short stature, craniofacial dimorphism, alopecia, bone fragility, and cardiovascular disorders. The most frequent cause of death is myocardial infarction at a mean age of 13 years old. Dental manifestations include delayed development and eruption of teeth, discoloration, crowding and rotation of teeth, and displaced teeth. Cone beam computed tomography images revealed the absence of the sphenoid, frontal, and maxillary sinus, flattening of the condyles and glenoid fossa, and bilateral hypoplasia of the mandibular condyles. The disease is caused by mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA). Here, we present a case report of an 11-year-old boy with classical features of HGPS, which was caused by a de novo germ-line mutation (C1824T, G608G) in exon 11 of the LMNA gene. Some uncommon HGPS-associated features in our patient, such as alterations in the facial sinuses and hypoplasia of the condyles, contributed to the expansion of the phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome from a dentomaxillofacial perspective.

  2. Clinical gnathostomiasis: case report and review of the English-language literature.

    PubMed

    Rusnak, J M; Lucey, D R

    1993-01-01

    Human gnathostomiasis is most frequently caused by the nematode Gnathostoma spinigerum. This disease is endemic to Southeast Asia, particularly Thailand and Japan. The clinical presentation is most commonly characterized by localized, intermittent, migratory swellings of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, often in association with localized pain, pruritus, and erythema. Since this worm can migrate to deeper tissues, any organ system may become involved. Characteristically, patients with gnathostomiasis have a moderate to severe elevation of the peripheral eosinophil count, with values not uncommonly exceeding 50% of the total white blood cell count. With modern-day travel and immigration, cases of gnathostomiasis are being diagnosed with increased frequency in the United States. Because of its rarity in this country, however, gnathostomiasis often is not included in an initial differential diagnosis despite the characteristic triad of intermittent migratory swelling, a history of travel to Southeast Asia, and eosinophilia. We report a case of cutaneous gnathostomiasis diagnosed in the United States, and we present a clinical review of the English-language literature on human gnathostomiasis.

  3. Gorham-Stout Disease: a Clinical Case Report and Immunological Mechanisms in Bone Erosion.

    PubMed

    Franco-Barrera, Maria José; Zavala-Cerna, Maria Guadalupe; Aguilar-Portillo, Georgina; Sánchez-Gomez, Diana Brisa; Torres-Bugarin, Olivia; Franco-Barrera, Miguel Angel; Roa-Encarnacion, Carlos Manuel

    2017-02-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) is a rare condition of osteolysis with excessive lymphangiogenesis within bone tissue. The etiology of this condition remains unknown but seems to affect mainly children and young adults of both genders all over the world. Unfortunately, there is no standardized method for diagnosis; however, histopathology remains as the gold standard. This condition is often misdiagnosed due to its varying clinical presentations from case-to-case. Here, we report the case of an 8-year-old girl who presented with chronic mandibular pain during mastication and received multiple antibiotic treatment due to infectious origin suspicion. After integrating information from clinical manifestations, radiographic, laboratory, and histopathology information, she was diagnosed with GSD. Additionally, due to the lack of literature with respect to insights into biological mechanisms and standardized treatment for this condition, we underwent a literature revision to provide information related to activation of cells from the immune system, such as macrophages, T-cells, and dendritic cells, and their contribution to the lymphangiogenesis, angiogenesis, and osteoclastogenic process in GSD. It is important to consider these mechanisms in patients with GSD, especially since new studies performed in earlier stages are required to confirm their use as novel diagnostic tools and find new possibilities for treatment.

  4. Multidisciplinary Approach for Restoring Function and Esthetics in a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Vaibhav D; Parkhedkar, Rambhau D

    2013-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is a genetically determined and enamel mineralization defect reported, depicted as “Hereditary brown teeth.” AI is characterized as a clinical entity and its clinical manifestations, histological appearance, and genetic pattern are characterized by their heterogeneity. The need for prosthodontic management of this group of patients varies. Some patients need oral hygiene instructions only, whereas others need extensive dental treatment that includes composite restorations, metal ceramic crowns, all ceramic crowns, porcelain veneers. A 20-year-old male patient presented with sensitive, discoloured, and mutilated teeth, with a decreased vertical dimension of occlusion. The 4-year recall examination revealed no pathology associated with the full mouth rehabilitation, and the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations were satisfied. The rehabilitation included all-ceramic crowns on anterior teeth and metal-ceramic crowns on posterior teeth following endodontic treatment and a crown-lengthening procedure for eliminating tooth sensitivity, improving the aesthetics and occlusion, and for restoring function. PMID:24551735

  5. Report on Provider-Client Interaction From 68 Methadone Maintenance Clinics in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Comulada, W Scott; Lin, Chunqing; Lan, Chiao-Wen; Cao, Xiaobin; Wu, Zunyou

    2016-10-06

    Provider-client interaction is an integral of clinical practice and central to the delivery of high-quality medical care. This article examines factors related to the provider-client interaction in the context of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Data were collected from 68 MMT clinics in China. In total, 418 service providers participated in the survey. Linear mixed effects regression models were performed to identify factors associated with provider-client interaction. It was observed that negative attitude toward drug users was associated with lower level of provider-client interaction and less time spent with each client. Other factors associated with lower level of interaction included being female, being younger, being a nurse, and fewer years in medical field. Higher provider-client interaction was associated with provider reported job satisfaction. The findings of this study call for a need to address provider negative attitudes that can impact provider-client interaction and the effectiveness of MMT. Future intervention efforts targeting MMT providers should be tailored by gender, provider type, and medical experiences.

  6. Power Delivery from an Actual Thermoelectric Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaibe, Hiromasa; Kajihara, Takeshi; Nagano, Kouji; Makino, Kazuya; Hachiuma, Hirokuni; Natsuume, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Similar to photovoltaic (PV) and fuel cells, thermoelectric generators (TEGs) supply direct-current (DC) power, essentially requiring DC/alternating current (AC) conversion for delivery as electricity into the grid network. Use of PVs is already well established through power conditioning systems (PCSs) that enable DC/AC conversion with maximum-power-point tracking, which enables commercial use by customers. From the economic, legal, and regulatory perspectives, a commercial PCS for PVs should also be available for TEGs, preferably as is or with just simple adjustment. Herein, we report use of a PV PCS with an actual TEG. The results are analyzed, and proper application for TEGs is proposed.

  7. Systematic Review of Outcome Measures Reported in Clinical Canine Osteoarthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Lucy; Dean, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To record and categorize the outcome measures used in dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA) by systematically reviewing the peer reviewed publications on OA in dogs. Study Design Systematic literature review. Study Population Peer reviewed literature on canine OA. Methods A computer‐based bibliographic search was performed on PubMed and CAB Abstracts in August 2013 to find peer reviewed publications relevant to canine OA. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The outcome measures reported within each publication were recorded and categorized for comparison. Adequately described outcome measures were assessed for uniqueness and evidence of prior validation. Results Of 3,697 publications identified and screened, 117 were deemed eligible for inclusion. Within eligible publications, outcome measures were used 618 times (median of 4 outcome measures per publication). Outcomes measured were divided into 5 groups containing 65 categories. The most frequently assessed outcomes were lameness assessment with no stated gait/mixed gaits (66 outcomes), radiography (58), and lameness single gait/lateral motion (55). Of 618 outcome measures reported, 491 were assessed for uniqueness and 348 (71%) were unique to a single publication. Ten outcome measures were reported to have been validated. Conclusion Many outcome measures have been used to assess canine OA. There is no consensus on which are the most useful outcomes or by which method they should be assessed. There is a pressing need for agreement on outcomes reporting in canine OA and for validation of outcome measures used for these assessments. Until consensus is reached, we recommend at least one validated outcome measure be used in every clinical study. PMID:27120270

  8. Impact of Exercise on Clinical Symptom Report and Neurocognition after Concussion in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Manikas, Vicky; Babl, Franz E; Hearps, Stephen; Dooley, Julian; Anderson, Vicki

    2017-03-21

    Recovery from concussion in childhood is poorly understood, despite its importance in decisions regarding return to normal activity. Resolution of post-concussive symptoms (PCS) is widely employed as a marker of recovery in clinical practice; however, it is unclear whether subtle impairments persist only to re-emerge in the context of increased physical or cognitive demands. This study aimed to examine the effect of strenuous exercise on clinical symptom report and neurocognition in children and adolescents after PCS resolution after concussion. We recruited children and adolescents with concussion (n = 30) on presentation to an Emergency Department (ED). At Day 2 and Day 10 post-self-reported symptom resolution, participants completed a strenuous exercise protocol, and pre- and post-exercise assessment of PCS and neurocognition. Results demonstrated an overall reduction in PCS from Day 2 to Day 10 post-symptom resolution, with no evidence of symptom increase after strenuous exercise at either time point. Neurocognitive performance was linked to task complexity: on less cognitively demanding tasks, processing speed was slower post-exercise and, unexpectedly, slower on Day 10 than Day 2, while for more demanding tasks (new learning), Day 2 exercise resulted in faster responses, but Day 10 processing speed post-exercise was slower. In summary, we found the expected recovery pattern for PCS, regardless of exercise, while for neurocognition, recovery was dependent on the degree of cognitive demand, and there was an unexpected reduction in performance from Day 2 to Day 10. Findings provide some suggestion that premature return to normal activities (e.g., school) may slow neurocognitive recovery.

  9. Clinical Spectrum of Stiff Person Syndrome: A Review of Recent Reports

    PubMed Central

    Sarva, Harini; Deik, Andres; Ullah, Aman; Severt, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Background “Classic” stiff person syndrome (SPS) features stiffness, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) antibodies, and other findings. Anti-GAD antibodies are also detected in some neurological syndromes (such as ataxia) in which stiffness is inconsistently present. Patients with otherwise “classic” SPS may either lack anti-GAD antibodies or be seropositive for others. Hence, SPS cases appear to fall within a clinical spectrum that includes conditions such as progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), which exhibits brainstem and autonomic features. We have compiled herein SPS-spectrum cases reported since 2010, and have segregated them on the basis of likely disease mechanism (autoimmune, paraneoplastic, or cryptogenic) for analysis. Methods The phrases “stiff person syndrome”, “PERM”, “anti-GAD antibody syndrome”, and “glycine receptor antibody neurological disorders” were searched for in PubMed in January 2015. The results were narrowed to 72 citations after excluding non-English and duplicate reports. Clinical descriptions, laboratory data, management, and outcomes were categorized, tabulated, and analyzed. Results Sixty-nine autoimmune, 19 paraneoplastic, and 13 cryptogenic SPS-spectrum cases were identified. SPS was the predominant diagnosis among the groups. Roughly two-thirds of autoimmune and paraneoplastic cases were female. Anti-GAD antibodies were most frequently identified, followed by anti-amphiphysin among paraneoplastic cases and by anti-glycine receptor antibodies among autoimmune cases. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly used medications. Prognosis seemed best for cryptogenic cases; malignancy worsened that of paraneoplastic cases. Discussion Grouping SPS-spectrum cases by pathophysiology provided insights into work-up, treatment, and prognosis. Ample phenotypic and serologic variations are present within the categories. Ruling out malignancy and autoimmunity is appropriate for suspected

  10. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM)

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. PMID:26188274

  11. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard.

  12. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  13. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  14. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  15. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  16. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  17. Inductive creation of an annotation schema for manually indexing clinical conditions from emergency department reports.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Wendy W; Dowling, John N

    2006-04-01

    Evaluating automated indexing applications requires comparing automatically indexed terms against manual reference standard annotations. However, there are no standard guidelines for determining which words from a textual document to include in manual annotations, and the vague task can result in substantial variation among manual indexers. We applied grounded theory to emergency department reports to create an annotation schema representing syntactic and semantic variables that could be annotated when indexing clinical conditions. We describe the annotation schema, which includes variables representing medical concepts (e.g., symptom, demographics), linguistic form (e.g., noun, adjective), and modifier types (e.g., anatomic location, severity). We measured the schema's quality and found: (1) the schema was comprehensive enough to be applied to 20 unseen reports without changes to the schema; (2) agreement between author annotators applying the schema was high, with an F measure of 93%; and (3) the authors made complementary errors when applying the schema, demonstrating that the schema incorporates both linguistic and medical expertise.

  18. Clinical management of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Seda; Ozel, Emre; Arukaslan, Goze; Tekce, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth with a follow-up for 18-months. A 35-year-old female patient was referred to our clinic with an extraoral sinus tract in the chin. The intraoral diagnosis revealed the fusion of her mandibular lateral incisors. Vitality pulp tests were negative for mandibular right central and lateral incisors. Radiographic examinations showed a fused tooth with two separate pulp chambers, two distinct roots, and two separate root canals. There were also periapical lesion of fused teeth and mandibular right central incisor, so endodontic treatment was carried out the related teeth. Radiographic examination revealed a complete healing of the lesion postoperatively at the end of 18-months. This paper reports the successful endodontic and restorative treatment of unilateral fused incisors. Because of the abnormal morphology of the crown and the complexity of the root canal system in fused teeth, treatment protocols require special attention. PMID:26962321

  19. [Rosai-Dorfman disease with spinal and cranial tumors. A clinical case reported].

    PubMed

    Molina-Carrión, Luis Enrique; Mendoza-Álvarez, Sergio Alberto; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia; Caldera-Duarte, Agustín; Lara-Torres, Héctor; Hernández-González, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease, known as well as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy, is a histiocytic proliferative disorder which may affect, with an extranodal presentation, the central nervous system, in 5 % of cases with exceptional reports of simultaneous development of spinal and cranial tumors. When it affects the central nervous system it appears more in men and it is shown as a mass in the cranial dura mater or in the spinal cord. The clinical symptoms of Rosai-Dorfman disease are fever, general malayse, weight loss, and nocturnal diaphoresis. Also, when Rosai-Dorfman disease affects the spinal cord, it has an impact on the thoracic spine, which causes paraparesis, quadriparesis, and sensory disorder. Histopathologically, the lymph nodes show emperipolesis. The diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease is usually good, since 40 % of the patients present a spontaneous remission if they are treated with oral corticosteroids, even though the lesion can be managed with fractionated radiotherapy or with radical surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old male who started with spinal injuries, and a year later showed intracranial lesions.

  20. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation-Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force.

    PubMed

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan; Burke, Laurie B

    2015-09-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient's health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment's benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is on the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a COA is to

  1. Discrepancy between financial disclosures of authors of clinical practice guidelines and reports by industry

    PubMed Central

    Andreatos, Nikolaos; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Muhammed, Maged; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is a substantial effort to increase the accuracy of conflicts of interest (COI) reporting, and reduce the influence of COI between physicians and industry, especially as it relates to clinical practice guidelines. We used the newly implemented Open Payments dataset to evaluate the accuracy of COI disclosures of authors of clinical practice guidelines that were either newly published or revised within 2014 and were included in the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) website (maintained by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). Authors were considered as having inaccurate COI disclosure if they had not reported all companies from which they had received funds >$5000 in the 12 months preceding the guideline's publication. We identified 223 guidelines that were either newly published (109/223; 48.9%) or revised (114/223; 51.1%) within 2014 and were included in the NGC website. Among the 1329 guideline authors with available Open Payments data, 523 received >$5000 from at least 1 healthcare-associated entity. However, only 56 out of the 523 authors (10.7%) were found to have accurate COI disclosure. The percentage of authors with accurate COI disclosure in revised guidelines was significantly lower than in newly published guidelines (6.8% vs 14.3%; P < 0.01) and was also found to differ between specialties. Furthermore, authors were less likely to inaccurately disclose “research payments” (37/49, 75.5%) compared to “general payments” (488/559, 87.3%, P = 0.02) as well as “other/associated research funding” (430/506, 85.0%, P = 0.08). No statistically significant association was detected between funding amount and disclosure accuracy. The majority of guideline authors lacked significant COIs, but among authors that received significant funds from at least 1 healthcare-associated entity the frequency of accurate disclosure was low. These findings indicate that the current process of disclosing COIs may be suboptimal

  2. Discrepancy between financial disclosures of authors of clinical practice guidelines and reports by industry.

    PubMed

    Andreatos, Nikolaos; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Muhammed, Maged; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    There is a substantial effort to increase the accuracy of conflicts of interest (COI) reporting, and reduce the influence of COI between physicians and industry, especially as it relates to clinical practice guidelines.We used the newly implemented Open Payments dataset to evaluate the accuracy of COI disclosures of authors of clinical practice guidelines that were either newly published or revised within 2014 and were included in the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) website (maintained by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). Authors were considered as having inaccurate COI disclosure if they had not reported all companies from which they had received funds >$5000 in the 12 months preceding the guideline's publication.We identified 223 guidelines that were either newly published (109/223; 48.9%) or revised (114/223; 51.1%) within 2014 and were included in the NGC website. Among the 1329 guideline authors with available Open Payments data, 523 received >$5000 from at least 1 healthcare-associated entity. However, only 56 out of the 523 authors (10.7%) were found to have accurate COI disclosure. The percentage of authors with accurate COI disclosure in revised guidelines was significantly lower than in newly published guidelines (6.8% vs 14.3%; P < 0.01) and was also found to differ between specialties. Furthermore, authors were less likely to inaccurately disclose "research payments" (37/49, 75.5%) compared to "general payments" (488/559, 87.3%, P = 0.02) as well as "other/associated research funding" (430/506, 85.0%, P = 0.08). No statistically significant association was detected between funding amount and disclosure accuracy.The majority of guideline authors lacked significant COIs, but among authors that received significant funds from at least 1 healthcare-associated entity the frequency of accurate disclosure was low. These findings indicate that the current process of disclosing COIs may be suboptimal and a proactive approach

  3. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  4. The Role of Technical Advances in the Adoption and Integration of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Roxanne E.; Rothrock, Nan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Spiegel, Brennan; Tucker, Carole A.; Crane, Heidi M.; Forrest, Christopher B.; Patrick, Donald L.; Fredericksen, Rob; Shulman, Lisa M.; Cella, David; Crane, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are gaining recognition as key measures for improving the quality of patient care in clinical care settings. Three factors have made the implementation of PROs in clinical care more feasible: increased use of modern measurement methods in PRO design and validation, rapid progression of technology (e.g., touch screen tablets, Internet accessibility, and electronic health records (EHRs)), and greater demand for measurement and monitoring of PROs by regulators, payers, accreditors, and professional organizations. As electronic PRO collection and reporting capabilities have improved, the challenges of collecting PRO data have changed. Objectives To update information on PRO adoption considerations in clinical care, highlighting electronic and technical advances with respect to measure selection, clinical workflow, data infrastructure, and outcomes reporting. Methods Five practical case studies across diverse healthcare settings and patient populations are used to explore how implementation barriers were addressed to promote the successful integration of PRO collection into the clinical workflow. The case studies address selecting and reporting of relevant content, workflow integration, pre-visit screening, effective evaluation, and EHR integration. Conclusions These case studies exemplify elements of well-designed electronic systems, including response automation, tailoring of item selection and reporting algorithms, flexibility of collection location, and integration with patient health care data elements. They also highlight emerging logistical barriers in this area, such as the need for specialized technological and methodological expertise, and design limitations of current electronic data capture systems. PMID:25588135

  5. Umbilical Pilonidal Sinus, an Underestimated and Little-Known Clinical Entity: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Mehmet; Kaplan, Elif Tugce; Kaplan, Tugba; Kaplan, Fatma Cigdem

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 26 • Female, 21 Final Diagnosis: Umbilical pilonidal sinus Symptoms: Hair tuft in the umbilicus • pain • periumbilical dermatitis • purulent discharge from the umbilicus • skin lesions • pruritis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Umbilicus preserving surgery Specialty: General Surgery • Dermatology • Plastic Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Umbilical pilonidal sinus (UPS) is a rare disease of young, hirsute, dark men with deep navels and poor personal hygiene. UPS could easily be misdiagnosed and mistreated due to its rarity and lack of awareness of the condition by physicians. However, the diagnosis is easy to establish with physical examination and a detailed history. Although it is being diagnosed and reported more frequently, there is still no consensus regarding best treatment options. Case Report: In this report, we present two cases of UPS, one in a man and one in a woman, who had typical symptoms of pain, swelling, and intermittent malodorous discharge from the umbilicus. They had small sinus openings with hair protruding deep in the navel. Because these two patients had previous histories of failed conservative treatments, an umbilicus preserving surgery was performed for both cases. Wounds were healed in 2–3 weeks with acceptable cosmetic results. During a more than 2 year follow-up period, there were no signs of recurrence. Conclusions: In a patient presenting with a history of intermittent discharge, itching, pain, or bleeding from the umbilicus and the presence of granulation tissue with or without protruding hair and periumbilical dermatitis, the diagnosis should consider UPS, even in female patients. Treatment generally depends on the severity of the disease, ranging from good personal hygiene to surgical excision of umbilical complex. The treatment of choice for chronic intermittent cases is surgical removal of the affected portion; paying special attention to cosmetic appearance. PMID

  6. National cataract surgery survey 1997-8: a report of the results of the clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Desai, P.; Minassian, D; Reidy, A.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—A national survey of over 100 hospitals in the UK was carried out to collect routine clinical information on the outcomes of cataract surgery. The clinical outcomes of interest were: visual acuity at time of discharge from postoperative hospital follow up, visual acuity at time of final refraction; complications related to surgery occurring during the operation, within 48 hours of surgery, and within 3 months of surgery. In addition, information on age and comorbidity was obtained. This article reports on the findings of the experience of approximately 18 000 patients who had cataract surgery in the hospital eye service of the NHS.
RESULTS—Of those with no ocular comorbidity, 85% achieved a visual acuity of 6/12 or better on discharge from postoperative hospital follow up, while 65% of patients with a serious co-existing eye disease achieved this level of acuity at this time. At final refraction, 92% of patients without ocular comorbidity and 77% of patients with ocular comorbidity achieved 6/12 or better visual acuity. The following main risk indicators were associated with visual outcomes and complications related to surgery: age, other eye diseases, diabetes and stroke, type of surgical procedure, and grade of surgeon.
CONCLUSIONS—The acceptability of these findings could fruitfully be the subject of discussion within the ophthalmic community and hopefully issues arising out of the study can lead to research, especially in-depth studies of the outcomes of cataract surgery in those patients with co-existing serious eye conditions.

 PMID:10574810

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside clinical trials II-An ISPOR Good Research Practices Task Force report.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Scott D; Willke, Richard J; Glick, Henry; Reed, Shelby D; Augustovski, Federico; Jonsson, Bengt; Briggs, Andrew; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-03-01

    Clinical trials evaluating medicines, medical devices, and procedures now commonly assess the economic value of these interventions. The growing number of prospective clinical/economic trials reflects both widespread interest in economic information for new technologies and the regulatory and reimbursement requirements of many countries that now consider evidence of economic value along with clinical efficacy. As decision makers increasingly demand evidence of economic value for health care interventions, conducting high-quality economic analyses alongside clinical studies is desirable because they broaden the scope of information available on a particular intervention, and can efficiently provide timely information with high internal and, when designed and analyzed properly, reasonable external validity. In 2005, ISPOR published the Good Research Practices for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Alongside Clinical Trials: The ISPOR RCT-CEA Task Force report. ISPOR initiated an update of the report in 2014 to include the methodological developments over the last 9 years. This report provides updated recommendations reflecting advances in several areas related to trial design, selecting data elements, database design and management, analysis, and reporting of results. Task force members note that trials should be designed to evaluate effectiveness (rather than efficacy) when possible, should include clinical outcome measures, and should obtain health resource use and health state utilities directly from study subjects. Collection of economic data should be fully integrated into the study. An incremental analysis should be conducted with an intention-to-treat approach, complemented by relevant subgroup analyses. Uncertainty should be characterized. Articles should adhere to established standards for reporting results of cost-effectiveness analyses. Economic studies alongside trials are complementary to other evaluations (e.g., modeling studies) as information for decision

  8. Patterns of Technology Use in Patients Attending a Cardiopulmonary Outpatient Clinic: A Self-Report Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-management education for cardiopulmonary diseases is primarily provided through time-limited, face-to-face programs, with access limited to a small percentage of patients. Telecommunication tools will increasingly be an important component of future health care delivery. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of technology use in patients attending a cardiopulmonary clinic in an academic medical center. Methods A prevalence survey was developed to collect data on participant demographics (age in years, sex, and socioeconomic status); access to computers, Internet, and mobile phones; and use of current online health support sites or programs. Surveys were offered by reception staff to all patients attending the outpatient clinic. Results A total of 123 surveys were collected between March and April 2014. Technological devices were a pervasive part of everyday life with respondents engaged in regular computer (102/123, 82.9%), mobile telephone (115/117, 98.3%), and Internet (104/121, 86.0%) use. Emailing (101/121, 83.4%), researching and reading news articles (93/121, 76.9%), social media (71/121, 58.7%), and day-to-day activities (65/121, 53.7%) were the most common telecommunication activities. The majority of respondents reported that access to health support programs and assistance through the Internet (82/111, 73.9%) would be of use, with benefits reported as better understanding of health information (16/111, 22.5%), avoidance of difficult travel requirements and time-consuming face-to-face appointments (13/111, 18.3%), convenient and easily accessible help and information (12/111, 16.9%), and access to peer support and sharing (9/111, 12.7%). The majority of patients did not have concerns over participating in the online environment (87/111, 78.4%); the few concerns noted related to privacy and security (10/15), information accuracy (2/15), and computer literacy and access (2/15). Conclusions Chronic disease burden and

  9. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: VI. The 2014 Clinical Trial Design Working Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul J.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Przepiorka, Donna; Horowitz, Mary M.; Koreth, John; Vogelsang, Georgia B.; Walker, Irwin; Carpenter, Paul A.; Griffith, Linda M.; Akpek, Gorgun; Mohty, Mohamad; Wolff, Daniel; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Cutler, Corey S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of chronic GVHD is intended to produce a sustainable benefit by reducing symptom burden, controlling objective manifestations of disease activity, preventing damage and impairment, and improving overall survival without causing disproportionate harms related to the treatment itself. Successful management can control the disease until systemic treatment is no longer needed. The complexity of the disease, the extended duration of follow-up needed to observe disease resolution and withdrawal of immunosuppressive treatment, and the lack of fully developed shorter-term endpoints impede progress in the field. Identification and characterization of primary endpoints demonstrating clinical benefit without the need for years of follow-up is an urgent need, with the understanding that clinical benefit encompasses not only the self-evident benefit of the primary endpoint but also any other associated benefits. This report discusses regulatory considerations, eligibility criteria, the value of controlled trial designs, the merits of proposed primary endpoints, and key considerations elaborated from experience and progress during the past decade. The report concludes by mapping an overall approach that could support and lead to maximally informative clinical trials, especially those that seek to demonstrate clinical benefit along a pathway to regulatory review and approval. PMID:25985921

  10. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: VI. The 2014 Clinical Trial Design Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul J; Lee, Stephanie J; Przepiorka, Donna; Horowitz, Mary M; Koreth, John; Vogelsang, Georgia B; Walker, Irwin; Carpenter, Paul A; Griffith, Linda M; Akpek, Gorgun; Mohty, Mohamad; Wolff, Daniel; Pavletic, Steven Z; Cutler, Corey S

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease is intended to produce a sustainable benefit by reducing symptom burden, controlling objective manifestations of disease activity, preventing damage and impairment, and improving overall survival without causing disproportionate harms related to the treatment itself. Successful management can control the disease until systemic treatment is no longer needed. The complexity of the disease, the extended duration of follow-up needed to observe disease resolution and withdrawal of immunosuppressive treatment, and the lack of fully developed shorter term endpoints impede progress in the field. Identification and characterization of primary endpoints demonstrating clinical benefit without requiring years of follow-up is urgently needed, with the understanding that clinical benefit encompasses not only the self-evident benefit of the primary endpoint but also any other associated benefits. This report discusses regulatory considerations, eligibility criteria, the value of controlled trial designs, the merits of proposed primary endpoints, and key considerations elaborated from experience and progress during the past decade. The report concludes by mapping an overall approach that could support and lead to maximally informative clinical trials, especially those that seek to demonstrate clinical benefit along a pathway to regulatory review and approval.

  11. Restorative management using hybrid ceramic of a patient with severe tooth erosion from swimming: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report presents the clinical appearance and treatment approach in a case of excessive anterior teeth erosion resulted from swimming in a poorly-chlorinated swimming pool. Clinical findings revealed tooth sensitivity, severe enamel erosion resembling veneer preparations, and the presence of anterior open bite. A novel hybrid ceramic (Vita Enamic) was chosen for fabricating full-coverage crowns for this patient. After 6-months follow-up, the tooth sensitivity disappeared and the patient was satisfied with esthetic outcome. The hybrid ceramic restorations can be recommended with no complications. PMID:25352965

  12. [Current biosafety in clinical laboratories in Japan: report of questionnaires' data obtained from clinical laboratory personnel in Japan].

    PubMed

    Goto, Mieko; Yamashita, Tomonari; Misawa, Shigeki; Komori, Toshiaki; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Takahashi, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    To determine the status of biosafety in clinical laboratories in Japan, we conducted a survey using questionnaires on the biosafety of laboratory personnel in 2004. We obtained data from 431 hospitals (response: 59.5%). Respondents were 301 institutions (70%) having biological safety cabinets (BSCs). BSCs were held in 78% of microbiological laboratories, 7.9% of genetic laboratories, 2.7% of histopathological laboratories, and 1% or less at other laboratories. A clean bench in examination rooms for acid-fast bacilli was applied at 20 hospitals. We found 28 cases of possible laboratory-associated tuberculosis infection, 25 of which were associated with lack of BSC. Other risk factors were immature skills and insufficiently skilled eguipment operation. The frequency of rupture accidents during specimen centrifugation was 67% in dealing with blood and 9.7% in collecting acid-fast bacilli. Half or more accidents were related to inadequate sample tube materials. Technologists were shown to be working on blood collection in many hospitals (75%), and 1,534 events of self-inflicted needle puncture developed in the last 5 years. These results suggest that biosafety systems are woefully lacking or inadequate in clinical laboratories in Japan and must be established at the earliest possible opportunity.

  13. What Writing Represents What Scientists Actually Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Often the writing that students in elementary school do in connection with science is their final report of a science fair project. They diligently file a report in the form of the scientific method--introduction, hypothesis, materials, procedure, results, and conclusion. This form of science writing persists through college courses in science,…

  14. New EMA report on paliperidone 3-month injections: taking clinical and policy decisions without an adequate evidence base.

    PubMed

    Ostuzzi, G; Papola, D; Gastaldon, C; Barbui, C

    2016-12-22

    Three-month long-acting paliperidone is a new, recently marketed, formulation of paliperidone, characterised by the longest available dosing interval among long-acting antipsychotics. The clinical profile of 3-month long-acting paliperidone was recently summarised by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in a public assessment report, released in April 2016. In this commentary, the main strengths and limitations of the EMA assessment report were appraised and discussed, in order to highlight possible implications for clinical practice, future research and regulatory practices for drug approval.

  15. Reporting of missing data and methods used to accommodate them in recent analgesic clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; McDermott, Michael P; McKeown, Andrew; Smith, Shannon M; Williams, Mark R; Hunsinger, Matthew; Farrar, John; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2014-09-01

    Missing data in clinical trials can bias estimates of treatment effects. Statisticians and government agencies recommend making every effort to minimize missing data. Although statistical methods are available to accommodate missing data, their validity depends on often untestable assumptions about why the data are missing. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency with which randomized clinical trials published in 3 major pain journals (ie, European Journal of Pain, Journal of Pain, and Pain) reported strategies to prevent missing data, the number of participants who completed the study (ie, completers), and statistical methods to accommodate missing data. A total of 161 randomized clinical trials investigating treatments for pain, published between 2006 and 2012, were included. Approximately two-thirds of the trials reported at least 1 method that could potentially minimize missing data, the most common being allowance of concomitant medications. Only 61% of the articles explicitly reported the number of patients who were randomized and completed the trial. Although only 14 articles reported that all randomized participants completed the study, fewer than 50% of the articles reported a statistical method to accommodate missing data. Last observation carried forward imputation was used most commonly (42%). Thirteen articles reported more than 1 method to accommodate missing data; however, the majority of methods, including last observation carried forward, were not methods currently recommended by statisticians. Authors, reviewers, and editors should prioritize proper reporting of missing data and appropriate use of methods to accommodate them so as to improve the deficiencies identified in this systematic review.

  16. Clinical Characteristics of Adults with Asperger's Syndrome Assessed with Self-Report Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanai, Chieko; Iwanami, Akira; Ota, Haruhisa; Yamasue, Hidenori; Matsushima, Eisuke; Yokoi, Hideki; Shinohara, Kazuyuki; Kato, Nobumasa

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome (AS) in adults is difficult, and clinical sample-based studies that systematically illustrate the clinical characteristics of adult AS patients are needed so that appropriate treatment can be provided. Here we examined the clinical characteristics of AS in 112 adults (median age, 28.0 years [range, 18-52]; 71 men…

  17. Guidelines for Clinical Experiences in Health Occupations Education. Information Series: Report No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Norma J., Ed.; Johnson, Lois H., Ed.

    This manual is intended to assist health occupations education (HOE) teachers in planning clinical experiences for their students. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the purpose, philosophy, and legal aspects of clinical experiences in HOE; the HOE clinical structure (teacher qualifications, the role of the…

  18. Clinically relevant enhancement of human sperm motility using compounds with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor activity

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Steve; Madamidola, Oladipo A.; Brown, Sean G.; Frame, Lorna; Lefièvre, Linda; Wyatt, Paul G.; Barratt, Christopher L.R.; Martins Da Silva, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can we identify compound(s) with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI) activity that could be added to human spermatozoa in vitro to enhance their motility without compromising other sperm functions? SUMMARY ANSWER We have identified several compounds that produce robust and effective stimulation of sperm motility and, importantly, have a positive response on patient samples. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY For >20 years, the use of non-selective PDEIs, such as pentoxifylline, has been known to influence the motility of human spermatozoa; however, conflicting results have been obtained. It is now clear that human sperm express several different phosphodiesterases and these are compartmentalized at different regions of the cells. By using type-specific PDEIs, differential modulation of sperm motility may be achieved without adversely affecting other functions such as the acrosome reaction (AR). STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This was a basic medical research study examining sperm samples from normozoospermic donors and subfertile patients attending the Assisted Conception Unit (ACU), Ninewells Hospital Dundee for diagnostic semen analysis, IVF and ICSI. Phase 1 screened 43 commercially available compounds with reported PDEI activity to identify lead compounds that stimulate sperm motility. Samples were exposed (20 min) to three concentrations (1, 10 and 100 µM) of compound, and selected candidates (n = 6) progressed to Phase 2, which provided a more comprehensive assessment using a battery of in vitro sperm function tests. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All healthy donors and subfertile patients were recruited at the Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee and ACU, Ninewells Hospital Dundee (ethical approval 08/S1402/6). In Phase 1, poor motility cells recovered from the 40% interface of the discontinuous density gradient were used as surrogates for patient samples. Pooled samples from three to four different donors were utilized in

  19. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2): a clinical report with review of previous cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Faruq, Mohammed; Mukerji, Mitali; Dwivedi, Manish Kumar; Pruthi, Sumit; Kapoor, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I is a heterogeneous group of spinocerebellar ataxias with variable neurologic presentations, with age of onset varying from infancy to adulthood. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I is composed mainly of 3 prevalent spinocerebellar ataxia types with different pathogenic loci, specifically spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (6p24-p23), spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (12q24.1), and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (14q32.1). The shared pathogenic mutational event is the expansion of the CAG repeat that results in polyglutamine extended stretches in the encoded proteins. CAG repeat disorders generally show the phenomenon of anticipation, which is more often associated with paternal transmission. In this report, we describe a patient with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (~320 CAG repeat) who inherited the disease from his father (47 CAG repeats). We have summarized the clinical, neuroimaging, electroencephalographic (EEG), and molecular data of previous cases and attempt to highlight the most consistent findings. Our intent is to help treating clinicians to suspect this disorder and to offer timely genetic counseling for a currently potentially untreatable disorder.

  20. Extracting subject demographic information from abstracts of randomized clinical trial reports.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Garten, Yael; Supekar, Kaustubh S; Das, Amar K; Altman, Russ B; Garber, Alan M

    2007-01-01

    In order to make more informed healthcare decisions, consumers need information systems that deliver accurate and reliable information about their illnesses and potential treatments. Reports of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) provide reliable medical evidence about the efficacy of treatments. Current methods to access, search for, and retrieve RCTs are keyword-based, time-consuming, and suffer from poor precision. Personalized semantic search and medical evidence summarization aim to solve this problem. The performance of these approaches may improve if they have access to study subject descriptors (e.g. age, gender, and ethnicity), trial sizes, and diseases/symptoms studied. We have developed a novel method to automatically extract such subject demographic information from RCT abstracts. We used text classification augmented with a Hidden Markov Model to identify sentences containing subject demographics, and subsequently these sentences were parsed using Natural Language Processing techniques to extract relevant information. Our results show accuracy levels of 82.5%, 92.5%, and 92.0% for extraction of subject descriptors, trial sizes, and diseases/symptoms descriptors respectively.

  1. [Kampo medicines as useful therapeutic agents in clinical practice of neurology: case reports & representative medicines].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Doctors in any department should have at least minimum knowledge of Kampo medicines. However, doctors who specialize in neurology often have inadequate knowledge of Kampo medicines. The efficacy of Kampo medicines in treating intractable diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases is not adequately understood and needs to be investigated in the future. On the other hand, Kampo medicines are often effective for treating common symptoms such as headache, dysesthesia, pain, and vertigo, encountered in daily medical practice. Because many patients suffer from these symptoms, the impact of these symptoms on our society is not small, even though the causes of these symptoms are not crucial. Having the skill to prescribe even a dozen or so Kampo medicines (for example, goshuyuto, goreisan, goshajinkigan, sokeikakketsuto) increases the treatment options and may be very beneficial in daily medical practice. In this article, I provide instructions on the use of representative Kampo medicines and present some case reports to elucidate their use. Amassing and sharing clinical experiences regarding the use of Kampo medicines would strengthen the medical evidences of Kampo medicines.

  2. Patient and provider priorities for self-reported domains of HIV clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Todd; Crane, Heidi M.; Crane, Paul K.; Merlin, Jessica; Gibbons, Laura E.; Rao, Deepa; Batey, D. Scott; Dant, Lydia; Páez, Edgar; Church, Anna; Patrick, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to understand how HIV-infected patients, their providers, and HIV care researchers prioritize self-reported domains of clinical care. Participants rank-ordered two lists of domains. A modified Delphi process was used for providers and researchers. Approximately 25% of patients were interviewed to discuss rationale for rank order choices. List 1 included anger, anxiety, depression, fatigue, physical function, pain, and sleep disturbance. List 2 included alcohol abuse, cognitive function, HIV stigma, HIV and treatment symptoms, medication adherence, positive affect, sexual risk behavior, sexual function, social roles, spirituality/meaning of life, and substance abuse. Seventy-four providers, 80 HIV care researchers and 66 patients participated. Patients ranked context-based domains, such as HIV stigma, more highly than providers, while health behaviors, such as drug or alcohol use, ranked lower. Patients described a need to address wider-context challenges such as HIV stigma in order to positively impact health behaviors. Divergent patient and provider priorities highlights the importance of incorporating views from all stakeholders and suggests the need for a care approach that more effectively addresses contextual barriers to adverse health behaviors. PMID:26304263

  3. Integrating Genomic Based Information into Clinical Warfarin (Coumadin®) Management: An Illustrative Case Report

    PubMed Central

    LaSala, Anthony; Bower, Bruce; Windemuth, Andreas; White, C. Michael; Kocherla, Mohan; Seip, Richard; Duconge, Jorge; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2013-01-01

    Warfarin is a well established oral anticoagulant for the treatment of thromboembolic disorders. Warfarin therapy is complicated by a narrow therapeutic index and marked inter-individual dose variability with therapeutic doses ranging from 1 mg to 10 mg/day.1 Recently genetic variation and resultant drug metabolizing polymorphisms have been found to contribute to warfarin dose variability with resultant hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications. Cytochrome P450 2C9 alters the rate of warfarin metabolism and clearance. A second enzyme, vitamin K epoxide reductase comple (VKOR) binds and reduces vitamin K which is necessary for activation of clotting Factors II, VII, IX and X. The VKORC1 gene encodes for vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, a key component of VKOR. The combination of physiologic factors (30%), CYP2C9 variations (20%) and VKORC1 variants (25%) accounts for approximately 75% of warfarin dose variability. This illustrative case report demonstrates the clinical importance of this new information. Clinicians need to incorporate these new genomic findings into appropriate management of warfarin dose anticoagulation. PMID:18763667

  4. Aspartame and seizure susceptibility: results of a clinical study in reportedly sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A J; Shaywitz, B A; Tuchman, L; French, J A; Luciano, D; Sullivan, C M

    1995-03-01

    The high intensity sweetener aspartame has been implicated anecdotally in seizure provocation. This possibility was investigated with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. After an extensive search, 18 individuals (16 adults and 2 children) who had seizures allegedly related to aspartame consumption were admitted to adult or pediatric epilepsy monitoring units where their EEG was monitored continuously for 5 days. Aspartame (50 mg/kg) or identically enpackaged placebo was administered in divided doses at 0800, 1000, and 1200 h on study days 2 and 4. All meals were uniformly standardized on treatment days. No clinical seizures or other adverse experiences were observed after aspartame ingestion. Mean plasma phenylalanine (Phe) concentrations increased significantly after aspartame ingestion (83.6 microM) as compared with placebo (52.3 microM). Results suggest that aspartame, in acute dosage of approximately 50 mg/kg, is no more likely than placebo to cause seizures in individuals who reported that their seizures were provoked by aspartame consumption.

  5. Clinical Features of Reported Ethylene Glycol Exposures in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jobson, Meghan A.; Hogan, Susan L.; Maxwell, Colin S.; Hu, Yichun; Hladik, Gerald A.; Falk, Ronald J.; Beuhler, Michael C.; Pendergraft, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethylene glycol is highly toxic and represents an important cause of poisonings worldwide. Toxicity can result in central nervous system dysfunction, cardiovascular compromise, elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis and acute kidney injury. Many states have passed laws requiring addition of the bittering agent, denatonium benzoate, to ethylene glycol solutions to reduce severity of exposures. The objectives of this study were to identify differences between unintentional and intentional exposures and to evaluate the utility of denatonium benzoate as a deterrent. Methods and Findings Using the National Poison Data System, we performed a retrospective analysis of reported cases of ethylene glycol exposures from January 2006 to December 2013. Outcome classification was summed for intentionality and used as a basis for comparison of effect groups. There were 45,097 cases of ethylene glycol exposures resulting in 154 deaths. Individuals more likely to experience major effects or death were older, male, and presented with more severe symptoms requiring higher levels of care. Latitude and season did not correlate with increased exposures; however, there were more exposures in rural areas. Denatonium benzoate use appeared to have no effect on exposure severity or number. Conclusion Deaths due to ethylene glycol exposure were uncommon; however, there were major clinical effects and more exposures in rural areas. Addition of denatonium benzoate was not associated with a reduction in exposures. Alternative means to deter ingestion are needed. These findings suggest the need to consider replacing ethylene glycol with alternative and less toxic agents. PMID:26566024

  6. Clinical Characteristics of Streptococcus Pneumoniae Meningoencephalitis after Transsphenoidal Surgery: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Nobuyuki; FUKUHARA, Noriaki; FUKUI, Takahito; YAMAGUCHI-OKADA, Mitsuo; NISHIOKA, Hiroshi; YAMADA, Shozo

    2014-01-01

    We report three extremely rare cases of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis (SPM) after transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). Between 2004 and 2010, we experienced three cases of severe SPM after surgery out of 1,965 patients undergoing TSS (0.15%). The three cases included a 4-year-old boy with a large cystic craniopharyngioma, a 40-year-old man with a non-functioning pituitary adenoma, and a 55-year-old man with acromegaly. The similarity among these SPM patients was that severe clinical events occurred suddenly 1–2 months postoperatively without any history of sinusitis or pneumonia. Despite intensive care these patients notably had residual neurological sequelae. In no case was rhinorrhea associated with SPM. It should be noted that SPM was not detected from bacterial cultures of the sphenoidal sinus mucous membranes (BCSM) obtained during TSS in two of the patients examined. Severe postoperative SPM can occur suddenly without cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage within 2 months after surgery and requires emergency treatment. Reduced resistance to infection may play a role in the occurrence of SPM in our three patients. Our study indicates that BCSM is not useful for predicting postoperative meningitis. PMID:24418784

  7. American Society of Clinical Oncology National Census of Oncology Practices: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Forte, Gaetano J; Hanley, Amy; Hagerty, Karen; Kurup, Anupama; Neuss, Michael N; Mulvey, Therese M

    2013-01-01

    In response to reports of increasing financial and administrative burdens on oncology practices and a lack of systematic information related to these issues, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) leadership started an effort to collect key practice-level data from all oncology practices in the United States. The result of the effort is the ASCO National Census of Oncology Practices (Census) launched in June 2012. The initial Census work involved compiling an inventory of oncology practices from existing lists of oncology physicians in the United States. A comprehensive, online data collection instrument was developed, which covered a number of areas, including practice characteristics (staffing configuration, organizational structure, patient mix and volume, types of services offered); organizational, staffing, and service changes over the past 12 months; and an assessment of the likelihood that the practice would experience organizational, staffing, and service changes in the next 12 months. More than 600 practices participated in the Census by providing information. In this article, we present preliminary highlights from the data gathered to date. We found that practice size was related to having experienced practice mergers, hiring additional staff, and increasing staff pay in the past 12 months, that geographic location was related to having experienced hiring additional staff, and that practices in metropolitan areas were more likely to have experienced practice mergers in the past 12 months than those in nonmetropolitan areas. We also found that practice size and geographic location were related to higher likelihoods of anticipating practice mergers, sales, and purchases in the future.

  8. Myometrial hyperplasia mimics the clinical presentation of uterine fibroids: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Patricia M; Cramer, Stewart F; Leppert, Phyllis C

    2013-11-01

    The clinical diagnosis of fibroid uterus is based on physical examination findings and/or ultrasound. However, it is not uncommon for routine pathology examination to report no significant fibroids in such cases. Myometrial hyperplasia (MMH) is a structural variation with irregular zones of hypercellularity and increased nucleus/cell ratio that appears in adolescence, can progress during the childbearing years, and can sometimes cause grossly detectable bulges on pathologic examination. MMH can be inframucosal, intramural (microscopic), or subserosal. Three premenopausal women with a preoperative diagnosis of fibroids on pelvic examination, and/or sonograms, underwent hysterectomies. In all the 3 cases, the Myoma Index (number of fibroids×size of largest fibroid) indicated insignificant fibroids. The pathology simulating fibroids was firm, bulging inframucosal MMH. Firm, bulging MMH can mimic uterine fibroids on ultrasound and physical examination. In hysterectomies for fibroid uterus with a Myoma Index <3.7, it is recommended that pathologists evaluate for MMH as the possible explanation for the findings on physical examination and/or ultrasound.

  9. Mandibular pathological fracture during treatment with a dynamic mouth opening device: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Marunick, Mark T; Garcia-Gazaui, Sabrina; Hildebrand, Joseph M

    2016-10-01

    Trismus is a well-known complication of head and neck cancer treatment. It is defined as a progressive tonic contraction of the muscles of mastication that results in decreased mouth opening. This condition can lead to impairment of speech and eating, malnutrition, poor oral hygiene, and difficulty with dental treatment. Its prevalence in patients with head and neck cancer ranges from 5% to 38%. Different treatments are available to improve muscle length and function. Mouth opening devices along with exercising of the mandible immediately after surgery and/or radiation therapy have been found to be effective in reducing the trismus induced by cancer therapy. Presently, only limited defined guidelines are available for initiating or monitoring trismus therapy in this patient population. This clinical report presents a patient with head and neck cancer and a history of progressive recurrent trismus as a sequela of extensive surgery and chemoradiation, who experienced a pathological fracture of the mandible during treatment with a mouth opening device.

  10. Full-mouth rehabilitation for a patient with dentinogenesis imperfecta: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bencharit, Sompop; Border, Michael B; Mack, C Russell; Byrd, Warren C; Wright, John T

    2014-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is a genetic disorder affecting the structural integrity of the dentin that can result in weakened dentin. The affected teeth, especially posterior teeth, often need to be extracted due to severe wear or fracture. This frequently yields a loss of posterior occlusion and occlusal vertical dimension. Besides wear and fracture, anterior teeth often have an unesthetic appearance because of discoloration. Current treatments of choice, including composite bonding restorations and, more recently, all-ceramic restorations, are typically suggested to preserve the remaining teeth and tooth structure. However, there are a limited number of studies on dental implants in patients with DI. The effectiveness of dentin bonding and dental implants in patients with DI is not known. This clinical report describes a 32-year-old Asian woman with DI who underwent full-mouth rehabilitation. The posterior occlusion, mostly in the molar areas, was restored with dental implants and ceramometal restorations. The anterior teeth and premolars were restored with bonded lithium disilicate glass-ceramic pressed veneers and crowns made with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing. This case demonstrates that restoring functional occlusion and esthetics for a patient with DI can be completed successfully using contemporary implant therapy and adhesive dentistry.

  11. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Following Clinical Islet Transplantation: Report of the First Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anthea; Olateju, Tolu; Deschenes, Jean; Shankarnarayan, Santosh H; Chua, Neil; Shapiro, A M James; Senior, Peter

    2017-04-08

    We report the first two cases of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in recipients of islet transplants worldwide. First, a 44-year old recipient of 3 islet infusions developed PTLD 80 months after his initial transplant, presenting with abdominal pain and diffuse terminal ileum thickening on imaging. He was treated with surgical excision, reduction of immunosuppression and rituximab. Seven months later he developed central nervous system PTLD, presenting with vertigo and diplopia; immunosuppression was discontinued, resulting in graft loss, and he was given high-dose methotrexate and consolidative autologous stem cell transplant. He remains in remission 37 months after initial diagnosis. Second, a 58-year old female recipient of 2 islet infusions developed PTLD 24 months after initial islet infusion, presenting with pancytopenia secondary to extensive bone marrow involvement. Immunosuppression was discontinued, resulting in graft loss, and she received rituximab and chemotherapy, achieving complete remission. Both cases were monomorphic B-cell PTLD subtype by histology and negative for EBV in tissue or blood. These cases document the first occurrences of this rare complication in islet transplant, likely secondary to prolonged, intensive immunosuppression, and highlight the variable clinical manifestations of PTLD. Further studies are needed to determine incidence rate and risk factors in islet transplantation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Adverse event assessment, analysis, and reporting in recent published analgesic clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon M; Wang, Anthony T; Katz, Nathaniel P; McDermott, Michael P; Burke, Laurie B; Coplan, Paul; Gilron, Ian; Hertz, Sharon H; Lin, Allison H; Rappaport, Bob A; Rowbotham, Michael C; Sampaio, Cristina; Sweeney, Michael; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    The development of valid and informative treatment risk-benefit profiles requires consistent and thorough information about adverse event (AE) assessment and participants' AEs during randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Despite a 2004 extension of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement recommending the specific AE information that investigators should report, there is little evidence that analgesic RCTs adequately adhere to these recommendations. This systematic review builds on prior recommendations by describing a comprehensive checklist for AE reporting developed to capture clinically important AE information. Using this checklist, we coded AE assessment methods and reporting in all 80 double-blind RCTs of noninvasive pharmacologic treatments published in the European Journal of Pain, Journal of Pain, and PAIN® from 2006 to 2011. Across all trials, reports of AEs were frequently incomplete, inconsistent across trials, and, in some cases, missing. For example, >40% of trials failed to report any information on serious adverse events. Trials of participants with acute or chronic pain conditions and industry-sponsored trials typically provided more and better-quality AE data than trials involving pain-free volunteers or trials that were not industry sponsored. The results of this review suggest that improved AE reporting is needed in analgesic RCTs. We developed an ACTTION (Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks) AE reporting checklist that is intended to assist investigators in thoroughly and consistently capturing and reporting these critically important data in publications.

  13. Mother and father self-reports of corporal punishment and severe physical aggression toward clinic-referred youth.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, A; Donnelly, W O; Lewis, T; Maynard, C

    2000-06-01

    Examined the extent to which 359 mothers and 140 fathers of clinic-referred youth (ages 2 to 17) reported using corporal punishment and severe physical aggression when asked directly via intake screening questionnaires at a community mental health center; higher prevalence rates emerged compared to families in the general population. Clinic-referred parents reported greater use of corporal punishment for younger relative to older youth, sons relative to daughters, and by single relative to married mothers. In cases with reports from both parents, mothers used corporal punishment more frequently than fathers. Demographic factors were not linked to severe physical aggression, except for mothers' treatment of sons versus daughters. After controlling for demographic factors, maternal and paternal reports of child externalizing behavior accounted for significant variance in their own and their partner's use of corporal punishment, and in mothers' use of severe physical aggression.

  14. Food-borne botulism: still actual topic

    PubMed Central

    Brola, Waldemar; Fudala, Malgorzata; Gacek, Szymon; Gruenpeter, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    Even though since the mid-1990s the number of food-borne botulism cases has systematically decreased and it now occurs in Poland relatively rarely, it is still a real epidemiological problem. There are about 30 cases of botulism in Poland a year, which ranks Poland the first among the European Union. In most cases the symptomatology of botulism is typical, however it does not always fully coincide with the one described in medical manuals which emphasise the dramatic clinical course of botulism with its frequent fatal consequences. Diagnosis of botulism may be difficult because of its rare prevalence and a variable clinical course, especially in old patients. Authors of this paper describe two cases of botulism and diagnostic problems associated with it. PMID:23391950

  15. Food-borne botulism: still actual topic.

    PubMed

    Brola, Waldemar; Fudala, Malgorzata; Gacek, Szymon; Gruenpeter, Pawel

    2013-02-06

    Even though since the mid-1990s the number of food-borne botulism cases has systematically decreased and it now occurs in Poland relatively rarely, it is still a real epidemiological problem. There are about 30 cases of botulism in Poland a year, which ranks Poland the first among the European Union. In most cases the symptomatology of botulism is typical, however it does not always fully coincide with the one described in medical manuals which emphasise the dramatic clinical course of botulism with its frequent fatal consequences. Diagnosis of botulism may be difficult because of its rare prevalence and a variable clinical course, especially in old patients. Authors of this paper describe two cases of botulism and diagnostic problems associated with it.

  16. Intraosseous Myoepithelial Carcinoma of Mandible- A Case Report with Clinical, Radiological, Histopathologic and Immuno-Histochemical Features

    PubMed Central

    K, Vandana Shenoy; Kengagsubbiah, Srivatsa; Kumar, Senthil; V, Sathyabhama

    2014-01-01

    The primary central salivary gland neoplasms of the mandible are rare. They look clinically and radiographically similar to the odontogenic tumours or cysts which are common in the mandible. Myoepithelial carcinoma is a malignant counter part of myoepithelioma. Their diagnosis mainly depends only on thorough histopathological examination. This paper is to report a case of extra salivary tumour, intraosseous myoepithelial carcinoma of right ramus of the mandible. This case report serves to increase awareness and improve the index of diagnosis. PMID:25302285

  17. A systematic review of the reporting of Data Monitoring Committees' roles, interim analysis and early termination in pediatric clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Decisions about interim analysis and early stopping of clinical trials, as based on recommendations of Data Monitoring Committees (DMCs), have far reaching consequences for the scientific validity and clinical impact of a trial. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency and quality of the reporting on DMC composition and roles, interim analysis and early termination in pediatric trials. Methods We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled clinical trials published from 2005 to 2007 in a sample of four general and four pediatric journals. We used full-text databases to identify trials which reported on DMCs, interim analysis or early termination, and included children or adolescents. Information was extracted on general trial characteristics, risk of bias, and a set of parameters regarding DMC composition and roles, interim analysis and early termination. Results 110 of the 648 pediatric trials in this sample (17%) reported on DMC or interim analysis or early stopping, and were included; 68 from general and 42 from pediatric journals. The presence of DMCs was reported in 89 of the 110 included trials (81%); 62 papers, including 46 of the 89 that reported on DMCs (52%), also presented information about interim analysis. No paper adequately reported all DMC parameters, and nine (15%) reported all interim analysis details. Of 32 trials which terminated early, 22 (69%) did not report predefined stopping guidelines and 15 (47%) did not provide information on statistical monitoring methods. Conclusions Reporting on DMC composition and roles, on interim analysis results and on early termination of pediatric trials is incomplete and heterogeneous. We propose a minimal set of reporting parameters that will allow the reader to assess the validity of trial results. PMID:20003383

  18. Clinical review: Consensus recommendations on measurement of blood glucose and reporting glycemic control in critically ill adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The management reporting and assessment of glycemic control lacks standardization. The use of different methods to measure the blood glucose concentration and to report the performance of insulin treatment yields major disparities and complicates the interpretation and comparison of clinical trials. We convened a meeting of 16 experts plus invited observers from industry to discuss and where possible reach consensus on the most appropriate methods to measure and monitor blood glucose in critically ill patients and on how glycemic control should be assessed and reported. Where consensus could not be reached, recommendations on further research and data needed to reach consensus in the future were suggested. Recognizing their clear conflict of interest, industry observers played no role in developing the consensus or recommendations from the meeting. Consensus recommendations were agreed for the measurement and reporting of glycemic control in clinical trials and for the measurement of blood glucose in clinical practice. Recommendations covered the following areas: How should we measure and report glucose control when intermittent blood glucose measurements are used? What are the appropriate performance standards for intermittent blood glucose monitors in the ICU? Continuous or automated intermittent glucose monitoring - methods and technology: can we use the same measures for assessment of glucose control with continuous and intermittent monitoring? What is acceptable performance for continuous glucose monitoring systems? If implemented, these recommendations have the potential to minimize the discrepancies in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials and to improve glucose control in clinical practice. Furthermore, to be fit for use, glucose meters and continuous monitoring systems must match their performance to fit the needs of patients and clinicians in the intensive care setting. See related commentary by Soto-Rivera and Agus, http://ccforum.com/content/17

  19. Novel clinical manifestations in Pallister-Killian syndrome: comprehensive evaluation of 59 affected individuals and review of previously reported cases.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Alisha; Liu, Hongbin; Park, Kristen; Campbell, Lindsey B; Jackson, Marie; Kostanecka, Anna; Pipan, Mary; Izumi, Kosuke; Pallister, Phillip; Krantz, Ian D

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome is a rare, multi-system developmental diagnosis typically caused by tetrasomy of chromosome 12p that exhibits tissue-limited mosaicism. The spectrum of clinical manifestations in Pallister-Killian syndrome is wide and includes craniofacial anomalies, clefts, ophthalmologic, audiologic, cardiac, musculoskeletal, diaphragmatic, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and cutaneous anomalies in association with intellectual disability and seizures. Growth parameters are often normal to elevated at birth with deceleration of growth postnatally. No formal estimate of the prevalence of Pallister-Killian syndrome has been made. Here, we report the clinical findings in 59 individuals with Pallister-Killian syndrome who were ascertained at Pallister-Killian syndrome Foundation family meetings held in the summers of 2006, 2008, 2009, and 2010. In addition, the clinical findings of 152 cases reported in the medical literature were reviewed and compared to the cohort examined here. Several novel clinical characteristics were identified through detailed dysmorphology examinations of this cohort and reassertion of a mild developmental variant is described. This report expands the clinical manifestations of Pallister-Killian syndrome and highlights the variable expressivity of this diagnosis with important implications for diagnosis and counseling.

  20. Actual and actuarial probabilities of competing risks: apples and lemons.

    PubMed

    Grunkemeier, Gary L; Jin, Ruyun; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2007-05-01

    The probability of a type of failure that is not inevitable, but can be precluded by other events such as death, is given by the cumulative incidence function. In cardiac research articles, it has become known as the actual probability, in contrast to the actuarial methods of estimation, usually implemented by the Kaplan-Meier (KM) estimate. Unlike cumulative incidence, KM attempts to predict what the latent failure probability would be if death were eliminated. To do this, the KM method assumes that the risk of dying and the risk of failure are independent. But this assumption is not true for many cardiac applications in which the risks of failure and death are negatively correlated (ie, patients with a higher risk of dying have a lower risk of failure, and patients with a lower risk of death have a higher risk of failure, which is a condition called informative censoring). Recent editorials in two cardiac journals have promoted the use of the KM method (actuarial estimate) for competing risk events (specifically for heart valve performance) and criticized the use of the cumulative incidence (actual) estimates. This report has two aims: to explain the difference between these two estimates and to show why the KM is generally not appropriate. In the process we will rely on alternative representations of the KM estimator (using redistribution to the right and inverse probability weighting) to explain the difference between the two estimates and to show how it may be possible to adjust KM to overcome the informative censoring.

  1. Relationship between psychiatric status, self-reported outcome measures, and clinical parameters in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Gamze; Kilic, Erkan; Ozgocmen, Salih

    2014-12-01

    This article aims to compare the risks of depression and anxiety in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) and investigate the relationship among self-reported outcome measures, clinical parameters, and physical variables of patients with axSpA. Patients with axSpA were recruited from Erciyes Spondyloarthritis Cohort. The patients met Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society classification criteria for axial SpA and were assessed in a cross-sectional study design for visual analog scale (VAS) pain, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life questionnaire (ASQoL), and Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score-C-reactive protein (ASDAS-CRP). Psychological status was evaluated using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to determine the associations between psychological variables and clinical parameters after adjusting for confounding variables. Of the 316 patients (142 nr-axSpA, 174 AS), 139 (44%) had high risk for depression (HADS-D score ≥ 7) and 71 (22.5%) for anxiety (HADS-A score ≥ 10). HADS-D and HADS-A scores were similar between patients with AS and nr-axSpA. Patients with high risk for depression and anxiety had higher scores in BASDAI, BASFI, and ASDAS-CRP, and also poorer scores in VAS pain and ASQoL. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the ASDAS-CRP, ASQoL, BASDAI, as well as educational level were factors associated with the risk of depression whereas the ASQoL and educational level were factors associated with the risk of anxiety. Patients with nr-axSpA and AS have similar burden of psychological distress. The quality of life (ASQoL) and educational level were factors associated with the risk of both depression and anxiety whereas disease activity (BASDAI and ASDAS-CRP) was the

  2. Reporting of intention-to-treat analyses in recent analgesic clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; McDermott, Michael P; McKeown, Andrew; Smith, Shannon M; Pawlowski, Joseph R; Poli, Joseph J; Rothstein, Daniel; Williams, Mark R; Bujanover, Shay; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Katz, Nathaniel P; Rowbotham, Michael C; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    The intention-to-treat (ITT) principle states that all subjects in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) should be analyzed in the group to which they were assigned, regardless of compliance with assigned treatment. Analyses performed according to the ITT principle preserve the benefits of randomization and are recommended by regulators and statisticians for analyses of RCTs. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency with which publications of analgesic RCTs in 3 major pain journals report an ITT analysis and the percentage of the author-declared ITT analyses that include all randomized subjects and thereby fulfill the most common interpretation of the ITT principle. RCTs investigating noninvasive, pharmacologic and interventional (eg, nerve blocks, implantable pumps, spinal cord stimulators, surgery) treatments for pain, published between January 2006 and June 2013 (n=173), were included. None of the trials using experimental pain models reported an ITT analysis; 47% of trials investigating clinical pain conditions reported an ITT analysis, and 5% reported a modified ITT analysis. Of the analyses reported as ITT, 67% reported reasons for excluding subjects from the analysis, and 18% of those listing reasons for exclusion did not do so in the Methods section. Such mislabeling can make it difficult to identify traditional ITT analyses for inclusion in meta-analyses. We hope that deficiencies in reporting identified in this study will encourage authors, reviewers, and editors to promote more consistent use of the term "intention to treat" for more accurate reporting of RCT-based evidence for pain treatments.

  3. Twelve-year results of a direct-bonded partial prosthesis in a patient with advanced periodontitis: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Minesaki, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2012-08-01

    Prosthodontic treatment for patients with advanced periodontitis is a therapeutic challenge. A minimally invasive technique is preferred to preserve the remaining mobile abutment teeth. This report describes the initial clinical treatment and 12-year follow-up of a direct-bonded prosthesis reinforced with a cast metal framework, used as a conservative treatment option to replace periodontally involved maxillary lateral incisors.

  4. A Study and Demonstration of the Training and Utilization of Psychological Assistants in Different Clinical Settings. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaulley, Mary H.

    The training program described in this final report is one of a number of attempts to solve the manpower shortage in psychology. The task proposes to demonstrate that the presence of psychological assistants, in this case seven female college graduates, increases the effectiveness and productivity of the clinical psychologists to whom they are…

  5. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were compared with…

  6. A survey of informatics approaches to whole-exome and whole-genome clinical reporting in the electronic health record

    PubMed Central

    Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Amendola, Laura; Aronson, Samuel J.; Garraway, Levi; Gray, Stacy; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Jarvik, Gail; Karavite, Dean; Lebo, Matthew; Plon, Sharon E.; Van Allen, Eliezer; Weck, Karen E.; White, Peter S.; Yang, Yaping

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Genome-scale clinical sequencing is being adopted more broadly in medical practice. The National Institutes of Health developed the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program to guide implementation and dissemination of best practices for the integration of sequencing into clinical care. This study describes and compares the state of the art of incorporating whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing results into the electronic health record, including approaches to decision support across the six current CSER sites. Methods The CSER Medical Record Working Group collaboratively developed and completed an in-depth survey to assess the communication of genome-scale data into the electronic health record. We summarized commonalities and divergent approaches. Results Despite common sequencing platform (Illumina) adoptions, there is a great diversity of approaches to annotation tools and workflow, as well as to report generation. At all sites, reports are human-readable structured documents available as passive decision support in the electronic health record. Active decision support is in early implementation at two sites. Conclusion The parallel efforts across CSER sites in the creation of systems for report generation and integration of reports into the electronic health record, as well as the lack of standardized approaches to interfacing with variant databases to create active clinical decision support, create opportunities for cross-site and vendor collaborations. PMID:24071794

  7. Cantharidin Poisoning due to Blister Beetle Ingestion in Children: Two case reports and a review of clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Al-Binali, Ali M; Shabana, Medhat; Al-Fifi, Suliman; Dawood, Sami; Shehri, Amer A; Al-Barki, Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Cantharidin is an intoxicant found in beetles in the Meloidae (Coleoptera) family. Ingestion may result in haematemesis, impaired level of consciousness, electrolyte disturbance, haematurea and renal impairment. Here, we report two paediatric cases of meloid beetle ingestion resulting in cantharidin poisoning and the clinical presentation of the ensuing intoxication.

  8. Transmyocardial laser revascularization with a high-power (800 W) CO2 laser: clinical report with 50 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zheng; Zhang, Zhaoguang; Ye, Jianguang; Yu, Jianbo

    1999-09-01

    This paper reports the clinical experience in transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) with high power CO2 laser and evaluates the preliminary results of TMLR. TMLR may improve angina pectoris and myocardial perfusion significantly. To switch on the laser in proper order may be helpful to shorten duration of surgery. A gentle removal of fat on the apex may increase the successful transmyocardial penetration.

  9. State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn: Clinical Practice Management Plan. Report 93-S-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report addresses the compliance of the Clinical Practice Management Plan at the Health Science Center (HSC) at Brooklyn with policies established by the State University of New York (SUNY) Board of Trustees. An executive summary highlights the scope of the audit, audit observations and conclusions, and comments of SUNY officials. An…

  10. Clinical Cancer Advances 2005: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Bajorin, Dean F; Bleiberg, Harry; Blum, Diane; Hao, Desirée; Johnson, Bruce E; Ozols, Robert F; Demetri, George D; Ganz, Patricia A; Kris, Mark G; Levin, Bernard; Markman, Maurie; Raghavan, Derek; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Vokes, Everett E; Winn, Rodger J; Mayer, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    This year, for the first time, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances 2005: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant clinical research presented or published over the past year across all cancer types. ASCO embarked on this project to provide the public, patients, policymakers, and physicians with an accessible summary of the year's most important research advances. While not intended to serve as a comprehensive review, this report provides a year-end snapshot of research that will have the greatest impact on patient care. As you will read, there is much good news from the front lines of cancer research. These pages report on new chemotherapy regimens that sharply reduce the risk of recurrence for very common cancers; the "coming of age" of targeted cancer therapies; promising studies of drugs to prevent cancer; and improvements in quality of life for people living with the disease, among many other advances. Survival rates for cancer are on the rise, increasing from 50% to 64% over the last 30 years. Cancer still exacts an enormous toll, however. Nearly 1.4 million Americans will be diagnosed this year, and some 570,000 will die of the disease. Clearly, more research is needed to find effective therapies for the most stubborn cancer types and stages. We need to know more about the long-term effects of newer, more targeted cancer therapies, some of which need to be taken over long periods of time. And we need to devote far greater attention to tracking and improving the care of the nearly 10 million cancer survivors in the United States today. Despite these and other challenges, the message of this report is one of hope. Through the dedicated, persistent pursuit of clinical research and participation in clinical trials by people with cancer, we steadily uncover new and better ways of treating, diagnosing, and preventing a disease that touches the

  11. The Clinical Relevance of Self-Reported Premenstrual Worsening of Depressive Symptoms in the Management of Depressed Outpatients: A STAR*D Report

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Charlotte L.; Rush, A. John; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Luther, James F.; Kornstein, Susan G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the incidence, clinical and demographic correlates, and relationship to treatment outcome of self-reported premenstrual exacerbation of depressive symptoms in premenopausal women with major depressive disorder who are receiving antidepressant medication. Method This post-hoc analysis used clinical trial data from treatment-seeking, premenopausal, adult female outpatients with major depression who were not using hormonal contraceptives. For this report, citalopram was used as the first treatment step. We also used data from the second step in which one of three new medications were used (bupropion-SR [sustained release], venlafaxine-XR [extended release], or sertraline). Treatment-blinded assessors obtained baseline treatment outcomes data. We hypothesized that those with reported premenstrual depressive symptom exacerbation would have more general medical conditions, longer index depressive episodes, lower response or remission rates, and shorter times-to-relapse with citalopram, and that they would have a better outcome with sertraline than with bupropion-SR. Results At baseline, 66% (n=545/821) of women reported premenstrual exacerbation. They had more general medical conditions, more anxious features, longer index episodes, and shorter times-to-relapse (41.3 to 47.1 weeks, respectively). Response and remission rates to citalopram, however, were unrelated to reported premenstrual exacerbation. Reported premenstrual exacerbation was also unrelated to differential benefit with sertraline and bupropion-SR. Conclusions Self-reported premenstrual exacerbation has moderate clinical utility in the management of depressed patients, although it is not predictive of overall treatment response. Factors that contribute to a more chronic or relapsing course may also play a role in premenstrual worsening of major depressive disorder (MDD). PMID:23480315

  12. Clinical cancer advances 2006: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ozols, Robert F; Herbst, Roy S; Colson, Yolonda L; Gralow, Julie; Bonner, James; Curran, Walter J; Eisenberg, Burton L; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schilsky, Richard L; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Winn, Rodger J

    2007-01-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO's PRESIDENT For the second consecutive year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO developed this report to demonstrate the enormous progress being made on the front lines of cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and physicians, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on new targeted therapies that are improving survival and response rates in hard-to-treat cancers such as kidney cancer, HER-2-positive breast cancer, head and neck cancer, and chronic myelogenous leukemia; the FDA's approval of the world's first preventive vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), which has the potential to dramatically reduce the global burden of cervical cancer; and advances in the fast-growing field of personalized medicine, including a new lung cancer test that could help physicians better target treatments and predict prognosis. These advances are only part of the landscape. Survival rates are on the rise, the number of cancer deaths in the United States began declining for the first time since 1930, and new research is showing that the rates of certain common cancers, such as those of the breast and colon, have stabilized, and may have even begun to decline. However, cancer research still faces a number of major obstacles. At a time of extraordinary scientific potential, declining federal funding of cancer research threatens to stall or even reverse recent progress. Such funding cuts have already led to fewer clinical trials, fewer talented young physicians entering the field, and a growing bottleneck of basic science discoveries

  13. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Shokouhinejad, Noushin

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic intervention in necrotic immature permanent teeth is usually a clinical challenge. With appropriate case selection, regenerative treatment can be effective, providing a desirable outcome. However, there is still no consensus on the optimal disinfection protocol or the method to achieve predictable clinical outcome. This article presents two cases of regenerative treatment in necrotic immature teeth, using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and BiodentineTM as coronal barriers and different irrigants, which led to different clinical outcomes. PMID:26884781

  14. Clinically significant differences in acute pain measured on self-report pain scales in children

    PubMed Central

    Tsze, Daniel S.; Hirschfeld, Gerrit; von Baeyer, Carl L.; Bulloch, Blake; Dayan, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to determine the minimum and ideal clinically significant differences (MCSD, ICSD) of the Faces Pain Scale–Revised (FPS-R) and the Color Analog Scale (CAS) in children and to identify any differences in these estimates based on patient characteristics. Methods This was a prospective study of children aged 4 to 17 years with acute pain presenting to two urban pediatric emergency departments. Participants self-reported their pain severity using the FPS-R and CAS and qualitatively described their changes in pain. Changes in pain score reported using the FPS-R and CAS that were associated with “a little less” and “much less” pain (MCSD and ICSD, respectively) were identified using a receiver operating characteristic–based method and expressed as raw change score and percent reductions. Estimates of MCSD and ICSD were determined for each category of initial pain severity (mild, moderate, and severe) and patient characteristics (age, sex, and ethnicity). Post hoc exploratory analyses evaluated categories of race, primary language, and etiology of pain. Results A total of 314 children with acute pain were enrolled; mean (±SD) age was 9.8 (±3.8) years. The FPS-R raw change score and percent reduction MCSD estimates were 2/10 and 25%, with ICSD estimates of 3/10 and 60%. For the CAS, raw change score and percent reduction MCSD estimates were 1/10 and 15%, with ICSD estimates of 2.75/10 and 52%. For both scales, raw change score and percent reduction estimates of the MCSD remained unchanged in children with either moderate or severe pain. For both scales, estimates of ICSD were not stable across categories of initial pain severity. There was no difference in MCSD or ICSD based on age, sex, ethnicity, race, primary language, or etiology of pain. Conclusions The MCSD estimates can be expressed as raw change score and percent reductions for the FPS-R and CAS. These estimates appear stable for children with moderate to severe pain

  15. Validity, Reliability and Acceptability of the Team Standardized Assessment of Clinical Encounter Report*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Camilla L.; Norris, Mireille; Sinha, Samir S.; Zorzitto, Maria L.; Madala, Sushma; Hamid, Jemila S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Team Standardized Assessment of a Clinical Encounter Report (StACER) was designed for use in Geriatric Medicine residency programs to evaluate Communicator and Collaborator competencies. Methods The Team StACER was completed by two geriatricians and interdisciplinary team members based on observations during a geriatric medicine team meeting. Postgraduate trainees were recruited from July 2010–November 2013. Inter-rater reliability between two geriatricians and between all team members was determined. Internal consistency of items for the constructs Communicator and Collaborator competencies was calculated. Raters completed a survey previously administered to Canadian geriatricians to assess face validity. Trainees completed a survey to determine the usefulness of this instrument as a feedback tool. Results Thirty postgraduate trainees participated. The prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa range inter-rater reliability for Communicator and Collaborator items were 0.87–1.00 and 0.86–1.00, respectively. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for Communicator and Collaborator items was 0.997 (95% CI: 0.993–1.00) and 0.997 (95% CI: 0.997–1.00), respectively. The instrument lacked discriminatory power, as all trainees scored “meets requirements” in the overall assessment. Niney-three per cent and 86% of trainees found feedback useful for developing Communicator and Collaborator competencies, respectively. Conclusions The Team StACER has adequate inter-rater reliability and internal consistency. Poor discriminatory power and face validity challenge the merit of using this evaluation tool. Trainees felt the tool provided useful feedback on Collaborator and Communicator competencies. PMID:28050222

  16. Programa Actual 1991 (Current Programme 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This annual report for the Bernard van Leer Foundation describes the foundation's activities during 1990. The foundation seeks to promote the development of human resources in communities with social, economic, and cultural problems, focusing its efforts on the needs of young children. The first part of the publication contains a general…

  17. Reporting of primary analyses and multiplicity adjustment in recent analgesic clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Smith, Shannon M; McKeown, Andrew; Burke, Laurie B; Hertz, Sharon H; Hunsinger, Matthew; Katz, Nathaniel P; Lin, Allison H; McDermott, Michael P; Rappaport, Bob A; Williams, Mark R; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2014-03-01

    Performing multiple analyses in clinical trials can inflate the probability of a type I error, or the chance of falsely concluding a significant effect of the treatment. Strategies to minimize type I error probability include prespecification of primary analyses and statistical adjustment for multiple comparisons, when applicable. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of primary analysis reporting and frequency of multiplicity adjustment in 3 major pain journals (ie, European Journal of Pain, Journal of Pain, and PAIN®). A total of 161 randomized controlled trials investigating noninvasive pharmacological treatments or interventional treatments for pain, published between 2006 and 2012, were included. Only 52% of trials identified a primary analysis, and only 10% of trials reported prespecification of that analysis. Among the 33 articles that identified a primary analysis with multiple testing, 15 (45%) adjusted for multiplicity; of those 15, only 2 (13%) reported prespecification of the adjustment methodology. Trials in clinical pain conditions and industry-sponsored trials identified a primary analysis more often than trials in experimental pain models and non-industry-sponsored trials, respectively. The results of this systematic review demonstrate deficiencies in the reporting and possibly the execution of primary analyses in published analgesic trials. These deficiencies can be rectified by changes in, or better enforcement of, journal policies pertaining to requirements for the reporting of analyses of clinical trial data.

  18. Can Some Marine-Derived Fungal Metabolites Become Actual Anticancer Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Lefranc, Florence; Kijjoa, Anake; Kiss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Marine fungi are known to produce structurally unique secondary metabolites, and more than 1000 marine fungal-derived metabolites have already been reported. Despite the absence of marine fungal-derived metabolites in the current clinical pipeline, dozens of them have been classified as potential chemotherapy candidates because of their anticancer activity. Over the last decade, several comprehensive reviews have covered the potential anticancer activity of marine fungal-derived metabolites. However, these reviews consider the term “cytotoxicity” to be synonymous with “anticancer agent”, which is not actually true. Indeed, a cytotoxic compound is by definition a poisonous compound. To become a potential anticancer agent, a cytotoxic compound must at least display (i) selectivity between normal and cancer cells (ii) activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells; and (iii) a preferentially non-apoptotic cell death mechanism, as it is now well known that a high proportion of cancer cells that resist chemotherapy are in fact apoptosis-resistant cancer cells against which pro-apoptotic drugs have more than limited efficacy. The present review thus focuses on the cytotoxic marine fungal-derived metabolites whose ability to kill cancer cells has been reported in the literature. Particular attention is paid to the compounds that kill cancer cells through non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms. PMID:26090846

  19. Reporting of cross-over clinical trials of analgesic treatments for chronic pain: Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks systematic review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; McDermott, Michael P; McKeown, Andrew; Hoang, Kim; Iwan, Katarzyna; Kralovic, Sarah; Rothstein, Daniel; Gilron, Ian; Katz, Nathaniel P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Senn, Stephen; Smith, Shannon M; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2016-11-01

    Cross-over trials are typically more efficient than parallel group trials in that the sample size required to yield a desired power is substantially smaller. It is important, however, to consider some issues specific to cross-over trials when designing and reporting them, and when evaluating the published results of such trials. This systematic review evaluated the quality of reporting and its evolution over time in articles of cross-over clinical trials of pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain published between 1993 and 2013. Seventy-six (61%) articles reported a within-subject primary analysis, or if no primary analysis was identified, reported at least 1 within-subject analysis, which is required to achieve the gain in power associated with the cross-over design. For 39 (31%) articles, it was unclear whether analyses conducted were within-subject or between-group. Only 36 (29%) articles reported a method to accommodate missing data (eg, last observation carried forward, n = 29), and of those, just 14 included subjects in the analysis who provided data from only 1 period. Of the articles that identified a within-subject primary analysis, 21 (51%) provided sufficient information for the results to be included in a meta-analysis (ie, estimates of the within-subject treatment effect and variability). These results and others presented in this article demonstrate deficiencies in reporting of cross-over trials for analgesic treatments. Clearer reporting in future trials could improve readers' ability to critically evaluate the results, use these data in meta-analyses, and plan future trials. Recommendations for proper reporting of cross-over trials that apply to any condition are provided.

  20. 45 CFR 60.11 - Reporting adverse actions on clinical privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Board of Medical Examiners—(1) Actions that must be reported and to whom the report must be made. Each health care entity must report to the Board of Medical Examiners in the State in which the health care... practitioners. A health care entity may report to the Board of Medical Examiners information as described...

  1. Using Actual Patients in the Classroom To Develop Positive Student Attitudes Toward Pharmaceutical Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Marie A.; Wade, William E.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluates the use of actual patients in a required clinical applications course at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy. Patients discuss their illness and how it affects their lives with the first-year students. On 12 of 13 items, students scored significantly higher on an attitude survey following the first patient presentation than…

  2. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Research Clinical Advisory Panel (RCAP) Meeting. [Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) Research and Clinical Advisory Panel convened on December 1, 2014 at the ISS Conference Facility in Houston. The panel members were provided updates to the current clinical cases and treatment plans along with the latest research activities (http://humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/Risks/?i=105) and preliminary study results. The following is a summary of this meeting.

  3. Reliability of Diagnosing Clinical Hypothyroidism in Adults with Down Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V. P.

    1995-01-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing hypothyroidism in 160 adults with Down syndrome was examined. A significant association between a clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism and increasing age was found but no significant association was found between a clinical and a biochemical diagnosis. Regular biochemical screening is recommended. (Author/SW)

  4. A Report on College-based Reading Clinics: Where Are We Going?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Gary W.

    A questionnaire was mailed to 341 colleges and universities granting graduate degrees in reading to obtain information about the function and operation of their reading clinics. The concerns addressed include the function of the clinic, the type of clients served, the type of staff employed, the kinds of services offered, and the kind of funding…

  5. MULTICATEGORICAL EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE IN CLINICAL PROBLEM-SOLVING TESTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WILDS, PRESTON L.; ZACHERT, VIRGINIA

    THIS PROJECT ATTEMPTED TO DETERMINE IF NUMERICAL SCORING SYSTEMS FOR CLINICAL PROBLEM-SOLVING TESTS COULD BE DEVELOPED WHICH WOULD MEASURE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERENT INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN TEACHING CLINICAL PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS. THE PROJECT WAS TO VALIDATE AND CROSS-VALIDATE THE SCORING SYSTEMS BY TESTS OF POPULATION SAMPLES OF KNOWN…

  6. The Clinical Practice of Traditional and Nontraditional Dental Hygienists. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, E. Marcia

    Information is presented on a study designed to gather details about the services provided by clinical dental hygienists in traditional and nontraditional settings. The 10 research topics addressed include: services provided by the clinical RDH in the traditional and nontraditional setting; time allocated for such services; how patients are…

  7. Contiguous autogenous transplant--nineteen years' clinical and radiographic follow-up: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sperling, I; Kozlovsky, A; Tal, H

    1994-08-01

    Contiguous autogenous transplant, also known as the bone-swaging procedure, is a technique aimed at regenerating lost periodontium. Clinical healing of bony defects after bone swaging has been satisfactory, but the relationship and mode of attachment between the bone graft and the root surface have not been fully investigated. A 19-year clinical and radiographic follow-up of a bony defect treated with the bone-swaging technique is presented. A significant coronal increase in bone height and a gain in clinical probing depth were achieved postsurgery and remained unchanged during the first 6 years. The long-term clinical and radiographic findings, however, indicated that the attachment developed at the root-bone interface may not have been a true attachment and may have been more vulnerable to pathogenic local agents. These observations may help the clinician to interpret the clinical and radiographic changes that occur in the area of a bony defect following the use of a bone graft.

  8. External Validity of Contingent Valuation: Comparing Hypothetical and Actual Payments.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mandy; Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Jareinpituk, Suthi; Cairns, John

    2016-10-09

    Whilst contingent valuation is increasingly used in economics to value benefits, questions remain concerning its external validity that is do hypothetical responses match actual responses? We present results from the first within sample field test. Whilst Hypothetical No is always an Actual No, Hypothetical Yes exceed Actual Yes responses. A constant rate of response reversals across bids/prices could suggest theoretically consistent option value responses. Certainty calibrations (verbal and numerical response scales) minimise hypothetical-actual discrepancies offering a useful solution. Helping respondents resolve uncertainty may reduce the discrepancy between hypothetical and actual payments and thus lead to more accurate policy recommendations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A parent-report Gender Identity Questionnaire for Children: A cross-national, cross-clinic comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Wallien, Madeleine; Johnson, Laurel L; Owen-Anderson, Allison F H; Bradley, Susan J; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2006-07-01

    A one-factor, 14-item parent-report Gender Identity Questionnaire for Children (GIQC) was developed in a sample of 325 clinic-referred children with gender identity problems and 504 controls from Toronto, Canada (Johnson et al., 2004). In this study, we report a cross-national, cross-clinic comparative analysis of the GIQC on gender-referred children (N = 338) from Toronto and gender-referred children (N = 175) from Utrecht, The Netherlands. Across clinics, the results showed both similarities and differences. Gender-referred boys from Utrecht had a significantly higher total score (indicating more cross-gender behavior) than did gender-referred boys from Toronto, but there was no significant difference for girls. In the Toronto sample, the gender-referred girls had a significantly higher total score than the gender-referred boys, but there was no significant sex difference in the Utrecht sample. Across both clinics, gender-referred children who met the complete DSM criteria for gender identity disorder (GID) had a significantly higher cross-gender score than the gender-referred children who were subthreshold for GID (Cohen's d = 1.11). The results of this study provide the first empirical evidence of relative similarity in cross-gender behavior in a sample of gender-referred children from western Europe when compared to North American children. The results also provide some support for cross-clinic consistency in clinician-based diagnosis of GID.

  10. Provider perceptions of the value of same-day, electronic patient-reported measures for use in clinical HIV care.

    PubMed

    Fredericksen, R J; Tufano, J; Ralston, J; McReynolds, J; Stewart, M; Lober, W B; Mayer, K H; Mathews, W C; Mugavero, M J; Crane, P K; Crane, H M

    2016-11-01

    Strong evidence suggests that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) aid in managing chronic conditions, reduce omissions in care, and improve patient-provider communication. However, provider acceptability of PROs and their use in clinical HIV care is not well known. We interviewed providers (n = 27) from four geographically diverse HIV and community care clinics in the US that have integrated PROs into routine HIV care, querying perceived value, challenges, and use of PRO data. Perceived benefits included the ability of PROs to identify less-observable behaviors and conditions, particularly suicidal ideation, depression, and substance use; usefulness in agenda setting prior to a visit; and reduction of social desirability bias in patient-provider communication. Challenges included initial flow integration issues and ease of interpretation of PRO feedback. Providers value same-day, electronic patient-reported measures for use in clinical HIV care with the condition that PROs are (1) tailored to be the most clinically relevant to their population; (2) well integrated into clinic flow; and (3) easy to interpret, highlighting chief patient concerns and changes over time.

  11. The importance of clinical grading of heart failure and other cardiac toxicities during chemotherapy: updating the common terminology criteria for clinical trial reporting.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Akm; Chen, Alice; Ivy, Percy; Lenihan, Daniel J; Kaltman, Jonathan; Taddei-Peters, Wendy; Remick, Scot C

    2011-07-01

    Although the use of chemotherapy and targeted therapy has improved the clinical benefit, progression-free survival, and overall survival of various cancers in recent years, old and new toxicities have limited their use. To balance the risk with the benefit of treatment, Common Toxicity Criteria and now Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) have been used by the oncology community for more than 20 years to assess toxicity from cancer treatment. This article details the description and grading of cardiac toxicities reported in association with cancer treatment and the use of CTCAE to assess them.

  12. FTLD-TDP and progressive supranuclear palsy in comorbidity-a report of two cases with different clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kateřina; Johanidesová, Silvie; Matěj, Radoslav; Keller, Jiří; Rohan, Zdeněk; Rusina, Robert

    2016-12-03

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (FTLD-TDP) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) are distinct neurodegenerations with different clinical presentations. We report two cases with FTLD-TDP and PSP in comorbidity: a patient with amnestic dementia developing frontal lobe dementia, Parkinsonism and supranuclear gaze palsy and a patient with cerebellar ataxia and nystagmus developing akinesia, rigidity, and subcortical dementia. Neuropathological examination revealed neuronal and glial tau pathology together with ubiquitin, and phospho-TDP-43-immunoreactivities in the hippocampus, striatum, mesencephalon, and frontal and temporal cortices. Clinical and neuropathological correlations in atypical neurodegenerations are crucial to describe new entities of overlapping syndromes.

  13. Mitigating preventable chronic disease: Progress report of the Cleveland Clinic's Lifestyle 180 program

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Poor lifestyle choices are key in development and progression of preventable chronic diseases. The purpose of the study was to design and test a program to mitigate the physical and fiscal consequences of chronic diseases. Methods Here we report the outcomes for 429 participants with one or more chronic conditions, including obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus, many of whom had failed traditional disease management programs, who enrolled into a comprehensive lifestyle intervention. The Lifestyle 180 program integrates nutrition, physical activity and stress management interventions and was conducted at the Wellness Institute of the Cleveland Clinic, United States. An intensive 6 week immersion course, with 8 hours of group instruction per week, was followed by 3 follow-up, 4 hour-long sessions over the course of 6 months. Results Changes in biometric (weight, height, waist circumference, resting heart rate and blood pressure) and laboratory variables (fasting lipid panel, blood glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c, ultra sensitive C-reactive protein) at 6 months were compared with baseline (pre-post analysis). At week 30, biometric and laboratory data were available for 244 (57%) and 299 (70%) participants, respectively. These had a mean ± SD reduction in weight (6.8 ± 6.9 kg, P < 0.001), waist circumference (6.1 ± 7.3 cm, P < 0.001), glucose (4.5 ± 29.6 mg/dL or 0.25 ± 1.64 mmol/L, P = 0.009), triglycerides (26.4 ± 58.5 mg/dL or 0.30 ± 0.66 mmol/L, P < 0.001), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) (7.9 ± 25.1 mg/dL or 0.2 ± 0.65 mmol/L, P < 0.001), hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) (0.20 ± 0.64%, P = 0.001), insulin (3.8 ± 11 microU/ml or 26.6 ± 76.4 ρmol, P < 0.001) and ultra sensitive C-reactive protein (US - CRP) (0.9 ± 4.8 mg/dL or 7.3 ± 40.2 nmol/L, P = 0.012), an increase in mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) (3.7 ± 8.4 mg/dL or 0.1 ± 0.22, P < 0.001), and decreased use of medications. Conclusion

  14. Design of clinical trials in acute kidney injury: report from an NIDDK workshop on trial methodology.

    PubMed

    Palevsky, Paul M; Molitoris, Bruce A; Okusa, Mark D; Levin, Adeera; Waikar, Sushrut S; Wald, Ron; Chertow, Glenn M; Murray, Patrick T; Parikh, Chirag R; Shaw, Andrew D; Go, Alan S; Faubel, Sarah G; Kellum, John A; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Liu, Kathleen D; Cheung, Alfred K; Weisbord, Steven D; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kaufman, James S; Devarajan, Prasad; Toto, Robert M; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Greene, Tom; Mehta, Ravindra L; Stokes, John B; Thompson, Aliza M; Thompson, B Taylor; Westenfelder, Christof S; Tumlin, James A; Warnock, David G; Shah, Sudhir V; Xie, Yining; Duggan, Emily G; Kimmel, Paul L; Star, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a complex clinical problem associated with significant short-term morbidity and mortality and lacking effective pharmacologic interventions. Patients with AKI experience longer-term risks for progressive chronic ESRD, which diminish patients' health-related quality of life and create a larger burden on the healthcare system. Although experimental models have yielded numerous promising agents, translation into clinical practice has been unsuccessful, possibly because of issues in clinical trial design, such as delayed drug administration, masking of therapeutic benefit by adverse events, and inadequate sample size. To address issues of clinical trial design, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases sponsored a workshop titled "Clinical Trials in Acute Kidney Injury: Current Opportunities and Barriers" in December 2010. Workshop participants included representatives from academia, industry, and government agencies whose areas of expertise spanned basic science, clinical nephrology, critical care medicine, biostatistics, pharmacology, and drug development. This document summarizes the discussions of collaborative workgroups that addressed issues related to patient selection, study endpoints, the role of novel biomarkers, sample size and power calculations, and adverse events and pilot/feasibility studies in prevention and treatment of AKI. Companion articles outline the discussions of workgroups for model trials related to prevention or treatment of established AKI in different clinical settings, such as in patients with sepsis.

  15. Content Validity of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Items in the Context of HIV Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Todd C.; Fredericksen, Rob J.; Crane, Heidi M.; Crane, Paul K.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Matthews, William C.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Morales, Leo S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Solorio, Rosa; Yang, Frances M.; Patrick, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess content validity and patient and provider prioritization of Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Depression, Anxiety, Fatigue, and Alcohol Use items in the context of clinical care for people living with HIV (PLWH), and to develop and assess new items as needed. Methods We conducted concept elicitation interviews (n=161), item pool matching, prioritization focus groups (n=227 participants), and cognitive interviews (n=48) with English-speaking (~75%) and Spanish-speaking (~25%) PLWH from clinical sites in Seattle, San Diego, Birmingham, and Boston. For each domain we also conducted item review and prioritization with two HIV provider panels of 3 to 8 members each. Results Among items most highly prioritized by PLWH and providers were those that included information regarding personal impacts of the concept being assessed, in addition to severity level. Items that addressed impact were considered most actionable for clinical care. We developed additional items addressing this. For depression we developed items related to suicide and other forms of self-harm, and for all domains we developed items addressing impacts PLWH and/or providers indicated were particularly relevant to clinical care. Across the 4 domains, 16 new items were retained for further psychometric testing. Conclusion PLWH and providers had priorities for what they believed providers should know to provide optimal care for PLWH. Incorporation of these priorities into clinical assessments used in clinical care of PLWH may facilitate patient-centered care. PMID:26245710

  16. Problems in the reporting of acne clinical trials: a spot check from the 2009 Annual Evidence Update on Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ingram, John R; Grindlay, Douglas J C; Williams, Hywel C

    2010-07-12

    In the course of producing the 2009 NHS Evidence--skin disorders Annual Evidence Update on Acne Vulgaris, 25 randomised controlled trials were examined. From these, at least 12 potentially serious problems of trial reporting were identified. Several trials concluded no effect of a treatment yet they were insufficiently powered to exclude potentially useful benefits. There were examples of duplicate publication and "salami publication", as well as two trials being combined and reported as one. In some cases, an incorrect "within-groups" statistical comparison was made and one trial report omitted original efficacy data and included only P values. Both of the non-inferiority studies examined failed to pre-specify a non-inferiority margin. Trials reported as "double-blind" compared treatments that were dissimilar in appearance or had differing adverse effect profiles. In one case an intention-to-treat analysis was not performed and there was a failure to account for all of the randomized participants. Trial results were made to sound more impressive by selective outcome reporting, emphasizing the statistical significance of treatment effects that were clinically insignificant, and by the use of larger-sounding odds ratios rather than rate ratios for common events. Most of the reporting problems could have been avoided by use of the CONSORT guidelines and prospective trial registration on a public clinical trials database.

  17. Preliminary report of a Web-based instrument to assess and teach knowledge and clinical thinking to medical student

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Hironobu; Ando, Hirotaka; Obika, Mikako; Miyoshi, Tomoko; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Bautista, Miho; Kataoka, Hitomi; Terasawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We report the preliminary development of a unique Web-based instrument for assessing and teaching knowledge and developing clinical thinking called the “Sequential Questions and Answers” (SQA) test. Included in this feasibility report are physicians’ answers to the Sequential Questions and Answers pre- and posttests and their brief questionnaire replies. Methods The authors refined the SQA test case scenario for content, ease of modifications of case scenarios, test uploading and answer retrieval. Eleven geographically distant physicians evaluated the SQA test, taking the pretest and posttest within two weeks. These physicians completed a brief questionnaire about the SQA test. Results Eleven physicians completed the SQA pre- and posttest; all answers were downloaded for analysis. They reported the ease of website login and navigating within the test module together with many helpful suggestions. Their average posttest score gain was 53% (p=0.012). Conclusions We report the successful launch of a unique Web-based instrument referred to as the Sequential Questions and Answers test. This distinctive test combines teaching organization of the clinical narrative into an assessment tool that promotes acquiring medical knowledge and clinical thinking. We successfully demonstrated the feasibility of geographically distant physicians to access the SQA instrument. The physicians’ helpful suggestions will be added to future SQA test versions. Medical schools might explore the integration of this multi-language-capable SQA assessment and teaching instrument into their undergraduate medical curriculum. PMID:25341203

  18. Are research papers reporting results from nutrigenetics clinical research a potential source of biohype?

    PubMed

    Stenne, R; Hurlimann, T; Godard, Béatrice

    2012-01-01

    Nutrigenetics is a promising field, but the achievability of expected benefits is challenged by the methodological limitations that are associated with clinical research in that field. The mere existence of these limitations suggests that promises about potential outcomes may be premature. Thus, benefits claimed in scientific journal articles in which these limitations are not acknowledged might stimulate biohype. This article aims to examine whether nutrigenetics clinical research articles are a potential source of biohype. Of the 173 articles identified, 16 contained claims in which clinical applications were extrapolated from study results. The methodological limitations being incompletely acknowledged, these articles could potentially be a source of biohype.

  19. Concordance between Responses to Questionnaire Scenarios and Actual Treatment to Repair or Replace Dental Restorations in the National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Heaven, Tim J.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the agreement between treatment recommended during hypothetical clinical scenarios and actual treatment provided in comparable clinical circumstances. Methods A total of 193 practitioners in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network participated in both a questionnaire and a clinical study. The questionnaire included three hypothetical scenarios about treatment of existing restorations. Clinicians then participated in a clinical study about repair or replacement of existing restorations. We quantified the overall concordance between their questionnaire responses and what they did in actual clinical treatment. Results Practitioners who recommended repair (instead of replacement) of more scenario restorations also had higher repair percentages in clinical practice. Additionally, for each of the three hypothetical scenario restorations, practitioners who recommended repair had higher repair percentages in clinical practice. Conclusions The questionnaire scenarios were a valid measure of clinicians’ tendency to repair or replace restorations in actual clinical practice. Clinical implications Although there was substantial variation in practitioners’ tendency to repair or replace restorations, responses to questionnaire scenarios by individual practitioners were concordant with what they did in actual clinical practice. PMID:25998565

  20. Can the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - Self-Report Version Be Used to Differentiate Clinical and Non-Clinical SAD Groups among Brazilians?

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Larissa F.; Loureiro, Sonia R.; Crippa, José A. S.; Osório, Flávia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) was the first evaluation instrument developed for screening for the signs and symptoms of Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and is currently still the most used worldwide. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of the LSAS - self-report version (LSAS-SR) to discriminate different Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) clinical groups. Method The sample was composed of Brazilians university students, allocated into three different groups, i.e., cases (C=118), non-cases (NC=95) and subclinical cases (SC=39). To achieve the aim, calculations of the ROC Curve and ANOVA were performed. Results The results found were excellent regardless of the technique used, highlighting the discriminatory capacity of the LSAS-SR. The score equal to or greater than 32 is suggested as a cutoff score for the Brazilian population, since this presented balance between the standards evaluated and the ability to differentiate both clinical and subclinical SAD cases from non-cases. Conclusion Despite the specific sample used in this study being composed only of university students, the use of the LSAS-SR can be indicated, in the Brazilian setting, for SAD screening in both clinical and research contexts. PMID:25811489

  1. Public reporting of clinical quality data: an update for cardiovascular specialists.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Gregory J; Drozda, Joseph P; Brindis, Ralph G; Masoudi, Frederick A; Rumsfeld, John S; Slattery, Lara E; Oetgen, William J

    2014-04-08

    Public reporting of hospital and individual provider quality of care measures is not a new concept. In the United States, the first national public reports of hospital mortality data occurred in 1986, and detailed physician-level data for cardiac surgery are now reported in 4 states. The development of the "Hospital Compare," and more recently, the "Physician Compare" websites has further expanded public reporting for hospitals and providers. Several professional organizations, including the American Medical Association, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American College of Cardiology, have published policy statements articulating key principles to guide the public reporting process. Despite the rapid proliferation of public reporting efforts, more research is needed to better define meaningful measures to report and fully understand the impact of public reporting on healthcare delivery.

  2. NCCN Work Group Report: Designing Clinical Trials in the Era of Multiple Biomarkers and Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Venook, Alan P.; Arcila, Maria E.; Benson, Al B.; Berry, Donald A.; Camidge, David Ross; Carlson, Robert W.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Guild, Valerie; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Lovly, Christine M.; McKee, Amy E.; Morgan, Robert J.; Olszanski, Anthony J.; Redman, Mary W.; Stearns, Vered; McClure, Joan; Birkeland, Marian L.

    2016-01-01

    Defining treatment susceptible or resistant populations of cancer patients through the use of genetically defined biomarkers has revolutionized cancer care in recent years for some disease/patient groups. Research continues to show that histologically defined diseases are diverse in their expression of unique mutations or other genetic alterations, however, which presents both opportunities for the development of personalized cancer treatments, but increased difficulty in testing these therapies because potential patient populations are divided into ever-smaller numbers. To address some of the growing challenges in biomarker development and clinical trial design, NCCN assembled a group of experts across specialties and solid tumor disease types to begin to define the problems and to consider alternate ways of designing clinical trials in the era of multiple biomarkers and targeted therapies. Results from that discussion are presented, focusing on issues of clinical trial design from the perspective of statisticians, clinical researchers, regulators, pathologists and information developers. PMID:25361808

  3. How wide is the clinical spectrum of the acrocallosal syndrome? Report of a mild case.

    PubMed Central

    Turolla, L; Clementi, M; Tenconi, R

    1990-01-01

    A boy presenting with an incomplete form of the acrocallosal syndrome is described. The syndrome shows clinical variability and it is stressed that none of the components is constant and facial dysmorphism is not always characteristic. Images PMID:2103730

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma: first clinical case report in China

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Zhong; Song, Zewen; Zhou, Yongmao; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Zizhu; Zhao, Yanzhong; Chen, Yang; Jin, Congjun; Chen, Xiang; Lu, Jianyun; Han, Rui; Li, Pengzhou; Sun, Xulong; Wang, Guohui; Shi, Guangqing; Zhu, Shaihong

    2016-01-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial for treating malignant melanoma by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was designed to evaluate whether the world’s first in-hospital neutron irradiator (IHNI) was qualified for BNCT. In this clinical trial planning to enroll 30 patients, the first case was treated on August 19, 2014. We present the protocol of this clinical trial, the treating procedure, and the clinical outcome of this first case. Only grade 2 acute radiation injury was observed during the first four weeks after BNCT and the injury healed after treatment. No late radiation injury was found during the 24-month follow-up. Based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) scan, pathological analysis and gross examination, the patient showed a complete response to BNCT, indicating that BNCT is a potent therapy against malignant melanoma and IHNI has the potential to enable the delivery of BNCT in hospitals. PMID:28174492

  5. What's new and hot in clinical organ transplantation: report from American Transplant Congress 2012.

    PubMed

    Humar, A

    2013-02-01

    Innovative and exciting advances in the clinical sciences in organ transplantation were presented at the American Transplant Congress 2012. The full spectrum of transplantation was covered with important advancements in many topics. Key areas covered by presentations included living donor outcomes, organ preservation, optimal allocation of deceased donors, new immunosuppression regimens, antibody mediated rejection and the regulatory environment. This review will highlight some of the most interesting and innovative clinical presentations from the meeting.

  6. What's hot, what's new in clinical organ transplantation: report from the American Transplant Congress 2015.

    PubMed

    Sung, R S

    2015-11-01

    Innovative and exciting advances in the clinical sciences in organ transplantation were presented at the American Transplant Congress 2015. The full spectrum of transplantation was covered, with important developments in many topics. Key areas covered by presentations included living donor outcomes, optimal utilization and allocation of deceased donors, new immunosuppression regimens, antibody-mediated rejection and tolerance induction. This review highlights some of the most interesting and noteworthy clinical presentations from the meeting.

  7. Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship: report of the second annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Allen, Alisha; Parikh, Gunjan; McPhaul, Michael J

    2003-11-01

    The second annual national meeting of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Clinical Research Fellowship for Medical Students program was held June 24 to 26, 2003, at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory near Long Island Sound. This 3-day meeting offered an opportunity for 63 of the 2002 Doris Duke clinical research fellows, program directors, administrators, and invited physician-scientists to present and share their research with one another in an informal, inspiring setting at an institution with a history that mirrors the development of modern American medical research. Following a keynote lecture by Dr. Kenneth Davis, dean of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, six physician-scientists representing different areas of clinical research presented their work. Oral and poster presentations by the Doris Duke fellows of their research were interspersed throughout the meeting and comprised its central focus. The fellows' research spanned a broad spectrum of clinical research from studies translating basic research findings to those addressing clinical questions to epidemiologic and health outcomes studies. The meeting culminated in a forum entitled "'Where Do We Go from Here?' Residency Selection and Further Research Training in Pursuit of a Career as a Clinician-Scientist," which was moderated by this year's clinical research fellow national program leader, Dr. Allyn L. Mark. The meeting celebrated the accomplishments of these talented medical students during their fellowship year and, it is hoped, instilled in them awareness that their continued efforts are important to the future progress of medicine.

  8. Clinical, Cognitive and Anatomical Evolution from Nonfluent Progressive Aphasia to Corticobasal Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Murray, Ryan C.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Weiner, Michael W.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent clinical and pathological studies have suggested that frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) show clinical and pathological overlap. We present four years of longitudinal clinical, cognitive and anatomical data in the case of a 56-year-old woman, AS, whose clinical picture evolved from FTLD to CBS. For the first three years, AS showed a progressive speech and language disorder compatible with a diagnosis of the nonfluent aphasia variant of FTLD. At year four, 10 years after her first symptom, AS developed the classical clinical signs of CBS, including alien limb phenomenon and dystonia. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) applied to AS’s four annual scans showed progression of atrophy from the inferior posterior frontal gyrus, to the left insula and finally to the medial frontal lobe. This case demonstrates the clinical overlap between FTLD and CBS and shows that the two can appear in the same patient at different stages of the disease in relation to the progression of anatomical damage. PMID:15788282

  9. Self-reported hand hygiene perceptions and barriers among companion animal veterinary clinic personnel in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Maureen E.C.; Weese, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the perceived importance of and barriers to hand hygiene among companion animal clinic staff. An anonymous, voluntary written questionnaire was completed by 356 of approximately 578 individuals (62%) from 49/51 clinics. On a scale of 1 (not important) to 7 (very important), the percentage of respondents who rated hand hygiene as a 5 or higher was at least 82% in all clinical scenarios queried. The most frequently reported reason for not performing hand hygiene was forgetting to do so (40%, 141/353). Specific discussion of hand hygiene practices at work was recalled by 32% (114/354) of respondents. Although veterinary staff seem to recognize the importance of hand hygiene, it should be emphasized more during staff training. Other barriers including time constraints and skin irritation should also be addressed, possibly through increased access to and use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. PMID:26933265

  10. Self-reported hand hygiene perceptions and barriers among companion animal veterinary clinic personnel in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Maureen E C; Weese, J Scott

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the perceived importance of and barriers to hand hygiene among companion animal clinic staff. An anonymous, voluntary written questionnaire was completed by 356 of approximately 578 individuals (62%) from 49/51 clinics. On a scale of 1 (not important) to 7 (very important), the percentage of respondents who rated hand hygiene as a 5 or higher was at least 82% in all clinical scenarios queried. The most frequently reported reason for not performing hand hygiene was forgetting to do so (40%, 141/353). Specific discussion of hand hygiene practices at work was recalled by 32% (114/354) of respondents. Although veterinary staff seem to recognize the importance of hand hygiene, it should be emphasized more during staff training. Other barriers including time constraints and skin irritation should also be addressed, possibly through increased access to and use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers.

  11. Targeted screening of high-risk cattle populations for BSE to augment mandatory reporting of clinical suspects.

    PubMed

    Doherr, M G; Heim, D; Fatzer, R; Cohen, C H; Vandevelde, M; Zurbriggen, A

    2001-09-20

    In Switzerland, the first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was diagnosed in November 1990. Case numbers peaked in 1995, with a total of 352 BSE cases identified by 30 April 2000. Reporting of clinically suspect cattle is currently the most commonly used method world-wide to detect BSE cases. The effectiveness of mandatory reporting depends on a variety of factors; for other diseases passive surveillance underestimates the incidence of clinical cases. The efficiency of passive surveillance systems for BSE will remain unknown until screening tests able to identify clinically affected cattle have been applied in several countries. This paper provides the first detailed description of a targeted screening programme for BSE. Two populations of cows >24 months of age were included in the targeted screening: (i) cows found dead or culled on site where the carcass was submitted to rendering (fallen stock) and (ii) cows with health-related problems unfit for routine slaughter that were slaughtered under emergency procedures (emergency slaughter). Between 1992 and 1999, on average 81 clinical BSE suspects per year were reported to the veterinary authorities (passive surveillance), of which 43% were confirmed with BSE. A total of 30 clinical cases were captured by passive surveillance and an additional 20 BSE cases detected by targeted screening between May 1999 and April 2000. The odds of finding a BSE case was 49 times higher in the fallen stock and 58 times higher in emergency-slaughtered cattle when compared to passive surveillance. The targeted screening of fallen stock and emergency-slaughtered cattle considerably increased the number of detected cases in this 12-month period. Targeted-screening cases were on average 4 months younger than the clinical suspect cases. In conclusion, post-mortem testing of fallen stock and emergency-slaughtered cows >24 months for BSE is an important active surveillance element within a total surveillance system that

  12. Systematic evaluation of patient-reported outcome (PRO) protocol content and reporting in UK cancer clinical trials: the EPiC study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khaled; Kyte, Derek; Keeley, Thomas; Efficace, Fabio; Armes, Jo; Brown, Julia M; Calman, Lynn; Copland, Chris; Gavin, Anna; Glaser, Adam; Greenfield, Diana M; Lanceley, Anne; Taylor, Rachel; Velikova, Galina; Brundage, Michael; Mercieca-Bebber, Rebecca; King, Madeleine T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emerging evidence suggests that patient-reported outcome (PRO)-specific information may be omitted in trial protocols and that PRO results are poorly reported, limiting the use of PRO data to inform cancer care. This study aims to evaluate the standards of PRO-specific content in UK cancer trial protocols and their arising publications and to highlight examples of best-practice PRO protocol content and reporting where they occur. The objective of this study is to determine if these early findings are generalisable to UK cancer trials, and if so, how best we can bring about future improvements in clinical trials methodology to enhance the way PROs are assessed, managed and reported. Hypothesis: Trials in which the primary end point is based on a PRO will have more complete PRO protocol and publication components than trials in which PROs are secondary end points. Methods and analysis Completed National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Portfolio Cancer clinical trials (all cancer specialities/age-groups) will be included if they contain a primary/secondary PRO end point. The NIHR portfolio includes cancer trials, supported by a range of funders, adjudged as high-quality clinical research studies. The sample will be drawn from studies completed between 31 December 2000 and 1 March 2014 (n=1141) to allow sufficient time for completion of the final trial report and publication. Two reviewers will then review the protocols and arising publications of included trials to: (1) determine the completeness of their PRO-specific protocol content; (2) determine the proportion and completeness of PRO reporting in UK Cancer trials and (3) model factors associated with PRO protocol and reporting completeness and with PRO reporting proportion. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the ethics committee at University of Birmingham (ERN_15-0311). Trial findings will be disseminated via presentations at local, national and international conferences, peer

  13. Two years later: journals are not yet enforcing the ARRIVE guidelines on reporting standards for pre-clinical animal studies.

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Lidster, Katie; Sottomayor, Ana; Amor, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern that poor experimental design and lack of transparent reporting contribute to the frequent failure of pre-clinical animal studies to translate into treatments for human disease. In 2010, the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines were introduced to help improve reporting standards. They were published in PLOS Biology and endorsed by funding agencies and publishers and their journals, including PLOS, Nature research journals, and other top-tier journals. Yet our analysis of papers published in PLOS and Nature journals indicates that there has been very little improvement in reporting standards since then. This suggests that authors, referees, and editors generally are ignoring guidelines, and the editorial endorsement is yet to be effectively implemented.

  14. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F.; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.; Olson, Beth A.; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A.; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  15. Actual versus perceived peer sexual risk behavior in online youth social networks.

    PubMed

    Black, Sandra R; Schmiege, Sarah; Bull, Sheana

    2013-09-01

    Perception of peer behaviors is an important predictor of actual risk behaviors among youth. However, we lack understanding of peer influence through social media and of actual and perceived peer behavior concordance. The purpose of this research is to document the relationship between individual perception of and actual peer sexual risk behavior using online social networks. The data are a result of a secondary analysis of baseline self-reported and peer-reported sexual risk behavior from a cluster randomized trial including 1,029 persons from 162 virtual networks. Individuals (seeds) recruited up to three friends who then recruited additional friends, extending three waves from the seed. ANOVA models compared network means of actual participant behavior across categories of perceived behavior. Concordance varied between reported and perceived behavior, with higher concordance between perceived and reported condom use, multiple partners, concurrent partners, sexual pressure, and drug and alcohol use during sex. Individuals significantly over-reported risk and under-reported protective peer behaviors related to sex.

  16. The clinical utility and specificity of parent report of executive function among children with prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tanya T; Glass, Leila; Coles, Claire D; Kable, Julie A; May, Philip A; Kalberg, Wendy O; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Jones, Kenneth L; Riley, Edward P; Mattson, Sarah N

    2014-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) result in behavioral issues related to poor executive function (EF). This overlap may hinder clinical identification of alcohol-exposed children. This study examined the relation between parent and neuropsychological measures of EF and whether parent ratings aid in differential diagnosis. Neuropsychological measures of EF, including the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS), were administered to four groups of children (8-16 years): alcohol-exposed with ADHD (AE+, n=80), alcohol-exposed without ADHD (AE-, n=36), non-exposed with ADHD (ADHD, n=93), and controls (CON, n=167). Primary caregivers completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). For parent ratings, multivariate analyses of variance revealed main effects of Exposure and ADHD and an interaction between these factors, with significant differences between all groups on nearly all BRIEF scales. For neuropsychological measures, results indicated main effects of Exposure and ADHD, but no interaction. Discriminant function analysis indicated the BRIEF accurately classifies groups. These findings confirm compounded behavioral, but not neuropsychological, effects in the AE+ group over the other clinical groups. Parent-report was not correlated with neuropsychological performance in the clinical groups and may provide unique information about neurobehavior. Parent-report measures are clinically useful in predicting alcohol exposure regardless of ADHD. Results contribute to a neurobehavioral profile of prenatal alcohol exposure.

  17. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Psoriasis Patients with Clear Versus Almost Clear Skin in the Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Junko; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Shin, Daniel B.; Krueger, Gerald G.; Robertson, Andrew D.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Van Voorhees, Abby S.; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is little evidence to guide the establishment of treatment goals for moderate-to-severe psoriasis in the clinical setting. Objective To compare Dermatology Life Quality Index scores and prescription topical medication use between patients with clear versus almost clear skin. Methods Multicenter cross-sectional study of 97 patients with clear skin and 441 patients with almost clear skin receiving current systemic therapy or phototherapy for a primary indication of plaque psoriasis evaluated at one of ten US outpatient dermatology sites participating in the Dermatology Clinical Effectiveness Research Network. Results In adjusted analyses, patients with clear versus almost clear skin were more likely to report no impact of psoriasis on quality of life (relative risk 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.37–1.86). Patients with clear versus almost clear skin were also more likely to report no prescription topical medication use in the preceding week (relative risk 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.73–2.49). Limitations Cross-sectional design prohibits longitudinal assessment of outcomes. Conclusions and Relevance Clinically important differences in quality of life and prescription topical medication use exist between patients with clear versus almost clear skin. Collectively, our results indicate that achievement of clear skin may be an important clinical distinction among patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. PMID:24928705

  18. Replacement of missing lateral incisors with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic veneer-fixed dental prostheses: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Bissasu, Sami M; Al-houri, Nabil A

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message This report describes the use of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic veneer-fixed dental prostheses in replacing congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. This kind of prosthesis has an advantage over a lingual-retainer resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis in its capability of changing the color and shape of the abutment teeth. The prostheses provided an acceptable esthetics and comfort for the patient. PMID:25356269

  19. Clinical improvement of diffuse lymphangiomatosis with pegylated interferon alfa-2b therapy: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Michio; Funato, Michinori; Kanda, Kaori; Ito, Masahumi; Teramoto, Takahide; Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse lymphangiomatosis is a very rare congenital disease, characterized by diffuse or multifocal lymphangioma in the skeletal tissue, spleen, liver, mediastinum, and/or lung. The prognosis is usually poor, especially for children with thoracic lesion, and treatments for the disease are controversial. The authors report a 9-year-old boy with diffuse lymphangiomatosis involving the thorax with pleural effusions, the spleen, and systemic bone. The patient was treated with pegylated interferon alfa-2b, and achieved good clinical and radiological improvement.

  20. First report of an OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate related to Tn2006 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Espinal, P; Macià, M D; Roca, I; Gato, E; Ruíz, E; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Oliver, A; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Bou, G; Tomás, M; Vila, J

    2013-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate belonging to European clone II and sequence type 2 was recovered from a patient in the Son Espases hospital in Mallorca, Spain. Genetic analysis showed the presence of the bla(OXA-23) gene in association with the widely disseminated transposon Tn2006. This is the first reported identification of A. baumannii carrying bla(OXA-23) in Spain.

  1. Mirror-image anterior crown fabrication with computer-aided design and rapid prototyping technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Chang, Won-Gun

    2013-02-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication of a maxillary central incisor single crown with rapid prototyping (RP) technology. A patient with a recently replaced metal ceramic crown had discomfort due to the nonanatomic lingual contour of the crown. With computer-aided design (CAD) software and rapid prototyping (RP) technology, the shape of the contralateral central incisor was duplicated and reproduced to make a mirror-image for a new crown. The prosthodontic planning and treatment approach are discussed.

  2. Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) Assessment in Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review of Guidance for Trial Protocol Writers

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Melanie; Kyte, Derek; Duffy, Helen; Gheorghe, Adrian; Mercieca-Bebber, Rebecca; Ives, Jonathan; Draper, Heather; Brundage, Michael; Blazeby, Jane; King, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests there are inconsistencies in patient-reported outcome (PRO) assessment and reporting in clinical trials, which may limit the use of these data to inform patient care. For trials with a PRO endpoint, routine inclusion of key PRO information in the protocol may help improve trial conduct and the reporting and appraisal of PRO results; however, it is currently unclear exactly what PRO-specific information should be included. The aim of this review was to summarize the current PRO-specific guidance for clinical trial protocol developers. Methods and Findings We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL and Cochrane Library databases (inception to February 2013) for PRO-specific guidance regarding trial protocol development. Further guidance documents were identified via Google, Google scholar, requests to members of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration registered clinical trials units and international experts. Two independent investigators undertook title/abstract screening, full text review and data extraction, with a third involved in the event of disagreement. 21,175 citations were screened and 54 met the inclusion criteria. Guidance documents were difficult to access: electronic database searches identified just 8 documents, with the remaining 46 sourced elsewhere (5 from citation tracking, 27 from hand searching, 7 from the grey literature review and 7 from experts). 162 unique PRO-specific protocol recommendations were extracted from included documents. A further 10 PRO recommendations were identified relating to supporting trial documentation. Only 5/162 (3%) recommendations appeared in ≥50% of guidance documents reviewed, indicating a lack of consistency. Conclusions PRO-specific protocol guidelines were difficult to access, lacked consistency and may be challenging to implement in practice. There is a need to develop easily accessible consensus-driven PRO protocol guidance. Guidance should be aimed at ensuring key PRO information

  3. The clinical features of burns resulting from two aerial devices set off in a public fireworks display: 149 case reports.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaosheng; Sun, Dongjie; Zhong, Xiaochun; Liu, Maolin; Ni, Youdi

    2014-12-01

    We report the clinical features of 149 cases with aerial devices burns in a public fireworks display. The characteristic features included sudden onset, masses of terrified burn victims, small and deep wounds, mild disease conditions, and favorable prognosis. Unlike in home or illegal fireworks displays, the body areas most often involved were the extremity, chest, abdomen, and back, and most of the victims were adults in these public fireworks displays.

  4. Augmentation of an anterior edentulous ridge for fixed prosthodontics with combined use of orthodontics and surgery: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Capri, Diego; Albehbehani, Yousif; Smukler, Hyman

    2003-08-01

    Untreated periodontitis may lead to tooth and tissue loss that can result in diminished masticatory function and esthetic deformities. Combined periodontal/prosthodontic treatment for patients with advanced periodontal disease has been well documented, and treatment results can often be improved with the use of adjunctive orthodontic treatment such as forced eruption. This clinical report describes a method of preprosthetic preparation of an edentulous ridge for a fixed partial denture that incorporates the combined use of orthodontics and surgical ridge augmentation.

  5. The combination of a nylon and traditional partial removable dental prosthesis for improved esthetics: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masayasu; Wee, Alvin G; Miyamoto, Takanari; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    A benefit of a nylon partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) is the absence of a metal framework, providing improved esthetics. Unfortunately, the lack of a traditional framework reduces rigidity and the support of occlusal rests. This clinical report describes a combination of a nylon PRDP (polyamide denture base resin) and a traditional PRDP (framework/resin) for a Kennedy Class II, Modification 1, partially edentulous mandible.

  6. A Fixed Telescopic Prosthesis Designed to Retrieve and Convert to Fixed-Removable Combination Case: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Panagiota, Spyropoulou; Polyzois, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    This clinical report describes a fixed maxillary telescopic dental prosthesis (FTDP) employing milled base metal copings and a metal superstructure veneered with composite resin, for the restoration in a periodontally compromised patient with uncontrolled diabetes. The telescopic prosthesis framework design incorporated occlusal rest seats in key positions along the arch in case of future posterior tooth loss, in order to be converted to fixed - removable combination prosthesis. The mandible was restored with a conventional fixed ceramo-metal dental prosthesis. PMID:27688397

  7. A report on small team clinical ethics consultation programmes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, M; Asai, A; Itai, K; Bito, S

    2008-12-01

    Clinical ethics support, including ethics consultation, has become established in the field of medical practice throughout the world. This practice has been regarded as useful, most notably in the UK and the USA, in solving ethical problems encountered by both medical practitioners and those who receive medical treatment. In Japan, however, few services are available to respond to everyday clinical ethical issues, although a variety of difficult ethical problems arise daily in the medical field: termination of life support, euthanasia and questions about patient autonomy. In light of these conditions, a group of 17 volunteer educators and researchers from the area of biomedical ethics, including the authors, have formed the Clinical Ethics Support and Education Project, and began providing Japan's first small team clinical ethics consultation service in October, 2006. Members include scholars of biomedical ethics, scholars of philosophy and ethics, legal professionals and legal scholars, nurses and doctors, consisting of five women and 12 men. Consultation teams, made up of a small number of members, were organised each time a request for consultation was received. Over approximately 15 months (October 2006-December 2007), the programme received 22 consultation requests from medical practitioners and medical institutions, and three from the families of patients. In this paper, we will discuss the status of our consultation service and examples of consultation cases we have handled. In addition, we will examine the process of evaluating small team clinical ethics consultation services, as well as the strengths and weakness of such programmes.

  8. Minimally invasive atlantoaxial fusion: cadaveric study and report of 5 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Srikantha, Umesh; Khanapure, Kiran S; Jagannatha, Aniruddha T; Joshi, Krishna C; Varma, Ravi G; Hegde, Alangar S

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally invasive techniques are being increasingly used to treat disorders of the cervical spine. They have a potential to reduce the postoperative neck discomfort subsequent to extensive muscle dissection associated with conventional atlantoaxial fusion procedures. The aim of this paper was to elaborate on the technique and results of minimally invasive atlantoaxial fusion. MATERIALS Minimally invasive atlantoaxial fusion was done initially in 4 fresh-frozen cadavers and subsequently in 5 clinical cases. Clinical cases included patients with reducible atlantoaxial instability and undisplaced or minimally displaced odontoid fractures. The surgical technique is illustrated in detail. RESULTS Among the cadaveric specimens, all C-1 lateral mass screws were in the correct position and 2 of the 8 C-2 screws had a vertebral canal breach. Among clinical cases, all C-1 lateral mass screws were in the correct position. Only one C-2 screw had a Grade 2 vertebral canal breach, which was clinically insignificant. None of the patients experienced neurological worsening or implant-related complications at follow-up. Evidence of rib graft fusion or C1-2 joint fusion was successfully demonstrated in 4 cases, and flexion-extension radiographs done at follow-up did not show mobility in any case. CONCLUSIONS Minimally invasive atlantoaxial fusion is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional approach in selected cases. Larger series with direct comparison to the conventional approach will be required to demonstrate clinical benefit presumed to be associated with a minimally invasive approach.

  9. A taxometric analysis of actual Internet sports gambling behavior.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Julia; LaBrie, Richard A; Shaffer, Howard J

    2011-03-01

    This article presents findings from the first taxometric study of actual gambling behavior to determine whether we can represent the characteristics of extreme gambling as qualitatively distinct (i.e., taxonic) or as a point along a dimension. We analyzed the bets made during a 24-month study period by the 4,595 most involved gamblers among a cohort of 48,114 people using an Internet service to gamble on sporting events. We applied two taxometric procedures (i.e., MAMBAC and MAXCOV) to three indicators of betting behavior: total money lost, total number of bets, and total money wagered. The results fail to provide support for the view that the most involved Internet sports gamblers include a distinct category of gamblers. More research is necessary to clarify the similar features of recreational and extreme gamblers and the dimensions that scientists can use to measure these behaviors. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for clinical, research, and public policy activities.

  10. Report of a workshop on malignant lymphoma: a review of molecular and clinical risk profiling.

    PubMed

    Gleissner, B; Küppers, R; Siebert, R; Glass, B; Trümper, L; Hiddemann, W; Dreyling, M

    2008-06-01

    Molecular genetic analysis adds important information for lymphoma biology and classification, but the latter is challenged by recent improvement of combined chemo-immunotherapy. In aggressive lymphoma, molecular profiling identifies risk groups with certain genetic background but still the International Prognostic Index (IPI) remains the most important clinically applicable predictor of outcome. In follicular lymphoma (FL), the importance of the meshwork of bystander cells becomes increasingly evident. As combined immuno-chemotherapy improved the prognosis of the patients, several clinical trials indicated that the FLIPI still efficiently discriminates patients at risk for transformation and relapse, although several mechanisms of transformation seem to exist. In mantle cell lymphoma it has been proven that pathogenesis and prognosis mainly depend on deregulation of the cell cycle. A reliable clinical risk score could be established.

  11. A Family with Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome: Report of the Clinical and Genetic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Jung; Lee, You Kyung; Joo, Choun-Ki; Moon, Jung Il; Mok, Jee Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe clinical findings in a Korean family with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. Methods A retrospective review of clinical data about patients with diagnosed Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. Five affected members of the family underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination. We screened the forkhead box C1 gene and the pituitary homeobox 2 gene in patients. Peripheral blood leukocytes and buccal mucosal epithelial cells were obtained from seven members of a family with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. DNA was extracted and amplified by polymerase chain reaction, followed by direct sequencing. Results The affected members showed iris hypoplasia, iridocorneal adhesions, posterior embryotoxon, and advanced glaucoma in three generation. None had systemic anomalies. Two mutations including c.1362_1364insCGG and c.1142_1144insGGC were identified in forkhead box C1 in four affected family members. Conclusions This study may help to understand clinical findings and prognosis for patients with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. PMID:26240509

  12. Preparing students to be moral agents in clinical nursing practice. Report of a national study.

    PubMed

    Cassells, J M; Redman, B K

    1989-06-01

    Various types of teaching and learning strategies can be effectively employed to assist students' professional development in ethical decision-making skills. To be prepared to act as a moral agent in clinical practice, a terminal goal upon completion of the baccalaureate program is the student's ability to develop and consistently use a systematic approach/framework when confronted by an ethical dilemma. Eleven skill steps not necessarily exclusive or in sequence were outlined as selected activities that can be considered for the ethical decision process. Specific ethical issues that are germane and applicable to many patient care situations were investigated and identified as frequently occurring in clinical practice. Course work about these issues prior to completion of their nursing programs may be beneficial in preparing students with basic knowledge and skill about them as they enter or return to clinical practice.

  13. Diagnosis of Sanfilippo disease correlating clinical, radiological and biochemical findings-a case report.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Udit; Meshram, Ajay; Vagha, Jayant; Swarnkar, Kirti; Palandurkar, Kamlesh

    2012-10-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a group of genetic diseases and its diagnosis is a challenging task due to multiple differential diagnosis. We had combined clinical findings, radiological and ophthalmological features. Biochemical test for urine glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was done for confirmation of diagnosis in the patient. The case of Sanfilippo disease was characterized by slowly progressive, severe CNS involvement with mild somatic disease. Radiological features were suggestive of Sanfilippo disease and urine GAG test for MPS was positive in the case. With the clinical features we had multiple differential diagnoses. The radiological investigations minimized the list and the biochemical test confirmed GAG in urine. In this case the combination of clinical, radiological and biochemical findings confirmed the diagnosis of Sanfilippo disease.

  14. Clinical pharmacology of lysergic acid diethylamide: case reports and review of the treatment of intoxication.

    PubMed

    Blaho, K; Merigian, K; Winbery, S; Geraci, S A; Smartt, C

    1997-01-01

    Intoxication and overdose are common presenting complaints to the emergency department. Acute intoxication with lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has become a relatively rare event, especially when compared with the incidence of ethanol and cocaine intoxication. We recently had an outbreak of presumed LSD intoxications occurring over one weekend. All patients had attended a performance by the musical group The Grateful Dead. At present, LSD intoxication or overdose can only be suspected based on clinical findings because there are no readily available rapid laboratory tests for detecting either the parent compound or the metabolites of the drug. The clinical findings and outcomes of five patients with suspected LSD intoxication are presented. The pharmacological effects of LSD and treatment modalities of intoxication are reviewed. All patients were treated conservatively based on clinical signs and symptoms. Only one patient required hospital admission for combative behavior that was initially refractory to pharmacological restraint.

  15. First report of IMI-1-producing colistin-resistant Enterobacter clinical isolate in Ireland, March 2013.

    PubMed

    Boo, T W; O'Connell, N; Power, L; O'Connor, M; King, J; McGrath, E; Hill, R; Hopkins, K L; Woodford, N

    2013-08-01

    We report the first case in Ireland of an IMI-1 carbapenemase-producing Enterobacter asburiae, which was resistant to both colistin and fosfomycin. The circumstances under which this isolate was acquired were unclear. Several reports of IMI-producing Enterobacter spp. have emerged in recent years, and colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae is also increasingly reported. Laboratories should be aware of the unusual antibiograms of IMI-producing isolates.

  16. Turkish Ministry of Health, 2nd Turkish Medical General Assembly Clinical Oncology Study Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Vahit; Dağoğlu, Nergiz; Dede, İsmet; Akçakaya, Adem; Kerem, Mustafa; Göksel, Fatih; Özgür, Enver; Başkan, Emel; Yaylacı, Mustafa; Ceydeli, Adil; Baykara, Meltem; Kızıltan, Huriye Şenay; Kömürcü, Şeref; Gümüş, Mahmut; Türk, H. Mehmet; Demirhan, Recep; Akgün, Ali; Kadoglou, Naim; Yatman, Emre; Elbi, Cem Cüneyt; Güleç, Seza; Soran, Atilla; Özet, Ahmet; Keleştimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is an increase in the incidence of cancer, and consequently in mortality rates, both in the world and in Turkey. The increase in the incidence and mortality rate of cancer are more prominent in our country as well as in other developing countries. The aim of this workshop was to determine the current status on prevention, screening, early diagnosis and treatment of cancer in our country, to identify related shortcomings, specify solutions and to share these with health system operators, and to aid in implementation of these systems. Developments on palliative care were also evaluated. Materials and Methods The current situation in the practice of clinical oncology, related drawbacks, problems encountered during multidisciplinary approach and their solutions were discussed under several sub-headings during a 3-day meeting organized by the Turkish Ministry of Health (Türkiye Cumhuriyeti Sağlık Bakanlığı-TCSB) with participation of 16 scientists from Turkey and 6 from abroad, and the conclusions were reported. Results It is expected that the newly established Turkish Health Institutes Association (Türkiye Sağlık Enstitüleri Başkanlığı-TÜSEB) and the National Cancer Institute (Ulusal Kanser Enstitüsü) will provide a new framework in the field of oncology. The current positive findings include the increase in the number of scientists who carry out successful trials in oncology both in Turkey and abroad, the implementation of the national cancer registry program by the Cancer Control Department and the breast cancer registry program by the Turkish Federation of Breast Diseases Societies (Türkiye Meme Hastalıkları Dernekleri Federasyonu-TMHDF), and introduction of Cancer Early Diagnosis, Screening, and Training Centers (Kanser Erken Tanı, Tarama ve Eğitim Merkezi-KETEM) for the application of community-based cancer screening programs. In addition to these, obvious shortcomings related to education, implementation, management and

  17. [Cerebral hemorrhage induced by low-dose streptokinase: a pharmacologic paradox? Report of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Fedeli, F; Skouse, D; Messina, A

    1997-01-01

    A case of an important intracranial hemorrhage after a low dose (approx. 500,000 UI) of streptokinase in a 60 year-old woman suffering from myocardial infarction is presented. Clinical, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, lab and tomographic findings are described. The authors suggest a pharmacokinetic mechanism which could be responsible of a "paradox effect" (a powerful and dangerous effect of the drug when given in low dose) and they wonder whether in case of allergic reactions should it be better not to stop the infusion of the thrombolytic drug and be more liberal with the "symptomatic" drugs. Tha patient is still alive and the clinical conditions slowly progressing.

  18. [Neuropsychiatric phenotype of Angelman syndrome and clinical care: report of seven cases].

    PubMed

    Cote-Orozco, Juan E; Mera-Solarte, Paola Del Rocío; Espinosa-García, Eugenia

    2017-04-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder caused by a lack or reduction of expression of UBE3A located within chromosome 15, which codes for ubiquitin protein ligase E3A, which has a key role in synaptic development and neural plasticity. Its main features are developmental delay/intellectual disability, lack of speech, a characteristic behavioural profile, and epilepsy. We describe clinical features and management of seven cases with 15q11-13 deletion. Due to their life expectancy, knowing and managing its comorbidities is crucial to improve their quality of life. We review the diagnosis and long-term clinical care of patients with Angelman syndrome.

  19. Factors influencing mother-child reports of depressive symptoms and agreement among clinically referred depressed youngsters in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Eniko; Gentzler, Amy M.; George, Charles; Kapornai, Krisztina; Tamás, Zsuzsanna; Kovacs, Maria; Vetró, Ágnes

    2007-01-01

    Background Psychiatric assessments of children typically involve two informants, the child and the parent. Understanding discordance in their reports has been of interest to clinicians and researchers. We examine differences between mothers’ and children’s report of children’s depressive symptom severity, and factors that may influence their reports and level of agreement. We hypothesized that agreement between mother and child would improve if (1) the mother is depressed, due to improved recall of mood congruent symptoms, (2) the child is older, due to better social-cognitive and communication skills, and (3) the child is a female. Methods Subjects were 354 children (158 girls; mean age 11.69 years, s.d.: 2.05 years) with Major Depressive Disorder. Depressive symptoms were evaluated by a semi-structured interview separately with the mother and the child. Agreement on symptom severity was based on concordance of the presence and extent of symptoms. Results Maternal reports were significantly higher than their son’s but not daughters’. Girls, particularly with increasing age, reported higher levels of symptoms; however mothers’ reports were not affected by child sex or age. Maternal depression predicted more severe symptom reports for both children and mothers. Agreement between the mother and the child increased as children got older. Limitations The same clinician interviewed the mother and the child, which might inflate rates of agreement. However, this method mirrors clinical evaluation. Conclusions During a clinical interview one must consider the age and sex of the child and the depressive state of the mother in assimilating information about the child. PMID:17125844

  20. Clinical Assessment of Affective Instability: Comparing EMA Indices, Questionnaire Reports, and Retrospective Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhan, Marika B.; Trull, Timothy J.; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional self-report measures of psychopathology may be influenced by a variety of recall biases. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) reduces these biases by assessing individuals' experiences as they occur in their natural environments. This study examines the discrepancy between trait questionnaire, retrospective report, and EMA measures of…