Science.gov

Sample records for actual energy density

  1. Energy in density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  2. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  3. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  4. High energy density electrochemical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, J. J.; Williams, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Primary cell has an anode of lithium, a cathode containing dihaloisocyanuric acid, and a nonaqueous electrolyte comprised of a solution of lithium perchlorate in methyl formate. It produces an energy density of 213 watt hrs/lb and can achieve a high current density.

  5. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S.; Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  6. Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-01

    Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under

  7. Calibrated energy simulations of potential energy savings in actual retail buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhafi, Zuhaira

    Retail stores are commercial buildings with high energy consumption due to their typically large volumes and long hours of operation. This dissertation assesses heating, ventilating and air conditioning saving strategies based on energy simulations with input parameters from actual retail buildings. The dissertation hypothesis is that "Retail store buildings will save a significant amount of energy by (1) modifying ventilation rates, and/or (2) resetting set point temperatures. These strategies have shown to be beneficial in previous studies. As presented in the literature review, potential energy savings ranged from 0.5% to 30% without compromising indoor thermal comfort and indoor air quality. The retail store buildings can be ventilated at rates significantly lower than rates called for in the ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2010 while maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Therefore, two dissertation objectives are addressed: (1) Investigate opportunities to reduce ventilation rates that do not compromise indoor air quality in retail stores located in Central Pennsylvania, (2) Investigate opportunities to increase (in summer) and decrease (in winter) set point temperatures that do not compromise thermal comfort. This study conducted experimental measurements of ventilation rates required to maintain acceptable air quality and indoor environmental conditions requirements for two retail stores using ASHRAE Standard 62.1_2012. More specifically, among other parameters, occupancy density, indoor and outdoor pollutant concentrations, and indoor temperatures were measured continuously for one week interval. One of these retail stores were tested four times for a yearlong time period. Pollutants monitored were formaldehyde, carbon dioxide, particle size distributions and concentrations, as well as total volatile organic compounds. As a part of the base protocol, the number of occupants in each store was hourly counted during the test, and the results reveal that the occupant

  8. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  9. High-Energy-Density Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenes, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Capacitors capable of storing energy at high densities are being developed for use in pulse-power circuits in such diverse systems as defibrillators, particle- beam accelerators, microwave sources, and weapons. Like typical previously developed energy-storage capacitors, these capacitors are made from pairs of metal/solid-dielectric laminated sheets that are wound and pressed into compact shapes to fit into cans, which are then filled with dielectric fluids. Indeed, these capacitors can be fabricated largely by conventional fabrication techniques. The main features that distinguish these capacitors from previously developed ones are improvements in (1) the selection of laminate materials, (2) the fabrication of the laminated sheets from these materials, and (3) the selection of dielectric fluids. In simplest terms, a high-performance laminated sheet of the type used in these capacitors is made by casting a dielectric polymer onto a sheet of aluminized kraft paper. The dielectric polymer is a siloxane polymer that has been modified with polar pendant groups to increase its permittivity and dielectric strength. Potentially, this polymer is capable of withstanding an energy density of 7.5 J/cm3, which is four times that of the previous state-of-the-art-capacitor dielectric film material. However, the full potential of this polymer cannot be realized at present because (1) at thicknesses needed for optimum performance (.8.0 m), the mechanical strength of a film of this polymer is insufficient for incorporation into a wound capacitor and (2) at greater thickness, the achievable energy density decreases because of a logarithmic decrease in dielectric strength with increasing thickness. The aluminized kraft paper provides the mechanical strength needed for processing of the laminate and fabrication of the capacitor, and the aluminum film serves as an electrode layer. Because part of the thickness of the dielectric is not occupied by the modified siloxane polymer, the

  10. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  11. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  12. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  13. Density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T. R.; Tripathy, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    High density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is studied on the basis of the stiffest density dependence of asymmetric contribution to energy per nucleon in charge neutral n + p + e + μ matter under beta equilibrium. The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy obtained in this way is neither very stiff nor soft at high densities and is found to be in conformity with recent observations of neutron stars.

  14. Actual and Prescribed Energy and Protein Intakes for Very Low Birth Weight Infants: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Deborah Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine (1) whether prescribed and delivered energy and protein intakes during the first two weeks of life met Ziegler's estimated requirements for Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) infants, (2) if actual energy during the first week of life correlated with time to regain birth weight and reach full enteral nutrition (EN) defined as…

  15. Investigating the discrepancy between the predicted and actual energy performance of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demanuele, Christine

    The threat of climate change has increased the demand for energy efficiency in buildings, with various stakeholders requesting more accurate predictions of energy consumption, and energy consultants coming under increased pressure to guarantee the energy performance of buildings. This study aims to investigate the factors causing the discrepancy which currently exists between the predicted and actual energy performance of buildings, which will lead to a deeper understanding of this discrepancy and, ultimately, more accurate energy predictions. As part of this study, a non-domestic building in London was modelled and monitored, so as to identify the main contributors to the discrepancy between the predicted and actual energy consumption. In addition, sensitivity analysis was carried out on a number of input variables to establish the set of influential parameters, and to determine whether using such techniques would successfully predict the range in which building energy consumption is likely to fall. The results show that the uncertainty calculated from differential sensitivity analysis encompasses the actual energy performance of the building. The most variable and influential parameters are those which are controlled by occupants, therefore it is paramount that management and occupants are well-informed about the building operation for energy targets to be achieved. Although the sensitivity analysis methods employed are impractical for commercial use, it is possible to develop simpler methods, encompassing all stages of building design and operation, which would decrease the discrepancy between the actual and predicted energy performance of buildings. Such techniques would be invaluable to energy consultants, for whom the cost resting on uncertainties in predictions is substantial due to more demanding clients and fines liable to be paid if energy predictions go wrong. A better understanding of the discrepancy, together with more accurate predictions, would

  16. An insight into actual energy use and its drivers in high-performance buildings

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Cheng; Hong, Tianzhen; Yan, Da

    2014-07-12

    Using portfolio analysis and individual detailed case studies, we studied the energy performance and drivers of energy use in 51 high-performance office buildings in the U.S., Europe, China, and other parts of Asia. Portfolio analyses revealed that actual site energy use intensity (EUI) of the study buildings varied by a factor of as much as 11, indicating significant variation in real energy use in HPBs worldwide. Nearly half of the buildings did not meet the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004 energy target, raising questions about whether a building’s certification as high performing accuratelymore » indicates that a building is energy efficient and suggesting that improvement in the design and operation of HPBs is needed to realize their energy-saving potential. We studied the influence of climate, building size, and building technologies on building energy performance and found that although all are important, none are decisive factors in building energy use. EUIs were widely scattered in all climate zones. There was a trend toward low energy use in small buildings, but the correlation was not absolute; some small HPBs exhibited high energy use, and some large HPBs exhibited low energy use. We were unable to identify a set of efficient technologies that correlated directly to low EUIs. In two case studies, we investigated the influence of occupant behavior as well as operation and maintenance on energy performance and found that both play significant roles in realizing energy savings. We conclude that no single factor determines the actual energy performance of HPBs, and adding multiple efficient technologies does not necessarily improve building energy performance; therefore, an integrated design approach that takes account of climate, technology, occupant behavior, and operations and maintenance practices should be implemented to maximize energy savings in HPBs. As a result, these

  17. An insight into actual energy use and its drivers in high-performance buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Cheng; Hong, Tianzhen; Yan, Da

    2014-07-12

    Using portfolio analysis and individual detailed case studies, we studied the energy performance and drivers of energy use in 51 high-performance office buildings in the U.S., Europe, China, and other parts of Asia. Portfolio analyses revealed that actual site energy use intensity (EUI) of the study buildings varied by a factor of as much as 11, indicating significant variation in real energy use in HPBs worldwide. Nearly half of the buildings did not meet the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004 energy target, raising questions about whether a building’s certification as high performing accurately indicates that a building is energy efficient and suggesting that improvement in the design and operation of HPBs is needed to realize their energy-saving potential. We studied the influence of climate, building size, and building technologies on building energy performance and found that although all are important, none are decisive factors in building energy use. EUIs were widely scattered in all climate zones. There was a trend toward low energy use in small buildings, but the correlation was not absolute; some small HPBs exhibited high energy use, and some large HPBs exhibited low energy use. We were unable to identify a set of efficient technologies that correlated directly to low EUIs. In two case studies, we investigated the influence of occupant behavior as well as operation and maintenance on energy performance and found that both play significant roles in realizing energy savings. We conclude that no single factor determines the actual energy performance of HPBs, and adding multiple efficient technologies does not necessarily improve building energy performance; therefore, an integrated design approach that takes account of climate, technology, occupant behavior, and operations and maintenance practices should be implemented to maximize energy savings in HPBs. As a result, these findings are

  18. Study on Tire-attached Energy Harvester for Low-speed Actual Vehicle Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zheng, R.; Kaizuka, T.; Su, D.; Nakano, K.

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a tire-attached energy harvester, in which a cantilever beam pasted piezoelectric film and magnets with the same polarity are fabricated as a bistable vibrating system, for low-speed actual-vehicle driving. As the wheel rotates, the energy harvester is subjected to the noise produced from the interaction between the paved road and the rotating tire, and tangentially gravitational force as a periodic input can be applied to achieve the occurrence of stochastic resonance. Stochastic resonance can significantly stimulate the response of the bistable vibrating system, and therefore enhance the energy harvesting efficiency.

  19. High energy density in multisoliton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, Danial; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.

    2015-09-01

    Solitons are very effective in transporting energy over great distances and collisions between them can produce high energy density spots of relevance to phase transformations, energy localization and defect formation among others. It is then important to study how energy density accumulation scales in multisoliton collisions. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximal energy density that can be achieved in collision of N slowly moving kinks and antikinks in the integrable sine-Gordon field, remarkably, is proportional to N2, while the total energy of the system is proportional to N . This maximal energy density can be achieved only if the difference between the number of colliding kinks and antikinks is minimal, i.e., is equal to 0 for even N and 1 for odd N and if the pattern involves an alternating array of kinks and antikinks. Interestingly, for odd (even) N the maximal energy density appears in the form of potential (kinetic) energy, while kinetic (potential) energy is equal to zero. The results of the present study rely on the analysis of the exact multisoliton solutions for N =1 ,2 , and 3 and on the numerical simulation results for N =4 ,5 ,6 , and 7. The effect of weak Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian perturbations on the maximal energy density in multikink collisions is also discussed as well as that of the collision relative phase. Based on these results one can speculate that the soliton collisions in the sine-Gordon field can, in principle, controllably produce very high energy density. This can have important consequences for many physical phenomena described by the Klein-Gordon equations.

  20. High-energy-density flat flexible capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. D.; Zelik, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Manufacturing technique produces flat flexible capacitors of energy density greater than 0.1 J/g. Exposure of some of metalized surface of each layer provides sufficient film surface to ensure good electrical connection to each layer of capacitor.

  1. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  2. Intermolecular electrostatic energies using density fitting.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, G Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A

    2005-07-22

    A method is presented to calculate the electron-electron and nuclear-electron intermolecular Coulomb interaction energy between two molecules by separately fitting the unperturbed molecular electron density of each monomer. This method is based on the variational Coulomb fitting method which relies on the expansion of the ab initio molecular electron density in site-centered auxiliary basis sets. By expanding the electron density of each monomer in this way the integral expressions for the intermolecular electrostatic calculations are simplified, lowering the operation count as well as the memory usage. Furthermore, this method allows the calculation of intermolecular Coulomb interactions with any level of theory from which a one-electron density matrix can be obtained. Our implementation is initially tested by calculating molecular properties with the density fitting method using three different auxiliary basis sets and comparing them to results obtained from ab initio calculations. These properties include dipoles for a series of molecules, as well as the molecular electrostatic potential and electric field for water. Subsequently, the intermolecular electrostatic energy is tested by calculating ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface. Results are presented for electron densities obtained at four different levels of theory using two different basis sets, fitted with three auxiliary basis sets. Additionally, a one-dimensional electrostatic energy surface scan is performed for four different systems (H2O dimer, Mg2+-H2O, Cu+-H2O, and n-methyl-formamide dimer). Our results show a very good agreement with ab initio calculations for all properties as well as interaction energies.

  3. Material Release at High-Energy Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilson, P. M.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Shvydky, A.; Solodov, A. A.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Froula, D. H.

    2013-10-01

    High-energy-density matter releases after an inertial time, creating nonideal plasmas with unique thermodynamic properties. Picosecond-resolution x-ray radiography and flash (100-ps) x-ray penumbral imaging were used to measure the release of metal targets heated by a powerful flux of energetic electrons or protons generated by the OMEGA EP Laser System. The data show target decompression over a nanosecond period after the initial target-heating phase. The measured plasma density profiles and target-release speeds were used to infer the pressure-density release isentropes. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  5. Towards the Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, Mario; More, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Pei, Junchen; Sarich, J.; Schunck, Nicolas F; Staszczak, A.; Wild, S.

    2009-01-01

    The UNEDF SciDAC project to develop and optimize the energy density functional for atomic nuclei using state-of-the-art computational infrastructure is briefly described. The ultimate goal is to replace current phenomenological models of the nucleus with a well-founded microscopic theory with minimal uncertainties, capable of describing nuclear data and extrapolating to unknown regions.

  6. Simulated thermal energy demand and actual energy consumption in refurbished and non-refurbished buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, C. A.; Visa, I.; Duta, A.

    2016-08-01

    The EU legal frame imposes the Nearly Zero Energy Buildings (nZEB) status to any new public building starting with January 1st, 2019 and for any other new building starting with 2021. Basically, nZEB represents a Low Energy Building (LEB) that covers more than half of the energy demand by using renewable energy systems installed on or close to it. Thus, two steps have to be followed in developing nZEB: (1) reaching the LEB status through state- of-the art architectural and construction solutions (for the new buildings) or through refurbishing for the already existent buildings, followed by (2) implementing renewables; in Romania, over 65% of the energy demand in a building is directly linked to heating, domestic hot water (DHW), and - in certain areas - for cooling. Thus, effort should be directed to reduce the thermal energy demand to be further covered by using clean and affordable systems: solar- thermal systems, heat pumps, biomass, etc. or their hybrid combinations. Obviously this demand is influenced by the onsite climatic profile and by the building performance. An almost worst case scenario is approached in the paper, considering a community implemented in a mountain area, with cold and long winters and mild summers (Odorheiul Secuiesc city, Harghita county, Romania). Three representative types of buildings are analysed: multi-family households (in blocks of flats), single-family houses and administrative buildings. For the first two types, old and refurbished buildings were comparatively discussed.

  7. High Energy Density Utracapacitors: Low-Cost, High Energy and Power Density, Nanotube-Enhanced Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FastCAP is improving the performance of an ultracapacitor—a battery-like electronic device that can complement, and possibly even replace, an HEV or EV battery pack. Ultracapacitors have many advantages over conventional batteries, including long lifespans (over 1 million cycles, as compared to 10,000 for conventional batteries) and better durability. Ultracapacitors also charge more quickly than conventional batteries, and they release energy more quickly. However, ultracapacitors have fallen short of batteries in one key metric: energy density—high energy density means more energy storage. FastCAP is redesigning the ultracapacitor’s internal structure to increase its energy density. Ultracapacitors traditionally use electrodes made of irregularly shaped, porous carbon. FastCAP’s ultracapacitors are made of tiny, aligned carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide a regular path for ions moving in and out of the ultracapacitor’s electrode, increasing the overall efficiency and energy density of the device.

  8. Nonlocal kinetic-energy-density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E. |

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we present nonlocal kinetic-energy functionals {ital T}[{ital n}] within the average density approximation (ADA) framework, which do not require any extra input when applied to any electron system and recover the exact kinetic energy and the linear response function of a homogeneous system. In contrast with previous ADA functionals, these present good behavior of the long-range tail of the exact weight function. The averaging procedure for the kinetic functional (averaging the Fermi momentum of the electron gas, instead of averaging the electron density) leads to a functional without numerical difficulties in the calculation of extended systems, and it gives excellent results when applied to atoms and jellium surfaces. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag. The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag-2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed-power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NTF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  10. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag . The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag -2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed- power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NIF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  11. Self-reported versus Actual Energy Intake in Youth with and without Loss of Control Eating

    PubMed Central

    Wolkoff, Laura E.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Kozlosky, Merel; Columbo, Kelli M.; Elliott, Camden A.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Osborn, Robyn L.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2010-01-01

    Episodes of loss of control over eating (LOC) in children and adolescents —often characterized by the consumption of highly palatable dessert and snack-type foods—have been associated with a lack of awareness while eating that could lead to under- or over-estimation of how much food is consumed. However, little is known about the reporting accuracy of food intake in youth with and without LOC eating. One-hundred-fifty-six girls and boys were administered the Eating Disorder Examination to assess for the presence of LOC eating. Youth were queried regarding the amounts of foods consumed directly following a multi-item, laboratory buffet test meal. Children with LOC (n=42) did not differ significantly from youth without LOC (n=114) in reporting accuracy of total food intake (reported minus actual energy intake: 153.0 ± 59.6 v. 96.9 ± 36.0 kcal; p=0.42). However, compared to those without LOC, children with LOC were less accurate at reporting percentage of energy intake from carbohydrate (p=0.01). Youth with LOC were also less accurate at reporting their intake of desserts (p=0.04). Findings point to the possibility that youth with LOC may have poorer recall of sweet food consumption. Future research is required to examine whether poorer recall reflects a lack of awareness while eating palatable, sweet foods. PMID:21184968

  12. Self-reported vs. actual energy intake in youth with and without loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, Laura E; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Shomaker, Lauren B; Kozlosky, Merel; Columbo, Kelli M; Elliott, Camden A; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Osborn, Robyn L; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2011-01-01

    Episodes of loss of control over eating (LOC) in children and adolescents--often characterized by the consumption of highly palatable dessert and snack-type foods--have been associated with a lack of awareness while eating that could lead to under- or over-estimation of how much food is consumed. However, little is known about the reporting accuracy of food intake in youth with and without LOC eating. One hundred fifty-six girls and boys were administered the Eating Disorder Examination to assess for the presence of LOC eating. Youth were queried regarding the amounts of foods consumed directly following a multi-item, laboratory buffet test meal. Children with LOC (n=42) did not differ significantly from youth without LOC (n=114) in reporting accuracy of total food intake (reported minus actual energy intake: 153.0 ± 59.6 vs. 96.9 ± 36.0 kcal; p=0.42). However, compared to those without LOC, children with LOC were less accurate at reporting percentage of energy intake from carbohydrate (p=0.01). Youth with LOC were also less accurate at reporting their intake of desserts (p=0.04). Findings point to the possibility that youth with LOC may have poorer recall of sweet food consumption. Future research is required to examine whether poorer recall reflects a lack of awareness while eating palatable, sweet foods.

  13. Actual and prescribed energy and protein intakes for very low birth weight infants: An observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allevato, Anthony J.

    Objectives: To determine (1) whether prescribed and delivered energy and protein intakes during the first two weeks of life met Ziegler's estimated requirements for Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) infants, (2) if actual energy during the first week of life correlated with time to regain birth weight and reach full enteral nutrition (EN) defined as 100 kcal/kg/day, (3) if growth velocity from time to reach full EN to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA) met Ziegler's estimated fetal growth velocity (16 g/kg/day), and (4) growth outcomes at 36 weeks' PMA. Study design: Observational study of feeding, early nutrition and early growth of 40 VLBW infants <30 weeks GA at birth in three newborn intensive care units NICUs. Results: During the first week of life, the percentages of prescribed and delivered energy (69% [65 kcal/kg/day]) and protein (89% [3.1 g/kg/day]) were significantly less than theoretical estimated requirements. Delivered intakes were 15% less than prescribed because of numerous interruptions in delivery and medical complications. During the second week, the delivered intakes of energy (90% [86 kcal/kg/day]) and protein (102% [3.5 g/kg/day]) improved although the differences between prescribed and delivered were consistently 15%. Energy but not protein intake during the first week was significantly related to time to reach full EN. Neither energy nor protein intake significantly correlated with days to return to birth weight. The average growth velocity from the age that full EN was attained to 36 weeks' PMA (15 g/kg/day) was significantly less than the theoretical estimated fetal growth velocity (16 g/kg/day) (p<0.03). A difference of 1 g/kg/day represents a total deficit of 42 - 54 grams over the course of a month. At 36 weeks' PMA, 53% of the VLBW infants had extrauterine growth restriction, or EUGR (<10th percentile) on the Fenton growth grid and 34% had EUGR on the Lubchenco growth grid. Conclusions: The delivered nutrient intakes were consistently less

  14. Inductor Geometry With Improved Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, H; Ngo, KDT; Moss, J; Lim, MHF; Rey, E

    2014-10-01

    The "constant-flux" concept is leveraged to achieve high magnetic-energy density, leading to inductor geometries with height significantly lower than that of conventional products. Techniques to shape the core and to distribute the winding turns to shape a desirable field profile are described for the two basic classes of magnetic geometries: those with the winding enclosed by the core and those with the core enclosed by the winding. A relatively constant flux distribution is advantageous not only from the density standpoint, but also from the thermal standpoint via the reduction of hot spots, and from the reliability standpoint via the suppression of flux crowding. In this journal paper on a constant-flux inductor (CFI) with enclosed winding, the foci are operating principle, dc analysis, and basic design procedure. Prototype cores and windings were routed from powder-iron disks and copper sheets, respectively. The design of CFI was validated by the assembled inductor prototype.

  15. Density of States for Warped Energy Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.; Fornari, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Warping of energy bands can affect the density of states (DOS) in ways that can be large or subtle. Despite their potential for significant practical impacts on materials properties, these effects have not been rigorously demonstrated previously. Here we rectify this using an angular effective mass formalism that we have developed. To clarify the often confusing terminology in this field, “band warping” is precisely defined as pertaining to any multivariate energy function E(k) that does not admit a second-order differential at an isolated critical point in k-space, which we clearly distinguish from band non-parabolicity. We further describe band “corrugation” as a qualitative form of band warping that increasingly deviates from being twice differentiable at an isolated critical point. These features affect the density-of-states and other parameters ascribed to band warping in various ways. We demonstrate these effects, providing explicit calculations of DOS and their effective masses for warped energy dispersions originally derived by Kittel and others. Other physical and mathematical examples are provided to demonstrate fundamental distinctions that must be drawn between DOS contributions that originate from band warping and contributions that derive from band non-parabolicity. For some non-degenerate bands in thermoelectric materials, this may have profound consequences of practical interest.

  16. Density of States for Warped Energy Bands

    PubMed Central

    Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.; Fornari, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Warping of energy bands can affect the density of states (DOS) in ways that can be large or subtle. Despite their potential for significant practical impacts on materials properties, these effects have not been rigorously demonstrated previously. Here we rectify this using an angular effective mass formalism that we have developed. To clarify the often confusing terminology in this field, “band warping” is precisely defined as pertaining to any multivariate energy function E(k) that does not admit a second-order differential at an isolated critical point in k-space, which we clearly distinguish from band non-parabolicity. We further describe band “corrugation” as a qualitative form of band warping that increasingly deviates from being twice differentiable at an isolated critical point. These features affect the density-of-states and other parameters ascribed to band warping in various ways. We demonstrate these effects, providing explicit calculations of DOS and their effective masses for warped energy dispersions originally derived by Kittel and others. Other physical and mathematical examples are provided to demonstrate fundamental distinctions that must be drawn between DOS contributions that originate from band warping and contributions that derive from band non-parabolicity. For some non-degenerate bands in thermoelectric materials, this may have profound consequences of practical interest. PMID:26905029

  17. Surprises in High Energy Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Edward Teller's work on what is now called High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) is not so well known as some of his work in other areas of physics. Yet he made substantial contributions since the 1940s and the models that he developed and the problems that he worked on are still relevant today. In this talk we shall look at two major areas in HEDP with the first treated more historically and the second more with a view to recent work that the author and others have undertaken which perhaps indicates future directions.

  18. High energy density redox flow device

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  19. Diffuse Waves and Energy Densities Near Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Rodriguez-Castellanos, A.; Campillo, M.; Perton, M.; Luzon, F.; Perez-Ruiz, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Green function can be retrieved from averaging cross correlations of motions within a diffuse field. In fact, it has been shown that for an elastic inhomogeneous, anisotropic medium under equipartitioned, isotropic illumination, the average cross correlations are proportional to the imaginary part of Green function. For instance coda waves are due to multiple scattering and their intensities follow diffusive regimes. Coda waves and the noise sample the medium and effectively carry information along their paths. In this work we explore the consequences of assuming both source and receiver at the same point. From the observable side, the autocorrelation is proportional to the energy density at a given point. On the other hand, the imaginary part of the Green function at the source itself is finite because the singularity of Green function is restricted to the real part. The energy density at a point is proportional with the trace of the imaginary part of Green function tensor at the source itself. The Green function availability may allow establishing the theoretical energy density of a seismic diffuse field generated by a background equipartitioned excitation. We study an elastic layer with free surface and overlaying a half space and compute the imaginary part of the Green function for various depths. We show that the resulting spectrum is indeed closely related to the layer dynamic response and the corresponding resonant frequencies are revealed. One implication of present findings lies in the fact that spatial variations may be useful in detecting the presence of a target by its signature in the distribution of diffuse energy. These results may be useful in assessing the seismic response of a given site if strong ground motions are scarce. It suffices having a reasonable illumination from micro earthquakes and noise. We consider that the imaginary part of Green function at the source is a spectral signature of the site. The relative importance of the peaks of

  20. Spectroscopy of compressed high energy density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, N. C.; Asfaw, A.; Hammel, B.; Keane, C.; Back, C. A.; Calisti, A.; Mossé, C.; Stamm, R.; Talin, B.; Wark, J. S.; Lee, R. W.; Klein, L.

    1996-06-01

    A theoretical and experimental time-resolved spectroscopic investigation of indirectly driven microsphere implosions is described. The plasma dynamics is studied for several fill gases with a trace amount of argon. Through an analysis of the line profile of Ar XVII 1s2-1s3p 1P, with a line center position at Eυ=3684 eV, the evolution of the plasma density and temperature as a function of fill gas is examined. The theoretical calculations are performed with a fast computer code, which has been previously benchmarked through the analysis of specific complex ionic spectra in hot dense plasmas. The experimental aspect of the work utilizes the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Nova 10 beam laser facility to indirectly drive the implosion of a gas filled plastic microsphere contained in a gold Holhraum target. The dynamical density measurement is derived from a streak camera linewidth measurement and a comparison with the computed profile. Calculations demonstrate that in certain cases there can be a substantial ion dynamics effect on the line shape. The frequency fluctuation model is used to compute the effect on the line profile and a comparison with the experimental spectra provides evidence that ion dynamics may be affecting the line shape. This study provides a method for obtaining an improved understanding of the basic processes dominating the underlying plasma physics of matter compressed to a state of high energy density.

  1. Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez De Tejada, H. A.; Durand-Manterola, H. J.; Lundin, R.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Sauvaud, J.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake H. Pérez-de-Tejada1, H. Durand-Manterola1, R. Lundin2, S. Barabash2, T. L. Zhang3, A. Sauvaud4, M. Reyes-Ruiz5. 1 - Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, México, D. F. 2 - Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Umea, Sweden 3 - Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria 4 - CESR, Toulouse, France 5 - Institute of Astronomy, UNAM, Ensenada, México Measurements conducted in the Venus wake with the magnetometer and the Aspera-4 plasma instrument of the Venus Express spacecraft show that average values of the kinetic energy density of the plasma in that region are comparable to average local values of the magnetic energy density. Observations were carried out in several orbits of the Venus Express near the midnight plane and suggest that the total energy content in the Venus wake is distributed with nearly comparable values between the plasma and the magnetic field. Processes associated with the solar wind erosion of planetary ions from the polar magnetic regions of the ionosphere are involved in the comparable distribution of both energy components.

  2. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  3. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-11-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  4. High Energy Density aluminum/oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell, an example of which is the metal/air cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, with high energy and power densities, environmentally acceptable and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum/oxygen system is currently under development for a prototype unmanned, undersea vehicle (UUV) for the US navy and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys, and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from 5 to 150 mA/cm 2 have been identified, such materials being essential to realize mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 h in a large scale, half-cell system.

  5. Perspectives on High-Energy-Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2008-11-01

    Much of 21st century plasma physics will involve work to produce, understand, control, and exploit very non-traditional plasmas. High-energy density (HED) plasmas are often examples, variously involving strong Coulomb interactions and few particles per Debeye sphere, dominant radiation effects, strongly relativistic effects, or strongly quantum-mechanical behavior. Indeed, these and other modern plasma systems often fall outside the early standard theoretical definitions of ``plasma''. This presentation will focus on two types of HED plasmas that exhibit non-traditional behavior. Our first example will be the plasmas produced by extremely strong shock waves. Shock waves are present across the entire realm of plasma densities, often in space or astrophysical contexts. HED shock waves (at pressures > 1 Mbar) enable studies in many areas, from equations of state to hydrodynamics to radiation hydrodynamics. We will specifically consider strongly radiative shocks, in which the radiative energy fluxes are comparable to the mechanical energy fluxes that drive the shocks. Modern HED facilities can produce such shocks, which are also present in dense, energetic, astrophysical systems such as supernovae. These shocks are also excellent targets for advanced simulations due to their range of spatial scales and complex radiation transport. Our second example will be relativistic plasmas. In general, these vary from plasmas containing relativistic particle beams, produced for some decades in the laboratory, to the relativistic thermal plasmas present for example in pulsar winds. Laboratory HED relativistic plasmas to date have been those produced by laser beams of irradiance ˜ 10^18 to 10^22 W/cm^2 or by accelerator-produced HED electron beams. These have applications ranging from generation of intense x-rays to production of proton beams for radiation therapy to acceleration of electrons. Here we will focus on electron acceleration, a spectacular recent success and a rare

  6. High Energy Density Matter for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrick, Patrick G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) program is to identify, develop, and exploit high energy atomic and molecular systems as energetic sources for rocket propulsion applications. It is a high risk, high payoff program that incorporates both basic and applied research, experimental and theoretical efforts, and science and engineering efforts. The HEDM program is co-sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the Phillips Laboratory (PURKS). It includes both in-house and contracted University/Industry efforts. Technology developed by the HEDM program offers the opportunity for significant breakthroughs in propulsion system capabilities over the current state-of-the-art. One area of great interest is the use of cryogenic solids to increase the density of the propellant and to act as a stable matrix for storage of energetic materials. No cryogenic solid propellant has ever been used in a rocket, and there remain engineering challenges to such a propellant. However, these solids would enable a wide class of highly energetic materials by providing an environment that is at very low temperatures and is a physical barrier to recombination or energy loss reactions. Previous to our experiments only hydrogen atoms had been isolated in solid hydrogen. To date we have succeeded in trapping B, Al, Li, N, and Mg atoms in solid H2. Small molecules, such as B2 and LiB, are also of interest. Current efforts involve the search for new energetic small molecules, increasing free radical concentrations up to 5 mole percent, and scale-up for propulsion testing.

  7. Actual evapotranspiration modeling using the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Maupin, Molly A.; Kenny, Joan F.; Perry, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Remote-sensing technology and surface-energy-balance methods can provide accurate and repeatable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) when used in combination with local weather datasets over irrigated lands. Estimates of ETa may be used to provide a consistent, accurate, and efficient approach for estimating regional water withdrawals for irrigation and associated consumptive use (CU), especially in arid cropland areas that require supplemental water due to insufficient natural supplies from rainfall, soil moisture, or groundwater. ETa in these areas is considered equivalent to CU, and represents the part of applied irrigation water that is evaporated and/or transpired, and is not available for immediate reuse. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study demonstrated the application of the remote-sensing-based Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to estimate 10-year average ETa at 1-kilometer resolution on national and regional scales, and compared those ETa values to the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Use Information Program’s 1995 county estimates of CU. The operational version of the operational SSEB (SSEBop) method is now used to construct monthly, county-level ETa maps of the conterminous United States for the years 2000, 2005, and 2010. The performance of the SSEBop was evaluated using eddy covariance flux tower datasets compiled from 2005 datasets, and the results showed a strong linear relationship in different land cover types across diverse ecosystems in the conterminous United States (correlation coefficient [r] ranging from 0.75 to 0.95). For example, r for woody savannas (0.75), grassland (0.75), forest (0.82), cropland (0.84), shrub land (0.89), and urban (0.95). A comparison of the remote-sensing SSEBop method for estimating ETa and the Hamon temperature method for estimating potential ET (ETp) also was conducted, using regressions of all available county averages of ETa for 2005 and 2010, and yielded correlations of r = 0

  8. Energy density of bloaters in the upper Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pothoven, Steven A.; Bunnell, David B.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Gorman, Owen T.; Roseman, Edward F.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the energy density of bloaters Coregonus hoyi as a function of fish size across Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Superior in 2008–2009 and assessed how differences in energy density are related to factors such as biomass density of bloaters and availability of prey. Additional objectives were to compare energy density between sexes and to compare energy densities of bloaters in Lake Michigan between two time periods (1998–2001 and 2008–2009). For the cross-lake comparisons in 2008, energy density increased with fish total length (TL) only in Lake Michigan. Mean energy density adjusted for fish size was 8% higher in bloaters from Lake Superior than in bloaters from Lake Huron. Relative to fish in these two lakes, small (175 mm TL) bloaters had higher energy density. In 2009, energy density increased with bloater size, and mean energy density adjusted for fish size was about 9% higher in Lake Michigan than in Lake Huron (Lake Superior was not sampled during 2009). Energy density of bloaters in Lake Huron was generally the lowest among lakes, reflecting the relatively low densities of opossum shrimp Mysis diluviana and the relatively high biomass of bloaters reported for that lake. Other factors, such as energy content of prey, growing season, or ontogenetic differences in energy use strategies, may also influence cross-lake variation in energy density. Mean energy density adjusted for length was 7% higher for female bloaters than for male bloaters in Lakes Michigan and Huron. In Lake Superior, energy density did not differ between males and females. Finally, energy density of bloaters in Lake Michigan was similar between the periods 2008–2009 and 1998–2001, possibly due to a low population abundance of bloaters, which could offset food availability changes linked to the loss of prey such as the amphipods Diporeia spp.

  9. SURFACE SYMMETRY ENERGY OF NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONALS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, N; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W; Bender, M; Pei, J

    2010-12-20

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron-rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  10. Energy density fluctuations in early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Guardo, G. L.; Ruggieri, M.; Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    The primordial nucleosinthesys of the element can be influenced by the transitions of phase that take place after the Big Bang, such as the QCD transition. In order to study the effect of this phase transition, in this work we compute the time evolution of thermodynamical quantities of the early universe, focusing on temperature and energy density fluctuations, by solving the relevant equations of motion using as input the lattice QCD equation of state to describe the strongly interacting matter in the early universe plasma. We also study the effect of a primordial strong magnetic field by means of a phenomenological equation of state. Our results show that small inhomogeneities of strongly interacting matter in the early Universe are moderately damped during the crossover.

  11. The Color of High Energy Density Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Y.; Widmann, K.

    2005-07-01

    The study of non-equilibrium phase transitions is a rapidly developing field. Non-thermal melting has been observed in femtosecond laser heated semiconductors such as silicon. This is thought to result from the excitation of valence electrons to the conduction band, giving rise to anti-bonding states. In metals, the process of melting under ultrafast laser excitation is not clearly understood. In our experiment, we measure the broadband (400-800nm) optical reflectivity and transmissivity of freestanding, 30nm-thick gold foils heated with 150fs, 400nm laser light. Prior to laser excitation the sample shows strong reflectivity for wavelengths above 500nm. This is due to interband (d to s/p) transitions, thus giving gold its characteristic color. The reflectivity and transmissivity spectra of the heated sample (hence the color of gold) change substantially with laser excitation energy densities. Such spectral signatures offer a new means of probing electronic and structure behaviors associated with non-equilibrium phase transitions. *Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California LLNL under contract #W- 7405-ENG-48. This research was also supported by NSERC, Canada.

  12. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joe A.; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold:  First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties;  Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data;  Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  13. Estimating the actual ET from a pecan farm using the OPEC energy-balance and Penman- Monteith methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debele, B.; Bawazir, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    Accurate estimation of ET from field crops/orchards is the basis for better irrigation water management. In areas like Mesilla Valley, NM, where water is scarce, it is even more important to precisely determine the crop ET. An OPEC energy balance system was run for 117 days (June 22 October 14, 2001) in a matured pecan farm at Mesilla Valley, NM. The actual evapotranspiration (ET) from pecan orchards was determined from the surface energy balance as a residual, having measured the net radiation, soil heat flux, and sensible heat components using the OPEC method. Since pecans are large trees, we have also examined the effect of including thermal energies stored in the air (Ga) and plant canopy (Gc), on top of the commonly used thermal energy stored in the soil (Gs), on surface energy balance, and hence ET. The results indicate that incorporating thermal energies stored in the air and canopy has a significant effect on total energy storage for shorter temporal resolutions, such as 30-minutes and an hour. Conversely, for longer temporal resolutions (e.g., diurnal and monthly averages), the effect of including thermal energies stored in the air and vegetation on total thermal energy storage is negligible. Our results also showed that the bulk of the total thermal energy storage (G = Gs + Ga + Gc) in the surface energy balance was stored in the soil (Gs). In addition, we have also determined the crop coefficient (Kc) of pecan by combining the actual ET obtained from the OPEC method and potential ET (ET0) calculated using weather data in the surrounding area. Our average pecan Kc values were comparable with the ones reported by other researchers using different methods. We conclude that the OPEC energy balance method can be used to calculate Kc values for pecan whereby farmers and extension agents use the calculated Kc values in combination with ET0 to determine the consumptive use of pecan trees.

  14. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals.

  15. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  16. Symmetry Energy as a Function of Density and Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Danielewicz, Pawel; Lee, Jenny

    2007-10-26

    Energy in nuclear matter is, in practice, completely characterized at different densities and asymmetries, when the density dependencies of symmetry energy and of energy of symmetric matter are specified. The density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities produces mass dependence of nuclear symmetry coefficient and, thus, can be constrained by that latter dependence. We deduce values of the mass dependent symmetry coefficients, by using excitation energies to isobaric analog states. The coefficient systematic, for intermediate and high masses, is well described in terms of the symmetry coefficient values of a{sub a}{sup V} = (31.5-33.5) MeV for the volume coefficient and a{sub a}{sup S} = (9-12) MeV for the surface coefficient. These two further correspond to the parameter values describing density dependence of symmetry energy, of L{approx}95 MeV and K{sub sym}{approx}25 MeV.

  17. Theoretical study of lithium ionic conductors by electronic stress tensor density and electronic kinetic energy density.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Fujii, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, Li3PO4 and Li3PS4, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Electrode/Dielectric Strip For High-Energy-Density Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.

    1994-01-01

    Improved unitary electrode/dielectric strip serves as winding in high-energy-density capacitor in pulsed power supply. Offers combination of qualities essential for high energy density: high permittivity of dielectric layers, thinness, and high resistance to breakdown of dielectric at high electric fields. Capacitors with strip material not impregnated with liquid.

  19. How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying marketfailures in the end use of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

    2007-09-01

    "Getting the price right" is a goal of many market-orientedenergy policies. However, there are situations where the consumer payingfor the energy is separate from the owner of the energy-using device.Economists call this a "principal agent problem". A team organised by theInternational Energy Agency examined seven end uses and one sector whereprincipal agent problems existed: refrigerators, water heating, spaceheating, vending machines, commercial HVAC, company cars, lighting, andfirms. These investigations took place in Australia, Japan, theNetherlands, Norway, and the United States. About 2 100 percent of theenergy consumed in the end uses examined was affected by principal agentproblems. The size (and sometimes even the existence) varied greatly fromone country to another but all countries had significant amounts ofenergy affected by principal agent problems. The presence of a marketfailure does not mean that energy use would fall substantially if thefailure were eliminated; however it does suggest that raising energyprices such as in the form of carbon taxes will not necessarily increaseefficiency investments.

  20. High energy density propulsion systems and small engine dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This study investigates all possible methods of powering small unmanned vehicles, provides reasoning for the propulsion system down select, and covers in detail the design and production of a dynamometer to confirm theoretical energy density calculations for small engines. Initial energy density calculations are based upon manufacturer data, pressure vessel theory, and ideal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. Engine tests are conducted with a braking type dynamometer for constant load energy density tests, and show true energy densities in excess of 1400 WH/lb of fuel. Findings and Conclusions. Theory predicts lithium polymer, the present unmanned system energy storage device of choice, to have much lower energy densities than other conversion energy sources. Small engines designed for efficiency, instead of maximum power, would provide the most advantageous method for powering small unmanned vehicles because these engines have widely variable power output, loss of mass during flight, and generate rotational power directly. Theoretical predictions for the energy density of small engines has been verified through testing. Tested values up to 1400 WH/lb can be seen under proper operating conditions. The implementation of such a high energy density system will require a significant amount of follow-on design work to enable the engines to tolerate the higher temperatures of lean operation. Suggestions are proposed to enable a reliable, small-engine propulsion system in future work. Performance calculations show that a mature system is capable of month long flight times, and unrefueled circumnavigation of the globe.

  1. High power density thermophotovoltaic energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noreen, Darryl L.; Du, Honghua

    1995-01-01

    R&D Technologies is developing thermophotovoltaic (TPV) technology based on the use of porous/fibrous ceramic broadband-type emitter designs that utilize recuperative or regenerative techniques to improve thermal efficiency and power density. This paper describes preliminary estimates of what will be required to accomplish sufficient power density to develop a practical, commercially-viable TPV generator. It addresses the needs for improved, thermal shock-resistant, long-life porous/fibrous ceramic emitters and provides information on the photocell technology required to achieve acceptable power density in broadband-type (with selective filter) TPV systems. TPV combustors/systems operating at a temperature of 1500 °C with a broadband-type emitter is proposed as a viable starting point for cost-effective TPV conversion. Based on current projections for photocell cost, system power densities of 7.5-10 watts per square centimeter of emitter area will be required for TPV to become a commercially viable technology.

  2. Energy dependence of island nucleation density during ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, Joshua M.; Brock, Joel D.

    2002-03-01

    Thin copper films were grown on single crystal copper substrates using highly collimated copper ion beams with precisely controlled incidence energies. The energetic collisions between the copper ions and the surface can form adatom-vacancy pairs or sputter eject atoms into the vaccuum. Island nucleation densities are affected by these atomistic mechanisms, which increase surface adatom densities and surface defect densities. This paper reports STM measurements of the island nucleation density for films grown both thermally and at energies between 10-150 eV. The measured island nucleation density systematically deviates with increasing energy from the density predicted by mean field nucleation theory (J.A. Venables, et.al., Rep. Prog. Phys. 47 (1984) p. 399-459). This deviation can be understood using a phenomenological extension of mean field nucleation theory that includes the effects of adatom-vacancy pair production and sputter ejection on the effective flux.

  3. Update of axion CDM energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2008-11-23

    We update cosmological bound on axion model. The contribution from the anharmonic effect and the newly introduced initial overshoot correction are considered. We present an explicit formula for the axion relic density in terms of the QCD scale {lambda}{sub QCD}, the current quark masses m{sub q}'s and the Peccei-Quinn scale F{sub a}, including firstly introduced 1.85 factor which is from the initial overshoot.

  4. Variational nature of the frozen density energy in density-based energy decomposition analysis and its application to torsional potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin

    2014-06-01

    The density-based energy decomposition analysis (DEDA) is the first of its kind to calculate the frozen density energy variationally. Defined with the constrained search formulation of density functional theory, the frozen density energy is optimized in practice using the Wu-Yang (WY) method for constrained minimizations. This variational nature of the frozen density energy, a possible reason behind some novel findings of DEDA, will be fully investigated in this work. In particular, we systematically study the dual basis set dependence in WY: the potential basis set used to expand the Lagrangian multiplier function and the regular orbital basis set. We explain how the convergence progresses differently on these basis sets and how an apparent basis-set independence is achieved. We then explore a new development of DEDA in frozen energy calculations of the ethane molecule, focusing on the internal rotation around the carbon-carbon bond and the energy differences between staggered and eclipsed conformations. We argue that the frozen density energy change at fixed bond lengths and bond angles is purely steric effects. Our results show that the frozen density energy profile follows closely that of the total energy when the dihedral angle is the only varying geometry parameter. We can further analyze the contributions from electrostatics and Pauli repulsions. These results lead to a meaningful DEDA of the torsional potential in ethane.

  5. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    PubMed Central

    Molloi, Sabee; Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer. PMID:25086548

  6. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, Sabee Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  7. High-Energy-Density Electrolytic Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Lewis, Carol R.

    1993-01-01

    Reductions in weight and volume make new application possible. Supercapacitors and improved ultracapacitors advanced electrolytic capacitors developed for use as electric-load-leveling devices in such applications as electric vehicle propulsion systems, portable power tools, and low-voltage pulsed power supplies. One primary advantage: offer power densities much higher than storage batteries. Capacitors used in pulse mode, with short charge and discharge times. Derived from commercially available ultracapacitors. Made of lightweight materials; incorporate electrode/electrolyte material systems capable of operation at voltages higher than previous electrode/electrolyte systems. By use of innovative designs and manufacturing processes, made in wide range of rated capacitances and in rated operating potentials ranging from few to several hundred volts.

  8. An exposition on Friedmann cosmology with negative energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Joshi, Ravi; Patla, Bijunath R.

    2015-06-01

    How would negative energy density affect a classic Friedmann cosmology? Although never measured and possibly unphysical, certain realizations of quantum field theories leaves the door open for such a possibility. In this paper we analyze the evolution of a universe comprising varying amounts of negative energy forms. Negative energy components have negative normalized energy densities, Ω < 0. They include negative phantom energy with an equation of state parameter w < -1, negative cosmological constant: w=-1, negative domain walls: w = -2/3, negative cosmic strings: w=-1/3, negative mass: w = 0, negative radiation: w = 1/3 and negative ultralight: w > 1/3. Assuming that such energy forms generate pressure like perfect fluids, the attractive or repulsive nature of negative energy components are reviewed. The Friedmann equation is satisfied only when negative energy forms are coupled to a greater magnitude of positive energy forms or positive curvature. We show that the solutions exhibit cyclic evolution with bounces and turnovers.The future and fate of such universes in terms of curvature, temperature, acceleration, and energy density are reviewed. The end states are dubbed ``big crunch," `` big void," or ``big rip" and further qualified as ``warped",``curved", or ``flat",``hot" versus ``cold", ``accelerating" versus ``decelerating" versus ``coasting". A universe that ends by contracting to zero energy density is termed ``big poof." Which contracting universes ``bounce" in expansion and which expanding universes ``turnover" into contraction are also reviewed.

  9. Negative vacuum energy densities and the causal diamond measure

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2009-07-15

    Arguably a major success of the landscape picture is the prediction of a small, nonzero vacuum energy density. The details of this prediction depend in part on how the diverging spacetime volume of the multiverse is regulated, a question that remains unresolved. One proposal, the causal diamond measure, has demonstrated many phenomenological successes, including predicting a distribution of positive vacuum energy densities in good agreement with observation. In the string landscape, however, the vacuum energy density is expected to take positive and negative values. We find the causal diamond measure gives a poor fit to observation in such a landscape - in particular, 99.6% of observers in galaxies seemingly just like ours measure a vacuum energy density smaller than we do, most of them measuring it to be negative.

  10. Assessing daily actual evapotranspiration through energy balance: an experiment to evaluate the selfpreservation hypothesis with acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.; Rallo, G.

    2013-10-01

    An operational use of the actual evapotranspiration estimates requires the integration from instantaneous to daily values. This can commonly be achieved under the hypothesis of daytime self-preservation of the evaporative fraction. In this study, it has been evaluated the effect of this assumption on the assessment of daily evapotranspiration from proximity sensing images acquired at hourly intervals over a homogeneous olive groove. Results have been validated by comparison with observations made by a micrometeorological (EC-flux tower) and an eco-physiological (sap flux) sensor. SEBAL model has been applied to thermal and multispectral images acquired during a clear day on August 2009 trough a FLIR A320G thermal camera and a Tetracam MCA II multispectral camera, installed on a tethered helium balloon. Thermal and multispectral images were characterized by very high spatial resolution. This experiment aims to analyze two effects: 1) the consistency of the self-preservation hypothesis for daily estimates of the actual evapotranspiration from hourly assessments at different times of the day; 2) the effects of the spatial resolution on the performances of the energy balance model. To evaluate the effects of the spatial resolution, semi-hourly observations made by a flux tower and sap-flow measures were compared to the evapotranspiration estimates performed using downscaled images at resolutions close to canopy sizes (2, 5 and 10 m). Results show that the best estimates are obtained with a spatial resolution comparable to the average size of the canopy with images taken approximately at 10 UTC.

  11. High Energy Density Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems for Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) technology for energy storage has been a NASA power system concept for many years. Compared to battery-based energy storage systems, RFCS has received relatively little attention or resources for development because the energy density and electrical efficiency were not sufficiently attractive relative to advanced battery systems. Even today, RFCS remains at a very low technology readiness level (TRL of about 2 indicating feasibility has been demonstrated). Commercial development of the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for automobiles and other terrestrial applications and improvements in lightweight pressure vessel design to reduce weight and improve performance make possible a high energy density RFCS energy storage system. The results from this study of a lightweight RFCS energy storage system for a remotely piloted, solar-powered, high altitude aircraft indicate an energy density up to 790 w-h/kg with electrical efficiency of 53.4% is attainable. Such an energy storage system would allow a solar-powered aircraft to carry hundreds of kilograms of payload and remain in flight indefinitely for use in atmospheric research, earth observation, resource mapping. and telecommunications. Future developments in the areas of hydrogen and oxygen storage, pressure vessel design, higher temperature and higher- pressure fuel cell operation, unitized regenerative fuel cells, and commercial development of fuel cell technology will improve both the energy density and electrical efficiency of the RFCS.

  12. Local Density Approximation Exchange-correlation Free-energy Functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasiev, Valentin; Sjostrom, Travis; Dufty, James; Trickey, S. B.

    2014-03-01

    Restricted path integral Monte-Carlo (RPIMC) simulation data for the homogeneous electron gas at finite temperatures are used to fit the exchange-correlation free energy as a function of the density and temperature. Together with a new finite- T spin-polarization interpolation, this provides the local spin density approximation (LSDA) for the exchange-correlation free-energy functional required by finite- T density functional theory. We discuss and compare different methods of fitting to the RPIMC data. The new function reproduces the RPIMC data in the fitting range of Wigner-Seitz radius and temperature, satisfies correct high-density, low- and high- T asymptotic limits and is applicable beyond the range of fitting data. Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, grant DE-SC0002139 and by the DOE Office of Fusion Sciences (FES).

  13. Validation of an improved energy balance model to estimate actual evapotranspiration in irrigated cotton ecosystems of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoefel, Patrick; Conrad, Christopher; Falk, Ulrike; Bauer-Marschallinger, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    The understanding of the hydrological and the energy cycles are essential in order to describe the complex interactions within the climate system of the earth. Being recognized as an essential component of both the water and the energy cycle, reliable estimation of actual evapotranspiration and its spatial distribution is one outstanding challenge in this context. For instance, in irrigation systems of arid regions, artificial locations of evapotranspiration have been created. An in-depth process understanding is of paramount importance, as irrigated agriculture consumes about 70 % of the available freshwater resources worldwide, with a significant but unsatisfyingly quantified impact on the water cycle, especially on regional scale. Moreover, an exact quantification of ET inside these artificial ecosystems enables assessments of crop water consumptions and hence about water use efficiency (WUE). The withdrawal of water for agricultural use in the countries of Central Asia is more than 90%. Khorezm region in Uzbekistan is a case study region for the problems of irrigated agriculture in CA. For Khorezm the seasonal actual ET was calculated for the years 2003 - 2010 using the partly modified surface energy balance algorithm for land (SEBAL). SEBAL was implemented based on MODIS time series to calculate the energy balance components like net radiation (Rn), sensible heat (H), latent heat (LE), and soil heat flux (G). Whilst SEBAL is using an empirical equation for estimating G, a more physically based method was introduced in this study. This method uses microwave soil moisture products (ASAR-SSM and ASCAT-SSM) as additional input information. The modelled energy balance components were intensively validated by field measurements with an eddy covariance system and soil sensors. For turbulent heat fluxes the RMSE is about 40 W/m² for H and 80 W/m² for LE with a coefficient of determination (r²) of 0.64 for H and 0.52 for LE. Soil heat flux estimation could be

  14. Frontiers for discovery in high energy density physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    2005-07-01

    Recent advances in extending the energy, power, and brightness of lasers, particle beams, and Z-pinch generators make it possible to create matter with extremely high energy density in the laboratory. The collective interaction of this matter, often in the plasma state, with itself, intense particle beams, and radiation fields, is a rapidly growing field of research called high energy density physics. It is a field characterized by extreme states of matter, previously unattainable in laboratory experiments, and not unlike the conditions occurring in many astrophysical systems. It is also a field rich in opportunities for scientific discovery and compelling applications, propelled by advances in high-performance computing and advanced instrumentation and measuring techniques. This plenary presentation will summarize the results of two recent national studies of high energy density physics commissioned by the National Academies -- National Research Council, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy's Interagency Working Group on the Physics of the Universe. It will also provide an overview of the exciting research opportunities of high intellectual value in this highly interdisciplinary field, with examples ranging from fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion, to the creation of quark-gluon plasmas characteristic of the very early Universe using heavy ion accelerators. For purposes of this presentation, the working definition of high energy density refers to energy densities exceeding 100 kilojoules per cubic centimeter, or equivalently, pressures exceeding one megabar. For reference, the bulk moduli of solid materials under standard conditions are about 100 kilojoules per cubic centimeter.

  15. Hybrid system for rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zheng; Yang, Yaqiong; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Minxia; Fu, Zhengwen; Wu, Yuping; Holze, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges of electrical energy storage (EES) is the development of environmentally friendly battery systems with high safety and high energy density. Rechargeable Mg batteries have been long considered as one highly promising system due to the use of low cost and dendrite-free magnesium metal. The bottleneck for traditional Mg batteries is to achieve high energy density since their output voltage is below 2.0 V. Here, we report a magnesium battery using Mg in Grignard reagent-based electrolyte as the negative electrode, a lithium intercalation compound in aqueous solution as the positive electrode, and a solid electrolyte as a separator. Its average discharge voltage is 2.1 V with stable discharge platform and good cycling life. The calculated energy density based on the two electrodes is high. These findings open another door to rechargeable magnesium batteries. PMID:26173624

  16. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, Philip J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2016-05-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field J =p u , which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields p and u , respectively. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous J (x ,z ,t ) from density perturbations alone: A Green's function-based calculation yields p ; u is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: The Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations and the result for J is found to agree typically to within 1% with J computed directly using p and u from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to density perturbation data from laboratory schlieren measurements of internal waves in a stratified fluid and the result for J agrees to within 6 % with results from Navier-Stokes simulations. Our method for determining the instantaneous velocity, pressure, and energy flux fields applies to any system described by a linear approximation of the density perturbation field, e.g., to small-amplitude lee waves and propagating vertical modes. The method can be applied using our matlab graphical user interface EnergyFlux.

  17. Energy density and spatial curvature in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, T.; Galloway, G.J.

    1981-04-01

    Positive energy density tends to limit the size of space. This effect is studied within several contexts. We obtain sufficient conditions (which involve the energy density in a crucial way) for the compactness of spatial hypersurfaces in space-time. We then obtain some results concerning static or, more generally, stationary space-times. The Schwarzchild solution puts an upper bound on the size of a static spherically symmetric fluid with density bounded from below. We derive a result of roughly the same nature which, however, requires no symmetry and allows for rotation. Also, we show that static or rotating universes with L = 0 require that the density along some spatial geodesic must fall off rapidly with distance from a point.

  18. High Energy Density Physics on LULI2000 Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Ozaki, N.; Ravasio, A.; Vinci, T.; Lepape, S.; Tanaka, K.; Riley, D.

    2006-07-01

    We present here a summary of some High Density Energy Physics experiments performed on the new facility LULI 2000. First, different flyer plate targets scheme have been tested loading shock in fused-quartz plate. Temperature data along the Hugoniot curve have been obtained. Second, a strongly coupled and degenerated Aluminium plasma has been probed by X-ray Thomson scattering. Compton shift from electrons has been observed in various density conditions.

  19. Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2016-05-01

    Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density is performed to a number of chemical species, which show non-nuclear attractors (NNA) in their gradient maps of the electron density. It is found that NNAs are removed using this molecular partitioning and although the virial theorem is not valid for all of the basins obtained in the being used AIM, all of the atoms obtained using the new approach obey this theorem. A comparison is also made between some atomic topological parameters which are obtained from the new partitioning approach and those calculated based on the electron density partitioning.

  20. Surface energy balance and actual evapotranspiration of the transboundary Indus Basin estimated from satellite measurements and the ETLook model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Cheema, M. J. M.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Miltenburg, I. J.; Pelgrum, H.

    2012-11-01

    The surface energy fluxes and related evapotranspiration processes across the Indus Basin were estimated for the hydrological year 2007 using satellite measurements. The new ETLook remote sensing model (version 1) infers information on actual Evaporation (E) and actual Transpiration (T) from combined optical and passive microwave sensors, which can observe the land-surface even under persistent overcast conditions. A two-layer Penman-Monteith equation was applied for quantifying soil and canopy evaporation. The novelty of the paper is the computation of E and T across a vast area (116.2 million ha) by using public domain microwave data that can be applied under all weather conditions, and for which no advanced input data are required. The average net radiation for the basin was estimated as being 112 Wm-2. The basin average sensible, latent and soil heat fluxes were estimated to be 80, 32, and 0 Wm-2, respectively. The average evapotranspiration (ET) and evaporative fraction were 1.2 mm d-1 and 0.28, respectively. The basin wide ET was 496 ± 16.8 km3 yr-1. Monte Carlo analysis have indicated 3.4% error at 95% confidence interval for a dominant land use class. Results compared well with previously conducted soil moisture, lysimeter and Bowen ratio measurements at field scale (R2 = 0.70; RMSE = 0.45 mm d-1; RE = -11.5% for annual ET). ET results were also compared against earlier remote sensing and modeling studies for various regions and provinces in Pakistan (R2 = 0.76; RMSE = 0.29 mmd-1; RE = 6.5% for annual ET). The water balance for all irrigated areas together as one total system in Pakistan and India (26.02 million ha) show a total ET value that is congruent with the ET value from the ETLook surface energy balance computations. An unpublished validation of the same ETLook model for 23 jurisdictional areas covering the entire Australian continent showed satisfactory results given the quality of the watershed data and the diverging physiographic and climatic

  1. High energy density capacitors fabricated by thin film technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T W; Johnson, G W; Wagner, A V

    1999-03-30

    Low energy density in conventional capacitors severely limits efforts to miniaturize power electronics and imposes design limitations on electronics in general. We have successfully applied physical vapor deposition technology to greatly increase capacitor energy density. The high dielectric breakdown strength we have achieved in alumina thin films allows high energy density to be achieved with this moderately low dielectric constant material. The small temperature dependence of the dielectric constant, and the high reliability, high resistivity, and low dielectric loss of Al 2 O 3 , make it even more appealing. We have constructed single dielectric layer thin film capacitors and shown that they can be stacked to form multilayered structures with no loss in yield for a given capacitance. Control of film growth morphology is critical for achieving the smooth, high quality interfaces between metal and dielectric necessary for device operation at high electric fields. Most importantly, high rate deposition with extremely low particle generation is essential for achieving high energy storage at a reasonable cost. This has been achieved by reactive magnetron sputtering in which the reaction to form the dielectric oxide has been confined to the deposition surface. By this technique we have achieved a yield of over 50% for 1 cm 2 devices with an energy density of 14 J per cubic centimeter of Al 2 O 3 dielectric material in 1.2 kV, 4 nF devices. By further reducing defect density and increasing the dielectric constant of the material, we will be able to increase capacitance and construct high energy density devices to meet the requirements of applications in power electronics.

  2. Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-06-30

    The Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2013) was held in Saint Malo, France, at the Palais du Grand Large on 25-28 June 2013 (http://web.luli.polytechnique.fr/ICHED2013/). This meeting was the fourth in a series which was first held in 2008. This conference covered all the important aspects of High Energy Density Physics including fundamental topics from strong-field physics to creating new states of matter (including radiation-dominated, high-pressure quantum and relativistic plasmas) and ultra-fast lattice dynamics on the timescale of atomic transitions.

  3. High-Energy-Density Cost-Effective Graphene Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuilov, Vladimir; Ying Mu, Ying; Hedayat, Nader; Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Sensor CAT at Stony Brook Team

    We introduce a cost-effective graphene platelet composite material as a replacement of an expensive reduced graphene oxide for electrodes in high energy density supercapacitors. We have tested a low size supercapacitor prototypes with the graphene platelets electrodes and newly developed polymer-gel Li + ion electrolyte. We discuss the ways how to increase the capacitance and the energy densities of the supercapacitor significantly. A working prototype for testing the concept of the high voltage supercapacitor has been developed as well. The first test done up to 10 V showed excellent performance of the multy-cell multi-layer high voltage test assembly.

  4. CMB constraints on spatial variations of the vacuum energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.; Canavezes, A.; de Carvalho, J. P. M.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2002-06-01

    In a recent article, a simple `spherical bubble' toy model for a spatially varying vacuum energy density was introduced, and type Ia supernovae data was used to constrain it. Here we generalize the model to allow for the fact that we may not necessarily be at the center of a region with a given set of cosmological parameters, and discuss the constraints on these models coming from cosmic microwave background radiation data. We find tight constraints on possible spatial variations of the vacuum energy density for any significant deviations from the center of the bubble and we comment on the relevance of our results.

  5. Nitroborazines as potential high energy materials: density functional theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Janning, Jay D; Ball, David W

    2010-05-01

    As part of a search for new high energy density materials, we used density functional theoretical calculations to determine the thermochemical properties of various nitro-substituted borazine molecules. Optimized geometries, vibrational frequencies and spectra, and enthalpies of formation and combustion were determined for nitroborazine, dinitroborazine, trinitroborazine, and methyltrinitroborazine with substituents on either the boron atoms or the nitrogen atoms of the parent borazine ring. Our results indicate that the specific enthalpy of combustion ranged from 4 to 11 kJ g(-1), with increasing substitution of nitro groups lowering the energy of combustion per unit mass.

  6. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  7. Density functional theory for comprehensive orbital energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Ayako; Tsuneda, Takao

    2013-08-14

    This study reveals the reason core 1s orbital energies and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies of hydrogen and rare gas atoms are underestimated by long-range corrected (LC) density functional theory (DFT), which quantitatively reproduces the HOMO energies of other systems and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies. Applying the pseudospectral regional (PR) self-interaction correction (SIC) drastically improved the underestimated orbital energies in LC-DFT calculations, while maintaining or improving the accuracies in the calculated valence HOMO and LUMO energies. This indicates that the self-interaction error in exchange functionals causes the underestimations of core 1s orbital energies and the HOMO energies of hydrogen and rare gas atoms in LC-DFT calculations. To clarify the reason for the improvement, the fractional occupation dependences of total electronic energies and orbital energies were examined. The calculated results clearly showed that the LC-PR functional gives almost linear dependences of total electronic energies for a slight decrease in the occupation number of core 1s orbitals, although this linear dependence disappears for significant decrease due to the shrinking of exchange self-interaction regions. It was also clarified that the PRSIC hardly affects the occupation number dependences of the total electronic energies and orbital energies for the fractional occupations of HOMOs and LUMOs. As a result, it was concluded that core orbital energies are obtained accurately by combining LC-DFT with PRSIC.

  8. Electromagnetic field energy density in homogeneous negative index materials.

    PubMed

    Shivanand; Webb, Kevin J

    2012-05-01

    An exact separation of both electric and magnetic energies into stored and lost energies is shown to be possible in the special case when the wave impedance is independent of frequency. A general expression for the electromagnetic energy density in such a dispersive medium having a negative refractive index is shown to be accurate in comparison with numerical results. Using an example metamaterial response that provides a negative refractive index, it is shown that negative time-averaged stored energy can occur. The physical meaning of this negative energy is explained as the energy temporarily borrowed by the field from the material. This observation for negative index materials is of interest when approaching properties for a perfect lens. In the broader context, the observation of negative stored energy is of consequence in the study of dispersive materials. PMID:22712096

  9. Theoretically predicted Fox-7 based new high energy density molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanta, Susanta

    2016-08-01

    Computational investigation of CHNO based high energy density molecules (HEDM) are designed with FOX-7 (1, 1-dinitro 2, 2-diamino ethylene) skeleton. We report structures, stability and detonation properties of these new molecules. A systematic analysis is presented for the crystal density, activation energy for nitro to nitrite isomerisation and the C-NO2 bond dissociation energy of these molecules. The Atoms in molecules (AIM) calculations have been performed to interpret the intra-molecular weak H-bonding interactions and the stability of C-NO2 bonds. The structure optimization, frequency and bond dissociation energy calculations have been performed at B3LYP level of theory by using G03 quantum chemistry package. Some of the designed molecules are found to be more promising HEDM than FOX-7 molecule, and are proposed to be candidate for synthetic purpose.

  10. Comparison of three methods to reduce energy density. Effects on daily energy intake.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rachel A; Roe, Liane S; Rolls, Barbara J

    2013-07-01

    Reductions in food energy density can decrease energy intake, but it is not known if the effects depend on the way that energy density is reduced. We investigated whether three methods of reducing energy density (decreasing fat, increasing fruit and vegetables, and adding water) differed in their effects on energy intake across the day. In a crossover design, 59 adults ate breakfast, lunch, and dinner in the laboratory once a week for 4 weeks. Across conditions, the entrées were either standard in energy density or were reduced in energy density by 20% using one of the three methods. Each meal included a manipulated entrée along with unmanipulated side dishes, and all foods were consumed ad libitum. Reducing the energy density of entrées significantly decreased daily energy intake compared to standard entrées (mean intake 2667 ± 77 kcal/day; 11,166 ± 322 kJ/day). The mean decrease was 396 ± 44 kcal/day (1658 ± 184 kJ/day) when fat was reduced, 308 ± 41 kcal/day (1290 ± 172 kJ/day) when fruit and vegetables were increased, and 230 ± 35 kcal/day (963 ± 147 kJ/day) when water was added. Daily energy intake was lower when fat was decreased compared to the other methods. These findings indicate that a variety of diet compositions can be recommended to reduce overall dietary energy density in order to moderate energy intake.

  11. Collapsing Bubble in Metal for High Energy Density Physics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, S F; Barnard, J J; Leung, P T; Yu, S S

    2011-04-13

    This paper presents a new idea to produce matter in the high energy density physics (HEDP) regime in the laboratory using an intense ion beam. A gas bubble created inside a solid metal may collapse by driving it with an intense ion beam. The melted metal will compress the gas bubble and supply extra energy to it. Simulations show that the spherical implosion ratio can be about 5 and at the stagnation point, the maximum density, temperature and pressure inside the gas bubble can go up to nearly 2 times solid density, 10 eV and a few megabar (Mbar) respectively. The proposed experiment is the first to permit access into the Mbar regime with existing or near-term ion facilities, and opens up possibilities for new physics gained through careful comparisons of simulations with measurements of quantities like stagnation radius, peak temperature and peak pressure at the metal wall.

  12. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  13. Improved DFT Potential Energy Surfaces via Improved Densities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Park, Hansol; Son, Suyeon; Sim, Eunji; Burke, Kieron

    2015-10-01

    Density-corrected DFT is a method that cures several failures of self-consistent semilocal DFT calculations by using a more accurate density instead. A novel procedure employs the Hartree-Fock density to bonds that are more severely stretched than ever before. This substantially increases the range of accurate potential energy surfaces obtainable from semilocal DFT for many heteronuclear molecules. We show that this works for both neutral and charged molecules. We explain why and explore more difficult cases, for example, CH(+), where density-corrected DFT results are even better than sophisticated methods like CCSD. We give a simple criterion for when DC-DFT should be more accurate than self-consistent DFT that can be applied for most cases. PMID:26722874

  14. Design for a High Energy Density Kelvin-Helmholtz Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A

    2007-10-29

    While many high energy density physics (HEDP) Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments have been fielded as part of basic HEDP and astrophysics studies, not one HEDP Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) experiment has been successfully performed. Herein, a design for a novel HEDP x-ray driven KH experiment is presented along with supporting radiation-hydrodynamic simulation and theory.

  15. Zinc-oxygen primary cell yields high energy density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, C. B.

    1968-01-01

    Zinc-oxygen primary cell yields high energy density for battery used as an auxiliary power source in space vehicle systems. Maximum reliability and minimum battery weight is achieved by using a stacking configuration of 23 series-connected modules with 6 parallel-connected cells per module.

  16. Quantum Chromodynamics and Nuclear Physics at Extreme Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.; Bass, S.A.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Mehen, T.; Springer, R.P.

    2005-11-07

    The report describes research in theoretical quantum chromodynamics, including effective field theories of hadronic interactions, properties of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy density, phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and algorithms and numerical simulations of lattice gauge theory and other many-body systems.

  17. Limit on the energy density in the submillimetre background radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowsik, R.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is made which indicates that the energy density in the submillimeter quanta cannot exceed about 0.4 eV/cu cm averaged over the galactic dimensions, independent of the exact spectral distribution of this radiation. This corresponds to an upper limit of 3.4 K on the radiation temperature in the galactic neighborhood.

  18. Active minimization of energy density in three-dimensional enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to further investigate and develop a novel approach for actively controlling the sound field in enclosures that is based on the acoustic energy density. Typically the acoustic field in an enclosure has been controlled by minimizing the sum of the squared pressures from several microphones distributed throughout the enclosure. The approach investigated in this study involved minimizing the acoustic energy density at the sensor locations, rather than the squared pressure. Research previous to this study in a simple one-dimensional enclosure showed that improved global attenuation of the acoustic field is often obtained by minimizing the energy density, rather than the pressure. The current study built on the previous research by extending the method of controlling the acoustic energy density to three-dimensional enclosures. The study was intended to help establish if improved control can still be expected in a more general enclosure. The study was designed to be both analytical/numerical and experimental in nature.

  19. New developments in the multiscale hybrid energy density computational method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sun; Shanying, Wang; Dianwu, Wang; Chongyu, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Further developments in the hybrid multiscale energy density method are proposed on the basis of our previous papers. The key points are as follows. (i) The theoretical method for the determination of the weight parameter in the energy coupling equation of transition region in multiscale model is given via constructing underdetermined equations. (ii) By applying the developed mathematical method, the weight parameters have been given and used to treat some problems in homogeneous charge density systems, which are directly related with multiscale science. (iii) A theoretical algorithm has also been presented for treating non-homogeneous systems of charge density. The key to the theoretical computational methods is the decomposition of the electrostatic energy in the total energy of density functional theory for probing the spanning characteristic at atomic scale, layer by layer, by which the choice of chemical elements and the defect complex effect can be understood deeply. (iv) The numerical computational program and design have also been presented. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB606402) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51071091).

  20. Quantum inequality restrictions on negative energy densities in curved spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Michael John

    1998-10-01

    In quantum field theory, there exist states in which the expectation value of the energy density for a quantized field is negative. These negative energy densities lead to several problems such as the failure of the classical energy conditions, the production of closed timelike curves and faster than light travel, violations of the second law of thermodynamics, and the possible production of naked singularities. Although quantum field theory introduces negative energies, it also provides constraints in the form of quantum inequalities (QI's). These uncertainty principle- type relations limit the magnitude and duration of any negative energy. We derive a general form of the QI on the energy density for both the quantized scalar and electromagnetic fields in static curved spacetimes. In the case of the scalar field, the QI can be written as the Euclidean wave operator acting on the Euclidean Green's function. Additionally, a small distance expansion on the Green's function is used to derive the QI in the short sampling time limit. It is found that the QI in this limit reduces to the flat space form with subdominant correction terms which depend on the spacetime geometry. Several example spacetimes are studied in which exact forms of the QI's can be found. These include the three- and four-dimensional static Robertson-Walker spacetimes, flat space with perfectly reflecting mirrors, Rindler and static de Sitter space, and the spacetime outside a black hole. In all of the above cases, we find that the quantum inequalities give a lower limit on how much negative energy may be observed relative to the vacuum energy density of the spacetime. For the particular case of the black hole, it is found that the quantum inequality on the energy density is measured relative to the Boulware vacuum. Finally, the application of the quantum inequalities to the Alcubierre warp drive spacetime leads to strict constraints on the thickness of the negative energy region needed to maintain

  1. Spatial decay of energy density of tidal internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovatsky, Iossif D.; Morozov, Eugene G.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2003-06-01

    The spatial decay of energy density of tidal internal waves (TIW) was studied using field data taken in the Indian Ocean near the Mascarene Ridge and in the Canary Basin of the eastern Atlantic near the Heyres-Irving-Cruiser chain of seamounts. Several moorings were deployed at distances between 90 and 1745 km east of these topographic features, with instruments located in the depth range 500-2500 m. The energy densities of TIW averaged over the spring-neap cycle were calculated using semidiurnal tidal components of current and temperature time series as well as local vertical gradients of temperature and density. It was found that the horizontal component of TIW, EH, is less depth-dependent compared to the vertical component, Eζ, although both components showed a general decrease of magnitude with the distance from topography. The decrease of total energy density ETW = EH + Eζ with distance from the topography is more rapid than that assumed in the work of [1995], and followed an inverse power law. At a distance of about x ≈ 10λ from the topography (where λ is the wavelength of the first mode), ETW in the main thermocline becomes equal to the energy density of the forcing barotropic tide, whereas for x/λ < 2, ETW exceeds the energy of the entire range of internal waves of the Garrett-Munk spectrum. A nonhydrostatic, nonlinear, two-dimensional numerical model shows a reasonable agreement with the observations for x/λ < 2-3, but in the far field it predicts a faster spatial decay of ETW than observed, possibly because of topographic generation of TIW along the measurement swath. The turbulent diffusivity estimates based on the [1981] model exceeded 10-4 m2/s within the main pycnocline at x = 100 km and suggest mixing enhancements due to TIW up to distances of 1000 km from the topography.

  2. Kinetic-energy density functional: Atoms and shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E. |

    1996-09-01

    We present a nonlocal kinetic-energy functional which includes an anisotropic average of the density through a symmetrization procedure. This functional allows a better description of the nonlocal effects of the electron system. The main consequence of the symmetrization is the appearance of a clear shell structure in the atomic density profiles, obtained after the minimization of the total energy. Although previous results with some of the nonlocal kinetic functionals have given incipient structures for heavy atoms, only our functional shows a clear shell structure for most of the atoms. The atomic total energies have a good agreement with the exact calculations. Discussion of the chemical potential and the first ionization potential in atoms is included. The functional is also extended to spin-polarized systems. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Results from the SLAC High Energy Density Plasma Lens Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    2000-04-01

    The plasma lens was proposed(P. Chen, Part. Acc. 20), 171 (1987). as a final focusing mechanism to achieve high luminosity for future high energy linear colliders. Previous experiments(See, for example, R. Govil et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett, 86, No. 16, 3202 (1999), and references therein. to test this concept were carried out at low energy densities. In this talk, results from the SLAC E-150 experiment(P. Chen et al.), Proposal for a Plasma Lens Experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam, SLAC Expt. Prop. E-150, April 1997. on plasma lens focusing of a high energy density beam with parameters relevant to linear colliders are presented and compared with theoretical expectations. The experiment was carried out at the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam, with nominal parameters of 30 GeV beam energy, 1.5× 10^10 electrons per bunch, bunch length σz = 0.7 mm and beam cross-section σ_x^* × σ_y^* = 7 μm × 3 μm. The plasma lens was produced by a fast pulsing gas-jet providing a neutral Nitrogen gas column with density up to 5× 10^18 / cm^3. The gas was then ionized by the leading portion of the incident high energy density electron beam, while the rest of the electrons in the same bunch were focused by the strong plasma pinching force and a reduction in the beam size of up to 40% was measured. The beam waist was also measured and compared with detailed numerical calculations with a particles-in-cell code. The reduction in focal length indicated a focusing strength approximately 100 times that of the FFTB final focus magnets. The synchrotron radiation with critical energy in the 1-10 MeV range due to the strong bending of beam particles inside the plasma lens was observed for the first time.

  4. Separating the Universe into real and fake energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne; Chiang, Chi-Ting; Li, Yin; LoVerde, Marilena

    2016-07-01

    The separate universe technique provides a means of establishing consistency relations between short-wavelength observables and the long-wavelength matter density fluctuations within which they evolve by absorbing the latter into the cosmological background. We extend it to cases where nongravitational forces introduce a Jeans scale in other species like dynamical dark energy or massive neutrinos. The technique matches the synchronous gauge matter density fluctuations to the local expansion using the acceleration equation and accounts for the temporal nonlocality and scale dependence of the long-wavelength response of small scale matter observables, e.g., the nonlinear power spectrum, halo abundance and the implied halo bias, and N -point correlation functions. Above the Jeans scale, the local Friedmann equation relates the expansion to real energy densities and a curvature that is constant in comoving coordinates. Below the Jeans scale, the curvature evolves and acts like a fake density component. In all cases, the matter evolution on small scales is correctly modeled as we illustrate using scalar field dark energy with adiabatic or isocurvature initial conditions across the Jeans scale set by its finite sound speed.

  5. A coupled remote sensing and simplified surface energy balance approach to estimate actual evapotranspiration from irrigated fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, G.B.; Budde, M.; Verdin, J.P.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate crop performance monitoring and production estimation are critical for timely assessment of the food balance of several countries in the world. Since 2001, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring crop performance and relative production using satellite-derived data and simulation models in Africa, Central America, and Afghanistan where ground-based monitoring is limited because of a scarcity of weather stations. The commonly used crop monitoring models are based on a crop water-balance algorithm with inputs from satellite-derived rainfall estimates. These models are useful to monitor rainfed agriculture, but they are ineffective for irrigated areas. This study focused on Afghanistan, where over 80 percent of agricultural production comes from irrigated lands. We developed and implemented a Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to monitor and assess the performance of irrigated agriculture in Afghanistan using a combination of 1-km thermal data and 250m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, both from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. We estimated seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) over a period of six years (2000-2005) for two major irrigated river basins in Afghanistan, the Kabul and the Helmand, by analyzing up to 19 cloud-free thermal and NDVI images from each year. These seasonal ETa estimates were used as relative indicators of year-to-year production magnitude differences. The temporal water-use pattern of the two irrigated basins was indicative of the cropping patterns specific to each region. Our results were comparable to field reports and to estimates based on watershed-wide crop water-balance model results. For example, both methods found that the 2003 seasonal ETa was the highest of all six years. The method also captured water management scenarios where a unique year-to-year variability was identified in addition to water-use differences between

  6. A Coupled Remote Sensing and Simplified Surface Energy Balance Approach to Estimate Actual Evapotranspiration from Irrigated Fields

    PubMed Central

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Budde, Michael; Verdin, James P.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate crop performance monitoring and production estimation are critical for timely assessment of the food balance of several countries in the world. Since 2001, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring crop performance and relative production using satellite-derived data and simulation models in Africa, Central America, and Afghanistan where ground-based monitoring is limited because of a scarcity of weather stations. The commonly used crop monitoring models are based on a crop water-balance algorithm with inputs from satellite-derived rainfall estimates. These models are useful to monitor rainfed agriculture, but they are ineffective for irrigated areas. This study focused on Afghanistan, where over 80 percent of agricultural production comes from irrigated lands. We developed and implemented a Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to monitor and assess the performance of irrigated agriculture in Afghanistan using a combination of 1-km thermal data and 250-m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, both from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. We estimated seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) over a period of six years (2000-2005) for two major irrigated river basins in Afghanistan, the Kabul and the Helmand, by analyzing up to 19 cloud-free thermal and NDVI images from each year. These seasonal ETa estimates were used as relative indicators of year-to-year production magnitude differences. The temporal water-use pattern of the two irrigated basins was indicative of the cropping patterns specific to each region. Our results were comparable to field reports and to estimates based on watershed-wide crop water-balance model results. For example, both methods found that the 2003 seasonal ETa was the highest of all six years. The method also captured water management scenarios where a unique year-to-year variability was identified in addition to water-use differences between

  7. High energy density interpenetrating networks from ionic networks and silicone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke B.; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne L.

    2015-04-01

    The energy density of dielectric elastomers (DEs) is sought increased for better exploitation of the DE technology since an increased energy density means that the driving voltage for a certain strain can be lowered in actuation mode or alternatively that more energy can be harvested in generator mode. One way to increase the energy density is to increase dielectric permittivity of the elastomer. A novel silicone elastomer system with high dielectric permittivity was prepared through the development of interpenetrating networks from ionically assembled silicone polymers and covalently crosslinked silicones. The system has many degrees of freedom since the ionic network is formed from two polymers (amine and carboxylic acid functional, respectively) of which the chain lengths can be varied, as well as the covalent silicone elastomer with many degrees of freedom arising from amongst many the varying content of silica particles. A parameter study is performed to elucidate which compositions are most favorable for the use as dielectric elastomers. The elastomers were furthermore shown to be self-repairing upon electrical breakdown.

  8. Pulse Power Capability Of High Energy Density Capacitors Based on a New Dielectric Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsor, Paul; Scholz, Tim; Hudis, Martin; Slenes, Kirk M.

    1999-01-01

    A new dielectric composite consisting of a polymer coated onto a high-density metallized Kraft has been developed for application in high energy density pulse power capacitors. The polymer coating is custom formulated for high dielectric constant and strength with minimum dielectric losses. The composite can be wound and processed using conventional wound film capacitor manufacturing equipment. This new system has the potential to achieve 2 to 3 J/cu cm whole capacitor energy density at voltage levels above 3.0 kV, and can maintain its mechanical properties to temperatures above 150 C. The technical and manufacturing development of the composite material and fabrication into capacitors are summarized in this paper. Energy discharge testing, including capacitance and charge-discharge efficiency at normal and elevated temperatures, as well as DC life testing were performed on capacitors manufactured using this material. TPL (Albuquerque, NM) has developed the material and Aerovox (New Bedford, MA) has used the material to build and test actual capacitors. The results of the testing will focus on pulse power applications specifically those found in electro-magnetic armor and guns, high power microwave sources and defibrillators.

  9. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  10. High energy-density science on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.; Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility, as well as its French counterpart Le Laser Megajoule, have been designed to confront one of the most difficult and compelling problem in shock physics - the creation of a hot, compassed DT plasma surrounded and confined by cold, nearly degenerate DT fuel. At the same time, these laser facilities will present the shock physics community with unique tools for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers can contribute to investigations of high energy density in the area of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  11. Error analysis and implementation issues for energy density probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locey, Lance L.; Woolford, Brady L.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2001-05-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the utility of acoustic energy density measurements as a means to gain a greater understanding of acoustic fields. Three spherical energy density probe designs are under development. The first probe design has three orthogonal pairs of surface mounted microphones. The second probe design utilizes a similarly sized sphere with four surface mounted microphones. The four microphones are located at the origin and unit vectors of a Cartesian coordinate system, where the origin and the tips of the three unit vectors all lie on the surface of the sphere. The third probe design consists of a similarly sized sphere, again with four surface microphones, each placed at the vertices of a regular tetrahedron. The sensing elements of all three probes are Panasonic electret microphones. The work presented here will expand on previously reported work, and address bias errors, spherical scattering effects, and practical implementation issues. [Work supported by NASA.

  12. Improving the energy density and power density of CFx by mechanical milling: a primary lithium battery electrode.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Anji; Breitung, Ben; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2013-11-13

    The effect of high energy ball milling on the electrochemical performance of graphite fluoride (CFx) was investigated. A significant improvement was observed in both energy density and power density. The volumetric energy density was increased up to a factor of 3 with ball milled materials compared with pristine materials. The gravimetric energy density was increased up to a factor of 2, depending on the discharge rates. At 6C the ball milled material still delivered 40% of its nominal capacity, whereas the pristine material did not exhibit any capacity any more. We achieved the power density of 9860 W/kg with a gravimetric energy density of 800 Wh/kg for the optimized material.

  13. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  14. Finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Hellemans, V.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bender, M.

    2012-10-20

    The systematic lack of convergence of self-consistent mean-field calculations with certain parameterizations of the Skyrme energy density functional has been attributed to the appearance of finite-size instabilities. In this contribution, we investigate what happens at the instability associated with the C{sub 0}{sup {Delta}s}s{sub 0} Dot-Operator {Delta}s{sub 0} term in a high-spin state of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg.

  15. Radial evolution of the energy density of solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of transport theories appropriate to a radially expanding solar wind, we describe new results for the radial evolution of the energy density in solar wind fluctuations at MHD scales. These models include the effects of 'mixing' and driving as well as the possibility of non-isotropic MHD turbulence. Implications of these results for solar wind heating, cosmic ray diffusion and interstellar pick-up ions will also be addressed.

  16. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  17. Optimizing liner implosions for high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Cylindrical metal shells imploded by magnetic fields - liners - are used as kinetic energy drivers for high energy density physics experiments in hydrodynamics and dynamic material property measurements. There are at least three ways in which liners have been, or are expected to be, used to produce high energy density, i.e., high pressure, in target materials. A common approach uses the liner as a convergent flyer plate, which impacts a material target cylinder after having been shocklessly accelerated across an intervening gap. The resultant shock and piston hydrodynamic flow in the target are used in exploration of a wide variety of phenomena and material properties. Another common method is to slowly compress a liner containing a material sample in a such fashion that little heating occurs. This technique is most useful for investigated physical properties at low temperature and extreme density. Finally, one can use a hybrid approach to shock heat with an impacting liner followed by slower adiabatic, if not isentropic, compression to explore material properties in extrema. The magnetic fields for driving these liners may be produced by either high explosive pulsed power generators or by capacitor banks. Here we will consider only capacitor banks.

  18. Towards the island of stability with relativistic energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Prassa, V.; Niksic, T.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic energy density functionals (REDF) provide a complete and accurate, global description of nuclear structure phenomena. Modern semi-empirical functionals, adjusted to the nuclear matter equation of state and to empirical masses of deformed nuclei, are applied to studies of shapes of superheavy nuclei. The theoretical framework is tested in a comparison to empirical masses, quadrupole deformations, and energy barriers of actinide nuclei. The model is used in a self-consistent mean-field calculation of spherical, axial and triaxial shapes of superheavy nuclei, alpha-decay energies and lifetimes. The effect of explicit treatment of collective correlations is analyzed in calculations that consistently use a collective Hamiltonian model based on REDFs.

  19. L. V. Al'tshuler, and High Energy Density Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Krikorian, Nerses H.; Keeler, R. Norris

    2012-03-01

    Knowledge of high energy densities critical to cosmology and astrophysics was achieved and exchanged among a very few scientists at a time when science was even more constrained by political considerations that it is today. Resources for the early studies necessarily involved atomic weaponry. A history of L. V. Al'tshuler and some others in his science is given in cosmological context. In the beginning of cosmology and the Universe, negative Fortov-Planck1 pressures c7h-1G-2 of 4.6 10115 Pa are overcome by inertial-vortex anti-gravity (dark energy) pressures to achieve a turbulent big bang and the first turbulent combustion with power 1066 watts at the Kolmogorov-Planck scale 10-35 meters. The big bang event ceased when negative- pressure gluon-viscous-forces extracted 10100 kg of mass-energy from the vacuum to produce the observed fossil vorticity turbulence Universe and its inflation with power 10145 watts.

  20. TRIDENT high-energy-density facility experimental capabilities and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Batha, S H; Aragonez, R; Archuleta, F L; Archuleta, T N; Benage, J F; Cobble, J A; Cowan, J S; Fatherley, V E; Flippo, K A; Gautier, D C; Gonzales, R P; Greenfield, S R; Hegelich, B M; Hurry, T R; Johnson, R P; Kline, J L; Letzring, S A; Loomis, E N; Lopez, F E; Luo, S N; Montgomery, D S; Oertel, J A; Paisley, D L; Reid, S M; Sanchez, P G; Seifter, A; Shimada, T; Workman, J B

    2008-10-01

    The newly upgraded TRIDENT high-energy-density (HED) facility provides high-energy short-pulse laser-matter interactions with powers in excess of 200 TW and energies greater than 120 J. In addition, TRIDENT retains two long-pulse (nanoseconds to microseconds) beams that are available for simultaneous use in either the same experiment or a separate one. The facility's flexibility is enhanced by the presence of two separate target chambers with a third undergoing commissioning. This capability allows the experimental configuration to be optimized by choosing the chamber with the most advantageous geometry and features. The TRIDENT facility also provides a wide range of standard instruments including optical, x-ray, and particle diagnostics. In addition, one chamber has a 10 in. manipulator allowing OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF) diagnostics to be prototyped and calibrated.

  1. TRIDENT high-energy-density facility experimental capabilities and diagnosticsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, S. H.; Aragonez, R.; Archuleta, F. L.; Archuleta, T. N.; Benage, J. F.; Cobble, J. A.; Cowan, J. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Gonzales, R. P.; Greenfield, S. R.; Hegelich, B. M.; Hurry, T. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Kline, J. L.; Letzring, S. A.; Loomis, E. N.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S. N.; Montgomery, D. S.; Oertel, J. A.; Paisley, D. L.; Reid, S. M.; Sanchez, P. G.; Seifter, A.; Shimada, T.; Workman, J. B.

    2008-10-01

    The newly upgraded TRIDENT high-energy-density (HED) facility provides high-energy short-pulse laser-matter interactions with powers in excess of 200TW and energies greater than 120J. In addition, TRIDENT retains two long-pulse (nanoseconds to microseconds) beams that are available for simultaneous use in either the same experiment or a separate one. The facility's flexibility is enhanced by the presence of two separate target chambers with a third undergoing commissioning. This capability allows the experimental configuration to be optimized by choosing the chamber with the most advantageous geometry and features. The TRIDENT facility also provides a wide range of standard instruments including optical, x-ray, and particle diagnostics. In addition, one chamber has a 10in. manipulator allowing OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF) diagnostics to be prototyped and calibrated.

  2. New potential high energy density compounds: Oxadiaziridine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Chi, Wei-Jie

    2014-10-01

    The -CN, -N3, -NF2, -NH2, -NHNO2, -NO2, and -ONO2 derivatives of oxadiaziridine were studied using B3LYP/6-311G** level of density functional theory. The gas phase heats of formation of oxadiaziridine derivatives were calculated by isodesmic reaction. All these compounds have high and positive heats of formation due to strain energies of small ring. Detonation properties were calculated via Kamlet-Jacobes equations and specific impulse. The effects of substituent groups on detonation performance were discussed. The impact sensitivity was estimated according to the "available free space per molecule in unit cell" and "energy gaps" methods. The similar conclusions were given by two different methods. The effects of substituents on impact sensitivity were discussed. According to the given estimations of detonation performance and sensitivity, some oxadiaziridine derivatives may be considered promising high energies materials.

  3. Density Functional Theory in High Energy Density Physics: phase-diagram and electrical conductivity of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2007-06-01

    Atomistic simulations employing Density Functional Theory (DFT) have recently emerged as a powerful way of increasing our understanding of materials and processes in high energy density physics. Knowledge of the properties of water (equation of state, electrical conductivity, diffusion, low-energy opacity) is essential for correctly describing the physics of giant planets as well as shock waves in water. Although a qualitative picture of water electrical conductivity has emerged, the necessary quantitative information is scarce over a wide range of temperature and density. Since experiments can only access certain areas of phase space, and often require modeling as a part of the analysis, Quantum Molecular Dynamics simulations play a vital role. Using finite-temperature density functional theory (FT-DFT), we have investigated the structure and electronic conductivity of water across three phase transitions (molecular liquid/ ionic liquid/ superionic/ electronic liquid). The ionic contribution to the conduction is calculated from proton diffusion and the electronic contribution is calculated using the Kubo-Greenwood formula. The calculations are performed with VASP, a plane-wave pseudo-potential code. There is a rapid transition to ionic conduction at 2000 K and 2 g/cm^3, whereas electronic conduction dominates at temperatures at and above 6000 K&[tilde;1]. Contrary to earlier results using the Car-Parrinello method&[tilde;2], we predict that the fluid bordering the superionic phase is conducting above 4000 K and 100 GPa. Our comprehensive use of FT-DFT explains the new findings. The calculated conductivity is compared to experimental data. I gratefully acknowledge Mike Desjarlais, my collaborator in this effort. The LDRD office at Sandia supported this work. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

  4. Energy boost in laser wakefield accelerators using sharp density transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Lifschitz, A.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V.

    2016-05-01

    The energy gain in laser wakefield accelerators is limited by dephasing between the driving laser pulse and the highly relativistic electrons in its wake. Since this phase depends on both the driver and the cavity length, the effects of dephasing can be mitigated with appropriate tailoring of the plasma density along propagation. Preceding studies have discussed the prospects of continuous phase-locking in the linear wakefield regime. However, most experiments are performed in the highly non-linear regime and rely on self-guiding of the laser pulse. Due to the complexity of the driver evolution in this regime, it is much more difficult to achieve phase locking. As an alternative, we study the scenario of rapid rephasing in sharp density transitions, as was recently demonstrated experimentally. Starting from a phenomenological model, we deduce expressions for the electron energy gain in such density profiles. The results are in accordance with particle-in-cell simulations, and we present gain estimations for single and multiple stages of rephasing.

  5. "Sloppy" nuclear energy density functionals: Effective model reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikšić, Tamara; Vretenar, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Concepts from information geometry are used to analyze parameter sensitivity for a nuclear energy density functional, representative of a class of semiempirical functionals that start from a microscopically motivated ansatz for the density dependence of the energy of a system of protons and neutrons. It is shown that such functionals are "sloppy," namely, characterized by an exponential range of sensitivity to parameter variations. Responsive to only a few stiff parameter combinations, sloppy functionals exhibit an exponential decrease of sensitivity to variations of the remaining soft parameters. By interpreting the space of model predictions as a manifold embedded in the data space, with the parameters of the functional as coordinates on the manifold, it is also shown that the exponential distribution of model manifold widths corresponds to the range of parameter sensitivity. Using the manifold boundary approximation method, we illustrate how to systematically construct effective nuclear density functionals of successively lower dimension in parameter space until sloppiness is eventually eliminated and the resulting functional contains only stiff combinations of parameters.

  6. Rationally designed polyimides for high-energy density capacitor applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Baldwin, Aaron F; Wang, Chenchen; Offenbach, Ido; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Ramprasad, Rampi; Sotzing, Gregory A

    2014-07-01

    Development of new dielectric materials is of great importance for a wide range of applications for modern electronics and electrical power systems. The state-of-the-art polymer dielectric is a biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film having a maximal energy density of 5 J/cm(3) and a high breakdown field of 700 MV/m, but with a limited dielectric constant (∼2.2) and a reduced breakdown strength above 85 °C. Great effort has been put into exploring other materials to fulfill the demand of continuous miniaturization and improved functionality. In this work, a series of polyimides were investigated as potential polymer materials for this application. Polyimide with high dielectric constants of up to 7.8 that exhibits low dissipation factors (<1%) and high energy density around 15 J/cm(3), which is 3 times that of BOPP, was prepared. Our syntheses were guided by high-throughput density functional theory calculations for rational design in terms of a high dielectric constant and band gap. Correlations of experimental and theoretical results through judicious variations of polyimide structures allowed for a clear demonstration of the relationship between chemical functionalities and dielectric properties.

  7. Density-based Energy Decomposition Analysis for Intermolecular Interactions with Variationally Determined Intermediate State Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Ayers, P.W.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-10-28

    The first purely density-based energy decomposition analysis (EDA) for intermolecular binding is developed within the density functional theory. The most important feature of this scheme is to variationally determine the frozen density energy, based on a constrained search formalism and implemented with the Wu-Yang algorithm [Q. Wu and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2498 (2003) ]. This variational process dispenses with the Heitler-London antisymmetrization of wave functions used in most previous methods and calculates the electrostatic and Pauli repulsion energies together without any distortion of the frozen density, an important fact that enables a clean separation of these two terms from the relaxation (i.e., polarization and charge transfer) terms. The new EDA also employs the constrained density functional theory approach [Q. Wu and T. Van Voorhis, Phys. Rev. A 72, 24502 (2005)] to separate out charge transfer effects. Because the charge transfer energy is based on the density flow in real space, it has a small basis set dependence. Applications of this decomposition to hydrogen bonding in the water dimer and the formamide dimer show that the frozen density energy dominates the binding in these systems, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the interactions. A more detailed examination reveals how the interplay of electrostatics and the Pauli repulsion determines the distance and angular dependence of these hydrogen bonds.

  8. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  9. Adiabatic corrections to density functional theory energies and wave functions.

    PubMed

    Mohallem, José R; Coura, Thiago de O; Diniz, Leonardo G; de Castro, Gustavo; Assafrão, Denise; Heine, Thomas

    2008-09-25

    The adiabatic finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC) to the electronic energies and wave functions of atoms and molecules is formulated for density-functional theory and implemented in the deMon code. The approach is tested for a series of local and gradient corrected density functionals, using MP2 results and diagonal-Born-Oppenheimer corrections from the literature for comparison. In the evaluation of absolute energy corrections of nonorganic molecules the LDA PZ81 functional works surprisingly better than the others. For organic molecules the GGA BLYP functional has the best performance. FNMC with GGA functionals, mainly BLYP, show a good performance in the evaluation of relative corrections, except for nonorganic molecules containing H atoms. The PW86 functional stands out with the best evaluation of the barrier of linearity of H2O and the isotopic dipole moment of HDO. In general, DFT functionals display an accuracy superior than the common belief and because the corrections are based on a change of the electronic kinetic energy they are here ranked in a new appropriate way. The approach is applied to obtain the adiabatic correction for full atomization of alcanes C(n)H(2n+2), n = 4-10. The barrier of 1 mHartree is approached for adiabatic corrections, justifying its insertion into DFT. PMID:18537228

  10. Electromagnetic potentials basis for energy density and power flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoff, H. E.

    2016-09-01

    In rounding out the education of students in advanced courses in applied electromagnetics it is incumbent on us as mentors to raise issues that encourage appreciation of certain subtle aspects that are often overlooked during first exposure to the field. One of these has to do with the interplay between fields and potentials, with the latter often seen as just a convenient mathematical artifice useful in solving Maxwell’s equations. Nonetheless, to those practiced in application it is well understood that various alternatives in the use of fields and potentials are available within electromagnetic (EM) theory for the definitions of energy density, momentum transfer, EM stress-energy tensor, and so forth. Although the various options are all compatible with the basic equations of electrodynamics (e.g., Maxwell’s equations, Lorentz force law, gauge invariance), nonetheless certain alternative formulations lend themselves to being seen as preferable to others with regard to the transparency of their application to physical problems of interest. Here we argue for the transparency of an energy density/power flux option based on the EM potentials alone.

  11. Electromagnetic potentials basis for energy density and power flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoff, H. E.

    2016-09-01

    In rounding out the education of students in advanced courses in applied electromagnetics it is incumbent on us as mentors to raise issues that encourage appreciation of certain subtle aspects that are often overlooked during first exposure to the field. One of these has to do with the interplay between fields and potentials, with the latter often seen as just a convenient mathematical artifice useful in solving Maxwell’s equations. Nonetheless, to those practiced in application it is well understood that various alternatives in the use of fields and potentials are available within electromagnetic (EM) theory for the definitions of energy density, momentum transfer, EM stress–energy tensor, and so forth. Although the various options are all compatible with the basic equations of electrodynamics (e.g., Maxwell’s equations, Lorentz force law, gauge invariance), nonetheless certain alternative formulations lend themselves to being seen as preferable to others with regard to the transparency of their application to physical problems of interest. Here we argue for the transparency of an energy density/power flux option based on the EM potentials alone.

  12. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  13. Improved energy density of nanocomposites with aligned PZT nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Haixiong; Lin, Yirong; Sodano, Henry A.

    2011-04-01

    The use of piezoelectric materials has become more popular for a wide range of applications, including structural health monitoring, power harvesting, vibration sensing and actuation. However, piezoceramic materials are often prone to breakage and are difficult to apply to curved surfaces when in their monolithic form. One approach to alleviate these issues is to embed the fragile piezoceramic inclusion into a polymer matrix. The flexible nature of the polymer matrix protects the ceramic from breaking under mechanical loading and makes the resulting compoistes easier to apply onto curved structure. However, most developed active ceramic composites have relatively low electroelastic coupling compared to bulk piezoceramics. There are two main methods to improve the eletroelastic properties of piezoceramic composites, namely using higher aspect ratio active inclusions and alignment of inclusions in the electric field direction. In this paper, the dielectric and energy storage property of nanowire composites is significantly enhanced by aligning the nanowires in the direction of the applied electrical field. PZT nanowires are hydrothermally synthesized and solutioncast into a polymer matrix, and then aligned using a shear flow based stretching method. The alignment was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy images and it is shown that the nanowires can be successfully aligned in the PVDF. The dielectric constant and energy density of the nanocomposites were tested using Agilent E4980A LCR meter and Sawyer-Tower circuit. This testing result shows that the dielectric constant and energy density of the composites can be increased by as much as 35.7% and 49.3% by aligning the nanowires in the electric field direction. Piezoceramic composites with enhanced energy storage property could lead to broader applications when using this type of materials for polymer based capacitive energy storage.

  14. High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

  15. Alternative definitions of the frozen energy in energy decomposition analysis of density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-02-28

    In energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of intermolecular interactions calculated via density functional theory, the initial supersystem wavefunction defines the so-called "frozen energy" including contributions such as permanent electrostatics, steric repulsions, and dispersion. This work explores the consequences of the choices that must be made to define the frozen energy. The critical choice is whether the energy should be minimized subject to the constraint of fixed density. Numerical results for Ne2, (H2O)2, BH3-NH3, and ethane dissociation show that there can be a large energy lowering associated with constant density orbital relaxation. By far the most important contribution is constant density inter-fragment relaxation, corresponding to charge transfer (CT). This is unwanted in an EDA that attempts to separate CT effects, but it may be useful in other contexts such as force field development. An algorithm is presented for minimizing single determinant energies at constant density both with and without CT by employing a penalty function that approximately enforces the density constraint.

  16. Alternative definitions of the frozen energy in energy decomposition analysis of density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Paul R.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-02-01

    In energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of intermolecular interactions calculated via density functional theory, the initial supersystem wavefunction defines the so-called "frozen energy" including contributions such as permanent electrostatics, steric repulsions, and dispersion. This work explores the consequences of the choices that must be made to define the frozen energy. The critical choice is whether the energy should be minimized subject to the constraint of fixed density. Numerical results for Ne2, (H2O)2, BH3-NH3, and ethane dissociation show that there can be a large energy lowering associated with constant density orbital relaxation. By far the most important contribution is constant density inter-fragment relaxation, corresponding to charge transfer (CT). This is unwanted in an EDA that attempts to separate CT effects, but it may be useful in other contexts such as force field development. An algorithm is presented for minimizing single determinant energies at constant density both with and without CT by employing a penalty function that approximately enforces the density constraint.

  17. Finiteness of the vacuum energy density in quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoukian, Edward B.

    1983-03-01

    Recent interest in the finiteness problem of the vacuum energy density (VED) in finite QED has motivated us to reexamine this problem in the light of an analysis we have carried out earlier. By a loopwise summation procedure, supplemented by a renormalization-group analysis, we study the finiteness of the VED with α, the renormalized fine-structure constant, fixed in the process as the (infinite order) zero of the eigenvalue condition F[1](x)|x=α=0∞, and with the electron mass totally dynamical of origin. We propose a possible finite solution for the VED in QED which may require only one additional eigenvalue condition for α.

  18. Ab initio derivation of model energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    I propose a simple and manageable method that allows for deriving coupling constants of model energy density functionals (EDFs) directly from ab initio calculations performed for finite fermion systems. A proof-of-principle application allows for linking properties of finite nuclei, determined by using the nuclear nonlocal Gogny functional, to the coupling constants of the quasilocal Skyrme functional. The method does not rely on properties of infinite fermion systems but on the ab initio calculations in finite systems. It also allows for quantifying merits of different model EDFs in describing the ab initio results.

  19. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  20. Nuclear clustering in the energy density functional approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ebran, J.-P.; Khan, E.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2015-10-15

    Nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) are a microscopic tool of choice extensively used over the whole chart to successfully describe the properties of atomic nuclei ensuing from their quantum liquid nature. In the last decade, they also have proved their ability to deal with the cluster phenomenon, shedding a new light on its fundamental understanding by treating on an equal footing both quantum liquid and cluster aspects of nuclei. Such a unified microscopic description based on nucleonic degrees of freedom enables to tackle the question pertaining to the origin of the cluster phenomenon and emphasizes intrinsic mechanisms leading to the emergence of clusters in nuclei.

  1. Causes of irregular energy density in f (R ,T ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Bamba, Kazuharu; Bhatti, M. Zaeem-ul-Haq

    2016-06-01

    We investigate irregularity factors for a self-gravitating spherical star evolving in the presence of an imperfect fluid. We explore the gravitational field equations and the dynamical equations with the systematic construction in f (R ,T ) gravity, where T is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Furthermore, we analyze two well-known differential equations (which occupy principal importance in the exploration of causes of energy density inhomogeneities) with the help of the Weyl tensor and the conservation laws. The irregularity factors for a spherical star are examined for particular cases of dust and isotropic and anisotropic fluids in dissipative and nondissipative regimes in the framework of f (R ,T ) gravity. It is found that, as the complexity of the matter with the anisotropic stresses increases, the inhomogeneity factor corresponds more closely to one of the structure scalars.

  2. Descriptions of carbon isotopes within the energy density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Atef; Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana; Tammam, M.

    2014-10-24

    Within the energy density functional (EDF) theory, the structure properties of Carbon isotopes are systematically studied. The shell model calculations are done for both even-A and odd-A nuclei, to study the structure of rich-neutron Carbon isotopes. The EDF theory indicates the single-neutron halo structures in {sup 15}C, {sup 17}C and {sup 19}C, and the two-neutron halo structures in {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C nuclei. It is also found that close to the neutron drip-line, there exist amazing increase in the neutron radii and decrease on the binding energies BE, which are tightly related with the blocking effect and correspondingly the blocking effect plays a significant role in the shell model configurations.

  3. The Atlas High-Energy Density Physics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Harold A.; Keinigs, Rhon K.; Anderson, Wallace E.; Atchison, Walter L.; Bartsch, R. Richard; Benage, John F.; Ballard, Evan O.; Bowman, David W.; Cochrane, James C.; Ekdahl, Carl A.; Elizondo, Juan M.; Faehl, Rickey J.; Fulton, Robert D.; Gribble, Robert F.; Guzik, Joyce A.; Kyrala, George A.; Miller, R. Bruce; Nielsen, Kurt E.; Parker, Jerald V.; Parsons, W. Mark; Munson, Carter P.; Oro, David M.; Rodriguez, George E.; Rogers, Harold H.; Scudder, David W.; Shlachter, Jack S.; Stokes, John L.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Trainor, R. James; Turchi, Peter J.; Wood, Blake P.

    2001-02-01

    Atlas is a pulsed-power facility under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory to drive high-energy density experiments. Atlas will be operational in the summer of 2000 and is optimized for the study of dynamic material properties, hydrodynamics, and dense plasmas under extreme conditions. Atlas is designed to implode heavy-liner loads in a z-pinch configuration. The peak current of 30 MA is delivered in 4 μs. A typical Atlas liner is a 47-gram-aluminum cylinder with ˜4-cm radius and 4-cm length. Three to five MJ of kinetic energy will be delivered to the load. Using composite layers and a variety of interior target designs, a wide variety of experiments in ˜cm3 volumes will be performed. Atlas applications, machine design, and the status of the project are reviewed.

  4. Curvature and Frontier Orbital Energies in Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Tamar; Autschbach, Jochen; Govind, Niranjan; Kronik, Leeor; Baer, Roi

    2012-12-20

    Perdew et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett 49, 1691 (1982)] discovered and proved two different properties that exact Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) must obey: (i) The exact total energy versus particle number must be a series of linear segments between integer electron points; (ii) Across an integer number of electrons, the exchange-correlation potential may ``jump’’ by a constant, known as the derivative discontinuity (DD). Here, we show analytically that in both the original and the generalized Kohn-Sham formulation of DFT, the two are in fact two sides of the same coin. Absence of a derivative discontinuity necessitates deviation from piecewise linearity, and the latter can be used to correct for the former, thereby restoring the physical meaning of the orbital energies. Using selected small molecules, we show that this results in a simple correction scheme for any underlying functional, including semi-local and hybrid functionals as well as Hartree-Fock theory, suggesting a practical correction for the infamous gap problem of density functional theory. Moreover, we show that optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid functionals can inherently minimize both DD and curvature, thus requiring no correction, and show that this can be used as a sound theoretical basis for novel tuning strategies.

  5. Strongly Interacting Matter at Very High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2011-06-05

    The authors discuss the study of matter at very high energy density. In particular: what are the scientific questions; what are the opportunities to makes significant progress in the study of such matter and what facilities are now or might be available in the future to answer the scientific questions? The theoretical and experimental study of new forms of high energy density matter is still very much a 'wild west' field. There is much freedom for developing new concepts which can have order one effects on the way we think about such matter. It is also a largely 'lawless' field, in that concepts and methods are being developed as new information is generated. There is also great possibility for new experimental discovery. Most of the exciting results from RHIC experiments were unanticipated. The methods used for studying various effects like flow, jet quenching, the ridge, two particle correlations etc. were developed as experiments evolved. I believe this will continue to be the case at LHC and as we use existing and proposed accelerators to turn theoretical conjecture into tangible reality. At some point this will no doubt evolve into a precision science, and that will make the field more respectable, but for my taste, the 'wild west' times are the most fun.

  6. Characterizing high-energy-density propellants for space propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokan, Timothy S.; Olds, John R.; Seitzman, Jerry M.; Ludovice, Peter J.

    2009-10-01

    A technique for computationally determining the thermophysical properties of high-energy-density matter (HEDM) propellants is presented. HEDM compounds are of interest in the liquid rocket engine industry due to their high density and high energy content relative to existing industry-standard propellants. In order to accurately model rocket engine performance, cost and weight in a conceptual design environment, several thermodynamic and physical properties are required over a range of temperatures and pressures. The approach presented here combines quantum mechanical and molecular dynamic (MD) calculations and group additivity methods. A method for improving the force field model coefficients used in the MD is included. This approach is used to determine thermophysical properties for two HEDM compounds of interest: quadricyclane and 2-azido-N,N-dimethylethanamine (DMAZ). The modified force field approach provides results that more accurately match experimental data than the unmodified approach. Launch vehicle and Lunar lander case studies are presented to quantify the system level impact of employing quadricyclane and DMAZ rather than industry standard propellants. In both cases, the use of HEDM propellants provides reductions in vehicle mass compared to industry standard propellants. The results demonstrate that HEDM propellants can be an attractive technology for future launch vehicle and Lunar lander applications.

  7. Vacuum energy density and pressure near a soft wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S. W.; Whisler, C. M.; Fulling, S. A.; Wagner, Jef; Carter, H. B.; Lujan, David; Mera, F. D.; Settlemyre, T. E.

    2016-05-01

    Perfectly conducting boundaries, and their Dirichlet counterparts for quantum scalar fields, predict nonintegrable energy densities. A more realistic model with a finite ultraviolet cutoff yields two inconsistent values for the force on a curved or edged boundary (the "pressure anomaly"). A still more realistic, but still easily calculable, model replaces the hard wall by a power-law potential; because it involves no a posteriori modification of the formulas calculated from the theory, this model should be anomaly free. Here we first set up the formalism and notation for the quantization of a scalar field in the background of a planar soft wall, and we approximate the reduced Green function in perturbative and WKB limits (the latter being appropriate when either the mode frequency or the depth into the wall is sufficiently large). Then we display numerical calculations of the energy density and pressure for the region outside the wall, which show that the pressure anomaly does not occur there. Calculations inside the wall are postponed to later papers, which must tackle the regularization and renormalization of divergences induced by the potential in the bulk region.

  8. Energy density matrix formalism for interacting quantum systems: Quantum Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Kim, Jeongnim; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2014-07-01

    We develop an energy density matrix that parallels the one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) for many-body quantum systems. Just as the density matrix gives access to the number density and occupation numbers, the energy density matrix yields the energy density and orbital occupation energies. The eigenvectors of the matrix provide a natural orbital partitioning of the energy density while the eigenvalues comprise a single-particle energy spectrum obeying a total energy sum rule. For mean-field systems the energy density matrix recovers the exact spectrum. When correlation becomes important, the occupation energies resemble quasiparticle energies in some respects. We explore the occupation energy spectrum for the finite 3D homogeneous electron gas in the metallic regime and an isolated oxygen atom with ground-state quantum Monte Carlo techniques implemented in the qmcpack simulation code. The occupation energy spectrum for the homogeneous electron gas can be described by an effective mass below the Fermi level. Above the Fermi level evanescent behavior in the occupation energies is observed in similar fashion to the occupation numbers of the 1RDM. A direct comparison with total energy differences shows a quantitative connection between the occupation energies and electron addition and removal energies for the electron gas. For the oxygen atom, the association between the ground-state occupation energies and particle addition and removal energies becomes only qualitative. The energy density matrix provides an avenue for describing energetics with quantum Monte Carlo methods which have traditionally been limited to total energies.

  9. Creating High Energy Density Jets in Laboratory Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Robert

    2005-04-01

    A new experimental platform for the investigation of high Mach-number, high energy-density jets has been developed at the University of Rochester's Omega laser facility. Assuming the scalability of the Euler equations, the resulting mm-sized jets should scale to astrophysical objects such as Herbig-Haro objects and jet-driven supernovae that may involve jets with similar internal Mach numbers. This scalability still holds in the presence of radiation as long as the relative importance of radiative cooling is similar. In these experiments, either direct or indirect laser drive is used to launch a strong shock into a 125 micron thick titanium foil target that caps a 700 micron thick titanium washer. After the shock breaks out into the 300 micron diameter cylindrical hole in the washer, a dense, well-collimated jet with an energy density of more than 0.1 MJ per cc is formed. The jet is then imaged as it propagates for 100s of ns down a cylinder of low-density polymer foam. The experiments are diagnosed by point-projection with a micro-dot vanadium backligher. The field of view is several mm and the resolution is 15 microns. The X-ray radiographs show the hydrodynamically unstable jet and the bow shock driving into the surrounding foam. Such complex experimental data provide a challenge to hydrocodes and so are being used to test the hydrodynamic simulations of these types of flows. Initial comparisons between the data and LANL and AWE simulations will be shown. However, the high Reynolds numbers of both the laboratory and astrophysical jets suggest that, given sufficient time and shear, turbulence should develop; this cannot be reliably modeled by present, resolution-limited simulations. Future work concerning the applicability of the Omega experiments to astrophysical objects and the quantitative study of turbulent mixing via subgrid-scale models will be discussed.

  10. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: application to electronic energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Markland, Thomas E; Reichman, David R

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  11. Reductions in entree energy density increase children's vegetable intake and reduce energy intake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The energy density (ED; kcal/g) of an entrée influences children's energy intake (EI), but the effect of simultaneously changing both ED and portion size of an entrée on preschool children's EI is unknown. In this within-subject crossover study, 3- to 5-year-old children (30 boys, 31 girls) in a day...

  12. Evaluation Of A Residential Retrofit Program In Omaha Nebraska: A Comparison Of Actual Energy Savings With Audit Predictions Using Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cory, Bradley S.

    The reEnergize Program conducted 957 energy upgrades in Omaha Nebraska from July 2010 to September 30th 2013, through a government grant within the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Projected program savings were provided upon program completion but it was unknown how effective the program was at actually reducing energy consumption in the homes that were upgraded. The following research report uses a PRISM analysis to remove the effect of weather and compare the actual pre and post utility usage rates to determine the actual effectiveness of the program. The housing characteristics, and individual energy upgrades were analyzed to see if any patterns or trends could be identified between consumption savings and housing type and specific upgrade measure. The results of the study showed that the program did induce savings but by much less than the engineering estimates predicted. It is likely that housing characteristics and upgrade measures play a role in inducing consumption savings but homeowner behavior is a stronger factor that influences savings.

  13. Ferroelectric polymer networks with high energy density and improved discharged efficiency for dielectric energy storage.

    PubMed

    Khanchaitit, Paisan; Han, Kuo; Gadinski, Matthew R; Li, Qi; Wang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Ferroelectric polymers are being actively explored as dielectric materials for electrical energy storage applications. However, their high dielectric constants and outstanding energy densities are accompanied by large dielectric loss due to ferroelectric hysteresis and electrical conduction, resulting in poor charge-discharge efficiencies under high electric fields. To address this long-standing problem, here we report the ferroelectric polymer networks exhibiting significantly reduced dielectric loss, superior polarization and greatly improved breakdown strength and reliability, while maintaining their fast discharge capability at a rate of microseconds. These concurrent improvements lead to unprecedented charge-discharge efficiencies and large values of the discharged energy density and also enable the operation of the ferroelectric polymers at elevated temperatures, which clearly outperforms the melt-extruded ferroelectric polymer films that represents the state of the art in dielectric polymers. The simplicity and scalability of the described method further suggest their potential for high energy density capacitors.

  14. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded descriptions (Ch. V), and a

  15. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites ("virtual electrodes") in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  16. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites (“virtual electrodes”) in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  17. A density functional for core-valence correlation energy.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Duminda S; Frisch, Michael J; Petersson, George A

    2015-12-01

    A density functional, εCV-DFT(ρc, ρv), describing the core-valence correlation energy has been constructed as a linear combination of εLY P (corr)(ρc), εV WN5 (corr)(ρc, ρv), εPBE (corr)(ρc, ρv), εSlater (ex)(ρc, ρv), εHCTH (ex)(ρc, ρv), εHF (ex)(ρc, ρv), and FCV-DFTNi,Zi, a function of the nuclear charges. This functional, with 6 adjustable parameters, reproduces (±0.27 kcal/mol rms error) a benchmark set of 194 chemical energy changes including 9 electron affinities, 18 ionization potentials, and 167 total atomization energies covering the first- and second-rows of the periodic table. This is almost twice the rms error (±0.16 kcal/mol) obtained with CCSD(T)/MTsmall calculations, but less than half the rms error (±0.65 kcal/mol) obtained with MP2/GTlargeXP calculations, and somewhat smaller than the rms error (±0.39 kcal/mol) obtained with CCSD/MTsmall calculations. The largest positive and negative errors from εCV-DFT(ρc, ρv) were 0.88 and -0.75 kcal/mol with the set of 194 core-valence energy changes ranging from +3.76 kcal/mol for the total atomization energy of propyne to -9.05 kcal/mol for the double ionization of Mg. Evaluation of the εCV-DFT(ρc, ρv) functional requires less time than a single SCF iteration, and the accuracy is adequate for any model chemistry based on the CCSD(T) level of theory. PMID:26646873

  18. Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Juan J.; Matzen, M. Keith; McDaniel, Dillon H.

    Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates (approximately) 500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-2, and a design concept for the proposed (approximately) 15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed.

  19. A density functional for core-valence correlation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Frisch, Michael J.; Petersson, George A.

    2015-12-01

    A density functional, ɛCV-DFT(ρc, ρv), describing the core-valence correlation energy has been constructed as a linear combination of ɛLY Pcorr(ρc), ɛV WN5corr(ρc, ρv), ɛPBEcorr(ρc, ρv), ɛSlaterex(ρc, ρv), ɛHCTHex(ρc, ρv), ɛHFex(ρc, ρv), and F CV -DFT (" separators=" N i , Z i ) , a function of the nuclear charges. This functional, with 6 adjustable parameters, reproduces (±0.27 kcal/mol rms error) a benchmark set of 194 chemical energy changes including 9 electron affinities, 18 ionization potentials, and 167 total atomization energies covering the first- and second-rows of the periodic table. This is almost twice the rms error (±0.16 kcal/mol) obtained with CCSD(T)/MTsmall calculations, but less than half the rms error (±0.65 kcal/mol) obtained with MP2/GTlargeXP calculations, and somewhat smaller than the rms error (±0.39 kcal/mol) obtained with CCSD/MTsmall calculations. The largest positive and negative errors from ɛCV-DFT(ρc, ρv) were 0.88 and -0.75 kcal/mol with the set of 194 core-valence energy changes ranging from +3.76 kcal/mol for the total atomization energy of propyne to -9.05 kcal/mol for the double ionization of Mg. Evaluation of the ɛCV-DFT(ρc, ρv) functional requires less time than a single SCF iteration, and the accuracy is adequate for any model chemistry based on the CCSD(T) level of theory.

  20. Holographic energy density on Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepe, Samuel; Peña, Francisco; Torres, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    In Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology we use the holographic Ricci-like cutoff for the energy density proposed by L. N. Granda and A. Oliveros and under this framework we study, through the cosmic evolution at late times, the sign change in the amount of nonconservation energy (Q ) present in this cosmology. We revise the early stage (curvature-dependent) of this cosmology, where a term reminiscent of stiff matter is the dominant, and in this stage we find a power-law solution for the cosmic scale factor although ω =-1 . Late and early phantom schemes are obtained without requiring ω <-1 . Nevertheless, these schemes are not feasible according to what is shown in this paper. We also show that ω =-1 alone does not imply a de Sitter phase in the present cosmology. Thermal aspects are revised by considering the energy interchange between the bulk and the spacetime boundary and we conclude that there is no thermal equilibrium between them. Finally, a ghost scalar graviton (extra degree of freedom in HL gravity) is required by the observational data.

  1. Stability of Magnetically Implode Liners for High Energy Density Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Anderson, W.E.; Atchison, W.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Clark, D.A.; Ekdahl, C.E.; Faehl, R.J.; Goforth, J.H.; Keinigs, R.K.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Morgan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Tasker, D.G.; Trainor, R.J.; Shlachter, J.S.

    1998-10-18

    Magnetically imploded cylindrical metal shells (z-pinch liners) are attractive drivers for a wide variety of hydrodynamics and material properties experiments. The ultimate utility of liners depends on the acceleration of near-solid density shells to velocities exceeding 20 km/sec with good azimuthal symmetry and axial uniformity. Two pulse power systems (Ranchero and Atlas) currently operational or under development at Los Alamos provide electrical energy adequate to accelerate {approximately}50 gr. liners to 1-2 MJ/cm kinetic energy. As in all z-pinches, the outer surface of a magnetically imploded liner is unstable to magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) modes during acceleration. Large-scale distortion in the liners from RT modes growing from glide plane interactions or initial imperfections could make liners unusable for man experiments. On the other hand, material strength in the liner should, from first principles, reduce the growth rate of RT modes - and can render some combinations of wavelength and amplitude analytically stable. The growth of instabilities in both soft aluminum liners and in high strength aluminum alloy liners has been studied analytically, computationally and experimentally at liner kinetic energies up to 100 KJ/cm on the Pegasus capacitor bank using driving currents up to 12 MA.

  2. Nuclear isomers as ultra-high-energy-density materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, C. H.; Weiss, M. S.; Anderson, J. D.

    1992-04-01

    Nuclear isomers are metastable states of atomic nuclei which release their energy in a prompt burst of electromagnetic radiation. Two kinds of nuclear isomers are known to exist: spin isomers and shape isomers. There is evidence for at least 27 different fissionless shape isomers in isotopes of mercury, lead, and thallium, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Three potential mechanisms for releasing the stored isomeric energy are neutron catalysis, laser-electron-nuclear coupling, and Stark-shift-induced mixing. While shape isomers are believed to hold the most promise for radioactivity-free, ultra-high-energy-density materials, spin isomers can be used as surrogates for developing the release mechanisms. It is proposed to undertake shell-model calculations for the nuclear levels in vicinity of the (sup 178)Hf spin isomer, in order to estimate the efficacy of neutron catalysis. It is also proposed to use the toroidal electron spectrometer to measure the conversion electrons from laser-induced transitions in (sup 229)Th. The final mechanism, Stark-shift-induced mixing of atomic and nuclear levels, would also be studied theoretically. Finally, isomer production is considered briefly, including the possibility of shape isomers in fission products from radwaste or nuclear explosions.

  3. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P. A.

    2010-10-15

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K{sup +} beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  4. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  5. Aromatic Polyurea Possessing High Electrical Energy Density and Low Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Yash; Lin, Minren; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Q. M.

    2016-10-01

    We report the development of a dielectric polymer, poly (ether methyl ether urea) (PEMEU), which possesses a dielectric constant of 4 and is thermally stable up to 150°C. The experimental results show that the ether units are effective in softening the rigid polymer and making it thermally processable, while the high dipole moment of urea units and glass structure of the polymer leads to a low dielectric loss and low conduction loss. As a result, PEMEU high quality thin films can be fabricated which exhibit exceptionally high breakdown field of >1.5 GV/m, and a low conduction loss at fields up to the breakdown. Consequently, the PEMEU films exhibit a high charge-discharge efficiency of 90% and a high discharged energy density of 36 J/cm3.

  6. Aromatic Polyurea Possessing High Electrical Energy Density and Low Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Yash; Lin, Minren; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Q. M.

    2016-07-01

    We report the development of a dielectric polymer, poly (ether methyl ether urea) (PEMEU), which possesses a dielectric constant of 4 and is thermally stable up to 150°C. The experimental results show that the ether units are effective in softening the rigid polymer and making it thermally processable, while the high dipole moment of urea units and glass structure of the polymer leads to a low dielectric loss and low conduction loss. As a result, PEMEU high quality thin films can be fabricated which exhibit exceptionally high breakdown field of >1.5 GV/m, and a low conduction loss at fields up to the breakdown. Consequently, the PEMEU films exhibit a high charge-discharge efficiency of 90% and a high discharged energy density of 36 J/cm3.

  7. Nickel-iron battery of high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, G.; Oliapuram, V. A.; Lexow, K. W.; Horn, K. G.

    1981-07-01

    The energy and power densities of conventional Nickel-Iron accumulators at about 26 wh/kg (5 h) and 18 w/kg (1 h) respectively are rather low. By using active materials of high utilization, electrode construction with low-weight support, light cell containers, and less electrolyte with gas recombination specific values of 45 wh/kg (5 h) and 35 w/kg (1 h) can be obtained as well as short-time load peaks of about 100 w/kg. An elastic casing is an essential feature of the new battery. The reversible pressure-volume changes can be used as a state-of-charge indicator. Production procedures, experimental results and recommendations for use are given. A 1 kwh batter has been completed.

  8. Many-body theory and Energy Density Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a method is first presented to construct an Energy Density Functional on a microscopic basis. The approach is based on the Kohn-Sham method, where one introduces explicitly the Nuclear Matter Equation of State, which can be obtained by an accurate many-body calculation. In this way it connects the functional to the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction. It is shown that the resulting functional can be performing as the best Gogny force functional. In the second part of the paper it is shown how one can go beyond the mean-field level and the difficulty that can appear. The method is based on the particle-vibration coupling scheme and a formalism is presented that can handle the correct use of the vibrational degrees of freedom within a microscopic approach.

  9. Supernova constraints on spatial variations of the vacuum energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.; de Carvalho, J. P. M.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2001-09-01

    We consider a very simple toy model for a spatially varying ``cosmological constant,'' where we are inside a spherical bubble (with a given set of cosmological parameters) that is surrounded by a larger region where these parameters are different. This model includes essential features of more realistic scenarios with a minimum number of parameters. We calculate the luminosity distance in the presence of spatial variations of the vacuum energy density using linear perturbation theory and discuss the use of type Ia supernovae to impose constraints on this type of model. We find that presently available observations are only constraining at very low redshifts, but also provide independent confirmation that the high-redshift supernovae data do prefer a relatively large positive cosmological constant.

  10. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  11. BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2012-07-01

    The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties. Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data. Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  12. Energy density and stress: A new approach to teaching electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, F.

    1989-08-01

    By introducing the electromagnetic field in the customary way, ideas are promoted that do not correspond to those of contemporary physics: on the one hand, ideas that stem from pre-Maxwellian times when interactions were still conceived as actions at a distance and, on the other hand, ideas that can be understood only from the point of view that the electromagnetic field is carried by a medium. A part of a course in electromagnetism is sketched in which, from the beginning, the electromagnetic field is presented as a system in its own right and the local quantities energy density and stress are put into the foreground. In this way, justice is done to the views of modern physics and, moreover, the field becomes conceptually simpler.

  13. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II. PMID:21033977

  14. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-04

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K{sup +} beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  15. THE IRON OPACITY PROJECT: High-Energy-Density Plasma Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palay, E.; Orban, C.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Pinnsonoault, M.; Bailey, J.

    2013-05-01

    Opacity governs radiation flow in plasma sources. Accurate opacities are needed to model unobservable laboratory and astrophysical conditions. High-energy-density (HED) plasma conditions prevalent in stellar interiors can now be recreated in the laboratory. The Z-pinch fusion device at the Sandia National Lab can reproduce temperatures and densities near the boundary where radiation transport changes from diffusion to convection inside the Sun. To benchmark theoretical opacities experiments are essential to resolve the outstanding discrepancy in solar abundances. The most common volatile elements C, N, O, Ne, etc. have been spectroscopically measured to be up to 50% lower than the standard abundances. This introduces conflict in the derived values of basic solar parameters such as the radiation/convection boundary, sound speed, and the primordial He abundance with precisely measured oscillations of the Sun through Helioseismology. A potential solution is increment of stellar opacities, which has inverse but complex relation with abundacnes, at least 30%. New iron opacity calculations include hitherto neglected atomic physics of fine structure and resonances which are largely treated as lines in existing opacities calculations. Preliminary results on radiative transitions in Ne Partial support: DOE,NSF.

  16. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  17. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  18. Fabrication and demonstration of high energy density lithium ion microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke

    density on a limited footprint area. In chapter 4, Li-ion batteries based on the LiMn2O4-TiP 2O7 couple are manufactured on flexible paper substrates; where the use of light-weight paper substrates significantly increase the gravimetric energy density of this electrode couple as compared to traditional metal current collectors. In chapter 5, a novel nanowire growth mechanism will be explored to grow interdigitated metal oxide nanowire micro battery electrodes. The growth kinetics of this mechanism is systematically studied to understand how to optimize the growth process to produce electrodes with improved electrochemical properties.

  19. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-01

    Buildings consume more than one third of the world?s total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small

  20. Frontiers in plasma science: a high energy density perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    The potential for ground-breaking research in plasma physics in high energy density (HED) regimes is compelling. The combination of HED facilities around the world spanning microjoules to megajoules, with time scales ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds enables new regimes of plasma science to be experimentally probed. The ability to shock and ramp compress samples and simultaneously probe them allows dense, strongly coupled, Fermi degenerate plasmas relevant to planetary interiors to be studied. Shock driven hydrodynamic instabilities evolving into turbulent flows relevant to the dynamics of exploding stars are being probed. The physics and dynamics of magnetized plasmas relevant to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion are also starting to be studied. High temperature, high velocity interacting flows are being probed for evidence of astrophysical collisionless shock formation. Turbulent, high magnetic Reynolds number flows are being experimentally generated to look for evidence of the turbulent magnetic dynamo effect. And new results from thermonuclear reactions in dense hot plasmas relevant to stellar interiors are starting to emerge. A selection of examples providing a compelling vision for frontier plasma science in the coming decade will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Metrology Challenges for High Energy Density Science Target Manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Seugling, R M; Bono, M J; Davis, P

    2009-02-19

    Currently, High Energy Density Science (HEDS) experiments are used to support and qualify predictive physics models. These models assume ideal conditions such as energy (input) and device (target) geometry. The experiments rely on precision targets constructed from components with dimensions in the millimeter range, while having micrometer-scale, functional features, including planar steps, sine waves, and step-joint geometry on hemispherical targets. Future target designs will likely have features and forms that rival or surpass current manufacturing and characterization capability. The dimensional metrology of these features is important for a number of reasons, including qualification of sub-components prior to assembly, quantification of critical features on the as-built assemblies and as a feedback mechanism for fabrication process development. Variations in geometry from part to part can lead to functional limitations, such as unpredictable instabilities during an experiment and the inability to assemble a target from poorly matched sub-components. Adding to the complexity are the large number and variety of materials, components, and shapes that render any single metrology technique difficult to use with low uncertainty. Common materials include metal and glass foams, doped transparent and opaque plastics and a variety of deposited and wrought metals. A suite of metrology tools and techniques developed to address the many critical issues relevant to the manufacture of HEDS targets including interferometry, x-ray radiography and contact metrology are presented including two sided interferometry for absolute thickness metrology and low force probe technology for micrometer feature coordinate metrology.

  2. Comment on "Single-point kinetic energy density functionals: A pointwise kinetic energy density analysis and numerical convergence investigation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickey, S. B.; Karasiev, Valentin V.; Chakraborty, Debajit

    2015-09-01

    We suggest a more nuanced view of the merit and utility of generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) for the noninteracting kinetic energy (KE) than the critique of Xia and Carter (XC) [Phys. Rev. B 91, 045124 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.045124]. Specifically, the multiple valuedness of the Pauli term enhancement factor (denoted G [n ] by XC) with respect to the inhomogeneity variable s can be excluded by enforcement of a bound on the Kohn-Sham KE to achieve universality of the functional along with enforcement of proper large-s behavior. This is physically sensible in that the excluded G values occur for s values that correspond to low densities. The behavior is exacerbated by peculiarities of pseudodensities. The VT84F KE GGA, constructed with these constraints, does not have the numerical instability in our older PBE2 functional analyzed by XC.

  3. Analytic energy-level densities of separable harmonic oscillators including approximate hindered rotor corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döntgen, M.

    2016-09-01

    Energy-level densities are key for obtaining various chemical properties. In chemical kinetics, energy-level densities are used to predict thermochemistry and microscopic reaction rates. Here, an analytic energy-level density formulation is derived using inverse Laplace transformation of harmonic oscillator partition functions. Anharmonic contributions to the energy-level density are considered approximately using a literature model for the transition from harmonic to free motions. The present analytic energy-level density formulation for rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator systems is validated against the well-studied CO+O˙ H system. The approximate hindered rotor energy-level density corrections are validated against the well-studied H2O2 system. The presented analytic energy-level density formulation gives a basis for developing novel numerical simulation schemes for chemical processes.

  4. Testing an Energy Balance Model for Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Data. [Hannover, West Germany barley and wheat fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurney, R. J.; Camillo, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An energy-balance model is used to estimate daily evapotranspiration for 3 days for a barley field and a wheat field near Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany. The model was calibrated using once-daily estimates of surface temperatures, which may be remotely sensed. The evaporation estimates were within the 95% error bounds of independent eddy correlation estimates for the daytime periods for all three days for both sites, but the energy-balance estimates are generally higher; it is unclear which estimate is biassed. Soil moisture in the top 2 cm of soil, which may be remotely sensed, may be used to improve these evaporation estimates under partial ground cover. Sensitivity studies indicate the amount of ground data required is not excessive.

  5. Characterizing high-energy-density propellants for space propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokan, Timothy

    There exists wide ranging research interest in high-energy-density matter (HEDM) propellants as a potential replacement for existing industry standard fuels for liquid rocket engines. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army Research Lab, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and the NASA Glenn Research Center each either recently concluded or currently has ongoing programs in the synthesis and development of these potential new propellants. In order to perform conceptual designs using these new propellants, most conceptual rocket engine powerhead design tools (e.g. NPSS, ROCETS, and REDTOP-2) require several thermophysical properties of a given propellant over a wide range of temperature and pressure. These properties include enthalpy, entropy, density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. Very little thermophysical property data exists for most of these potential new HEDM propellants. Experimental testing of these properties is both expensive and time consuming and is impractical in a conceptual vehicle design environment. A new technique for determining these thermophysical properties of potential new rocket engine propellants is presented. The technique uses a combination of three different computational methods to determine these properties. Quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics are used to model new propellants at a molecular level in order to calculate density, enthalpy, and entropy. Additivity methods are used to calculate the kinematic viscosity and thermal conductivity of new propellants. This new technique is validated via a series of verification experiments of HEDM compounds. Results are provided for two HEDM propellants: quadricyclane and 2-azido-N,N-dimethylethanamine (DMAZ). In each case, the new technique does a better job than the best current computational methods at accurately matching the experimental data of the HEDM compounds of interest. A case study is provided to help quantify the vehicle level impacts of using HEDM

  6. Lateral density variations in elastic Earth models from an extended minimum energy approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, B. V.

    1980-01-01

    Kaula's minimum energy approach was extended to include the nonhydrostatic gravitational potential energy and the density perturbation field was obtained to degree and order eight. The depth profiles for the density perturbation show a stratification with density excesses and deficiencies alternating with depth. The addition of the gravitational potential energy in the minimization process does not change significantly the conclusions based on results for the minimum shear strain energy case, concerning the inability of the mantle to withstand the lateral loading elastically.

  7. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration under complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N. B.

    2010-07-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial scales. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at varying temporal and spatial scales under complex terrain. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can fully account for the dynamic impacts of complex terrain and changing land cover in concert with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement) over time. Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  8. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration over heterogeneous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N.-B.

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial coverage in the study areas. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at different temporal and spatial scales under heterogeneous terrain with varying elevations, slopes and aspects. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can account for the dynamic impacts of heterogeneous terrain and changing land cover with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement). Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  9. High Energy Density Studies at the OMEGA laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehly, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The primary emphasis of the scientific program at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics is laser-driven inertial confinement fusion. We report on high-energy-density (HED) experiments that use the OMEGA laser to produce multi-megabar shocks in materials of interest to the national fusion effort and the associated HED sciences. We present measurements of the behavior of shocked diamond, in both the single-crystal and ultranano-crystalline forms used as an ablator material in fusion capsules. Using the impedance-matching technique both the Hugoniot and release behaviors are measured with respect to multiple reference materials. The release of shocked diamond into liquid deuterium is also measured. We present the results of sound-speed measurements in shocked quartz which is also used as a reference for sound speed measurements in CH and fused silica. This is done using an unsteady wave analysis that tracks the propagation of small perturbations in shock pressure as they traverse the shocked material from `piston' to shock front. The arrival times of these perturbations, as compared to the same in a reference material, provides the sound speed in the shock material. We also present results of optical and x-ray probing of shock waves in foam targets and solid targets, as well as the release plumes of shock material after shock breakout. The import of these measurements to the fusion program and basic HED science will be discussed and plans for future work presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  10. Ion energy distributions and densities in the plume of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shotaro; Cravens, Thomas E.; Omidi, Nojan; Perry, Mark E.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2016-10-01

    Enceladus has a dynamic plume that is emitting gas, including water vapor, and dust. The gas is ionized by solar EUV radiation, charge exchange, and electron impact and extends throughout the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. The charge exchange collisions alter the plasma composition. Ice grains (dust) escape from the vicinity of Enceladus and form the E ring, including a portion that is negatively charged by the local plasma. The inner magnetosphere within 10 RS (Saturn radii) contains a complex mixture of plasma, neutral gas, and dust that links back to Enceladus. In this paper we investigate the energy distributions, ion species and densities of water group ions in the plume of Enceladus using test particle and Monte Carlo methods that include collisional processes such as charge exchange and ion-neutral chemical reactions. Ion observations from the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) for E07 are presented for the first time. We use the modeling results to interpret observations made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the INMS. The low energy ions, as observed by CAPS, appear to be affected by a vertical electric field (EZ=-10 μV/m) in the plume. The EZ field may be associated with the charged dust and/or the pressure gradient of plasma. The model results, along with the results of earlier models, show that H3O+ ions created by chemistry are predominant in the plume, which agrees with INMS and CAPS data, but the INMS count rate in the plume for the model is several times greater than the data, which we do not fully understand. This composition and the total ion count found in the plume agree with INMS and CAPS data. On the other hand, the Cassini Langmuir Probe measured a maximum plume ion density more than 30,000 cm-3, which is far larger than the maximum ion density from our model, 900 cm-3. The model results also demonstrate that most of the ions in the plume are from the external magnetospheric flow and are not generated by local

  11. Upgrading of biorenewables to high energy density fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John C; Batista, Enrique R; Chen, Weizhong; Currier, Robert P; Dirmyer, Matthew R; John, Kevin D; Kim, Jin K; Keith, Jason; Martin, Richard L; Pierpont, Aaron W; Silks Ill, L. A. "" Pete; Smythe, Mathan C; Sutton, Andrew D; Taw, Felicia L; Trovitch, Ryan J; Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Waidmann, Christopher R; Wu, Ruilian; Baker, R. Thomas; Schlaf, Marcel

    2010-12-07

    According to a recent report, lignocellulose is the most abundant renewable biological resource on earth, with an annual production of {approx} 200 x 10{sup 9} tons. Conversion of lignocellulosics derived from wood, agricultural wastes, and woody grasses into liquid fuels and value-added chemical feedstocks is an active area of research that has seen an explosion of effort due to the need to replace petroleum based sources. The carbohydrates D-glucose (C{sub 6}), L-arabinose (C{sub 5}), and D-xylose (C{sub 5}) are readily obtained from the hydrolysis of lignocellulose and constitute the most abundant renewable organic carbon source on the planet. Because they are naturally produced on such a large scale, these sugars have the greatest potential to displace petrochemical derived transportation fuel. Recent efforts in our laboratories aimed towards the production of high energy density transportation fuels from carbohydrates have been structured around the parameters of selective carbohydrate carbon chain extension chemistries, low reaction temperatures, and the desired use of water or neat substrate as the solvent. Some of our efforts in this regard will be presented.

  12. Plasma polymerized high energy density dielectric films for capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagishi, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    High energy density polymeric dielectric films were prepared by plasma polymerization of a variety of gaseous monomers. This technique gives thin, reproducible, pinhole free, conformable, adherent, and insoluble coatings and overcomes the processing problems found in the preparation of thin films with bulk polymers. Thus, devices are prepared completely in a vacuum environment. The plasma polymerized films prepared all showed dielectric strengths of greater than 1000 kV/cm and in some cases values of greater than 4000 kV/cm were observed. The dielectric loss of all films was generally less than 1% at frequencies below 10 kHz, but this value increased at higher frequencies. All films were self healing. The dielectric strength was a function of the polymerization technique, whereas the dielectric constant varied with the structure of the starting material. Because of the thin films used (thickness in the submicron range) surface smoothness of the metal electrodes was found to be critical in obtaining high dielectric strengths. High dielectric strength graft copolymers were also prepared. Plasma polymerized ethane was found to be thermally stable up to 150 C in the presence of air and 250 C in the absence of air. No glass transitions were observed for this material.

  13. Building A Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Carlson; Dick Furnstahl; Mihai Horoi; Rusty Lusk; Witek Nazarewicz; Esmond Ng; Ian Thompson; James Vary

    2012-09-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory. The main physics areas of UNEDF, defined at the beginning of the project, were: ab initio structure; ab initio functionals; DFT applications; DFT extensions; reactions.

  14. Flexible enhanced energy density composites for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, H.; Kollosche, M.; McCarthy, D. N.; Risse, S.; Becker, A.; Ragusch, H.; Kofod, G.

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators deform due to voltage-induced Maxwell-stress, which interacts with the mechanical properties of the material. Such actuators are considered for many potential applications where high actuation strain and moderate energy density comparable to biological muscle are required. However, the high voltage commonly required to drive them is a limitation, especially for biomedical applications. The high driving voltage can be lowered by developing materials with increased permittivity, while leaving the mechanical properties unaffected. Here, an approach to lowering the driving voltage is presented, which relies on a grafted nano-composite, in which conducting nanoparticles are integrated directly into a flexible matrix by chemical grafting. The conducting particles are π-conjugated soft macromolecules, which are grafted chemically to a polymer matrix flexible backbone. Dielectric spectroscopy, tensile mechanical analysis, and electrical breakdown strength tests were performed to fully characterize the electro-mechanical properties. Planar actuators were prepared from the resulting composites and actuation properties were tested in two different modes: constant force and constant strain. With this approach, it was found that the mechanical properties of the composites were mostly unaffected by the amount of nanoparticles, while the permittivity was seen to increase from 2.0 to 15, before percolation made further concentration increases impossible. Hence, it could be demonstrated that the socalled "optimum load" was independent from the permittivity (as expected), while the operating voltage could be lowered, or higher strains could be observed at the same voltage.

  15. Experimental measurement of energy density in a vibrating plate and comparison with energy finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navazi, H. M.; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, A.; Ghobad, Y.; Haddadpour, H.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a new method and formulation is presented for experimental measurement of energy density of high frequency vibrations of a plate. By use of the new proposed method and eight accelerometers, both kinetic and potential energy densities are measured. Also, a computer program is developed based on energy finite element method to evaluate the proposed method. For several points, the results of the developed experimental formulation are compared with those of the energy finite element analysis results. It is observed that, there is a good agreement between experimental results and analyses. Finally, another test setup with reduced accelerometer spacing was prepared and based on the comparison between kinetic and potential results, it is concluded that, the kinetic and potential counterparts of the energy density are equal in high frequency bands. Based on this conclusion, the measurement procedure was upgraded to an efficient and very simple one for high frequency ranges. According to the new test procedure, another experimental measurement was performed and the results had a good agreement with the EFEA results.

  16. High-energy-density electron jet generation from an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T. P. Shao, F. Q.; Zou, D. B.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, W. Q.; Li, X. H.; Liu, J. X.; Ouyang, J. M.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Wang, J. W.; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-01-14

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we propose a scheme for strong coupling of a petawatt laser with an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasmas. When relevant parameters are properly chosen, most laser energy can be fully deposited inside the cone with only 10% leaving the tip opening. Due to the asymmetric ponderomotive acceleration by the strongly decayed laser pulse, high-energy-density electrons with net laser energy gain are accumulated inside the cone, which then stream out of the tip opening continuously, like a jet. The jet electrons are fully relativistic, with speeds around 0.98−0.998 c and densities at 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} level. The jet can keep for a long time over 200 fs, which may have diverse applications in practice.

  17. Symmetry energy at subnuclear densities and nuclei in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro; Iida, Kei

    2007-01-15

    We examine how the properties of inhomogeneous nuclear matter at subnuclear densities depend on the density dependence of the symmetry energy. Using a macroscopic nuclear model we calculate the size and shape of nuclei in neutron star matter at zero temperature in a way dependent on the density dependence of the symmetry energy. We find that for smaller symmetry energy at subnuclear densities, corresponding to the larger density symmetry coefficient L, the charge number of nuclei is smaller and the critical density at which matter with nuclei or bubbles becomes uniform is lower. The decrease in the charge number is associated with the dependence of the surface tension on the nuclear density and the density of a sea of neutrons, whereas the decrease in the critical density can be generally understood in terms of proton clustering instability in uniform matter.

  18. Dietary energy density is associated with increased intake in free-living humans.

    PubMed

    de Castro, John M

    2004-02-01

    Dietary energy density markedly influences the daily dietary intake of humans. The present study examined the relation of energy density to dietary intake and body size in 371 male and 581 female adults. The subjects were free-living and provided a detailed record of their everyday food and drink intake in 7-d food diaries. The reported diets were analyzed for the relation of energy density to body size and to per-meal, daily, and weekly dietary intake. High energy density was associated with greater (P < 0.001) total intake, especially of fat, when intake was correlated with energy density (r = 0.26, P < 0.001) and when the daily intake of individual participants was correlated with their daily dietary density (r = 0.66, P < 0.001). These results occurred regardless of sex, low reporting, or the inclusion of drinks in the energy density calculations. High energy density was also associated with a high rate of intake (r = 0.46, P < 0.001) and large meal sizes (r = 0.61, P < 0.001). However, energy density was not correlated with body size, height, weight, or body mass index. High energy density appears to be related to greater overall intake in the short-term, but there may be compensation over the long term, with no net effect on body size. PMID:14747669

  19. Covariant energy density functionals: The assessment of global performance across the nuclear landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A. V.

    2015-10-15

    The assessment of the global performance of the state-of-the-art covariant energy density functionals and related theoretical uncertainties in the description of ground state observables has recently been performed. Based on these results, the correlations between global description of binding energies and nuclear matter properties of covariant energy density functionals have been studied in this contribution.

  20. Change in dietary energy density after implementation of the Texas Public School Nutrition Policy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of energy-dense foods has been associated with rising obesity rates and the metabolic syndrome. Reducing dietary energy density is an important strategy to address obesity, but few studies have examined the effect of nutrition policies on children's energy density. The study's objective ...

  1. TEMPO-based catholyte for high-energy density nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Liu, Tianbiao; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A TEMPO-based non-aqueous electrolyte with the TEMPO concentration as high as 2.0 m is demonstrated as a high-energy-density catholyte for redox flow battery applications. With a hybrid anode, Li|TEMPO flow cells using this electrolyte deliver an energy efficiency of ca. 70% and an impressively high energy density of 126 W h L(-1) .

  2. A generalized model for estimating the energy density of invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Daniel A.; Csargo, Isak J.; Von Eschen, Aaron; Thul, Megan D.; Baker, James M.; Hayer, Cari-Ann; Howell, Jessica; Krause, Jacob; Letvin, Alex; Chipps, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Invertebrate energy density (ED) values are traditionally measured using bomb calorimetry. However, many researchers rely on a few published literature sources to obtain ED values because of time and sampling constraints on measuring ED with bomb calorimetry. Literature values often do not account for spatial or temporal variability associated with invertebrate ED. Thus, these values can be unreliable for use in models and other ecological applications. We evaluated the generality of the relationship between invertebrate ED and proportion of dry-to-wet mass (pDM). We then developed and tested a regression model to predict ED from pDM based on a taxonomically, spatially, and temporally diverse sample of invertebrates representing 28 orders in aquatic (freshwater, estuarine, and marine) and terrestrial (temperate and arid) habitats from 4 continents and 2 oceans. Samples included invertebrates collected in all seasons over the last 19 y. Evaluation of these data revealed a significant relationship between ED and pDM (r2  =  0.96, p < 0.0001), where ED (as J/g wet mass) was estimated from pDM as ED  =  22,960pDM − 174.2. Model evaluation showed that nearly all (98.8%) of the variability between observed and predicted values for invertebrate ED could be attributed to residual error in the model. Regression of observed on predicted values revealed that the 97.5% joint confidence region included the intercept of 0 (−103.0 ± 707.9) and slope of 1 (1.01 ± 0.12). Use of this model requires that only dry and wet mass measurements be obtained, resulting in significant time, sample size, and cost savings compared to traditional bomb calorimetry approaches. This model should prove useful for a wide range of ecological studies because it is unaffected by taxonomic, seasonal, or spatial variability.

  3. High-energy-density electron beam from interaction of two successive laser pulses with subcritical-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Yu, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Murakami, M.; Zepf, M.; Rykovanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that a narrow electron beam with high energy and charge density can be generated in a subcritical-density plasma by two consecutive laser pulses. Although the first laser pulse dissipates rapidly, the second pulse can propagate for a long distance in the thin wake channel created by the first pulse and can further accelerate the preaccelerated electrons therein. Given that the second pulse also self-focuses, the resulting electron beam has a narrow waist and high charge and energy densities. Such beams are useful for enhancing the target-back space-charge field in target normal sheath acceleration of ions and bremsstrahlung sources, among others.

  4. Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Munoz-Cordoves, G.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moire pattern formation and grating survival was also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ~1 kA/ns. Lastly, these results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  5. Energy flow, energy density of Timoshenko beam and wave mode incoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Rao, Zhushi; Ta, Na

    2015-10-01

    Time-averaged energy flow and energy density are of significance in vibration analysis. The wave decomposition method is more fruitful and global in physical sense than the state variables depicted point by point. By wave approach, the Timoshenko beam vibration field is decomposed into two distinct modes: travelling and evanescent waves. Consequently, the power and energy functions defined on these waves' amplitude and phase need to be established. However, such formulas on Timoshenko beam are hardly found in literatures. Furthermore, the incoherence between these two modes is of theoretical and practical significance. This characteristic guarantees that the resultant power or energy of a superposed wave field is equal to the sum of the power or energy that each wave mode would generate individually. Unlike Euler-Bernoulli beam, such incoherence in the Timoshenko beam case has not been theoretically proved so far. Initially, the power and energy formulas based on wave approach and the corresponding incoherence proof are achieved by present work, both in theoretical and numerical ways. Fortunately, the theoretical and numerical results show that the travelling and evanescent wave modes are incoherent with each other both on power and energy functions. Notably, the energy function is unconventional and self-defined in order to obtain the incoherence. Some remarkable power transmission characteristics of the evanescent wave are also illustrated meanwhile.

  6. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density.

  7. Assessment of Cognitive Processing by Multiple Sclerosis Patients Using Electroencephalographic Energy Density Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Leslie D.; Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Luna, Bernadette; Montgomery, Richard W.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Recent neuropsychological studies demonstrate that cognitive dysfunction is a common symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis. In many cases the presence of cognitive impairment affects the patient's daily activities to a greater extent than would be found due to their physical disability alone. Cognitive dysfunction can have a significant impact on the quality of life of both the patient and that of their primary caregiver. Two cognitively impaired male MS patients were given a visual discrimination task before and after a one hour cooling period. The subjects were presented a series of either red or blue circles or triangles. One of these combinations, or one fourth of the stimuli, was designated as the "target" presentation. EEG was recorded from 20 scalp electrodes using a Tracor Northern 7500 EEG/ERP system. Oral and ear temperatures were obtained and recorded manually every five minutes during the one hour cooling period. The EEG ERP signatures from each series of stimuli were analyzed in the energy density domain to determine the locus of neural activity at each EEG sampling time. The first subject's ear temperature did not decrease during the cooling period. It was actually elevated approximately 0.05C by the end of the cooling period compared to his mean of control period value. In turn, Subject One's discrimination performance and cortical energy remained essentially the same after body cooling. In contrast, Subject Two's ear temperature decreased approx. 0.8C during his cooling period. Subject Two's ERROR score decreased from 12 during the precooling control period to 2 after cooling. His ENERGY value increased approximately 300%, from a precooling value of approximately 200 to a postcooling value of nearly 600.

  8. The National Ignition Facility: A New Era in High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2009-06-10

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's most energetic laser system, is now operational. This talk will describe NIF, the ignition campaign, and new opportunities in fusion energy and high energy density science enabled by NIF.

  9. Spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianlong; Lü, Baida; Zhu, Shifu

    2009-07-01

    The formulas of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence are derived by using Maxwell's equations. Expressions expressed by elements of electric cross spectral density matrixes of the magnetic and the mutual cross spectral density matrix are obtained for the partially coherent electromagnetic beams. Taken the partially coherent Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) electromagnetic beam as a typical example, the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density in atmospheric turbulence are numerically calculated. It is found that the turbulence shows a broadening effect on the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density. Some interesting results are obtained and explained with regard to their physical nature.

  10. 3D printed elastic honeycombs with graded density for tailorable energy absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Simon R. G.; Farrow, Ian R.; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the development and experimental analysis of hyperelastic honeycombs with graded densities, for the purpose of energy absorption. Hexagonal arrays are manufactured from thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) via fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printing and the density graded by varying cell wall thickness though the structures. Manufactured samples are subject to static compression tests and their energy absorbing potential analysed via the formation of energy absorption diagrams. It is shown that by grading the density through the structure, the energy absorption profile of these structures can be manipulated such that a wide range of compression energies can be efficiently absorbed.

  11. Experimental energy-density flux characterization of ultrashort laser pulse filaments.

    PubMed

    Faccio, Daniele; Lotti, Antonio; Matijosius, Aidas; Bragheri, Francesca; Degiorgio, Vittorio; Couairon, Arnaud; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2009-05-11

    Visualization of the energy density flux gives a unique insight into the propagation properties of complex ultrashort pulses. This analysis, formerly relegated to numerical investigations, is here shown to be an invaluable experimental diagnostic tool. By retrieving the spatio-temporal amplitude and phase we experimentally obtain the energy density flux within complex ultrashort pulses generated by filamentation in a nonlinear Kerr medium.

  12. Energy density of lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in Lakes Huron and Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pothoven, S.A.; Nalepa, T.F.; Madenjian, C.P.; Rediske, R.R.; Schneeberger, P.J.; He, J.X.

    2006-01-01

    We collected lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis off Alpena and Tawas City, Michigan, USA in Lake Huron and off Muskegon, Michigan USA in Lake Michigan during 2002–2004. We determined energy density and percent dry weight for lake whitefish from both lakes and lipid content for Lake Michigan fish. Energy density increased with increasing fish weight up to 800 g, and then remained relatively constant with further increases in fish weight. Energy density, adjusted for weight, was lower in Lake Huron than in Lake Michigan for both small (≤800 g) and large fish (>800 g). Energy density did not differ seasonally for small or large lake whitefish or between adult male and female fish. Energy density was strongly correlated with percent dry weight and percent lipid content. Based on data from commercially caught lake whitefish, body condition was lower in Lake Huron than Lake Michigan during 1981–2003, indicating that the dissimilarity in body condition between the lakes could be long standing. Energy density and lipid content in 2002–2004 in Lake Michigan were lower than data for comparable sized fish collected in 1969–1971. Differences in energy density between lakes were attributed to variation in diet and prey energy content as well as factors that affect feeding rates such as lake whitefish density and prey abundance.

  13. High energy and power density capacitors from solution-processed ternary ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Han, Kuo; Gadinski, Matthew Robert; Zhang, Guangzu; Wang, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Concurrent improvements in dielectric constant and breakdown strength are attained in a solution-processed ternary ferroelectric polymer nanocomposite incorporated with two-dimensional boron nitride nanosheets and zero-dimensional barium titanate nanoparticles that synergistically interact to enable a remarkable energy-storage capability, including large discharged energy density, high charge-discharge efficiency, and great power density.

  14. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse, and propellant density specific impulse.

  15. Energy density functional analysis of shape coexistence in {sup 44}S

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Yao, J. M.; Vretenar, D.; Niksic, T.; Meng, J.

    2012-10-20

    The structure of low-energy collective states in the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 44}S is analyzed using a microscopic collective Hamiltonian model based on energy density functionals (EDFs). The calculated triaxial energy map, low-energy spectrum and corresponding probability distributions indicate a coexistence of prolate and oblate shapes in this nucleus.

  16. Measurement of sound power and absorption in reverberation chambers using energy density.

    PubMed

    Nutter, David B; Leishman, Timothy W; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Blotter, Jonathan D

    2007-05-01

    Reverberation chamber measurements typically rely upon spatially averaged squared pressure for the calculation of sound absorption, sound power, and other acoustic values. While a reverberation chamber can provide an approximately diffuse sound field, variations in sound pressure consistently produce uncertainty in measurement results. This paper explores the benefits of using total energy density or squared particle velocity magnitude (kinetic energy density) instead of squared pressure (potential energy density) for sound absorption and sound power measurements. The approaches are based on methods outlined in current ISO standards. The standards require a sufficient number of source-receiver locations to obtain suitable measurement results. The total and kinetic energy densities exhibit greater spatial uniformity at most frequencies than potential energy density, thus requiring fewer source-receiver positions to produce effective results. Because the total energy density is typically the most uniform of the three quantities at low frequencies, its use could also impact the usable low-frequency ranges of reverberation chambers. In order to employ total and kinetic energy densities for sound absorption measurements, relevant energy-based impulse responses were developed as part of the work for the assessment of sound field decays.

  17. Density measurement of thin layers by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jürgen; Ramm, Jürgen; Gemming, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    A method to measure the density of thin layers is presented which utilizes electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques within a transmission electron microscope. The method is based on the acquisition of energy filtered images in the low loss region as well as of an element distribution map using core loss edges. After correction of multiple inelastic scattering effects, the intensity of the element distribution map is proportional to density and thickness. The dependence of the intensities of images with low energy loss electrons on the density is different from that. This difference allows the calculation of the relative density pixel by pixel and to determine lateral density gradients or fluctuations in thin films without relying on a constant specimen thickness. The method is demonstrated at thin carbon layers produced with density gradients.

  18. TEMPO-based catholyte for high-energy density nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Liu, Tianbiao; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A TEMPO-based non-aqueous electrolyte with the TEMPO concentration as high as 2.0 m is demonstrated as a high-energy-density catholyte for redox flow battery applications. With a hybrid anode, Li|TEMPO flow cells using this electrolyte deliver an energy efficiency of ca. 70% and an impressively high energy density of 126 W h L(-1) . PMID:25327755

  19. Options for integrated beam experiments for inertial fusion energy and high-energy density physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, M. A.; Celata, C. M.; Lee, E. P.; Logan, B. G.; Waldron, W. L.; Yu, S. S.; Barnard, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL), a collaboration among LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, is presently focused on separate smaller-scale scientific experiments addressing key issues of future Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and High-Energy-Density-Physics (HEDP) drivers: the injection, transport, and focusing of intense heavy ion beams at currents from 25 to 600 mA. As a next major step in the HIF-VNL program, we aim for a fully integrated beam physics experiment, which allows integrated source-to-target physics research with a high-current heavy ion beam of IFE-relevant brightness with the goal of optimizing target focusing. This paper describes two rather different options for such an integrated experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) and the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Both proposals put emphasis on the unique capability for integrated injection, acceleration, compression, and focusing of a high-current, space-charge-dominated heavy ion beam.

  20. Strain energy density and surface layer energy for a crack-like ellipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipp, M. E.; Sih, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    Some of the fundamental concepts of sharp crack fracture criteria are applied to cracks and narrow ellipses. The strain energy density theory is extended to notch boundaries, where the energy in a surface layer is calculated and the location of failure initiation is determined. The concept of a core region near the notch tip, and its consequences, are examined in detail. The example treated is that of an elliptical cavity loaded uniformly at a large distance from the hole, and at an angle to the hole; the results are shown to approach that of the crack solution for narrow ellipses, and to display quite satisfactory agreement with recently published experimental data under both tensile and compressive loading conditions. Results also indicate that in globally unstable configurations in brittle materials, the original loading and notch geometry are sufficient to predict the subsequent crack trajectory with considerable accuracy.

  1. Estimation of energy density of Li-S batteries with liquid and solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Heng; Otaegui, Laida; Singh, Gurpreet; Armand, Michel; Rodriguez-Martinez, Lide M.

    2016-09-01

    With the exponential growth of technology in mobile devices and the rapid expansion of electric vehicles into the market, it appears that the energy density of the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries (LIBs) cannot satisfy the practical requirements. Sulfur has been one of the best cathode material choices due to its high charge storage (1675 mAh g-1), natural abundance and easy accessibility. In this paper, calculations are performed for different cell design parameters such as the active material loading, the amount/thickness of electrolyte, the sulfur utilization, etc. to predict the energy density of Li-S cells based on liquid, polymeric and ceramic electrolytes. It demonstrates that Li-S battery is most likely to be competitive in gravimetric energy density, but not volumetric energy density, with current technology, when comparing with LIBs. Furthermore, the cells with polymer and thin ceramic electrolytes show promising potential in terms of high gravimetric energy density, especially the cells with the polymer electrolyte. This estimation study of Li-S energy density can be used as a good guidance for controlling the key design parameters in order to get desirable energy density at cell-level.

  2. Energy Density, Energy Intake, and Body Weight Regulation in Adults12345

    PubMed Central

    Karl, J. Philip; Roberts, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    The role of dietary energy density (ED) in the regulation of energy intake (EI) is controversial. Methodologically, there is also debate about whether beverages should be included in dietary ED calculations. To address these issues, studies examining the effects of ED on EI or body weight in nonelderly adults were reviewed. Different approaches to calculating dietary ED do not appear to alter the direction of reported relations between ED and body weight. Evidence that lowering dietary ED reduces EI in short-term studies is convincing, but there are currently insufficient data to determine long-term effectiveness for weight loss. The review also identified key barriers to progress in understanding the role of ED in energy regulation, in particular the absence of a standard definition of ED, and the lack of data from multiple long-term clinical trials examining the effectiveness of low-ED diet recommendations for preventing both primary weight gain and weight regain in nonobese individuals. Long-term clinical trials designed to examine the impact of dietary ED on energy regulation, and including multiple ED calculation methods within the same study, are still needed to determine the importance of ED in the regulation of EI and body weight. PMID:25398750

  3. Volume and surface contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy within the coherent density fluctuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2016-07-01

    The volume and surface components of the nuclear symmetry energy (NSE) and their ratio are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model (CDFM). The estimations use the results of the model for the NSE in finite nuclei based on the Brueckner energy-density functional for nuclear matter. In addition, we present results for the NSE and its volume and surface contributions obtained by using the Skyrme energy-density functional. The CDFM weight function is obtained using the proton and neutron densities from the self-consistent HF+BCS method with Skyrme interactions. We present and discuss the values of the volume and surface contributions to the NSE and their ratio obtained for the Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopic chains, studying their isotopic sensitivity. The results are compared with estimations of other approaches which have used available experimental data on binding energies, neutron-skin thicknesses, excitation energies to isobaric analog states (IAS), and also with results of other theoretical methods.

  4. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge andmore » discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.« less

  5. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge and discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.

  6. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodríguez

    2010-04-01

    Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete positions. The idea of measuring the total energy density instead of the potential energy density on the assumption that the former quantity varies less with position than the latter goes back to the 1930s. However, the phenomenon was not analyzed until the late 1970s and then only for the region of high modal overlap, and this analysis has never been published. Moreover, until fairly recently, measurement of the total sound energy density required an elaborate experimental arrangement based on finite-difference approximations using at least four amplitude and phase matched pressure microphones. With the advent of a three-dimensional particle velocity transducer, it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the ensemble statistics of kinetic and total sound energy densities in reverberant enclosures theoretically, experimentally, and numerically.

  7. Microphysical derivation of the Canham–Helfrich free-energy density

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Brian; Fried, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    The Canham–Helfrich free-energy density for a lipid bilayer has drawn considerable attention. Aside from the mean and Gaussian curvatures, this free-energy density involves a spontaneous mean-curvature that encompasses information regarding the preferred, natural shape of the lipid bilayer. We use a straightforward microphysical argument to derive the Canham–Helfrich free-energy density. Our derivation (i) provides a justification for the common assertion that spontaneous curvature originates primarily from asymmetry between the leaflets comprising a bilayer and (ii) furnishes expressions for the splay and saddle-splay moduli in terms of derivatives of the underlying potential. PMID:23389779

  8. Form and Actuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Michel

    A basic choice underlies physics. It consists of banishing actual situations from theoretical descriptions, in order to reach a universal formal construct. Actualities are then thought of as mere local appearances of a transcendent reality supposedly described by the formal construct. Despite its impressive success, this method has left major loopholes in the foundations of science. In this paper, I document two of these loopholes. One is the problem of time asymmetry in statistical thermodynamics, and the other is the measurement problem of quantum mechanics. Then, adopting a broader philosophical standpoint, I try to turn the whole picture upside down. Here, full priority is given to actuality (construed as a mode of the immanent reality self-reflectively being itself) over formal constructs. The characteristic aporias of this variety of "Copernican revolution" are discussed.

  9. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-02-10

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm₋3 in amore » low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of <8%. We found the 50 ± 15 μm spatial resolution achieved across the full field of view was limited by the x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.« less

  10. Estimation of Actual Crop ET of Paddy Using the Energy Balance Model SMARET and Validation with Field Water Balance Measurements and a Crop Growth Model (ORYZA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, N. D.; Muraleedharan, B. V.; Kathirvel, K.; Narasimhan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable management of water resources requires reliable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) at fine spatial and temporal resolution. This is significant in the case of rice based irrigation systems, one of the major consumers of surface water resources and where ET forms a major component of water consumption. However huge tradeoff in the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite images coupled with lack of adequate number of cloud free images within a growing season act as major constraints in deriving ET at fine spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing based energy balance models. The scale at which ET is determined is decided by the spatial and temporal scale of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which form inputs to energy balance models. In this context, the current study employed disaggregation algorithms (NL-DisTrad and DisNDVI) to generate time series of LST and NDVI images at fine resolution. The disaggregation algorithms aimed at generating LST and NDVI at finer scale by integrating temporal information from concurrent coarse resolution data and spatial information from a single fine resolution image. The temporal frequency of the disaggregated images is further improved by employing composite images of NDVI and LST in the spatio-temporal disaggregation method. The study further employed half-hourly incoming surface insolation and outgoing long wave radiation obtained from the Indian geostationary satellite (Kalpana-1) to convert the instantaneous ET into daily ET and subsequently to the seasonal ET, thereby improving the accuracy of ET estimates. The estimates of ET were validated with field based water balance measurements carried out in Gadana, a subbasin predominated by rice paddy fields, located in Tamil Nadu, India.

  11. From dilute matter to the equilibrium point in the energy-density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. J.; Grasso, M.; Lacroix, D.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the large value of the scattering length in nuclear systems, standard density-functional theories based on effective interactions usually fail to reproduce the nuclear Fermi-liquid behavior both at very low densities and close to equilibrium. Guided on one side by the success of the Skyrme density functional and, on the other side, by resummation techniques used in effective field theories for systems with large scattering lengths, a new energy-density functional is proposed. This functional, adjusted on microscopic calculations, reproduces the nuclear equations of state of neutron and symmetric matter at various densities. Furthermore, it provides reasonable saturation properties as well as an appropriate density dependence for the symmetry energy.

  12. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2011-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility

  13. The National Ignition Facility - Applications for Inertial Fusion Energy and High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1999-08-12

    Over the past several decades, significant and steady progress has been made in the development of fusion energy and its associated technology and in the understanding of the physics of high-temperature plasmas. While the demonstration of net fusion energy (fusion energy production exceeding that required to heat and confine the plasma) remains a task for the next millennia and while challenges remain, this progress has significantly increased confidence that the ultimate goal of societally acceptable (e.g. cost, safety, environmental considerations including waste disposal) central power production can be achieved. This progress has been shared by the two principal approaches to controlled thermonuclear fusion--magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF). ICF, the focus of this article, is complementary and symbiotic to MFE. As shown, ICF invokes spherical implosion of the fuel to achieve high density, pressures, and temperatures, inertially confining the plasma for times sufficient long (t {approx} 10{sup -10} sec) that {approx} 30% of the fuel undergoes thermonuclear fusion.

  14. The energy balance relation for weak solutions of the density-dependent Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, T. M.; Shvydkoy, R.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with constant viscosity coefficient and density which is bounded and bounded away from zero. We show that the energy balance relation for this system holds for weak solutions if the velocity, density, and pressure belong to a range of Besov spaces of smoothness 1/3. A density-dependent version of the classical Kármán-Howarth-Monin relation is derived.

  15. Energy Confinement of High-Density Pellet-Fueled Plasmas in the Alcator C Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, M.; Gwinn, D.; Milora, S.; Parker, J.; Parker, R.; Wolfe, S.; Besen, M.; Camacho, F.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Foord, M.; Gandy, R.; Gomez, C.; Granetz, R.; Labombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Lloyd, B.; Marmar, E.; McCool, S.; Pappas, D.; Petrasso, R.; Pribyl, P.; Rice, J.; Schuresko, D.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Watterson, R.

    1984-07-01

    A series of pellet-fueling experiments has been carried out on the Alcator C tokamak. High-speed hydrogen pellets penetrate to within a few centimeters of the magnetic axis, raise the plasma density, and produce peaked density profiles. Energy confinement is observed to increase over similar discharges fueled only by gas puffing. In this manner record values of electron density, plasma pressure, and Lawson number (n τ) have been achieved.

  16. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  17. High energy density micro plasma bunch from multiple laser interaction with thin target

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Han; Yu, Wei; Luan, S. X.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Cai, H. B.; Zhou, C. T.; Yang, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.

    2014-01-13

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to investigate radiation-pressure driven acceleration and compression of small solid-density plasma by intense laser pulses. It is found that multiple impacts by presently available short-pulse lasers on a small hemispheric shell target can create a long-living tiny quasineutral monoenergetic plasma bunch of very high energy density.

  18. Polymerization contraction of resin composite vs. energy and power density of light-cure.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2005-10-01

    This study measured the polymerization contraction of a resin composite cured at three levels of energy density, each attained at six different levels of power density. The polymerization contraction of the composite was recorded by the method of the deflecting disc (n = 5) for 1 h following the start of irradiation. Power densities of 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1,000 mW cm(-2), as measured on a dental radiometer, were obtained by variation of distance and supply voltage of a commercial light-curing unit. The spectral distribution at each power density was recorded using a spectrophotometer. The absorption spectrum of camphorquinone was also recorded, and the efficiency of the radiation at each power density was calculated as the integral over wavelength of the product of absorption and emission. From the slope of the contraction curves, an approximation to the initial rate of polymerization, Rp, was calculated and was taken as an alternative measure of power density. Statistical analyses showed that polymerization contraction increased significantly with increasing levels of energy density received by the resin composite, and, for each level of energy density, that the contraction decreased significantly with increasing power density.

  19. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Energy density calculations for ball-lightning-like luminous silicon balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Gerson S.; Ferreira, Joacy V.; Bastos, Cristiano C.; dos Santos, Marcus V.; Pavão, Antonio C.

    2010-05-01

    The energy density of a luminous silicon ball [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 048501 (2007)] is calculated for a model with a metal core surrounded by an atmosphere of silicon oxides. Experimental data combined with the molecular orbital calculations of the oxidation enthalpy lead to a mean energy density of 3.9 MJ m-3, which is within the range of estimates from other ball lightning models. This result provides good evidence to support the silicon-based model.

  20. Equation of state for tungsten over a wide range of densities and internal energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishchenko, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    A caloric model, which describes the pressure-density-internal-energy relationship in a broad region of condensed-phase states, is applied for tungsten. As distinct from previously known caloric equations of state for this material, a new form of the cold-compression curve at T = 0 K is used. Thermodynamic characteristics along the cold curve and shock Hugoniots are calculated for the metal and compared with some theoretical results and experimental data available at high energy densities.

  1. Report of the Interagency Task Force on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    2007-08-01

    Identifies the needs for improving Federal stewardship of specific aspects of high energy density physics, particularly the study of high energy density plasmas in the laboratory, and strengthening university activities in this latter discipline. The report articulates how HEDP fits into the portfolio of federally funded missions and includes agency actions to be taken that are necessary to further this area of study consistent with Federal priorities and plans, while being responsive to the needs of the scientific community.

  2. Plasma guns for controlled fusion at megagauss energy-densities

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Roderick, Norman F; Degnan, James H; Frese, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at a low power level has been used on Tore Supra to induce local perturbations of the current density profile. Regimes with strong MHD activity have been analysed, and compared with similar stable discharges, in order to investigate the possible causes of their instability and relate the evolution of the discharge to the localization of EC power deposition. Both co- and counter-current drive pulses have been applied to dominantly or fully non-inductive discharges, sustained by a lower hybrid current drive. Detailed reconstructions by current diffusion calculations have been performed and the error bars evaluated. This method has proved valuable for shedding light on the complex interplay between the evolutions of temperature and safety factor profiles in steady-state tokamak plasmas. The crucial role of the dynamic evolution of rational surfaces has been identified. Moreover, we demonstrate that the operational domain in which ECCD can be employed must cope with the overall current profile characteristics, in particular the position where the safety factor has a minimum.

  3. Use of nonlinear programming to optimize performance response to energy density in broiler feed formulation.

    PubMed

    Guevara, V R

    2004-02-01

    A nonlinear programming optimization model was developed to maximize margin over feed cost in broiler feed formulation and is described in this paper. The model identifies the optimal feed mix that maximizes profit margin. Optimum metabolizable energy level and performance were found by using Excel Solver nonlinear programming. Data from an energy density study with broilers were fitted to quadratic equations to express weight gain, feed consumption, and the objective function income over feed cost in terms of energy density. Nutrient:energy ratio constraints were transformed into equivalent linear constraints. National Research Council nutrient requirements and feeding program were used for examining changes in variables. The nonlinear programming feed formulation method was used to illustrate the effects of changes in different variables on the optimum energy density, performance, and profitability and was compared with conventional linear programming. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, I determined the impact of variation in prices. Prices for broiler, corn, fish meal, and soybean meal were increased and decreased by 25%. Formulations were identical in all other respects. Energy density, margin, and diet cost changed compared with conventional linear programming formulation. This study suggests that nonlinear programming can be more useful than conventional linear programming to optimize performance response to energy density in broiler feed formulation because an energy level does not need to be set.

  4. NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Deexcitation Energy of Superdeformed Secondary Minima as a Probe to Density Dependence of Symmetry Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei-Zhou; Lu, Xing; Chen, Yun-Peng

    2010-10-01

    Deexcitation energies of superdeformed secondary minima of odd-odd Au and Tl isotopes are investigated with the relativistic mean field (RMF) model where the isoscalar-isovector coupling is included to change the symmetry energy. It is verified by the theoretical analysis and numerical results that the deexcitation energies of superdeformed secondary minima relative to the ground states in these heavy nuclei are sensitive to differences in the symmetry energy. In particular, the linear correlation between the deexcitation energies of odd-odd Au and Tl isotopes and the neutron skin thickness in 208Pb is established. Moreover, explorations are extended to superdeformed candidates of other mass regions. It is found that the linear correlation can even be established between the deexcitation energies and the symmetry pressure at subsaturation density. These indicate that deexcitation energies can serve as a probe to the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  5. Dietary energy density and body weight in adults and children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Obbagy, Julie E; Altman, Jean M; Essery, Eve V; McGrane, Mary M; Wong, Yat Ping; Spahn, Joanne M; Williams, Christine L

    2012-05-01

    Energy density is a relatively new concept that has been identified as an important factor in body weight control in adults and in children and adolescents. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 encourages consumption of an eating pattern low in energy density to manage body weight. This article describes the systematic evidence-based review conducted by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC), with support from the US Department of Agriculture's Nutrition Evidence Library, which resulted in this recommendation. An update to the committee's review was prepared for this article. PubMed was searched for English-language publications from January 1980 to May 2011. The literature review included 17 studies (seven randomized controlled trials, one nonrandomized controlled trial, and nine cohort studies) in adults and six cohort studies in children and adolescents. Based on this evidence, the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee concluded that strong and consistent evidence in adults indicates that dietary patterns relatively low in energy density improve weight loss and weight maintenance. In addition, the committee concluded that there was moderately strong evidence from methodologically rigorous longitudinal cohort studies in children and adolescents to suggest that there is a positive association between dietary energy density and increased adiposity. This review supports a relationship between energy density and body weight in adults and in children and adolescents such that consuming diets lower in energy density may be an effective strategy for managing body weight.

  6. Spectroscopic properties of nuclear skyrme energy density functionals.

    PubMed

    Tarpanov, D; Dobaczewski, J; Toivanen, J; Carlsson, B G

    2014-12-19

    We address the question of how to improve the agreement between theoretical nuclear single-particle energies (SPEs) and observations. Empirically, in doubly magic nuclei, the SPEs can be deduced from spectroscopic properties of odd nuclei that have one more or one less neutron or proton. Theoretically, bare SPEs, before being confronted with observations, must be corrected for the effects of the particle vibration coupling (PVC). In the present work, we determine the PVC corrections in a fully self-consistent way. Then, we adjust the SPEs, with PVC corrections included, to empirical data. In this way, the agreement with observations, on average, improves; nevertheless, large discrepancies still remain. We conclude that the main source of disagreement is still in the underlying mean fields, and not in including or neglecting the PVC corrections.

  7. Constrained Parmeterization of Reduced Density Approximation of Kinetic Energy Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debajit; Trickey, Samuel; Karasiev, Valentin

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of forces in ab initio MD is greatly accelerated by orbital-free DFT, especially at finite temperature. The recent achievement of a fully non-empirical constraint-based generalized gradient (GGA) functional for the Kohn-Sham KE Ts [ n ] brings to light the inherent limitations of GGAs. This motivates inclusion of higher-order derivatives in the form of reduced derivative approximation (RDA) functionals. That, in turn, requires new functional forms and design criteria. RDA functionals are constrained further to produce a positive-definite, non-singular Pauli potential. We focus on designing a non-empirical constraint-based meta-GGA functional with certain combinations of higher-order derivatives which avoid nuclear-site singularities to a specified order of gradient expansion. Here we report progress on this agenda. Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, grant DE-SC0002139.

  8. Actual evapotranspiration (water use) assessment of the Colorado River Basin at the Landsat resolution using the operational simplified surface energy balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Russell L, Scott; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating consumptive water use in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) is important for assessing and managing limited water resources in the basin. Increasing water demand from various sectors may threaten long-term sustainability of the water supply in the arid southwestern United States. We have developed a first-ever basin-wide actual evapotranspiration (ETa) map of the CRB at the Landsat scale for water use assessment at the field level. We used the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for estimating ETa using 328 cloud-free Landsat images acquired during 2010. Our results show that cropland had the highest ETa among all land cover classes except for water. Validation using eddy covariance measured ETa showed that the SSEBop model nicely captured the variability in annual ETa with an overall R2 of 0.78 and a mean bias error of about 10%. Comparison with water balance-based ETa showed good agreement (R2 = 0.85) at the sub-basin level. Though there was good correlation (R2 = 0.79) between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based ETa (1 km spatial resolution) and Landsat-based ETa (30 m spatial resolution), the spatial distribution of MODIS-based ETa was not suitable for water use assessment at the field level. In contrast, Landsat-based ETa has good potential to be used at the field level for water management. With further validation using multiple years and sites, our methodology can be applied for regular production of ETa maps of larger areas such as the conterminous United States.

  9. High-energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage. PMID:26702440

  10. High–energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage. PMID:26702440

  11. High-energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage.

  12. Energy density inhomogeneities in charged radiating stars with generalized CDTT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Yousaf, Z.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we analyze the role of electromagnetic field and generalized Carrol-Duvvuri-Trodden-Turner (CDTT) model on the existence of homogeneous energy density. For this purpose, we model spherical star with anisotropic matter distribution dissipating in the mode of heat and radiation density. To develop a relationship between the Weyl tensor and matter parameters, we construct two evolution equations. We explore inhomogeneity parameters for particular cases of non-dissipative and dissipative matter distributions. It is concluded that in addition to other fluid variables higher order f( R) corrections, relaxation processes and electromagnetic field affect the energy density inhomogeneity of spherical stars.

  13. Modulatory factors in the effect of energy density on energy intake.

    PubMed

    Westerterp-Plantenga, M S

    2004-08-01

    The effect of energy density (ED) on energy intake (EI) has been assessed in short-term and long-term experiments. In the short term, it was found that ED affects EI directly in situations when the subjects cannot estimate the ED of the food; then subjects mainly monitor the weight of the food ingested. In the long term, the effects of ED on EI are modulated. Average daily EI appears to be related to ED of the food and drinks when ED is determined by specific macronutrients, but not when ED is only determined by the weight of water. Thus, the short-term effect ED has on EI cannot be extrapolated to the long term, because a possible dominating effect of the weight of water determining ED undoes the relationship of ED with EI. Moreover, in the long-term portion sizes are used to compensate for correctly estimated ED, resulting in less variation in EI than ED alone would imply. Finally, dietary restraint compensates for the effect of a relatively high ED on daily EI, whereas dietary unrestraint compensates for the effect of relatively low ED on daily EI. We conclude that the short-term effect of ED on EI is modulated by the effect of water on ED, and compensated for by the effect of dietary restraint and adapted portion sizes. PMID:15384321

  14. Density functional theory screening of gas-treatment strategies for stabilization of high energy-density lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Stephan L.; Morgan, Benjamin J.; Passerini, Stefano; Teobaldi, Gilberto

    2015-11-01

    To explore the potential of molecular gas treatment of freshly cut lithium foils in non-electrolyte-based passivation of high-energy-density Li anodes, density functional theory (DFT) has been used to study the decomposition of molecular gases on metallic lithium surfaces. By combining DFT geometry optimization and Molecular Dynamics, the effects of atmospheric (N2, O2, CO2) and hazardous (F2, SO2) gas decomposition on Li(bcc) (100), (110), and (111) surfaces on relative surface energies, work functions, and emerging electronic and elastic properties are investigated. The simulations suggest that exposure to different molecular gases can be used to induce and control reconstructions of the metal Li surface and substantial changes (up to over 1 eV) in the work function of the passivated system. Contrary to the other considered gases, which form metallic adlayers, SO2 treatment emerges as the most effective in creating an insulating passivation layer for dosages ≤1 mono-layer. The substantial Li → adsorbate charge transfer and adlayer relaxation produce marked elastic stiffening of the interface, with the smallest change shown by nitrogen-treated adlayers.

  15. Encircling the dark: constraining dark energy via cosmic density in spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codis, S.; Pichon, C.; Bernardeau, F.; Uhlemann, C.; Prunet, S.

    2016-08-01

    The recently published analytic probability density function for the mildly non-linear cosmic density field within spherical cells is used to build a simple but accurate maximum likelihood estimate for the redshift evolution of the variance of the density, which, as expected, is shown to have smaller relative error than the sample variance. This estimator provides a competitive probe for the equation of state of dark energy, reaching a few per cent accuracy on wp and wa for a Euclid-like survey. The corresponding likelihood function can take into account the configuration of the cells via their relative separations. A code to compute one-cell-density probability density functions for arbitrary initial power spectrum, top-hat smoothing and various spherical-collapse dynamics is made available online, so as to provide straightforward means of testing the effect of alternative dark energy models and initial power spectra on the low-redshift matter distribution.

  16. The Impact of Neighbourhood Density on the Energy Demand of Passive Houses and on Potential Energy Sources from the Waste Flows and Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupka, Robert

    This study demonstrates how the density of a neighbourhood affects its energy demand, metabolism (energy and material flows) and its ability to produce its own energy. Single-family detached houses and row townhouses were each modeled using passive solar housing guidelines with the DesignBuilder building energy simulation software. Energy demand is then modeled within neighbourhoods at two densities based on south facing windows fully un-shaded at 9:00 am, and 12:00 pm solar time on Dec. 21. The neighbourhood metabolisms were then calculated based on location and density. The potential energy supply was evaluated from the spatial characteristics of the neighbourhood (for solar) and the metabolism (municipal solid waste and wastewater flows.) The potential energy demand and supply are then compared for the varying building types and densities to determine the sensitivity of the energy supply and demand relationships.

  17. Flexible asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy and high power density in aqueous electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yingwen; Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Songtao; Varanasi, Chakrapani V.; Liu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Supercapacitors with both high energy and high power densities are critical for many practical applications. In this paper, we discuss the design and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on nanocomposite electrodes of MnO2, activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The combined unique properties of each of these components enable highly flexible and mechanically strong films that can serve as electrodes directly without using any current collectors or binders. Using these flexible electrodes and a roll-up approach, asymmetric supercapacitors with 2 V working voltage were successfully fabricated. The fabricated device showed excellent rate capability, with 78% of the original capacitance retained when the scan rate was increased from 2 mV s-1 to 500 mV s-1. Owing to the unique composite structure, these supercapacitors were able to deliver high energy density (24 W h kg-1) under high power density (7.8 kW kg-1) conditions. These features could enable supercapacitor based energy storage systems to be very attractive for a variety of critical applications, such as the power sources in hybrid electric vehicles and the back-up powers for wind and solar energy, where both high energy density and high power density are required.Supercapacitors with both high energy and high power densities are critical for many practical applications. In this paper, we discuss the design and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on nanocomposite electrodes of MnO2, activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The combined unique properties of each of these components enable highly flexible and mechanically strong films that can serve as electrodes directly without using any current collectors or binders. Using these flexible electrodes and a roll-up approach, asymmetric supercapacitors with 2 V working voltage were successfully fabricated. The fabricated device showed excellent rate capability, with 78% of

  18. Combustion characteristics of high-energy/high-density hydrocarbon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, C.; Friedauer, M.J.; Udaykumar, H.S.; Shyy, W.

    1996-12-31

    The combustion characteristics of PCU Alkene Dimers (C{sub 22}H{sub 24}) are evaluated as solid fuels in high speed flows, at conditions typical for ramjet operation (i.e., Mach 0.25, stagnation temperature and pressure of 300 K and 150 kPa, respectively). Samples of the dimer are binded into a solid layer with a styrene-polybutadiene copolymer (8% w/w) on the test chamber wall and convectively ignited by a gaseous flame in air. The goals of this research are of both practical and fundamental relevance: (1) determine the ability of the high energy fuel to increase practical devices` performance, (2) quantify and improve the combustion characteristics of the alkene dimers (i.e., ignition, flame stability, particulate formation), (3) investigate the dynamics of the solid-gas interface combustion. To date, ignition times and rates of heat release were measured and the theoretical modelling was initiated. Preliminary results indicate that, in the present configuration, the dimer ignition times fall within the range reported in literature for other solid fuels. Large differences exist among different sets of data due primarily to nonsimilar geometrical configuration of the test. The dimer exhibits substantial rates of heat release in comparison with other solid fuels.

  19. Towards a Microscopic Reaction Description Based on Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Nobre, G A; DIetrich, F S; Escher, J E; Thompson, I J; Dupuis, M; Terasaki, J; Engel, J

    2011-09-26

    A microscopic calculation of reaction cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all particle-hole excitations in the target and one-nucleon pickup channels. The particle-hole states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and subsequently to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. Target excitations for {sup 40,48}Ca, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 90}Zr and {sup 144}Sm were described in a random-phase framework using a Skyrme functional. Reaction cross sections obtained agree very well with experimental data and predictions of a state-of-the-art fitted optical potential. Couplings between inelastic states were found to be negligible, while the pickup channels contribute significantly. The effect of resonances from higher-order channels was assessed. Elastic angular distributions were also calculated within the same method, achieving good agreement with experimental data. For the first time observed absorptions are completely accounted for by explicit channel coupling, for incident energies between 10 and 70 MeV, with consistent angular distribution results.

  20. Analysis of energy density of food in relation to energy intake regulation in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Westerterp-Plantenga, M S

    2001-03-01

    The relationship between energy density (ED) of food and drink consumption ad libitum and energy intake (EI) was analysed. EI was taken as average daily EI over the long term, and as EI during a single meal. Moreover, the distribution of EI over three ED categories was analysed. Average daily EI was related to ED of the food and drinks when ED was strongly influenced by specific macronutrients. When ED was strongly influenced by the weight of water, it was not related to EI. During a meal subjects monitored mainly weight, and to a lesser extent, the energy content of the food ingested. Therefore, covertly manipulated ED of a meal affected EI directly. The impact of ED on EI was modulated by dietary behaviours such as restraint. Overt manipulation of ED for 6 months showed that EI was adjusted to a decreased but not to an increased ED in dietary-unrestrained subjects, and that EI was adjusted to an increased but not to a decreased ED in dietary-restrained subjects. Knowledge of ED was shown to lead to an inverse relationship between portion sizes and ED during a meal. Average daily EI consisted of a distribution of EI over the three different categories of ED, so that obese women ate more of foods with a high ED and less of foods with a low ED compared with normal weight women (and nutritional guidelines). In conclusion, ED affected daily EI by means of macronutrient specific effects. EI from a meal with an unknown ED can become inversely related to EI through learning or conditioning. Therefore, the effect of ED on EI during a single meal observation cannot be extrapolated directly to the 24 h effect on EI. With regard to the treatment of obesity, a conscious decreased consumption of foods high in ED and an increase in consumption of low-ED food is necessary to decrease and subsequently maintain body weight, particularly in subjects with a sedentary lifestyle. PMID:11299081

  1. A coarse-grain force field for RDX: Density dependent and energy conserving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joshua D.; Barnes, Brian C.; Izvekov, Sergei; Lísal, Martin; Sellers, Michael S.; Taylor, DeCarlos E.; Brennan, John K.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the development of a density-dependent transferable coarse-grain model of crystalline hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) that can be used with the energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics method. The model is an extension of a recently reported one-site model of RDX that was developed by using a force-matching method. The density-dependent forces in that original model are provided through an interpolation scheme that poorly conserves energy. The development of the new model presented in this work first involved a multi-objective procedure to improve the structural and thermodynamic properties of the previous model, followed by the inclusion of the density dependency via a conservative form of the force field that conserves energy. The new model accurately predicts the density, structure, pressure-volume isotherm, bulk modulus, and elastic constants of the RDX crystal at ambient pressure and exhibits transferability to a liquid phase at melt conditions.

  2. Communication: Simple and accurate uniform electron gas correlation energy for the full range of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachiyo, Teepanis

    2016-07-01

    A simple correlation energy functional for the uniform electron gas is derived based on the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. It can reproduce the known correlation functional in the high-density limit, while in the mid-density range maintaining a good agreement with the near-exact correlation energy of the uniform electron gas to within 2 × 10-3 hartree. The correlation energy is a function of a density parameter rs and is of the form a * ln ( 1 + /b r s + /b rs 2 ) . The constants "a" and "b" are derived from the known correlation functional in the high-density limit. Comparisons to the Ceperley-Alder's near-exact Quantum Monte Carlo results and the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair correlation functional are also reported.

  3. Constraints on the inner edge of neutron star crusts from relativistic nuclear energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakidis, Ch. C.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2010-06-15

    The transition density n{sub t} and pressure P{sub t} at the inner edge between the liquid core and the solid crust of a neutron star are analyzed using the thermodynamical method and the framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals. Starting from a functional that has been carefully adjusted to experimental binding energies of finite nuclei, and varying the density dependence of the corresponding symmetry energy within the limits determined by isovector properties of finite nuclei, we estimate the constraints on the core-crust transition density and pressure of neutron stars: 0.086 fm{sup -3}<=n{sub t}<0.090 fm{sup -3} and 0.3 MeV fm{sup -3}

  4. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-15

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N/sub 2/ and F/sub 2/, which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules.

  5. Myocardial signal density levels and beam-hardening artifact attenuation using dual-energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Granillo, Gaston A; Carrascosa, Patricia; Cipriano, Silvina; de Zan, Macarena; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Capunay, Carlos; Cury, Ricardo C

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of myocardial perfusion using single-energy (SE) imaging is influenced by beam-hardening artifacts (BHA). We sought to explore the ability of dual-energy (DE) imaging to attenuate the presence of BHA. Myocardial signal density (SD) was evaluated in 2240 myocardial segments (112 for each energy level) and in 320 American Heart Association segments among the SE group. Compared to DE reconstructions at the best energy level, SE acquisitions showed no significant differences overall regarding myocardial SD or signal-to-noise ratio. The segments most commonly affected by BHA showed significantly lower myocardial SD at the lowest energy levels, progressively normalizing at higher energy levels.

  6. Unbiased Estimate of Dark Energy Density from Type Ia Supernova Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2001-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are currently the best probes of the dark energy in the universe. To constrain the nature of dark energy, we assume a flat universe and that the weak energy condition is satisfied, and we allow the density of dark energy, ρX(z), to be an arbitrary function of redshift. Using simulated data from a space-based SN pencil-beam survey, we find that by optimizing the number of parameters used to parameterize the dimensionless dark energy density, f(z)=ρX(z)/ρX(z=0), we can obtain an unbiased estimate of both f(z) and the fractional matter density of the universe, Ωm. A plausible SN pencil-beam survey (with a square degree field of view and for an observational duration of 1 yr) can yield about 2000 SNe Ia with 0<=z<=2. Such a survey in space would yield SN peak luminosities with a combined intrinsic and observational dispersion of σ(mint)=0.16 mag. We find that for such an idealized survey, Ωm can be measured to 10% accuracy, and the dark energy density can be estimated to ~20% to z~1.5, and ~20%-40% to z~2, depending on the time dependence of the true dark energy density. Dark energy densities that vary more slowly can be more accurately measured. For the anticipated Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission, Ωm can be measured to 14% accuracy, and the dark energy density can be estimated to ~20% to z~1.2. Our results suggest that SNAP may gain much sensitivity to the time dependence of the dark energy density and Ωm by devoting more observational time to the central pencil-beam fields to obtain more SNe Ia at z>1.2. We use both a maximum likelihood analysis and a Monte Carlo analysis (when appropriate) to determine the errors of estimated parameters. We find that the Monte Carlo analysis gives a more accurate estimate of the dark energy density than the maximum likelihood analysis.

  7. Band offset formation at semiconductor heterojunctions through density-based minimization of interface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Raymond T.; Kronik, Leeor

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the magnitude of band offset (BO) at any semiconductor heterojunction is directly derivable from the distribution of charge at that interface and that the latter is decided by a minimization of total energy. However, the fact that BO formation is governed by energy minimization has not been explicitly used in theoretical BO models, likely because the equilibrium charge densities at heterojunction interfaces appear difficult to predict, except via explicit calculation. In this paper, electron densities at a large number of (100), (110), and (111) oriented heterojunctions between lattice-matched, isovalent semiconductors with the zinc blende (ZB) structure have been calculated by first-principles methods and analyzed in detail for possible common characteristics among energy-minimized densities. Remarkably, the heterojunction electron density was found to largely depend only on the immediate, local atomic arrangement. In fact, it is so much so that a juxtaposition of local electron-densities generated in oligo-cells (LEGOs) accurately reproduced the charge densities that minimize the energy for the heterojunctions. Furthermore, the charge distribution for each bulk semiconductor was found to display a striking separability of its electrostatic effect into two neutral parts, associated with the cation and the anion, which are approximately transferrable among semiconductors. These discoveries form the basis of a neutral polyhedra theory (NPT) that approximately predicts the equilibrium charge density and BO of relaxed heterojunctions from the energy minimization requirement. Well-known experimentally observed characteristics of heterojunctions, such as the insensitivity of BO to heterojunction orientation and the identity of interface bonds, the transitivity rule, etc., are all in good agreement with the NPT. Therefore, energy minimization, which essentially decides the electronic properties of all other solid and molecular systems, also governs

  8. Midrapidity inclusive densities in high energy pp collisions in additive quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabelski, Yu. M.; Shuvaev, A. G.

    2016-08-01

    High energy (CERN SPS and LHC) inelastic pp (pbar{p}) scattering is treated in the framework of the additive quark model together with Pomeron exchange theory. We extract the midrapidity inclusive density of the charged secondaries produced in a single quark-quark collision and investigate its energy dependence. Predictions for the π p collisions are presented.

  9. Dietary energy density is associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in U.S. adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising obesity rates have been linked to the consumption of energy-dense diets. We examined whether dietary energy density was associated with obesity and related disorders, including insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. We conducted a cross-sectional study using nationally representative ...

  10. Impact of a School Nutrition Policy to Middle School Students Dietary Energy Density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The consumption of energy-dense foods has been associated with rising obesity rates and linked to the metabolic syndrome. Reducing dietary energy density (DED) is an important strategy to address obesity, but few studies have examined the effect of nutrition policies on children's DED. The Texas Pub...

  11. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l-1). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l-1 is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from -20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications.

  12. The effect of cell size and channel density on neuronal information encoding and energy efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Faisal, A Aldo; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the determinants of neuronal energy consumption and their relationship to information coding is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Three of the main determinants are cell size, ion channel density, and stimulus statistics. Here we investigate their impact on neuronal energy consumption and information coding by comparing single-compartment spiking neuron models of different sizes with different densities of stochastic voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels and different statistics of synaptic inputs. The largest compartments have the highest information rates but the lowest energy efficiency for a given voltage-gated ion channel density, and the highest signaling efficiency (bits spike−1) for a given firing rate. For a given cell size, our models revealed that the ion channel density that maximizes energy efficiency is lower than that maximizing information rate. Low rates of small synaptic inputs improve energy efficiency but the highest information rates occur with higher rates and larger inputs. These relationships produce a Law of Diminishing Returns that penalizes costly excess information coding capacity, promoting the reduction of cell size, channel density, and input stimuli to the minimum possible, suggesting that the trade-off between energy and information has influenced all aspects of neuronal anatomy and physiology. PMID:23778164

  13. The effect of cell size and channel density on neuronal information encoding and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Faisal, A Aldo; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2013-09-01

    Identifying the determinants of neuronal energy consumption and their relationship to information coding is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Three of the main determinants are cell size, ion channel density, and stimulus statistics. Here we investigate their impact on neuronal energy consumption and information coding by comparing single-compartment spiking neuron models of different sizes with different densities of stochastic voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels and different statistics of synaptic inputs. The largest compartments have the highest information rates but the lowest energy efficiency for a given voltage-gated ion channel density, and the highest signaling efficiency (bits spike(-1)) for a given firing rate. For a given cell size, our models revealed that the ion channel density that maximizes energy efficiency is lower than that maximizing information rate. Low rates of small synaptic inputs improve energy efficiency but the highest information rates occur with higher rates and larger inputs. These relationships produce a Law of Diminishing Returns that penalizes costly excess information coding capacity, promoting the reduction of cell size, channel density, and input stimuli to the minimum possible, suggesting that the trade-off between energy and information has influenced all aspects of neuronal anatomy and physiology.

  14. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l−1). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l−1 is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from −20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications. PMID:25709083

  15. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l(-1)). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l(-1) is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from -20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications. PMID:25709083

  16. Evaluation of discharge energy density of antiferroelectric ceramics for pulse capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ran; Xu, Zhuo; Feng, Yujun; Wei, Xiaoyong; Tian, Jingjing; Huang, Dong

    2016-07-01

    The energy in pulse capacitors need to discharge rapidly to obtain high peak power. However, the discharge energy density of antiferroelectric (AFE) dielectrics for pulse capacitors is traditionally evaluated by hysteresis loop (defined as quasi-static method). To verify whether the quasi-static method is suitable for pulse applications, AFE ceramics Pb0.94La0.04[(Zr0.70Sn0.30)0.86Ti0.14]O3 were prepared, and their discharge energy density was calculated by hysteresis loop and pulse current (defined as dynamic method), respectively. A significant difference was found between these two kinds of results. Under 36 kV/cm, the discharge energy density calculated by 1 Hz hysteresis loop was 0.35 J/cm3 while that by pulse discharge current was only 0.18 J/cm3. It was found that the discharge energy density declined with increasing test frequency (0.1 Hz-100 Hz) and decreased further via dynamic hysteresis loop in microseconds scale. This declination can be explained by the viscous force during the motion of the domain wall. Thus, for pulse capacitors, it is more reasonable and practical to evaluate discharge energy density of AFE by pulse current than by quasi-static hysteresis loop.

  17. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l(-1)). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l(-1) is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from -20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications.

  18. The National Ignition Facility and the Golden Age of High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W; Moses, E I; Newton, M

    2007-09-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density (HED) science. When completed, NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, making it the world's largest and highest-energy laser system. The NIF is poised to become the world's preeminent facility for conducting ICF and fusion energy research and for studying matter at extreme densities and temperatures.

  19. Thomas-Fermi approach to density functional theory: binding energy for atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Rocco, H. O.; Lanzini, F.; Aguiar, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we re-examine the Thomas-Fermi formalism as an approach to the calculation of atomic binding energies. We focus on the concept of electron density as the central magnitude, and the way in which the different contributions to the total energy can be evaluated from it. Total energies of simple atoms (Z = 2 to 10) are calculated using three different analytical approximations for the electronic density, and the results are compared with those obtained within the Hartree-Fock model.

  20. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  1. The role of energy density and acoustic cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Loske, Achim M

    2010-02-01

    Today a high percentage of urinary stones are successfully treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL); however, misconceptions regarding fragmentation mechanisms, as well as treatment parameters like dose, applied energy and focal area are still common. A main stone comminution mechanism during SWL is acoustic cavitation. The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of cavitation and energy density on stone fragmentation. A research lithotripter was used to expose a large set of artificial kidney stones to shock waves varying different parameters. Hundreds of pressure records were used to calculate the energy density of the lithotripter at different settings. Results indicate that energy density is a crucial parameter and that better SWL treatment outcomes could be obtained placing the calculus at a prefocal position.

  2. Efficient Calculations of Dispersion Energies for Nanoscale Systems from Coupled Density Response Functions.

    PubMed

    Podeszwa, Rafał; Cencek, Wojciech; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2012-06-12

    Dispersion energies computed from coupled Kohn-Sham (CKS) dynamic density-density response functions are known to be highly accurate. At the same time, the computational algorithm is of only modest complexity compared to other accurate methods of dispersion energy calculation. We present a new implementation of this algorithm that removes several computational barriers present in current implementations and enables calculations of dispersion energies for systems with more than 200 atoms using more than 5000 basis functions. The improvements were mainly achieved by reorganizing the algorithm to minimize memory and disk usage. We present applications to two systems: the buckycatcher complex with fullerene and the vancomycin complex with a diacetyl-Lys-d-Ala-d-Ala bacterial wall precursor, both calculations performed with triple-ζ-quality basis sets. Our implementation makes it possible to use ab initio computed dispersion energies in popular "density functional theory plus dispersion" approaches.

  3. Reverse energy partitioning-An efficient algorithm for computing the density of states, partition functions, and free energy of solids.

    PubMed

    Do, Hainam; Wheatley, Richard J

    2016-08-28

    A robust and model free Monte Carlo simulation method is proposed to address the challenge in computing the classical density of states and partition function of solids. Starting from the minimum configurational energy, the algorithm partitions the entire energy range in the increasing energy direction ("upward") into subdivisions whose integrated density of states is known. When combined with the density of states computed from the "downward" energy partitioning approach [H. Do, J. D. Hirst, and R. J. Wheatley, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 174105 (2011)], the equilibrium thermodynamic properties can be evaluated at any temperature and in any phase. The method is illustrated in the context of the Lennard-Jones system and can readily be extended to other molecular systems and clusters for which the structures are known. PMID:27586913

  4. Reverse energy partitioning—An efficient algorithm for computing the density of states, partition functions, and free energy of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Hainam; Wheatley, Richard J.

    2016-08-01

    A robust and model free Monte Carlo simulation method is proposed to address the challenge in computing the classical density of states and partition function of solids. Starting from the minimum configurational energy, the algorithm partitions the entire energy range in the increasing energy direction ("upward") into subdivisions whose integrated density of states is known. When combined with the density of states computed from the "downward" energy partitioning approach [H. Do, J. D. Hirst, and R. J. Wheatley, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 174105 (2011)], the equilibrium thermodynamic properties can be evaluated at any temperature and in any phase. The method is illustrated in the context of the Lennard-Jones system and can readily be extended to other molecular systems and clusters for which the structures are known.

  5. Interpolating moving least-squares methods for fitting potential energy surfaces : computing high-density potential energy surface data from low-density ab initio data points.

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, R.; Thompson, D. L.; Guo, Y.; Wagner, A. F.; Minkoff, M.; Chemistry; Univ. of Missouri-Columbia; Oklahoma State Univ.

    2007-05-11

    A highly accurate and efficient method for molecular global potential energy surface (PES) construction and fitting is demonstrated. An interpolating-moving-least-squares (IMLS)-based method is developed using low-density ab initio Hessian values to compute high-density PES parameters suitable for accurate and efficient PES representation. The method is automated and flexible so that a PES can be optimally generated for classical trajectories, spectroscopy, or other applications. Two important bottlenecks for fitting PESs are addressed. First, high accuracy is obtained using a minimal density of ab initio points, thus overcoming the bottleneck of ab initio point generation faced in applications of modified-Shepard-based methods. Second, high efficiency is also possible (suitable when a huge number of potential energy and gradient evaluations are required during a trajectory calculation). This overcomes the bottleneck in high-order IMLS-based methods, i.e., the high cost/accuracy ratio for potential energy evaluations. The result is a set of hybrid IMLS methods in which high-order IMLS is used with low-density ab initio Hessian data to compute a dense grid of points at which the energy, Hessian, or even high-order IMLS fitting parameters are stored. A series of hybrid methods is then possible as these data can be used for neural network fitting, modified-Shepard interpolation, or approximate IMLS. Results that are indicative of the accuracy, efficiency, and scalability are presented for one-dimensional model potentials as well as for three-dimensional (HCN) and six-dimensional (HOOH) molecular PESs

  6. Density-Functional Theory Studies of Correlation Energy Effects at Metallic Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Abdel-Raouf Eid

    In this thesis we study the effects of correlation in the inhomogeneous electron gas at metallic surfaces. These studies are performed within the context of density-functional theory (DFT). Using accurate representations of the electronic density profile, we have estimated variationally the surface correlation energy of jellium metal. The accuracy of these estimates is founded in the assumption that the exchange -correlation energy functional of the density is approximated accurately by the wave-vector analysis method, and by the fact that the non-local exchange energy contributions are treated exactly. In contrast to the previously accepted conclusion that for surfaces correlation effects are as significant as exchange, our results indicate the ratio of these energies to lie between 34% - 97% over the metallic density range, the smaller ratios corresponding to the higher density metals. In this work we have also examined the local density (LDA) and gradient expansion approximations (GEA) (to O((DEL)('2))) for the correlation energy. We have demonstrated for realistic metal surface densities the cancellation of the errors in the LDA for exchange and correlation, and shown that the density profiles at surfaces would have to be unphysically slowly varying for the correlation energy GEA to converge. We have also studied the effects of correlation at surfaces by screening the exchange, and observe that the surface exchange energy for screened-Coulomb interaction decreases as the screening length is reduced. Thus, the more short-ranged the interaction, the easier it is to split the crystal in two. In addition we have derived the DFT first gradient correction coefficient in the GEA for the screened-Coulomb exchange energy, and shown it to be the same as that obtained within Hartree -Fock theory (HFT) for finite screening. This coefficient reduces to the DFT bare-Coulomb interaction value in the limit of no screening in which limit the HFT coefficient is singular. The GEA

  7. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Vermaas, David A; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-05-01

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for RED and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible RED process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible process with maximized power density using a constant-resistance load is then examined to assess the energy conversion efficiency and power density. With equal volumes of seawater and river water, energy conversion efficiency of ∼ 33-44% can be obtained in RED, while the rest is lost through dissipation in the internal resistance of the ion-exchange membrane stack. We show that imperfections in the selectivity of typical ion exchange membranes (namely, co-ion transport, osmosis, and electro-osmosis) can detrimentally lower efficiency by up to 26%, with co-ion leakage being the dominant effect. Further inspection of the power density profile during RED revealed inherent ineffectiveness toward the end of the process. By judicious early discontinuation of the controlled mixing process, the overall power density performance can be considerably enhanced by up to 7-fold, without significant compromise to the energy efficiency. Additionally, membrane resistance was found to be an important factor in determining the power densities attainable. Lastly, the performance of an RED stack was examined for different membrane conductivities and intermembrane distances simulating high performance membranes and stack design. By thoughtful selection of the operating parameters, an efficiency of ∼ 37% and an overall gross power density of 3.5 W/m(2) represent the maximum performance that can potentially be achieved in a seawater-river water RED system with low

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Reimund, Kevin K.; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R.; Wilson, Aaron D.

    2015-08-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π/(1+√w⁻¹), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at “maximum power density operating pressure” requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  9. Flexible asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy and high power density in aqueous electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yingwen; Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Songtao; Varanasi, Chakrapani V; Liu, Jie

    2013-02-01

    Supercapacitors with both high energy and high power densities are critical for many practical applications. In this paper, we discuss the design and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on nanocomposite electrodes of MnO(2), activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The combined unique properties of each of these components enable highly flexible and mechanically strong films that can serve as electrodes directly without using any current collectors or binders. Using these flexible electrodes and a roll-up approach, asymmetric supercapacitors with 2 V working voltage were successfully fabricated. The fabricated device showed excellent rate capability, with 78% of the original capacitance retained when the scan rate was increased from 2 mV s(-1) to 500 mV s(-1). Owing to the unique composite structure, these supercapacitors were able to deliver high energy density (24 W h kg(-1)) under high power density (7.8 kW kg(-1)) conditions. These features could enable supercapacitor based energy storage systems to be very attractive for a variety of critical applications, such as the power sources in hybrid electric vehicles and the back-up powers for wind and solar energy, where both high energy density and high power density are required.

  10. Fully nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals: a proposal and a general assessment for atomic systems.

    PubMed

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J E

    2008-08-21

    Following some recent ideas on the construction of kinetic energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the homogeneous electron gas, a family of them with a nonlocal term based on the von Weizsacker functional and with a dependence on the logarithm of the density is presented. As localized systems are the most difficult to study with explicit kinetic functionals, in this paper we apply to atomic systems a number of families of fully nonlocal kinetic functionals. We have put our attention in both the total kinetic energy and the local behavior of the kinetic energy density, and the results clearly show the quality of these fully nonlocal functionals. They make a good description of the local behavior of the kinetic energy density and maintain good results for the total kinetic energies. We must remark that almost all the functionals discussed in the paper, when using an adequate reference density, can be evaluated as a single integral in momentum space, with a quasilinear scaling for the computational cost.

  11. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si-carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs. PMID:27311811

  12. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si–carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs. PMID:27311811

  13. Link between Food Energy Density and Body Weight Changes in Obese Adults.

    PubMed

    Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Rodacki, Tomasz; Dobrowolska-Iwanek, Justyna; Brzozowska, Anna; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Wojtanowska-Krosniak, Agnieszka; Zagrodzki, Paweł; Bechthold, Angela; Mardas, Marcin; Boeing, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    Regulating the energy density of food could be used as a novel approach for successful body weight reduction in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to conduct a systemic review of the literature on the relationship between food energy density and body weight changes in obese adults to obtain solid evidence supporting this approach. The search process was based on the selection of publications in the English language listed in public databases. A meta-analysis was performed to combine individual study results. Thirteen experimental and observational studies were identified and included in the final analysis. The analyzed populations consist of 3628 individuals aged 18 to 66 years. The studies varied greatly in terms of study populations, study design and applied dietary approaches. The meta-analysis revealed a significant association between low energy density foods and body weight reduction, i.e., -0.53 kg when low energy density foods were eaten (95% CI: -0.88, -0.19). In conclusions, this study adds evidence which supports the energy density of food as a simple but effective measure to manage weight in the obese with the aim of weight reduction. PMID:27104562

  14. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-06-17

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si-carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs.

  15. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-06-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si-carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs.

  16. Link between Food Energy Density and Body Weight Changes in Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Rodacki, Tomasz; Dobrowolska-Iwanek, Justyna; Brzozowska, Anna; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Wojtanowska-Krosniak, Agnieszka; Zagrodzki, Paweł; Bechthold, Angela; Mardas, Marcin; Boeing, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    Regulating the energy density of food could be used as a novel approach for successful body weight reduction in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to conduct a systemic review of the literature on the relationship between food energy density and body weight changes in obese adults to obtain solid evidence supporting this approach. The search process was based on the selection of publications in the English language listed in public databases. A meta-analysis was performed to combine individual study results. Thirteen experimental and observational studies were identified and included in the final analysis. The analyzed populations consist of 3628 individuals aged 18 to 66 years. The studies varied greatly in terms of study populations, study design and applied dietary approaches. The meta-analysis revealed a significant association between low energy density foods and body weight reduction, i.e., −0.53 kg when low energy density foods were eaten (95% CI: −0.88, −0.19). In conclusions, this study adds evidence which supports the energy density of food as a simple but effective measure to manage weight in the obese with the aim of weight reduction. PMID:27104562

  17. Link between Food Energy Density and Body Weight Changes in Obese Adults.

    PubMed

    Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Rodacki, Tomasz; Dobrowolska-Iwanek, Justyna; Brzozowska, Anna; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Wojtanowska-Krosniak, Agnieszka; Zagrodzki, Paweł; Bechthold, Angela; Mardas, Marcin; Boeing, Heiner

    2016-04-20

    Regulating the energy density of food could be used as a novel approach for successful body weight reduction in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to conduct a systemic review of the literature on the relationship between food energy density and body weight changes in obese adults to obtain solid evidence supporting this approach. The search process was based on the selection of publications in the English language listed in public databases. A meta-analysis was performed to combine individual study results. Thirteen experimental and observational studies were identified and included in the final analysis. The analyzed populations consist of 3628 individuals aged 18 to 66 years. The studies varied greatly in terms of study populations, study design and applied dietary approaches. The meta-analysis revealed a significant association between low energy density foods and body weight reduction, i.e., -0.53 kg when low energy density foods were eaten (95% CI: -0.88, -0.19). In conclusions, this study adds evidence which supports the energy density of food as a simple but effective measure to manage weight in the obese with the aim of weight reduction.

  18. Estimating food portions. Influence of unit number, meal type and energy density.

    PubMed

    Almiron-Roig, Eva; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Dodd, Jessica; Jebb, Susan A

    2013-12-01

    Estimating how much is appropriate to consume can be difficult, especially for foods presented in multiple units, those with ambiguous energy content and for snacks. This study tested the hypothesis that the number of units (single vs. multi-unit), meal type and food energy density disrupts accurate estimates of portion size. Thirty-two healthy weight men and women attended the laboratory on 3 separate occasions to assess the number of portions contained in 33 foods or beverages of varying energy density (1.7-26.8 kJ/g). Items included 12 multi-unit and 21 single unit foods; 13 were labelled "meal", 4 "drink" and 16 "snack". Departures in portion estimates from reference amounts were analysed with negative binomial regression. Overall participants tended to underestimate the number of portions displayed. Males showed greater errors in estimation than females (p=0.01). Single unit foods and those labelled as 'meal' or 'beverage' were estimated with greater error than multi-unit and 'snack' foods (p=0.02 and p<0.001 respectively). The number of portions of high energy density foods was overestimated while the number of portions of beverages and medium energy density foods were underestimated by 30-46%. In conclusion, participants tended to underestimate the reference portion size for a range of food and beverages, especially single unit foods and foods of low energy density and, unexpectedly, overestimated the reference portion of high energy density items. There is a need for better consumer education of appropriate portion sizes to aid adherence to a healthy diet.

  19. The energy of supernovae and the density of the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhibov, F. Kh.; Smirnov, M. A.

    The density of the interstellar medium and the initial expansion energy (IEE) of a number of supernova remnants (SNRs) are calculated on a basis of a new list of calibration sources. Plerions and SNRs with a central source have practically the same IEE as shell SNRs, i.e., (2.6 + or - 0.5) x 10 to the 50th erg. An empirical relationship between the density of SNR optical filaments and shock velocity is obtained.

  20. Energy conversion method in the ocean using the density difference of water

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, H.; Mitsuhashi, W.

    1981-01-01

    A new method which produces energy from the ocean by utilizing the density difference of water, by means of a ''chimney effect'', is proposed. Density difference of water in the ocean occurs in two ways, namely differences of consistency and water temperature. For instance, fresh river water and melting flows and icebergs are pointed out as some origins of the former, while thermal effects of volcanoes and hot springs may account for the latter. 5 refs.

  1. A High Power Density Single-Phase PWM Rectifier With Active Ripple Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruxi; Wang, Fei; Boroyevich, Dushan; Burgos, Rolando; Lai, Rixin; Ning, Puqi; Rajashekara, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that single-phase pulse width modulation rectifiers have second-order harmonic currents and corresponding ripple voltages on the dc bus. The low-frequency harmonic current is normally filtered using a bulk capacitor in the bus, which results in low power density. However, pursuing high power density in converter design is a very important goal in the aerospace applications. This paper studies methods for reducing the energy storage capacitor for single-phase rectifiers. The minimum ripple energy storage requirement is derived independently of a specific topology. Based on theminimum ripple energy requirement, the feasibility of the active capacitor s reduction schemes is verified. Then, we propose a bidirectional buck boost converter as the ripple energy storage circuit, which can effectively reduce the energy storage capacitance. The analysis and design are validated by simulation and experimental results.

  2. Antiferroelectric Thin-Film Capacitors with High Energy-Storage Densities, Low Energy Losses, and Fast Discharge Times.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Won; Amarsanaa, Gantsooj; Won, Sung Sik; Chae, Song A; Lee, Dae Su; Kim, Ill Won

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a capacitor with high energy densities, low energy losses, fast discharge times, and high temperature stabilities, based on Pb(0.97)Y(0.02)[(Zr(0.6)Sn(0.4))(0.925)Ti(0.075)]O3 (PYZST) antiferroelectric thin-films. PYZST thin-films exhibited a high recoverable energy density of U(reco) = 21.0 J/cm(3) with a high energy-storage efficiency of η = 91.9% under an electric field of 1300 kV/cm, providing faster microsecond discharge times than those of commercial polypropylene capacitors. Moreover, PYZST thin-films exhibited high temperature stabilities with regard to their energy-storage properties over temperatures ranging from room temperature to 100 °C and also exhibited strong charge-discharge fatigue endurance up to 1 × 10(7) cycles. PMID:26606502

  3. Antiferroelectric Thin-Film Capacitors with High Energy-Storage Densities, Low Energy Losses, and Fast Discharge Times.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Won; Amarsanaa, Gantsooj; Won, Sung Sik; Chae, Song A; Lee, Dae Su; Kim, Ill Won

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a capacitor with high energy densities, low energy losses, fast discharge times, and high temperature stabilities, based on Pb(0.97)Y(0.02)[(Zr(0.6)Sn(0.4))(0.925)Ti(0.075)]O3 (PYZST) antiferroelectric thin-films. PYZST thin-films exhibited a high recoverable energy density of U(reco) = 21.0 J/cm(3) with a high energy-storage efficiency of η = 91.9% under an electric field of 1300 kV/cm, providing faster microsecond discharge times than those of commercial polypropylene capacitors. Moreover, PYZST thin-films exhibited high temperature stabilities with regard to their energy-storage properties over temperatures ranging from room temperature to 100 °C and also exhibited strong charge-discharge fatigue endurance up to 1 × 10(7) cycles.

  4. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  5. Density distribution of high energy electrons in pulsed corona discharge of NO+N 2 mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenchun; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Younian

    2003-12-01

    Emission spectroscopy of the high-voltage pulsed positive corona discharge in a line-cylinder reactor is used to investigate the high-energy electron density distribution in the discharge gap. The relative overall emission intensity spatial distribution profile of the A 2Σ +→X 2Π transition of NO is successfully recorded against a severe electromagnetic pulse interference coming from the corona discharge at one atmosphere. The spectroscopic investigation shows that the high-energy electron density in the discharge has a nonlinearly decline in the radial distribution. When varying the discharge voltage, the absolute emission intensity of NO is different but the radial distribution profile is similar. If an oxygen flow was introduced into the discharge reactor, the emission intensity of NO decreases tremendously and, therefore, the high-energy electron density decreases reasonably.

  6. Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kun; Parkhill, John

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from an input electron density. The output of the network is used as a nonlocal correction to conventional local and semilocal kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. The density which minimizes the total energy given by the functional is examined in detail. We identify several avenues to improve on this exploratory work, by reducing numerical noise and changing the structure of our functional. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  7. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applicationsand Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan D.A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Celata, C.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Debonnel, C.S.; Grote, D.P.; Efthimiom, P.C.; Eylon, S.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich,I.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier,W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.L.; Penn, G.E.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Rose,D.V.; Sefkow, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Startsev, E.A.; Tabak, M.; Thoma, C.; Vay, J-L; Wadron, W.L.; Wurtele, J.S.; Welch, D.R.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-09-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers.

  8. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for High Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; et al.

    2005-09-19

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers.

  9. First-order exchange energy of intermolecular interactions from coupled cluster density matrices and their cumulants.

    PubMed

    Korona, Tatiana

    2008-06-14

    A new method for the calculation of the first-order intermolecular exchange energy is proposed. It is based on the partition of two-particle density matrices of monomers into the antisymmetrized product of one-particle density matrices and the remaining cumulant part. This partition is used to modify the formula for the first-order exchange energy developed by Moszynski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 100, 5080 (1994)]. The new expression has been applied for the case of monomer density matrices derived from the expectation value expression for the coupled cluster singles and doubles wave function. In this way an accurate method of calculation of the first-order exchange energy for many-electron systems has been obtained, where both monomers are described on the coupled cluster level. Numerical results are presented for several benchmark van der Waals systems to illustrate the performance of the new approach.

  10. Towards improved local hybrid functionals by calibration of exchange-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V. E-mail: martin.kaupp@tu-berlin.de; Kaupp, Martin E-mail: martin.kaupp@tu-berlin.de

    2014-11-28

    A new approach for the calibration of (semi-)local and exact exchange-energy densities in the context of local hybrid functionals is reported. The calibration functions are derived from only the electron density and its spatial derivatives, avoiding spatial derivatives of the exact-exchange energy density or other computationally unfavorable contributions. The calibration functions fulfill the seven more important out of nine known exact constraints. It is shown that calibration improves substantially the definition of a non-dynamical correlation energy term for generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based local hybrids. Moreover, gauge artifacts in the potential-energy curves of noble-gas dimers may be corrected by calibration. The developed calibration functions are then evaluated for a large range of energy-related properties (atomization energies, reaction barriers, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomic energies) of three sets of local hybrids, using a simple one-parameter local-mixing. The functionals are based on (a) local spin-density approximation (LSDA) or (b) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation, and on (c) Becke-88 (B88) exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlation. While the uncalibrated GGA-based functionals usually provide very poor thermochemical data, calibration allows a dramatic improvement, accompanied by only a small deterioration of reaction barriers. In particular, an optimized BLYP-based local-hybrid functional has been found that is a substantial improvement over the underlying global hybrids, as well as over previously reported LSDA-based local hybrids. It is expected that the present calibration approach will pave the way towards new generations of more accurate hyper-GGA functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities.

  11. Towards improved local hybrid functionals by calibration of exchange-energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2014-11-01

    A new approach for the calibration of (semi-)local and exact exchange-energy densities in the context of local hybrid functionals is reported. The calibration functions are derived from only the electron density and its spatial derivatives, avoiding spatial derivatives of the exact-exchange energy density or other computationally unfavorable contributions. The calibration functions fulfill the seven more important out of nine known exact constraints. It is shown that calibration improves substantially the definition of a non-dynamical correlation energy term for generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based local hybrids. Moreover, gauge artifacts in the potential-energy curves of noble-gas dimers may be corrected by calibration. The developed calibration functions are then evaluated for a large range of energy-related properties (atomization energies, reaction barriers, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomic energies) of three sets of local hybrids, using a simple one-parameter local-mixing. The functionals are based on (a) local spin-density approximation (LSDA) or (b) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation, and on (c) Becke-88 (B88) exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlation. While the uncalibrated GGA-based functionals usually provide very poor thermochemical data, calibration allows a dramatic improvement, accompanied by only a small deterioration of reaction barriers. In particular, an optimized BLYP-based local-hybrid functional has been found that is a substantial improvement over the underlying global hybrids, as well as over previously reported LSDA-based local hybrids. It is expected that the present calibration approach will pave the way towards new generations of more accurate hyper-GGA functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities.

  12. Associations between eating frequency and energy intake, energy density, diet quality and body weight status in adults from the USA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong; Hollis, James H

    2016-06-01

    To investigate associations between eating frequency and energy intake, energy density, diet quality and body weight status in adults from the USA, combined data from the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used in this study. The first 24-h dietary recall data from eligible participants (4017 men and 3774 women) were used to calculate eating frequency, as well as energy intake, energy density and the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010), as a measure of diet quality. BMI and waist circumference were obtained from the NHANES body measures data. Adjusting for confounding socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors, a higher eating frequency was significantly associated with higher energy intake in both men and women (both P<0·001). A higher eating frequency was also significantly associated with lower energy density in both men and women, regardless of whether beverage or water intake was included in the calculation of energy density (all P<0·01). Moreover, there was a significant positive association between eating frequency and the HEI-2010 total score in both men and women (both P<0·001). Eating frequency was inversely associated with BMI in women (P=0·003), as well as waist circumference in both men (P=0·032) and women (P=0·010). Results from the present study suggested that adults with a higher eating frequency in the USA had a healthier diet with lower energy density and better diet quality, and eating frequency was inversely associated with body weight status.

  13. Kinematics, material symmetry, and energy densities for lipid bilayers with spontaneous curvature

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Mohsen; Seguin, Brian; Fried, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    Continuum mechanical tools are used to describe the deformation, energy density, and material symmetry of a lipid bilayer with spontaneous curvature. In contrast to conventional approaches in which lipid bilayers are modeled by material surfaces, here we rely on a three-dimensional approach in which a lipid bilayer is modeling by a shell-like body with finite thickness. In this setting, the interface between the leaflets of a lipid bilayer is assumed to coincide with the mid-surface of the corresponding shell-like body. The three-dimensional deformation gradient is found to involve the curvature tensors of the mid-surface in the spontaneous and the deformed states, the deformation gradient of the mid-surface, and the transverse deformation. Attention is also given to the coherency of the leaflets and to the area compatibility of closed lipid bilayers (i.e., vesicles). A hyperelastic constitutive theory for lipid bilayers in the liquid phase is developed. In combination, the requirements of frame-indifference and material symmetry yield a representation for the energy density of a lipid bilayer. This representation shows that three scalar invariants suffice to describe the constitutive response of a lipid bilayer exhibiting in-plane fluidity and transverse isotropy. In addition to exploring the geometrical and physical properties of these invariants, fundamental constitutively-associated kinematical quantities are emphasized. On this basis, the effect on the energy density of assuming that the lipid bilayer is incompressible is considered. Lastly, a dimension reduction argument is used to extract an areal energy density per unit area from the three-dimensional energy density. This step explains the origin of spontaneous curvature in the areal energy density. Importantly, along with a standard contribution associated with the natural curvature of lipid bilayer, our analysis indicates that constitutive asymmetry between the leaflets of the lipid bilayer gives rise to

  14. Coaxial wet-spun yarn supercapacitors for high-energy density and safe wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liang; Huang, Tieqi; Zheng, Bingna; Han, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gopalsamy, Karthikeyan; Sun, Haiyan; Gao, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Yarn supercapacitors have great potential in future portable and wearable electronics because of their tiny volume, flexibility and weavability. However, low-energy density limits their development in the area of wearable high-energy density devices. How to enhance their energy densities while retaining their high-power densities is a critical challenge for yarn supercapacitor development. Here we propose a coaxial wet-spinning assembly approach to continuously spin polyelectrolyte-wrapped graphene/carbon nanotube core-sheath fibres, which are used directly as safe electrodes to assembly two-ply yarn supercapacitors. The yarn supercapacitors using liquid and solid electrolytes show ultra-high capacitances of 269 and 177 mF cm(-2) and energy densities of 5.91 and 3.84 μWh cm(-2), respectively. A cloth supercapacitor superior to commercial capacitor is further interwoven from two individual 40-cm-long coaxial fibres. The combination of scalable coaxial wet-spinning technology and excellent performance of yarn supercapacitors paves the way to wearable and safe electronics. PMID:24786366

  15. Coaxial wet-spun yarn supercapacitors for high-energy density and safe wearable electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Liang; Huang, Tieqi; Zheng, Bingna; Han, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gopalsamy, Karthikeyan; Sun, Haiyan; Gao, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Yarn supercapacitors have great potential in future portable and wearable electronics because of their tiny volume, flexibility and weavability. However, low-energy density limits their development in the area of wearable high-energy density devices. How to enhance their energy densities while retaining their high-power densities is a critical challenge for yarn supercapacitor development. Here we propose a coaxial wet-spinning assembly approach to continuously spin polyelectrolyte-wrapped graphene/carbon nanotube core-sheath fibres, which are used directly as safe electrodes to assembly two-ply yarn supercapacitors. The yarn supercapacitors using liquid and solid electrolytes show ultra-high capacitances of 269 and 177 mF cm−2 and energy densities of 5.91 and 3.84 μWh cm−2, respectively. A cloth supercapacitor superior to commercial capacitor is further interwoven from two individual 40-cm-long coaxial fibres. The combination of scalable coaxial wet-spinning technology and excellent performance of yarn supercapacitors paves the way to wearable and safe electronics. PMID:24786366

  16. Ionic liquid enabled FeS2 for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler; Piper, Daniela Molina; Kim, Seul Cham; Han, Sang Sub; Bhat, Vinay; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Se-Hee

    2014-11-19

    High-energy-density FeS2 cathodes en-abled by a bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI-) anion-based room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolyte are demonstrated. A TFSI-based ionic liquid (IL) significantly mitigates polysulfide dissolution, and therefore the parasitic redox shuttle mechanism, that plagues sulfur-based electrode chemistries. FeS2 stabilization with a TFSI(-) -based IL results in one of the highest energy density cathodes, 542 W h kg(-1) (normalized to cathode composite mass), reported to date.

  17. Development of a high-density energy-storage capacitor for Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, D.K.; Cooper, R.A.; Sevigny, J.A.; Merritt, B.T.; Carder, B.M.; Whitham, K.

    1981-10-22

    This paper covers Maxwell's approach to developing energy storage capacitors. Based on previous capacitor designs of 3 KJ, 5 KJ and 10 KJ, the final Nova 12.5 KJ capacitor evolved. At the outset of the Nova capacitor development program, a relatively new dielectric system, polypropylene-paper-DOP, seemed to show superiority in volumetric efficiency, life, and more importantly cost. However, as a result of studies performed at Maxwell, a high-density, energy-storage capacitor was developed utilizing new high-quality, high-density paper and caster oil as the dielectric. Test data have demonstrated that the Maxwell 12.5 KJ capacitor exceeds all LLNL's qualification requirements.

  18. Fragmentation in isotopic and isobaric systems as probe of density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Gautam, Sakshi; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2016-11-01

    We probe the density-dependent behavior of symmetry energy using the yield of various fragments in central collisions of various isotopic and isobaric colliding pairs. We calculate the yields of free nucleons, light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments in neutron-rich colliding systems as well as the ratio of relative yields of above fragments and free nucleons. Our findings reveal that the ratio of relative yield of light charged particles poses better candidate to probe the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy.

  19. Energy Flux and Density of Nonuniform Electromagnetic Waves with Total Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    Analytic expressions are obtained for the energy flux and density of refracted nonuniform waves produced during total reflection at the boundary between two isotropic media for the general case of elliptically polarized incident light. The average values are determined as functions of the parameters of the adjoining media and the angle of incidence. The cases of linearly and circularly polarized incident waves are examined in detail. An explicit general expression relating the energy fl ux and density of these waves for arbitrarily polarized incident light is obtained.

  20. Expansion-free evolving spheres must have inhomogeneous energy density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-04-15

    In a recent paper a systematic study on shearing expansion-free spherically symmetric distributions was presented. As a particular case of such systems, the Skripkin model was mentioned, which corresponds to a nondissipative perfect fluid with a constant energy density. Here we show that such a model is inconsistent with junction conditions. It is shown that in general for any nondissipative fluid distribution, the expansion-free condition requires the energy density to be inhomogeneous. As an example we consider the case of dust, which allows for a complete integration.

  1. Estimating the neutrally buoyant energy density of a Rankine-cycle/fuel-cell underwater propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Daniel F.; Cadou, Christopher P.

    2014-02-01

    A unique requirement of underwater vehicles' power/energy systems is that they remain neutrally buoyant over the course of a mission. Previous work published in the Journal of Power Sources reported gross as opposed to neutrally-buoyant energy densities of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell/Rankine-cycle based power system based on the exothermic reaction of aluminum with seawater. This paper corrects this shortcoming by presenting a model for estimating system mass and using it to update the key findings of the original paper in the context of the neutral buoyancy requirement. It also presents an expanded sensitivity analysis to illustrate the influence of various design and modeling assumptions. While energy density is very sensitive to turbine efficiency (sensitivity coefficient in excess of 0.60), it is relatively insensitive to all other major design parameters (sensitivity coefficients < 0.15) like compressor efficiency, inlet water temperature, scaling methodology, etc. The neutral buoyancy requirement introduces a significant (∼15%) energy density penalty but overall the system still appears to offer factors of five to eight improvements in energy density (i.e., vehicle range/endurance) over present battery-based technologies.

  2. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee -Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-11

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190°C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh/kg, which is 3 times higher than that of conventional tubular Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 280°C, was obtained for planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 190°C over a long-term cell test (1000 cycles). The high energy density and superior cycle stability are attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials (NaCl and Ni) at 190°C. The results reported in this work demonstrate that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at anmore » intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.« less

  3. [Cost and energy density of diet in Brazil, 2008-2009].

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Camila Zancheta; Claro, Rafael Moreira

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the cost and energy density of diet consumed in Brazilian households. Data from the Brazilian Household Budget Survey (POF 2008/2009) were used to identify the main foods and their prices. Similar items were grouped, resulting in a basket of 67 products. Linear programming was applied for the composition of isoenergetic baskets, minimizing the deviation from the average household diet. Restrictions were imposed on the inclusion of items and the energy contribution of the various food groups. A reduction in average cost of diet was applied at intervals of R$0.15 to the lowest possible cost. We identified an inverse association between energy density and cost of diet (p < 0.05), and at the lowest possible cost we obtained the maximum value of energy density. Restrictions on the diet's cost resulted in the selection of diets with higher energy density, indicating that cost of diet may lead to the adoption of inadequate diets in Brazil.

  4. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alfonso R; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-07-21

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (∼1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material.

  5. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Alfonso R.; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-07-01

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (˜1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material.

  6. Effect of Radial Density Configuration on Wave Field and Energy Flow in Axially Uniform Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lei; Li, Qingchong; Zhang, Huijie; Li, Yinghong; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Bailing; Zhuang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the radial density configuration in terms of width, edge gradient and volume gradient on the wave field and energy flow in an axially uniform helicon plasma is studied in detail. A three-parameter function is employed to describe the density, covering uniform, parabolic, linear and Gaussian profiles. It finds that the fraction of power deposition near the plasma edge increases with density width and edge gradient, and decays in exponential and “bump-on-tail” profiles, respectively, away from the surface. The existence of a positive second-order derivative in the volume density configuration promotes the power deposition near the plasma core, which to our best knowledge has not been pointed out before. The transverse structures of wave field and current density remain almost the same during the variation of density width and gradient, confirming the robustness of the m=1 mode observed previously. However, the structure of the electric wave field changes significantly from a uniform density configuration, for which the coupling between the Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) mode and the helicon mode is very strong, to non-uniform ones. The energy flow in the cross section of helicon plasma is presented for the first time, and behaves sensitive to the density width and edge gradient but insensitive to the volume gradient. Interestingly, the radial distribution of power deposition resembles the radial profile of the axial component of current density, suggesting the control of the power deposition profile in the experiment by particularly designing the antenna geometry to excite a required axial current distribution. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405271)

  7. Constructing multiscale gravitational energy spectra from molecular cloud surface density PDF - interplay between turbulence and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Gravity is believed to be important on multiple physical scales in molecular clouds. However, quantitative constraints on gravity are still lacking. We derive an analytical formula which provides estimates on multiscale gravitational energy distribution using the observed surface density probability distribution function (PDF). Our analytical formalism also enables one to convert the observed column density PDF into an estimated volume density PDF, and to obtain average radial density profile ρ(r). For a region with N_col ˜ N^{-γ _N}, the gravitational energy spectra is E_p(k)˜ k^{-4(1 - 1/γ _N)}. We apply the formula to observations of molecular clouds, and find that a scaling index of -2 of the surface density PDF implies that ρ ˜ r-2 and Ep(k) ˜ k-2. The results are valid from the cloud scale (a few parsec) to around ˜ 0.1 pc. Because of the resemblance the scaling index of the gravitational energy spectrum and the that of the kinetic energy power spectrum of the Burgers turbulence (where E ˜ k-2), our result indicates that gravity can act effectively against turbulence over a multitude of physical scales. This is the critical scaling index which divides molecular clouds into two categories: clouds like Orion and Ophiuchus have shallower power laws, and the amount of gravitational energy is too large for turbulence to be effective inside the cloud. Because gravity dominates, we call this type of cloud g-type clouds. On the other hand, clouds like the California molecular cloud and the Pipe nebula have steeper power laws, and turbulence can overcome gravity if it can cascade effectively from the large scale. We call this type of cloud t-type clouds. The analytical formula can be used to determine if gravity is dominating cloud evolution when the column density PDF can be reliably determined.

  8. Focusing dynamics of high-energy density, laser-driven ion beams.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; d'Humières, E; Lefebvre, E; Romagnani, L; Toncian, T; Antici, P; Audebert, P; Brambrink, E; Cecchetti, C A; Kudyakov, T; Pipahl, A; Sentoku, Y; Borghesi, M; Willi, O; Fuchs, J

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of the focusing of laser-driven ion beams produced from concave solid targets was studied. Most of the ion beam energy is observed to converge at the center of the cylindrical targets with a spot diameter of 30  μm, which can be very beneficial for applications requiring high beam energy densities. Also, unbalanced laser irradiation does not compromise the focusability of the beam. However, significant filamentation occurs during the focusing, potentially limiting the localization of the energy deposition region by these beams at focus. These effects could impact the applicability of such high-energy density beams for applications, e.g., in proton-driven fast ignition. PMID:22400936

  9. Folding paper-based lithium-ion batteries for higher areal energy densities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qian; Song, Zeming; Ma, Teng; Smith, Bethany B; Tang, Rui; Yu, Hongyu; Jiang, Hanqing; Chan, Candace K

    2013-10-01

    Paper folding techniques are used in order to compact a Li-ion battery and increase its energy per footprint area. Full cells were prepared using Li4Ti5O12 and LiCoO2 powders deposited onto current collectors consisting of paper coated with carbon nanotubes. Folded cells showed higher areal capacities compared to the planar versions with a 5 × 5 cell folded using the Miura-ori pattern displaying a ~14× increase in areal energy density.

  10. Determination of Energy Independent Neutron Densities using Dirac Phenomenology based on the RIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. C.; Kerr, L. J.; Hama, S.; Mercer, R. L.

    2002-04-01

    A new method for extracting neutron densities from intermediate energy elastic proton-nucleus scattering observables using a global Dirac phenomenological (DP) approach based on the Relativistic Impulse Approximation (RIA) is presented. (B. C. Clark, et al.) BAPS Vol 46, No. 7 pg.139, 2001. We have considered data sets for ^40Ca, ^48Ca and ^208Pb and energies from 500 MeV to 1040 MeV. The global fits are successful in reproducing the data and in predicting data sets not included in the analysis. Using this global DP approach we have obtained energy independent neutron densities. The vector point proton density distribution, ρ^p_v, is determined from the empirical charge density after unfolding the proton form factor. The other densities, ρ^n_v, ρ^p_s, ρ^n_s, are parameterized using the cosh form given in our paper on global DP optical potentials.(E. D. Cooper, et al.) Phys Rev. 47C, pg. 297, 1993 Neutron skin thicknesses extracted using the global analysis are compared to predictions from theoretical models.

  11. Study of Au/TiO2 interface structure using Energy Density Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min; Trinkle, Dallas R.; Martin, Richard M.

    2010-03-01

    We propose a way to decompose the total energy in a material into the contribution associated with each of the atoms, using the first principles energy density formalism[1]. Although the energy density function is non-unique up to a gauge transformation, we show that unique defect energies can be found by defining volumes for each atoms using the Bader charge analysis[2]. The methods are applied to gold nanoclusters supported on rutile titanium dioxide, which are commonly used as catalysts for chemical reactions. The variation in structure and chemistry of the interface may affect catalytic acticity. In this work, we study four model interfaces; Au(111)//TiO2(110) and Au(100)//TiO2(110), with and without bridging oxygen. Calculations are performed using the projector augmented wave method implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package[3], and the energy density method computes the interfacial energies to determine the equlibrium interfacial structure. [1]Phys. Rev. B 45, 6074 (1992) [2]Comput. Mater. Sci. 36, 254 (2006) [3]Phys. Rev. B 59, 1758 (1999)

  12. Approach to kinetic energy density functionals: Nonlocal terms with the structure of the von Weizsaecker functional

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2008-02-15

    We propose a kinetic energy density functional scheme with nonlocal terms based on the von Weizsaecker functional, instead of the more traditional approach where the nonlocal terms have the structure of the Thomas-Fermi functional. The proposed functionals recover the exact kinetic energy and reproduce the linear response function of homogeneous electron systems. In order to assess their quality, we have tested the total kinetic energies as well as the kinetic energy density for atoms. The results show that these nonlocal functionals give as good results as the most sophisticated functionals in the literature. The proposed scheme for constructing the functionals means a step ahead in the field of fully nonlocal kinetic energy functionals, because they are capable of giving better local behavior than the semilocal functionals, yielding at the same time accurate results for total kinetic energies. Moreover, the functionals enjoy the possibility of being evaluated as a single integral in momentum space if an adequate reference density is defined, and then quasilinear scaling for the computational cost can be achieved.

  13. Effect of the energy density of a solid-liquid meal on gastric emptying and satiety.

    PubMed

    Carbonnel, F; Lémann, M; Rambaud, J C; Mundler, O; Jian, R

    1994-09-01

    The effect of the energy density of a meal on gastric emptying and satiety was assessed in nine volunteers. They ingested, in randomized order, a diluted (2671 kJ/L, 950 mL) and a concentrated (7452 kJ/L, 350 mL) test meal of 2500 kJ each (80% as solids). Half-emptying times of solids and liquids were not significantly different for the diluted and concentrated meal (solids: 145 +/- 18 and 156 +/- 16 min, respectively; liquids: 76 +/- 10 and 84 +/- 10 min, respectively), and consequently, pyloric outputs of energy were identical. Neither the intensity and duration of satiety, nor the amount of energy ingested, ad libitum, 6 h after the test meal, were significantly affected by energy density of the food ingested. Both the intensity and duration of satiety correlated significantly with the gastric emptying time for solids (r = 0.60 and 0.67, respectively, P < 0.01). These results show that satiety depends on gastric emptying of energy and is not affected by the energy density of food intake. PMID:8074058

  14. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  15. Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: Non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, T.; Lander, B.; Seifert, U.; Speck, T.

    2013-11-28

    We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

  16. A novel high-density power energy harvesting methodology for transmission line online monitoring devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yadong; Xie, Xiaolei; Hu, Yue; Qian, Yong; Sheng, Gehao; Jiang, Xiuchen; Liu, Yilu

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel energy-harvesting model which takes the primary current, secondary turns, dimension, the magnitude of magnetic flux density B, and the core loss resistance into consideration systematically. The relationship among the potential maximum output power, the dimension of energy harvesting coil (EHC), the load type of EHC, and the secondary turns is predicted by theoretical analysis and further verified by experiments. A high power density harvester is also developed and tested. It is shown that the power density of this novel harvester is 0.7 mW/g at 10 A, which is more than 2 times powerful than the traditional ones. Hence, it could lighten the half weight of the harvester at the same conditions.

  17. A novel high-density power energy harvesting methodology for transmission line online monitoring devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yadong; Xie, Xiaolei; Hu, Yue; Qian, Yong; Sheng, Gehao; Jiang, Xiuchen; Liu, Yilu

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel energy-harvesting model which takes the primary current, secondary turns, dimension, the magnitude of magnetic flux density B, and the core loss resistance into consideration systematically. The relationship among the potential maximum output power, the dimension of energy harvesting coil (EHC), the load type of EHC, and the secondary turns is predicted by theoretical analysis and further verified by experiments. A high power density harvester is also developed and tested. It is shown that the power density of this novel harvester is 0.7 mW/g at 10 A, which is more than 2 times powerful than the traditional ones. Hence, it could lighten the half weight of the harvester at the same conditions. PMID:27475607

  18. Energy density in small systems equal to the one in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paić, G.; Cuautle, E.

    2016-07-01

    The recent developments in the study of quark-gluon matter at high densities have shown that there are many similarities between the behavior of the observables in light and heavy systems, especially when the light systems are observed at high multiplicities. Contrary to what was previously thought, the small systems do exhibit collective effects that could indicate that small droplets of strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma are possible. The results infer that the energy densities can be computed in light systems in the same way as in heavy systems and hence, the energy density should be considered when comparing systems with different sizes. We review some of the aspects as well as the existing main models and the way to disentangle them using experimental data.

  19. Compressed Liquid Densities and Helmholtz Energy Equation of State for Fluoroethane (R161)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haiyan; Fang, Dan; Gao, Kehui; Meng, Xianyang; Wu, Jiangtao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, compressed liquid densities of Fluoroethane (R161, CAS No. 353-36-6) were measured using a high-pressure vibrating-tube densimeter over the temperature range from (283 to 363) K with pressures up to 100 MPa. A Helmholtz energy equation of state for R161 was developed from these density measurements and other experimental thermodynamic property data from the literature. The formulation is valid for temperatures from the triple point temperature of 130 K to 420 K with pressures up to 100 MPa. The approximate uncertainties of properties calculated with the new equation of state are estimated to be 0.25 % in density, 0.2 % in saturated liquid density between 230 K and 320 K, and 0.2 % in vapor pressure below 350 K. Deviations in the critical region are higher for all properties. The extrapolation behavior of the new formulation at high temperatures and high pressures is reasonable.

  20. Technological development of cylindrical and flat shaped high energy density capacitors. [using polymeric films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelik, J. A.; Parker, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Cylindrical wound metallized film capacitors rated 2 micron F 500 VDC that had an energy density greater than 0.3 J/g, and flat flexible metallized film capacitors rated at 2 micron F 500 VDC that had an energy density greater than 0.1 J/g were developed. Polysulfone, polycarbonate, and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) were investigated as dielectrics for the cylindrical units. PVF2 in 6.0 micron m thickness was employed in the final components of both types. Capacitance and dissipation factor measurements were made over the range 25 C to 100 C, and 10 Hz to 10 kHz. No pre-life-test burning was performed, and six of ten cylindrical units survived a 2500 hour AC plus DC lift test. Three of the four failures were infant mortality. All but two of the flat components survived 400 hours. Finished energy densities were 0.104 J/g at 500 V and 0.200 J/g at 700 V, the energy density being limited by the availability of thin PVF2 films.

  1. Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M.

    2012-10-20

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

  2. Energy density, nutrient adequacy and food prices in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose was to assess the relationship of food cost with: 1) energy density (ED) and 2) nutrient adequacy [naturally nutrient rich (NNR) score] for 102 foods inventoried in a sample of 225 supermarkets, small/medium grocery stores, and convenience stores in the 36-county region of the Lower Miss...

  3. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  4. A Quasi-Solid-State Sodium-Ion Capacitor with High Energy Density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faxing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chang, Zheng; Wu, Xiongwei; Liu, Xiang; Fu, Lijun; Zhu, Yusong; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Wei

    2015-11-18

    A quasi-solid-state sodium-ion capacitor is demonstrated with nanoporous disordered carbon and macroporous graphene as the negative and positive electrodes, respectively, using a sodium-ion-conducting gel polymer electrolyte. It can operate at a cell voltage as high as 4.2 V with an energy density of record high 168 W h kg(-1).

  5. A Fiber Supercapacitor with High Energy Density Based on Hollow Graphene/Conducting Polymer Fiber Electrode.

    PubMed

    Qu, Guoxing; Cheng, Jianli; Li, Xiaodong; Yuan, Demao; Chen, Peining; Chen, Xuli; Wang, Bin; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-05-01

    A hollow graphene/conducting polymer composite fiber is created with high mechanical and electronic properties and used to fabricate novel fiber-shaped supercapacitors that display high energy densities and long life stability. The fiber supercapacitors can be woven into flexible powering textiles that are particularly promising for portable and wearable electronic devices.

  6. THE FRACTAL DENSITY STRUCTURE IN SUPERSONIC ISOTHERMAL TURBULENCE: SOLENOIDAL VERSUS COMPRESSIVE ENERGY INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.; Schmidt, Wolfram E-mail: rklessen@ita.uni-heidelberg.de

    2009-02-10

    In a systematic study, we compare the density statistics in high-resolution numerical experiments of supersonic isothermal turbulence, driven by the usually adopted solenoidal (divergence-free) forcing and by compressive (curl-free) forcing. We find that for the same rms Mach number, compressive forcing produces much stronger density enhancements and larger voids compared to solenoidal forcing. Consequently, the Fourier spectra of density fluctuations are significantly steeper. This result is confirmed using the {delta}-variance analysis, which yields power-law exponents {beta} {approx} 3.4 for compressive forcing and {beta} {approx} 2.8 for solenoidal forcing. We obtain fractal dimension estimates from the density spectra and {delta}-variance scaling, and by using the box counting, mass size, and perimeter area methods applied to the volumetric data, projections, and slices of our turbulent density fields. Our results suggest that compressive forcing yields fractal dimensions significantly smaller compared to solenoidal forcing. However, the actual values depend sensitively on the adopted method, with the most reliable estimates based on the {delta}-variance, or equivalently, on Fourier spectra. Using these methods, we obtain D {approx} 2.3 for compressive and D {approx} 2.6 for solenoidal forcing, which is within the range of fractal dimension estimates inferred from observations (D {approx} 2.0-2.7). The velocity dispersion to size relations for both solenoidal and compressive forcings obtained from velocity spectra follow a power law with exponents in the range 0.4-0.5, in good agreement with previous studies.

  7. Publications of Proceedings for the RF 2005 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, Jr, N C

    2006-01-01

    The University of California, Davis hosted the High Energy Density and High Power RF 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF in Kalamata, Greece, 13-17 June, 2005. The Proceedings cost was supported by these funds from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Proceedings was published through the American Institute of Physics.

  8. Ag incorporated Mn3O4/AC nanocomposite based supercapacitor devices with high energy density and power density.

    PubMed

    Nagamuthu, S; Vijayakumar, S; Muralidharan, G

    2014-12-14

    Silver incorporated Mn3O4/amorphous carbon (AC) nanocomposites are synthesized by a green chemistry method. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the structural changes in Mn3O4/AC nanocomposites attributable to the addition of silver. Cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge and ac-impedance studies indicated that the Ag-Mn3O4/AC-5 electrode was the most suitable candidate for supercapacitor applications. From the galvanostatic charge-discharge studies, a higher specific capacitance of 981 F g(-1) at a specific current of 1 A g(-1) was obtained. An Ag-Mn3O4/AC-symmetric supercapacitor consisting of an Ag-incorporated Mn3O4/AC composite as an anode as well as a cathode, and an asymmetric supercapacitor consisting of an Ag-incorporated Mn3O4/AC composite as a cathode and an activated carbon as an anode have been fabricated. The symmetric device exhibits a specific cell capacitance of 72 F g(-1) at a specific current of 1 A g(-1) whereas the asymmetric device delivers a specific cell capacitance of 180 F g(-1) at a high current rate of 10 A g(-1). The asymmetric supercapacitor device yields a high energy density of 81 W h kg(-1). This is higher than that of lead acid batteries and comparable with that of nickel hydride batteries.

  9. Silicon-Nanowire Based Lithium Ion Batteries for Vehicles With Double the Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Ionel; Cohen, Yehonathan

    2015-03-31

    Amprius researched and developed silicon nanowire anodes. Amprius then built and delivered high-energy lithium-ion cells that met the project’s specific energy goal and exceeded the project’s energy density goal. But Amprius’ cells did not meet the project’s cycle life goal, suggesting additional manufacturing process development is required. With DOE support, Amprius developed a new anode material, silicon, and a new anode structure, nanowire. During the project, Amprius also began to develop a new multi-step manufacturing process that does not involve traditional anode production processes (e.g. mixing, drying and calendaring).

  10. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg-1, higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  11. Edge-enriched, porous carbon-based, high energy density supercapacitors for hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Jung; Yang, Cheol-Min; Park, Ki Chul; Kaneko, Katsumi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Noguchi, Minoru; Fujino, Takeshi; Oyama, Shigeki; Endo, Morinobu

    2012-03-12

    Supercapacitors can store and deliver energy by a simple charge separation, and thus they could be an attractive option to meet transient high energy density in operating fuel cells and in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. To achieve such requirements, intensive studies have been carried out to improve the volumetric capacitance in supercapacitors using various types and forms of carbons including carbon nanotubes and graphenes. However, conventional porous carbons are not suitable for use as electrode material in supercapacitors for such high energy density applications. Here, we show that edge-enriched porous carbons are the best electrode material for high energy density supercapacitors to be used in vehicles as an auxiliary powertrain. Molten potassium hydroxide penetrates well-aligned graphene layers vertically and consequently generates both suitable pores that are easily accessible to the electrolyte and a large fraction of electrochemically active edge sites. We expect that our findings will motivate further research related to energy storage devices and also environmentally friendly electric vehicles. PMID:22378623

  12. Neural network approach to quantum-chemistry data: Accurate prediction of density functional theory energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabin, Roman M.; Lomakina, Ekaterina I.

    2009-08-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) approach has been applied to estimate the density functional theory (DFT) energy with large basis set using lower-level energy values and molecular descriptors. A total of 208 different molecules were used for the ANN training, cross validation, and testing by applying BLYP, B3LYP, and BMK density functionals. Hartree-Fock results were reported for comparison. Furthermore, constitutional molecular descriptor (CD) and quantum-chemical molecular descriptor (QD) were used for building the calibration model. The neural network structure optimization, leading to four to five hidden neurons, was also carried out. The usage of several low-level energy values was found to greatly reduce the prediction error. An expected error, mean absolute deviation, for ANN approximation to DFT energies was 0.6±0.2 kcal mol-1. In addition, the comparison of the different density functionals with the basis sets and the comparison of multiple linear regression results were also provided. The CDs were found to overcome limitation of the QD. Furthermore, the effective ANN model for DFT/6-311G(3df,3pd) and DFT/6-311G(2df,2pd) energy estimation was developed, and the benchmark results were provided.

  13. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium–nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium–nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg−1, higher than that of conventional tubular sodium–nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium–nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium–nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs. PMID:26864635

  14. Edge-enriched, porous carbon-based, high energy density supercapacitors for hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Jung; Yang, Cheol-Min; Park, Ki Chul; Kaneko, Katsumi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Noguchi, Minoru; Fujino, Takeshi; Oyama, Shigeki; Endo, Morinobu

    2012-03-12

    Supercapacitors can store and deliver energy by a simple charge separation, and thus they could be an attractive option to meet transient high energy density in operating fuel cells and in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. To achieve such requirements, intensive studies have been carried out to improve the volumetric capacitance in supercapacitors using various types and forms of carbons including carbon nanotubes and graphenes. However, conventional porous carbons are not suitable for use as electrode material in supercapacitors for such high energy density applications. Here, we show that edge-enriched porous carbons are the best electrode material for high energy density supercapacitors to be used in vehicles as an auxiliary powertrain. Molten potassium hydroxide penetrates well-aligned graphene layers vertically and consequently generates both suitable pores that are easily accessible to the electrolyte and a large fraction of electrochemically active edge sites. We expect that our findings will motivate further research related to energy storage devices and also environmentally friendly electric vehicles.

  15. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density.

    PubMed

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2016-02-11

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg(-1), higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  16. Method for controlling energy density for reliable pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dowden, P. C. E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov; Bi, Z.; Jia, Q. X. E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov

    2014-02-15

    We have established a methodology to stabilize the laser energy density on a target surface in pulsed laser deposition of thin films. To control the focused laser spot on a target, we have imaged a defined aperture in the beamline (so called image-focus) instead of focusing the beam on a target based on a simple “lens-focus.” To control the laser energy density on a target, we have introduced a continuously variable attenuator between the output of the laser and the imaged aperture to manipulate the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a “constant voltage” mode to eliminate changes in the lasers’ beam dimensions. This methodology leads to much better controllability/reproducibility for reliable pulsed laser deposition of high performance electronic thin films.

  17. The Dawn of a New Era for High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E; McCrory, R; Meyerhofer, D; Keane, C

    2009-02-26

    The field of High Energy Density (HED) physics is on the verge of a revolutionary event - the achievement of fusion ignition in the laboratory. New laser facilities, the OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) laser at the University of Rochester and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, greatly extend the range of high energy density (HED) plasma conditions (including ignition) accessible in the laboratory. These conditions are among the most extreme obtainable, with pressures in excess of {approx}1,000,000 atmospheres. Experiments at these facilities will elucidate fundamental new science in astrophysics, materials science, laser-matter interactions, and other areas. The demonstration of fusion ignition will be the culmination of decades of research, and for the first time, will open the burning plasma regime to laboratory exploration. Ignition will spur the development of advanced options for clean, environmentally sustainable energy.

  18. A priori classical density functionals of water: toward first principles exploration of aqueous based energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Letchworth Weaver, Kendra; Arias, Tomas

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel description of water which will allow the first a priori studies of catalysis of biofuels in aqueous electrochemical environments. Our method offers a computationally efficient alternative to the thermal sampling required by molecular dynamics yet provides a more realistic description of bulk water than including explicit frozen water or traditional continuum solvation models. Into Joint Density Functional Theory (JDFT), which joins an electron density-functional for the solute with classical density-functional theories for liquid water into a single variational principle for the free energy of the combined system, we introduce the innovation of an a priori form of the coupling functional between the quantum-mechanical system and liquid water based on a local density approximation to the Hohenberg-Kohn density-only functional. Without any fits to solvation data whatsoever, this new method predicts solvation energies of small organic molecules well compared to state-of-the art empirical quantum-chemical cavity approaches. The site interaction potentials produced closely resemble the widely used TIP3P site potentials for water without requiring any empirical parameters. R. Sundararaman et al, unpublished, to be presented at the APS March Meeting (2011)

  19. Microporous organic polymer-based lithium ion batteries with improved rate performance and energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chong; Yang, Xiao; Ren, Wenfeng; Wang, Yanhong; Su, Fabing; Jiang, Jia-Xing

    2016-06-01

    Microporous organic polymers with triphenylamine segments were employed as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. YPTPA with the highest surface area exhibits a discharge plateau at ∼3.6 V vs. Li/Li+, an initial Coulombic efficiency of 96.8% at 50 mA g-1 and a discharge capacity of 105.7 mAh g-1 at 200 mA g-1. Compared to the homo-coupled polymer of OPTPA with relatively low surface area (66 m2 g-1), SPTPA and YPTPA with higher surface area (544 and 1557 m2 g-1, respectively) show enhanced rate performances and energy densities. YPTPA can deliver 97.6 mAh g-1 within less than 3 min at high rate of 2000 mA g-1 and the energy density of 334 Wh kg-1 under an ultrahigh power density of 6816 W kg-1, while OPTPA only presents 48.2 mAh g-1 at 2000 mA g-1 with an energy density of 155 Wh kg-1 under 6414 W kg-1. The great improvement in electrochemical properties of SPTPA and YPTPA demonstrates that increasing surface area of polymer cathodes by interweaving the redox-active units into microporous polymer skeleton is an efficient way to develop advanced polymer cathode materials with outstanding electrochemical performance.

  20. SCAN: An Efficient Density Functional Yielding Accurate Structures and Energies of Diversely-Bonded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei

    The accuracy and computational efficiency of the widely used Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) are limited by the approximation to its exchange-correlation energy Exc. The earliest local density approximation (LDA) overestimates the strengths of all bonds near equilibrium (even the vdW bonds). By adding the electron density gradient to model Exc, generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) generally soften the bonds to give robust and overall more accurate descriptions, except for the vdW interaction which is largely lost. Further improvement for covalent, ionic, and hydrogen bonds can be obtained by the computationally more expensive hybrid GGAs, which mix GGAs with the nonlocal exact exchange. Meta-GGAs are still semilocal in computation and thus efficient. Compared to GGAs, they add the kinetic energy density that enables them to recognize and accordingly treat different bonds, which no LDA or GGA can. We show here that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-GGA improves significantly over LDA and the standard Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA for geometries and energies of diversely-bonded materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen, and vdW bonds) at comparable efficiency. Often SCAN matches or improves upon the accuracy of a hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. This work has been supported by NSF under DMR-1305135 and CNS-09-58854, and by DOE BES EFRC CCDM under DE-SC0012575.

  1. Investigation of efficient shock acceleration of ions using high energy lasers in low density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antici, P.; Gauthier, M.; D'Humieres, E.; Albertazzi, B.; Beaucourt, C.; Böker, J.; Chen, S.; Dervieux, V.; Feugeas, J. L.; Glesser, M.; Levy, A.; Nicolai, P.; Romagnani, L.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Pepin, H.; Fuchs, J.

    2012-10-01

    Intense research is being conducted on sources of laser-accelerated ions and their applications that have the potential of becoming novel particle sources. In most experiments, a high intensity and short laser pulse interacts with a solid density target. It was recently shown that a promising way to accelerate ions to higher energies and in a collimated beam is to use under-dense or near-critical density targets instead of solid ones. In these conditions, simulations have revealed that protons are predicted to be accelerated by a collisionless shock mechanism that significantly increases their energy. We present recent experiments performed on the 100 TW LULI laser (France) and the TITAN facility at LLNL, USA. The near critical density plasma was prepared by exploding thin solid foils by a long laser pulse. The plasma density profile was controlled by varying the target thickness and the delay between the long and the short laser pulse. When exploding the target, we obtained proton energies that are comparable if not higher than what was obtained under similar laser conditions, but with solid targets which make them a promising candidate for an efficient proton source.

  2. A coarse-grain force field for RDX: Density dependent and energy conserving.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joshua D; Barnes, Brian C; Izvekov, Sergei; Lísal, Martin; Sellers, Michael S; Taylor, DeCarlos E; Brennan, John K

    2016-03-14

    We describe the development of a density-dependent transferable coarse-grain model of crystalline hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) that can be used with the energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics method. The model is an extension of a recently reported one-site model of RDX that was developed by using a force-matching method. The density-dependent forces in that original model are provided through an interpolation scheme that poorly conserves energy. The development of the new model presented in this work first involved a multi-objective procedure to improve the structural and thermodynamic properties of the previous model, followed by the inclusion of the density dependency via a conservative form of the force field that conserves energy. The new model accurately predicts the density, structure, pressure-volume isotherm, bulk modulus, and elastic constants of the RDX crystal at ambient pressure and exhibits transferability to a liquid phase at melt conditions. PMID:26979691

  3. Level Density of COBALT-57 in the Energy Region 1 Mev to 14 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vivek

    The level density of ^{57 }Co is studied in the energy region of 1-14 MeV using three experimental techniques. Levels are counted in the resolved region, evaporation spectra are measured in the resolved to continuum region, and the coherence width is measured in the region of level overlap. Use of Hauser-Feshbach fits to the evaporation cross sections requires level densities of the residual nucleus. A two -parameter based Fermi gas form is used for the calculation of level density as a function of the nuclear excitation energy. This procedure enables level density calculation beyond the energy region in which the two fixed parameters provide the best fits to the data. A comparison is made between the level density obtained from the above described methods and the predictions of the microscopic model in an energy range of 1-20 MeV. This model utilizes a BCS pairing Hamiltonian and specific sets of single particle states and calculates numerical values of the level density. Comparisons are also made with level density of ^{57 }Co obtained in various other studies. Both the resolved level studies and the fits to the evaporation spectra were conducted using the ^{56}Fe(d,n)^{57 }Co and ^{57}Fe(p,n) ^{57}Co reactions. Standard neutron time-of-flight techniques including pulse shape discrimination for elimination of gamma -rays were employed. An energy resolution as good as 6 keV at 1-1.5 MeV neutron energy was obtained for high resolution measurements. For Ericson fluctuation measurements, the excitation functions corresponding to the ground state and the first two excited states of the residual nucleus in the ^{56}Fe(p,n) ^{56}Co reaction were obtained for lab angles between 0^circ and 150^circ. The ^{56}Fe(d,n) ^{57}Co reaction proves to be very selective in populating resolved states and includes substantial contributions from mechanisms other than the compound nuclear. The ^{57 }Fe(p,n)^{57}Co reaction populated 14 previously unknown levels. The fits to the

  4. Strongly Interacting Matter Matter at Very High Energy Density: 3 Lectures in Zakopane

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2010-06-09

    These lectures concern the properties of strongly interacting matter at very high energy density. I begin with the Color Glass Condensate and the Glasma, matter that controls the earliest times in hadronic collisions. I then describe the Quark Gluon Plasma, matter produced from the thermalized remnants of the Glasma. Finally, I describe high density baryonic matter, in particular Quarkyonic matter. The discussion will be intuitive and based on simple structural aspects of QCD. There will be some discussion of experimental tests of these ideas.

  5. Magnetic Density of States at Low Energy in Geometrically Frustrated Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaouanc, A.; de Réotier, P. Dalmas; Glazkov, V.; Marin, C.; Bonville, P.; Hodges, J. A.; Gubbens, P. C.; Sakarya, S.; Baines, C.

    2005-07-01

    Using muon-spin-relaxation measurements we show that the pyrochlore compound Gd2Ti2O7, in its magnetically ordered phase below ˜1 K, displays persistent spin dynamics down to temperatures as low as 20 mK. The characteristics of the induced muon relaxation can be accounted for by a scattering process involving two magnetic excitations, with a density of states characterized by an upturn at low energy and a small gap depending linearly on the temperature. We propose that such a density of states is a generic feature of geometrically frustrated magnetic materials.

  6. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a 'pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers 'filling' and amino-functionalized graphene 'crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm(-2)) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g(-1) (4.7 mAh cm(-2)) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm(-2)) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm(-2) by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm(-2). PMID:26608228

  7. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-11-26

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a 'pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers 'filling' and amino-functionalized graphene 'crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm(-2)) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g(-1) (4.7 mAh cm(-2)) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm(-2)) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm(-2) by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm(-2).

  8. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-07-11

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 Ah · g(-1) at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems.

  9. Fermi energy control of vacancy coalescence and dislocation density in melt-grown GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.; Lin, D. G.; Aoyama, T.

    1984-01-01

    A striking effect of the Fermi energy on the dislocation density in melt-grown GaAs has been discovered. Thus, a shift of the Fermi energy from 0.1 eV above to 0.2 eV below its intrinsic value (at high temperature, i.e., near 1100 K) increases the dislocation density by as much as five orders of magnitude. The Fermi energy shift was brought about by n-type and p-type doping at a level of about 10 to the 17th per cu cm (under conditions of optimum partial pressure of As, i.e., under optimum melt stoichiometry). This effect must be associated with the fact that the Fermi energy controls the charge state of vacancies (i.e., the occupancy of the associated electronic states) which in turn must control their tendency to coalesce and thus the dislocation density. It appears most likely that gallium vacancies are the critical species.

  10. Enhanced von Weizsäcker Wang-Govind-Carter kinetic energy density functional for semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Ilgyou; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a new form of orbital-free (OF) kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) for semiconductors that is based on the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC99) nonlocal KEDF. We enhance within the latter the semi-local von Weizsäcker KEDF term, which is exact for a single orbital. The enhancement factor we introduce is related to the extent to which the electron density is localized. The accuracy of the new KEDF is benchmarked against Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) by comparing predicted energy differences between phases, equilibrium volumes, and bulk moduli for various semiconductors, along with metal-insulator phase transition pressures. We also compare point defect and (100) surface energies in silicon for a broad test of its applicability. This new KEDF accurately reproduces the exact non-interacting kinetic energy of KSDFT with only one additional adjustable parameter beyond the three parameters in the WGC99 KEDF; it exhibits good transferability between semiconducting to metallic silicon phases and between various III-V semiconductors without parameter adjustment. Overall, this KEDF is more accurate than previously proposed OF KEDFs (e.g., the Huang-Carter (HC) KEDF) for semiconductors, while the computational efficiency remains at the level of the WGC99 KEDF (several hundred times faster than the HC KEDF). This accurate, fast, and transferable new KEDF holds considerable promise for large-scale OFDFT simulations of metallic through semiconducting materials.

  11. Structured block copolymer thin film composites for ultra-high energy density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Saumil; Hailu, Shimelis; Grabowski, Christopher; Durstock, Michael; Raghavan, Dharmaraj; Karim, Alamgir

    2014-03-01

    Development of high energy density capacitors is essential for future applications like hybrid vehicles and directed energy weaponry. Fundamentally, energy density is governed by product of dielectric permittivity ɛ and breakdown strength Vbd. Hence, improvements in energy density are greatly reliant on improving either ɛ or Vbd or a combination of both. Polymer films are widely used in capacitors due to high Vbd and low loss but they suffer from very low permittivities. Composite dielectrics offer a unique opportunity to combine the high ɛ of inorganic fillers with the high Vbd of a polymer matrix. For enhancement of dielectric properties, it is essential to improve matrix-filler interaction and control the spatial distribution of fillers for which nanostructured block copolymers BCP act as ideal templates. We use Directed Self-assembly of block copolymers to rapidly fabricate highly aligned BCP-TiO2 composite nanostructures in thin films under dynamic thermal gradient field to synergistically combine the high ɛ of functionalized TiO2 and high Vbd of BCP matrix. The results of impact of BCP morphology, processing conditions and concentration of TiO2 on capacitor performance will be reported. U.S. Air Force of Scientific Research under contract FA9550-12-1-0306

  12. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium–sulfur batteries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium–sulfur (Li–S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a ‘pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers ‘filling' and amino-functionalized graphene ‘crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm−2) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g−1 (4.7 mAh cm−2) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm−2) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm−2 by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm−2. PMID:26608228

  13. Impact of the Pedestal Plasma Density on ELM Dynamics and Energy Loss Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.; BOUT++ Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The latest BOUT + + studies show an emerging understanding of ELM dynamics and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELM energy losses with ITPA multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT + + simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELM energy losses vs collisionality via a density scan, while keeping the plasma cross-sectional shape, total stored energy, total plasma current, pressure profiles fixed. The neoclassical collisionality at peak gradient position increases by a factor of 3262 from 0.0019 to 6.197. The critical trend of linear simulations emerges as a transition from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collsionality with decreasing density. Nonlinear BOUT + + simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward turbulence spreading as void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELM energy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. This work was performed for USDOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL LDRD project 12-ERD-022 and the China Natural Science Foundation under Contract No. 10721505. LLNL-ABS-656793.

  14. Self-suspended vibration-driven energy harvesting chip for power density maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Gonzalo; Agustí, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    This work introduces a new concept to integrate energy-harvesting devices with the aim of improving their throughput, mainly in terms of scavenged energy density and frequency tunability. This concept, named energy harvester in package (EHiP), is focused on the heterogeneous integration of a MEMS die, dedicated to scavenging energy, with an auxiliary chip, which can include the control and power management circuitry, sensors and RF transmission capabilities. The main advantages are that the whole die can be used as an inertial mass and the chip area usage is optimized. Based on this concept, in this paper we describe the development and characterization of a MEMS die fully dedicated to harvesting mechanical energy from ambient vibrations through an electrostatic transduction. A test PCB has been fabricated to perform the assembly that allows measurement of the resonance motion of the whole system at 289 Hz. An estimated maximum generated power of around 11 μW has been obtained for an input vibration acceleration of ˜10 m s-2 when the energy harvester operates in a constant-charge cycle for the best-case scenario. Therefore, a maximum scavenged power density of 0.85 mW cm-3 is theoretically expected for the assembled system. These results demonstrate that the generated power density of any vibration-based energy harvester can be significantly increased by applying the EHiP concept, which could become an industrial standard for manufacturing this kind of system, independently of the transduction type, fabrication technology or application.

  15. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance based algorithms to estimate actual evapotranspiration over the western and southern regions of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Shereif H.; Alazba, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In countries with absolute water scarcity such as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), large-scale actual evapotranspiration estimation is of great concern in water use practices. Herein, spatial and temporal distribution of actual evapotranspiration (AET) in the western and southern regions of KSA during 1992-2014 was estimated using the SEBAL model with field observations. Zonal statistics for each land use-cover type were also identified, in order to understand their effects on water consumption. In addition, daily and seasonal water consumption for major crops was computed. Results revealed a gradual increase in monthly AET values from January to April and subsequent decline from May to December. The maximum monthly AET values were observed for irrigated cropland in southwestern, central, and southeastern regions of Asir Province, central and southwestern regions of Al-Baha Province, central and the plains region of Jazan Province, southern portion of Makkah Province, and limited areas in the northern regions of Madinah Province. The annual AET ranged from 418.8 to 3442.3 mm yr-1. The normal distribution of mean annual AET values ranged from 717 to 1020 mm yr-1. Forty-two percent of the study area had an annual AET that ranged from 717 to 1020 mm yr-1. The second highest range of frequencies was concentrated around 1020-1322 mm yr-1, representing the majority of agricultural land. The consumptive water use of the different land cover types in study area indicated that irrigated cropland which occupied 14.6% of the study area had AET rates much higher than other land uses. Water bodies are the next highest, with forest and shrubland and sparse vegetation slightly lower, and very low AET rates from bare soil. Daily and seasonal water consumption of major cropping systems varied spatially depending on cropping practices and climatic conditions.

  16. SU-D-204-01: Dual-Energy Calibration for Breast Density Measurement Using Spectral Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, H; Cho, H; Kumar, N; Sennung, D; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of minimizing the systematic errors in dual-energy breast density quantification induced by the use of tissue-equivalent plastic phantoms as the calibration basis materials. Methods: Dual-energy calibration using tissue-equivalent plastic phantoms was performed on a spectral mammography system based on scanning multi-slit Si strip photon-counting detectors. The plastic phantom calibration used plastic water and adipose-equivalent phantoms as the basis materials, which have different x-ray attenuation properties compared to water and lipid in actual breast tissue. Two methods were used to convert the dual-energy decomposition measurements in plastic phantom thicknesses into true water and lipid basis. The first method was based entirely on the theoretical x-ray attenuation coefficients of the investigated materials in the mammographic energy range. The conversion matrix was determined from least-squares fitting of the target material using the reported attenuation coefficients of water and lipid. The second method was developed based on experimental calibrations, which measured the low-and high-energy signals of pure water and lipid of known thicknesses. A non-linear rational function was used to correlate the decomposed thicknesses to the known values, so that the conversion coefficients can be determined. Both methods were validated using independent measurements of water and lipid mixture phantoms. The correlation of the dual-energy decomposition measurements and the known values were studied with linear regression analysis. Results: There was an excellent linear correlation between the converted water thicknesses and the known values. The slopes of the linear fits were determined to be 0.63 and 1.03 for the simulation and experimental results, respectively. The non-linear fitting in the experimental approach reduced the root-mean-square (RMS) errors from approximately 3.4 mm to 1.5 mm. Conclusion: The results suggested

  17. Kohn-Sham kinetic energy density in the nuclear and asymptotic regions: Deviations from the von Weizsäcker behavior and applications to density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Sala, Fabio; Fabiano, Eduardo; Constantin, Lucian A.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the Kohn-Sham positive-definite kinetic energy (KE) density significantly differs from the von Weizsäcker (VW) one at the nuclear cusp as well as in the asymptotic region. At the nuclear cusp, the VW functional is shown to be linear, and the contribution of p -type orbitals to the KE density is theoretically derived and numerically demonstrated in the limit of infinite nuclear charge as well in the semiclassical limit of neutral large atoms. In the latter case, it reaches 12% of the KE density. In the asymptotic region we find new exact constraints for meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) exchange functionals: with an exchange enhancement factor proportional to √{α }, where α is the common meta-GGA ingredient, both the exchange energy density and the potential are proportional to the exact ones. In addition, this describes exactly the large-gradient limit of quasi-two-dimensional systems.

  18. Screened exchange hybrid density functional for accurate and efficient structures and interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Caldeweyher, Eike; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-06-21

    We extend the recently introduced PBEh-3c global hybrid density functional [S. Grimme et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2015, 143, 054107] by a screened Fock exchange variant based on the Henderson-Janesko-Scuseria exchange hole model. While the excellent performance of the global hybrid is maintained for small covalently bound molecules, its performance for computed condensed phase mass densities is further improved. Most importantly, a speed up of 30 to 50% can be achieved and especially for small orbital energy gap cases, the method is numerically much more robust. The latter point is important for many applications, e.g., for metal-organic frameworks, organic semiconductors, or protein structures. This enables an accurate density functional based electronic structure calculation of a full DNA helix structure on a single core desktop computer which is presented as an example in addition to comprehensive benchmark results. PMID:27240749

  19. Nuclear level density of even-even nuclei with temperature-dependent pairing energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, V.; Alavi, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of using a temperature-dependent pairing term on the back-shifted Fermi gas (BSFG) model of nuclear level density of some even-even nuclei has been investigated. We have chosen an approach to determine the adjustable parameters from theoretical calculations, directly. The exact Ginzburg-Landau (EGL) theory was used to determine the temperature-dependent pairing energy as back-shifted parameter of the BSFG model. The level density parameter of the BSFG model has been determined through the Thomas-Fermi approximation. The level densities of 96Mo, 106,112Cd, 106,108Pd, 164Dy, 232Th, 238U and heat capacities of 96Mo and 164Dy nuclei were calculated. Good agreement between theory and experiment was observed.

  20. Pulsed-Power-Driven High Energy Density Physics and Inertial Confinement Fusion Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, M. Keith

    2004-11-01

    There continues to be dramatic progress in applying pulsed-power drivers to research in High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories delivers 20-MA load currents to create high magnetic fields (> 1000 T) and pressures (Mbar to Gbar). In a z-pinch configuration, the magnetic pressure (Lorentz Force) supersonically implodes a plasma created from a cylindrical wire array, which at stagnation generates a plasma with energy densities of 10 MJ/cm^3 and temperatures exceeding 1 keV at 0.1% of solid density. These HED plasmas produce x-ray energies approaching 2 MJ at powers greater than 200 TW for ICF, radiation hydrodynamics, radiation-material interactions, Inertial Fusion Energy, astrophysics, and opacity experiments. In an alternate configuration, the large magnetic pressure is used to directly drive Isentropic Compression Experiments (ICE) to pressures greater than 3 Mbar and accelerate flyer plates to 27 km/s for equation of state (EOS) experiments at pressures up to 10 Mbar in Al. The challenge to model these complex geometric configurations over multiple orders of magnitude in spatial scale, temperatures, densities, and radiation fluxes is daunting. Nevertheless, development of multi-dimensional radiation-MHD codes (e.g. ALEGRA) coupled with more accurate material models (e.g. quantum molecular dynamics calculations within density functional theory) has resulted in a productive synergy between validating the simulations and guiding the experiments. The Z facility is now routinely used to drive ICF capsules (focusing on implosion symmetry and neutron production) and several different HEDP experiments (including radiation-driven hydrodynamic jets; material EOS, phase transitions, and strength; and the detailed behavior of z-pinch wire array initiation and implosion). This research is performed in collaboration with many other groups from around the world. A $60M, five-year project to enhance

  1. Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-09

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

  2. High energy and power density asymmetric supercapacitors using electrospun cobalt oxide nanowire anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyadharan, Baiju; Aziz, Radhiyah Abd; Misnon, Izan Izwan; Anil Kumar, Gopinathan M.; Ismail, Jamil; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan

    2014-12-01

    Electrochemical materials are under rigorous search for building advanced energy storage devices. Herein, supercapacitive properties of highly crystalline and ultrathin cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires (diameter ∼30-60 nm) synthesized using an aqueous polymeric solution based electrospinning process are reported. These nanowire electrodes show a specific capacitance (CS) of ∼1110 F g-1 in 6 M KOH at a current density of 1 A g-1 with coulombic efficiency ∼100%. Asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) (CS ∼175 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 galvanostatic cycling) are fabricated using the Co3O4 as anode and commercial activated carbon (AC) as cathode and compared their performance with symmetric electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) fabricated using AC (CS ∼31 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 galvanostatic cycling). The Co3O4//AC ASCs deliver specific energy densities (ES) of 47.6, 35.4, 20 and 8 Wh kg-1 at specific power densities (PS) 1392, 3500, 7000 and 7400 W kg-1, respectively. The performance of ASCs is much superior to the control EDLCs, which deliver ES of 9.2, 8.9, 8.4 and 6.8 Wh kg-1 at PS 358, 695, 1400 and 3500 W kg-1, respectively. The ASCs show nearly six times higher energy density (∼47.6 Wh kg-1) than EDLC (8.4 Wh kg-1) without compromising its power density (∼1400 W kg-1) at similar galvanostatic cycling conditions (2 A g-1).

  3. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  4. Multispecies Density and Temperature Gradient Dependence of Quasilinear Particle and Energy Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; R.V. Budny; W.M. Tang

    2004-08-09

    The variations of the normalized quasilinear particle and energy fluxes with artificial changes in the density and temperature gradients, as well as the variations of the linear growth rates and real frequencies, for ion temperature gradient and trapped-electron modes, are calculated. The quasilinear fluxes are normalized to the total energy flux, summed over all species. Here, realistic cases for tokamaks and spherical torii are considered which have two impurity species. For situations where there are substantial changes in the normalized fluxes, the ''diffusive approximation,'' in which the normalized fluxes are taken to be linear in the gradients, is seen to be inaccurate. Even in the case of small artificial changes in density or temperature gradients, changes in the fluxes of different species (''off-diagonal'') generally are significant, or even dominant, compared to those for the same species (''diagonal'').

  5. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modelingmore » of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.« less

  6. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.

  7. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y

    2013-08-21

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.

  8. Large laser sparks for laboratory simulation of high-energy-density events in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babankova, Dagmar; Juha, Libor; Civias, Svatopluk; Bittner, Michal; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Ryc, Leszek; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jiri; Ullschmied, Jiri

    2005-09-01

    Single ≤1 kJ pulses from a high-power laser are focused into molecular gases to create large laser sparks. This provides a unique way to mimic the chemical effects of high-energy-density events in planetary atmospheres (cometary impact, lightning) matching the natural energy-density, its spatio-temporal evolution and plasma-volume scaling of such events in a fully-controlled laboratory environment. Some chemical reactions initiated by laser-induced dielectric breakdown (LIDB) in both pure molecular gases and mixtures related to the chemical evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere were studied. Most of the experiments were carried out in a static gas cell. However, an initial series of experiments was also performed with a gas-puff target placed within a vacuum interaction chamber. Under these dynamic conditions the hot core of a laser spark can be directly investigated.

  9. Testing the Tube Super-Dielectric Material Hypothesis: Increased Energy Density Using NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandy, Jonathan; Cortes, Francisco Javier Quintero; Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The focus of the present work is the evaluation of the low-frequency dielectric performance of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays, created by anodization, filled with aqueous NaCl solutions. At low frequency (ca. <10-2 Hz), capacitors made up of this so-called tube super-dielectric material were found to have extreme dielectric constants, greater than 1 billion. The same capacitors also registered unprecedented energy densities, nearly 400 J/cm3, better than that observed (<250 J/cm3) for the same type of anodized titania filled with an aqueous solution of NaNO3, and about an order of magnitude better than commercial supercapacitors. Sufficient data were collected to propose a correlation relating dielectric thickness and salt concentration to overall energy density.

  10. Mixed metal oxides as alternate cathodes for high energy density electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Silver (II) oxide is currently the Navy`s cathode of choice in high energy density, high rate batteries for torpedo and mobile target applications, for medium rate applications such as Seal Delivery Vehicles, and may be useful for low rate, long endurance UUV missions. While it is certainly a versatile material, silver (II) oxide is expensive to produce and has a lower faradaic (storage) capacity than desired. New research being conducted at the NUWC electric propulsion laboratory is focused toward developing new, lower cost cathode materials with energy densities at least comparable to silver (II) oxide. Mixed metal oxides, with silver (II) oxide as one component, are under investigation. Other materials, without a silver component, are also being considered. This poster will illustrate recent developments in the modification of the silver (II) oxide cathode for Navy applications.

  11. Energy density dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, T.; Ezumi, N.; Sawada, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    The recovery of tritium in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue for safety. So far, the oxidation procedure using an atmospheric pressure plasma is expected to be part of the recovery method. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen oxidation by plasma chemistry, we have investigated the dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency on gas flow rate and input power in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma. It has been found that the combustion efficiency depends on energy density of absorbed microwave power. Hence, the energy density is considered as a key parameter for combustion processes. Also neutral gas temperatures inside and outside the plasma were measured by an optical emission spectroscopy method and thermocouple. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature in the plasma is much higher than the outside temperature of plasma. The high neutral gas temperature may affect the combustion reaction. (authors)

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on viscosity reduction of cereal porridges for improving energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Oh, Sang-Hee; Byun, Eui-Hong; Yook, Hong-Sun; Kim, Mee-Ree; Kim, Kwan-Soo; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2008-03-01

    Cereal porridges have low energy and nutrient density because of its viscosity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on the reduction of viscosity and on the increasing solid content of cereal porridge. Four cereals, wheat, rice, maize (the normal starchy type) and waxy rice, were used in this study. The porridge with 3000 cP was individually prepared from cereal flour, gamma-irradiated at 20 kGy and tested. Gamma irradiation of 20 kGy was allowed that the high viscous and rigid cereal porridges turned into semi-liquid consistencies. The solid contents of all porridges could increase by irradiation, compared with non-irradiated ones. No significant differences of starch digestibility were observed in all cereal porridge samples. The results indicated that gamma irradiation might be helpful for improving energy density of cereal porridge with acceptable consistency.

  13. Orbital relaxation effects on Kohn–Sham frontier orbital energies in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, DaDi; Zheng, Xiao; Li, Chen; Yang, Weitao

    2015-04-21

    We explore effects of orbital relaxation on Kohn–Sham frontier orbital energies in density functional theory by using a nonempirical scaling correction approach developed in Zheng et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 174105 (2013)]. Relaxation of Kohn–Sham orbitals upon addition/removal of a fractional number of electrons to/from a finite system is determined by a systematic perturbative treatment. The information of orbital relaxation is then used to improve the accuracy of predicted Kohn–Sham frontier orbital energies by Hartree–Fock, local density approximation, and generalized gradient approximation methods. The results clearly highlight the significance of capturing the orbital relaxation effects. Moreover, the proposed scaling correction approach provides a useful way of computing derivative gaps and Fukui quantities of N-electron finite systems (N is an integer), without the need to perform self-consistent-field calculations for (N ± 1)-electron systems.

  14. Orbital relaxation effects on Kohn-Sham frontier orbital energies in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, DaDi; Zheng, Xiao; Li, Chen; Yang, Weitao

    2015-04-01

    We explore effects of orbital relaxation on Kohn-Sham frontier orbital energies in density functional theory by using a nonempirical scaling correction approach developed in Zheng et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 174105 (2013)]. Relaxation of Kohn-Sham orbitals upon addition/removal of a fractional number of electrons to/from a finite system is determined by a systematic perturbative treatment. The information of orbital relaxation is then used to improve the accuracy of predicted Kohn-Sham frontier orbital energies by Hartree-Fock, local density approximation, and generalized gradient approximation methods. The results clearly highlight the significance of capturing the orbital relaxation effects. Moreover, the proposed scaling correction approach provides a useful way of computing derivative gaps and Fukui quantities of N-electron finite systems (N is an integer), without the need to perform self-consistent-field calculations for (N ± 1)-electron systems.

  15. A novel strain energy density algorithm for laser-induced micro-hollows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, Serap

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical adaptation and stability of implants are dependent on strain energy density algorithms of their surfaces. These applications are in their early stage, but theoretical predictions show us that we can manufacture very strong, flexible biomaterial surface which has a shock absorbing ability. Laser micro-machining is a clean tool for biomedical industry. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a laser micro-machining method for imitating lotus effect on commercially pure titanium specimen surfaces and to develop a novel strain energy density algorithm. Novel 3D nelumbo leafs were prepared using a fiber laser (λ=1060 nm) with 200-250 ns pulse durations and optimum operation parameters were suggested.

  16. Testing the Tube Super-Dielectric Material Hypothesis: Increased Energy Density Using NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandy, Jonathan; Cortes, Francisco Javier Quintero; Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The focus of the present work is the evaluation of the low-frequency dielectric performance of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays, created by anodization, filled with aqueous NaCl solutions. At low frequency (ca. <10-2 Hz), capacitors made up of this so-called tube super-dielectric material were found to have extreme dielectric constants, greater than 1 billion. The same capacitors also registered unprecedented energy densities, nearly 400 J/cm3, better than that observed (<250 J/cm3) for the same type of anodized titania filled with an aqueous solution of NaNO3, and about an order of magnitude better than commercial supercapacitors. Sufficient data were collected to propose a correlation relating dielectric thickness and salt concentration to overall energy density.

  17. Improved parameterization of interatomic potentials for rare gas dimers with density-based energy decomposition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nengjie; Lu, Zhenyu; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Yingkai

    2014-06-01

    We examine interatomic interactions for rare gas dimers using the density-based energy decomposition analysis (DEDA) in conjunction with computational results from CCSD(T) at the complete basis set (CBS) limit. The unique DEDA capability of separating frozen density interactions from density relaxation contributions is employed to yield clean interaction components, and the results are found to be consistent with the typical physical picture that density relaxations play a very minimal role in rare gas interactions. Equipped with each interaction component as reference, we develop a new three-term molecular mechanical force field to describe rare gas dimers: a smeared charge multipole model for electrostatics with charge penetration effects, a B3LYP-D3 dispersion term for asymptotically correct long-range attractions that is screened at short-range, and a Born-Mayer exponential function for the repulsion. The resulted force field not only reproduces rare gas interaction energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS level, but also yields each interaction component (electrostatic or van der Waals) which agrees very well with its corresponding reference value.

  18. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Sonnad, K.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; Krasnykh, A.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-10

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  19. Activated Microporous Carbon Derived from Almond Shells for High Energy Density Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun; Yang, Shaoran; Cai, Junjie; Zhang, Qiaobao; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Kaili

    2016-06-22

    Via the activation treatment of carbonized almond shells with HNO3 and KOH, activated microporous carbon (AMC-3 and AMC-2) was successfully synthesized. These two AMC electrodes demonstrate remarkable electrochemical behaviors such as high rate capability, high specific capacitance, and excellent cycle stability when serving as electrodes for supercapacitors. More importantly, through the use of a Zn-Ni-Co ternary oxide (ZNCO) positive electrode and the AMC negative electrode, asymmetric supercapacitors (ASC) were assembled that deliver superior energy density (53.3 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 1126.1 W kg(-1) for ASC-2 and 53.6 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 1124.5 W kg(-1) for ASC-3) and excellent stability (82.7% and 83.4% specific capacitance retention for ZNCO//AMC ASC-2 and ZNCO//AMC ASC-3, respectively, after 5000 cycles). Through these two methods, low-cost, renewable, and environmentally friendly electrode materials can be provided for high energy density supercapacitors. PMID:27253880

  20. Strongly Driven Magnetic Reconnection in a Magnetized High-Energy-Density Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, G.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P.-Y.; Haberberger, D.; Hu, S. X.; Ivancic, S.; Nilson, P. M.; Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection in a magnetized high-energy-density plasma is characterized by measuring the dynamics of the plasma density and magnetic field between two counter-propagating and colliding plasma flows. The density and magnetic field were profiled using the 4 ω angular filter refractometry and fast proton deflectometry diagnostics, respectively. The plasma flows are created by irradiating oppositely placed plastic targets with 1.8-kJ, 2-ns laser beams on the OMEGA EP Laser System. The two plumes are magnetized by an externally controlled magnetic field with an x-type null point geometry with B = 0 at the midplane and B = 8 T at the targets. The interaction region is pre-filled with a low-density background plasma. The counterflowing super-Alfvénic plasma plumes sweep up and compress the magnetic field and the background plasma into a pair of magnetized ribbons, which collide, stagnate, and reconnect at the midplane, allowing for the first detailed observation of a stretched current sheet in laser-driven reconnection experiments. The measurements are in good agreement with first-principles particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and NLUF Grant DE-SC0008655.

  1. Neutron-proton effective mass splitting in terms of symmetry energy and its density slope

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, S.

    2015-01-15

    Using a simple density-dependent finite-range effective interaction having Yukawa form, the density dependence of isoscalar and isovector effective masses is studied. The isovector effective mass is found to be different for different pairs of like and unlike nucleons. Using HVH theorem, the neutron-proton effective mass splitting is represented in terms of symmetry energy and its density slope. It is again observed that the neutron-proton effective mass splitting has got a positive value when isoscalar effective mass is greater than the isovector effective mass and has a negative value for the opposite case. Furthermore, the neutron-proton effective mass splitting is found to have a linear dependence on asymmetry β. The second-order symmetry potential has a vital role in the determination of density slope of symmetry energy but it does not have any contribution on neutron-proton effective mass splitting. The finite-range effective interaction is compared with the SLy2, SKM, f{sub −}, f{sub 0}, and f{sub +} forms of interactions.

  2. Design and simulation of high-energy-density shear experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Devolder, B.; di Stefano, C.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Merritt, E. C.; Perry, T. S.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Zhou, Y. K.

    2015-11-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid density, 20 micron thick Al plate, variations of the experiment have been performed and are studied. These variations have included increasing the fluid density (by modifying the metal plate material from Al to Ti), imposing sinusoidal perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. In addition to examining the shear-induced mixing, the simulations reveal other physics, such as how the interaction of our indirect-drive halfraums with a mated shock tube's ablator impedes a stagnation-driven shock. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and NIF facility operations by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Activated Microporous Carbon Derived from Almond Shells for High Energy Density Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun; Yang, Shaoran; Cai, Junjie; Zhang, Qiaobao; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Kaili

    2016-06-22

    Via the activation treatment of carbonized almond shells with HNO3 and KOH, activated microporous carbon (AMC-3 and AMC-2) was successfully synthesized. These two AMC electrodes demonstrate remarkable electrochemical behaviors such as high rate capability, high specific capacitance, and excellent cycle stability when serving as electrodes for supercapacitors. More importantly, through the use of a Zn-Ni-Co ternary oxide (ZNCO) positive electrode and the AMC negative electrode, asymmetric supercapacitors (ASC) were assembled that deliver superior energy density (53.3 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 1126.1 W kg(-1) for ASC-2 and 53.6 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 1124.5 W kg(-1) for ASC-3) and excellent stability (82.7% and 83.4% specific capacitance retention for ZNCO//AMC ASC-2 and ZNCO//AMC ASC-3, respectively, after 5000 cycles). Through these two methods, low-cost, renewable, and environmentally friendly electrode materials can be provided for high energy density supercapacitors.

  4. Surface Studies with Combined Free Energy Functionals of Electronic and Liquid Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letchworth Weaver, Kendra; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Arias, Tomás

    2012-02-01

    The microscopic structure of both a solid surface and a contacting liquid can be dramatically affected by the interaction between the two systems, particularly at the interface between a polar surface and a polar liquid. We present a study of oxide and metallic surfaces in an aqueous electrolyte environment with Joint Density Functional Theory (JDFT), a computationally efficient alternative to molecular dynamics simulations which replaces thermal sampling with a single variational principle for the free energy of the full system. Within the rigorous framework of JDFT, we introduce classical density-functionals for ionic species and describe how to couple them with existing functionals for liquid water and traditional electronic density-functionals. Calculations employ a liquid water functional, which captures bulk properties and microscopic structure over the entire phase diagram of the liquid, and a density-only coupling functional between the electronic and liquid systems, which can reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules to within chemical accuracy. With this microscopically accurate description of the liquid-solid interface structure, we gain physical insight which could direct future studies of catalysis and electrode stability in electrochemical systems.

  5. Nanostructured metal-oxides for use as high power and energy density storage electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondragón-Rodríguez, G. C.; Saruhan, Bilge

    2014-06-01

    The most significant advantage of double layer supercapacitors over batteries is their ability of being almost continuously charged and discharged without degradation. This is why batteries and supercapacitors are complementary to each other. The supercapacitors can supply power to the system when there are surges or energy bursts relying on their fast charge/discharge ability while the batteries can supply the bulk energy since they can store and deliver larger amount of energy over a longer period of time resulting in a higher discharge capacitance. With the introduction of new electrodes, super-capacitors will provide higher energy densities and charge rapidly with longer lifetimes, relying on the addition of pseudo-capacitance as well as higher surface areas. Pseudo-capacitance is achieved by the use of metal-oxides yielding faradaic reactions over redox couples. Capacitive charge-storage properties of mesoporous films made of complex metal-oxides preferably in core + shell architecture are superior to those of nonporous crystalline metal-oxides. RuO2 yields the highest energy densities however is not attractive for commercial use due to high cost. Other promising candidates are MnO2, Co2O3, NiO, etc. which need to be improved for achievement of long-term stability. Additionally, the type of electrolyte is important in terms of supercapacitor's performance and thus, needs to be optimized considering the characteristics of the employed electrode material. This work describes the fabrication and performance of mesoporous double oxides (MnCu, MnNi, MnCo) in aqueous electrolytes. Thin films are deposited by sputtering technique on graphite foils. Specific capacitance, energy and power densities are calculated and the role of electrolyte on electrode performance is discussed.

  6. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y.

    2013-07-01

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and additional DSC data on nanocomposites and pure PI resin. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02842a

  7. Superconductivity, cohesive energy density, and electron-atom ratio in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Lawson, D. D.; Hrubes, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that superconductivity above 8 K occurs in alloys and metallic compounds within relatively narrow regions of cohesive energy density with a sharp peak which includes Nb3Ge, SiV3, Nb3Ga, and NbN. When cross-correlated with the electron-atom ratio, high-temperature superconductivity can be observed in only a few regions. This suggests a search for superconductors with high-transition temperatures and critical fields within these regions.

  8. Neutron-star matter within the energy-density functional theory and neutron-star structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fantina, A. F.; Chamel, N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    2015-02-24

    In this lecture, we will present some nucleonic equations of state of neutron-star matter calculated within the nuclear energy-density functional theory using generalized Skyrme functionals developed by the Brussels-Montreal collaboration. These equations of state provide a consistent description of all regions of a neutron star. The global structure of neutron stars predicted by these equations of state will be discussed in connection with recent astrophysical observations.

  9. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.; Teller, E.

    1995-10-20

    We describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, we focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: Equations of state, hydrodynamic mixing, and the transport of radiation. We will describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  10. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.

    1995-08-14

    The authors describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, the authors focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: equations of state, turbulent hydrodynamics, and the transport of radiation. They describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  11. Defect-Engineered Graphene for High-Energy- and High-Power-Density Supercapacitor Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Childress, Anthony S; Karakaya, Mehmet; Dandeliya, Sushmita; Srivastava, Anurag; Lin, Ye; Rao, Apparao M; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2016-09-01

    Defects are often written off as performance limiters. Contrary to this notion, it is shown that controlling the defect configuration in graphene is critical to overcome a fundamental limitation posed by quantum capacitance and opens new channels for ion diffusion. Defect-engineered graphene flexible pouch capacitors with energy densities of 500% higher than the state-of-the-art supercapacitors are demonstrated. PMID:27299300

  12. Blind test of density-functional-based methods on intermolecular interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, DeCarlos E.; Ángyán, János G.; Galli, Giulia; Zhang, Cui; Gygi, Francois; Hirao, Kimihiko; Song, Jong Won; Rahul, Kar; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.; Podeszwa, Rafał; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Toulouse, Julien; Peverati, Roberto; Truhlar, Donald G.; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade, a number of approaches have been developed to fix the failure of (semi)local density-functional theory (DFT) in describing intermolecular interactions. The performance of several such approaches with respect to highly accurate benchmarks is compared here on a set of separation-dependent interaction energies for ten dimers. Since the benchmarks were unknown before the DFT-based results were collected, this comparison constitutes a blind test of these methods.

  13. Effect of energy density on color stability in dental resin composites under accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Zamarripa, Eliezer; Ancona, Adriana L; D'Accorso, Norma B; Macchi, Ricardo L; Abate, Pablo F

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the energy density that is used for polymerization on properties of dental resin composites are well known. However, few studies relate color stability to this factor. The aim of this study was to assess color changes (deltaE*), in vitro, in terms of accelerated aging under UV exposure of specimens prepared with different energy densities. Four commercial dental resin composites were included in the study. Thirty six specimens were prepared for each one of them, following the procedure established by ISO 4049 Standard, and assigned to three groups: A (3.75 J/cm2), B (9 J/cm2), C (24 J/cm2). Each group was further subdivided into four subgroups: 1 (no aging), 2 (500 hours aging), 3 (1000 hours aging) and 4 (1500 hours aging). The results were analyzed by means of ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05) to determine the effect of the factors. Correlation was performed in order to determine the possible relationship among variables. Energy density is not a significant factor in color stability. However aging is directly proportional to color changes. deltaE* depends on filler size; hybrid material presented deltaE* of 2.1(0.5), 2.4(0.6) and 3.3(0.3) at 500, 1000 and 1500 hours of accelerated aging respectively, and nanofilled material showed deltaE* of 3.0(0.6), 4.5(1.2) and 5.9(0.6) at the same times respectively. It can be concluded that deltaE* does not depend on energy density; however other factors are involved in color change. Further studies in this area are warranted.

  14. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-15

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shock-driven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure, and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  15. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Collins, G. W.; Sio, H.; Boehly, T. R.

    2015-09-15

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. The sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  16. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Sio, H.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, G. W.

    2015-09-04

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. As a result, the sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  17. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A.; Fawcett, E.; Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G.

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  18. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A. . Dept. of Physics); Fawcett, E. . Dept. of Physics); Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. )

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  19. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    DOE PAGES

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-06

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shockdriven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  20. Interacting boson model from energy density functionals: {gamma}-softness and the related topics

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, K.

    2012-10-20

    A comprehensive way of deriving the Hamiltonian of the interacting boson model (IBM) is described. Based on the fact that the multi-nucleon induced surface deformation in finite nucleus is simulated by effective boson degrees of freedom, the potential energy surface calculated with self-consistent mean-field method employing a given energy density functional (EDF) is mapped onto the IBM analog, and thereby the excitation spectra and transition rates with good symmetry quantum numbers are calculated. Recent applications of the proposed approach are reported: (i) an alternative robust interpretation of the {gamma}-soft nuclei and (ii) shape coexistence in lead isotopes.

  1. A high-energy-density redox flow battery based on zinc/polyhalide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Lai, Qinzhi; Zhang, Jianlu; Zhang, Huamin

    2012-05-01

    Zn and the Art of Battery Development: A zinc/polyhalide redox flow battery employs Br(-) /ClBr(2-) and Zn/Zn(2+) redox couples in its positive and negative half-cells, respectively. The performance of the battery is evaluated by charge-discharge cycling tests and reveals a high energy efficiency of 81%, based on a Coulombic efficiency of 96% and voltage efficiency of 84%. The new battery technology can provide high performance and energy density at an acceptable cost.

  2. Comparative study of fusion barriers using Skyrme interactions and the energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Torabi, F.

    2015-12-01

    Using different Skyrme interactions, we have carried out a comparative analysis of fusion barriers for a wide range of interacting nuclei in the framework of semiclassical Skyrme energy density formalism. The results of our calculations reveal that SVI, SII, and SIII Skyrme forces are able to reproduce the empirical values of barrier heights with higher accuracy than the other considered forces in this formalism. It is also shown that the calculated nucleus-nucleus potentials derived from such Skyrme interactions are able to explain the fusion cross sections at energies near and above the barrier.

  3. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  4. Zero-point energies, the uncertainty principle, and positivity of the quantum Brownian density operator.

    PubMed

    Tameshtit, Allan

    2012-04-01

    High-temperature and white-noise approximations are frequently invoked when deriving the quantum Brownian equation for an oscillator. Even if this white-noise approximation is avoided, it is shown that if the zero-point energies of the environment are neglected, as they often are, the resultant equation will violate not only the basic tenet of quantum mechanics that requires the density operator to be positive, but also the uncertainty principle. When the zero-point energies are included, asymptotic results describing the evolution of the oscillator are obtained that preserve positivity and, therefore, the uncertainty principle.

  5. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: beyond mean-field description of exotic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Niksic, T.; Ring, P.; Lalazissis, G. A.

    2009-01-28

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals is extended to include correlations related to the restoration of broken symmetries and to fluctuations of collective variables. The generator coordinate method is used to perform configuration mixing of angular-momentum and particle-number projected relativistic wave functions. This approach enables a quantitative description of the evolution of shell-structure, deformation and shape coexistence phenomena in nuclei with soft potential energy surfaces, and singular properties of excitation spectra and transition rates at critical points of quantum shape phase transitions.

  6. A Microelectromechanical High-Density Energy Storage/Rapid Release System

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Allen, Jim J.; Meeks, Kent D.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Sam L.

    1999-07-21

    One highly desirable characteristic of electrostatically driven microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is that they consume very little power. The corresponding drawback is that the force they produce may be inadequate for many applications. It has previously been demonstrated that gear reduction units or microtransmissions can substantially increase the torque generated by microengines. Operating speed, however, is also reduced by the transmission gear ratio. Some applications require both high speed and high force. If this output is only required for a limited period of time, then energy could be stored in a mechanical system and rapidly released upon demand. We have designed, fabricated, and demonstrated a high-density energy storage/rapid release system that accomplishes this task. Built using a 5-level surface micromachining technology, the assembly closely resembles a medieval crossbow. Energy releases on the order of tens of nanojoules have already been demonstrated, and significantly higher energy systems are under development.

  7. Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) for the Calculation of Atomization Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The calculation of atomization energies using density functional theory (DFT), using the B3LYP hybrid functional, is reported. The sensitivity of the atomization energy to basis set is studied and compared with the coupled cluster singles and doubles approach with a perturbational estimate of the triples (CCSD(T)). Merging the B3LYP results with the G2(MP2) approach is also considered. It is found that replacing the geometry optimization and calculation of the zero-point energy by the analogous quantities computed using the B3LYP approach reduces the maximum error in the G2(MP2) approach. In addition to the 55 G2 atomization energies, some results for transition metal containing systems will also be presented.

  8. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Seyler, C. E.; Atoyan, L.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Potter, W. M.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    Hall physics is often neglected in high energy density plasma jets due to the relatively high electron density of such jets (n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}). However, the vacuum region surrounding the jet has much lower densities and is dominated by Hall electric field. This electric field redirects plasma flows towards or away from the axis, depending on the radial current direction. A resulting change in the jet density has been observed experimentally. Furthermore, if an axial field is applied on the jet, the Hall effect is enhanced and ignoring it leads to serious discrepancies between experimental results and numerical simulations. By combining high currents (∼1 MA) and magnetic field helicity (15° angle) in a pulsed power generator such as COBRA, plasma jets can be magnetized with a 10 T axial field. The resulting field enhances the impact of the Hall effect by altering the density profile of current-free plasma jets and the stability of current-carrying plasma jets (e.g., Z-pinches)

  9. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Seyler, C. E.; Atoyan, L.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Potter, W. M.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    Hall physics is often neglected in high energy density plasma jets due to the relatively high electron density of such jets (ne ˜ 1019 cm-3). However, the vacuum region surrounding the jet has much lower densities and is dominated by Hall electric field. This electric field redirects plasma flows towards or away from the axis, depending on the radial current direction. A resulting change in the jet density has been observed experimentally. Furthermore, if an axial field is applied on the jet, the Hall effect is enhanced and ignoring it leads to serious discrepancies between experimental results and numerical simulations. By combining high currents (˜1 MA) and magnetic field helicity (15° angle) in a pulsed power generator such as COBRA, plasma jets can be magnetized with a 10 T axial field. The resulting field enhances the impact of the Hall effect by altering the density profile of current-free plasma jets and the stability of current-carrying plasma jets (e.g., Z-pinches).

  10. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-05-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates–sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity–have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics.

  11. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime.

    PubMed

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates-sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity-have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics. PMID:27193700

  12. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime

    PubMed Central

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates–sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity–have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics. PMID:27193700

  13. Feedback control of plasma electron density and ion energy in an inductively coupled plasma etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Huang, H.-M.; Hsieh, C.-H.

    2009-01-15

    Here the authors report the development of a fuzzy logic based feedback control of the plasma electron density and ion energy for high density plasma etch process. The plasma electron density was measured using their recently developed transmission line microstrip microwave interferometer mounted on the chamber wall, and the rf voltage was measured by a commercial impedance meter connected to the wafer stage. The actuators were two 13.56 MHz rf power generators which provided the inductively coupled plasma power and bias power, respectively. The control system adopted the fuzzy logic control algorithm to reduce frequent actuator action resulting from measurement noise. The experimental results show that the first wafer effect can be eliminated using closed-loop control for both poly-Si and HfO{sub 2} etching. In particular, for the HfO2 etch, the controlled variables in this work were much more effective than the previous one where ion current was controlled, instead of the electron density. However, the pressure disturbance effect cannot be reduced using plasma electron density feedback.

  14. A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Vijayakumar, M.; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang; Hu, Jian Z.; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-05-01

    Low cost, high performance redox flow batteries are highly demanded for up to multi-megawatt levels of renewable and grid energy storage. Here, we report a new vanadium redox flow battery with a significant improvement over the current technologies. This new battery utilizes a sulfate-chloride mixed solution, which is capable of dissolving more than 2.5 M vanadium or about a 70% increase in the energy storage capacity over the current vanadium sulfate system. More importantly, the new electrolyte remains stable over a wide temperature range of -5 to 60oC, potentially eliminating the need of active heat management. Its high energy density, broad operational temperature window, and excellent electrochemical performance would lead to a significant reduction in the cost of energy storage, thus accelerating its market penetration.

  15. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, E. W.; Ratcliff, L. E.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.; Hine, N. D. M.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable.

  16. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Tait, E W; Ratcliff, L E; Payne, M C; Haynes, P D; Hine, N D M

    2016-05-18

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable. PMID:27094207

  17. Weighted-density functionals for cavity formation and dispersion energies in continuum solvation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Gunceler, Deniz; Arias, T. A.

    2014-10-01

    Continuum solvation models enable efficient first principles calculations of chemical reactions in solution, but require extensive parametrization and fitting for each solvent and class of solute systems. Here, we examine the assumptions of continuum solvation models in detail and replace empirical terms with physical models in order to construct a minimally-empirical solvation model. Specifically, we derive solvent radii from the nonlocal dielectric response of the solvent from ab initio calculations, construct a closed-form and parameter-free weighted-density approximation for the free energy of the cavity formation, and employ a pair-potential approximation for the dispersion energy. We show that the resulting model with a single solvent-independent parameter: the electron density threshold (nc), and a single solvent-dependent parameter: the dispersion scale factor (s6), reproduces solvation energies of organic molecules in water, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride with RMS errors of 1.1, 0.6 and 0.5 kcal/mol, respectively. We additionally show that fitting the solvent-dependent s6 parameter to the solvation energy of a single non-polar molecule does not substantially increase these errors. Parametrization of this model for other solvents, therefore, requires minimal effort and is possible without extensive databases of experimental solvation free energies.

  18. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  19. Weighted-density functionals for cavity formation and dispersion energies in continuum solvation models

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Gunceler, Deniz; Arias, T. A.

    2014-10-07

    Continuum solvation models enable efficient first principles calculations of chemical reactions in solution, but require extensive parametrization and fitting for each solvent and class of solute systems. Here, we examine the assumptions of continuum solvation models in detail and replace empirical terms with physical models in order to construct a minimally-empirical solvation model. Specifically, we derive solvent radii from the nonlocal dielectric response of the solvent from ab initio calculations, construct a closed-form and parameter-free weighted-density approximation for the free energy of the cavity formation, and employ a pair-potential approximation for the dispersion energy. We show that the resulting model with a single solvent-independent parameter: the electron density threshold (n{sub c}), and a single solvent-dependent parameter: the dispersion scale factor (s{sub 6}), reproduces solvation energies of organic molecules in water, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride with RMS errors of 1.1, 0.6 and 0.5 kcal/mol, respectively. We additionally show that fitting the solvent-dependent s{sub 6} parameter to the solvation energy of a single non-polar molecule does not substantially increase these errors. Parametrization of this model for other solvents, therefore, requires minimal effort and is possible without extensive databases of experimental solvation free energies.

  20. Hydrate-melt electrolytes for high-energy-density aqueous batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yuki; Usui, Kenji; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Ko, Seongjae; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Atsuo

    2016-10-01

    Aqueous Li-ion batteries are attracting increasing attention because they are potentially low in cost, safe and environmentally friendly. However, their low energy density (<100 Wh kg‑1 based on total electrode weight), which results from the narrow operating potential window of water and the limited selection of suitable negative electrodes, is problematic for their future widespread application. Here, we explore optimized eutectic systems of several organic Li salts and show that a room-temperature hydrate melt of Li salts can be used as a stable aqueous electrolyte in which all water molecules participate in Li+ hydration shells while retaining fluidity. This hydrate-melt electrolyte enables a reversible reaction at a commercial Li4Ti5O12 negative electrode with a low reaction potential (1.55 V versus Li+/Li) and a high capacity (175 mAh g‑1). The resultant aqueous Li-ion batteries with high energy density (>130 Wh kg‑1) and high voltage (∼2.3–3.1 V) represent significant progress towards performance comparable to that of commercial non-aqueous batteries (with energy densities of ∼150–400 Wh kg‑1 and voltages of ∼2.4–3.8 V).

  1. Bounds on the local energy density of holographic CFTs from bulk geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Sebastian; Hickling, Andrew; Wiseman, Toby

    2016-11-01

    The stress tensor is a basic local operator in any field theory; in the context of AdS/CFT, it is the operator which is dual to the bulk geometry itself. Here we exploit this feature by using the bulk geometry to place constraints on the local energy density in static states of holographic (2+1)-dimensional CFTs living on a closed (but otherwise generally curved) spatial geometry. We allow for the presence of a marginal scalar deformation, dual to a massless scalar field in the bulk. For certain vacuum states in which the bulk geometry is well-behaved at zero temperature, we find that the bulk equations of motion imply that the local energy density integrated over specific boundary domains is negative. In the absence of scalar deformations, we use the inverse mean curvature flow to show that if the CFT spatial geometry has spherical topology but non-constant curvature, the local energy density must be positive somewhere. This result extends to other topologies, but only for certain types of vacuum; in particular, for a generic toroidal boundary, the vacuum’s bulk dual must be the zero-temperature limit of a toroidal black hole.

  2. Testing DARKexp against energy and density distributions of Millennium-II halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolting, Chris; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Hjorth, Jens

    2016-09-01

    We test the DARKexp model for relaxed, self-gravitating, collisionless systems against equilibrium dark matter halos from the Millennium-II simulation. While limited tests of DARKexp against simulations and observations have been carried out elsewhere, this is the first time the testing is done with a large sample of simulated halos spanning a factor of ~ 50 in mass, and using independent fits to density and energy distributions. We show that DARKexp, a one shape parameter family, provides very good fits to the shapes of density profiles, ρ(r), and differential energy distributions, N(E), of individual simulated halos. The best fit shape parameter phi0 obtained from the two types of fits are correlated, though with scatter. Our most important conclusions come from ρ(r) and N(E) that have been averaged over many halos. These show that the bulk of the deviations between DARKexp and individual Millennium-II halos come from halo-to-halo fluctuations, likely driven by substructure, and other density perturbations. The average ρ(r) and N(E) are quite smooth and follow DARKexp very closely. The only deviation that remains after averaging is small, and located at most bound energies for N(E) and smallest radii for ρ(r). Since the deviation is confined to 3-4 smoothing lengths, and is larger for low mass halos, it is likely due to numerical resolution effects.

  3. Development of high energy density fuels from mild gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The overall objective of the program is the determination of the minimal processing requirements to produce High Energy Density Fuels (HEDF), meeting a minimal energy density of 130,000 Btu/gal (conventional jet fuels have energy densities in the vicinity of 115,000--120,000 Btu/gal) and having acceptable advanced fuel specifications in accordance with the three defined categories of HEDF. The program encompasses assessing current technology capability; selecting acceptable processing and refining schemes; and generating samples of advanced test fuels. A task breakdown structure was developed containing eight key tasks. This report summarizes the work that Amoco Oil Company (AOC), as key subcontractor, performed in the execution of Task 4, Proposed Upgrading Schemes for Advanced Fuel. The intent of the Task 4 study was to represent all the candidate processing options, that were either studied in the experimental efforts of Task 3 or were available from the prior art in the open literature, in a linear program (LP) model. The LP model would allow scaling of the bench-scale Task 3 results to commercial scale and would perform economic evaluations on any combination of the processes which might be used to make HEDF. Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the process and economic bases used. Sections 3.0 and 4.0 details the economics and processing sensitivities for HEDF production. 1 ref., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. High-Energy Density and Superhard Nitrogen-Rich B-N Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Lu, Siyu; Tse, John S.

    2015-09-01

    The pressure-induced transformation of diatomic nitrogen into nonmolecular polymeric phases may produce potentially useful high-energy-density materials. We combine first-principles calculations with structure searching to predict a new class of nitrogen-rich boron nitrides with a stoichiometry of B3N5 that are stable or metastable relative to solid N2 and h -BN at ambient pressure. The most stable phase at ambient pressure has a layered structure (h -B3N5 ) containing hexagonal B3N3 layers sandwiched with intercalated freely rotating N2 molecules. At 15 GPa, a three-dimensional C 2 2 21 structure with single N-N bonds becomes the most stable. This pressure is much lower than that required for triple-to-single bond transformation in pure solid nitrogen (110 GPa). More importantly, C 2 2 21-B3N5 is metastable, and can be recovered under ambient conditions. Its energy density of ˜3.44 kJ /g makes it a potential high-energy-density material. In addition, stress-strain calculations estimate a Vicker's hardness of ˜4 4 GPa . Structure searching reveals a new clathrate sodalitelike BN structure that is metastable under ambient conditions.

  5. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials.

    PubMed

    Woll, K; Bergamaschi, A; Avchachov, K; Djurabekova, F; Gier, S; Pauly, C; Leibenguth, P; Wagner, C; Nordlund, K; Mücklich, F

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (± 0.33) ms(-1) and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material.

  6. Poynting vector, energy densities, and pressure of collective transverse electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-01-15

    A systematic calculation of the electromagnetic properties (Poynting vector, electromagnetic energy, and pressure) of the collective transverse fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas with velocity-anisotropic plasma particle distributions functions is presented. Time-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly damped wave-like fluctuations and space-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly propagating and aperiodic fluctuations are calculated. For aperiodic fluctuations, the Poynting vector as well as the sum of the space-averaged electric and magnetic field energy densities vanish. However, aperiodic fluctuations possess a positive pressure given by its magnetic energy density. This finite pressure density p{sub a} of aperiodic fluctuations has important consequences for the dynamics of cosmic unmagnetized plasmas such as the intergalactic medium after reionization. Adopting the standard cosmological evolution model, we show that this additional pressure changes the expansion law of the universe leading to further deceleration. Negative vacuum pressure counterbalances this deceleration to an accelerating universe provided that the negative vacuum pressure is greater than 1.5p{sub a}, which we estimate to be of the order 2.1 {center_dot} 10{sup -16} dyn cm{sup -2}.

  7. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of themore » FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.« less

  8. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of the FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.

  9. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Woll, K.; Bergamaschi, A.; Avchachov, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Gier, S.; Pauly, C.; Leibenguth, P.; Wagner, C.; Nordlund, K.; Mücklich, F.

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (±0.33) ms−1 and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material. PMID:26822309

  10. Comparison of Energy Efficiency and Power Density in Pressure Retarded Osmosis and Reverse Electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, NY; Elimelech, M

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural -> anthropogenic -> engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the

  11. Comparison of energy efficiency and power density in pressure retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural → anthropogenic → engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the

  12. Comparison of energy efficiency and power density in pressure retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural → anthropogenic → engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the

  13. Mapping the energy density of shaped waves in scattering media onto a complete set of diffusion modes.

    PubMed

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi S; Mosk, Allard P; Vellekoop, Ivo M; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L

    2016-08-01

    We study the energy density of shaped waves inside a quasi-1D disordered waveguide. We find that the spatial energy density of optimally shaped waves, when expanded in the complete set of eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation, is well described by considering only a few of the lowest eigenfunctions. Taking into account only the fundamental eigenfunction, the total internal energy inside the sample is underestimated by only 2%. The spatial distribution of the shaped energy density is very similar to the fundamental eigenfunction, up to a cosine distance of about 0.01. We obtain the energy density of transmission eigenchannels inside the sample by numerical simulation of the scattering matrix. Computing the transmission-averaged energy density over all transmission channels yields the ensemble averaged energy density of shaped waves. From the averaged energy density, we reconstruct its spatial distribution using the eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. The results of our study have exciting applications in controlled biomedical imaging, efficient light harvesting in solar cells, enhanced energy conversion in solid-state lighting, and low threshold random lasers. PMID:27505816

  14. Mapping the energy density of shaped waves in scattering media onto a complete set of diffusion modes.

    PubMed

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi S; Mosk, Allard P; Vellekoop, Ivo M; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L

    2016-08-01

    We study the energy density of shaped waves inside a quasi-1D disordered waveguide. We find that the spatial energy density of optimally shaped waves, when expanded in the complete set of eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation, is well described by considering only a few of the lowest eigenfunctions. Taking into account only the fundamental eigenfunction, the total internal energy inside the sample is underestimated by only 2%. The spatial distribution of the shaped energy density is very similar to the fundamental eigenfunction, up to a cosine distance of about 0.01. We obtain the energy density of transmission eigenchannels inside the sample by numerical simulation of the scattering matrix. Computing the transmission-averaged energy density over all transmission channels yields the ensemble averaged energy density of shaped waves. From the averaged energy density, we reconstruct its spatial distribution using the eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. The results of our study have exciting applications in controlled biomedical imaging, efficient light harvesting in solar cells, enhanced energy conversion in solid-state lighting, and low threshold random lasers.

  15. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Kortelainen, Markus; Nazarewicz, Witold; Olsen, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Background: The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, the correlations governing the behavior of the many-body system, and the properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or the nuclear energy density functional (EDF). But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. Purpose: To establish an efficient framework to compute energy-weighted sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy finite-amplitude method (FAM) based on the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Methods: To compute sum rules, we carry out contour integration of the response function in the complex-energy plane. We benchmark our results against the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA theory, the Thouless theorem for the energy-weighted sum rule, and the dielectric theorem for the inverse-energy-weighted sum rule. Results: We derive the sum-rule expressions from the contour integration of the complex-energy FAM. We demonstrate that calculated sum-rule values agree with those obtained from the matrix formulation of the QRPA. We also discuss the applicability of both the Thouless theorem about the energy-weighted sum rule and the dielectric theorem for the inverse-energy-weighted sum rule to nuclear density functional theory in cases when the EDF is not based on a Hamiltonian. Conclusions: The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method

  16. Measurements of plasma bremsstrahlung and plasma energy density produced by electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noland, Jonathan David

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to gain an understanding on the relative importance of microwave power, neutral pressure, and magnetic field configuration on the behavior of the hot electrons within an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma. This was carried out through measurement of plasma bremsstrahlung with both NaI(Tl) (hv > 30 keV) and CdTe (2 keV < hv < 70 keV) x-ray detectors, and through measurement of the plasma energy density with a diamagnetic loop placed around the plasma chamber. We also examined the anisotropy in x-ray power by simultaneously measuring the x-ray spectra in two orthogonal directions: radially and axially, using NaI(Tl) detectors. We have seen that for a 6.4 GHz ECRIS, both the x-ray power produced by confined electrons and the plasma energy density behave logarithmically with microwave power. The x-ray flux created by electrons lost from the plasma, however, does not saturate. Thus, the small increase in plasma density that occurred at high microwave powers (> 150 W on a 6.4 GHz ECRIS) was accompanied by a large increase in total x-ray power. We suggest that the saturation of x-ray power and plasma energy density was due to rf-induced pitch-angle scattering of the electrons. X-ray power and plasma energy density were also shown to saturate with neutral pressure, and to increase nearly linearly as the gradient of the magnetic field in the resonance zone was decreased. All of these findings were in agreement with the theoretical models describing ECRIS plasmas. We have discussed the use of a diamagnetic loop as a means of exploring various plasma time scales on a relative basis. Specifically, we focused much of our attention on studying how changing ion source parameters, such as microwave power and neutral pressure, would effect the rise and decay of the integrated diamagnetic signal, which can be related to plasma energy density. We showed that increasing microwave power lowers the e-fold times at both the leading

  17. Thermodynamics predicts density-dependent energy use in organisms and ecological communities.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jian D L; Paganin, David M; Thomson, James R; Mac Nally, Ralph

    2015-04-01

    Linking our knowledge of organisms to our knowledge of ecological communities and ecosystems is a key challenge for ecology. Individual size distributions (ISDs) link the size of individual organisms to the structure of ecological communities, so that studying ISDs might provide insight into how organism functioning affects ecosystems. Similarly shaped ISDs among ecosystems, coupled with allometric links between organism size and resource use, suggest the possibility of emergent resource-use patterns in ecological communities. We drew on thermodynamics to develop a maximization principle that predicted both organism and community energy use. These predictions highlighted the importance of density-dependent metabolic rates and were able to explain nonlinear relationships between community energy use and community biomass. We analyzed data on fish community energy use and biomass and found evidence of nonlinear scaling, which was predicted by the thermodynamic principle developed here and is not explained by other theories of ISDs. Detailed measurements of organism energy use will clarify the role of density dependence in driving metabolic rates and will further test our derived thermodynamic principle. Importantly, our study highlights the potential for fundamental links between ecology and thermodynamics.

  18. Analytical energy gradients for second-order multireference perturbation theory using density fitting.

    PubMed

    Győrffy, Werner; Shiozaki, Toru; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2013-03-14

    We present algorithms for computing analytical energy gradients for multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and partially internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) using density fitting (DF). Our implementation is applicable to both single-state and multi-state CASPT2 analytical gradients. The accuracy of the new methods is demonstrated for structures and excitation energies of valence and Rydberg states of pyrrole, as well as for structures and adiabatic singlet-triplet energy splittings for the hydro-, the O,O(')-formato-, and the N,N(')-diiminato-copper-dioxygen complexes. It is shown that the effects of density fitting on optimized structures and relative energies are negligible. For cases in which the total cost is dominated by the integral evaluations and transformations, the DF-CASPT2 gradient calculations are found to be faster than the corresponding conventional calculations by typically a factor of three to five using triple-ζ basis sets, and by about a factor of ten using quadruple-ζ basis sets.

  19. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Najafabadi, Mojgan Mortazavi; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g) was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P = 0.01). Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression.

  20. A low cost, high energy density and long cycle life potassium-sulfur battery for grid-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Bowden, Mark E.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2015-08-15

    Alkali metal-sulfur batteries are attractive for energy storage applications because of their high energy density. Among the batteries, lithium-sulfur batteries typically use liquid in the battery electrolyte, which causes problems in both performance and safety. Sodium-sulfur batteries can use a solid electrolyte such as beta alumina but this requires a high operating temperature. Here we report a novel potassium-sulfur battery with K+-conducting beta-alumina as the electrolyte. Our studies indicate that liquid potassium exhibits much better wettability on the surface of beta-alumina compared to liquid sodium at lower temperatures. Based on this observation, we develop a potassium-sulfur battery that can operate at as low as 150°C with excellent performance. In particular, the battery shows excellent cycle life with negligible capacity fade in 1000 cycles because of the dense ceramic membrane. This study demonstrates a new battery with a high energy density, long cycle life, low cost and high safety, which is ideal for grid-scale energy storage.

  1. Reflections from a systematic review of dietary energy density and weight gain: is the inclusion of drinks valid?

    PubMed

    Johnson, L; Wilks, D C; Lindroos, A K; Jebb, S A

    2009-11-01

    The association between dietary energy density, increased energy intake and weight gain is supported by experimental evidence, but confirmation of an effect in free-living humans is limited. Experimental evidence supports a role of energy density in obesity through changes in food composition, not drinks consumption. The inclusion of drinks in the calculation creates a variable of questionable validity and has a substantive impact on the estimated energy density of the diet. We posit, based on the experimental evidence, that calculating the energy density of diets by excluding drinks and including calories from drinks as a covariate in the analysis is the most valid and reliable method of testing the relationship between energy density and weight gain in free-living humans. We demonstrate, by systematically reviewing existing observational studies of dietary energy density and weight gain in free-living humans, how current variation in the method for calculating energy density hampers the interpretation of these data. Reaching an a priori decision on the appropriate methodology will reduce the error caused by multiple comparisons and facilitate meaningful interpretation of epidemiological evidence to inform the development of effective obesity prevention strategies. PMID:19413706

  2. Research Opportunities in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas on the NDCX-II Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, John; Cohen, Ron; Friedman, Alex; Grote, Dave; Lund, Steven; Sharp, Bill; Bieniosek, Frank; Ni, Pavel; Roy, Prabir; Henestroza, Enrique; Jung, Jin-Young; Kwan, Joe; Lee, Ed; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lidia, Steven; Logan, Grant; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Waldron, Will

    2009-03-23

    Intense beams of heavy ions offer a very attractive tool for fundamental research in high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy science. These applications build on the significant recent advances in the generation, compression and focusing of intense heavy ion beams in the presence of a neutralizing background plasma. Such beams can provide uniform volumetric heating of the target during a time-scale shorter than the hydrodynamic response time, thereby enabling a significant suite of experiments that will elucidate the underlying physics of dense, strongly-coupled plasma states, which have been heretofore poorly understood and inadequately diagnosed, particularly in the warm dense matter regime. The innovations, fundamental knowledge, and experimental capabilities developed in this basic research program is also expected to provide new research opportunities to study the physics of directly-driven ion targets, which can dramatically reduce the size of heavy ion beam drivers for inertial fusion energy applications. Experiments examining the behavior of thin target foils heated to the warm dense matter regime began at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 2008, using the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment - I (NDCX-I) facility, and its associated target chamber and diagnostics. The upgrade of this facility, called NDCX-II, will enable an exciting set of scientific experiments that require highly uniform heating of the target, using Li{sup +} ions which enter the target with kinetic energy in the range of 3 MeV, slightly above the Bragg peak for energy deposition, and exit with energies slightly below the Bragg peak. This document briefly summarizes the wide range of fundamental scientific experiments that can be carried out on the NDCX-II facility, pertaining to the two charges presented to the 2008 Fusion Energy Science Advisory Committee (FESAC) panel on High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP). These charges include: (1) Identify

  3. Isospin effects and the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Steiner, A. W.; Carlson, B. V.; Donangelo, R.

    2009-10-15

    The density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is inspected using the statistical multifragmentation model with Skyrme effective interactions. The model consistently considers the expansion of the fragments' volumes at finite temperature at the freeze-out stage. By selecting parametrizations of the Skyrme force that lead to very different equations of state for the symmetry energy, we investigate the sensitivity of the isoscaling parameter and the isotopic distributions to differences in the symmetry energy. Our results suggest that, in spite of being sensitive to the thermal dilation of the fragments' volumes, it is difficult to distinguish among the Skyrme forces from the isoscaling analysis. On the other hand, the isotopic distribution of the emitted fragments turns out to be very sensitive to the force employed in the calculation.

  4. Organic semiconductor density of states controls the energy level alignment at electrode interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Oehzelt, Martin; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing charge carrier injection barriers and extraction losses at interfaces between organic semiconductors and metallic electrodes is critical for optimizing the performance of organic (opto-) electronic devices. Here, we implement a detailed electrostatic model, capable of reproducing the alignment between the electrode Fermi energy and the transport states in the organic semiconductor both qualitatively and quantitatively. Covering the full phenomenological range of interfacial energy level alignment regimes within a single, consistent framework and continuously connecting the limiting cases described by previously proposed models allows us to resolve conflicting views in the literature. Our results highlight the density of states in the organic semiconductor as a key factor. Its shape and, in particular, the energy distribution of electronic states tailing into the fundamental gap is found to determine both the minimum value of practically achievable injection barriers as well as their spatial profile, ranging from abrupt interface dipoles to extended band-bending regions. PMID:24938867

  5. High Energy Density Thermal Batteries: Thermoelectric Reactors for Efficient Automotive Thermal Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-15

    HEATS Project: Sheetak is developing a new HVAC system to store the energy required for heating and cooling in EVs. This system will replace the traditional refrigerant-based vapor compressors and inefficient heaters used in today’s EVs with efficient, light, and rechargeable hot-and-cold thermal batteries. The high energy density thermal battery—which does not use any hazardous substances—can be recharged by an integrated solid-state thermoelectric energy converter while the vehicle is parked and its electrical battery is being charged. Sheetak’s converters can also run on the electric battery if needed and provide the required cooling and heating to the passengers—eliminating the space constraint and reducing the weight of EVs that use more traditional compressors and heaters.

  6. Hypovalency--a kinetic-energy density description of a 4c-2e bond.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-06-01

    A bond descriptor based on the kinetic energy density, the localized-orbital locator (LOL), is used to characterize the nature of the chemical bond in electron deficient multi-center bonds. The boranes B(2)H(6), B(4)H(4), B(4)H(10), [B(6)H(6)](2-), and [B(6)H(7)](-) serve as prototypical examples of hypovalent 3c-2e and 4c-2e bonding. The kinetic energy density is derived from a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from pure density functional calculations (PBE/TZVP), and the topology of LOL is analyzed in terms of (3,-3) attractors (Gamma). The B-B-B and B-H-B 3c-2e, and the B-B-H-B 4c-2e bonding situations are defined by their own characteristic LOL profiles. The presence of one attractor in relation to the three or four atoms that are engaged in electron deficient bonding provides sufficient indication of the type of 3c-2e or 4c-2e bond present. For the 4c-2e bond in [B(6)H(7)](-) the LOL analysis is compared to results from an experimental QTAIM study. PMID:19452076

  7. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liewen; Ko Che Ming; Xu Jun; Li Baoan

    2010-08-15

    Expressing explicitly the parameters of the standard Skyrme interaction in terms of the macroscopic properties of asymmetric nuclear matter, we show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness {Delta}r{sub np} of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E{sub sym}({rho}{sub 0}) and its density slope L at saturation density {rho}{sub 0}. Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and the double neutron/proton ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies leads to a more stringent limit on L approximately independent of E{sub sym}({rho}{sub 0}). The implication of these new constraints on the {Delta}r{sub np} of {sup 208}Pb as well as the core-crust transition density and pressure in neutron stars is discussed.

  8. Novel LLM series high density energy materials: Synthesis, characterization, and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagoria, Philip; Zhang, Maoxi; Tsyshevskiy, Roman; Kuklja, Maija

    Novel high density energy materials must satisfy specific requirements, such as an increased performance, reliably high stability to external stimuli, cost-efficiency and ease of synthesis, be environmentally benign, and be safe for handling and transportation. During the last decade, the attention of researchers has drifted from widely used nitroester-, nitramine-, and nitroaromatic-based explosives to nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds. Good thermal stability, the low melting point, high density, and moderate sensitivity make heterocycle materials attractive candidates for use as oxidizers in rocket propellants and fuels, secondary explosives, and possibly as melt-castable ingredients of high explosive formulations. In this report, the synthesis, characterization, and results of quantum-chemical DFT study of thermal stability of LLM-191, LLM-192 and LLM-200 high density energy materials are presented. Work performed under the auspices of the DOE by the LLNL (Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344). This research is supported in part by ONR (Grant N00014-12-1-0529) and NSF. We used NSF XSEDE (Grant DMR-130077) and DOE NERSC (Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231) resources.

  9. Hypovalency--a kinetic-energy density description of a 4c-2e bond.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-06-01

    A bond descriptor based on the kinetic energy density, the localized-orbital locator (LOL), is used to characterize the nature of the chemical bond in electron deficient multi-center bonds. The boranes B(2)H(6), B(4)H(4), B(4)H(10), [B(6)H(6)](2-), and [B(6)H(7)](-) serve as prototypical examples of hypovalent 3c-2e and 4c-2e bonding. The kinetic energy density is derived from a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from pure density functional calculations (PBE/TZVP), and the topology of LOL is analyzed in terms of (3,-3) attractors (Gamma). The B-B-B and B-H-B 3c-2e, and the B-B-H-B 4c-2e bonding situations are defined by their own characteristic LOL profiles. The presence of one attractor in relation to the three or four atoms that are engaged in electron deficient bonding provides sufficient indication of the type of 3c-2e or 4c-2e bond present. For the 4c-2e bond in [B(6)H(7)](-) the LOL analysis is compared to results from an experimental QTAIM study.

  10. Graphene-based in-plane micro-supercapacitors with high power and energy densities

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhong–Shuai; Parvez, Khaled; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are important on-chip micro-power sources for miniaturized electronic devices. Although the performance of micro-supercapacitors has been significantly advanced by fabricating nanostructured materials, developing thin-film manufacture technologies and device architectures, their power or energy densities remain far from those of electrolytic capacitors or lithium thin-film batteries. Here we demonstrate graphene-based in-plane interdigital micro-supercapacitors on arbitrary substrates. The resulting micro-supercapacitors deliver an area capacitance of 80.7 μF cm−2 and a stack capacitance of 17.9 F cm−3. Further, they show a power density of 495 W cm−3 that is higher than electrolytic capacitors, and an energy density of 2.5 mWh cm−3 that is comparable to lithium thin-film batteries, in association with superior cycling stability. Such microdevices allow for operations at ultrahigh rate up to 1,000 V s−1, three orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional supercapacitors. Micro-supercapacitors with an in-plane geometry have great promise for numerous miniaturized or flexible electronic applications. PMID:24042088

  11. A high energy density shock driven Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Bono, M. J.; Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    Radiographic data from a novel and highly successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability experiment is presented along with synapses of the theory and simulation behind the target design. Data on instability growth are compared to predictions from simulation and theory. The key role played by baroclinic vorticity production in the functioning of the target and the key design parameters are also discussed. The data show the complete evolution of large distinct KH eddies, from formation to turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low density bubbles comparable to the vortex size are observed forming in the free-stream region above each vortex at late time. These bubbles have the appearance of localized shocks, possibly supporting a theoretical fluid dynamics conjecture about the existence of supersonic bubbles over the vortical structure [transonic convective Mach numbers, D. Papamoschou and A. Roshko, J. Fluid Mech. 197, 453 (1988)] that support localized shocks (shocklets) not extending into the free stream (P. E. Dimotakis, Proceedings of the 22nd Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, 1991, Paper No. AIAA 91-1724). However, it is also possible that these low density bubbles are the result of a cavitationlike effect. Hypothesis that may explain the appearance of low density bubbles will be discussed.

  12. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  13. A high energy density shock driven Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Bono, M. J.; Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2009-05-15

    Radiographic data from a novel and highly successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability experiment is presented along with synapses of the theory and simulation behind the target design. Data on instability growth are compared to predictions from simulation and theory. The key role played by baroclinic vorticity production in the functioning of the target and the key design parameters are also discussed. The data show the complete evolution of large distinct KH eddies, from formation to turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low density bubbles comparable to the vortex size are observed forming in the free-stream region above each vortex at late time. These bubbles have the appearance of localized shocks, possibly supporting a theoretical fluid dynamics conjecture about the existence of supersonic bubbles over the vortical structure [transonic convective Mach numbers, D. Papamoschou and A. Roshko, J. Fluid Mech. 197, 453 (1988)] that support localized shocks (shocklets) not extending into the free stream (P. E. Dimotakis, Proceedings of the 22nd Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, 1991, Paper No. AIAA 91-1724). However, it is also possible that these low density bubbles are the result of a cavitationlike effect. Hypothesis that may explain the appearance of low density bubbles will be discussed.

  14. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F.

    2016-11-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ˜1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  15. [Epidemiologic studies on nutrition role in develomeat of osteoarthrosis. Report 1. Analysis of actual intake of nutrients and energy in depend on financial position and in come patients osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Khodyrev, V N; Martinchik, A N

    2010-01-01

    The study gives the characteristic of the social situation of patients with osteoarthrosis (OA), among which is dominated by people with disabilities and senior citizens (60%), most of which belongs to the poor. The actual nutrition of patients with OA is characterized by low energy intake and macronutrients. Feeding low-income patients with OA was characterized by inadequate intake of ascorbic acid and calcium, whereas the intake of vitamin A, E and beta-carotene was higher in patients with OA compared with the control group.

  16. Bubbler---A Novel Ultra High Power Density Energy Harvesting Method Based on Reverse Electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tsung-Hsing

    A novel approach to direct conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy has been proposed and experimentally and theoretically investigated. The method combines previously demonstrated reverse electrowetting on dielectric (REWOD) phenomenon with the fast self-oscillating process of bubble growth and collapse inside a conductive liquid placed in contact with a dielectric-covered electrode. Fast bubble dynamics, used in conjunction with REWOD, can enable extremely high power densities, in excess of 10 kW/m2. The method can be scaled in power from microwatts to tens of watts, and can enable direct coupling to a wide range of mechanical energy sources, which make it particularly attractive for energy harvesting applications. We believe that this approach can enable extraction of useful energy from various non-traditional sources including thermal expansion of buildings, human motion, and vehicle and machinery movement. Also, this makes the fabrication of small light-weight energy harvesting devices capable of producing a wide range of power outputs feasible.

  17. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Kortelainen, Markus; Nazarewicz, Witold; Olsen, Erik

    2015-04-27

    The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, correlations governing the behavior of the many-body system, and properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or nuclear energy density functional (EDF). But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. To establish an efficient framework to compute energy-weighted sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy finite-amplitude method (FAM) based on the quasiparticle random- phase approximation. The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method is very efficient and well-adaptable to parallel computing. As a result, the FAM formulation is especially useful when standard theorems based on commutation relations involving the nuclear Hamiltonian and external field cannot be used.

  18. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Kortelainen, Markus; Nazarewicz, Witold; Olsen, Erik

    2015-04-27

    The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, correlations governing the behavior of the many-body system, and properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or nuclear energy density functional (EDF). But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. To establish anmore » efficient framework to compute energy-weighted sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy finite-amplitude method (FAM) based on the quasiparticle random- phase approximation. The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method is very efficient and well-adaptable to parallel computing. As a result, the FAM formulation is especially useful when standard theorems based on commutation relations involving the nuclear Hamiltonian and external field cannot be used.« less

  19. Bubbler: A Novel Ultra-High Power Density Energy Harvesting Method Based on Reverse Electrowetting

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsung-Hsing; Manakasettharn, Supone; Taylor, J. Ashley; Krupenkin, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed and successfully demonstrated a novel approach to direct conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy using microfluidics. The method combines previously demonstrated reverse electrowetting on dielectric (REWOD) phenomenon with the fast self-oscillating process of bubble growth and collapse. Fast bubble dynamics, used in conjunction with REWOD, provides a possibility to increase the generated power density by over an order of magnitude, as compared to the REWOD alone. This energy conversion approach is particularly well suited for energy harvesting applications and can enable effective coupling to a broad array of mechanical systems including such ubiquitous but difficult to utilize low-frequency energy sources as human and machine motion. The method can be scaled from a single micro cell with 10−6 W output to power cell arrays with a total power output in excess of 10 W. This makes the fabrication of small light-weight energy harvesting devices capable of producing a wide range of power outputs feasible. PMID:26567850

  20. Bubbler: A Novel Ultra-High Power Density Energy Harvesting Method Based on Reverse Electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-Hsing; Manakasettharn, Supone; Taylor, J Ashley; Krupenkin, Tom

    2015-11-16

    We have proposed and successfully demonstrated a novel approach to direct conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy using microfluidics. The method combines previously demonstrated reverse electrowetting on dielectric (REWOD) phenomenon with the fast self-oscillating process of bubble growth and collapse. Fast bubble dynamics, used in conjunction with REWOD, provides a possibility to increase the generated power density by over an order of magnitude, as compared to the REWOD alone. This energy conversion approach is particularly well suited for energy harvesting applications and can enable effective coupling to a broad array of mechanical systems including such ubiquitous but difficult to utilize low-frequency energy sources as human and machine motion. The method can be scaled from a single micro cell with 10(-6) W output to power cell arrays with a total power output in excess of 10 W. This makes the fabrication of small light-weight energy harvesting devices capable of producing a wide range of power outputs feasible.

  1. Three-dimensional modeling and analysis of a high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, K. S.; Hurricane, O. A.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Hansen, J. F.; Harding, E. C.

    2012-09-15

    A recent series of experiments on the OMEGA laser provided the first controlled demonstration of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in a high-energy-density physics context [E. C. Harding et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045005, (2009); O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056305, (2009)]. We present 3D simulations which resolve previously reported discrepancies between those experiments and the 2D simulation used to design them. Our new simulations reveal a three-dimensional mechanism behind the low density 'bubble' structures which appeared in the experimental x-ray radiographs at late times but were completely absent in the 2D simulations. We also demonstrate that the three-dimensional expansion of the walls of the target is sufficient to explain the 20% overprediction by 2D simulation of the late-time growth of the KH rollups. The implications of these results for the design of future experiments are discussed.

  2. High-power density piezoelectric energy harvesting using radially strained ultrathin trigonal tellurium nanowire assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Il; Lee, Sangmin; Lee, Eungkyu; Sohn, Sungwoo; Lee, Yean; Lee, Sujeong; Moon, Geondae; Kim, Dohyang; Kim, Youn Sang; Myoung, Jae Min; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-06-01

    A high-yield solution-processed ultrathin (<10 nm) trigonal tellurium (t-Te) nanowire (NW) is introduced as a new class of piezoelectric nanomaterial with a six-fold higher piezoelectric constant compared to conventional ZnO NWs for a high-volume power-density nanogenerator (NG). While determining the energy-harvesting principle in a NG consisting of t-Te NW, it is theoretically and experimentally found that t-Te NW is piezoelectrically activated only by creating strain in its radial direction, along which it has an asymmetric crystal structure. Based upon this mechanism, a NG with a monolayer consisting of well-aligned t-Te NWs and a power density of 9 mW/cm(3) is fabricated.

  3. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  4. Equation satisfied by the energy-density functional for electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that the electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy-density functional V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}] satisfies the equationV{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]-V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}]={integral}d{sup 3}r({delta}V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]/{delta}{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r))[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r)-{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r)], where {rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r) and {rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r) are N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential of the N-electron system at coupling strength {gamma}.

  5. High energy density amorphous silicon anodes for lithium ion batteries deposited by DC sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmakis, Filippos; Elmasides, Costas; Fanz, Patrik; Hagen, Markus; Georgoulas, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    As more and more applications require high energy density electrochemical storage systems that deliver more than 200 Wh/kg, Lithium-ion batteries with silicon-based anodes provide promising electrochemical properties especially high specific capacity. In this paper, we present micro-grain structured silicon deposited by DC sputtering on special copper foil that serves as current collector. It is demonstrated that high-density silicon anodes are obtained with more than 2000 mAh g-1 and 2.0 mAh cm-2 that can be considered as a commercial value. In addition, irreversible capacity during the first galvanostatic cycle can be lower than 20% for such anodes. Finally, it is found that there exists a clear correlation between the grain-size and the texture of the amorphous silicon to the electrochemical performance of half-cells.

  6. Shell energy and the level-density parameter of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nerlo-Pomorska, Bozena; Pomorski, Krzysztof; Bartel, Johann

    2006-09-15

    Macroscopic-microscopic calculations have been performed with the Yukawa folded mean field for 134 spherical even-even nuclei and 6 deformed ones at temperatures 0{<=}T{<=}5 MeV and elongations ranging from oblate shapes to the scission configuration of fissioning nuclei. The Strutinsky type free-energy shell corrections for this sample of nuclei and their temperature and deformation dependence are found by a folding procedure in particle-number space. The average dependence of the single-particle level-density parameter on mass number A and isospin I is determined and compared with previous estimates obtained using the relativistic mean-field theory, the Hartree-Fock approximation with the Skyrme effective interaction, and the phenomenological Thomas-Fermi approach adjusted to experimental data. The estimates for the level-density parameter obtained for different deformations are fitted by a liquid-drop type expression.

  7. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-15

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  8. Simplified gravitational collapse with an interacting vacuum energy density. Curvature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perico, E. L. D.; Lima, J. A. S.; Campos, M.

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of a spherical core, in which the fluid component interact with a growing vacuum energy density, filling an homogeneous and isotropic geometry with an arbitrary curvature parameter, is investigated. The complete set of exact solutions for all values of the free parameters are obtained, and the influence of the curvature term on the collapsing time, black hole mass and other physical quantities are also discussed in detail. We show that for the same initial conditions the total black hole mass depends only on the effective matter density parameter (including the vacuum component). It is also shown that the analytical condition to form a black hole, i.e. the formation of an apparent horizon, is not altered by the contribution of the curvature terms, however, the remaining physical quantities are quantitatively modified.

  9. A Novel Creep-Fatigue Life Prediction Model for P92 Steel on the Basis of Cyclic Strain Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Dongmei; Ren, Jianxing; Zhang, Lai-Chang

    2016-09-01

    A novel creep-fatigue life prediction model was deduced based on an expression of the strain energy density in this study. In order to obtain the expression of the strain energy density, the load-controlled creep-fatigue (CF) tests of P92 steel at 873 K were carried out. Cyclic strain of P92 steel under CF load was divided into elastic strain, applying and unloading plastic strain, creep strain, and anelastic strain. Analysis of cyclic strain indicates that the damage process of P92 steel under CF load consists of three stages, similar to pure creep. According to the characteristics of the strains above, an expression was defined to describe the strain energy density for each cycle. The strain energy density at stable stage is inversely proportional to the total strain energy density dissipated by P92 steel. However, the total strain energy densities under different test conditions are proportional to the fatigue life. Therefore, the expression of the strain energy density at stable stage was chosen to predict the fatigue life. The CF experimental data on P92 steel were employed to verify the rationality of the novel model. The model obtained from the load-controlled CF test of P92 steel with short holding time could predict the fatigue life of P92 steel with long holding time.

  10. Ru oxide supercapacitors with high loadings and high power and energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaorong; Pickup, Peter G.

    Supercapacitors with very high energy and power densities have been constructed with hydrous ruthenium oxide powder prepared by a sol-gel method and annealed at 110 °C. Novel features of the capacitors, which improve their performances, are the use of a carbon fibre paper support, a Nafion separator, and Nafion as a binder. 1 M sulfuric acid was employed as the electrolyte. The performances of the supercapacitors were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy and constant current discharging. The interfacial capacitance increased linearly with increasing ruthenium oxide loading to at least 50 mg cm -2 on each electrode. The gravimetric capacitance of the Ru oxide measure by impedance reached 742 F g -1 (9.66 F cm -2) at a loading of 13.0 mg cm -2, and an interfacial capacitance of 34.9 F cm -2 (682 F g -1) was obtained at 51.2 mg cm -2. The average effective series resistance was 0.55 Ω, the electronic resistance of the electrodes was negligible, and their ionic resistances were <0.42 Ω. The average power density for full discharge at 1 A cm -2 for supercapacitors with 10 mg cm -2 Ru oxide increased by 39% when 5% Nafion binder was added. The maximum average power density for full discharge was 31.5 W g -1 while the maximum energy density was 31.2 Wh kg -1. At a 1 mA discharge rate a specific capacitance of 977 F g -1 of Ru oxide was obtained.

  11. Voyager 1 in the Local Interstellar Medium: Cosmic-ray Energy Density and Ionization Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B. C.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.; Johannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the energy spectra of cosmic ay nuclei and electrons in the local interstellar medium (LISM) from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem on Voyager 1 (V1). We use four models of the local interstellar spectra of nuclei and one of electrons that are constrained by the observations to compute the energy density and ionization rate of atomic H in the LISM above 3 MeV for electrons and protons and above 3 MeV/nuc for nuclei with Z > 1. We find that the total cosmic-ray energy density is in the range 0.82-0.97 eV/cm3, which includes a contribution of 0.023 eV/cm3 from electrons. We find the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic H to be in the range 1.45-1.58 x 10-17 s-1, which is a factor of more than 10 below the cosmic-ray ionization rate in diffuse interstellar clouds based on astrochemistry methods. We discuss possible reasons for this difference. Voyager data analysis is supported by NASA Grant NNN12AA012. GALPROP development is supported by NASA Grants NNX13AC47G and NNX10AE78G.

  12. Density and energy relaxation in an open one-dimensional system.

    PubMed

    Jose, Prasanth P; Bagchi, Biman

    2004-05-01

    A new master equation to mimic the dynamics of a collection of interacting random walkers in an open system is proposed and solved numerically. In this model, the random walkers interact through excluded volume interaction (single-file system); and the total number of walkers in the lattice can fluctuate because of exchange with a bath. In addition, the movement of the random walkers is biased by an external perturbation. Two models for the latter are considered: (1) an inverse potential (V proportional, variant 1/r), where r is the distance between the center of the perturbation and the random walker and (2) an inverse of sixth power potential (V proportional, 1/r6). The calculated density of the walkers and the total energy show interesting dynamics. When the size of the system is comparable to the range of the perturbing field, the energy relaxation is found to be highly nonexponential. In this range, the system can show stretched exponential (e-(t/taus)beta) and even logarithmic time dependence of energy relaxation over a limited range of time. Introduction of density exchange in the lattice markedly weakens this nonexponentiality of the relaxation function, irrespective of the nature of perturbation.

  13. Novel high energy density materials: Synthesis by megabar hot pressing. LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzana, H.E.; Yoo, C.S.; Lipp, M.; Barbee, T. III; McMahan, A.K.; Mailhiot, C.

    1996-04-01

    The goal of this work was to demonstrate proof-of-principle existence of a new class of high energy density materials (HEDMs). These proposed novel solids are derived from first and second row elements arranged in a uniform, three-dimensional network. Thus, every bond in these systems is energetic, in contrast to conventional energetic materials that store energy only within individual molecules. Recent predictions have suggested that a number of possible compounds including a polymeric form of nitrogen can be synthesized at high pressures and recovered metastably at ambient conditions. Specifically, polymeric nitrogen is predicted to have an energy density about three times that of a typical explosive. Such extended solid HEDMs offer dramatic new opportunities as explosives, monopropellants, or as environmentally clean fuels. The authors utilized the laser heated diamond anvil cell as the synthesis route for establishing proof-of-principle existence. They conducted high pressure studies of pure molecular nitrogen samples and completely revised the previously published equation-of-state. They also pursued studies of carbon monoxide, a compound that is isoelectronic with nitrogen and exhibits very similar high pressure phase transformations. Carbon monoxide polymerizes under pressure into a solid that can be recovered and may be energetic.

  14. Density-matrix based determination of low-energy model Hamiltonians from ab initio wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Changlani, Hitesh J.; Zheng, Huihuo; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2015-09-14

    We propose a way of obtaining effective low energy Hubbard-like model Hamiltonians from ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations for molecular and extended systems. The Hamiltonian parameters are fit to best match the ab initio two-body density matrices and energies of the ground and excited states, and thus we refer to the method as ab initio density matrix based downfolding. For benzene (a finite system), we find good agreement with experimentally available energy gaps without using any experimental inputs. For graphene, a two dimensional solid (extended system) with periodic boundary conditions, we find the effective on-site Hubbard U{sup ∗}/t to be 1.3 ± 0.2, comparable to a recent estimate based on the constrained random phase approximation. For molecules, such parameterizations enable calculation of excited states that are usually not accessible within ground state approaches. For solids, the effective Hamiltonian enables large-scale calculations using techniques designed for lattice models.

  15. Unstable modes in supercooled and normal liquids: Density of states, energy barriers, and self-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, T.

    1994-09-01

    The unstable mode density of states <ρu(ω;T)> is obtained from computer simulation and is analyzed, theoretically and empirically, over a broad range of supercooled and normal liquid temperatures in the unit density Lennard-Jones liquid. The functional form of <ρu(ω;T)> is determined and the ω, T dependence is seen to be consistent with a theory given by us previously. The parameters in the theory are determined and are related to the topological features of the potential energy surface in the configuration space; it appears that diffusion involves a low degree of cooperativity at all but the lowest temperatures. It is shown that analysis of <ρu(ω;T)> yields considerable information about the energy barriers to diffusion, namely, a characteristic ω-dependent energy and the distribution of barrier heights, gν(E). The improved description of <ρu(ω;T)> obtained in the paper is used to implement normal mode theory of the self-diffusion constant D(T) with no undetermined constants; agreement with simulation in the supercooled liquid is excellent. Use of a lower frequency cutoff on the contribution of unstable modes to diffusion, in an attempt to remove spurious contributions from anharmonicities unrelated to barrier crossing, yields the Zwanzig-Bassler temperature dependence for D(T). It is argued that the distribution of barriers plays a crucial role in determining the T dependence of the self-diffusion constant.

  16. Sulphur-impregnated flow cathode to enable high-energy-density lithium flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongning; Zou, Qingli; Liang, Zhuojian; Liu, Hao; Li, Quan; Lu, Yi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are promising technologies for large-scale electricity storage, but have been suffering from low energy density and low volumetric capacity. Here we report a flow cathode that exploits highly concentrated sulphur-impregnated carbon composite, to achieve a catholyte volumetric capacity 294 Ah l-1 with long cycle life (>100 cycles), high columbic efficiency (>90%, 100 cycles) and high energy efficiency (>80%, 100 cycles). The demonstrated catholyte volumetric capacity is five times higher than the all-vanadium flow batteries (60 Ah l-1) and 3-6 times higher than the demonstrated lithium-polysulphide approaches (50-117 Ah l-1). Pseudo-in situ impedance and microscopy characterizations reveal superior electrochemical and morphological reversibility of the sulphur redox reactions. Our approach of exploiting sulphur-impregnated carbon composite in the flow cathode creates effective interfaces between the insulating sulphur and conductive carbon-percolating network and offers a promising direction to develop high-energy-density flow batteries.

  17. Density-matrix based determination of low-energy model Hamiltonians from ab initio wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Changlani, Hitesh J; Zheng, Huihuo; Wagner, Lucas K

    2015-09-14

    We propose a way of obtaining effective low energy Hubbard-like model Hamiltonians from ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations for molecular and extended systems. The Hamiltonian parameters are fit to best match the ab initio two-body density matrices and energies of the ground and excited states, and thus we refer to the method as ab initio density matrix based downfolding. For benzene (a finite system), we find good agreement with experimentally available energy gaps without using any experimental inputs. For graphene, a two dimensional solid (extended system) with periodic boundary conditions, we find the effective on-site Hubbard U(∗)/t to be 1.3 ± 0.2, comparable to a recent estimate based on the constrained random phase approximation. For molecules, such parameterizations enable calculation of excited states that are usually not accessible within ground state approaches. For solids, the effective Hamiltonian enables large-scale calculations using techniques designed for lattice models. PMID:26374007

  18. Identifying high energy density stream-reaches through refined geospatial resolution in hydropower resource assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K.; Yang, Majntxov; Yeasmin, Dilruba; Saetern, Sen; Kao, Shih -Chieh; Smith, Brennan T.

    2016-01-07

    Benefited from the rapid development of multiple geospatial data sets on topography, hydrology, and existing energy-water infrastructures, the reconnaissance level hydropower resource assessment can now be conducted using geospatial models in all regions of the US. Furthermore, the updated techniques can be used to estimate the total undeveloped hydropower potential across all regions, and may eventually help identify further hydropower opportunities that were previously overlooked. To enhance the characterization of higher energy density stream-reaches, this paper explored the sensitivity of geospatial resolution on the identification of hydropower stream-reaches using the geospatial merit matrix based hydropower resource assessment (GMM-HRA) model. GMM-HRAmore » model simulation was conducted with eight different spatial resolutions on six U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 8-digit hydrologic units (HUC8) located at three different terrains; Flat, Mild, and Steep. The results showed that more hydropower potential from higher energy density stream-reaches can be identified with increasing spatial resolution. Both Flat and Mild terrains exhibited lower impacts compared to the Steep terrain. Consequently, greater attention should be applied when selecting the discretization resolution for hydropower resource assessments in the future study.« less

  19. Aromatic Polythiourea Dielectrics with High Energy Density, High Breakdown Strength, and Low Dielectric Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shan; Burlingame, Quinn; Lin, Minren; Zhang, Qiming

    2013-03-01

    There is an increasing demand on dielectric materials with high electric energy density and low loss for a broad range of applications in modern electronics and electrical power systems such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), medical defibrillators, filters, and switched-mode power supplies. One major challenge in developing dielectric polymers is how to achieve high energy density Ue while maintaining low dielectric loss, even at very high-applied electric fields. Here we show that amorphous polar-polymers with very low impurity concentration can be promising for realizing such a dielectric polymer. Polar-polymer with high dipole moment and weak dipole coupling can provide relatively high dielectric constant for high Ue, eliminate polarization and conduction losses due to weak dipolar coupling and strong polar-scattering to charge carriers. Indeed, an aromatic polythiourea thin film can maintain low loss to high fields (>1 GV/m) with a high Ue (~ 24 J/cm3) , which is very attractive for energy storage capacitors.

  20. Attained energy densities and neutral pion spectra in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.; Albrecht, R.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Bock, R.; Claesson, G.; Clewing, G.; Dragon, L.

    1989-01-01

    The main goal of the CERN heavy-ion experiments is the search for an indication that the predicted state of deconfined quarks and gluons, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), has been produced. The quantity most crucial to the probability of QGP formation is the thermalized energy density attained during the heavy-ion reaction. The amount of energy radiated transverse to the beam direction is the experimental quantity which is believed to be a measure of the amount of energy deposition in the reaction, and hence to reflect the energy density attained. In this presentation we consider the systematics of transverse energy production at CERN SPS energies, and we use the results to make estimates, under various assumptions, of attained energy densities. 18 refs., 2 figs.