Science.gov

Sample records for actual engine speed

  1. Speeding up enzyme engineering computationally.

    PubMed

    Scrutton, Nigel S

    2017-01-01

    Can in silico engineering speed up the delivery of biocatalysts for the burgeoning bioeconomy? In this issue, Kamerlin and coworkers introduce CADEE [Amrein et al. (2017), IUCrJ, 4, 50-64] - a framework for Computer-Aided Directed Evolution of Enzymes - that promises to lessen the burden on 'wet lab' enzymologists when optimizing biocatalysts using laboratory-based directed evolution methods.

  2. Enforcement of speed limits--actual policy and drivers' knowledge.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Finn; Pedersen, Hassa

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the penalty rules and examines drivers' perceptions of enforcement of speed limits. The survey was carried out using a sample of 204 Norwegian drivers, answering questions in a setting closely associated with their driving situation. For minor speeding offences drivers overestimated on average their fines. For serious speeding offences drivers significantly underestimated how many kilometers per hour they could exceed the speed limits before losing their driving license. They also overestimated the probability of being caught speeding. This resulted in a perceived expected penalty twice the real one. The paper also examines the relationship between different driver characteristics and their knowledge of the enforcement policy for speeding. Older drivers had less knowledge about the threshold level for serious speeding but more knowledge about the detection rate than younger drivers do. Experienced drivers had more knowledge about the threshold level for serious speeding than inexperienced drivers. The number of times drivers were stopped due to speeding offences increased their knowledge of fines for minor speeding.

  3. Speed governor for diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyshevich, Y.K.; Miselev, M.A.; Svistunov, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    A speed governor was developed for the 12ChSN 18/20 ship diesel engine to reduce emission of fumes and eliminate transient overloads, with pneumatic correction of the fuel injection rate according to the supercharge pressure. The device includes an electric corrector, and a hydraulic amplifier with slide valve. It is found that the regulator improves the performance, including torque and combustion characteristics and reduces the emission level to 15% within 2 s and decreases only to a 65% level. It was also tested on a Kometa hydrofoil ship with regulation of the diesel start over an 80 to 90 s acceleration period independently of the crank turning time, and maintained overloads and fume emission within prescribed limits.

  4. A Finite Speed Curzon-Ahlborn Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Curzon and Ahlborn achieved finite power output by introducing the concept of finite rate of heat transfer in a Carnot engine. The finite power can also be achieved through a finite speed of the piston on the four branches of the Carnot cycle. The present paper combines these two approaches to study the behaviour of output power in terms of…

  5. Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2002-01-01

    Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

  6. Speed control of automotive diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outbib, Rachid; Graton, Guillaume; Dovifaaz, Xavier; Younes, Rafic

    2014-04-01

    This paper deals with Diesel engine control. More precisely, a model-based approach is considered to stabilise engine speed around a defined value. The model taken into account is nonlinear and contains explicitly the expression of fuel conversion efficiency. In general in the literature, this experimentally obtained quantity is modelled with either a polynomial or an exponential form (see for instance Younes, R. (1993). Elaboration d'un modèle de connaissance du moteur diesel avec turbocompresseur à géométrie variable en vue de l'optimisation de ses émissions. Ecole Centrale de Lyon; Omran, R., Younes, R., Champoussin, J., & Outbib, R. (2011). New indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) model for predicting crankshaft movement. Energy Conversion and Management, 52, 3376-3382). This paper focuses on engine speed feedback stabilisation when fuel conversion efficiency is modelled with an exponential form, which is more suitable for automative applications. Simulation results are proposed to highlight the closed-loop control performances.

  7. Engine control system having speed-based timing

    DOEpatents

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2012-02-14

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the cylinder and an actuator associated with the engine valve. The control system also has a controller in communication with the actuator. The controller is configured to receive a signal indicative of engine speed and compare the engine speed signal with a desired engine speed. The controller is also configured to selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve to control an amount of air/fuel mixture delivered to the cylinder based on the comparison.

  8. The preferred walk to run transition speed in actual lunar gravity.

    PubMed

    De Witt, John K; Edwards, W Brent; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M; Norcross, Jason R; Gernhardt, Michael L

    2014-09-15

    Quantifying the preferred transition speed (PTS) from walking to running has provided insight into the underlying mechanics of locomotion. The dynamic similarity hypothesis suggests that the PTS should occur at the same Froude number across gravitational environments. In normal Earth gravity, the PTS occurs at a Froude number of 0.5 in adult humans, but previous reports found the PTS occurred at Froude numbers greater than 0.5 in simulated lunar gravity. Our purpose was to (1) determine the Froude number at the PTS in actual lunar gravity during parabolic flight and (2) compare it with the Froude number at the PTS in simulated lunar gravity during overhead suspension. We observed that Froude numbers at the PTS in actual lunar gravity (1.39±0.45) and simulated lunar gravity (1.11±0.26) were much greater than 0.5. Froude numbers at the PTS above 1.0 suggest that the use of the inverted pendulum model may not necessarily be valid in actual lunar gravity and that earlier findings in simulated reduced gravity are more accurate than previously thought.

  9. Actualization of Competencies of Graduates-Engineers in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivashova, Valentina A.; Dub, Galina V.; Kenina, Diana S.; Kosintseva, Yulia F.; Migatcheva, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of the empirical research relevant to the labor market competencies of graduates with the major in engineering. Subjective preferences of employers shape requirements for the personal and professional characteristics of a graduate. In authors' opinion, the professional competences of engineers stated in educational…

  10. Miniaturized High Speed Controls for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and Test)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    AO/A-006 108 MINIATURIZED HIGH SPEED CONTROLS FOR TURBINE ENGINES (FABRICATION AND TEST ) D. G. Burnell, et al Colt lndustries, Incorporated Prepared...Speed Controlsma193-Ag97 for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and May 1973RIN ORD REugR 1974 Test ) 6.PRFRIA GOG EOTNME 7. AUTHOR(.) 6- CONTRACT OR GRANT... y asd Id..,tify by block numnb.) ’-This report summarizes the design and development of con- trol components and high speed fuel pump technology for

  11. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R. M.; Winsor, R. E.; Ryan, III, T. W.; Schwalb, J. A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, Jr., R. P.

    1991-11-01

    The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

  12. Discrepancy between actual and estimated speeds of drivers in the presence of child pedestrians

    PubMed Central

    Harre, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: First, to measure the speeds of vehicles with and without children on the footpath, and second to compare these with drivers' estimates of how fast they would go in these conditions. Design: The speeds of vehicles in three conditions: control (no children present), children playing with a ball on the footpath, and children waiting to cross the road, were measured using speed tubes during two 55 minute sessions. Drivers' estimates of their speeds were measured with a questionnaire. Setting: Speeds were measured on a main road in Auckland, New Zealand. The questionnaire was conducted at another time with drivers stopping for petrol approximately 500 metres from the measurement site. Subjects: A total of 1446 speed measurements were taken and 93 drivers‘ questionnaire responses were analysed. Results: The mean free speed of vehicles in the control condition was 55.60 kph, with drivers‘ estimates being 56.37 kph. When children were playing with a ball the measured speed was 54.29 kph and the estimated speed 39.27 kph. When children were waiting to cross the measured speed was 52.78 kph, estimated speed 34.02 kph. Analyses indicated that there were significant differences between measured and estimated speeds. Conclusions: New Zealand drivers make inadequate speed adjustments in the presence of children, despite probably believing they do so. Establishing specific rules about appropriate speeds around children and highlighting to drivers the discrepancy between their attitudes and behaviour are two intervention strategies suggested. PMID:12642557

  13. Determination of combustion parameters using engine crankshaft speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taglialatela, F.; Lavorgna, M.; Mancaruso, E.; Vaglieco, B. M.

    2013-07-01

    Electronic engine controls based on real time diagnosis of combustion process can significantly help in complying with the stricter and stricter regulations on pollutants emissions and fuel consumption. The most important parameter for the evaluation of combustion quality in internal combustion engines is the in-cylinder pressure, but its direct measurement is very expensive and involves an intrusive approach to the cylinder. Previous researches demonstrated the direct relationship existing between in-cylinder pressure and engine crankshaft speed and several authors tried to reconstruct the pressure cycle on the basis of the engine speed signal. In this paper we propose the use of a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network to model the relationship between the engine crankshaft speed and some parameters derived from the in-cylinder pressure cycle. This allows to have a non-intrusive estimation of cylinder pressure and a real time evaluation of combustion quality. The structure of the model and the training procedure is outlined in the paper. A possible combustion controller using the information extracted from the crankshaft speed information is also proposed. The application of the neural network model is demonstrated on a single-cylinder spark ignition engine tested in a wide range of speeds and loads. Results confirm that a good estimation of some combustion pressure parameters can be obtained by means of a suitable processing of crankshaft speed signal.

  14. High Speed Balancing Applied to the T700 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Lee, C.; Martin, M.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed under Contracts NAS3-23929 and NAS3-24633 is presented. MTI evaluated the feasibility of high-speed balancing for both the T700 power turbine rotor and the compressor rotor. Modifications were designed for the existing Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) T53/T55 high-speed balancing system for balancing T700 power turbine rotors. Tests conducted under these contracts included a high-speed balancing evaluation for T700 power turbines in the Army/NASA drivetrain facility at MTI. The high-speed balancing tests demonstrated the reduction of vibration amplitudes at operating speed for both low-speed balanced and non-low-speed balanced T700 power turbines. In addition, vibration data from acceptance tests of T53, T55, and T700 engines were analyzed and a vibration diagnostic procedure developed.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Thermoeconomic Evaluation Criteria for an Actual Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Gülcan; Açıkkalp, Emin; Savaş, Ahmet Fevzi; Yamık, Hasan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an actual heat engine is investigated by using different thermoeconomic evaluation criteria in the literature. A criteria that has not been investigated in detail is considered and it is called as ecologico-economical criteria (F_{EC}). It is the difference of power cost and exergy destruction rate cost of the system. All four criteria are applied to an irreversible Carnot heat engine, results are presented numerically and some suggestions are made.

  16. Non-intrusive speed sensor. [space shuttle main engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maram, J.; Wyett, L.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs.

  17. Low pressure high speed Stirling air engine. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.A.

    1980-06-16

    The purpose of this project was to design, construct and test a simple, appropriate technology low pressure, high speed, wood-fired Stirling air engine of 100 W output. The final design was a concentric piston/displacer engine of 454 in. bore and 1 in. stroke with a rhombic drive mechanism. The project engine was ultimately completed and tested, using a propane burner for all tests as a matter of convenience. The 100 W aim was exceeded, at atmospheric pressure, over a wide range of engine speed with the maximum power being 112 W at 1150 rpm. A pressure can was constructed to permit pressurization; however the grant funds were running out, and the only pressurized power test attempted was unsuccessful due to seal difficulties. This was a disappointment because numerous tests on the 4 cubic inch engine suggested power would be more than doubled with pressurization at 25 psig. A manifold was designed and constructed to permit operation of the engine over a standard No. 40 pot bellied stove. The engine was run successfully, but at reduced speed and power, over this stove. The project engine started out being rather noisy in operation, but modifications ultimately resulted in a very quiet engine. Various other difficulties and their solutions also are discussed. (LCL)

  18. Model-based diagnosis of large diesel engines based on angular speed variations of the crankshaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbazeille, M.; Randall, R. B.; Guillet, F.; El Badaoui, M.; Hoisnard, C.

    2010-07-01

    This work aims at monitoring large diesel engines by analyzing the crankshaft angular speed variations. It focuses on a powerful 20-cylinder diesel engine with crankshaft natural frequencies within the operating speed range. First, the angular speed variations are modeled at the crankshaft free end. This includes modeling both the crankshaft dynamical behavior and the excitation torques. As the engine is very large, the first crankshaft torsional modes are in the low frequency range. A model with the assumption of a flexible crankshaft is required. The excitation torques depend on the in-cylinder pressure curve. The latter is modeled with a phenomenological model. Mechanical and combustion parameters of the model are optimized with the help of actual data. Then, an automated diagnosis based on an artificially intelligent system is proposed. Neural networks are used for pattern recognition of the angular speed waveforms in normal and faulty conditions. Reference patterns required in the training phase are computed with the model, calibrated using a small number of actual measurements. Promising results are obtained. An experimental fuel leakage fault is successfully diagnosed, including detection and localization of the faulty cylinder, as well as the approximation of the fault severity.

  19. Synchronizing Photography For High-Speed-Engine Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, K. S.

    1989-01-01

    Light flashes when shaft reaches predetermined angle. Synchronization system facilitates visualization of flow in high-speed internal-combustion engines. Designed for cinematography and holographic interferometry, system synchronizes camera and light source with predetermined rotational angle of engine shaft. 10-bit resolution of absolute optical shaft encoder adapted, and 2 to tenth power combinations of 10-bit binary data computed to corresponding angle values. Pre-computed angle values programmed into EPROM's (erasable programmable read-only memories) to use as angle lookup table. Resolves shaft angle to within 0.35 degree at rotational speeds up to 73,240 revolutions per minute.

  20. Investigation of frequency-response characteristics of engine speed for a typical turbine-propeller engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Burt L , III; Oppenheimer, Frank L

    1951-01-01

    Experimental frequency-response characteristics of engine speed for a typical turbine-propeller engine are presented. These data were obtained by subjecting the engine to sinusoidal variations of fuel flow and propeller-blade-angle inputs. Correlation is made between these experimental data and analytical frequency-response characteristics obtained from a linear differential equation derived from steady-state torque-speed relations.

  1. System for detecting an engine speed in a multi-cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kinugasa, Y.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a system for detecting engine speed in a multi-cylinder internal combustion engine which has N cylinders provided with n sets of camshafts where n is at least two, each of the sets of camshafts being mechanically connected to a crank shaft of the engine, each of the sets of camshafts for separately operating respective valves of respective cylinders in the engine, and system comprising: timing means, cooperating with one of the camshafts, for issuing timing signals representing a rotational speed of the one camshaft; angle determining means for determining a determined angle substantially equal to (720/N) x n degrees; engine state detecting means for detecting whether the engine is in a state which the engine requires a shortened period for detection of the engine speed; modifying means for modifying a time of calculating the engine speed when the engine is in the state, by changing the determined angle; time detecting means, responsive to the timing signals from the timing means, for detecting a time required for a rotation of the camshaft by the determined angle and means for calculating an engine speed from the detected time.

  2. Engineering Models Ease and Speed Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA astronauts plan to return to the Moon as early as 2015 and establish a lunar base, from which 6-month flights to Mars would be launched by 2030. Essential to this plan is the Ares launch vehicle, NASA s next-generation spacecraft that will, in various iterations, be responsible for transporting all equipment and personnel to the Moon, Mars, and beyond for the foreseeable future. The Ares launch vehicle is powered by the J-2X propulsion system, with what will be the world s largest rocket nozzles. One of the conditions that engineers carefully consider in designing rocket nozzles particularly large ones is called separation phenomenon, which occurs when outside ambient air is sucked into the nozzle rim by the relatively low pressures of rapidly expanding exhaust gasses. This separation of exhaust gasses from the side-wall imparts large asymmetric transverse loads on the nozzle, deforming the shape and thus perturbing exhaust flow to cause even greater separation. The resulting interaction can potentially crack the nozzle or break actuator arms that control thrust direction. Side-wall loads are extremely difficult to measure directly, and, until now, techniques were not available for accurately predicting the magnitude and frequency of the loads. NASA researchers studied separation phenomenon in scale-model rocket nozzles, seeking to use measured vibration on these nozzle replicas to calculate the unknown force causing the vibrations. Key to this approach was the creation of a computer model accurately representing the nozzle as well as the test cell.

  3. Wind plant capacity credit variations: A comparison of results using multiyear actual and simulated wind-speed data

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter-annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

  4. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., power density, and maximum in-use engine speed. 1042.140 Section 1042.140 Protection of Environment... Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed. This section describes how to determine the maximum engine power, displacement, and power density of an engine for...

  5. Low-speed inducers for cryogenic upper-stage engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissell, W. R.; Jenkins, D. S.; King, J. A.; Jackson, E. D.

    1975-01-01

    Two-phase, low-speed hydrogen and oxygen inducers driven by electric motors and applicable to the tug engine were designed and constructed. The oxygen inducer was tested in liquid and two-phase oxygen. Its head and flow performance were approximately as designed, and it was able to accelerate to full speed in 3 seconds and produce its design flow and head. The analysis of the two-phase data indicated that the inducer was able to pump with vapor volume fractions in excess of 60 percent. The pump met all of its requirements (duration of runs and number of starts) to demonstrate its mechanical integrity.

  6. Corps of Engineers considers adjustable-speed generation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Bonneville Power Administration recently commissioned a study to assess the various aspects of adjustable-speed generation (also called variable-speed generation). Electronic Power Conditioning Inc., of Corvallis, Oregon, studied the cost, efficiency, and other operating implications of installing the necessary hardware to enable adjustable-speed generation at four Corps hydroelectric plants on the lower Snake River (Ice Harbor, Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite). Results of the study indicate that, while costly, five adjustable-speed options could be installed and operated on a practical basis. The Corps initiated the study to determine the cost for adding adjustable-speed generation at the four projects to improve fish survival. The Northwest Power Planning Council currently is considering proposals to modify operating procedures for hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River and its tributaries, including seasonal adjustments of pool levels behind dams to flush fish through the river system more rapidly. However, dropping pool levels significantly below normal levels may cause a loss in generating efficiency and a corresponding increase in fish mortality. Adjustable-speed generation is seen as a method for solving both problems

  7. Tablet PCs in Engineering Mathematics Courses at the J.B. Speed School of Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hieb, Jeffrey L.; Ralston, Patricia A. S.

    2010-01-01

    In fall 2007, J.B. Speed School of Engineering at the University of Louisville joined the ranks of universities requiring the purchase of Tablet PCs for all new entering students. This article presents a description of how the Department of Engineering Fundamentals incorporated Tablet PCs into their instruction, a review of the literature…

  8. Speed and efficiency limits of multilevel incoherent heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, V.; Niedenzu, W.; Kofman, A. G.; Kurizki, G.

    2016-12-01

    We present a comprehensive theory of heat engines (HE) based on a quantum-mechanical "working fluid" (WF) with periodically modulated energy levels. The theory is valid for any periodicity of driving Hamiltonians that commute with themselves at all times and do not induce coherence in the WF. Continuous and stroke cycles arise in opposite limits of this theory, which encompasses hitherto unfamiliar cycle forms, dubbed here hybrid cycles. The theory allows us to discover the speed, power, and efficiency limits attainable by incoherently operating multilevel HE depending on the cycle form and the dynamical regimes.

  9. Speed And Power Control Of An Engine By Modulation Of The Load Torque

    DOEpatents

    Ziph, Benjamin; Strodtman, Scott; Rose, Thomas K

    1999-01-26

    A system and method of speed and power control for an engine in which speed and power of the engine is controlled by modulation of the load torque. The load torque is manipulated in order to cause engine speed, and hence power to be changed. To accomplish such control, the load torque undergoes a temporary excursion in the opposite direction of the desired speed and power change. The engine and the driven equipment will accelerate or decelerate accordingly as the load torque is decreased or increased, relative to the essentially fixed or constant engine torque. As the engine accelerates or decelerates, its power increases or decreases in proportion.

  10. High-Speed Visualisation of Combustion in Modern Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, W.; Nauwerck, A.; Han, K.-M.; Pfeil, J.; Velji, A.; Spicher, U.

    2006-07-01

    Today research and development in the field of gasoline engines have to face a double challenge: on the one hand, fuel consumption has to be reduced, while on the other hand, ever more stringent emission standards have to be fulfilled. The development of engines with its complexity of in-cylinder processes requires modern development tools to exploit the full potential in order to reduce fuel consumption. Especially optical, non-intrusive measurement techniques will help to get a better understanding of the processes. With the presented high-speed visualisation system the electromagnetic radiation from combustion in the UV range is collected by an endoscope and transmitted to a visualisation system by 10, 000 optical fibres. The signal is projected to 1, 920 photomultipliers, which convert the optical into electric signals with a maximum temporal resolution of 200 kHz. This paper shows the systematic application of flame diagnostics in modern combustion systems. For this purpose, a single-cylinder SI engine has been modified for a spray guided combustion strategy as well as for HCCI. The characteristics of flame propagation in both combustion modes were recorded and correlated with thermodynamic analyses. In case of the spray guided GDI engine, high pressure fuel injection was applied and evaluated.

  11. Unsteady pressure loads in a generic high speed engine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Thurlow, Ernie M.

    1992-01-01

    Unsteady pressure loads were measured along the top interior wall of a generic high-speed engine (GHSE) model undergoing performance tests in the combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility at the Langley Research Center. Flow to the model inlet was simulated at 72000 ft and a flight Mach number of 4. The inlet Mach number was 3.5 with a total temperature and pressure of 1640 R and 92 psia. The unsteady pressure loads were measured with 5 piezoresistive gages, recessed into the wall 4 to 12 gage diameters to reduce incident heat flux to the diaphragms, and distributed from the inlet to the combustor. Contributors to the unsteady pressure loads included boundary layer turbulence, combustion noise, and transients generated by unstart loads. Typical turbulent boundary layer rms pressures in the inlet ranged from 133 dB in the inlet to 181 dB in the combustor over the frequency range from 0 to 5 kHz. Downstream of the inlet exist, combustion noise was shown to dominate boundary layer turbulence noise at increased heat release rates. Noise levels in the isolator section increased by 15 dB when the fuel-air ratio was increased from 0.37 to 0.57 of the stoichiometric ratio. Transient pressure disturbances associated with engine unstarts were measured in the inlet and have an upstream propagation speed of about 7 ft/sec and pressure jumps of at least 3 psia.

  12. Enabling propulsion materials for high-speed civil transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Herbell, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Headquarters and LeRC have advocated an Enabling Propulsion Materials Program (EPM) to begin in FY-92. The High Speed Research Phase 1 program which began in FY-90 has focused on the environmental acceptability of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Studies by industry, including Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, GE Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, and in-house studies by NASA concluded that NO(x) emissions and airport noise reduction can only be economically achieved by revolutionary advancements in materials technologies. This is especially true of materials for the propulsion system where the combustor is the key to maintaining low emissions, and the exhaust nozzle is the key to reducing airport noise to an acceptable level. Both of these components will rely on high temperature composite materials that can withstand the conditions imposed by commercial aircraft operations. The proposed EPM program will operate in conjunction with the HSR Phase 1 Program and the planned HSR Phase 2 program slated to start in FY-93. Components and subcomponents developed from advanced materials will be evaluated in the HSR Phase 2 Program.

  13. High-performance diesel engines power high-speed hydrofoil catamaran

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The speed of any sea-water craft is dependent on the design of its engine. Mitsubishi Heavy industries has developed a high-speed, fully submerged, super shuttle 400 hydrofoil catamaran ferry, which uses high-performance diesel engines to reach speeds up to 45 knots. The twin-hull design with V section forms permits the use of wide hydrofoils, allowing substantial lifting power. Each of the 16-cylinder engines has a maximum continuous output of 2100 kW at a maximum speed of 2000 r/min. Each catamaran section holds two engines driving a Mitsubishi MWJ-5000A waterjet through a combining reduction gear. 3 figs.

  14. Thermal Conductance Engineering for High-Speed TES Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    Many current and future applications for superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters require significantly faster pulse response than is currently available. X-ray spectroscopy experiments at next-generation synchrotron light sources need to successfully capture very large fluxes of photons, while detectors at free-electron laser facilities need pulse response fast enough to match repetition rates of the source. Additionally, neutrino endpoint experiments such as HOLMES need enormous statistics, yet are extremely sensitive to pile-up effects that can distort spectra. These issues can be mitigated only by fast rising and falling edges. To address these needs, we have designed high-speed TES detectors with novel geometric enhancements to increase the thermal conductance of pixels suspended on silicon nitride membranes. This paper shows that the thermal conductivity can be precisely engineered to values spanning over an order of magnitude to achieve fast thermal relaxation times tailored to the relevant applications. Using these pixel prototypes, we demonstrate decay time constants faster than 100 μ s, while still maintaining spectral resolution of 3 eV FWHM at 1.5 keV. This paper also discusses the trade-offs inherent in reducing the pixel time constant, such as increased bias current leading to degradation in energy resolution, and potential modifications to improve performance.

  15. Multiroller traction drive speed reducer: Evaluation for automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a nominal 14:1 fixed-ratio Nasvytis multiroller traction drive retrofitted as the speed reducer in an automotive gas turbine engine. Power turbine speeds of 45,000 rpm and a drive output power of 102 kW (137 hp) were reached. The drive operated under both variable roller loading (proportional to torque) and fixed roller loading (automatic loading mechanism locked). The drive operated smoothly and efficiently as the engine speed reducer. Engine specific fuel consumption with the traction speed reducer was comparable to that with the original helical gearset.

  16. Unified Multi-speed analysis (UMA) for the condition monitoring of aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nembhard, Adrian D.; Sinha, Jyoti K.

    2015-12-01

    For rotating machinery in which speeds and dynamics constantly change, performing vibration-based condition monitoring can be challenging. Thus, an effort is made here to develop a Unified Multi-speed fault diagnosis technique that can exploit useful vibration information available at various speeds from a rotating machine in a single analysis. Commonly applied indicators are computed from data collected from a rig at different speeds for a baseline case and different faults. Four separate analyses are performed: single speed at a single bearing, integrated features from multiple speeds at a single bearing, single speed for integrated features from multiple bearings and the proposed Unified Multi-speed analysis. The Unified Multi-speed approach produces the most conspicuous separation and isolation among the conditions tested. Observations made here suggest integration of more dynamic features available at different speeds improves the learning process of the tool which could prove useful for aero-engine condition monitoring.

  17. How to Combine Engines to Achieve High Speed, Hypersonic Speed, Speed of Light and Even Higher-Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwizerwa, Celestin; Nishimwe, Celestine

    2014-03-01

    When Einstein left us, he left us a really big problem to solve, does anything can travel faster than the speed of light? There hasn't been any way to try this in the past, because there were any technology which could accelerate objects at this speed. What researchers tried to do, was to accelerate particles. But there must be a way to play with speeds so that, as we do math, we may practically multiply the speed by any number we want, we also may practically divide the speed by any number we want. In this paper I will try to show how. Also, In our real life, there might be a need of such high speeds, so that a lot of problems may be solved, as for example the airplane technology, electric power, space travel, car transmission, industrial high temperature and so on ...I do not say for sure that, the object will move faster than the speed of light, but, people who have ability may try to accelerate it at this speed and even faster to see what will happen as now it is very easy to realize. There are two ways; you go to space to do it or, you create a vacuum and move it inside.

  18. Yanmar's new N260 medium-speed engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.

    1994-06-01

    YANMAR Diesel Engine Co., Ltd., has an enviable record of sales of its engines to overseas customers, particularly for ships' gen-sets. Many of these machines are specified to burn HFO in the 380 cSt range, and the experience gained from engines in service has been well used in the development of the company's latest series of engines. Designated as the [open quotes]N[close quotes] engines, the series comprises three bore-size variations of 330, 280 and 260 mm, with the smallest of these being the last to be introduced to the market. Whereas the N330 and N280 engines are available in six and eight-cylinder configurations, the N260 engine is produced only in the six-cylinder form. However, output can be between 1103 and 1324 kW at 720 or 750 r/min. With the N260 engine, the piston stroke is 360 mm as opposed to the 330 mm of the earlier T260 design. The N260 engine design follows the contemporary idea of incorporating as many service systems into the engine frame casting to reduce maintenance on pipework and fittings. 1 fig.

  19. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

  20. High-Speed Tests of a Model Twin-Engine Low-Wing Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V; LEONARD LLOYD H

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of force tests made of a 1/8-scale model of a twin-engine low-wing transport airplane in the NACA 8-foot high-speed tunnel to investigate compressibility and interference effects of speeds up to 450 miles per hour. In addition to tests of the standard arrangement of the model, tests were made with several modifications designed to reduce the drag and to increase the critical speed.

  1. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 1: Engine design study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial tranport engine are presented. The results of the phase 1 study effort cover the following areas: (1) statement of an airline's major objectives for future transport engines, (2) airline's method of evaluating engine proposals, (3) description of an optimum engine for a long range subsonic commercial transport including installation and critical design features, (4) discussion of engine performance problems and experience with performance degradation, (5) trends in engine and pod prices with increasing technology and objectives for the future, (6) discussion of the research objectives for composites, reversers, advanced components, engine control systems, and devices to reduce the impact of engine stall, and (7) discussion of the airline objectives for noise and pollution reduction.

  2. A High-speed Engine Pressure Indicator of the Balanced Diaphragm Type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, H C; Newell, F B

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a pressure-measuring device especially adapted for use in mapping indicator diagrams of high-speed internal combustion engines. The cards are obtained by a point-to-point method giving the average of a large number of engine cycles. The principle involved is the balancing of the engine cylinder pressure against a measured pressure on the opposite side of the metal a diaphragm of negligible stiffness. In its application as an engine indicator the phase of the engine cycle to which a pressure measurement corresponds is selected by a timing device. The report discusses briefly the errors which must be avoided in the development of an indicator for light high-speed engines, where vibration is serious, and outlines the principles underlying the design of this instrument in order to be free of such errors. A detailed description of the instrument and accessories follows together with operating directions.

  3. Induction system effects on small-scale turbulence in a high-speed diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, A.E.; Mittica, A.

    1987-10-01

    The influence of the induction system on small-scale turbulence in a high-speed, automotive diesel engine was investigated under variable swirl conditions. The induction system was made up of two equiverse swirl tangential ducts, and valves of the same size and lift. Variable swirl conditions were obtained by keeping one of the inlet valves either closed or functioning, and by changing engine speed. The investigation was carried out for two induction system configurations: with both ducts operating and with only one of them operating. Two different engine speeds were considered, one relatively low (1600 rpm) and the other quite high (3000 rpm), the latter being the highest speed at which engine turbulence has been measured up to now. Cycle-resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements of air velocity were performed throughout the induction and compression strokes, under motored conditions, along a radial direction at an axial level that was virtually in the middle of the combustion chamber at top dead center. The velocity data were analyzed using the nonstationary time-averaging procedure previously developed by the authors. Correlation and spectral analysis of the small-scale turbulence so determined was also performed. The turbulence intensity and its degree of nonhomogeneity and anisotropy were sensibly influenced by the variable swirl conditions, depending on both the intake system configuration and engine speed.

  4. Legacy of earthworms' engineering effects enlarges the actual effects of earthworms on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Obdřej; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms were recognized as key factor responsible for changes from early to late successional plant communities. They incorporate organic matter into the soil and creates there persistent structures, which improves conditions for plant growth. Earthworm activity might be therefore expected to be more important in early stages of the succession, when earthworm colonization of previously earthworm free soil starts, than in the late stages of the succession, where the soil was previously modified by earthworms. However, earthworms affect plants also via other effects such as increase of nutrient availability. The relative importance of soil structure modification and other earthworm effects on plants is poorly known, despite it is important for both theoretical and applied ecology. To test the effect of earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Aporrectodea caliginosa) on plants we performed microcosm laboratory experiment, where earthworms were affecting early successional (Poa compressa, Medicago lupulina, and Daucus carota) and late successional (Arrhenatherum elatius, Lotus corniculatus, and Plantago laceolata) plat species in soil previously unaffected by earthworms and in soil with previous long term effect of earthworms. These soils were taken from the early and late successional monitoring sites of the Sokolov coal mining district with known history. Earthworms increased plant biomass proportionally more in late successional soil. It was mainly because they increased availability of nutrients (nitrate and potassium) and plants get higher advantage out of this in late successional soil. Earthworms increased plant biomass of both early and late successional species, but late successional species suppressed early successional species in competition. This suppression was more intensive in presence of earthworms and in late successional soil. We therefore found multiplicative effect between earthworm soil engineering activity and their other effects, which might be

  5. Method and apparatus for selectively controlling the speed of an engine

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roy Inge

    2001-02-27

    A control assembly 12 for use within a vehicle 10 having an engine 14 and which selectively controls the speed of the engine 14 in order to increase fuel efficiency and to effect relatively smooth starting and stopping of the engine. Particularly, in one embodiment, control assembly 12 cooperatively operates with a starter/alternator assembly 20 and is adapted for use with hybrid vehicles employing a start/stop powertrain assembly, wherein fuel efficiency is increased by selectively stopping engine operation when the vehicle has stopped.

  6. The Development of Jet-engine Nacelles for a High-speed Bomber Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, Robert E

    1947-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation made for the purpose of developing suitable jet-engine nacelle designs for a high-speed medium bomber are presented. Two types of nacelles were investigated, the first enclosing two 4000-pounds-thrust jet engines and a 65-inch-diameter landing wheel and the second enclosing a single 4000-pounds-thrust jet engine. Both types of nacelles were tested in positions underslung beneath the wing and centrally located on the wing. This report summarizes the investigation which was performed at low speed for the purpose of developing entrance and body shapes of suitable form. Included are results from the high-speed portion of the investigation on the characteristics of an underslung nacelle.

  7. A New Turbo-shaft Engine Control Law during Variable Rotor Speed Transient Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei; Miao, Lizhen; Zhang, Haibo; Huang, Jinquan

    2015-12-01

    A closed-loop control law employing compressor guided vanes is firstly investigated to solve unacceptable fuel flow dynamic change in single fuel control for turbo-shaft engine here, especially for rotorcraft in variable rotor speed process. Based on an Augmented Linear Quadratic Regulator (ALQR) algorithm, a dual-input, single-output robust control scheme is proposed for a turbo-shaft engine, involving not only the closed loop adjustment of fuel flow but also that of compressor guided vanes. Furthermore, compared to single fuel control, some digital simulation cases using this new scheme about variable rotor speed have been implemented on the basis of an integrated system of helicopter and engine model. The results depict that the command tracking performance to the free turbine rotor speed can be asymptotically realized. Moreover, the fuel flow transient process has been significantly improved, and the fuel consumption has been dramatically cut down by more than 2% while keeping the helicopter level fight unchanged.

  8. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 2: Engine preliminary design assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial transport engine are presented. The results of the phase 2 study effort cover the following areas: (1) general review of preliminary engine designs suggested for a future aircraft, (2) presentation of a long range view of airline propulsion system objectives and the research programs in noise, pollution, and design which must be undertaken to achieve the goals presented, (3) review of the impact of propulsion system unreliability and unscheduled maintenance on cost of operation, (4) discussion of the reliability and maintainability requirements and guarantees for future engines.

  9. Radiation-hard/high-speed array-based optical engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, K. K.; Buchholz, P.; Heidbrink, S.; Kagan, H. P.; Kass, R. D.; Moore, J.; Smith, D. S.; Vogt, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    We have designed and fabricated a compact array-based optical engine for transmitting data at 10 Gb/s. The device consists of a 4-channel ASIC driving a VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser) array in an optical package. The ASIC is designed using only core transistors in a 65 nm CMOS process to enhance the radiation-hardness. The ASIC contains an 8-bit DAC to control the bias and modulation currents of the individual channels in the VCSEL array. The DAC settings are stored in SEU (single event upset) tolerant registers. Several devices were irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons and the performance of the devices is satisfactory after the irradiation.

  10. Fuel Consumption of a Carburetor Engine at Various Speeds and Torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Clark, J Denny

    1938-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain fuel-consumption curves for a single-cylinder engine with a Wright 1820-G and Pratt & Whitney 1340-H cylinder at varying speeds, manifold pressures, and air-fuel ratios. The 1340- H cylinder was tested at speeds from 1,200 to 2,400 r.p.m. and at manifold pressures from 21 to 38 inches of mercury absolute. Less than extensive tests were made of the 1820-G cylinder. The results of the tests showed that the minimum brake fuel consumption was obtained when the engines were operating at high torques and at speeds from 60 to 70 percent of the rated speed. The fuel consumption increased at an increasing rate as the torque was reduced; and, at 45 percent of maximum torque, the fuel consumption was 20 percent higher than at maximum torque when the engines were operating at 70 percent of rated speed. Minimum specific fuel consumption was obtained at the same air-fuel ratio regardless of compression ratio. No improvement in fuel consumption was obtained when mixtures leaner than an air-fuel ratio of 15.5 were used. The leanest mixture ratio on which the engine with the 1340-H cylinder would operate smoothly was 18.5 and the spark advance for maximum power with this mixture ratio was 50 degrees B.T.C. A method is discussed for reducing the amount of testing necessary to obtain curves for minimum brake fuel consumption.

  11. Investigation of High-Performance Fuels in Multicylinder and in Single-Cylinder Engines at High and Cruising Engine Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Arthur H.; Nelson, R. Lee; Richard, Paul H.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare the knock-limited performance of a 20-percent triptane blend in 28-K fuel with that of 28-R and 33-R fuels at high engine speeds, cruising speeds, and two compression ratios in an K-1830-94 multicylinder engine, Data were obtained with the standard compression ratio of 6.7 and with a compression ratio of 3.0, The three fuels were investigated at engine speeds of 1800, 2250, 2600, and 2800 rpm at high and low blower ratios. A carburetor-air temperature of approximate1y 100 deg F was maintained for the multicylinder-engine runs, Data were obtained on a single R-1830-94 cylinder engine as a means of checking the multicylinder data at the higher speeds. A satisfactory correlation between average mixture temperature and knock-limited manifold pressure was obtained by plotting knock-limited manifold pressure against average mixture temperature for the whole range of engine speeds at constant carburetor air temperature and cylinder-head temperature. The single-cylinder knock-limited performance based on charge-air flow matched that of the multicylinder engine within 6 percent under all the conditions except for 28-R fuel at 2800 rpm; these curves differed from each other by 11 percent in the rich region. The knock rating of 33-R fuel was found to be a little higher than that of the 20-percent triptane blend and 26-R fuel at high mixture temperatures (above 210 deg F) and lean mixtures. The 33-R fuel exhibited rich knock limits appreciably lower than the 20-percent triptane blend, Increasing the compression ratio from 6.7 to 8.0 lowered the knock-limited manifold pressure for all fuels approximately 15 to 18 inches of mercury absolute in the cruising range and 20 to 28 inches of mercury absolute at higher engine speeds. Brake specific fuel consumption was reduced 7 to 9 percent by the increase in compression ratio from 6.7 to 8,0,

  12. High-Speed Observer: Automated Streak Detection for the Aerospike Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieckhoff, T. J.; Covan, M. A.; OFarrell, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A high-frame-rate digital video camera, installed on test stands at Stennis Space Center (SSC), has been used to capture images of the aerospike engine plume during test. These plume images are processed in real time to detect and differentiate anomalous plume events. Results indicate that the High-Speed Observer (HSO) system can detect anomalous plume streaking events that are indicative of aerospike engine malfunction.

  13. The Effects of Engine Speed and Mixture Temperature on the Knocking Characteristics of Several Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1940-01-01

    Six 100-octane and two 87-octane aviation engine fuels were tested in a modified C.F.R. variable-compression engine at 1,500, 2,000 and 2,500 rpm. The mixture temperature was raised from 50 to 300 F in approximately 50 degree steps and, at each temperature, the compression ratio was adjusted to give incipient knock as shown by a cathode ray indicator. The results are presented in tabular form. The results are analyzed on the assumption that the conditions which determine whether a given fuel will knock are the maximum values of density and temperature reached by the burning gases. A maximum permissible density factor, proportional to the maximum density of the burning gases just prior to incipient knock, and the temperature of the burning gases at that time were computed for each of the test conditions. Values of the density factors were plotted against the corresponding end-gas temperatures for the three engine speeds and also against engine speed for several and end-gas temperatures. The maximum permissible density factor varied only slightly with engine speed but decreased rapidly with an increase in the end-gas temperature. The effect of changing the mixture temperature was different for fuels of different types. The results emphasize the desirability of determining the anti knock values of fuels over a wide range of engine and intake-air conditions rather that at a single set of conditions.

  14. Fuel Property Effects on the Cold Startability of Navy High-Speed Diesel Engines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    207 MAY 1 81%7I By A.F. Montemayor D W E.C. Owens J. P. Buckingham Belvoir Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility (SwRI) Southwest Research Institute...Property Effects on the Cold Startability of Navy High-Speed Diesel Engines (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHORIS) Montemayor , A.F.; Owens, E.C.; Buckingham, J.P.; Jung

  15. Preknock Vibrations in a Spark-Ignition Engine Cylinder as Revealed by High-Speed Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Cearcy D; Logan, Walter O , Jr

    1944-01-01

    The high-speed photographic investigation of the mechanics of spark-ignition engine knock recorded in three previous reports has been extended with use of the NACA high-speed camera and combustion apparatus with a piezoelectric pressure pickup in the combustion chamber. The motion pictures of knocking combustion were taken at the rate of 40,000 frames per second. Existence of the preknock vibrations in the engine cylinder suggested in Technical Report no.727 has been definitely proved and the vibrations have been analyzed both in the high-speed motion pictures and the pressure traces. Data are also included to show that the preknock vibrations do not progressively build up to cause knock. The effect of tetraethyl lead on the preknock vibrations has been studied and results of the tests are presented. Photographs are presented which in some cases clearly show evidence of autoignition in the end zone a considerable length of time before knock occurs.

  16. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Annual technical progress report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

  17. Some Effects of Injection Advance Angle, Engine-Jacket Temperature, and Speed on Combustion in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1936-01-01

    An optical indicator and a high-speed motion-picture camera capable of operating at the rate of 2,000 frames per second were used to record simultaneously the pressure development and the flame formation in the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus. Tests were made at engine speeds of 570 and 1,500 r.p.m. The engine-jacket temperature was varied from 100 degrees to 300 degrees F. And the injection advance angle from 13 degrees after top center to 120 degrees before top center. The results show that the course of the combustion is largely controlled by the temperature and pressure of the air in the chamber from the time the fuel is injected until the time at which combustion starts and by the ignition lag. The conclusion is presented that in a compression-ignition engine with a quiescent combustion chamber the ignition lag should be the longest that can be used without excessive rates of pressure rise; any further shortening of the ignition lag decreased the effective combustion of the engine.

  18. Man B W brings two-stroke slow-speed engines back to Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Kunberger, K.

    1994-09-01

    In a move started almost ten years ago, MAN B W Diesel A/S has now centralized the company's Copenhagen activities into one place. With these moves, it seems that the restructuring of the Danish engine builder, Burmeister Wain, into a member of the worldwide diesel engine group, MAN B W, has been completed. Just as interesting, however, are recent moves to expand the company's capabilities for producing two-stroke engines in Europe. MAN in Augsburg, Germany, acquired B W in 1980. This was the time when MAN decided to terminate its own two-stroke engine developments in favor of the B W design. The two-stroke engines designed in Copenhagen are more than 90% directed to the marine market and less than 10% for land-based power plants. Whereas, in Augsburg, the four-stroke engine market activities are some 65% directed to the power generation market, leaving 35% to marine. The big medium-speed marine engines built in Augsburg are mostly used for passenger ships, cruise ships and ferries, just to name the major applications. The two-stroke engines from Copenhagen are used for container ships, tankers or bulk carriers. 2 figs.

  19. New 380 MM bore medium-speed engine from Stork-Waertsilae Diesel

    SciTech Connect

    Kunberger, K.

    1993-09-01

    In what is the first major engine development evolving from the know-how of Wartsila Diesel International and one of its group member companies, Stork-Wartsila Diesel has introduced the new SW38 medium-speed diesel engine family for power generation and marine propulsion applications. With a rated speed of 600 r/min, the SW38 engine family is suitable for 50 and 60 cycle power plants up to 11.5 MW output per set, and also makes for a compact marine propulsion system within a power bracket of 3960 to 11,880 kW. As a designated successor to the successful TM 410 family, the new SW38 series represents a completely new design. In addition to economy, ecology and reliability, production costs were an important design criteria. Unitized construction methods, with many cast-in components, results in fewer parts, and total engine weight is about 10 to 15% lower than that of similar models. Another prime goal was to optimize the engine for low emissions, without affecting the low fuel consumption. Using a new combustion philosophy, SWD claims to reduce NO[sub x] emissions by 50-70% without jeopardizing the fuel consumption. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Effects of diesel engine speed and water content on emission characteristics of three-phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan; Wang, Kuo-Hua

    2004-01-01

    The effects of water content of three-phase emulsions and engine speed on the combustion and emission characteristics of diesel engines were investigated in this study. The results show that a larger water content of water-in oil (W/O) and oil-in-water-in-oil (O/W/O) emulsion caused a higher brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) value and a lower O2, as well as a lower NOx emission, but a larger CO emission. The increase in engine speed resulted in an increase of bsfc, exhaust gas temperature, fuel-to-air ratio, CO2 emission and a decrease of NOx, CO emission, and smoke opacity. Because of the physical structural differences, the three-phase O/W/O emulsions were observed to produce a higher exhaust gas temperature, a higher emulsion viscosity and a lower CO emission, in comparison with that of the two-phase W/O emulsion. In addition, the use of W/O emulsions with water content larger than 20% may cause diesel engines to shut down earlier than those running on O/W/O emulsions with the same water content. Hence, it is suggested that the emulsions with water content larger than 20% are not suitable for use as alternative fuel for diesel engines.

  1. Performance of a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine Using Multiple Orifice Fuel Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Foster, H H

    1930-01-01

    This report presents test results obtained at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics during an investigation to determine the relative performance of a single-cylinder, high-speed, compression-ignition engine when using fuel injection valve nozzles with different numbers, sizes, and directions of round orifices. A spring-loaded, automatic injection valve was used, centrally located at the top of a vertical disk-type combustion chamber formed between horizontally opposed inlet and exhaust valves of a 5 inch by 7 inch engine.

  2. Compact opto-electronic engine for high-speed compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidman, James; Weston, Tyler; Hewitt, Donna; Herman, Matthew A.; McMackin, Lenore

    2013-09-01

    The measurement efficiency of Compressive Sensing (CS) enables the computational construction of images from far fewer measurements than what is usually considered necessary by the Nyquist- Shannon sampling theorem. There is now a vast literature around CS mathematics and applications since the development of its theoretical principles about a decade ago. Applications include quantum information to optical microscopy to seismic and hyper-spectral imaging. In the application of shortwave infrared imaging, InView has developed cameras based on the CS single-pixel camera architecture. This architecture is comprised of an objective lens to image the scene onto a Texas Instruments DLP® Micromirror Device (DMD), which by using its individually controllable mirrors, modulates the image with a selected basis set. The intensity of the modulated image is then recorded by a single detector. While the design of a CS camera is straightforward conceptually, its commercial implementation requires significant development effort in optics, electronics, hardware and software, particularly if high efficiency and high-speed operation are required. In this paper, we describe the development of a high-speed CS engine as implemented in a lab-ready workstation. In this engine, configurable measurement patterns are loaded into the DMD at speeds up to 31.5 kHz. The engine supports custom reconstruction algorithms that can be quickly implemented. Our work includes optical path design, Field programmable Gate Arrays for DMD pattern generation, and circuit boards for front end data acquisition, ADC and system control, all packaged in a compact workstation.

  3. The Charging Process in a High-speed, Single-cylinder, Four-stroke Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Blake; Schecter, Harry; Taylor, E S

    1939-01-01

    Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations were made on an aircraft-type, single cylinder engine, in order to determine the physical nature of the inlet process, especially at high piston speeds. The engine was run at speeds from 1,500 to 2,600 r.p.m. (mean piston speeds of 1,370 to 2,380 feet per minute). Measurements were made of the cylinder pressure during the inlet stroke and of the power output and volumetric efficiency. Measurements were also made, with the engine not running, to determine the resistance and mass of air in the inlet valve port at various crank angles. Results of analysis indicate that mass has an appreciable effect, but friction plays the major part in restricting flow. The observed fact that the volumetric efficiency is considerably less than 100 percent is attributed to thermal effects. An estimate was made of the magnitude of these effects in the present case, and their general nature is discussed.

  4. The Effect of Rotor Cruise Tip Speed, Engine Technology and Engine/Drive System RPM on the NASA Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR2) Size and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robuck, Mark; Wilkerson, Joseph; Maciolek, Robert; Vonderwell, Dan

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year study was conducted under NASA NNA06BC41C Task Order 10 and NASA NNA09DA56C task orders 2, 4, and 5 to identify the most promising propulsion system concepts that enable rotor cruise tip speeds down to 54% of the hover tip speed for a civil tiltrotor aircraft. Combinations of engine RPM reduction and 2-speed drive systems were evaluated. Three levels of engine and the drive system advanced technology were assessed; 2015, 2025 and 2035. Propulsion and drive system configurations that resulted in minimum vehicle gross weight were identified. Design variables included engine speed reduction, drive system speed reduction, technology, and rotor cruise propulsion efficiency. The NASA Large Civil Tiltrotor, LCTR, aircraft served as the base vehicle concept for this study and was resized for over thirty combinations of operating cruise RPM and technology level, quantifying LCTR2 Gross Weight, size, and mission fuel. Additional studies show design sensitivity to other mission ranges and design airspeeds, with corresponding relative estimated operational cost. The lightest vehicle gross weight solution consistently came from rotor cruise tip speeds between 422 fps and 500 fps. Nearly equivalent results were achieved with operating at reduced engine RPM with a single-speed drive system or with a two-speed drive system and 100% engine RPM. Projected performance for a 2025 engine technology provided improved fuel flow over a wide range of operating speeds relative to the 2015 technology, but increased engine weight nullified the improved fuel flow resulting in increased aircraft gross weights. The 2035 engine technology provided further fuel flow reduction and 25% lower engine weight, and the 2035 drive system technology provided a 12% reduction in drive system weight. In combination, the 2035 technologies reduced aircraft takeoff gross weight by 14% relative to the 2015 technologies.

  5. Orbit transfer vehicle engine technology program. Task B-6 high speed turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Bearing types were evaluated for use on the Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) high pressure fuel pump. The high speed, high load, and long bearing life requirements dictated selection of hydrostatic bearings as the logical candidate for this engine. Design and fabrication of a bearing tester to evaluate these cryogenic hydrostatic bearings was then conducted. Detailed analysis, evaluation of bearing materials, and design of the hydrostatic bearings were completed resulting in fabrication of Carbon P5N and Kentanium hydrostatic bearings. Rotordynamic analyses determined the exact bearing geometry chosen. Instrumentation was evaluated and data acquisition methods were determined for monitoring shaft motion up to speeds in excess of 200,000 RPM in a cryogenic atmosphere. Fabrication of all hardware was completed, but assembly and testing was conducted outside of this contract.

  6. Performance potential of an advanced technology Mach 3 turbojet engine installed on a conceptual high-speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Shelby J., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.; Coen, Peter G.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an advanced technology conceptual turbojet optimized for a high-speed civil aircraft is presented. This information represents an estimate of performance of a Mach 3 Brayton (gas turbine) cycle engine optimized for minimum fuel burned at supersonic cruise. This conceptual engine had no noise or environmental constraints imposed upon it. The purpose of this data is to define an upper boundary on the propulsion performance for a conceptual commercial Mach 3 transport design. A comparison is presented demonstrating the impact of the technology proposed for this conceptual engine on the weight and other characteristics of a proposed high-speed civil transport. This comparison indicates that the advanced technology turbojet described could reduce the gross weight of a hypothetical Mach 3 high-speed civil transport design from about 714,000 pounds to about 545,000 pounds. The aircraft with the baseline engine and the aircraft with the advanced technology engine are described.

  7. Constant speed control of four-stroke micro internal combustion swing engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dedong; Lei, Yong; Zhu, Honghai; Ni, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The increasing demands on safety, emission and fuel consumption require more accurate control models of micro internal combustion swing engine (MICSE). The objective of this paper is to investigate the constant speed control models of four-stroke MICSE. The operation principle of the four-stroke MICSE is presented based on the description of MICSE prototype. A two-level Petri net based hybrid model is proposed to model the four-stroke MICSE engine cycle. The Petri net subsystem at the upper level controls and synchronizes the four Petri net subsystems at the lower level. The continuous sub-models, including breathing dynamics of intake manifold, thermodynamics of the chamber and dynamics of the torque generation, are investigated and integrated with the discrete model in MATLAB Simulink. Through the comparison of experimental data and simulated DC voltage output, it is demonstrated that the hybrid model is valid for the four-stroke MICSE system. A nonlinear model is obtained from the cycle average data via the regression method, and it is linearized around a given nominal equilibrium point for the controller design. The feedback controller of the spark timing and valve duration timing is designed with a sequential loop closing design approach. The simulation of the sequential loop closure control design applied to the hybrid model is implemented in MATLAB. The simulation results show that the system is able to reach its desired operating point within 0.2 s, and the designed controller shows good MICSE engine performance with a constant speed. This paper presents the constant speed control models of four-stroke MICSE and carries out the simulation tests, the models and the simulation results can be used for further study on the precision control of four-stroke MICSE.

  8. The selection of convertible engines with current gas generator technology for high speed rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Lewis has sponsored two studies to determine the most promising convertible engine concepts for high speed rotorcraft. These studies projected year 2000 convertible technology limited to present gas generator technology. Propulsion systems for utilization on aircraft needing thrust only during cruise and those aircraft needing both power and thrust at cruise were investigated. Mission calculations for the two contractors involved were based upon the fold tilt rotor concept. Analysis and comparison of the General Electric concepts (geared UDF, clutched fan, and VIGV fan), and the Allison Gas Turbine concepts (clutched fan, VIGV fan, variable pitch fan, single rotation tractor propfan, and counter rotation tractor propfan) are presented.

  9. The selection of convertible engines with current gas generator technology for high speed rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Lewis sponsored two studies to determine the most promising convertible engine concepts for high speed rotorcraft. These studies projected year 2000 convertible technology limited to present gas generator technology. Propulsion systems for utilization on aircraft needing thrust only during cruise and those aircraft needing both power and thrust at cruise were investigated. Mission calculations for the two contractors involved were based upon the fold tilt rotor concept. Analysis and comparison of the General Electric concepts (geared UDF, clutched fan, and Variable Inlet Guide Vane (VIGV) fan), and the Allison Gas Turbine concepts (clutched fan, VIGV fan, variable pitch fan, single rotation tractor propfan, and counter rotation tractor propfan) are presented.

  10. Cylinder head temperature determination using high-speed phosphor thermometry in a fired internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Litterscheid, C.; Ding, C.-P.; Brübach, J.; Albert, B.; Dreizler, A.

    2014-08-01

    This paper documents the application of high-speed phosphor thermometry to measure cylinder head temperatures under fired engine conditions. The thermographic phosphor Gd3Ga5O12:Cr,Ce was synthesized with a special composition to meet the requirements of the measurement technique and the device under test. Calibration measurements are given in the first section, providing the temperature lifetime characteristic and temporal standard deviations in order to quantify single-shot precision. Accuracy was investigated for laser-induced heating. Measurements inside an optically accessible combustion engine are presented in the second section. Measurement locations at the cylinder head were determined, as well as temperature evolutions for variations in spark timing and air-fuel ratio.

  11. Unsteady loads measurements in a generic high speed engine model by means of recessed transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from measurements of unsteady loads during performance tests of a generic high-speed engine model, which were made using high-frequency pressure gages installed in existing calorimeter ports of the engine model and recessed into the interior wall surface in order to reduce thermal flux to the gage diaphragm. In was found that the boundary layer pressure spectra at the model wall start to deviate from their flat plate counterpart at a short distance into the model inlet, which suggests the contributions to the spectra from the shock/boundary layer interaction. It was also found that significant levels of combustion noise propagate up through the subsonic portion of the boundary layer well into the inlet region. At the condition of an unstart, the combustion noise apparently couples with the acoustic modes of the model to cause acoustic 'hot spots' well upstream of the combustor.

  12. Fuel Vaporization and Its Effect on Combustion in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1933-01-01

    The tests discussed in this report were conducted to determine whether or not there is appreciable vaporization of the fuel injected into a high-speed compression-ignition engine during the time available for injection and combustion. The effects of injection advance angle and fuel boiling temperature were investigated. The results show that an appreciable amount of the fuel is vaporized during injection even though the temperature and pressure conditions in the engine are not sufficient to cause ignition either during or after injection, and that when the conditions are such as to cause ignition the vaporization process affects the combustion. The results are compared with those of several other investigators in the same field.

  13. A simulation study of the low-speed characteristics of a light twin with an engine-out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Moul, T. M.; Brown, P. W.

    1983-01-01

    Potential safety advantages provided by the two engines on a light twin aircraft are not realized in practice as evidenced by recent engine-failure accident statistics. These statistics showed twice the fatality rate from engine failure for twins as for single-engine aircraft. The statistics showed also that one-half of the fatal engine-out accidents involved a stall. An improvement of the low-speed engine-out characteristics is, therefore, needed. An investigation of the engine-out characteristics of light twin-engine aircraft is currently being conducted as part of the comprehensive stall/spin program for general aviation aircraft. The present study is concerned with the first phase of this program. The primary objective of this study is to advance the understanding of the basic flight dynamics and piloting problems for an engine-out condition. An all-digital computer system was used in the conducted simulation study.

  14. High-speed engine/component performance assessment using exergy and thrust-based methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation summarizes a comparative study of two high-speed engine performance assessment techniques based on energy (available work) and thrust-potential (thrust availability). Simple flow-fields utilizing Rayleigh heat addition and one-dimensional flow with friction are used to demonstrate the fundamental inability of conventional energy techniques to predict engine component performance, aid in component design, or accurately assess flow losses. The use of the thrust-based method on these same examples demonstrates its ability to yield useful information in all these categories. Energy and thrust are related and discussed from the stand-point of their fundamental thermodynamic and fluid dynamic definitions in order to explain the differences in information obtained using the two methods. The conventional definition of energy is shown to include work which is inherently unavailable to an aerospace Brayton engine. An engine-based energy is then developed which accurately accounts for this inherently unavailable work; performance parameters based on this quantity are then shown to yield design and loss information equivalent to the thrust-based method.

  15. Optical engineering application of modeled photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for high-speed digital camera dynamic range optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, James; Gueymard, Christian A.

    2009-08-01

    As efforts to create accurate yet computationally efficient estimation models for clear-sky photosynthetically active solar radiation (PAR) have succeeded, the range of practical engineering applications where these models can be successfully applied has increased. This paper describes a novel application of the REST2 radiative model (developed by the second author) in optical engineering. The PAR predictions in this application are used to predict the possible range of instantaneous irradiances that could impinge on the image plane of a stationary video camera designed to image license plates on moving vehicles. The overall spectral response of the camera (including lens and optical filters) is similar to the 400-700 nm PAR range, thereby making PAR irradiance (rather than luminance) predictions most suitable for this application. The accuracy of the REST2 irradiance predictions for horizontal surfaces, coupled with another radiative model to obtain irradiances on vertical surfaces, and to standard optical image formation models, enable setting the dynamic range controls of the camera to ensure that the license plate images are legible (unsaturated with adequate contrast) regardless of the time of day, sky condition, or vehicle speed. A brief description of how these radiative models are utilized as part of the camera control algorithm is provided. Several comparisons of the irradiance predictions derived from the radiative model versus actual PAR measurements under varying sky conditions with three Licor sensors (one horizontal and two vertical) have been made and showed good agreement. Various camera-to-plate geometries and compass headings have been considered in these comparisons. Time-lapse sequences of license plate images taken with the camera under various sky conditions over a 30-day period are also analyzed. They demonstrate the success of the approach at creating legible plate images under highly variable lighting, which is the main goal of this

  16. Application of High Speed Digital Image Correlation in Rocket Engine Hot Fire Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Schmidt, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Hot fire testing of rocket engine components and rocket engine systems is a critical aspect of the development process to understand performance, reliability and system interactions. Ground testing provides the opportunity for highly instrumented development testing to validate analytical model predictions and determine necessary design changes and process improvements. To properly obtain discrete measurements for model validation, instrumentation must survive in the highly dynamic and extreme temperature application of hot fire testing. Digital Image Correlation has been investigated and being evaluated as a technique to augment traditional instrumentation during component and engine testing providing further data for additional performance improvements and cost savings. The feasibility of digital image correlation techniques were demonstrated in subscale and full scale hotfire testing. This incorporated a pair of high speed cameras to measure three-dimensional, real-time displacements and strains installed and operated under the extreme environments present on the test stand. The development process, setup and calibrations, data collection, hotfire test data collection and post-test analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  17. [Relation of actual nutritional characteristics to the health status of retirees and persons of preretirement age employed in mechanical engineering production].

    PubMed

    Grigorov, Iu G; Kozlovskaia, S G; Semes'ko, T M; Medovar, B Ia

    1988-01-01

    Actual nutrition and health state were investigated in 406 males of pre-pension and pension age (40-70 years) engaged in physical work (III category of difficulty) at an engineering plant. The chemical composition of their food was evaluated with respect to 74 chemical elements. The state of the workers' health was evaluated by the data obtained from the registers kept at the Plant medical unit. A relationship has been established between the character of the actual nutrition and the presence of an age-dependent disease, as well as the role of certain nutrients in the development of this or that disease in different age periods. A conclusion has been made on the necessity of the development of differential physiological requirements in the nutrients and energy for elder subjects engaged in the social industry, and inclusion of the rational nutrition into the complex of measures for prevention of age-dependent diseases.

  18. Human engineering analysis for the high speed civil transport flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regal, David M.; Alter, Keith W.

    1993-01-01

    The Boeing Company is investigating the feasibility of building a second generation supersonic transport. If current studies support its viability, this airplane, known as the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), could be launched early in the next century. The HSCT will cruise at Mach 2.4, be over 300 feet long, have an initial range of between 5000 and 6000 NM, and carry approximately 300 passengers. We are presently involved in developing an advanced flight deck for the HSCT. As part of this effort we are undertaking a human engineering analysis that involves a top-down, mission driven approach that will allow a systematic determination of flight deck functional and information requirements. The present paper describes this work.

  19. [Airborne Japanese cedar allergens studied by immunoblotting technique using anti-Cry j I monoclonal antibody--comparison with actual pollen counts and effect of wind speed and directions].

    PubMed

    Iwaya, M; Murakami, G; Matsuno, M; Onoue, Y; Takayanagi, M; Kayahara, M; Adachi, Y; Adachi, Y; Okada, T; Kenda, S

    1995-07-01

    We collected airborne particles of Japanese cedar pollen with Burkard's sampling tape in Toyama from February to April 1992. The tape was cut into two pieces in parallel to time axis. The one of piece of the tapes was stained with glycerin-jerry and stained pollens were counted with a microscope. The other piece was treated according to the immunoblotting technique. The airborne pollen allergens, reacting with anti-Cry j I monoclonal antibody, were stained as blue spots. The spots were classified by diameter into two groups, large spots (> 50 microns) and small spots (< 50 microns). There were significant correlations found between the airborne Cry j I allergen spots (in large and small) and actual pollen counts obtained with the Burkard's sampler and the Durham's sampler (r = 0.729, 0.586 in large spots and r = 0.676, 0.489 in small spots, p < 0.001). The counts of small spots stayed in high level even in April when actual pollen counts decreased. We concluded that this discrepancy was caused by allergenic crushed cedar pollen particles staying floating longer than actual pollens. Secondly we set a gauge of wind speed and direction at the same point as the samplers. The actual pollen counts and large spots counts were significantly larger in the wind (SE wind in Toyama city) from cedar trees blooming area than other areas. However small spots counts did not differ significantly according to wind directions. Wind speed did not effect on actual pollen counts, large spots counts and small spots count.

  20. Experimental study on the effect of varying syngas composition on the emissions of dual fuel CI engine operating at various engine speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahgoub, B. K. M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Karim, Z. A. A.; Hagos, F. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Using syngas as a supplement fuel of diesel in dual fuel mode is a proposed solution in the effort to protect the environment and control the serious threats posed by greenhouse gas emissions from compression ignition engines. The objective of this study was to experimentally examine the effect of syngas composition on the exhaust emission of dual fuel compression ignition (CI) engine at various engine speeds, and to compare the operating ranges of imitated syngas versus pure diesel. The study was conducted using a naturally aspirated, two strokes, single cylinder 3.7 kW diesel engine operated at speeds of 1200, 2000 and 3000 rpm. The engine was tested with three different syngas compositions. Diesel fuel was partially substituted by syngas through the air inlet. The test results disclose the impact of using syngas in CI engines on emission of CO2, NOx, unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The experimental measurements confirmed that all syngas compositions are capable of reducing the emissions of CO2 and NOX compared with diesel fuel. Wide range of diesel replacement ratios (up to 72%) was attained without any penalty. Syngas with composition of 49% N2, 12% CO2, 25% CO, 10% H2, and 4% CH4 reduced the emissions of CO2 and NOx at engine speed of 1200 rpm up to 1% and 108 ppm, respectively. The lowest emission of UHC and NOx was emitted when the engine was operating at speed of 2000 rpm and 3000 rpm, respectively with composition of 38% N2, 8% Co2, 29% CO, 19% H2, and 6% CH4. Therefore, syngas could be a promising technique for controlling NOx emissions in CI engines. However, hydrogen content in syngas is important parameter that needs to be further investigation for its effect.

  1. Investigations of an air starting motor of marine medium-speed diesel engine with numerical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yeon Won; Choi, Yoon Hwan; Doh, Deog Hee

    2010-04-01

    The marine medium-speed diesel engines are started by two methods; one is the electric motors, and the other air starting motors. Even though air starting motor is dependent of the engine types and sizes, it has been widely used in this area due to its simplicity, convenience and reliability. The purpose of this paper is to give the designing parameters in order to make a proper "Air Starting Motor" using CFD. The aerodynamic approaches were given to understand the internal flow characteristics of the air starting motor. In addition, we have carried out the investigation of effects of tip clearance. In the calculations the tip clearance of air starting motor has been varied between 0, 2.8, 4.3 and 5.7% of blade span. The results of computation are the tip clearance increased to 2.8%, the torque decreased 24%, and there was no more large changes when the clearances increased to 4.3% and 5.7%.

  2. Comprehensive Modeling and Analysis of Rotorcraft Variable Speed Propulsion System With Coupled Engine/Transmission/Rotor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSmidt, Hans A.; Smith, Edward C.; Bill, Robert C.; Wang, Kon-Well

    2013-01-01

    This project develops comprehensive modeling and simulation tools for analysis of variable rotor speed helicopter propulsion system dynamics. The Comprehensive Variable-Speed Rotorcraft Propulsion Modeling (CVSRPM) tool developed in this research is used to investigate coupled rotor/engine/fuel control/gearbox/shaft/clutch/flight control system dynamic interactions for several variable rotor speed mission scenarios. In this investigation, a prototypical two-speed Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) is proposed and designed to achieve 50 percent rotor speed variation. The comprehensive modeling tool developed in this study is utilized to analyze the two-speed shift response of both a conventional single rotor helicopter and a tiltrotor drive system. In the tiltrotor system, both a Parallel Shift Control (PSC) strategy and a Sequential Shift Control (SSC) strategy for constant and variable forward speed mission profiles are analyzed. Under the PSC strategy, selecting clutch shift-rate results in a design tradeoff between transient engine surge margins and clutch frictional power dissipation. In the case of SSC, clutch power dissipation is drastically reduced in exchange for the necessity to disengage one engine at a time which requires a multi-DCT drive system topology. In addition to comprehensive simulations, several sections are dedicated to detailed analysis of driveline subsystem components under variable speed operation. In particular an aeroelastic simulation of a stiff in-plane rotor using nonlinear quasi-steady blade element theory was conducted to investigate variable speed rotor dynamics. It was found that 2/rev and 4/rev flap and lag vibrations were significant during resonance crossings with 4/rev lagwise loads being directly transferred into drive-system torque disturbances. To capture the clutch engagement dynamics, a nonlinear stick-slip clutch torque model is developed. Also, a transient gas-turbine engine model based on first principles mean

  3. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial engines. 3: Propulsion system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial transport engine are presented. The results of the phase 3 effort cover the requirements and objectives for future aircraft propulsion systems. These requirements reflect the results of the Task 1 and 2 efforts and serve as a baseline for future evaluations, specification development efforts, contract/purchase agreements, and operational plans for future subsonic commercial engines. This report is divided into five major sections: (1) management objectives for commercial propulsion systems, (2) performance requirements for commercial transport propulsion systems, (3) design criteria for future transport engines, (4) design requirements for powerplant packages, and (5) testing.

  4. The comparative performance of Roots type aircraft engine superchargers as affected by change in impeller speed and displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Marsden; Wilson, Ernest E

    1929-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made on three sizes of roots type aircraft engine superchargers. The impeller contours and diameters of these machines were the same, but the length were 11, 8 1/4, and 4 inches, giving displacements of 0.509, 0.382, and 0.185 cubic foot per impeller revolution. The information obtained serves as a basis for the examination of the individual effects of impeller speed and displacement on performance and of the comparative performance when speed and displacement are altered simultaneously to meet definite service requirements. According to simple theory, when assuming no losses, the air weight handled and the power required for a given pressure difference are directly proportional to the speed and the displacement. These simple relations are altered considerably by the losses. When comparing the performance of different sizes of machines whose impeller speeds are so related that the same service requirements are met, it is found that the individual effects of speed and displacement are canceled to a large extent, and the only considerable difference is the difference in the power losses which decrease with increase in the displacement and the accompanying decrease in speed. This difference is small in relation to the net power of the engine supercharger unit, so that a supercharger with short impellers may be used in those applications where the space available is very limited with any considerable sacrifice in performance.

  5. Engineering approach to the prediction of shock patterns in bounded high-speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azevedo, D. J.; Liu, Ching Shi

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional symmetric wedge configuration representative of a single high-speed intake in steady flow was investigated. The analysis presented here is intended as an engineering approach for estimating certain features of the internal shock system. The primary interest here is the prediction of the size and location of the almost-normal shock wave that develops when the leading-edge shocks intersect at angles above a certain critical value that is less than the wedge detachment angle. The almost-normal shock wave is frequently referred to as the 'Mach stem', Parametric studies enabled the sensitivity of the Mach stem height to various flowfield parameters to be examined, thus indicating how accurately these parameters must be measured in a given experiment. Results of these predictions were compared with those of a steady-flow experiment performed at nominal freestream Mach numbers from 2.8 to 5. The predicted stem heights were consistently lower than the mean experimental values, attributable both to experimental uncertainties and to certain simplifying assumptions used in the analysis. Modification of these assumptions to better represent the test environment improved the analytical results.

  6. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE... an engine family's power density in kW/L by dividing the unrounded maximum engine power by the...

  7. High-speed IR monitoring of a turbojet engine gas flow using an uncooled MWIR imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares-Herrero, R.; Archilla-Prat, V.; Montojo-Supervielle, M. T.; Gutiérrez-Álvarez, R.; Vergara, G.; Baldasano-Ramírez, A.; Mercader, Daniel; Jiménez, Ana

    2011-05-01

    Several sensors are used during the performance tests of a turbojet engine to record parameters such as temperature, pressure, vibration, etc. However, most of these sensors have long time constants and are unable to measure fast transients and fluctuations. In this paper we show an alternative sensor to characterize some phenomena observing the flow resulting from the combustion at the outlet of a turbojet engine, using a very high-speed uncooled MWIR COTS imaging sensor from New Infrared Technologies, which provides over 1,600 fps. The experiments include monitoring of flow stability during a long observation time (accelerations and stationary regimes), and higher frequency events such as surges. Compressor surges produce extremely loud bangs from the engine, and may be accompanied by a fast increment of the exhaust gas temperature and an increase in rotor speed due to the reduction in work done by the stalled compressor, causing severe stresses within the engine from the intense aerodynamic buffeting within the compressor. The main conclusion of this study is the demonstration of the potential and worthiness of high-speed uncooled IR imagers for detecting and analyzing fast transient events and stationary events during combustion test studies from thrusters such as turbojets and rockets.

  8. High-speed laser-induced fluorescence and spark plug absorption sensor diagnostics for mixing and combustion studies in engines.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Michael; Schucht, Torsten; Thiele, Olaf; Sick, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous high-speed in-cylinder measurements of laser-induced fluorescence of biacetyl as a fuel tracer and mid-infrared broadband absorption of fuel and combustion products (water and carbon dioxide) using a spark plug probe are compared in an optical engine. The study addresses uncertainties and the applicability of absorption measurements at a location slightly offset to the spark plug when information about mixing at the spark plug is desired. Absorbance profiles reflect important engine operation events, such as valve opening and closing, mixing, combustion, and outgassing from crevices.

  9. High speed photography and pulsed laser holography for diagnostic investigations of mixture formation and vibration in reciprocating engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, H.; Wanders, K.; Mueller, J.; Steinbichler, H.

    1983-08-01

    Using high speed photography, injection and mixture formation processes were recorded and the ignition delay time was determined at full load of a reference diesel engine at 2500 rpm. Pressure was measured by a quartz pressure transducer. Pressure increase was compared with ignition delay. Using holographic interferometry, the injection jet interaction with its environment in the atmosphere was shown. In order to identify the optimum points for fixing antiknocking sensors, holographic interferometry is recommended, because of its high local resolution. For localizing noise sources, holographic recording and evaluation of the vibration modes of complete engine transmission systems under sinusoidal and operational excitation is useful.

  10. Analysis of the Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) Energy Bypass Engine for High-Speed Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of the MHD energy bypass air-breathing engine for high-speed propulsion is analyzed in this investigation. This engine is a specific type of the general class of inverse cycle engines. In this paper, the general relationship between engine performance (specific impulse and specific thrust) and the overall total pressure ratio through an engine (from inlet plane to exit plane) is first developed and illustrated. Engines with large total pressure decreases, regardless of cause or source, are seen to have exponentially decreasing performance. The ideal inverse cycle engine (of which the MHD engine is a sub-set) is then demonstrated to have a significant total pressure decrease across the engine; this total pressure decrease is cycle-driven, degrades rapidly with energy bypass ratio, and is independent of any irreversibility. The ideal MHD engine (inverse cycle engine with no irreversibility other than that inherent in the MHD work interaction processes) is next examined and is seen to have an additional large total pressure decrease due to MHD-generated irreversibility in the decelerator and the accelerator. This irreversibility mainly occurs in the deceleration process. Both inherent total pressure losses (inverse cycle and MHD irreversibility) result in a significant narrowing of the performance capability of the MHD bypass engine. The fundamental characteristics of MHD flow acceleration and flow deceleration from the standpoint of irreversibility and second-law constraints are next examined in order to clarify issues regarding flow losses and parameter selection in the MM modules. Severe constraints are seen to exist in the decelerator in terms of allowable deceleration Mach numbers and volumetric (length) required for meaningful energy bypass (work interaction). Considerable difficulties are also encountered and discussed due to thermal/work choking phenomena associated with the deceleration process. Lastly, full engine simulations utilizing inlet

  11. A High-Speed Motion-Picture Study of Normal Combustion, Knock and Preignition in a Spark-Ignition Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Spencer, R C; Miller, Cearcy D

    1941-01-01

    Combustion in a spark-ignition engine was investigated by means of the NACA high-speed motion-picture cameras. This camera is operated at a speed of 40,000 photographs a second and therefore makes possible the study of changes that take place in the intervals as short as 0.000025 second. When the motion pictures are projected at the normal speed of 16 frames a second, any rate of movement shown is slowed down 2500 times. Photographs are presented of normal combustion, of combustion from preignitions, and of knock both with and without preignition. The photographs of combustion show that knock may be preceded by a period of exothermic reaction in the end zone that persists for a time interval of as much as 0.0006 second. The knock takes place in 0.00005 second or less.

  12. Development of advanced combustion technology for medium- and high-speed natural gas engines. Final report, January 1985-February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.E.

    1989-07-01

    The project investigated the several variables which influence the performance of pre-chamber equipped, lean-burn natural gas engines in general, and of the pre-chamber in particular. The effort was divided into four closely inter-related phases: Theoretical Analysis, Constant Volume Combustion (CVC) Rig Tests, Single Cylinder Engine Tests and Multi-Cylinder Engine Tests. The Theoretical Analysis was directed toward development of a computer program, called COGEN, which was then used to predict output performance trends resulting from changes to input parameters. The CVC Rig Test program was directed towards an improved understanding of the pre-chamber combustion process using high speed photography and simultaneous measurement of instantaneous pressures. Variations of pre-chamber size, throat design and air-fuel ratio were studied to guide the later engine test programs. The Single Cylinder Engine Tests were directed towards bridging the gap between the CVC Test Rig and the performance to be expected from a commercial multi-cylinder engine. Variations in pre-chamber design as well as engine compression ratio, Intake Manifold Temperature and load were investigated.

  13. Performance of J33-A-27 Turbojet-Engine Compressor. III; Over-All Performance Characteristics of Modified Compressor with Water Injection at Design Equivalent Speed of 11,800 RPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withee, Joseph R., Jr.; Beede, William L.; Ginsburg, Ambrose

    1950-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of water injection on the over-all performance of a modified J33-A-27 turbojet-engine compressor at the design equivalent speed of 11,800 rpm. The water-air ratio by weight was 0.05. With water injection the peak pressure ratio increased 9.0 per- cent, the maximum efficiency decreased 15 percent (actual numerical difference 0.12), and. the maximum total weight flow increased 9.3 percent.

  14. The performance and application of high speed long life LH2 hybrid bearings for reusable rocket engine turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented for two different experimental programs which were conducted to investigate the characteristics of a hybrid (hydrostatic/ball) bearing operating in liquid hydrogen. The same bearing design was used in both programs. Analytical predictions were made of the bearing characteristics and are compared with the experimental results when possible. The first program used a bearing tester to determine the steady state, transient, and cyclic life characteristics of the bearing over a wide range of operating conditions. The second program demonstrated the feasibility of applying hybrid bearings to an actual high speed turbopump by retrofitting and then testing an existing liquid hydrogen turbopump with the bearings.

  15. Role of Air-Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines in High Speed Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Lee, Jin-Ho; Anderberg, Michael O.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of flight Mach number on the relative performance of pulse detonation engines and gas turbine engines is investigated. The effect of ram and mechanical compression on combustion inlet temperature and the subsequent sensible heat release is determined. Comparison of specific thrust, fuel consumption and impulse for the two engines show the relative benefits over the Mach number range.

  16. Benefits of variable rotor speed in integrated helicopter/engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Takanori; Rock, Stephen M.

    1993-01-01

    Current helicopter flight and propulsion controls are typically designed with the assumption that rotor speed will be held to a constant setpoint. A new flight and propulsion control system using a continuously variable rotor speed command is proposed to improve the maneuverability and agility of helicopter systems. In this new approach, the flight control system generates an optimal variable rotor speed command in addition to conventional control commands in a framework of integrated flight/propulsion control. The benefits (i.e. improved maneuverability and agility) of varying rotor speed during transient maneuvers are demonstrated using a bob-up maneuver as an example. In particular, two types of benefits are identified in different maneuver conditions. One comes from a thrust augmentation, while the other comes from an exchange of rotational and translational energy. In the example, a simple linear dynamic hover model is used with an optimal control design method to generate the optimal rotor speed command.

  17. Effects of unbalance location on dynamic characteristics of high-speed gasoline engine turbocharger with floating ring bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longkai; Bin, Guangfu; Li, Xuejun; Liu, Dingqu

    2016-03-01

    For the high-speed gasoline engine turbocharger rotor, due to the heterogeneity of multiple parts material, manufacturing and assembly errors, running wear in impeller and uneven carbon of turbine, the random unbalance usually can be developed which will induce excessive rotor vibration, and even lead to nonlinear vibration accidents. However, the investigation of unbalance location on the nonlinear high-speed turbocharger rotordynamic characteristics is less. In order to discuss the rotor unbalance location effects of turbocharger with nonlinear floating ring bearings(FRBs), the realistic turbocharger of gasoline engine is taken as a research object. The rotordynamic equations of motion under the condition of unbalance are derived by applied unbalance force and nonlinear oil film force of FRBs. The FE model of turbocharger rotor-bearing system is modeled which includes the unbalance excitation and nonlinear FRBs. Under the conditions of four different applied locations of unbalance, the nonlinear transient analyses are performed based on the rotor FEM. The differences of dynamic behavior are obvious to the turbocharger rotor systems for four conditions, and the bifurcation phenomena are different. From the results of waterfall and transient response analysis, the speed for the appearance of fractional frequency is not identical and the amplitude magnitude is different from the different unbalance locations, and the non-synchronous vibration does not occur in the turbocharger and the amplitude is relative stable and minimum under the condition 4. The turbocharger vibration and non-synchronous components could be reduced or suppressed by controlling the applied location of unbalance, which is helpful for the dynamic design, fault diagnosis and vibration control of the high-speed gasoline engine turbochargers.

  18. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the cylinders, the stroke length, and the number of cylinders. Calculate the engine's intended... cylinders having an internal diameter of 13.0 cm and a 15.5 cm stroke length, the rounded displacement...

  19. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the cylinders, the stroke length, and the number of cylinders. Calculate the engine's intended... cylinders having an internal diameter of 13.0 cm and a 15.5 cm stroke length, the rounded displacement...

  20. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the cylinders, the stroke length, and the number of cylinders. Calculate the engine's intended... cylinders having an internal diameter of 13.0 cm and a 15.5 cm stroke length, the rounded displacement...

  1. 76 FR 78 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard; Engine Control Module Speed Limiter Device

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... speeding, tailgating, and abrupt lane changes. These commenters expressed the belief that limiting the... time that will allow manufacturers to undergo a systems integration process. The change to the...

  2. Develop the dual fuel conversion system for high output, medium speed diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-16

    The original plan for the project involved design modifications to an existing system to enhance its performance and increase the limit of power that was achieved by the original design and to apply the higher performance product to the full sized engine and test its performance. The new system would also be applied to a different engine model. The specific work would include the redesign of gas injectors, piston configurations and two types of igniters, engine instrumentation, monitoring and testing.

  3. Low emissions combustor technology for high-speed civil transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: NASA High Speed Research (HSR) ozone research objectives; NO(x) formation; emission reduction; High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) supersonic cruise combustion operating conditions; NO(x) correlations; typical NO(x) characteristics of a current technology and low NO(x) combustors; HSCT emission reduction strategies; variation of NO(x) with equivalence ratio; the Emission Reduction Program; and emission reduction milestones.

  4. Relation Between Spark-Ignition Engine Knock, Detonation Waves, and Autoignition as Shown by High-Speed Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Cearcy D

    1946-01-01

    A critical review of literature bearing on the autoignition and detonation-wave theories of spark-ignition engine knock and on the nature of gas vibrations associated with combustion and knock results in the conclusion that neither the autoignition theory nor the detonation-wave theory is an adequate explanation of spark-ignition engine knock. A knock theory is proposed, combining the autoignition and detonation-wave theories, which introduces the idea that the detonation wave develops in autoignited or after-burning gases, and ascribes comparatively low-pitched heavy knocks to autoignition but high-pitched pinging knocks to detonation waves with the possibility of combinations of the two types of knocks. Analysis of five shots of knocking combustion, taken with the NACA high-speed motion-picture camera at the rate of 40,000 photographs per second reveals propagation speeds ranging from 3250 to more than 5500 feet per second. The range of propagation speeds from 3250 to more than 5500 feet per second is held to be considered with the proposed combined theory but not with either the simple autoignition theory or the simple detonation-wave theory.

  5. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Final report, September 28, 1990--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.; Ryan, T.W. III; Schwalb, J.A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, R.P. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The goal of this program was to study the feasibility of operating a Detroit Diesel Series 149 engine at high speeds using a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. The CWS-fueled 149 engine is proposed for the mine-haul off-highway truck and work boat marine markets. Economic analysis studies indicate that, for these markets, the use of CWS fuel could have sufficient operating cost savings, depending upon the future diesel fuel price, emission control system capital and operating costs, and maintenance and overhaul costs. A major portion of the maintenance costs is expected to be due to lower life and higher cost of the CWS injectors. Injection and combustion systems were specially designed for CWS, and were installed in one cylinder of a Detroit Diesel 8V-149TI engine for testing. The objective was to achieve engine operation for sustained periods at speeds up to 1,900 rpm with reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate. A computer simulation predicted autoignition of coal fuel at 1,900 rpm would require an average droplet size of 18 microns and 19:1 compression ratio, so the injection system, and pistons were designed accordingly. The injection system was capable of supplying the required volume of CWS/injection with a duration of approximately 25 crank angle degrees and peak pressures on the order of 100 mpa. In addition to the high compression ratio, the combustion system also utilized hot residual gases in the cylinder, warm inlet air admission and ceramic insulated engine components to enhance combustion. Autoignition of CWS fuel was achieved at 1900 rpm, at loads ranging from 20--80 percent of the rated load of diesel-fuel powered cylinders. Limited emissions data indicates coal burnout rates in excess of 99 percent. NO{sub x} levels were significantly lower, while unburned hydrocarbon levels were higher for the CWS fueled cylinder than for corresponding diesel-fuel powered cylinders.

  6. Procedure for generating global atmospheric engine emissions data from future supersonic transport aircraft. The 1990 high speed civil transport studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, R. A.; Stroup, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The input for global atmospheric chemistry models was generated for baseline High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configurations at Mach 1.6, 2.2, and 3.2. The input is supplied in the form of number of molecules of specific exhaust constituents injected into the atmosphere per year by latitude and by altitude (for 2-D codes). Seven exhaust constituents are currently supplied: NO, NO2, CO, CO2, H2O, SO2, and THC (Trace Hydrocarbons). An eighth input is also supplied, NO(x), the sum of NO and NO2. The number of molecules of a given constituent emitted per year is a function of the total fuel burned by a supersonic fleet and the emission index (EI) of the aircraft engine for the constituent in question. The EIs for an engine are supplied directly by the engine manufacturers. The annual fuel burn of a supersonic fleet is calculated from aircraft performance and economic criteria, both of which are strongly dependent on basic design parameters such as speed and range. The altitude and latitude distribution of the emission is determined based on 10 Intern. Air Transport Assoc. (IATA) regions chosen to define the worldwide route structure for future HSCT operations and the mission flight profiles.

  7. The 727 airplane side inlet low-speed performance confirmation model test for refanned JT8D engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuehle, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a low-speed wind tunnel test of a 0.3 scale model 727 airplane side inlet for JT8D-100 engines are presented. The objectives of the test were to develop lines for a full-scale flightworthy inlet, to evaluate inlet total pressure recovery and steady-state total pressure distortion, and to obtain model-scale distortion data which can be used in the assessment of the compatibility of the inlet with the JT8D-100 series engines. A secondary objective was to obtain internal/external cowl static pressures for the determination of nacelle loads. Two basic inlet models were tested at static, forward speed, angle-of-attack (inflow angle), and cross-wind conditions. One model was with and one without an acoustic ring. Two modifications to the models were also tested, one with the ring closer to the inlet throat and one with a larger lip. Test measurements consisted of inlet surface static pressure, engine face total pressure, inlet airflow, tunnel total pressure, tunnel total temperature and tunnel velocity. Total pressure traverses were taken directly behind the ring and strut. No dynamic measurements were taken.

  8. Design and operation of a medium speed 12-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine. Phase 2: Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confer, G. L.; Hsu, B. D.; McDowell, R. E.; Gal, E.; Vankleunen, W.; Kaldor, S.; Mengel, M.

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, General Electric has been pioneering the development of a coal fired diesel engine to power a locomotive. The feasibility of using a coal water slurry (CWS) mixture as a fuel in a medium speed diesel engine has been demonstrated with the first successful locomotive systems test in 1991 on the GE Transportation Systems test track in Erie, PA. Phase 2 of the development process incorporates the results of the programs research in durable engine parts, improved combustion efficiency, and emissions reduction. A GE 7FDL12 engine has been built using diamond insert injector nozzles, tungsten carbide coated piston rings, and tungsten carbide coated liners to overcome power assembly wear. Electronic controlled fuel injection for both diesel pilot and main CWS injector were incorporated to control injection timing. An envelop filter and copper oxide sorbent system were used to cleanup engine emissions. The system is capable of removing over 99% of the particulates, 90% of the SO2, and 85% of NO(x).

  9. Analysis of Experimental Sea-level Transient Data and Analog Method of Obtaining Altitude Response for Turbine-propeller Engine with Relay-type Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasu, George; Pack, George J

    1951-01-01

    Correlation has been established between transient engine and control data obtained experimentally and data obtained by simulating the engine and control with an analog computer. This correlation was established at sea-level conditions for a turbine-propeller engine with a relay-type speed control. The behavior of the controlled engine at altitudes of 20,000 and 35,000 feet was determined with an analog computer using the altitude pressure and temperature generalization factors to calculate the new engine constants for these altitudes. Because the engine response varies considerably at altitude some type of compensation appears desirable and four methods of compensation are discussed.

  10. Identification of Knock in NACA High-Speed Photographs of Combustion in a Spark-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Cearcy D; Olsen, H Lowell

    1943-01-01

    Report presents the results of a study of combustion in a spark-ignition engine given in NACA Technical Reports 704 and 727. The present investigation was made with the NACA high-speed motion-picture camera, operating at 40,000 photographs a second, and with a cathode-ray oscillograph operating on a piezoelectric pick-up in the combustion chamber. Photographs are presented showing that the origin of knock is not necessarily in the end gas. The data obtained indicates that knock takes place only in a part of the cylinder charge which has been previously ignited either by autoignition or by the passage of the flame fronts but which has not burned to completion. Mottled regions in the high-speed Schlieren photographs are demonstrated to represent combustion regions.

  11. Engine technology challenges for a 21st century high speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent NASA funded studies by Boeing and Douglas suggest an opportunity exists for a 21st Century High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) to become part of the international air transportation system. However, before this opportunity for high speed travel can be realized, certain environmental and and economic barrier issues must be overcome. These challenges are outlined. Research activities which NASA has planned to address these barrier issues and to provide a technology base to allow U.S. manufacturers to make an informed go/no go decision on developing the HSCT are discussed.

  12. Bibliography on aerodynamics of airframe/engine integration of high-speed turbine-powered aircraft, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography was developed as a first step in the preparation of a monograph on the subject of the aerodynamics of airframe/engine integration of high speed turbine powered aircraft. It lists 1535 unclassified documents published mainly in the period from 1955 to 1980. Primary emphasis was devoted to aerodynamic problems and interferences encountered in the integration process; however, extensive coverage also was given to the characteristics and problems of the isolated propulsion system elements. A detailed topic breakdown structure is used. The primary contents of the individual documents are indicated by the combination of the document's title and its location within the framework of the bibliography.

  13. The effects of engine speed and injection characteristics on the flow field and fuel/air mixing in motored two-stroke diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Carpenter, M. H.; Ramos, J. I.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented on the effects of the engine speed, injection angle, droplet distribution function, and spray cone angle on the flow field, spray penetration and vaporization, and turbulence in a turbocharged motored two-stroke diesel engine. The results indicate that the spray penetration and vaporization, velocity, and turbulence kinetic energy increase with the intake swirl angle. Good spray penetration, vaporization, and mixing can be achieved by injecting droplets of diameters between 50 and 100 microns along a 120-deg cone at about 315 deg before top-dead-center for an intake swirl angle of 30 deg. The spray penetration and vaporization were found to be insensitive to the turbulence levels within the cylinder. The results have also indicated that squish is necessary in order to increase the fuel vaporization rate and mixing.

  14. Fiber optic sensors for measuring angular position and rotational speed. [air breathing engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two optical sensors, a 360 deg rotary encoder and a tachometer, were built for operation with the light source and detectors located remotely from the sensors. The source and detectors were coupled to the passive sensing heads through 3.65 meter fiber optic cables. The rotary encoder and tachometer were subjected to limited environmental testing. They were installed on an air breathing engine during recent altitude tests. Over 100 hours of engine operation were accumulated without any failure of either device.

  15. Scientific instrument engineering at Japanese congresses devoted to high-speed imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelev, Mikhail Ya

    2011-06-30

    The information about the congresses held in Japan and devoted to fast imaging processes and photonics is presented. Reports devoted to the technique and the results of applications of superhigh-speed recording instrumentation in different fields of science and technology are considered. (registration of fast processes)

  16. PIV, high-speed PLIF and chemiluminescence imaging for near-spark-plug investigations in IC engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, C. M.; Smith, J. D.; Sick, V.

    2006-07-01

    Measurements of the local flow and mixture condition near the spark plug of internal combustion engines are important to characterize their influence on ignition and combustion performance. This is especially true for direct-injection engines where limited time is available for mixture formation and optimum stratification of the fuel/air mixture to achieve best performance. Transient processes need to be visualized in an optically challenging environment. The application of digital Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for flow field measurements along with crank angle-resolved planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and chemiluminescence imaging is discussed in the context of investigations of a highly stratified sprayguided direct-injection engine. Flow fields were captured in a firing optical single-cylinder engine to study the interaction of the fast spray and the underlying in-cylinder tumble flow. The impingement of the fuel spray on the spark plug electrodes and subsequent dispersion of the fuel cloud was filmed at a rate of 12kHz with a new PLIF technique using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser. Subsequent flame development and combustion progress could be followed via high-speed imaging of OH* chemiluminescence. This approach was also combined with double- pulse PLIF imaging of fuel distributions.

  17. A Study by High-Speed Photography of Combustion and Knock in a Spark-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Cearcy D

    1942-01-01

    The study of combustion in a spark-ignition engine given in Technical Report no. 704 has been continued. The investigation was made with the NACA high-speed motion-picture camera and the NACA optical engine indicator. The camera operates at the rate of 40,000 photographs a second and makes possible the study of phenomena occurring in time intervals as short as 0.000025 second. Photographs are presented of combustion without knock and with both light and heavy knocks, the end zone of combustion being within the field of view. Time-pressure records covering the same conditions as the photographs are presented and their relations to the photographs are studied. Photographs with ignition at various advance angles are compared with a view to observing any possible relationship between pressure and flame depth. A tentative explanation of knock is suggested, which is designed to agree with the indications of the high-speed photographs and the time-pressure records.

  18. Investigation of upper-surface-blowing nacelle integration at cruise speeds utilizing powered engine simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meleason, E. T.; Wells, O. D.

    1976-01-01

    Various overwing nacelle designs were investigated on a representative four engine short haul aircraft configuration during a combined analytical and experimental program. Design conditions were M sub o = 0.7 and C sub L = 0.4. All nacelles had D shaped nozzle exits and included a streamline contoured design, a low boattail angle reference configuration, and a high boattail angle powered lift design. Testing was done with the design four engine airplane configuration as well as with only inboard nacelles installed. Turbopowered engine simulators were used to provide realistic representation of nacelle flows. Performance trends are compared for the various nacelle designs. In addition, comparisons are presented between analytical and experimental pressure distributions and between flow through and powered simulator results.

  19. Engineering prediction of turbulent skin friction and heat transfer in high-speed flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bertram, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    A large collection of experimental turbulent-skin-friction and heat-transfer data for flat plates and cones was used to determine the most accurate of six of the most popular engineering-prediction methods; the data represent a Mach number range from 4 to 13 and ratio of wall to total temperature ranging from 0.1 to 0.7. The Spalding and Chi method incorporating virtual-origin concepts was found to be the best prediction method for Mach numbers less than 10; the limited experimental data for Mach numbers greater than 10 were not well predicted by any of the engineering methods except the Coles method.

  20. Compact high-speed MWIR spectrometer applied to monitor CO2 exhaust dynamics from a turbojet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares-Herrero, R.; Vergara, G.; Gutiérrez Álvarez, R.; Fernández Montojo, C.; Gómez, L. J.; Villamayor, V.; Baldasano Ramírez, A.; Montojo, M. T.; Archilla, V.; Jiménez, A.; Mercader, D.; González, A.; Entero, A.

    2013-05-01

    Dfgfdg Due to international environmental regulations, aircraft turbojet manufacturers are required to analyze the gases exhausted during engine operation (CO, CO2, NOx, particles, unburned hydrocarbons (aka UHC), among others).Standard procedures, which involve sampling the gases from the exhaust plume and the analysis of the emissions, are usually complex and expensive, making a real need for techniques that allow a more frequent and reliable emissions measurements, and a desire to move from the traditional gas sampling-based methods to real time and non-intrusive gas exhaust analysis, usually spectroscopic. It is expected that the development of more precise and faster optical methods will provide better solutions in terms of performance/cost ratio. In this work the analysis of high-speed infrared emission spectroscopy measurements of plume exhaust are presented. The data was collected during the test trials of commercial engines carried out at Turbojet Testing Center-INTA. The results demonstrate the reliability of the technique for studying and monitoring the dynamics of the exhausted CO2 by the observation of the infrared emission of hot gases. A compact (no moving parts), high-speed, uncooled MWIR spectrometer was used for the data collection. This device is capable to register more than 5000 spectra per second in the infrared band ranging between 3.0 and 4.6 microns. Each spectrum is comprised by 128 spectral subbands with aband width of 60 nm. The spectrometer operated in a passive stand-off mode and the results from the measurements provided information of both the dynamics and the concentration of the CO2 during engine operation.

  1. High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for studying in-cylinder processes in a DI diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, K. T.

    1995-07-01

    The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 micron sec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color W imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

  2. Small High-Speed Self-Acting Shaft Seals for Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, R. E.; Boynton, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Design analysis, fabrication, and experimental evaluation were performed on three self-acting facetype LOX seal designs and one circumferential-type helium deal design. The LOX seals featured Rayleigh step lift pad and spiral groove geometry for lift augmentation. Machined metal bellows and piston ring secondary seal designs were tested. The helium purge seal featured floating rings with Rayleigh step lift pads. The Rayleigh step pad piston ring and the spiral groove LOX seals were successfully tested for approximately 10 hours in liquid oxygen. The helium seal was successfully tested for 24 hours. The shrouded Rayleigh step hydrodynamic lift pad LOX seal is feasible for advanced, small, high-speed oxygen turbopumps.

  3. Engine technology challenges for a 21st Century High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.; Gilkey, Samuel; Hines, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Ongoing NASA-funded studies by Boeing, McDonnell-Douglas, General Electric, and Pratt & Whitney indicate that an opportunity exists for a 21st Century High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) to become a major part of the international air transportation system. However, before industry will consider an HSCT product launch and an investment estimated to be over $15 billion for design and certification, major technology advances must be made. An overview of the propulsion-specific technology advances that must be in hand before an HSCT product launch could be considered is presented.

  4. A 727 airplane center duct inlet low speed performance confirmation model test for refanned JT8D engines, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaldschmidt, G.; Syltebo, B. E.; Ting, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    The results from testing of a 0.3 scale model center duct inlet (S duct) for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D-100 engines are presented. The objective of this test was to demonstrate that the required airflow of the JT8D-100 engine (480 lb/sec as compared to 334 lb/sec for JT8D-15) can be achieved with minimum modifications to the existing 727 airplane structure at acceptable levels of total pressure recovery and distortion. Steady-state pressure recovery, steady-state pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure measurements were taken at the engine face station. Surface static pressure measurements were taken along the duct. Test results indicated that the required airflow was achieved with acceptable pressure recovery (comparable to the current 727-200 S duct). Inlet inflow angle variation within the 727 airplane operating regime (minus 5 to 5 degrees) had no effect on the inlet performance. Pressure distortion at static and forward speed at takeoff airflow conditions are within P and WA limits for the Phase II duct when equipped with vortex generators. Static crosswind operation between 10 knots and 25 knots appears feasible at full takeoff power.

  5. Combustion Velocity of Benzine-Benzol-Air Mixtures in High-Speed Internal-Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnauffer, Kurt

    1932-01-01

    The present paper describes a device whereby rapid flame movement within an internal-combustion engine cylinder may be recorded and determined. By the aid of a simple cylindrical contact and an oscillograph the rate of combustion within the cylinder of an airplane engine during its normal operation may be measured for gas intake velocities of from 30 to 35 m/s and for velocities within the cylinder of from 20 to 25 m/s. With it the influence of mixture ratios, of turbulence, of compression ratio and kind of fuel on combustion velocity may be determined. Besides the determination of the influence of the above factors on combustion velocity, the degree of turbulence may also be determined. As a unit of reference in estimating the degree of turbulence, the intake velocity of the charge is chosen.

  6. Analysis of a New Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle Engine Concept at Low Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, S.; Trefny, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of the Independent Ramjet Stream (IRS) cycle is presented. The IRS cycle is a variation of the conventional ejector-Ramjet, and is used at low speed in a rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion system. In this new cycle, complete mixing between the rocket and ramjet streams is not required, and a single rocket chamber can be used without a long mixing duct. Furthermore, this concept allows flexibility in controlling the thermal choke process. The resulting propulsion system is intended to be simpler, more robust, and lighter than an ejector-ramjet. The performance characteristics of the IRS cycle are analyzed for a new single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicle concept, known as "Trailblazer." The study is based on a quasi-one-dimensional model of the rocket and air streams at speeds ranging from lift-off to Mach 3. The numerical formulation is described in detail. A performance comparison between the IRS and ejector-ramjet cycles is also presented.

  7. Technical, engineering, and economic feasibility of a high-speed ground corridor. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R.; Suliman, M.; McCullough, B.F.

    1993-05-01

    Despite the considerable effort devoted to transportation planning and design system development over the past 30 years, there has not been widespread application of the resulting new technology. This is now changing. As city freeways become increasingly congested, the need to incorporate design innovations that provide for safe and efficient transportation facilities becomes greater than ever. As the paper reports, advanced technology in information systems, automation, and telecommunications can potentially yield not only cost savings and productivity improvement, but new developments in transportation as well. The study, providing an overview of the state of the art of this technology, explores the research opportunities available for implementing such technology in the creation of a safe and efficient high-speed ground corridor, one that will be capable of meeting the alarming projected traffic demand of the future.

  8. A New High-Speed Oil-Free Turbine Engine Rotordynamic Simulator Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2007-01-01

    A new test rig has been developed for simulating high-speed turbomachinery rotor systems using Oil-Free foil air bearing technology. Foil air bearings have been used in turbomachinery, primarily air cycle machines, for the past four decades to eliminate the need for oil lubrication. The goal of applying this bearing technology to other classes of turbomachinery has prompted the fabrication of this test rig. The facility gives bearing designers the capability to test potential bearing designs with shafts that simulate the rotating components of a target machine without the high cost of building "make-and-break" hardware. The data collected from this rig can be used to make design changes to the shaft and bearings in subsequent design iterations. This paper describes the new test rig and demonstrates its capabilities through the initial run with a simulated shaft system.

  9. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices. PMID:25466541

  10. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices.

  11. Engine Technology Challenges for the High-Speed Civil Transport Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plencner, Robert M.; Misra, Ajay; Graber, Edwin J., Jr.; Shaw, Robert J.; Seng, Gary T.

    1998-01-01

    Ongoing NASA-funded and privately funded studies continue to indicate that an opportunity exists for a second generation supersonic commercial airliner, or High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), to become a key part of the 21 st century international air transportation system. Long distance air travel is projected to be the fastest growing segment of the air transportation market by the turn of the century with increases at about 5 percent per annum over the next two decades. This projection suggests that by the year 2015, more than 600,000 passengers per day will be traveling long distances, predominantly over water. These routes would provide the greatest potential for an HSCT to become a significant part of the international air transportation system. The potential market for an HSCT is currently projected to be anywhere from 500-1500 aircraft over the 2005-2030 time period. Such an aircraft fleet size would represent a considerable share of the potential long-range aircraft market. However, this projected HSCT fleet can become a reality only if technologies are developed which will allow an HSCT design that is (1) environmentally compatible and (2) economically viable. Simply stated, the HSCT will be a technology driven airplane. Without significant advances in airframe and propulsion technologies over the levels currently available, there will be no second generation supersonic airliner! This paper will briefly describe the propulsion technology challenges which must be met prior to any product launch decision being made by industry and the progress toward meeting these challenges through NASAs High-Speed Research (HSR) Program, a partnership between NASA and Boeing, General Electric and Pratt & Whitney.

  12. Multiroller Traction Drive Speed Reducer. Evaluation for Automotive Gas Turbine Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    for Automotive Gas Turbine Engine Douglas A. Rohn lewi’s Research Center Cleveland, Ohow Neil E. Anderson lProputsiou Laboratory AURADCOAI Research and...3 0 5 WO 1• 000 0 M 30 200 3ODD 350 4 0OO Output torqlue, In- lbl Figure IO. - Sun-roller displacem’ent as a function of output torque and output...Oigantzittior Report No Douglas A. Rohn, Neil F. Anderson, and Stuart H1. Loewenthal E-1002 10. Work Unit Ncr. 9. Performing Organization Name and Address

  13. Effect of empennage arrangement on single-engine nozzle/afterbody static pressures at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, William P.; Burley, James R., II

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects on empennage arrangement on single-engine nozzle/afterbody static pressures. Tests were done at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20, nozzle pressure ratios from 1.0 (jet off) to 8.0. and angles of attack from -3 to 9 deg (at jet off conditions), depending on Mach number. Three empennage arrangements (aft, staggered, and forward) were investigated. Extensive measurements were made of static pressure on the nozzle/afterbody in the vicinity of the tail surfaces.

  14. Pre- and post-injection flow characterization in a heavy-duty diesel engine using high-speed PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, R. P. C.; Luijten, C. C. M.; Dam, N. J.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    2012-09-01

    High-speed particle image velocimetry (HS-PIV) using hollow microspheres has been applied to characterize the flow in a heavy-duty diesel engine during and after fuel injection. The injection timings were varied in the range representing those used in premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) regimes, and multiple injections have been applied to investigate their influence on the flow inside the combustion chamber. By injecting into pure nitrogen, combustion is avoided and the flow can be studied long after injection. The results show a sudden change of air motion at the start of injection as a result of the air entrainment at the core of the spray. Furthermore, as expected, spray injection causes a considerable increase in the cycle-to-cycle fluctuations of the flow pattern, the more so for longer injection durations.

  15. Design study and performance analysis of a high-speed multistage variable-geometry fan for a variable cycle engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Parker, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A design technology study was performed to identify a high speed, multistage, variable geometry fan configuration capable of achieving wide flow modulation with near optimum efficiency at the important operating condition. A parametric screening study of the front and rear block fans was conducted in which the influence of major fan design features on weight and efficiency was determined. Key design parameters were varied systematically to determine the fan configuration most suited for a double bypass, variable cycle engine. Two and three stage fans were considered for the front block. A single stage, core driven fan was studied for the rear block. Variable geometry concepts were evaluated to provide near optimum off design performance. A detailed aerodynamic design and a preliminary mechanical design were carried out for the selected fan configuration. Performance predictions were made for the front and rear block fans.

  16. System and method of cylinder deactivation for optimal engine torque-speed map operation

    SciTech Connect

    Sujan, Vivek A; Frazier, Timothy R; Follen, Kenneth; Moon, Suk-Min

    2014-11-11

    This disclosure provides a system and method for determining cylinder deactivation in a vehicle engine to optimize fuel consumption while providing the desired or demanded power. In one aspect, data indicative of terrain variation is utilized in determining a vehicle target operating state. An optimal active cylinder distribution and corresponding fueling is determined from a recommendation from a supervisory agent monitoring the operating state of the vehicle of a subset of the total number of cylinders, and a determination as to which number of cylinders provides the optimal fuel consumption. Once the optimal cylinder number is determined, a transmission gear shift recommendation is provided in view of the determined active cylinder distribution and target operating state.

  17. Flow prediction for propfan engine installation effects on transport aircraft at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samant, S. S.; Yu, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    An Euler-based method for aerodynamic analysis of turboprop transport aircraft at transonic speeds has been developed. In this method, inviscid Euler equations are solved over surface-fitted grids constructed about aircraft configurations. Propeller effects are simulated by specifying sources of momentum and energy on an actuator disc located in place of the propeller. A stripwise boundary layer procedure is included to account for the viscous effects. A preliminary version of an approach to embed the exhaust plume within the global Euler solution has also been developed for more accurate treatment of the exhaust flow. The resulting system of programs is capable of handling wing-body-nacelle-propeller configurations. The propeller disks may be tractors or pushers and may represent single or counterrotation propellers. Results from analyses of three test cases of interest (a wing alone, a wing-body-nacelle model, and a wing-nacelle-endplate model) are presented. A user's manual for executing the system of computer programs with formats of various input files, sample job decks, and sample input files is provided in appendices.

  18. High-speed polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography scan engine based on Fourier domain mode locked laser.

    PubMed

    Bonesi, Marco; Sattmann, Harald; Torzicky, Teresa; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Eigenwillig, Christoph; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2012-11-01

    We report on a new swept source polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography scan engine that is based on polarization maintaining (PM) fiber technology. The light source is a Fourier domain mode locked laser with a PM cavity that operates in the 1300 nm wavelength regime. It is equipped with a PM buffer stage that doubles the fundamental sweep frequency of 54.5 kHz. The fiberization allows coupling of the scan engine to different delivery probes. In a first demonstration, we use the system for imaging human skin at an A-scan rate of 109 kHz. The system illuminates the sample with circularly polarized light and measures reflectivity, retardation, optic axis orientation, and Stokes vectors simultaneously. Furthermore, depolarization can be quantified by calculating the degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU). The high scanning speed of the system enables dense sampling in both, the x- and y-direction, which provides the opportunity to use 3D evaluation windows for DOPU calculation. This improves the spatial resolution of DOPU images considerably.

  19. Performance of a 13-Stage Development Compressor for the J40-WE-24 Engine at Equivalent Speeds from 30 to 112 Percent of Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, James E.; Lucas, James G.; Finger, Harold B.

    1953-01-01

    The performance of a 13-stage development comressor for the J40-WE-24 engine has been determined at equivalent speeds from 30 to 112 percent of design. The design total-pressure ratio of 6.0 and the design weight flow of 164 pounds per second were not attained, An analysis was conducted to determine the reasons for the poor performance at the design and over-design speed. The analysis indicated that most of the difficulty could be attributed to the fact that the first stage was overcompromised to favor part-speed performance,

  20. The Uncontrolled Economic Engine of the Developing Economies, Speeding up the Climate Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, K. M.; Khan, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    As we progress into the 21st century, the world faces challenges of truly global nature bearing implications on the whole world in one way or another. The global economic engine has shifted from the western world (Developed Economies) to the eastern world (Developing Economies) which has brought about tremendous change in the climate related variables in this part of the world. As uncontrolled carbon emissions grow in the developing economies, the phenomenon of global warming and climate shifts become more and more prevalent. While this economic activity provides income for millions of households, it is contributing generously to the rapid degradation of the environment. Developing economies as it has been seen do not employ or abide by stringent regulations regarding emissions which result in uncontrolled emissions. In this particular scenario, it is a tedious task to convince governments in the developing economies to implement regulations regarding emissions because businesses in these economies deem such regulations to be economically unviable. The other side of the problem is that these uncontrolled emission are causing evident climate shifts which has had adverse impacts on the agricultural societies where shifting climates are leading to reduced agricultural output and productivity. Consequently the lives of millions associated directly or indirectly with agriculture are affected and on a more global level, the agricultural produce is decreasing which increases the chances of famine in parts of the world. The situation could have devastating impacts on the global economy and environmental standards and therefore needs to be addressed on emergency basis. The first step towards betterment could be the introduction of the carbon trading economy in the developing economies which would incentivize emission reduction and become more attractive and in the process sustaining minimum possible damage to the environment. Though carbon trading is a formidable first step

  1. "I Actually Contributed to Their Research": The Influence of an Abbreviated Summer Apprenticeship Program in Science and Engineering for Diverse High-School Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgin, Stephen R.; McConnell, William J.; Flowers, Alonzo M., III

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of a research apprenticeship program that we developed for diverse high-school students often underrepresented in similar programs and in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professions. Through the apprenticeship program, students spent 2 weeks in the summer engaged in biofuels-related research…

  2. Method and device for optimizing the air-fuel mixture burn rate of internal combustion engines during low speed, light and heavy load operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Burandt, C.O.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes a method for optimizing low speed light load and low speed heavy load operating conditions in an internal combustion engine. The engine has a camshaft, a crankshaft, at least one intake valve and at least one piston, and is capable of providing for small valve events, and the engine providing for earlier than normal intake valve closings the method comprises: sensing the load demand on the engine, regulating the phasing of the operation of the camshaft of the engine with the operation of the crankshaft of the engine in response to the sensed load demand by advancing the operation of camshaft relative to the operation of the crankshaft when a heavy load demand is sensed and by retarding the operation of the camshaft relative to the operation of the crankshaft when alight load demand is sensed, and sensing detonation in the engine and regulating the phasing operation of the camshaft relative to the operation of the crankshaft by advancing the operation of the camshaft relative to the crankshaft when detonation is sensed.

  3. Icing tunnel tests of Electro-Impulse De-Icing of an engine inlet and high-speed wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is given of four earlier tests in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel and of flight tests in NASA's Icing Research Aircraft and in a Cessna 206 airplane. Details are given of recent icing tunnel tests of thicker-skinned wings, a Gates Learjet, a composite leading edge, and a Boeing 767, and of a Falcon Fanjet engine inlet. These were tested at speeds from 87 to 220 knots, air temperatures from -2 to -15 C, LWC values of 0.6 to 2.4 grams/cu meter, and median droplet diameters from 12 to 20 microns. Energy requirements are reported, as well as conclusions from comparisons of several Electro-Impulse De-Icing coil system designs. Fundamental studies of the structural dynamics and ice shedding of a 12.7 cm (5 inch) diameter semicylinder are described. Some potential problem areas are discussed: fatigue of skin and coil mountings, system weight and cost, electro-magnetic interference and noise.

  4. The Fundamental Principles of High-speed Semi-diesel Engines. Part I: a General Discussion of the Subject of Fuel Injection in Diesel Engines and Detailed Descriptions of Many Types of Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchner,

    1926-01-01

    Three questions relating to the technical progress in the utilization of heavy oils are discussed. The first question considers solid injection in high-speed automobile engines, the second concerns the development of the hot-bulb engine, and the third question relates to the need for a more thorough investigation of the processes on which the formatation of combustible, rapidly-burning mixtures depend.

  5. Resonant Vibrations Resulting from the Re-Engineering of a Constant-Speed 2-Bladed Turbine to a Variable-Speed 3-Bladed Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, P.; Wright, A. D.; Finersh, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    The CART3 (Controls Advanced Research Turbine, 3-bladed) at the National Wind Technology Center has recently been converted from a 2-bladed constant speed machine to a 3-bladed variable speed machine designed specically for controls research. The purpose of this conversion was to develop an advanced controls field-testing platform which has the more typical 3-bladed configuration. A result of this conversion was the emergence of several resonant vibrations, some of which initially prevented operation of the turbine until they could be explained and resolved. In this paper, the investigations into these vibrations are presented as 'lessons-learned'. Additionally, a frequency-domain technique called waterfall plotting is discussed and its usefulness in this research is illustrated.

  6. `I Actually Contributed to Their Research': The influence of an abbreviated summer apprenticeship program in science and engineering for diverse high-school learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgin, Stephen R.; McConnell, William J.; Flowers, Alonzo M., III

    2015-02-01

    This study describes an investigation of a research apprenticeship program that we developed for diverse high-school students often underrepresented in similar programs and in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professions. Through the apprenticeship program, students spent 2 weeks in the summer engaged in biofuels-related research practices within working university chemistry and engineering laboratories. The experience was supplemented by discussions and activities intended to impact nature of science (NOS) and inquiry understandings and to allow for an exploration of STEM careers and issues of self-identity. Participants completed a NOS questionnaire before and after the experience, were interviewed multiple times, and were observed while working in the laboratories. Findings revealed that as a result of the program, participants (1) demonstrated positive changes in their understandings of certain NOS aspects many of which were informed by their laboratory experiences, (2) had an opportunity to explore and strengthen STEM-related future plans, and (3) examined their self-identities. A majority of participants also described a sense of belonging within the laboratory groups and believed that they were making significant contributions to the ongoing work of those laboratories even though their involvement was necessarily limited due to the short duration of the program. For students who were most influenced by the program, the belonging they felt was likely related to issues of identity and career aspirations.

  7. Flutter parametric studies of cantilevered twin-engine-transport type wing with and without winglet. Volume 1: Low-speed investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, K. G.; Nagaraja, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    Flutter characteristics of a cantilevered high aspect ratio wing with winglet were investigated. The configuration represented a current technology, twin-engine airplane. A low-speed and high-speed model were used to evaluate compressibility effects through transonic Mach numbers and a wide range of mass-density ratios. Four flutter mechanisms were obtained in test, as well as analysis from various combinations of configuration parameters. The coupling between wing tip vertical and chordwise motions was shown to have significant effect under some conditions. It is concluded that for the flutter model configurations studied, the winglet related flutter was amenable to the conventional flutter analysis techniques.

  8. Very High Fuel Economy, Heavy Duty, Constant Speed, Truck Engine Optimized Via Unique Energy Recovery Turbines and Facilitated High Efficiency Continuously Variable Drivetrain

    SciTech Connect

    Bahman Habibzadeh

    2010-01-31

    The project began under a corporative agreement between Mack Trucks, Inc and the Department of Energy starting from September 1, 2005. The major objective of the four year project is to demonstrate a 10% efficiency gain by operating a Volvo 13 Litre heavy-duty diesel engine at a constant or narrow speed and coupled to a continuously variable transmission. The simulation work on the Constant Speed Engine started on October 1st. The initial simulations are aimed to give a basic engine model for the VTEC vehicle simulations. Compressor and turbine maps are based upon existing maps and/or qualified, realistic estimations. The reference engine is a MD 13 US07 475 Hp. Phase I was completed in May 2006 which determined that an increase in fuel efficiency for the engine of 10.5% over the OICA cycle, and 8.2% over a road cycle was possible. The net increase in fuel efficiency would be 5% when coupled to a CVT and operated over simulated highway conditions. In Phase II an economic analysis was performed on the engine with turbocompound (TC) and a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). The system was analyzed to determine the payback time needed for the added cost of the TC and CVT system. The analysis was performed by considering two different production scenarios of 10,000 and 60,000 units annually. The cost estimate includes the turbocharger, the turbocompound unit, the interstage duct diffuser and installation details, the modifications necessary on the engine and the CVT. Even with the cheapest fuel and the lowest improvement, the pay back time is only slightly more than 12 months. A gear train is necessary between the engine crankshaft and turbocompound unit. This is considered to be relatively straight forward with no design problems.

  9. Test data report, low speed wind tunnel tests of a full scale lift/cruise-fan inlet, with engine, at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shain, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A low speed wind tunnel test of a fixed lip inlet with engine, was performed. The inlet was close coupled to a Hamilton Standard 1.4 meter, variable pitch fan driven by a lycoming T55-L-11A engine. Tests were conducted with various combinations of inlet angle of attack freestream velocities, and fan airflows. Data were recorded to define the inlet airflow separation boundaries, performance characteristics, and fan blade stresses. The test model, installation, instrumentation, test, data reduction and final data are described.

  10. Measurement of the flow field in a diesel engine combustion chamber after combustion by cross-correlation of high-speed photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. H.; Yates, D. A.; Winterbone, D. E.

    1996-03-01

    A cellular cross-correlation technique is applied to high-speed photographs of the luminous phase of combustion in a high-speed direct-injection diesel engine. The method enables the velocity and vorticity distributions in the combustion chamber to be evaluated. The results obtained from the basic technique are refined to remove spurious results and to complete the definition of the flow field by applying data validation, interpolation, and smoothing. The velocity and vorticity fields evaluated at two swirl ratios show the way in which the basically solid body swirl motion interacts with the fuel jets in the combustion chamber. A better understanding of the post-combustion fluid motion is obtained, and this should be of help in validating CFD codes and also the design of engines.

  11. U.S. Navy High-Speed Diesel Engine Performance Evaluation: Cummins NH-220G and Detroit Diesel 6V-53N

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    DTNSRDC-PASD-CR-14-84, 1988. 4. Montemayor , A.F., et al., “Section 6 High-Speed Diesel Engine Test Plan,” U.S. Army Fuels and Lubricants Research...Laboratory, San Antonio, TX, 29 March 1985. 5. Montemayor , A.F., Naegli, D.W., Dodge, L.G., Owens, E.C., and Bowden, J.N., “Fuel Property Effects on Diesel

  12. Abacus giving the variation of the mean pressure of an aviation engine as a function of its speed of rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margoulis, W

    1921-01-01

    Comparing the results of the calculations for computing the mean pressure of an aviation engine for any number of revolutions, with those of experiment, the writer, by numerous examples, shows the perfect agreement between them. This report will show that, by means of a special abacus, an engineer can instantly plot the characteristics of an engine.

  13. Nonintrusive shaft speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.; Wyett, L.; Maram, J.

    1985-01-01

    Reusable rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV), etc., have throttling capabilities that require real-time, closed-loop control systems of engine propellant flows, combustion temperatures and pressures, and turbopump rotary speeds. In the case of the SSME, there are four turbopumps that require real-time measurement and control of their rotary speeds. Variable-reluctance magnetic speed sensors were designed, fabricated, and tested for all four turbopumps, resulting in the successful implementation and operation of three of these speed sensors during each of the 12 Shuttle flights.

  14. The effect of forward speed on J85 engine noise from suppressor nozzles as measured in the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effect of forward speed on the exhaust noise from a conical ejector nozzle and three suppressor nozzles mounted behind a J85 engine was performed in a 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The nozzles were tested at three engine power settings and at wind tunnel forward speeds up to 91 m/sec (300 ft/sec). In addition, outdoor static tests were conducted to determine (1) the differences between near field and far field measurements, (2) the effect of an airframe on the far field directivity of each nozzle, and (3) the relative suppression of each nozzle with respect to the baseline conical ejector nozzle. It was found that corrections to near field data are necessary to extrapolate to far field data and that the presence of the airframe changed the far field directivity as measured statically. The results show that the effect of forward speed was to reduce the noise from each nozzle more in the area of peak noise, but the change in forward quadrant noise was small or negligible. A comparison of wind tunnel data with available flight test data shows good agreement.

  15. High-Speed Multiplexed Spatiotemporally Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Gas Recirculation Dynamics in a Multi-Cylinder Engine Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2016-04-01

    The need for more environmentally friendly and efficient energy conversion is of paramount importance in developing and designing next-generation internal combustion (IC) engines for transportation applications. One effective solution to reducing emissions of mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which has been widely implemented in modern vehicles. However, cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variations in the charge-gas uniformity can be a major barrier to optimum EGR implementation on multi-cylinder engines, and can limit performance, stability, and efficiency. Precise knowledge and fine control over the EGR system is therefore crucial, particularly for optimizing advanced engine concepts such as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI). An absorption-based laser diagnostic was developed to study spatiotemporal charge-gas distributions in an IC engine intake manifold in real-time. The laser was tuned to an absorption band of carbon dioxide (CO2), a standard exhaust-gas marker, near 2.7 µm. The sensor was capable of probing four separate measurement locations simultaneously, and independently analyzing EGR fraction at speeds of 5 kHz (1.2 crank-angle degree (CAD) at 1 k RPM) or faster with high accuracy. The probes were used to study spatiotemporal EGR non-uniformities in the intake manifold and ultimately promote the development of more efficient and higher performance engines.

  16. High-Speed Multiplexed Spatiotemporally Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Gas Recirculation Dynamics in a Multi-Cylinder Engine Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; ...

    2016-04-01

    The need for more environmentally friendly and efficient energy conversion is of paramount importance in developing and designing next-generation internal combustion (IC) engines for transportation applications. One effective solution to reducing emissions of mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which has been widely implemented in modern vehicles. However, cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variations in the charge-gas uniformity can be a major barrier to optimum EGR implementation on multi-cylinder engines, and can limit performance, stability, and efficiency. Precise knowledge and fine control over the EGR system is thus crucial, particularly for optimizing advanced engine concepts such as reactivity controlled compressionmore » ignition (RCCI). An absorption-based laser diagnostic was developed to study spatiotemporal charge-gas distributions in an IC engine intake manifold in real-time. The laser was tuned to an absorption band of carbon dioxide (CO2), a standard exhaust-gas marker, near 2.7 µm. The sensor was capable of probing four separate measurement locations simultaneously, and independently analyzing EGR fraction at speeds of 5 kHz (1.2 crank-angle degree (CAD) at 1 k RPM) or faster with high accuracy. Lastly, the probes were used to study spatiotemporal EGR non-uniformities in the intake manifold and ultimately promote the development of more efficient and higher performance engines.« less

  17. High-Speed Multiplexed Spatiotemporally Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Gas Recirculation Dynamics in a Multi-Cylinder Engine Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P.

    2016-04-01

    The need for more environmentally friendly and efficient energy conversion is of paramount importance in developing and designing next-generation internal combustion (IC) engines for transportation applications. One effective solution to reducing emissions of mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which has been widely implemented in modern vehicles. However, cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variations in the charge-gas uniformity can be a major barrier to optimum EGR implementation on multi-cylinder engines, and can limit performance, stability, and efficiency. Precise knowledge and fine control over the EGR system is thus crucial, particularly for optimizing advanced engine concepts such as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI). An absorption-based laser diagnostic was developed to study spatiotemporal charge-gas distributions in an IC engine intake manifold in real-time. The laser was tuned to an absorption band of carbon dioxide (CO2), a standard exhaust-gas marker, near 2.7 µm. The sensor was capable of probing four separate measurement locations simultaneously, and independently analyzing EGR fraction at speeds of 5 kHz (1.2 crank-angle degree (CAD) at 1 k RPM) or faster with high accuracy. Lastly, the probes were used to study spatiotemporal EGR non-uniformities in the intake manifold and ultimately promote the development of more efficient and higher performance engines.

  18. Performance and Durability Assessment of Two Emission Control Technologies Installed on a Legacy High-Speed Marine Diesel Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-05

    Cat 1) (>37 kW and displacement/cylinder [disp] ɝ L) and Cat 2 (5< disp < 30 L) new engines and marine distillate fuel for vessels in...bunker and distillate fuels) were applied by EPA to Cat 1 and 2 engines on ships operating internationally and all Cat 3 (disp >5 L) engines...replaced in ɝ-yr period) requirements encompass Tier 0-2, Category ( Cat ) 1 and 2, model year 1973 or later, and rating >600 kW. Retrofit installation

  19. The Course of Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smet, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Actualization is traditionally seen as the process following syntactic reanalysis whereby an item's new syntactic status manifests itself in new syntactic behavior. The process is gradual in that some new uses of the reanalyzed item appear earlier or more readily than others. This article accounts for the order in which new uses appear during…

  20. The Determination of Several Spray Characteristics of a High-Speed Oil Engine Injection System with an Oscilloscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Chester W; Moore, Charles S

    1928-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the injection lag, duration of injection, and spray start and cut-off characteristics of a fuel injection system operated on an engine and injecting fuel into the atmosphere.

  1. Comparison of High-Speed Operating Characteristics of Size 215 Cylindrical-Roller Bearings as Determined in Turbojet Engine and in Laboratory Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E Fred; Nemeth, Zolton N

    1952-01-01

    A comparison of the operating characteristics of 75-millimeter-bore (size 215) cylindrical-roller one-piece inner-race-riding cage-type bearings was made by means of a laboratory test rig and a turbojet engine. Cooling correlation parameters were determined by means of dimensional analysis, and the generalized results for both the inner- and the outer-race bearing operating temperatures are computed for the laboratory test rig and the turbojet engine. A method is given that enables the designer to predict the inner- and outer-race turbine roller-bearing temperatures from single curves, regardless of variations in speed, load, oil flow, oil inlet temperature, oil inlet viscosity, oil-jet diameter, or any combination of these parameters.

  2. Analysis of Wall Models for Internal Combustion Engine Simulations Using High-speed Micro-PIV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Peter; Ewan, Tim; Jainski, Christopher; Dreizler, Andreas; Lu, Louise; Sick, Volker; Ihme, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    The performance of internal combustion engines (IC-engine) is affected by the thermo-viscous boundary layer region. Computational models for the prediction of engine performance typically rely on wall functions to overcome the need for resolving the boundary layer structure. The objective of this contribution is to assess some of the assumptions on the wall functions under realistic operating conditions in a motored engine. Crank angle resolved high-resolution micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) measurements were conducted previously in a spark-ignition direct-injection single cylinder engine. Data analysis is performed to assess the inner structure of the boundary layer. Using these measurements, the performance of a hierarchy of wall models, including the wall function model, which is commonly used in RANS and LES IC-engine simulations, and three hybrid RANS/LES wall models with increasing fidelity are investigated. It is shown that all four models provide adequate predictions if the first grid-point is located in the viscous sublayer; the wall function model has consistently underpredicted the shear velocity if the first grid-point is located outside the viscous sublayer, however the other three hybrid wall models all give reasonable results in this region.

  3. Performance of J-33-A-21 Turbojet-Engine Compressor I - Over-All Performance Characteristics at Equivalent Impeller Speeds from 6000 to 13,400 RPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beede, William L.; Kovach, Karl; Creagh, John W.R.

    1948-01-01

    The NACA is investigating a series of J-33 turbojet-engine compressors to determine the over-all and component performances and to improve theories of flow through large centrifugal compressors, The production model J-33-A-21 was operated over a range of inlet temperatures from 80 to -40 F and inlet pressures from 14 to 5 inches mercury absolute for equivalent impeller speeds from 6000 to 13,400 rpm. At the equivalent design speed of 11,500 rpm, the compressor had a peak pressure ratio of 3.98 at an equivalent weight flow of 73.4 pounds per second and an adiabatic temperature-rise , efficiency of 0.701. When the compressor speed was reduced from the design speed to 6000 rpm, the adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency increased to 0.747. At the maximum equivalent speed investigated (13,400 rpm), a peak pressure ratio of 5.09 was obtained at an adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency of 0.617 and an equivalent weight flow of 66.O pounds per second. An increase in inlet pressure from 5.5 to 14 inches mercury absolute, with a consequent increase in Reynolds number index, improved the pressure ratio but had no apparent effect on the ratio of temperature rise through the compressor to inlet temperature. The variation of the peak adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency with inlet pressure is in the direction that would be expected from a Reynolds number effect. Decrease in the inlet temperature from 80 to -40 F, with a consequent increase in Reynolds number index, resulted in scatter of the pressure-ratio data and increased values of temperature ratio. The variation of the adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency with inlet temperature is probably the result of heat-transfer effects and scatter in the pressure ratio.

  4. Low-Speed Aerodynamic and Hydrodynamic Characteristics of a Proposed Supersonic Multijet Water-Based Hydro-Ski Aircraft with Upward-Rotating Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petynia, William W.; Croom, Delwin R.; Davenport, Edwin E.

    1958-01-01

    The low-speed aerodynamic and hydrodynamic characteristics of a proposed multijet water-based aircraft configuration for supersonic operation have been investigated. The design features include upward-rotating engines, body indentation, a single hydro-ski, and a wing with an aspect ratio of 3.0, a taper ratio of 0.143, 36.90 sweepback of the quarter-chord line, and NACA 65AO04 airfoil sections. For the aerodynamic investigation, with the flaps retracted, the model was longitudinally and directionally stable up to the stall. The all-movable horizontal tail was capable of trimming the model up to a lift coefficient of approximately 0.87. All flap configurations investigated had a tendency to become longitudinally unstable at stall. The effectiveness of the all-movable horizontal tail increased with increasing lift coefficient for all flap configurations investigated; however, with the large static margin of the configuration with the center of gravity at 0.25 mean aerodynamic chord, the all-movable horizontal tail was not powerful enough to trim all the various flapped configurations investigated throughout the angle-of-attack range. For the hydrodynamic investigation, longitudinal stability during take-offs and landings was satisfactory. Decreasing the area of the hydro-ski 60 percent increased the maximum resistance and emergence speed 40 and 70 percent, respectively. Without the jet exhaust, the resistance was reduced by simulating the vertical-lift component of the forward engines rotated upward. However, the jet exhaust of the forward engines increased the maximum resistance approximately 60 percent. The engine inlets and horizontal tail were free from spray for all loads investigated and for both hydro-ski sizes.

  5. Vehicle speed control device

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Trump, W.E.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is described for automatically limiting the speed of a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine having a spark ignition system with an ignition coil, comprising: sensor means for generating a speed signal directly representative of the speed of the vehicle comprising a series of speed signal pulses having a pulse repetition frequency proportional to the speed of the vehicle; control means for converting speed signal pulses into a DC voltage proportional to the vehicle speed; means for comparing the DC voltage to a predetermined DC voltage having substantially zero AC components representative of a predetermined maximum speed and for generating a difference signal in response thereto; and means for generating a pulse-width modulated control signal responsive to the difference signal; power means responsive to the control signal for intermittently interrupting the ignition system.

  6. High-Speed Photography

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Schelev, M.Y.

    1998-08-01

    The applications of high-speed photography to a diverse set of subjects including inertial confinement fusion, laser surgical procedures, communications, automotive airbags, lightning etc. are briefly discussed. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  7. Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Szymkowicz, Patrick G.; Northrop, William F

    2012-01-01

    It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that

  8. Simulation of spray development and turbulent combustion processes in low and high speed diesel engines by the CMC-ISR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young J.; Huh, Kang Y.

    2012-02-01

    Simulation is performed to analyse the characteristics of turbulent spray combustion in conventional low and high speed diesel engine conditions. Turbulence-chemistry interaction is resolved by the Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model in the spatially integrated form of an Incompletely Stirred Reactor (ISR). After validation against measured pressure traces, characteristic length and time scales and dimensionless numbers are estimated at the locations of sequentially injected fuel groups. Conditional flame structures are calculated for sequentially evaporated fuel groups to consider different available periods for ignition chemistry. Injection overlaps the combustion period in the high rpm engine, while most combustion occurs after injection and evaporation are complete in the low rpm engine. Ignition occurs in rich premixture with the initial peak temperature at the equivalence ratio around 2-4 as observed in Dec [2]. It corresponds to the most reactive mixture fraction of the minimum ignition delay for the given mixture states. Combustion proceeds to lean and rich sides in the mixture fraction space as a diffusion process by turbulence. The mean scalar dissipation rates (SDRs) are lower than the extinction limit to show stability of diffusion flames throughout the combustion period.

  9. Experimental and numerical results for a generic axisymmetric single-engine afterbody with tails at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, J. R., II; Carlson, J. R.; Henderson, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    Static pressure measurements were made on the afterbody, nozzle and tails of a generic single-engine axisymmetric fighter configuration. Data were recorded at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2. NPR was varied from 1.0 to 8.0 and angle of attack was varied from -3 deg. to 9 deg. Experimental data were compared with numerical results from two state-of-the-art computer codes.

  10. Effect of cage design on characteristics of high-speed-jet-lubricated 35-millimeter-bore ball bearing. [turbojet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.; Pinel, S. I.; Signer, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with a 35 mm bore angular contact ball bearing with a double outer land guided cage. Provisions were made for jet lubrication and outer-ring cooling of the bearing. Test conditions included a combined thrust and radial load at nominal shaft speeds of 48,000 rpm, and an oil-in temperature of 394 K (250 F). Successful operation of the test bearing was accomplished up to 2.5 million DN. Test results were compared with those obtained with similar bearing having a single outer land guided cage. Higher temperatures were generated with the double outer land guided cage bearing, and bearing power loss and cage slip were greater. Cooling the outer ring resulted in a decrease in overall bearing operating temperature.

  11. Effect of water injection and off scheduling of variable inlet guide vanes, gas generator speed and power turbine nozzle angle on the performance of an automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Chrysler/ERDA baseline automotive gas turbine engine was used to experimentally determine the power augmentation and emissions reductions achieved by the effect of variable compressor and power engine geometry, water injection downstream of the compressor, and increases in gas generator speed. Results were dependent on the mode of variable geometry utilization. Over 20 percent increase in power was accompanied by over 5 percent reduction in SFC. A fuel economy improvement of at least 6 percent was estimated for a vehicle with a 75 kW (100 hp) engine which could be augmented to 89 kW (120 hp) relative to an 89 Kw (120 hp) unaugmented engine.

  12. Controlled Speed Accessory Drive demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    A Controlled Speed Accessory Drive System was examined in an effort to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars. Concept feasibility and the performance of a typical system during actual road driving conditions were demonstrated. The CSAD system is described as a mechanical device which limits engine accessory speeds, thereby reducing parasitic horsepower losses and improving overall vehicle fuel economy. Fuel consumption data were compiled for fleets of GSA vehicles. Various motor pool locations were selected, each representing different climatic conditions. On the basis of a total accumulated fleet usage of nearly three million miles, an overall fuel economy improvement of 6 percent to 7 percent was demonstrated. Coincident chassis dynamometer tests were accomplished on selected vehicles to establish the effect of different accessory drive systems on exhaust emissions, and to evaluate the magnitude of the mileage benefits which could be derived.

  13. High-speed fuel tracer fluorescence and OH radical chemiluminescence imaging in a spark-ignition direct-injection engine.

    PubMed

    Smith, James D; Sick, Volker

    2005-11-01

    An innovative technique has been demonstrated to achieve crank-angle-resolved planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of fuel followed by OH* chemiluminescence imaging in a firing direct-injected spark-ignition engine. This study used two standard KrF excimer lasers to excite toluene for tracking fuel distribution. The intensified camera system was operated at single crank-angle resolution at 2000 revolutions per minute (RPM) for 500 consecutive cycles. Through this work, it has been demonstrated that toluene and OH* can be imaged through the same optical setup while similar signal levels are obtained from both species, even at these high rates. The technique is useful for studying correlations between fuel distribution and subsequent ignition and flame propagation without the limitations of phase-averaging imaging approaches. This technique is illustrated for the effect of exhaust gas recirculation on combustion and will be useful for studies of misfire causes. Finally, a few general observations are presented as to the effect of preignition fuel distribution on subsequent combustion.

  14. High-speed fuel tracer fluorescence and OH radical chemiluminescence imaging in a spark-ignition direct-injection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James D.; Sick, Volker

    2005-11-01

    An innovative technique has been demonstrated to achieve crank-angle-resolved planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of fuel followed by OH* chemiluminescence imaging in a firing direct-injected spark-ignition engine. This study used two standard KrF excimer lasers to excite toluene for tracking fuel distribution. The intensified camera system was operated at single crank-angle resolution at 2000 revolutions per minute (RPM) for 500 consecutive cycles. Through this work, it has been demonstrated that toluene and OH* can be imaged through the same optical setup while similar signal levels are obtained from both species, even at these high rates. The technique is useful for studying correlations between fuel distribution and subsequent ignition and flame propagation without the limitations of phase-averaging imaging approaches. This technique is illustrated for the effect of exhaust gas recirculation on combustion and will be useful for studies of misfire causes. Finally, a few general observations are presented as to the effect of preignition fuel distribution on subsequent combustion.

  15. Speed Variance and Its Influence on Accidents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Nicholas J.; Gadirau, Ravi

    A study was conducted to investigate the traffic engineering factors that influence speed variance and to determine to what extent speed variance affects accident rates. Detailed analyses were carried out to relate speed variance with posted speed limit, design speeds, and other traffic variables. The major factor identified was the difference…

  16. Silence Amenity Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hajime

    Engineering civilization brought convenient and comfortable life to us. However, some environmental problems such as various pollutions have also been developed with it. Acoustical noise is one of the major problems in modern life. Noise is generated from a noise source and propagates through transmitting medium such as the air and eventually reaches a receiver, usually a human being. The noise problem can be avoided, therefore, if one of those three elements in the noise problem is removed completely. In actual case, engineers are looking for most efficient way combining the controls for these three elements. In this article, basic characteristics of noise is reviewed briefly at first, then sound field analysis to predict sound transmission is discussed Aerodynamic noise is one of the major problems in silence amenity engineering today. Basic concept of the aerodynamic noise generation mechanism is discussed in detail with applications to turbo-machinery and high speed train noise control technology.

  17. Analytical and numerical prediction of harmonic sound power in the inlet of aero-engines with emphasis on transonic rotation speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, Serge; Polacsek, Cyril; Barrier, Raphael

    2014-12-01

    Tone noise radiated through the inlet of a turbofan is mainly due to rotor-stator interactions at subsonic regimes (approach flight), and to the shock waves attached to each blade at supersonic helical tip speeds (takeoff). The axial compressor of a helicopter turboshaft engine is transonic as well and can be studied like turbofans at takeoff. The objective of the paper is to predict the sound power at the inlet radiating into the free field, with a focus on transonic conditions because sound levels are much higher. Direct numerical computation of tone acoustic power is based on a RANS (Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes) solver followed by an integration of acoustic intensity over specified inlet cross-sections, derived from Cantrell and Hart equations (valid in irrotational flows). In transonic regimes, sound power decreases along the intake because of nonlinear propagation, which must be discriminated from numerical dissipation. This is one of the reasons why an analytical approach is also suggested. It is based on three steps: (i) appraisal of the initial pressure jump of the shock waves; (ii) 2D nonlinear propagation model of Morfey and Fisher; (iii) calculation of the sound power of the 3D ducted acoustic field. In this model, all the blades are assumed to be identical such that only the blade passing frequency and its harmonics are predicted (like in the present numerical simulations). However, transfer from blade passing frequency to multiple pure tones can be evaluated in a fourth step through a statistical analysis of irregularities between blades. Interest of the analytical method is to provide a good estimate of nonlinear acoustic propagation in the upstream duct while being easy and fast to compute. The various methods are applied to two turbofan models, respectively in approach (subsonic) and takeoff (transonic) conditions, and to a Turbomeca turboshaft engine (transonic case). The analytical method in transonic appears to be quite reliable by comparison

  18. Experimental Assessment of the Emissions Control Potential of a Rich/Quench/ Lean Combustor for High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R. (Technical Monitor); Rosfjord, T. J.; Padget, F. C.

    2001-01-01

    In support of Pratt & Whitney efforts to define the Rich burn/Quick mix/Lean burn (RQL) combustor for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft engine, UTRC conducted a flametube-scale study of the RQL concept. Extensive combustor testing was performed at the Supersonic Cruise (SSC) condition of an HSCT engine cycle. Data obtained from probe traverses near the exit of the mixing section confirmed that the mixing section was the critical component in controlling combustor emissions. Circular-hole configurations, which produced rapidly-, highly-penetrating jets, were most effective in limiting NO(x). The spatial profiles of NO(x) and CO at the mixer exit were not directly interpretable using a simple flow model based on jet penetration, and a greater understanding of the flow and chemical processes in this section are required to optimize it. Neither the rich-combustor equivalence ratio nor its residence time was a direct contributor to the exit NO(x). Based on this study, it was also concluded that: (1) While NO(x) formation in both the mixing section and the lean combustor contribute to the overall emission, the NOx formation in the mixing section dominates. The gas composition exiting the rich combustor can be reasonably represented by the equilibrium composition corresponding to the rich combustor operating condition. Negligible NO(x) exits the rich combustor. (2) At the SSC condition, the oxidation processes occurring in the mixing section consume 99 percent of the CO exiting the rich combustor. Soot formed in the rich combustor is also highly oxidized, with combustor exit SAE Smoke Number <3. (3) Mixing section configurations which demonstrated enhanced emissions control at SSC also performed better at part-power conditions. Data from mixer exit traverses reflected the expected mixing behavior for off-design jet to crossflow momentum-flux ratios. (4) Low power operating conditions require that the RQL combustor operate as a lean-lean combustor to achieve

  19. Experimental Assessment of the Emissions Control Potential of a Rich/Quench/Lean Combustor for High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosfjord, T. J.; Padget, F. C.; Tacina, Robert R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In support of Pratt & Whitney efforts to define the Rich burn/Quick mix/Lean burn (RQL) combustor for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft engine, UTRC conducted a flametube-scale study of the RQL concept. Extensive combustor testing was performed at the Supersonic Cruise (SSC) condition of a HSCT engine cycle, Data obtained from probe traverses near the exit of the mixing section confirmed that the mixing section was the critical component in controlling combustor emissions. Circular-hole configurations, which produced rapidly-, highly-penetrating jets, were most effective in limiting NOx. The spatial profiles of NOx and CO at the mixer exit were not directly interpretable using a simple flow model based on jet penetration, and a greater understanding of the flow and chemical processes in this section are required to optimize it. Neither the rich-combustor equivalence ratio nor its residence time was a direct contributor to the exit NOx. Based on this study, it was also concluded that (1) While NOx formation in both the mixing section and the lean combustor contribute to the overall emission, the NOx formation in the mixing section dominates. The gas composition exiting the rich combustor can be reasonably represented by the equilibrium composition corresponding to the rich combustor operating condition. Negligible NOx exits the rich combustor. (2) At the SSC condition, the oxidation processes occurring in the mixing section consume 99 percent of the CO exiting the rich combustor. Soot formed in the rich combustor is also highly oxidized, with combustor exit SAE Smoke Number <3. (3) Mixing section configurations which demonstrated enhanced emissions control at SSC also performed better at part-power conditions. Data from mixer exit traverses reflected the expected mixing behavior for off-design jet to crossflow momentum-flux ratios. (4) Low power operating conditions require that the RQL combustor operate as a lean-lean combustor to achieve low CO and

  20. Reading Speed as a Constraint of Accuracy of Self-Perception of Reading Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Heekyung; Linderholm, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that college students take reading speed into consideration when evaluating their own reading skill, even if reading speed does not reliably predict actual reading skill. To test this hypothesis, we measured self-perception of reading skill, self-perception of reading speed, actual reading skill and actual reading speed to…

  1. The Effects of a Highly Cambered Low-Drag Wing and of Auxiliary Flaps on the High-Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Pursuit Airplane Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, Victor M

    1944-01-01

    Results are presented for tests of two wings, an NACA 230-series wing and a highly-cambered NACA 66-series wing on a twin-engine pursuit airplane. Auxiliary control flaps were tested in combinations with each wing. Data showing comparison of high-speed aerodynamic characteristics of the model when equipped with each wing, the effect of the auxiliary control flaps on aerodynamic characteristics, and elevator effectiveness for the model with the 66-series wing are presented. High-speed aerodynamic characteristics of the model were improved with the 66-series wing.

  2. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  3. Calculating Speed of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  4. Aerojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA is developing technology for air-breathing rocket engines that could help make space transportation safe, reliable and affordable for ordinary people. Powered by engines that breathe oxygen from the air, the spacecraft would be completely reusable, take off and land at airport runways, and be ready to fly again within days. The engines would get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engines rely totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn the hydrogen fuel. Once the vehicle's speed increases to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-power mode to propel the vehicle into orbit. This Quick Time movie features an aerojet engine which is the main propulsion system of the X-series future launch vehicles.

  5. Quiet engine program flight engine design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klapproth, J. F.; Neitzel, R. E.; Seeley, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of a preliminary flight engine design study based on the Quiet Engine Program high-bypass, low-noise turbofan engines. Engine configurations, weight, noise characteristics, and performance over a range of flight conditions typical of a subsonic transport aircraft were considered. High and low tip speed engines in various acoustically treated nacelle configurations were included.

  6. Simultaneous high-speed gas property measurements at the exhaust gas recirculation cooler exit and at the turbocharger inlet of a multicylinder diesel engine using diode-laser-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jatana, Gurneesh S; Magee, Mark; Fain, David; Naik, Sameer V; Shaver, Gregory M; Lucht, Robert P

    2015-02-10

    A diode-laser-absorption-spectroscopy-based sensor system was used to perform high-speed (100 Hz to 5 kHz) measurements of gas properties (temperature, pressure, and H(2)O vapor concentration) at the turbocharger inlet and at the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler exit of a diesel engine. An earlier version of this system was previously used for high-speed measurements of gas temperature and H(2)O vapor concentration in the intake manifold of the diesel engine. A 1387.2 N m tunable distributed feedback diode laser was used to scan across multiple H(2)O absorption transitions, and the direct absorption signal was recorded using a high-speed data acquisition system. Compact optical connectors were designed to conduct simultaneous measurements in the intake manifold, the EGR cooler exit, and the turbocharger inlet of the engine. For measurements at the turbocharger inlet, these custom optical connectors survived gas temperatures as high as 800 K using a simple and passive arrangement in which the temperature-sensitive components were protected from high temperatures using ceramic insulators. This arrangement reduced system cost and complexity by eliminating the need for any active water or oil cooling. Diode-laser measurements performed during steady-state engine operation were within 5% of the thermocouple and pressure sensor measurements, and within 10% of the H(2)O concentration values derived from the CO(2) gas analyzer measurements. Measurements were also performed in the engine during transient events. In one such transient event, where a step change in fueling was introduced, the diode-laser sensor was able to capture the 30 ms change in the gas properties; the thermocouple, on the other hand, required 7.4 s to accurately reflect the change in gas conditions, while the gas analyzer required nearly 600 ms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of such a simple and passive arrangement of high-temperature optical connectors as well

  7. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central…

  8. Compact change speed transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, K.; Yamaguchi, T.

    1989-06-06

    A change speed transmission is described comprising: a stationary part; an input member; an output member; first and second planetary gear sets; clutch and brake means for selectively controlling the first and second planetary gear sets to provide a plurality of forward speed rations and a reverse speed ratio between the input and output member; the clutch and brake means including a first clutch, a first one-way clutch, and a second one-way clutch which, when the first clutch is engaged, provide a path of transmission of reaction to the stationary part thereby establishing a path of transmission of torque through at least a part of the first and second planetary gear sets to achieve a predetermined one speed ratio of the forward speed ratios; the clutch and brake means including also a brake and a second slutch which, when both of the brake and the second clutch are engaged, hinder the action of the second one-way clutch and that of the first one-way clutch, respectively, thereby providing engine braking during running with the predetermined one speed ratio; the first clutch including means forming a drum-shaped member disposed radially outwardly of and receiving at least one of the first and second planetary gear sets, and an actuating piston of the first clutch; and the second clutch including an actuating piston slidably disposed within the actuating piston of the first clutch.

  9. The results of low-speed wind tunnel tests to investigate the effects of the NASA refan JT8D engine nacelles on the stability and control characteristics of the Boeing 727-200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirkey, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    The results from two low-speed wind tunnel tests of the Boeing 727-200 airplane as configured with the NASA refan JT8D-109 turbofan engines are presented. The objective of these tests was to determine the effects of the refan installation on the low-speed stability and control characteristics of the 727 airplane. Four side nacelle locations were tested to insure that aerodynamic interactions of the nacelles and empennage would be optimized. The optimum location was judged to be the same as that of the production JT8D-9 engines; the current production engine mounts can be used for this location. Some small changes in the basic airplane characteristics are attributable to the refan nacelles. The flaps up longitudinal and lateral-directional stability are both slightly increased for low angles of attack and sideslip respectively. The longitudinal stability at stall is improved for both the flaps up and landing flap configurations. The high attitude characteristics of the basic airplane are not significantly altered by the refan nacelle installation. Directional control capability is not affected by the refan nacelles.

  10. Improving the Response of a Wheel Speed Sensor by Using a RLS Lattice Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Wilmar

    2006-01-01

    Among the complete family of sensors for automotive safety, consumer and industrial application, speed sensors stand out as one of the most important. Actually, speed sensors have the diversity to be used in a broad range of applications. In today's automotive industry, such sensors are used in the antilock braking system, the traction control system and the electronic stability program. Also, typical applications are cam and crank shaft position/speed and wheel and turbo shaft speed measurement. In addition, they are used to control a variety of functions, including fuel injection, ignition timing in engines, and so on. However, some types of speed sensors cannot respond to very low speeds for different reasons. What is more, the main reason why such sensors are not good at detecting very low speeds is that they are more susceptible to noise when the speed of the target is low. In short, they suffer from noise and generally only work at medium to high speeds. This is one of the drawbacks of the inductive (magnetic reluctance) speed sensors and is the case under study. Furthermore, there are other speed sensors like the differential Hall Effect sensors that are relatively immune to interference and noise, but they cannot detect static fields. This limits their operations to speeds which give a switching frequency greater than a minimum operating frequency. In short, this research is focused on improving the performance of a variable reluctance speed sensor placed in a car under performance tests by using a recursive least-squares (RLS) lattice algorithm. Such an algorithm is situated in an adaptive noise canceller and carries out an optimal estimation of the relevant signal coming from the sensor, which is buried in a broad-band noise background where we have little knowledge of the noise characteristics. The experimental results are satisfactory and show a significant improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio at the system output.

  11. Performance of Axial-Flow Supersonic Compressor of the XJ55-FF-1 Turbojet Engine. IV - Analysis of Compressor Operation over a Range of Equivalent Tip Speeds from 801 to 1614 Feet Per Second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Robert C.; Hartmann, Melvin J.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the axial-flow supersonic compressor of the XJ55-FF-1 turbojet engine. An analysis of the performance of the rotor was made based on detailed flow measurements behind the rotor. The compressor apparently did not obtain the design normal-shock configuration in this investigation. A large redistribution of mass occurred toward the root of the rotor over the entire speed range; this condition was so acute at design speed that the tip sections were completely inoperative. The passage pressure recovery at maximum pressure ratio at 1614 feet per second varied from a maximum of 0.81 near the root to 0.53 near the tip, which indicated very poor efficiency of the flow process through the rotor. The results, however, indicated that the desired supersonic operation may be obtained by decreasing the effective contraction ratio of the rotor blade passage.

  12. Acoustic testing of a supersonic tip speed fan with acoustic treatment and rotor casting slots. Quiet engine program scale model fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic tests were conducted on a high tip speed (1550 ft/sec, 472.44 m/sec) single stage fan with varying amounts of wall acoustic treatment and with circumferential slots over the rotor blade tips. The slots were also tested with acoustic treatment placed behind the slots. The wall treatment results show that the inlet treatment is more effective at high fan speeds and aft duct treatment is more effective at low fan speeds. Maximum PNL's on a 200-foot (60.96 m) sideline show the untreated slots to have increased the rear radiated noise at approach. However, when the treatment was added to the slots inlet radiated noise was decreased, resulting in little change relative to the solid casing on an EPNL basis.

  13. High-speed horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence correction using a large actuator-number MEMS spatial light modulator in an interferometric phase conjugation engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olsen, J; Olivier, S; Young, P; Kartz, M; Flath, L; Kruelivitch, P; Crawford, J; Azucena, O

    2004-03-04

    Atmospheric propagation results for a high-speed, large-actuator-number, adaptive optics system are presented. The system uses a MEMS-based spatial light modulator correction device with 1024 actuators. Tests over a 1.35 km path achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 Hz and Strehl ratios close to 0.5. The wave-front sensor was based on a quadrature interferometer that directly measures phase. This technique does not require global wave-front reconstruction, making it relatively insensitive to scintillation and phase residues. The results demonstrate the potential of large actuator number MEMS-based spatial light modulators to replace conventional deformable mirrors.

  14. Vehicular enginee idel speed and cruise control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, A.A.; Sokalski, R.G.

    1986-02-11

    This patent describes a vehicular cruise and engine idling speed control system. This system consists of: 1.) An actuator adapted for engagement to a vehicular engine throttle that in a first engaged condition is operable upon receipt of a first control signal to move the throttle to regulate the vehicle speed. In a second engaged condition the engine throttle is operable upon receipt of a second control signal to regulate engine idling speed independent of the vehicle speed, 2.) A controller which responds to a sensed vehicle speed and an operator selected vehicle speed to provide the first and second control signal from at least one sensed engine operating condition upon establishment of the second engaged condition, 3.) An operator control for establishment of the first and second engaged conditions, 4.) A sensor throttle, actuated by the operator, is functionally effective for switching the controller output from the second control signal to the first control signal and causes the actuator to position the throttle at an advanced engine idle speed pick-up position, 5.) A device for differentiating between the operator selected vehicle speed throttle position and the regulated engine idle speed pick-up throttle position, 6.) A mechanism for insuring that the engine speed decreases in a uniform manner from the engine idle speed pick-up throttle position to the regulated engine idle speed throttle position.

  15. 14 CFR 23.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... For each propeller whose pitch cannot be controlled in flight— (1) During takeoff and initial climb at the all engine(s) operating climb speed specified in § 23.65, the propeller must limit the engine...

  16. 14 CFR 23.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... For each propeller whose pitch cannot be controlled in flight— (1) During takeoff and initial climb at the all engine(s) operating climb speed specified in § 23.65, the propeller must limit the engine...

  17. Engine Icing Modeling and Simulation (Part 2): Performance Simulation of Engine Rollback Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2011-01-01

    Ice buildup in the compressor section of a commercial aircraft gas turbine engine can cause a number of engine failures. One of these failure modes is known as engine rollback: an uncommanded decrease in thrust accompanied by a decrease in fan speed and an increase in turbine temperature. This paper describes the development of a model which simulates the system level impact of engine icing using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k). When an ice blockage is added to C-MAPSS40k, the control system responds in a manner similar to that of an actual engine, and, in cases with severe blockage, an engine rollback is observed. Using this capability to simulate engine rollback, a proof-of-concept detection scheme is developed and tested using only typical engine sensors. This paper concludes that the engine control system s limit protection is the proximate cause of iced engine rollback and that the controller can detect the buildup of ice particles in the compressor section. This work serves as a feasibility study for continued research into the detection and mitigation of engine rollback using the propulsion control system.

  18. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  19. Non-intrusive speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L.

    1986-01-01

    In Phase I of the Non-Intrusive Speed Sensor program, a computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs. Phase II of this program developed the variable-source magnetic speed sensor through the detailed design task and guided the design into breadboard fabrication. The speed sensor and its integral speed nut were evaluated at both unit and system level testing. The final room-temperature and cryogenic spin testing of the hardware demonstrated that the sensor was capable of generating sufficient output signal to enable remote speed sensing from 1500 to 40000 rpm over a speed nut/sensor separation of 3.5 inches.

  20. High-Speed Sealift Technology. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Engineering Directorate Technology Projection Report HIGH-SPEED SEALIFT TECHNOLOGY Volume 1 BY OWEN K. RITTER MICHAEL T. TEMPLEMAN...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Surface Warfare Center,Carderock Division,Total Ship Systems Engineering Directorate...11 3.4.3.2 Diesel Engines

  1. Twin engine synchronizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kobus, J.R.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes an apparatus for synchronizing the speeds of two engines, each having its own throttle level connected by an associated cable to a respective hand throttle lever, comprising moving means carried by the throttle lever of one of the engines for moving the throttle lever of the one engine independently of its associated cable and its respective hand throttle lever to increase or decrease the speed of the one engine until the speed of the one engine matches the speed of the other engine. The moving means moves the throttle lever of the one engine without moving its associated cable or its respective hand throttle lever, and actuating means mounted remote from the throttle lever of the one engine for actuating the moving means.

  2. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogardus, Scott; Loper, Brent; Nauman, Chris; Page, Jeff; Parris, Rusty; Steinbach, Greg

    1990-01-01

    The design process of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) combines existing technology with the expectation of future technology to create a Mach 3.0 transport. The HSCT was designed to have a range in excess of 6000 nautical miles and carry up to 300 passengers. This range will allow the HSCT to service the economically expanding Pacific Basin region. Effort was made in the design to enable the aircraft to use conventional airports with standard 12,000 foot runways. With a takeoff thrust of 250,000 pounds, the four supersonic through-flow engines will accelerate the HSCT to a cruise speed of Mach 3.0. The 679,000 pound (at takeoff) HSCT is designed to cruise at an altitude of 70,000 feet, flying above most atmospheric disturbances.

  3. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  4. A Sequential Shifting Algorithm for Variable Rotor Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Edwards, Jason M.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    A proof of concept of a continuously variable rotor speed control methodology for rotorcraft is described. Variable rotor speed is desirable for several reasons including improved maneuverability, agility, and noise reduction. However, it has been difficult to implement because turboshaft engines are designed to operate within a narrow speed band, and a reliable drive train that can provide continuous power over a wide speed range does not exist. The new methodology proposed here is a sequential shifting control for twin-engine rotorcraft that coordinates the disengagement and engagement of the two turboshaft engines in such a way that the rotor speed may vary over a wide range, but the engines remain within their prescribed speed bands and provide continuous torque to the rotor; two multi-speed gearboxes facilitate the wide rotor speed variation. The shifting process begins when one engine slows down and disengages from the transmission by way of a standard freewheeling clutch mechanism; the other engine continues to apply torque to the rotor. Once one engine disengages, its gear shifts, the multi-speed gearbox output shaft speed resynchronizes and it re-engages. This process is then repeated with the other engine. By tailoring the sequential shifting, the rotor may perform large, rapid speed changes smoothly, as demonstrated in several examples. The emphasis of this effort is on the coordination and control aspects for proof of concept. The engines, rotor, and transmission are all simplified linear models, integrated to capture the basic dynamics of the problem.

  5. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  6. Thermal design of a natural gas - diesel dual fuel turbocharged V18 engine for ship propulsion and power plant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvartzides, S.; Karmalis, I.

    2016-11-01

    A detailed method is presented on the thermal design of a natural gas - diesel dual fuel internal combustion engine. An 18 cylinder four stroke turbocharged engine is considered to operate at a maximum speed of 500 rpm for marine and power plant applications. Thermodynamic, heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena are mathematically analyzed to provide a real cycle analysis together with a complete set of calculated operation conditions, power characteristics and engine efficiencies. The method is found to provide results in close agreement to published data for the actual performance of similar engines such as V18 MAN 51/60DF.

  7. Calculation of the Actual Cost of Engine Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Cost Estimating Integrated Tools ( ACEIT ) helps analysts store, retrieve, and analyze data; build cost models; analyze risk; time phase budgets; and...Tools ( ACEIT ).” n. pag. http://www.aceit.com/ 21 February 2003. • USAMC Logistics Support Activity (LOGSA). “Cost Analysis Strategy Assessment

  8. An Overview of Engineering Courses in Brazil: Actual Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canen, Alberto G.; Tammela, Iara; Camatta, Diogo Cevolani

    2016-01-01

    Brazil is one of the largest countries in the world as well one of the greatest economies among developing countries. To be competitive, Brazil needs to be able to develop technology, research and knowledge. In this sense, we argue that economic growth is directly related to technological development, which is linked to the investments in…

  9. Acoustic analysis of aft noise reduction techniques measured on a subsonic tip speed 50.8 cm (twenty inch) diameter fan. [quiet engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.; Clemons, A.

    1977-01-01

    Sound data which were obtained during tests of a 50.8 cm diameter, subsonic tip speed, low pressure ratio fan were analyzed. The test matrix was divided into two major investigations: (1) source noise reduction techniques; and (2) aft duct noise reduction with acoustic treatment. Source noise reduction techniques were investigated which include minimizing second harmonic noise by varying vane/blade ratio, variation in spacing, and lowering the Mach number through the vane row to lower fan broadband noise. Treatment in the aft duct which includes flow noise effects, faceplate porosity, rotor OGV treatment, slant cell treatment, and splitter simulation with variable depth on the outer wall and constant thickness treatment on the inner wall was investigated. Variable boundary conditions such as variation in treatment panel thickness and orientation, and mixed porosity combined with variable thickness were examined. Significant results are reported.

  10. Wind-tunnel investigation of the powered low-speed longitudinal aerodynamics of the Vectored-Engine-Over (VEO) wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W.; Whitten, P. D.; Stumpfl, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation incorporating both static and wind-on testing was conducted in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to determine the effects of vectored thrust along with spanwise blowing on the low-speed aerodynamics of an advanced fighter configuration. Data were obtained over a large range of thrust coefficients corresponding to takeoff and landing thrust settings for many nozzle configurations. The complete set of static thrust data and the complete set of longitudinal aerodynamic data obtained in the investigation are presented. These data are intended for reference purposes and, therefore, are presented without analysis or comment. The analysis of the thrust-induced effects found in the investigation are not discussed.

  11. Effects of spanwise nozzle geometry and location on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Yip, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A V/STOL tunnel study was performed to determine the effects of spanwise blowing on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a model using a vectored-over-wing powered lift concept. The effects of spanwise nozzle throat area, internal and external nozzle geometry, and vertical and axial location were investigated. These effects were studied at a Mach number of 0.186 over an angle-of-attack range from 14 deg to 40 deg. A high pressure air system was used to provide jet-exhaust simulation. Engine nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 3.75.

  12. Knocking Combustion Observed in a Spark-Ignition Engine with Simultaneous Direct and Schlieren High-Speed Motion Pictures and Pressure Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterstrom, Gordon E

    1948-01-01

    Simultaneous direct and Schlieren photographs at 40,000 frames per second and correlated pressure records were taken of knocking combustion in a special spark-ignition engine to ascertain the intensity of certain end-zone reactions previously noted from Schlieren photography alone. A violent propagated homogeneous autoignition, or a similar phenomenon, previously observed, was again observed. The pressure records show autoignition of varying violence before the passage of a probable detonation wave. Extensive autoignition without occurrence of gas vibrations was seen in one explosion.

  13. Investigation of Performance of Axial-Flow Compressor of XT-46 Turbine-Propeller Engine. I - Preliminary Investigation at 50-,70-, and 100-Percent Design Equivalent Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, John W.R.; Sandercrock, Donald M.

    1950-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted to determine the performance of the 12-stage axial-flow compressor of the XT-46 turbine-propeller engine. This compressor was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 9 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.86. The design pressure ratios per stage were considerably greater than any employed in current aircraft gas-turbine engines using this type of compressor. The compressor performance was evaluated at two stations. The station near the entrance section of the combustors indicated a peak pressure ratio of 6.3 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.63 for a corrected weight flow of 23.1 pounds per second. The other, located one blade-chord downstream of the last stator row, indicated a peak pressure ratio of 6.97 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.81 for a corrected weight flow of 30.4 pounds per second. The difference in performance obtained at the two stations is attributed to shock waves in the vicinity of the last stator row. These shock waves and the accompanying flow choking, together with interstage circulatory flows, shift the compressor operating curves into the region where surge would normally occur. The inability of the compressor to meet design pressure ratio is probably due to boundary-layer buildup in the last stages, which cause axial velocities greater than design values that, in turn, adversely affect the angles of attack and turning angles in these blade rows.

  14. A Variable Speed Fan Dynamometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Karl D

    1920-01-01

    Fan brakes used as absorption dynamometers in testing internal combustion engines have the disadvantage that a given fan will run only at one speed when the engine is delivering full power. In order to be able to vary the speed at which a given power will be absorbed, English manufacturers have for some time been using a cylindrical housing around the fan with one or two variable openings in the periphery. Here, results are given of tests conducted to determine how great a range of speed can be obtained from such a device. The tests show that a power ratio of five to 1 can be obtained, the power ratio being defined as the ratio of the power absorbed by the fan at a given speed with the outlet open to the power absorbed at the same speed with the second outlet closed. Data show that improvements in the design of the fan brake can make the speed ratio approach but not exceed a value of two to one. Also given here are a brief outline of previous work on fan brakes, a description of the experimental apparatus and methods used in the tests, and a more detailed statement of test results.

  15. Low speed phaselock speed control system. [for brushless dc motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulcher, R. W.; Sudey, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A motor speed control system for an electronically commutated brushless dc motor is provided which includes a phaselock loop with bidirectional torque control for locking the frequency output of a high density encoder, responsive to actual speed conditions, to a reference frequency signal, corresponding to the desired speed. The system includes a phase comparator, which produces an output in accordance with the difference in phase between the reference and encoder frequency signals, and an integrator-digital-to-analog converter unit, which converts the comparator output into an analog error signal voltage. Compensation circuitry, including a biasing means, is provided to convert the analog error signal voltage to a bidirectional error signal voltage which is utilized by an absolute value amplifier, rotational decoder, power amplifier-commutators, and an arrangement of commutation circuitry.

  16. NASA Now: The Speed of Sound

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about sonic booms and the speed of sound from aerospace engineer George Hatcher. Hatcher shares the excitement of physics in his description of the space shuttle re-entering Earth’s atmosph...

  17. NASA Now Minute: The Speed of Sound

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about sonic booms and the speed of sound from aerospace engineerGeorge Hatcher as he shares the excitement of physics in hisdescription of how the space shuttles reentered Earth’s atmosph...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.510 - Engine mapping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the atmospheric pressure near the engine's air inlet is not within ± 5 kPa of the atmospheric pressure... engines as follows: (1) Record the atmospheric pressure. (2) Warm up the engine by operating it. We...-speed engines. For constant-speed engines, generate a map as follows: (1) Record the...

  19. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... engine tests: (i) Engine speed setpoints for each mode shall be within 2 percent of the speed of the... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air...

  20. High speed rotorcraft propulsion concepts to control power/speed characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettner, J. L.; Hawkins, J. M.; Blandford, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Recent NASA sponsored rotorcraft airframer studies have demonstrated the desire for constant power over a wide range of output speed for turboshaft propulsion systems. This study interrogated several different concepts aimed at maintaining constant power over a speed variation from 100-50 percent with minimum increase in fuel consumption. The baseline engine was an advanced technology 8000 shp, fixed turbine geometry, turboshaft engine. The concepts investigated included variable geometry turbines, variable geometry compressors, power transfer from the HP to LP shafts, counterrotating power turbine with a combiner gearbox, and variable speed transmission integrated with the baseline turboshaft engine. The concept that best satisfies the program objectives with superior engine performance and with the least technical risk is the baseline (fixed geometry turbines) turboshaft engine integrated with the variable speed transmission.

  1. Investigating potential correlations between jet engine noise and plume dynamics in the hypertemporal infrared domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunio, Phillip M.; Weber, Reed; Knobel, Kimberly; Wager, Jason; Lopez, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    Jet engine noise can be a hazard and environmental pollutant, affecting personnel working in close proximity to jet engines. Mitigating the effects of jet engine noise could reduce the potential for hearing loss in runway workers, but engine noise is not yet sufficiently well-characterized that it can easily be mitigated for new engine designs. That is, there exists a very complex relationship between jet engine design parameters, operating conditions, and resultant noise power levels. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the utility of high-speed imaging (also called hypertemporal imaging) in correlating the infrared signatures of jet aircraft engines with acoustic noise from the jet engines. This paper will focus on a theoretical analysis of jet engine infrared signatures, and will define potentially-detectable characteristics of such signatures in the hypertemporal domain. A systematic test campaign to determine whether such signatures actually exist and can be correlated with acoustic jet engine characteristics will be proposed. The detection of any hypertemporal signatures in association with acoustic signatures of jet engines will enable the use of a new domain in characterizing jet engine noise. This may in turn enable new methods of predicting or mitigating jet engine noise, which could lead to benefits for operators of large numbers of jet engines.

  2. High speed holographic cine-recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Donald; Watts, David; Gordon, Joseph; Lysogorski, Charles; Powers, Aaron; Perry, John; Chenette, Eugene; Hudson, Roger; Young, Raymond

    2005-08-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory and North Dancer Labs researchers have completed the initial development and transition to operational use of a high-speed holographic movie system. This paper documents the first fully operational use of a novel and unique experimental capability for high-speed holographic movies and high-speed cinema interferometry. In this paper we document the initial experiments that were performed with the High Speed Holographic Recorder (HSHR) at the Munitions Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory Site at Eglin, AFB, Florida. These experiments were performed to assess the possibilities for high-speed cine-laser holography combined with high-speed videography to document the formation and propagation of plumes of materials created by impact of high-speed projectiles. This paper details the development of the experimental procedures and initial results of this new tool. After successful integration and testing the system was delivered to Arnold Engineering Development Center.

  3. Analysis of an Increase in the Efficiency of a Spark Ignition Engine Through the Application of an Automotive Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkisz, Jerzy; Fuc, Pawel; Lijewski, Piotr; Ziolkowski, Andrzej; Galant, Marta; Siedlecki, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    We have analyzed the increase of the overall efficiency of a spark ignition engine through energy recovery following the application of an automotive thermoelectric generator (ATEG) of our own design. The design of the generator was developed following emission investigations during vehicle driving under city traffic conditions. The measurement points were defined by actual operation conditions (engine speed and load), subsequently reproduced on an engine dynamometer. Both the vehicle used in the on-road tests and the engine dynamometer were fit with the same, downsized spark ignition engine (with high effective power-to-displacement ratio). The thermodynamic parameters of the exhaust gases (temperature and exhaust gas mass flow) were measured on the engine testbed, along with the fuel consumption and electric current generated by the thermoelectric modules. On this basis, the power of the ATEG and its impact on overall engine efficiency were determined.

  4. Response to actual and simulated recordings of conventional takeoff and landing jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabry, J. E.; Sullivan, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    Comparability between noise characteristics of synthesized recordings of aircraft in flight and actual recordings were investigated. Although the synthesized recordings were more smoothly time-varying than the actual recordings and the synthesizer could not produce a comb-filter effect that was present in the actual recordings, results supported the conclusion that annoyance response is comparable to the synthesized and actual recordings. A correction for duration markedly improved the validity of engineering calculation procedures designed to measure noise annoyance. Results led to the conclusion that the magnitude estimation psychophysical method was a highly reliable approach for evaluating engineering calculation procedures designed to measure noise annoyance. For repeated presentations of pairs of actual recordings, differences between judgment results for identical signals ranged from 0.0 to 0.5 db.

  5. Gas turbine engine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A variable orifice system is described that is responsive to compressor inlet pressure and temperature, compressor discharge pressure and rotational speed of a gas-turbine engine. It is incorporated into a hydraulic circuit that includes a zero gradient pump driven at a speed proportional to the speed of the engine. The resulting system provides control of fuel rate for starting, steady running, acceleration and deceleration under varying altitudes and flight speeds.

  6. High-speed rotorcraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, John W.; Fitzpatrick, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently completed high-speed rotorcraft design studies for NASA provide the basis to assess technology needs for the development of these aircraft. Preliminary analysis of several concepts possessing helicopter-like hover characteristics and cruise capabilities in the 450 knot regime, led to the selection of two concepts for further study. The concepts selected included the Rotor/Wing and the Tilt Wing. The two unique concepts use turbofan and turboshaft engines respectively. Designs, based on current technology for each, established a baseline configuration from which technology trade studies could be conducted. Propulsion technology goals from the IHPTET program established the advanced technolgy year. Due to high-speed requirements, each concept possesses its own unique propulsion challenges. Trade studies indicate that achieving th IHPTET Phase III goals significantly improves the effectiveness of both concepts. Increased engine efficiency is particularly important to VTOL aircraft by reducing gross weight.

  7. Turbojet-engine Starting and Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Cafferty, R. J.; Straight, D. M.

    1956-01-01

    From considerations of safety and reliability in performance of gas-turbine aircraft, it is clear that engine starting and acceleration are of utmost importance. For this reason extensive efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the factors involved in the starting and acceleration of engines. In chapter III it is shown that certain basic combustion requirements must be met before ignition can occur; consequently, the design and operation of an engine must be tailored to provide these basic requirements in the combustion zone of the engine, particularly in the vicinity of the ignition source. It is pointed out in chapter III that ignition by electrical discharges is aided by high pressure, high temperature, low gas velocity and turbulence, gaseous fuel-air mixture, proper mixture strength, and-an optimum spark. duration. The simultaneous achievement of all these requirements in an actual turbojet-engine combustor is obviously impossible, yet any attempt to satisfy as many requirements as possible will result in lower ignition energies, lower-weight ignition systems, and greater reliability. These factors together with size and cost considerations determine the acceptability of the final ignition system. It is further shown in chapter III that the problem of wall quenching affects engine starting. For example, the dimensions of the volume to be burned must be larger than the quenching distance at the lowest pressure and the most adverse fuel-air ratio encountered. This fact affects the design of cross-fire tubes between adjacent combustion chambers in a tubular-combustor turbojet engine. Only two chambers in these engines contain spark plugs; therefore, the flame must propagate through small connecting tubes between the chambers. The quenching studies indicate that if the cross-fire tubes are too narrow the flame will not propagate from one chamber to another. In order to better understand the role of the basic factors in actual engine operation, many

  8. Computer-Based Laboratory For Engine-System Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Robert B.; Garcia, Raul C.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory evaluates artificially intelligent engine-system monitors without potentially hazardous measurements on actual engines. Monitor enhances engine controller by detecting undesirable trends and counteracting them. Once proved in laboratory, monitor will then be tried on real engine.

  9. Effect of speed and load on ultra-high-speed ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Signer, H.

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the effects of speed and load on the operation of 120-mm bore angular-contact ball bearings at speeds to 25,000 rpm and thrust loads to 22,240 newtons (5000 lb). Bearing temperature and power consumption increased with increases in load and/or speed. The effect of load on temperature and power consumption was small relative to the speed effect. Actual measurements of bearing operating contact angle were in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Skidding occurred in the bearing in various amounts, generally increasing with speed at given load. The highest amount of skidding, 6 percent, occurred at the highest speed, 25,000 rpm. No visible damage to the bearing surfaces occurred due to the skidding.

  10. Dynamics of a turbojet engine considered as a quasi-static system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, Edward W; Taylor, Burt L, III

    1951-01-01

    A determination of the dynamic characteristics of a typical turbojet engine with a centrifugal compressor, a sonic-flow turbine-nozzle diaphragm, and fixed area exhaust nozzle is presented. A generalized equation for transient behavior of the engine was developed; this equation was then verified by calculations using compressor and turbine performance charts extrapolated from equilibrium operating data and by experimental data obtained from an engine operated under transients in fuel flow. The results indicate that a linear differential equation for engine acceleration as a function of fuel flow and engine speed for operation near a steady-state operating condition can be written. The coefficients of this equation can be obtained either from actual transient data or, with a fair degree of accuracy, from the steady-state performance maps of the compressor and turbine, and can be corrected for altitude in the same manner that steady-state performance data are corrected.

  11. Jet engine testing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Zweifel, T.L.

    1987-03-24

    An apparatus is described for testing jet engines mounted on an aircraft, the jet engines of the type having a high speed rotor and a low speed rotor, comprising: representative signal means for providing first representative signals representative of rotation rates of the low speed rotor in the jet engines and second representative signals representative of rotation rates of the high speed rotor in the jet engines; equivalent signal means coupled to receive the second representative signals for deriving equivalent signals representative of low speed rotor rotation rates of normally operating jet engines having high speed rotor rotation rates represented by the second representative signals; first difference signal means coupled to receive the first representative signals and the equivalent signals for providing first difference signals representative of differences between the first representative signals and the equivalent signals; means for providing threshold signals; first detector means coupled to the threshold signal means and the first difference signal means for comparing the threshold signals and the first difference signals to provide first detected signals representative of values of the first difference signals relative to the threshold signals; and engine failure indicator means coupled to receive the detected signals for determination of engine failures.

  12. Comparison between Computer-Controlled Troposcatter Simulation and an Actual Link.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of this report is to compare a computer-controlled troposcatter simulation with data obtained over an actual troposcatter test link. Parameters compared are fade rate, signal amplitude, and fade duration and correlation coefficient distributions, as well as error rates obtained with various high speed digital modems. (Author)

  13. Simultaneously firing two cylinders of an even firing camless engine

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Daniel G

    2014-03-11

    A valve control system includes an engine speed control module that determines an engine speed and a desired engine stop position. A piston position module determines a desired stopping position of a first piston based on the desired engine stop position. A valve control module receives the desired stopping position, commands a set of valves to close at the desired stopping position if the engine speed is less than a predetermined shutdown threshold, and commands the set of valves to reduce the engine speed if the engine speed is greater than the predetermined shutdown threshold.

  14. Flight Investigation of the Cooling Characteristics of a Two-row Radial Engine Installation III : Engine Temperature Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennak, Robert M; Messing, Wesley E; Morgan, James E

    1946-01-01

    The temperature distribution of a two-row radial engine in a twin-engine airplane has been investigated in a series of flight tests. The test engine was operated over a wide range of conditions at density altitudes of 5000 and 20,000 feet; quantitative results are presented showing the effects of flight and engine variables upon average engine temperature and over-all temperature spread. Discussions of the effect of the variables on the shape of the temperature patterns and on the temperature distribution of individual cylinders are also included. The results indicate that, for the tests conducted, the temperature distribution patterns were chiefly determined by the fuel-air ratio and cooling-air distributions. It was possible to calculate individual cylinder temperature, on the assumption of equal power distribution among cylinders, to within an average of plus or minus 14 degrees F. of the actual temperature. A considerable change occurred in either the spread or the thrust axis, the average engine fuel-air ratio, the engine speed, the power, or the blower ratio. Smaller effects on the temperature pattern were noticed with a change in cowl-flap opening and altitude. In most of the tests, a change in conditions affected the temperature of the barrels less than that of the heads. The variation of flight and engine variables had a negligible effect on the temperature distributions of the individual cylinders. (author)

  15. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  16. Exhaust emissions from high speed passenger ferries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, D. A.

    Exhaust emission measurements have been carried out on-board three high-speed passenger ferries (A, B and C) during normal service routes. Ship A was powered by conventional, medium-speed, marine diesel engines, Ship B by gas turbine engines and Ship C conventional, medium-speed, marine diesel engines equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO x abatement. All ships had similar auxiliary engines (marine diesels) for generating electric power on-board. Real-world emission factors of NOx, SO2, CO, CO 2, NMVOC, CH4, N2O, NH3, PM and PAH at steady-state engine loads and for complete voyages were determined together with an estimate of annual emissions. In general, Ship B using gas turbines showed favourable NO x, PM and PAH emissions but at the expense of higher fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions. Ship C with the SCR had the lowest NO x emissions but highest NH 3 emissions especially during harbour approaches and stops. The greatest PM and PAH specific emissions were measured from auxiliary engines operating at low engine loads during harbour stops. Since all ships used a low-sulphur gas oil, SO 2 emissions were relatively low in all cases.

  17. Free piston stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents a basic introduction to free piston Stirling engine technology through a review of specialized background material. It also includes information based on actual construction and operation experience with these machines, as well as theoretical and analytical insights into free piston Stirling engine technology.

  18. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  19. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  20. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  1. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  2. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  3. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  4. Speed control system for a windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, C.E.

    1981-06-23

    A speed control system for a windmill having blades which can be feathered for altering speed and with the blades under the control of a mechanism which includes a piston assembly and a fluid governor associated therewith. Spring means are used to feather the blades against the force of the piston assembly which is interconnected with the blades, and the speed of blade rotation actually creates the fluid pressure acting on the piston assembly and a governor is associated with the piston assembly for controlling the position of the piston and thus controlling the feathering of the blades, all according to the speed of rotation of the windmill blades. The windmill can be used for generating electric power, and fail-safe mechanisms are employed for protecting in the event of a windmill blade breakage.

  5. Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.

  6. Qualitative and temporal reasoning in engine behavior analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, W. E.; Stamps, M. E.; Ali, M.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulation models, engine experts, and experimental data are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of abnormal engine behavior. Engine parameters monitored during operation are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of actual engine behavior. Similarities between the representations of failure scenarios and the actual engine behavior are used to diagnose fault conditions which have already occurred, or are about to occur; to increase the surveillance by the monitoring system of relevant engine parameters; and to predict likely future engine behavior.

  7. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  8. The Art Speed of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Jan

    2006-03-01

    The Roman poet Horace predicted correctly his phrase aere perennius, would last ``longer than bronze'' because the Ode he wrote travels to the eye at nearly the speed of light regardless of the rate of the decay of the paper it's written on. John Keats's 19th century Ode predicted correctly the youthful figures he saw on a bronze age Grecian Urn moved in ``slow time'' aging little from the time of painting to the time of his viewing in the British museum-and to ours today of the same urn. The youthful images of the Keystone Kops have aged slower than their twins-- their mortal actors. Discoveries about light's speed occurred synchronously with the engineering of telegraph and radio transmissions in the 19th century-which allowed anyone an experience of what Physics had discovered. Einstein's privotal papers appeared in the same year as the first feature film shot and transmitted at the speed of light regardless of the aging of the film stock. Experiencing the light-like speed of art in Keat's ode, Cubism, Bob and Ray's radio, the Keystone Kops provides an aesthetic, visceral understanding of Einstein's Twin's Paradox about the dilation of time.

  9. Numerical Speed of Sound and its Application to Schemes for all Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Edwards, Jack R.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of "numerical speed of sound" is proposed in the construction of numerical flux. It is shown that this variable is responsible for the accurate resolution of' discontinuities, such as contacts and shocks. Moreover, this concept can he readily extended to deal with low speed and multiphase flows. As a results, the numerical dissipation for low speed flows is scaled with the local fluid speed, rather than the sound speed. Hence, the accuracy is enhanced the correct solution recovered, and the convergence rate improved. We also emphasize the role of mass flux and analyze the behavior of this flux. Study of mass flux is important because the numerical diffusivity introduced in it can be identified. In addition, it is the term common to all conservation equations. We show calculated results for a wide variety of flows to validate the effectiveness of using the numerical speed of sound concept in constructing the numerical flux. We especially aim at achieving these two goals: (1) improving accuracy and (2) gaining convergence rates for all speed ranges. We find that while the performance at high speed range is maintained, the flux now has the capability of performing well even with the low: speed flows. Thanks to the new numerical speed of sound, the convergence is even enhanced for the flows outside of the low speed range. To realize the usefulness of the proposed method in engineering problems, we have also performed calculations for complex 3D turbulent flows and the results are in excellent agreement with data.

  10. Valve operating device for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, M.; Kumagai, K.; Fukuo, K.; Hiro, T.; Matsumoto, M.

    1989-02-28

    A valve operating mechanism is described for intake or exhaust valves of an internal combustion engine having a low-speed cam formed on a camshaft and suited for an operation mode of the intake or exhaust valves during low-speed operation of the engine, a high-speed cam formed on the camshaft and suited for an operation mode of the intake or exhaust valves during high-speed operation of the engine, a cam follower held in slidable contact with the low-speed cam, a cam follower held in slidable contact with the high-speed cam, and a selective coupling mechanism disposed between the cam followers for selectively connecting and disconnecting the cam followers in order to open and close the intake or exhaust valves dependent on the operating speed of the engine. The improvement comprises a low-speed lubricating oil passage for supplying lubricating oil to sliding surfaces of the low-speed cam and the associated cam follower and a high-speed lubricating oil passage for supplying lubricating oil to sliding surfaces of the high-speed cam and the associate cam follower, the low-speed lubricating oil passage and the high-speed lubricating oil passage being separate of each other. It also includes a control valve connected between and oil supply source and the low-speed lubricating oil passage and the high-speed lubricating oil passage, the control valve being selectively operable for communicating the high-speed lubricating oil passage and the oil pressure supply source throughout a full operating range of the engine while restricting the rate of flow of oil during low-speed operation of the engine and for communicating the low-speed lubricating oil passage and the oil pressure supply source at least during low-speed operation of the engine.

  11. Speed limits of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everling, E

    1923-01-01

    This paper is restricted to the question of attainable speed limits and attacks the problem from different angles. Theoretical limits due to air resistance are presented along with design factors which may affect speed such as wing loads, wing areas, wing section shifting, landing speeds, drag-lift ratios, and power coefficients.

  12. Deterministic prediction of surface wind speed variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drisya, G. V.; Kiplangat, D. C.; Asokan, K.; Satheesh Kumar, K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of wind speed is an important aspect of various tasks related to wind energy management such as wind turbine predictive control and wind power scheduling. The most typical characteristic of wind speed data is its persistent temporal variations. Most of the techniques reported in the literature for prediction of wind speed and power are based on statistical methods or probabilistic distribution of wind speed data. In this paper we demonstrate that deterministic forecasting methods can make accurate short-term predictions of wind speed using past data, at locations where the wind dynamics exhibit chaotic behaviour. The predictions are remarkably accurate up to 1 h with a normalised RMSE (root mean square error) of less than 0.02 and reasonably accurate up to 3 h with an error of less than 0.06. Repeated application of these methods at 234 different geographical locations for predicting wind speeds at 30-day intervals for 3 years reveals that the accuracy of prediction is more or less the same across all locations and time periods. Comparison of the results with f-ARIMA model predictions shows that the deterministic models with suitable parameters are capable of returning improved prediction accuracy and capturing the dynamical variations of the actual time series more faithfully. These methods are simple and computationally efficient and require only records of past data for making short-term wind speed forecasts within practically tolerable margin of errors.

  13. New superlong-stroke slow-speed diesel

    SciTech Connect

    Kunberger, K.

    1994-09-01

    Changes in the marine market and ship design in recent years created a demand for lower speed two-stroke engines. To meet this demand, MAN B W has added to its MC engine family the new S-versions, with cylinder bores of 80, 70, 60, 50 and 26 cm. The stroke-to-bore ratio was selected to be around 3.8:1, versus 3.2:1 for the previous L-versions. This basically reduced the engine speed to achieve a mean piston speed for improved propeller efficiency, increased the cylinder displacement for higher output, and improved the fuel consumption. 5 figs.

  14. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  15. Performance of J33-A-27 Turbojet-Engine Compressor. II; Over - All Performance Characteristics of Modified Compressor at Equivalent Impeller Speeds from 6100 to 13,250 RPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beede, William L.; Ginsburg, Ambrose

    1950-01-01

    A modified J33-A-27 compressor was operated over a range of equivalent impeller speeds from 6100 to 13,250 rpm in order to obtain the over-all compressor performance. At the equivalent design speed of 11,800 rpm, the maximum efficiency of 0.764 and peak pressure ratio of 4.56 occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 104.07 pounds per second. At the highest equivalent speed (13,250 rpm) a maximum efficiency of 0.711, a maximum equivalent weight flow of 123.00 pounds per second, and a peak pressure ratio of 5.76 were obtained.

  16. Simulating a small turboshaft engine in real-time multiprocessor simulator (RTMPS) environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, E. J.; Arpasi, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A Real-Time Multiprocessor Simulator (RTMPS) has been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The RTMPS uses parallel microprocessors to achieve computing speeds needed for real-time engine simulation. This report describes the use of the RTMPS system to simulate a small turboshaft engine. The process of programming the engine equations and distributing them over one, two, and four processors is discussed. Steady-state and transient results from the RTMPS simulation are compared with results from a main-frame-based simulation. Processor execution times and the associated execution time savings for the two and four processor cases are presented using actual data obtained from the RTMPS system. Included is a discussion of why the minimum achievable calculation time for the turboshaft engine model was attained using four processors. Finally, future enhancements to the RTMPS system are discussed including the development of a generalized partitioning algorithm to automatically distribute the system equations among the processors in optimum fashion.

  17. Speed Management Strategies; A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Saadati, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically identify the various methods of speed management and their effects. Methods: A systematic search was performed in Science Direct, Ovid Medline, Scopus, PubMed and ProQuest databases from April to June 2015. Hand searching and reference of selected articles were used to improve article identification. Articles published after 1990 which had reported on efficacy/effectiveness of speed management strategies were included. Data were extracted using pre-defined extraction table. Results: Of the 803 retrieved articles, 22 articles were included in this review. Most of the included articles (63%) had before-after design and were done in European countries. Speed cameras, engineering schemes, intelligent speed adaption (ISA), speed limits and zones, vehicle activated sign and integrated strategies were the most common strategies reported in the literature. Various strategies had different effects on mean speed of the vehicles ranging from 1.6 to 10 km/h. Moreover, 8-65% and 11-71% reduction was reported in person injured accidents and fatal accidents, respectively as a result of employing various strategies. Conclusion: Literature revealed positive effects of various speed management strategies. Using various strategies was mostly dependent on road characteristics, driver’s attitude about the strategy as well as economic and technological capabilities of the country. Political support is considered as a main determinant in selecting speed management strategies. PMID:27540546

  18. Subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics and engine pressure distributions for an aircraft with an integrated scramjet designed for Mach 6 cruise. [conducted in Langley 7 by 10 foot high speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Fox, C. H., Jr.; Johnston, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    A 1/10-scale model of a proposed hypersonic aircraft with an integrated scramjet was tested. The investigation took place over a Mach number range from 0.2 to 0.7 and an angle of attack range from 2 deg to approximately 17 deg at a sideslip angle of 0 deg. The primary configuration variables studied were engine location, internal engine geometry, and external engine geometry. The results are presented without analysis.

  19. High speed machining of space shuttle external tank liquid hydrogen barrel panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Actual and projected optimum High Speed Machining data for producing shuttle external tank liquid hydrogen barrel panels of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are reported. The data included various machining parameters; e.g., spindle speeds, cutting speed, table feed, chip load, metal removal rate, horsepower, cutting efficiency, cutter wear (lack of) and chip removal methods.

  20. Performance of Allison Model 400-C6 Turbojet-Engine Compressor. I; Over-All Performance Characteristics of Compressor at Equivalent Impeller Speeds of 6000, 7000, and 8500 RPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, Karl; Withee, Joseph R., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    The Allison model 400-C6 compressor was operated at an inlet pressure of 12 inches of mercury absolute ana ambient inlet temperature at equivalent impeller speeds of 6000, 7000, and 8500 rpm. Additional runs at an equivalent speed of 7000 rpm and ambient inlet temperature were made at inlet pressures from 7 to 22 inches of mercury absolute. The results of this investigation are compared with those of the 533-A-23 compressors. For the speeds investigated, the Allison model 400-C6 compressor had a maximum adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency of 0.768 at an equivalent speed of 7000 rpm; the corresponding equivalent weight flow was 45.0 pounds per second and the pressure ratio was 1.83. At an equivalent impeller speed of 8500 rpm, the maximum equivalent weight flow was 61.6 pounds per second and the peak pressure ratio of 2.38 occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 52.2 pounds per 1 second and an adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency of 0.714. At an equivalent speed of 7000 rpm, increasing the compressor- inlet pressure increased the maximum equivalent weight flow and the pressure ratio.

  1. Aerodynamic Experiments of Small Scale Combined Cycle Engine in Various Mach Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Kouichiro; Kouchi, Toshinori; Kato, Kanenori; Sakuranaka, Noboru; Watanabe, Syuuichi

    A small model aerodynamic tests of the combined cycle engine were carried out to evaluate its performance in subsonic and supersonic conditions. In this regime of the flow speed, the combined cycle engine operates as an ejector-jet or ramjet. The nitrogen gas was exhausted as the substitution for the actual rocket gas. In a subsonic condition, there appeared local pressure rise at the kink point of the ramp, increasing the pressure drag. Both wall pressure and the pitot pressure distribution at the exit of the model suggested that the flow structure is “two-layered” ; one is subsonic induced air flow, and the other is the supersonic rocket exhaust. A slit was carved on the topwall inside the isolator section, expecting a better suction performance in the ejector-jet mode. The modification actually had an effect to enhance the lower limit of the rocket pressure at which the choking of the induced air is achieved.

  2. 40 CFR 1042.101 - Exhaust emission standards for Category 1 engines and Category 2 engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the duty cycle specified in § 1042.505(b)(1), except for variable-speed propulsion marine engines used...), except for variable-speed marine engines used with controllable-pitch propellers or with electrically... NOX+HC standards. (D) Subzones 2 and 3: 1.9 for PM and CO standards. (iii) For variable-speed...

  3. Explosive Percolation Transition is Actually Continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recently a discontinuous percolation transition was reported in a new “explosive percolation” problem for irreversible systems [D. Achlioptas, R. M. D’Souza, and J. Spencer, Science 323, 1453 (2009)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1167782] in striking contrast to ordinary percolation. We consider a representative model which shows that the explosive percolation transition is actually a continuous, second order phase transition though with a uniquely small critical exponent of the percolation cluster size. We describe the unusual scaling properties of this transition and find its critical exponents and dimensions.

  4. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  5. Internal Combustion Engines as Fluidized Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavich, Zoe; Taie, Zachary; Menon, Shyam; Beckwith, Walter; Daly, Shane; Halliday, Devin; Hagen, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Using an internal combustion engine as a chemical reactor could provide high throughput, high chemical conversion efficiency, and reactant/product handling benefits. For processes requiring a solid catalyst, the ability to develop a fluidized bed within the engine cylinder would allow efficient processing of large volumes of fluid. This work examines the fluidization behavior of particles in a cylinder of an internal combustion engine at various engine speeds. For 40 micron silica gel particles in a modified Megatech Mark III transparent combustion engine, calculations indicate that a maximum engine speed of about 60.8 RPM would result in fluidization. At higher speeds, the fluidization behavior is expected to deteriorate. Experiments gave qualitative confirmation of the analytical predictions, as a speed of 48 RPM resulted in fluidized behavior, while a speed of 171 RPM did not. The investigation shows that under certain conditions a fluidized bed can be obtained within an engine cylinder. Corresponding Author.

  6. Performance of J33-A-23 Turbojet-Engine Compressor. II; Over-All Performance Characteristics of Compressor with 34-Blade Impeller at Equivalent Impeller Speeds from 6000 to 11.750 RPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beede, William L.; Kovach, Karl

    1948-01-01

    The J33-A-23 compressor with a 34-blade impeller was operated at ambient inlet temperature and an inlet pressure of 14 inches mercury absolute over a range of equivalent impeller speeds from 6000 to 11,750 rpm. Additional runs at equivalent speeds of 7,000, 10,000, and 11,750 rpm and ambient inlet temperature were made at inlet pressures of 5 and 10 inches mercury absolute. The results of this investigation are compared with those of the J33-A-23 compressor with a 17-blade impeller. At the design equivalent speed of 11,750 rpm the 533-A-23 compressor with a 34-blade impeller had a peak pressure ratio of 4.49 at an equivalent weight flow of 82.4 pounds per second and an adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency of 0.740. The maximum equivalent flow at design speed was 91.8 pounds per second. The peak efficiency at design speed (0.757) occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 85.5 pounds per second. The maximum adiabatic temperature- rise efficiency of 0.773 was obtained at an equivalent impeller speed of 10,000 rpm, an equivalent weight flow of 65.8 pounds per second, and a pressure ratio of 3.27. At equivalent impeller speeds of.l0,000 and 11,75O rpm a decrease in inlet pressure resulted in a decrease in maximum equivalent weight flow, peak pressure ratio, and peak adiabatic temperature- rise efficiency.

  7. High speed handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-01-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2. PMID:24653618

  8. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOEpatents

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  9. Variable current speed controller for eddy current motors

    DOEpatents

    Gerth, H.L.; Bailey, J.M.; Casstevens, J.M.; Dixon, J.H.; Griffith, B.O.; Igou, R.E.

    1982-03-12

    A speed control system for eddy current motors is provided in which the current to the motor from a constant frequency power source is varied by comparing the actual motor speed signal with a setpoint speed signal to control the motor speed according to the selected setpoint speed. A three-phase variable voltage autotransformer is provided for controlling the voltage from a three-phase power supply. A corresponding plurality of current control resistors is provided in series with each phase of the autotransformer output connected to inputs of a three-phase motor. Each resistor is connected in parallel with a set of normally closed contacts of plurality of relays which are operated by control logic. A logic circuit compares the selected speed with the actual motor speed obtained from a digital tachometer monitoring the motor spindle speed and operated the relays to add or substract resistance equally in each phase of the motor input to vary the motor current to control the motor at the selected speed.

  10. Thermoregulation during prolonged actual and laboratory-simulated bicycling.

    PubMed

    Brown, S L; Banister, E W

    1985-01-01

    Thermoregulatory and cardiorespiratory responses to bicycling 55 km (mean speed 9.7 m X s-1) outdoors (15 degrees C DB) were compared to equivalent cycle ergometry (90 min at 65% VO2max) in the laboratory (20-23 degrees C DB, 50% RH) in 7 trained cyclists. Outdoor environmental conditions were simulated with fans and lamps, and were contrasted with standard no-wind, no-sun laboratory conditions. Sweating rate was similar during outdoor and laboratory simulated outdoor cycling (0.90 and 0.87 to 0.94 1 X h-1 respectively). During outdoor bicycling, mean heart rate (161 bt X min-1) was 7-13% higher (p less than .05) than under laboratory conditions, suggesting a greater strain for a similar external work rate. The increase in rectal temperature (0.8 degrees C) was 33-50% less (p less than 0.05) at the cooler outdoor ambient temperature than in the laboratory. Thermoregulatory stress was greater under the no-fan, no-lamp laboratory condition than during simulated outdoor conditions (36-38% greater (p less than 0.05) sweating rate, 15-18% greater (p less than 0.01) mean skin temperature, 6.4 to 7.8 fold greater (p less than 0.01) amount of clothing-retrained sweat). The cooling wind encountered in actual road bicycling apparently reduces thermoregulatory and circulatory demands compared with stationary cycle ergometry indoors. Failure to account for this enhanced cooling may result in overestimation of the physiological stress of actual road cycling.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Laboratory Tests of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-24

    and stabilize it. f. Repeat steps c and d. g. Repeat steps e and f until maximum engine speed is achieved h. Decrease the engine speed 200 rpm for...diesel engines or 400 rpm for *gasoline, and stabilize it. i. Repeat steps c and d. j. Repeat steps h and i until original speed is achieved. k. Stop the...load to 1/4 full load. d. Repeat step b. e. Repeat steps c and d for 1/2, 3/4, and full loads. f. Increase engine speed 200 rpm and reduce the load

  12. Speed, Acceleration, and Velocity: Level II, Unit 9, Lesson 1; Force, Mass, and Distance: Lesson 2; Types of Motion and Rest: Lesson 3; Electricity and Magnetism: Lesson 4; Electrical, Magnetic, and Gravitational Fields: Lesson 5; The Conservation and Conversion of Matter and Energy: Lesson 6; Simple Machines and Work: Lesson 7; Gas Laws: Lesson 8; Principles of Heat Engines: Lesson 9; Sound and Sound Waves: Lesson 10; Light Waves and Particles: Lesson 11; Program. A High.....

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Speed, Acceleration, and Velocity; Force, Mass, and Distance; Types of Motion and Rest; Electricity and Magnetism; Electrical, Magnetic, and Gravitational Fields; The Conservation and Conversion of Matter and Energy; Simple Machines and Work; Gas Laws; Principles of Heat Engines;…

  13. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  14. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  15. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  16. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  17. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  18. Spatial 3D infrastructure: display-independent software framework, high-speed rendering electronics, and several new displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Won-Suk; Napoli, Joshua; Cossairt, Oliver S.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Purtell, Thomas J., II; Schooler, James F.; Banker, Yigal; Favalora, Gregg E.

    2005-03-01

    We present a software and hardware foundation to enable the rapid adoption of 3-D displays. Different 3-D displays - such as multiplanar, multiview, and electroholographic displays - naturally require different rendering methods. The adoption of these displays in the marketplace will be accelerated by a common software framework. The authors designed the SpatialGL API, a new rendering framework that unifies these display methods under one interface. SpatialGL enables complementary visualization assets to coexist through a uniform infrastructure. Also, SpatialGL supports legacy interfaces such as the OpenGL API. The authors" first implementation of SpatialGL uses multiview and multislice rendering algorithms to exploit the performance of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) to enable real-time visualization of 3-D graphics from medical imaging, oil & gas exploration, and homeland security. At the time of writing, SpatialGL runs on COTS workstations (both Windows and Linux) and on Actuality"s high-performance embedded computational engine that couples an NVIDIA GeForce 6800 Ultra GPU, an AMD Athlon 64 processor, and a proprietary, high-speed, programmable volumetric frame buffer that interfaces to a 1024 x 768 x 3 digital projector. Progress is illustrated using an off-the-shelf multiview display, Actuality"s multiplanar Perspecta Spatial 3D System, and an experimental multiview display. The experimental display is a quasi-holographic view-sequential system that generates aerial imagery measuring 30 mm x 25 mm x 25 mm, providing 198 horizontal views.

  19. Mod II engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Albert E.; Huang, Shyan-Cherng

    1987-01-01

    The testing of a prototype of an automotive Stirling engine, the Mod II, is discussed. The Mod II is a one-piece cast block with a V-4 single-crankshaft configuration and an annular regenerator/cooler design. The initial testing of Mod II concentrated on the basic engine, with auxiliaries driven by power sources external to the engine. The performance of the engine was tested at 720 C set temperature and 820 C tube temperature. At 720 C, it is observed that the power deficiency is speed dependent and linear, with a weak pressure dependency, and at 820 C, the power deficiency is speed and pressure dependent. The effects of buoyancy and nozzle spray pattern on the heater temperature spread are investigated. The characterization of the oil pump and the operating cycle and temperature spread tests are proposed for further evaluation of the engine.

  20. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  1. Method and system for determining induction motor speed

    DOEpatents

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Bharadwaj, Raj M.

    2004-03-30

    A non-linear, semi-parametric neural network-based adaptive filter is utilized to determine the dynamic speed of a rotating rotor within an induction motor, without the explicit use of a speed sensor, such as a tachometer, is disclosed. The neural network-based filter is developed using actual motor current measurements, voltage measurements, and nameplate information. The neural network-based adaptive filter is trained using an estimated speed calculator derived from the actual current and voltage measurements. The neural network-based adaptive filter uses voltage and current measurements to determine the instantaneous speed of a rotating rotor. The neural network-based adaptive filter also includes an on-line adaptation scheme that permits the filter to be readily adapted for new operating conditions during operations.

  2. 40 CFR 86.1332-90 - Engine mapping procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Perform an engine power map. (1) During engine preparation or warm-up, the engine may be operated such... engine, start the engine and operate at zero load in accordance with the manufacturer's start-up and warm... measured rated speed in all calculations. (x) For warm engines, the entire warm-up procedure specified...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1332-90 - Engine mapping procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Perform an engine power map. (1) During engine preparation or warm-up, the engine may be operated such... engine, start the engine and operate at zero load in accordance with the manufacturer's start-up and warm... measured rated speed in all calculations. (x) For warm engines, the entire warm-up procedure specified...

  4. Separation of combustion noise in IC engines under cyclo-non-stationary regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, J.; Ducleaux, N.; NGhiem, G.; Wang, S.

    2013-07-01

    The separation and ranking of combustion and mechanical noise sources is of prime concern for the noise control of internal combustion (IC) engines. Signal processing techniques have been devised recently that can achieve such a separation using the cyclostationary property of IC engine signals. The object of this paper is to extend this framework to the situation where the engine undergoes a transient speed regime, for instance during a run-up. This raises some new and non-trivial questions. First, the assumption of cyclostationarity has to be relaxed and replaced by the vaguer notion of "cyclo-non-stationarity". Second - and related to the first point - the practice of cyclic averaging has to be revisited. Third, the design of the separation filter must explicitly incorporate speed dependence. This paper proposes simple but robust solutions to these issues, with a special effort to make them practicable from an industrial point of view. In particular, the cyclic difference operator is introduced in lieu of cyclic averaging, and speed-dependence is captured by use of a flexible basis of B-splines whose knots density is automatically selected from the data. Successful examples of separation are then demonstrated on actual data measured during an engine run-up.

  5. Energy efficient aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, R.; Miller, B.

    1979-01-01

    The three engine programs that constitute the propulsion portion of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program are described, their status indicated, and anticipated improvements in SFC discussed. The three engine programs are: (1) engine component improvement, directed at current engines, (2) energy efficient engine, directed at new turbofan engines, and (3) advanced turboprops, directed at technology for advanced turboprop-powered aircraft with cruise speeds to Mach 0.8. Unique propulsion system interactive ties to the airframe resulting from engine design features to reduce fuel consumption are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advanced turboprop since it offers the largest potential fuel savings of the three propulsion programs and also has the strongest interactive ties to the airframe.

  6. Energy efficient aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, R.; Miller, B.

    1979-01-01

    The three engine programs that constitute the propulsion portion of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program are described, their status indicated, and anticipated improvements in SFC discussed. The three engine programs are (1) Engine Component Improvement--directed at current engines, (2) Energy Efficiency Engine directed at new turbofan engines, and (3) Advanced Turboprops--directed at technology for advanced turboprop--powered aircraft with cruise speeds to Mach 0.8. Unique propulsion system interactive ties to the airframe resulting from engine design features to reduce fuel consumption are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advanced turboprop since it offers the largest potential fuel savings of the three propulsion programs and also has the strongest interactive ties to the airframe.

  7. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  8. Turbomachinery technology for high-speed civil flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Neal T.; Glassman, Arthur J.

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis' research and technology efforts applicable to turbomachinery for high-speed flight are discussed. The potential benefits and cycle requirements for advanced variable cycle engines and the supersonic throughflow fan engine for a high-speed civil transport application are presented. The supersonic throughflow fan technology program is discussed. Technology efforts in the basic discipline areas addressing the severe operating conditions associated with high-speed flight turbomachinery are reviewed. Included are examples of work in internal fluid mechanics, high-temperature materials, structural analysis, instrumentation and controls.

  9. Tutorial on Actual Space Environmental Hazards For Space Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Fennell, J. F.; Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    It has become common in the space science community to conduct research on diverse physical phenomena because they are thought to contribute to space weather. However, satellites contend with only three primary environmental hazards: single event effects, vehicle charging, and total dose, and not every physical phenomenon that occurs in space contributes in substantial ways to create these hazards. One consequence of the mismatch between actual threats and all-encompassing research is the often-described gap between research and operations; another is the creation of forecasts that provide no actionable information for design engineers or spacecraft operators. An example of the latter is the physics of magnetic field emergence on the Sun; the phenomenon is relevant to the formation and launch of coronal mass ejections and is also causally related to the solar energetic particles that may get accelerated in the interplanetary shock. Unfortunately for the research community, the engineering community mitigates the space weather threat (single-event effects from heavy ions above ~50 MeV/nucleon) with a worst-case specification of the environment and not with a prediction. Worst-case definition requires data mining of past events, while predictions involve large-scale systems science from the Sun to the Earth that is compelling for scientists and their funding agencies but not actionable for design or for most operations. Differing priorities among different space-faring organizations only compounds the confusion over what science research is relevant. Solar particle impacts to human crew arise mainly from the total ionizing dose from the solar protons, so the priority for prediction in the human spaceflight community is therefore much different than in the unmanned satellite community, while both communities refer to the fundamental phenomenon as space weather. Our goal in this paper is the presentation of a brief tutorial on the primary space environmental phenomena

  10. Preliminary Performance Data on Westinghouse Electronic Power Regulator Operating on J34-WE-32 Turbojet Engine in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, James R.; Blivas, Darnold; Pack, George J.

    1950-01-01

    The behavior of the Westinghouse electronic power regulator operating on a J34-WE-32 turbojet engine was investigated in the NACA Lewis altitude wind tunnel at the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Department of the Navy. The object of the program was to determine the, steady-state stability and transient characteristics of the engine under control at various altitudes and ram pressure ratios, without afterburning. Recordings of the response of the following parameters to step changes in power lever position throughout the available operating range of the engine were obtained; ram pressure ratio, compressor-discharge pressure, exhaust-nozzle area, engine speed, turbine-outlet temperature, fuel-valve position, jet thrust, air flow, turbine-discharge pressure, fuel flow, throttle position, and boost-pump pressure. Representative preliminary data showing the actual time response of these variables are presented. These data are presented in the form of reproductions of oscillographic traces.

  11. 14 CFR 23.73 - Reference landing approach speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Reference landing approach speed. (a) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category reciprocating engine... reciprocating engine-powered airplanes of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight, the reference landing approach... normal, utility, and acrobatic category jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and...

  12. 14 CFR 23.73 - Reference landing approach speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Reference landing approach speed. (a) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category reciprocating engine... reciprocating engine-powered airplanes of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight, the reference landing approach... normal, utility, and acrobatic category jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and...

  13. Shaft speed control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Simple mechanism controls rotation of heavy-duty shaft by mechanical comparison with rotation of small, precise, stepper motor. Mechanism can be used to limit winding and unwinding speeds of large spools and reels and to control speed of other rotating shafts. Setup incorporates reference shaft geared down from stepper motor and feedback shaft geared up from shaft to be controlled. Feedback and reference shafts are coupled with brake assembly inside stationary cylinder. When work shaft speeds up, brakes are activated automatically to slow it down.

  14. Possible improvements in gasoline engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziembinski, S

    1923-01-01

    High-compression engines are investigated with the three main objects being elimination of vibration, increase of maximum efficiency, and conservation of this efficiency at the highest possible speeds.

  15. NASA Now: Shuttle Engineering Challenge

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this installment of NASA Now, you’ll meet Guidance, Navigation and Flight Controls engineer George Hatcher, who talks about the complex system needed to fly the space shuttle at extreme speeds...

  16. Generalized extreme gust wind speeds distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, E.; Yeung, C.

    2002-01-01

    Since summer 1996, the US wind engineers are using the extreme gust (or 3-s gust) as the basic wind speed to quantify the destruction of extreme winds. In order to better understand these destructive wind forces, it is important to know the appropriate representations of these extreme gust wind speeds. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the most suitable extreme value distributions for the annual extreme gust wind speeds recorded in large selected areas. To achieve this objective, we are using the generalized Pareto distribution as the diagnostic tool for determining the types of extreme gust wind speed distributions. The three-parameter generalized extreme value distribution function is, thus, reduced to either Type I Gumbel, Type II Frechet or Type III reverse Weibull distribution function for the annual extreme gust wind speeds recorded at a specific site.With the considerations of the quality and homogeneity of gust wind data collected at more than 750 weather stations throughout the United States, annual extreme gust wind speeds at selected 143 stations in the contiguous United States were used in the study. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cycle Engine Modelling Of Spark Ignition Engine Processes during Wide-Open Throttle (WOT) Engine Operation Running By Gasoline Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, M. F. Abdul; Rahman, M. M.; Bakar, R. A.

    2012-09-01

    One-dimensional engine model is developed to simulate spark ignition engine processes in a 4-stroke, 4 cylinders gasoline engine. Physically, the baseline engine is inline cylinder engine with 3-valves per cylinder. Currently, the engine's mixture is formed by external mixture formation using piston-type carburettor. The model of the engine is based on one-dimensional equation of the gas exchange process, isentropic compression and expansion, progressive engine combustion process, and accounting for the heat transfer and frictional losses as well as the effect of valves overlapping. The model is tested for 2000, 3000 and 4000 rpm of engine speed and validated using experimental engine data. Results showed that the engine is able to simulate engine's combustion process and produce reasonable prediction. However, by comparing with experimental data, major discrepancy is noticeable especially on the 2000 and 4000 rpm prediction. At low and high engine speed, simulated cylinder pressures tend to under predict the measured data. Whereas the cylinder temperatures always tend to over predict the measured data at all engine speed. The most accurate prediction is obtained at medium engine speed of 3000 rpm. Appropriate wall heat transfer setup is vital for more precise calculation of cylinder pressure and temperature. More heat loss to the wall can lower cylinder temperature. On the hand, more heat converted to the useful work mean an increase in cylinder pressure. Thus, instead of wall heat transfer setup, the Wiebe combustion parameters are needed to be carefully evaluated for better results.

  18. Speeding earthquake disaster relief

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortensen, Carl; Donlin, Carolyn; Page, Robert A.; Ward, Peter

    1995-01-01

    In coping with recent multibillion-dollar earthquake disasters, scientists and emergency managers have found new ways to speed and improve relief efforts. This progress is founded on the rapid availability of earthquake information from seismograph networks.

  19. Speed- Reading Made Easy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, W. S.

    1970-01-01

    Illustrates a compromise between vertical and horizontal typographies which should make speed reading faster and more reliable, and suggests that computers could prepare text according to this arrangement. (MB)

  20. High Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert E.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Schmitz, Frederic H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NASA High Speed Research Program will be presented from a NASA Headquarters perspective. The presentation will include the objectives of the program and an outline of major programmatic issues.

  1. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  2. High-speed schlieren imaging of rocket exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coultas-McKenney, Caralyn; Winter, Kyle; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Experiments are conducted to examine the exhaust of a variety of rocket engines. The rocket engines are mounted in a schlieren system to allow high-speed imaging of the engine exhaust during startup, steady state, and shutdown. A variety of rocket engines are explored including a research-scale liquid rocket engine, consumer/amateur solid rocket motors, and water bottle rockets. Comparisons of the exhaust characteristics, thrust and cost for this range of rockets is presented. The variety of nozzle designs, target functions, and propellant type provides unique variations in the schlieren imaging.

  3. A Risk Assessment Architecture for Enhanced Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sharp. Lauren M.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2010-01-01

    On very rare occasions, in-flight emergencies have occurred that required the pilot to utilize the aircraft's capabilities to the fullest extent possible, sometimes using actuators in ways for which they were not intended. For instance, when flight control has been lost due to damage to the hydraulic systems, pilots have had to use engine thrust to maneuver the plane to the ground and in for a landing. To assist the pilot in these situations, research is being performed to enhance the engine operation by making it more responsive or able to generate more thrust. Enabled by modification of the propulsion control, enhanced engine operation can increase the probability of a safe landing during an inflight emergency. However, enhanced engine operation introduces risk as the nominal control limits, such as those on shaft speed, temperature, and acceleration, are exceeded. Therefore, an on-line tool for quantifying this risk must be developed to ensure that the use of an enhanced control mode does not actually increase the overall danger to the aircraft. This paper describes an architecture for the implementation of this tool. It describes the type of data and algorithms required and the information flow, and how the risk based on engine component lifing and operability for enhanced operation is determined.

  4. Continuous QKD and high speed data encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbinden, Hugo; Walenta, Nino; Guinnard, Olivier; Houlmann, Raphael; Wen, Charles Lim Ci; Korzh, Boris; Lunghi, Tommaso; Gisin, Nicolas; Burg, Andreas; Constantin, Jeremy; Legré, Matthieu; Trinkler, Patrick; Caselunghe, Dario; Kulesza, Natalia; Trolliet, Gregory; Vannel, Fabien; Junod, Pascal; Auberson, Olivier; Graf, Yoan; Curchod, Gilles; Habegger, Gilles; Messerli, Etienne; Portmann, Christopher; Henzen, Luca; Keller, Christoph; Pendl, Christian; Mühlberghuber, Michael; Roth, Christoph; Felber, Norbert; Gürkaynak, Frank; Schöni, Daniel; Muheim, Beat

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a Swiss project dedicated to the development of high speed quantum key distribution and data encryption. The QKD engine features fully automated key exchange, hardware key distillation based on finite key security analysis, efficient authentication and wavelength division multiplexing of the quantum and the classical channel and one-time pas encryption. The encryption device allows authenticated symmetric key encryption (e.g AES) at rates of up to 100 Gb/s. A new quantum key can uploaded up to 1000 times second from the QKD engine.

  5. High-Speed Propeller for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Gatzen, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    Engine efficiency increased. Propeller blades required to be quite thin and highly swept to minimize compressibility losses and propeller noise during high-speed cruise. Use of 8 or 10 blades with highpropeller-power loading allows overall propeller diameter to be kept relatively small. Area-ruled spinner and integrated nacelle shape reduce compressibility losses in propeller hub region. Finally, large modern turboshaft engine and gearbox provide power to advanced propeller. Fuel savings of 30 to 50 percent over present systems anticipated. Propfan system adaptable to number of applications, such as highspeed (subsonic) business and general-aviation aircraft, and military aircraft including V/STOL.

  6. High-speed phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Baum, E.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  7. High-speed phosphor thermometry.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, N; Baum, E; Brübach, J; Dreizler, A

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  8. [Risk perception and speeding].

    PubMed

    Thielen, Iara Picchioni; Hartmann, Ricardo Carlos; Soares, Diogo Picchioni

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses risk perception comparing drivers with and without fines for speeding. The research aimed to show the interaction between speeding laws and speeding behavior. Speeders' explanations for their behavior revealed important factors in the determination of risk perception: control (driver-centered), risk minimization (drivers claimed there was no risk involved in the way they speeded), self-confidence (they considered themselves good drivers and believed they were able to define what constitutes speeding), and lack of credibility in the institutions that manage traffic risks. Speeders display a cognitive construct of personal invulnerability combined with unrealistic optimism and overrated self-perception, along with an exaggerated perception of their control over the traffic setting, centered on their self-purported driving skills. No difference was found in risk perception between drivers in the two groups. There was no relationship between objective and perceived risks, since drivers from the two groups showed a generic perception of objective risks, but out-of-context in relation to the inherent potential for accidents at different speeds.

  9. High Speed Ice Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  10. Two-dimensional shear wave speed and crawling wave speed recoveries from in vitro prostate data

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kui; McLaughlin, Joyce R.; Thomas, Ashley; Parker, Kevin; Castaneda, Benjamin; Rubens, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    The crawling wave experiment was developed to capture a shear wave induced moving interference pattern that is created by two harmonic vibration sources oscillating at different but almost the same frequencies. Using the vibration sonoelastography technique, the spectral variance image reveals a moving interference pattern. It has been shown that the speed of the moving interference pattern, i.e., the crawling wave speed, is proportional to the shear wave speed with a nonlinear factor. This factor can generate high-speed artifacts in the crawling wave speed images that do not actually correspond to increased stiffness. In this paper, an inverse algorithm is developed to reconstruct both the crawling wave speed and the shear wave speed using the phases of the crawling wave and the shear wave. The feature for the data is the application to in vitro prostate data, while the features for the algorithm include the following: (1) A directional filter is implemented to obtain a wave moving in only one direction; and (2) an L1 minimization technique with physics inspired constraints is employed to calculate the phase of the crawling wave and to eliminate jump discontinuities from the phase of the shear wave. The algorithm is tested on in vitro prostate data measured at the Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound and University of Rochester. Each aspect of the algorithm is shown to yield image improvement. The results demonstrate that the shear wave speed images can have less artifacts than the crawling wave images. Examples are presented where the shear wave speed recoveries have excellent agreement with histology results on the size, shape, and location of cancerous tissues in the glands. PMID:21786924

  11. Two-dimensional shear wave speed and crawling wave speed recoveries from in vitro prostate data.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kui; McLaughlin, Joyce R; Thomas, Ashley; Parker, Kevin; Castaneda, Benjamin; Rubens, Deborah J

    2011-07-01

    The crawling wave experiment was developed to capture a shear wave induced moving interference pattern that is created by two harmonic vibration sources oscillating at different but almost the same frequencies. Using the vibration sonoelastography technique, the spectral variance image reveals a moving interference pattern. It has been shown that the speed of the moving interference pattern, i.e., the crawling wave speed, is proportional to the shear wave speed with a nonlinear factor. This factor can generate high-speed artifacts in the crawling wave speed images that do not actually correspond to increased stiffness. In this paper, an inverse algorithm is developed to reconstruct both the crawling wave speed and the shear wave speed using the phases of the crawling wave and the shear wave. The feature for the data is the application to in vitro prostate data, while the features for the algorithm include the following: (1) A directional filter is implemented to obtain a wave moving in only one direction; and (2) an L(1) minimization technique with physics inspired constraints is employed to calculate the phase of the crawling wave and to eliminate jump discontinuities from the phase of the shear wave. The algorithm is tested on in vitro prostate data measured at the Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound and University of Rochester. Each aspect of the algorithm is shown to yield image improvement. The results demonstrate that the shear wave speed images can have less artifacts than the crawling wave images. Examples are presented where the shear wave speed recoveries have excellent agreement with histology results on the size, shape, and location of cancerous tissues in the glands.

  12. Methods for rotational speed reduction for alternating current electric motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, A. V.; Glukhanich, D. Y.

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of rotational speed reduction methods for alternating current electric motors are given, assigned to low-speed electric drives of various power levels. The integrated classification of electric machines of well-known types is given, the rotational speed reduction method being used as the basis. The main advantages and disadvantages, defining perspectives for the application in various low-speed electric drives, are explained. The approximate bounds of engineering expediency of the applications of the motors are given for obtaining certain assessments in selection of a type of the drive motor.

  13. Exhaust emissions of DI diesel engine using unconventional fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudrajad, Agung; Ali, Ismail; Hamdan, Hazmie; Hamzah, Mohd. Herzwan

    2012-06-01

    Optimization of using waste plastic and tire disposal fuel on diesel engine were observed. The experimental project was comparison between using both of unconventional fuel and base diesel fuel. The engine experiment was conducted with YANMAR TF120 single cylinder four stroke diesel engine set-up at variable engine speed at 2100, 1900, 1700, 1500 and 1300 rpm. The data have been taken at each point of engine speed during the stabilized engine-operating regime. Measurement of emissions parameters at different engine speed conditions have generally indicated lower in emission COfor waste plastic fuel, lower NOx for tire disposal fuel and lower SOx for diesel fuel.

  14. Corrected Launch Speed for a Projectile Motion Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Justin M.; Boleman, Michael W.

    2013-09-01

    At our university, students in introductory physics classes perform a laboratory exercise to measure the range of a projectile fired at an assigned angle. A set of photogates is used to determine the initial velocity of the projectile (the launch velocity). We noticed a systematic deviation between the experimentally measured range and the range calculated using the speed as determined by the photogates. In this paper, we will discuss the origin of this systematic error and derive a simple formula to correct it. In particular, we find that the launch speed given by our instrument is significantly different from the actual launch speed of our projectile.

  15. Dynamic Characteristics and Stability Analysis of Space Shuttle Main Engine Oxygen Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, Edgar J.; Branagan, Lyle

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of the Space Shuttle high pressure oxygen pump are presented. Experimental data is presented to show the vibration spectrum and response under actual engine operation and also in spin pit testing for balancing. The oxygen pump appears to be operating near a second critical speed and is sensitive to self excited aerodynamic cross coupling forces in the turbine and pump. An analysis is presented to show the improvement in pump stability by the application of turbulent flow seals, preburner seals, and pump shaft cross sectional modifications.

  16. Wave rotor demonstrator engine assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the program was to determine a wave rotor demonstrator engine concept using the Allison 250 series engine. The results of the NASA LERC wave rotor effort were used as a basis for the wave rotor design. A wave rotor topped gas turbine engine was identified which incorporates five basic requirements of a successful demonstrator engine. Predicted performance maps of the wave rotor cycle were used along with maps of existing gas turbine hardware in a design point study. The effects of wave rotor topping on the engine cycle and the subsequent need to rematch compressor and turbine sections in the topped engine were addressed. Comparison of performance of the resulting engine is made on the basis of wave rotor topped engine versus an appropriate baseline engine using common shaft compressor hardware. The topped engine design clearly demonstrates an impressive improvement in shaft horsepower (+11.4%) and SFC (-22%). Off design part power engine performance for the wave rotor topped engine was similarly improved including that at engine idle conditions. Operation of the engine at off design was closely examined with wave rotor operation at less than design burner outlet temperatures and rotor speeds. Challenges identified in the development of a demonstrator engine are discussed. A preliminary design was made of the demonstrator engine including wave rotor to engine transition ducts. Program cost and schedule for a wave rotor demonstrator engine fabrication and test program were developed.

  17. Emissions factors for gaseous and particulate pollutants from offshore diesel engine vessels in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Chen, Y.; Tian, C.; Li, J.; Zhang, G.; Matthias, V.

    2015-09-01

    Shipping emissions have significant influence on atmospheric environment as well as human health, especially in coastal areas and the harbor districts. However, the contribution of shipping emissions on the environment in China still need to be clarified especially based on measurement data, with the large number ownership of vessels and the rapid developments of ports, international trade and shipbuilding industry. Pollutants in the gaseous phase (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, total volatile organic compounds) and particle phase (particulate matter, organic carbon, elemental carbon, sulfates, nitrate, ammonia, metals) in the exhaust from three different diesel engine power offshore vessels in China were measured in this study. Concentrations, fuel-based and power-based emissions factors for various operating modes as well as the impact of engine speed on emissions were determined. Observed concentrations and emissions factors for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, total volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter were higher for the low engine power vessel than for the two higher engine power vessels. Fuel-based average emissions factors for all pollutants except sulfur dioxide in the low engine power engineering vessel were significantly higher than that of the previous studies, while for the two higher engine power vessels, the fuel-based average emissions factors for all pollutants were comparable to the results of the previous studies. The fuel-based average emissions factor for nitrogen oxides for the small engine power vessel was more than twice the International Maritime Organization standard, while those for the other two vessels were below the standard. Emissions factors for all three vessels were significantly different during different operating modes. Organic carbon and elemental carbon were the main components of particulate matter, while water-soluble ions and elements were present in trace amounts. Best-fit engine speeds

  18. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  19. DAC 22 High Speed Civil Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Between tests, NASA research engineer Dave Hahne inspects a tenth-scale model of a supersonic transport model in the 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The model is being used in support of NASA's High-Speed Research (HSR) program. Langley researchers are applying advance aerodynamic design methods to develop a wing leading-edge flap system which significantly improves low-speed fuel efficiency and reduces noise generated during takeoff operation. Langley is NASA's lead center for the agency's HSR program, aimed at developing technology to help U.S. industry compete in the rapidly expanding trans-oceanic transport market. A U.S. high-speed civil transport is expected to fly in about the year 2010. As envisioned, it would fly 300 passengers across the Pacific in about four hours at Mach 2.4 (approximately 1,600 mph/1950 kph) for a modest increase over business class fares.

  20. The NASA high-speed turboprop program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. F.; Miller, B. A.; Graber, E. J.; Sagerser, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Technology readiness for Mach 0.7 to 0.8 turboprop powered aircraft with the potential for fuel savings and DOC reductions of up to 30 and 15 percent respectively relative to current in-service aircraft is addressed. The areas of propeller aeroacoustics, propeller structures, turboprop installed performance, aircraft cabin environment, and turboprop engine and aircraft studies are emphasized. Large scale propeller characteristics and high speed propeller flight research tests using a modified testbed aircraft are also considered.

  1. Speed Reading: Remember the Tortoise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Richard G.

    1973-01-01

    After speed-reading partisans questioned the criticisms in a Psychology Today article, another psychologist conducted a controlled study of speed readers. As we said before, "Speed Readers Don't Read; They Skim". (Editor)

  2. Everyone Deserves a Speeding Ticket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burris, Harold

    1993-01-01

    Presents a first day physics activity having students determine the fine for a speeding ticket if the speeds considered include the earth's rotation and revolution speed, and the movement through the galaxy. (MDH)

  3. J-2 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    This chart is an illustration of J-2 Engine characteristics. A cluster of five J-2 engines powered the Saturn V S-II (second) stage with each engine providing a thrust of 200,000 pounds. A single J-2 engine powered the S-IVB stage, the Saturn IB second stage, and the Saturn V third stage. The engine was uprated to provide 230,000 pounds of thrust for the fourth Apollo Saturn V flight and subsequent missions. Burning liquid hydrogen as fuel and using liquid oxygen as the oxidizer, the cluster of five J-2 engines for the S-II stage burned over one ton of propellant per second, during about 6 1/2 minutes of operation, to take the vehicle to an altitude of about 108 miles and a speed of near orbital velocity, about 17,400 miles per hour.

  4. Traction contact performance evaluation at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of traction tests performed on two fluids are presented. These tests covered a pressure range of 1.0 to 2.5 GPa, an inlet temperature range of 30 'C to 70 'C, a speed range of 10 to 80 m/sec, aspect ratios of .5 to 5 and spin from 0 to 2.1 percent. The test results are presented in the form of two dimensionless parameters, the initial traction slope and the maximum traction peak. With the use of a suitable rheological fluid model the actual traction curves measured can now be reconstituted from the two fluid parameters. More importantly, the knowledge of these parameters together with the fluid rheological model, allow the prediction of traction under conditions of spin, slip and any combination thereof. Comparison between theoretically predicted traction under these conditions and those measured in actual traction tests shows that this method gives good results.

  5. High-Resolution Gene Flow Model for Assessing Environmental Impacts of Transgene Escape Based on Biological Parameters and Wind Speed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Haccou, Patsy; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental impacts caused by transgene flow from genetically engineered (GE) crops to their wild relatives mediated by pollination are longstanding biosafety concerns worldwide. Mathematical modeling provides a useful tool for estimating frequencies of pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) that are critical for assessing such environmental impacts. However, most PMGF models are impractical for this purpose because their parameterization requires actual data from field experiments. In addition, most of these models are usually too general and ignored the important biological characteristics of concerned plant species; and therefore cannot provide accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies. It is necessary to develop more accurate PMGF models based on biological and climatic parameters that can be easily measured in situ. Here, we present a quasi-mechanistic PMGF model that only requires the input of biological and wind speed parameters without actual data from field experiments. Validation of the quasi-mechanistic model based on five sets of published data from field experiments showed significant correlations between the model-simulated and field experimental-generated PMGF frequencies. These results suggest accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies using this model, provided that the necessary biological parameters and wind speed data are available. This model can largely facilitate the assessment and management of environmental impacts caused by transgene flow, such as determining transgene flow frequencies at a particular spatial distance, and establishing spatial isolation between a GE crop and its coexisting non-GE counterparts and wild relatives. PMID:26959240

  6. External Validity of Contingent Valuation: Comparing Hypothetical and Actual Payments.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mandy; Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Jareinpituk, Suthi; Cairns, John

    2016-10-09

    Whilst contingent valuation is increasingly used in economics to value benefits, questions remain concerning its external validity that is do hypothetical responses match actual responses? We present results from the first within sample field test. Whilst Hypothetical No is always an Actual No, Hypothetical Yes exceed Actual Yes responses. A constant rate of response reversals across bids/prices could suggest theoretically consistent option value responses. Certainty calibrations (verbal and numerical response scales) minimise hypothetical-actual discrepancies offering a useful solution. Helping respondents resolve uncertainty may reduce the discrepancy between hypothetical and actual payments and thus lead to more accurate policy recommendations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Principles of As-Built Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.

    1996-11-01

    As-Built Engineering is a product realization methodology founded on the notion that life-cycle engineering should be based on what is actually produced and not on what is nominally designed. As-Built Engineering is a way of thinking about the production realization process that enables customization in mass production environments. It questions the relevance of nominal based methods of engineering and the role that tolerancing plays in product realization. As-Built Engineering recognizes that there will always be errors associated with manufacturing that cannot be controlled and therefore need to be captured in order to fully characterize each individual product`s unique attributes. One benefit of As-Built Engineering is the ability to provide actual product information to designers and analysts enabling them to verify their assumptions using actual part and assembly data. Another benefit is the ability to optimize new and re-engineered assemblies.

  8. Liquid rocket engine test facility engineering challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Hartwig; Ziegenhagen, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Liquid rocket engines for launch vehicles and space crafts as well as their subsystems need to be verified and qualified during hot-runs. A high test cadence combined with a flexible test team helps to reduce the cost for test verification during development/qualification as well as during acceptance testing for production. Test facility intelligence allows to test subsystems in the same manner as during complete engine system tests and will therefore reduce development time and cost. This paper gives an overview of the maturing of test engineering know how for rocket engine test stands as well as high altitude test stands for small propulsion thrusters at EADS-ST in Ottobrunn and Lampoldshausen and is split into two parts: Part 1 gives a historical overview of the EADS-ST test stands at Ottobrunn and Lampoldshausen since the beginning of Rocket propulsion activities in the 1960s. Part 2 gives an overview of the actual test capabilities and the test engineering know-how for test stand construction/adaptation and their use during running programs. Examples of actual realised facility concepts are given to demonstrate cost saving potential for test programs in both cases for development/qualification issues as well as for production purposes.

  9. Nonintrusive shaft speed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.; Wyett, L.

    1985-04-01

    A computerized literature search on nonintrusive/noncontacting speed sensing technologies was performed, resulting in 550 abstracts and 42 articles. Fourteen techniques were identified and theoretically analyzed, resulting in the recommendation of the Microwave, Infrared, and Magnetic technologies for experimental evaluation. Test results with a novel magnetic approach, consisting of a permanent magnet placed on the rotating shaft and a pickup coil placed on the housing, indicated detection of a strong signal from 3.5 inches at the lowest required speed (600 rpm), through a 1.75-inch thick Inconel plate. Test results with microwave and infrared speed sensing approaches indicated transmission of sufficient microwave and infrared energy for detection even through heavily bubble-laden water (15 percent cavitation). Although all three techniques demonstrated feasibility, the magnetic sensor was recommended for preliminary design, which indicated no technical obstacles.

  10. Rotordynamic Feasibility of a Conceptual Variable-Speed Power Turbine Propulsion System for Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    A variable-speed power turbine concept is analyzed for rotordynamic feasibility in a Large Civil Tilt-Rotor (LCTR) class engine. Implementation of a variable-speed power turbine in a rotorcraft engine would enable high efficiency propulsion at the high forward velocities anticipated of large tilt-rotor vehicles. Therefore, rotordynamics is a critical issue for this engine concept. A preliminary feasibility study is presented herein to address this concern and identify if variable-speed is possible in a conceptual engine sized for the LCTR. The analysis considers critical speed placement in the operating speed envelope, stability analysis up to the maximum anticipated operating speed, and potential unbalance response amplitudes to determine that a variable-speed power turbine is likely to be challenging, but not impossible to achieve in a tilt-rotor propulsion engine.

  11. Performance/combustion characteristics of six Canadian alternative fuels tested in a bombardier medium speed diesel

    SciTech Connect

    Grimsey, R.G.; Stoneman, R.T.; Webster, G.D.; Chan, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Six experimental fuels representative of Canadian future fuel options were tested against a reference fuel in a bombardier 12 cylinder, 4 stroke, 3000 hp, medium speed diesel. The reference fuel was a straight run ASTM number2-d. Each fuel was analyzed for physical and chemical properties. The engine was tested under a marine application propeller law load curve at 8 different engine speeds. Correlations between fuel properties and engine performance/combustion behaviour indicated that the longest ignition delays were observed for fuels with the lowest cetane numbers. Rates of combustion pressure rise increased proportionately with decreased cetane numbers and increased levels of aromatic components. Increases in peak combustion pressures and rates of pressure rise at low engine speeds are not expected to pose durability problems with medium speed engines operating at or near rated speed and load for the fuels tested.

  12. Air turbo-ramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepler, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A jet engine designed to power a supersonic airplane throughout a range of speeds from subsonic to high supersonic includes a housing which bounds an internal passage having in succession a fixed-area inlet section, a diverging passage section, a mixing section, a combustion section, and an outlet section. A fan rotor rotates in the inlet section and includes a plurality of rotor blade members. The housing includes a main body and at least one flap which is movable between one end position in which it externally bounds a portion of the diverging passage section and another end position in which it externally delimits a diverging discharge passage connecting the diverging passage section with the exterior of the housing. The cross-sectional area of the outlet section is adjustable. The rotor is driven in rotation by a fuel/oxygen powered turbine the outlet of which communicates with the mixing section, but the driving action of the turbine is discontinued at actual supersonic velocities exceeding a predetermined supersonic velocity. The pitch of at least one element of each of the rotor blade members is adjustable.

  13. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  14. 40 CFR 86.096-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission data engines. (i) Engines will be chosen to be run for emission data based upon engine family... emission control systems. One engine of each engine system combination must be run for smoke emission data... features as the injection system, fuel system, compression ratio, rated speed, rated horsepower,...

  15. 40 CFR 86.096-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission data engines. (i) Engines will be chosen to be run for emission data based upon engine family... emission control systems. One engine of each engine system combination must be run for smoke emission data... features as the injection system, fuel system, compression ratio, rated speed, rated horsepower,...

  16. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., except constant speed engines, engines rated under 19 kW, and propulsion marine diesel engines. (2) The 5... this subpart shall be used for propulsion marine diesel engines. (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of... rated under 19 kW; or (B) Propulsion marine diesel engines, provided the propulsion marine...

  17. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., except constant speed engines, engines rated under 19 kW, and propulsion marine diesel engines. (2) The 5... this subpart shall be used for propulsion marine diesel engines. (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of... rated under 19 kW; or (B) Propulsion marine diesel engines, provided the propulsion marine...

  18. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., except constant speed engines, engines rated under 19 kW, and propulsion marine diesel engines. (2) The 5... this subpart shall be used for propulsion marine diesel engines. (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of... rated under 19 kW; or (B) Propulsion marine diesel engines, provided the propulsion marine...

  19. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., except constant speed engines, engines rated under 19 kW, and propulsion marine diesel engines. (2) The 5... this subpart shall be used for propulsion marine diesel engines. (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of... rated under 19 kW; or (B) Propulsion marine diesel engines, provided the propulsion marine...

  20. 40 CFR 1051.615 - What are the special provisions for certifying small recreational engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Engine speed(percent) 1 Torque(percent) 2 Minimum time in mode(minutes) Weighting factors 1 85 100 5.0 0... speed is percent of maximum test speed. 2 Percent torque is percent of maximum torque at the commanded...—Ramped-modal Cycle for Testing Recreational Engines RMC mode Time Speed(percent) 1, 2 Torque(percent)...

  1. 40 CFR 1051.615 - What are the special provisions for certifying small recreational engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Engine speed(percent) 1 Torque(percent) 2 Minimum time in mode(minutes) Weighting factors 1 85 100 5.0 0... speed is percent of maximum test speed. 2 Percent torque is percent of maximum torque at the commanded...—Ramped-modal Cycle for Testing Recreational Engines RMC mode Time Speed(percent) 1, 2 Torque(percent)...

  2. 40 CFR 1051.615 - What are the special provisions for certifying small recreational engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Engine speed(percent) 1 Torque(percent) 2 Minimum time in mode(minutes) Weighting factors 1 85 100 5.0 0... speed is percent of maximum test speed. 2 Percent torque is percent of maximum torque at the commanded...—Ramped-modal Cycle for Testing Recreational Engines RMC mode Time Speed(percent) 1, 2 Torque(percent)...

  3. 40 CFR 1051.615 - What are the special provisions for certifying small recreational engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Engine speed(percent) 1 Torque(percent) 2 Minimum time in mode(minutes) Weighting factors 1 85 100 5.0 0... speed is percent of maximum test speed. 2 Percent torque is percent of maximum torque at the commanded...—Ramped-modal Cycle for Testing Recreational Engines RMC mode Time Speed(percent) 1 2 Torque(percent) 2...

  4. 40 CFR 1039.645 - What special provisions apply to engines used for transportation refrigeration units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of this part apply for emissions measured over the steady-state test cycle described in paragraph (b...-Mode Cycle for TRU Engines Mode number Engine speed 1 Torque(percent) 2 Weightingfactors 1 Maximum test speed 75 0.25 2 Maximum test speed 50 0.25 3 Intermediate test speed 75 0.25 4 Intermediate test...

  5. 40 CFR 1039.645 - What special provisions apply to engines used for transportation refrigeration units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of this part apply for emissions measured over the steady-state test cycle described in paragraph (b...-Mode Cycle for TRU Engines Mode number Engine speed 1 Torque(percent) 2 Weightingfactors 1 Maximum test speed 75 0.25 2 Maximum test speed 50 0.25 3 Intermediate test speed 75 0.25 4 Intermediate test...

  6. 40 CFR 1039.645 - What special provisions apply to engines used for transportation refrigeration units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of this part apply for emissions measured over the steady-state test cycle described in paragraph (b...-Mode Cycle for TRU Engines Mode number Engine speed 1 Torque(percent) 2 Weightingfactors 1 Maximum test speed 75 0.25 2 Maximum test speed 50 0.25 3 Intermediate test speed 75 0.25 4 Intermediate test...

  7. SPEEDE Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Barbara H.; Wei, P. Betty

    1993-01-01

    A nontechnical overview of electronic data interchange (EDI) and of the SPEEDE/ExPRESS Project, which uses EDI to transmit transcripts between schools and colleges, is presented. It explores the fundamental value of the technology, specific costs and benefits, and its potential to transform the delivery of academic support services. (Author/MSE)

  8. High speed metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, R. F.; Pohl, R. F.

    1982-10-01

    Four types of steel (AISI 1340, 4140, 4340, and HF-1) which are commonly used in large caliber projectile manufacture were machined at different hardness ranges representing the as-forged and the heat treated condition with various ceramic tools using ceramic coated tungsten carbide as a reference. Results show that machining speeds can be increased significantly using present available tooling.

  9. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  10. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  11. Transition at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Certain conjectures on the physics of instabilities in high-speed flows are discussed and the state of knowledge of hypersonic transition summarized. The case is made for an unpressured systematic research program in this area consisting of controlled microscopic experiments, theory, and numerical simulations.

  12. The Role of Non-Actuality Implicatures in Processing Elided Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Margaret; Clifton, Charles; Frazier, Lyn

    2011-01-01

    When an elided constituent and its antecedent do not match syntactically, the presence of a word implying the non-actuality of the state of affairs described in the antecedent seems to improve the example (This information should be released but Gorbachev didn’t. vs This information was released but Gorbachev didn’t.) We model this effect in terms of Non-Actuality Implicatures (NAIs) conveyed by non-epistemic modals like should and other words such as want to and be eager to that imply non-actuality. We report three studies. A rating and interpretation study showed that such implicatures are drawn and that they improve the acceptability of mismatch ellipsis examples. An interpretation study showed that adding a NAI trigger to ambiguous examples increases the likelihood of choosing an antecedent from the NAI clause. An eye movement study shows that a NAI trigger also speeds online reading of the ellipsis clause. By introducing alternatives (the desired state of affairs vs. the actual state of affairs), the NAI trigger introduces a potential Question Under Discussion (QUD). Processing an ellipsis clause is easier, the processor is more confident of its analysis, when the ellipsis clause comments on the QUD. PMID:22247589

  13. Simulation of a combined-cycle engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangerpen, Jon

    1991-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program was developed to simulate the performance of combined-cycle engines. These engines combine features of both gas turbines and reciprocating engines. The computer program can simulate both design point and off-design operation. Widely varying engine configurations can be evaluated for their power, performance, and efficiency as well as the influence of altitude and air speed. Although the program was developed to simulate aircraft engines, it can be used with equal success for stationary and automative applications.

  14. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  15. Factors Associated with the Perception of Speed among Recreational Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Friedrich; Ruedl, Gerhard; Kopp, Martin; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Skiers have to differ between slow to moderate and fast skiing speed to determine their skiing style according to the ISO 11088 standard for setting binding release values. Despite existing evidence that males ski significantly faster than females, no sex-specific factor was inserted into the ISO 11088 standard. Objective To evaluate factors potentially associated with the perception of individual skiing speed among recreational skiers. Methods Skiing speeds of 416 adult skiers (62% males,) were measured with a radar speed gun. Skiers were interviewed about their age, sex, skill level, risk taking behaviour and helmet use. Finally, skiers had to rate their perceived speed on one out of three speed categories (fast, moderate, slow). Results The measured mean speed of this cohort was 48.2±14.3 km/h (30.0±8.9 mph). A total of 32%, 52%, and 16% of skiers perceived their actual speed as fast, moderate and slow, respectively. Mean speed differed significantly between the 3 speed categories with a mean of about 53.5±13.7 km/h (33.2±8.5 mph) for fast, 47.6±14.0 km/h (29.6±8.7 mph) for moderate, and 39.4±12.2 km/h (24.5±7.6 mph) for slow skiing, respectively. Sex (η2 = .074), skill level (η2 = .035) and risk taking behavior (η2 = .033) showed significant differences of skiing speeds with regard to the 3 categories of speed perception (all p < .001) while age groups and ski helmet use did not. Males, more skilled skiers and risky skiers perceived their actual speed as fast, moderate and slow, when skiing up to 10 km/h (6 mph) faster compared to females, less skilled and cautious skiers. Conclusion The perception of skiing speed as fast, moderate or slow depends on sex, skill level, and risk taking behaviour. These findings should be considered when discussing the introduction of a sex factor into the ISO 11088 standard for setting binding release values. PMID:26121670

  16. Double-reed exhaust valve engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2015-06-30

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a double reed outlet valve for controlling the flow of low-pressure working fluid out of the engine. The double reed provides a stronger force resisting closure of the outlet valve than the force tending to open the outlet valve. The double reed valve enables engine operation at relatively higher torque and lower efficiency at low speed, with lower torque, but higher efficiency at high speed.

  17. Measurement and characterization of fully transient diesel fuel jet processes in an optical engine with production injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Nicholas; Rothamer, David

    2016-10-01

    The effects of transient rate-of-injection profiles on high-pressure diesel fuel jets have been studied in an optically accessible internal combustion engine. High-speed optical imaging measurements were applied over a range of ambient conditions, fuel types, and injection parameters. This paper demonstrates that during the early part of the injection, while the liquid core is disintegrating, the penetration is functionally linked to the inviscid orifice exit velocity up until a downstream distance hypothesized to be the jet breakup length. The jets then transitioned to a mixing dominated penetration behavior afterward. Therefore, for cases that exhibit transient rate-of-injection profiles, quasi-steady penetration analytical solutions for penetration have poor agreement with the empirical data. The development of an adaptive edgefinding algorithm for accurately detecting jets in engines is detailed. These findings indicate that empirical correlations widely used throughout the engine community for estimating jet penetration do not accurately represent actual injection parameters under transient conditions.

  18. Maximum speed and mechanical power output in lizards.

    PubMed

    Farley, C T

    1997-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that maximum running speed is limited by how much mechanical power the muscular system can produce. To test this hypothesis, two species of lizards, Coleonyx variegatus and Eumeces skiltonianus, sprinted on hills of different slopes. According to the hypothesis, maximum speed should decrease on steeper uphill slopes but mechanical power output at maximum speed should be independent of slope. For level sprinting, the external mechanical power output was determined from force platform data. For uphill sprinting, the mechanical power output was approximated as the power required to lift the center of mass vertically. When the slope increased from level to 40 degrees uphill, maximum speed decreased by 28% in C. variegatus and by 16% in E. skiltonianus. At maximum speed on a 40 degrees uphill slope in both species, the mechanical power required to lift the body vertically was approximately 3.9 times greater than the external mechanical power output at maximum speed on the level. Because total limb mass is small in both species (6-16% of body mass) and stride frequency is similar at maximum speed on all slopes, the internal mechanical power output is likely to be small and similar in magnitude on all slopes. I conclude that the muscular system is capable of producing substantially more power during locomotion than it actually produces during level sprinting. Thus, the capacity of the muscular system to produce power does not limit maximum running speed.

  19. Variable speed controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Younger, Frank

    1992-01-01

    This report details a new design for a variable speed controller which can be used to operate lunar machinery without the astronaut using his or her upper body. In order to demonstrate the design, a treadle for an industrial sewing machine was redesigned to be used by a standing operator. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from sit down to stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with a sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator along with the ergonomics involved. Included with the design analysis are suggestions for possible uses for the speed controller in other applications.

  20. Forecasting Solar Wind Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2006-03-01

    By explicitly taking into account the effects of Alfvén waves, I derive from a simple energetics argument a fundamental relation that predicts solar wind (SW) speeds in the vicinity of Earth from physical properties on the Sun. Kojima et al. recently found from observations that the ratio of surface magnetic field strength to the expansion factor of open magnetic flux tubes is a good indicator of the SW speed. I show by using the derived relation that this nice correlation is evidence of Alfvén wave acceleration of the SW in expanding flux tubes. The observations further require that the fluctuation amplitudes of magnetic field lines at the surface be almost universal in different coronal holes, which needs to be tested with future observations.

  1. Cryogenic, high speed, turbopump bearing cooling requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Fred J.; Gibson, Howard G.; Cannon, James L.; Cody, Joe C.

    1988-01-01

    Although the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has repeatedly demonstrated the capability to perform during launch, the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) main shaft bearings have not met their 7.5 hour life requirement. A tester is being employed to provide the capability of subjecting full scale bearings and seals to speeds, loads, propellants, temperatures, and pressures which simulate engine operating conditions. The tester design permits much more elaborate instrumentation and diagnostics than could be accommodated in an SSME turbopump. Tests were made to demonstrate the facilities; and the devices' capabilities, to verify the instruments in its operating environment and to establish a performance baseline for the flight type SSME HPOTP Turbine Bearing design. Bearing performance data from tests are being utilized to generate: (1) a high speed, cryogenic turbopump bearing computer mechanical model, and (2) a much improved, very detailed thermal model to better understand bearing internal operating conditions. Parametric tests were also made to determine the effects of speed, axial loads, coolant flow rate, and surface finish degradation on bearing performance.

  2. The results of a low speed wind tunnel test to investigate the effects of installing refan JT8D engines on the McDonnell Douglas DC-9-30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisenberry, H. E.; Doss, P. G.; Kressly, A. E.; Prichard, R. D.; Thorndike, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    A low speed wind tunnel test was conducted to assess the effects of the larger JT8D refan nacelles on the stability and control characteristics of the DC-9-30, with emphasis on the deep stall regime. Deep stall pitching moment and elevator hinge moment data, and low angle of attack tail-on and tail-off pitching moment data are presented. The refan nacelle was tested in conjunction with various pylons of reduced span relative to the production DC-9-30 pylon. Also, a horizontal tail that was larger than the production tail was tested. The data show that the refan installation has a small detrimental effect on the DC-9-30 deep stall recovery capability, that recovery characteristics are essentially independent of pylon span, and that the larger horizontal tail significantly increases recovery margins. The deep stall characteristics with the refan installation, within the range of pylon spans tested, are acceptable with no additional design changes anticipated.

  3. Unobtrusive assessment of walking speed in the home using inexpensive PIR sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Stuart; Austin, Daniel; Kaye, Jeffrey; Pavel, Misha

    2010-01-01

    Walking speed and activity are important measures of functional ability in the elderly. Our earlier studies have suggested that continuous monitoring may allow us to detect changes in walking speed that are also predictive of cognitive changes. We evaluated the use of passive infrared (PIR) sensors for measuring walking speed in the home on an ongoing basis. In comparisons with gait mat estimates (ground truth) and the results of a timed walk test (the clinical gold standard) in 18 subjects, we found that the clinical measure overestimated typical walking speed, and the PIR sensor estimations of walking speed were highly correlated to actual gait speed. Examination of in-home walking patterns from more than 100,000 walking speed samples for these subjects suggested that we can accurately assess walking speed in the home. We discuss the potential of this approach for continuous assessment. PMID:19965096

  4. Monitoring speed before and during a speed publicity campaign.

    PubMed

    van Schagen, Ingrid; Commandeur, Jacques J F; Goldenbeld, Charles; Stipdonk, Henk

    2016-12-01

    Driving speeds were monitored during a period of 16 weeks encompassing different stages of an anti-speeding campaign in the Netherlands. This campaign targeted speed limit violations in built-up areas. The observation periods differed in terms of intensity and media used for the campaign. Small road-side radars, mounted in light poles, were used and registered the speeds on 20 locations in built-up areas. Speeds of over 10 million vehicles were measured. Ten locations had a posted speed limit of 50km/h; the other ten had a posted speed limit of 30km/h. Posters were placed at half of each group of locations to remind drivers of the speed limit. The average speed on the 50km/h roads was 46.2km/h, and 36.1km/h on the 30km/h roads. The average proportions of vehicles exceeding the speed limit were 33.3% and 70.1% respectively. For the 30km/h roads, the data shows differences in speed and speeding behaviour between the six distinguished observation periods, but overall these differences cannot be logically linked to the contents of the phases and, hence, cannot be explained as an effect of the campaign. The only exception was an effect of local speed limit reminders on the 30km/h roads. This effect, however, was temporary and had disappeared within a week.

  5. Multi-speed transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, N.; Nakayama, H.; Sumi, M.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a multi-speed transmission having forward speed gear trains and at least one reverse speed gear train, comprising, a pair of parallel fork shafts, one the shaft being fixed, the other the shaft being slidable along its axial direction, means to selectively engage the gear trains and means to retain the selective engagement means in the selected position. The means selectively engages the gear trains including a first shift fork connected to the fixed fork shaft so as to slide to either side of its disengaged neutral position, a second shift fork connected to the slideable fork shaft so as to slide to either side of its disengaged neutral position, and a third shift fork connected to the slidable fork shaft so as to slide in one direction by motion of the slideable fork shaft to only one side of its disengaged neutral position. Also included is a reverse shift fork connected to the slideable fork shaft and adapted to be actuated by motion of the slideable fork shaft in a direction opposite to the direction of the motion which engages the third shift fork.

  6. Two-speed transaxle

    DOEpatents

    Kalns, Ilmars

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  7. High speed multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiao; Brustle, Anne; Gautam, Vini; Cockburn, Ian; Gillespie, Cathy; Gaus, Katharina; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in-vivo. Real time processes revealed through live imaging provided many opportunities to capture cellular activities in living animals. The typical parameters that determine the performance of multiphoton microscopy are speed, field of view, 3D imaging and imaging depth; many of these are important to achieving data from in-vivo. Here, we provide a full exposition of the flexible polygon mirror based high speed laser scanning multiphoton imaging system, PCI-6110 card (National Instruments) and high speed analog frame grabber card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), which allows for rapid adjustments between frame rates i.e. 5 Hz to 50 Hz with 512 × 512 pixels. Furthermore, a motion correction algorithm is also used to mitigate motion artifacts. A customized control software called Pscan 1.0 is developed for the system. This is then followed by calibration of the imaging performance of the system and a series of quantitative in-vitro and in-vivo imaging in neuronal tissues and mice.

  8. Do speed cameras reduce speeding in urban areas?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniele Falci de; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Costa, Dário Alves da Silva; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2015-11-01

    This observational study aimed to estimate the prevalence of speeding on urban roadways and to analyze associated factors. The sample consisted of 8,565 vehicles circulating in areas with and without fixed speed cameras in operation. We found that 40% of vehicles 200 meters after the fixed cameras and 33.6% of vehicles observed on roadways without speed cameras were moving over the speed limit (p < 0.001). Motorcycles showed the highest recorded speed (126km/h). Most drivers were men (87.6%), 3.3% of all drivers were using their cell phones, and 74.6% of drivers (not counting motorcyclists) were wearing their seatbelts. On roadway stretches without fixed speed cameras, more women drivers were talking on their cell phones and wearing seatbelts when compared to men (p < 0.05 for both comparisons), independently of speed limits. The results suggest that compliance with speed limits requires more than structural interventions.

  9. Self-Actualization and the Effective Social Studies Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rodney B.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a study undertaken to investigate the relationship between social studies teachers' degrees of self-actualization and their teacher effectiveness. Investigates validity of using Maslow's theory of self-actualization as a way of identifying the effective social studies teacher personality. (Author/DB)

  10. Self-Actualization Effects Of A Marathon Growth Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dorothy S.; Medvene, Arnold M.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a marathon group experience on university student's level of self-actualization two days and six weeks after the experience. Gains in self-actualization as a result of marathon group participation depended upon an individual's level of ego strength upon entering the group. (Author)

  11. Self-actualization: Its Use and Misuse in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Stanley D.

    1982-01-01

    The writings of Abraham Maslow are analyzed to determine the meaning of the psychological term "self-actualization." After pointing out that self-actualization is a rare quality and that it has little to do with formal education, the author concludes that the concept has little practical relevance for teacher education. (PP)

  12. The Self-Actualization of Polk Community College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearsall, Howard E.; Thompson, Paul V., Jr.

    This article investigates the concept of self-actualization introduced by Abraham Maslow (1954). A summary of Maslow's Needs Hierarchy, along with a description of the characteristics of the self-actualized person, is presented. An analysis of humanistic education reveals it has much to offer as a means of promoting the principles of…

  13. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means risks described...

  14. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means...

  15. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means...

  16. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means...

  17. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means...

  18. Facebook as a Library Tool: Perceived vs. Actual Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Terra B.

    2011-01-01

    As Facebook has come to dominate the social networking site arena, more libraries have created their own library pages on Facebook to create library awareness and to function as a marketing tool. This paper examines reported versus actual use of Facebook in libraries to identify discrepancies between intended goals and actual use. The results of a…

  19. School Guidance Counselors' Perceptions of Actual and Preferred Job Duties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, John Dexter

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide process data for school counselors, administrators, and the public, regarding school counselors' actual roles within the guidance counselor preferred job duties and actual job duties. In addition, factors including National Certification or no National Certification, years of counseling experience, and…

  20. The Effect of Weather On a Ship’s Speed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    the need for some current measurements in the neighbourhood of an eddy warranted a reasonable attempt to deduce ships’ speed from engine revolutions...RANRL TECHNICAL NOTE No. 4/77 cl) C) L•-J (C) COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA 1977 €., THE EFFECT OF WEATHER ON A SHIP’S SPEED (U) DDC BY C. S. NUSSON JUL 12...NOTE NO. 4/77 TI.- EFFECT OF WEATHER ON A SHIP’S SPEED (U) C.S. Nilsson . COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA 1977 SUMMARY The need for better dead-reckoning

  1. High-speed civil transport study. Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system of study of the potential for a high speed commercial transport aircraft addressed technology, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicated a need for fleets of transport with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the years 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5000 to 6000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristics, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high speed civil transport. Significant advances are needed to take off gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environment acceptability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  2. High-speed civil transport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system study of the potential for a high-speed commercial transport has addressed technological, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicate a need for fleets of transports with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the year 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5,000 to 6,000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristic, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene-type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high-speed civil transport; significant advances are required to reduce takeoff gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environmental accepatability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  3. Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1941-01-01

    Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the time became it was generally possible. to design propellers with quite low tip. speeds. With the development of new engines having increased power and rotational speeds, however, the problems became of increasing importance.

  4. The role of visual processing speed in reading speed development.

    PubMed

    Lobier, Muriel; Dubois, Matthieu; Valdois, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    A steady increase in reading speed is the hallmark of normal reading acquisition. However, little is known of the influence of visual attention capacity on children's reading speed. The number of distinct visual elements that can be simultaneously processed at a glance (dubbed the visual attention span), predicts single-word reading speed in both normal reading and dyslexic children. However, the exact processes that account for the relationship between the visual attention span and reading speed remain to be specified. We used the Theory of Visual Attention to estimate visual processing speed and visual short-term memory capacity from a multiple letter report task in eight and nine year old children. The visual attention span and text reading speed were also assessed. Results showed that visual processing speed and visual short term memory capacity predicted the visual attention span. Furthermore, visual processing speed predicted reading speed, but visual short term memory capacity did not. Finally, the visual attention span mediated the effect of visual processing speed on reading speed. These results suggest that visual attention capacity could constrain reading speed in elementary school children.

  5. Experimental quiet engine program aerodynamic performance of fan A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Parker, D. E.; Dunbar, L. W.

    1971-01-01

    The aerodynamic component test results are presented of fan A, one of two high-bypass-ratio, 1160 feet per second single-stage fans, which was designed and tested as part of the NASA Experimental Quiet Engine Program. This fan was designed to deliver a bypass pressure ratio of 1.50 with an adiabatic efficiency of 86.5% at a total fan flow of 950 lb/sec. It was tested with and without inlet flow distortion. A bypass total-pressure ratio of 1.52 and an adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% at a total fan flow of 962 lb/sec were actually achieved. An operating margin of 12.4% was demonstrated at design speed.

  6. Experimental quiet engine program aerodynamic performance of Fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Parker, D. E.; Dunbar, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents the aerodynamic component test results of Fan C, a high-bypass-ratio, low-aerodynamic-loading, 1550 feet per second (472.4 m/sec), single-stage fan, which was designed and tested as part of the NASA Experimental Quiet Engine Program. The fan was designed to deliver a bypass pressure ratio of 1.60 with an adiabatic efficiency of 84.2 percent at a total fan flow of 915 lb/sec (415.0 kg/sec). It was tested with and without inlet distortion. A bypass total-pressure ratio of 1.61 and an adiabatic efficiency of 83.9 percent at a total fan flow of 921 lb/sec (417.8 kg/sec) were actually achieved. An operating margin in excess of 14.6 percent was demonstrated at design speed.

  7. J-2 Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Smokeless flame juts from the diffuser of a unique vacuum chamber in which the upper stage rocket engine, the hydrogen fueled J-2, was tested at a simulated space altitude in excess of 60,000 feet. The smoke you see is actually steam. In operation, vacuum is established by injecting steam into the chamber and is maintained by the thrust of the engine firing through the diffuser. The engine was tested in this environment for start, stop, coast, restart, and full-duration operations. The chamber was located at Rocketdyne's Propulsion Field Laboratory, in the Santa Susana Mountains, near Canoga Park, California. The J-2 engine was developed by Rocketdyne for the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  8. Indicator system provides complete data of engine cylinder pressure variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Jones, R. W.; Morgan, N. E.

    1966-01-01

    Varying reference pressure used together with a balanced pressure pickup /a diaphragm switch/ to switch the electric output of the pressure transducer in a reference pressure line obtains precise engine cylinder pressure data from a high speed internal combustion engine.

  9. Overview of Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Joe

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to plan an engine technology program that will enable next generation engines for both commercial and military applications, and to emphasize revolutionary technologies that will enable future subsonic and high-speed applications.

  10. High speed flywheel

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, Stephen V.

    1991-01-01

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  11. Low speed airfoil study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    Airfoil geometries were developed for low speed high lift applications, such as general aviation aircraft, propellers and helicopter rotors. The primary effort was to determine the extent to which the application of turbulent boundary layer separation criteria, plus manipulation of other input parameters, specifically trailing edging velocity ratio, could be utilized to achieve high C sub Lmax airfoils with relatively low drag at C sub Lmax. Both single-element and double-element airfoils were considered. Wind tunnel testing of some airfoils was included.

  12. Actual 10-Year Survivors Following Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Prescott, Jason D.; Wang, Tracy S.; Glenn, Jason; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Poultsides, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with limited therapeutic options beyond surgical resection. The characteristics of actual long-term survivors following surgical resection for ACC have not been previously reported. Method Patients who underwent resection for ACC at one of 13 academic institutions participating in the US Adrenocortical Carcinoma Group from 1993 to 2014 were analyzed. Patients were stratified into four groups: early mortality (died within 2 years), late mortality (died within 2–5 years), actual 5-year survivor (survived at least 5 years), and actual 10-year survivor (survived at least 10 years). Patients with less than 5 years of follow-up were excluded. Results Among the 180 patients available for analysis, there were 49 actual 5-year survivors (27%) and 12 actual 10-year survivors (7%). Patients who experienced early mortality had higher rates of cortisol-secreting tumors, nodal metastasis, synchronous distant metastasis, and R1 or R2 resections (all P < 0.05). The need for multi-visceral resection, perioperative blood transfusion, and adjuvant therapy correlated with early mortality. However, nodal involvement, distant metastasis, and R1 resection did not preclude patients from becoming actual 10-year survivors. Ten of twelve actual 10-year survivors were women, and of the seven 10-year survivors who experienced disease recurrence, five had undergone repeat surgery to resect the recurrence. Conclusion Surgery for ACC can offer a 1 in 4 chance of actual 5-year survival and a 1 in 15 chance of actual 10-year survival. Long-term survival was often achieved with repeat resection for local or distant recurrence, further underscoring the important role of surgery in managing patients with ACC. PMID:27633419

  13. Structure of High-Speed Sprays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    AD-Ri65 655 STRUCTURE OF HIGH-SPEED SPRAYS(U) PRINCETON UNIV NJ 1 /2 DEPT OF MECHRNICRL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING BRACCO FEB 85 ARO-i8333.7-EG DRAG29...and vaporization was negligible. During the second 3-year ARO grant for the period July 81-June 84 drop sizes ( 1 ) were measured by photography in the...tial drop size has been evaluated only preliminarily ( 1 ). But the prediction of the intact core length Is both weaker and largely untested. It Is weaker

  14. Engine monitoring display study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Mary E.

    1992-01-01

    The current study is part of a larger NASA effort to develop displays for an engine-monitoring system to enable the crew to monitor engine parameter trends more effectively. The objective was to evaluate the operational utility of adding three types of information to the basic Boeing Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (EICAS) display formats: alphanumeric alerting messages for engine parameters whose values exceed caution or warning limits; alphanumeric messages to monitor engine parameters that deviate from expected values; and a graphic depiction of the range of expected values for current conditions. Ten training and line pilots each flew 15 simulated flight scenarios with five variants of the basic EICAS format; these variants included different combinations of the added information. The pilots detected engine problems more quickly when engine alerting messages were included in the display; adding a graphic depiction of the range of expected values did not affect detection speed. The pilots rated both types of alphanumeric messages (alert and monitor parameter) as more useful and easier to interpret than the graphic depiction. Integrating engine parameter messages into the EICAS alerting system appears to be both useful and preferred.

  15. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-28

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing. 17 figs.

  16. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing.

  17. Frontoparietal cortex and cerebellum contribution to the update of actual and mental motor performance during the day

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Laura; Roccatagliata, Luca; Ruggeri, Piero; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Bove, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Actual and imagined movement speed increases from early morning until mid-afternoon. Here, we investigated the neural correlates of these daily changes. Fifteen subjects performed actual and imagined right finger opposition movement sequences at 8 am and 2 pm. Both actual and imagined movements were significantly faster at 2 pm than 8 am. In the morning, actual movements significantly activated the left primary somatosensory and motor areas, and bilaterally the cerebellum; in the afternoon activations were similar but reduced. Contrast analysis revealed greater activity in the cerebellum, the left primary sensorimotor cortex and parietal lobe in the morning than in the afternoon. Imagined movements in the morning significantly activated the parietal association cortices bilaterally, the left supplementary and premotor areas, and the right orbitofrontal cortex and cerebellum. In the afternoon, the frontal lobe was significantly activated with the right cerebellum. Contrast analysis revealed increased activity in the left parietal lobe in the morning than in the afternoon. For both tasks, speed in the morning was significantly related to the BOLD signal in the brain areas resulted more active. These findings suggest that motor performance is continuously updated on a daily basis with a predominant role of the frontoparietal cortex and cerebellum. PMID:27444783

  18. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  19. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  20. Approximate dynamic model of a turbojet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artemov, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    An approximate dynamic nonlinear model of a turbojet engine is elaborated on as a tool in studying the aircraft control loop, with the turbojet engine treated as an actuating component. Approximate relationships linking the basic engine parameters and shaft speed are derived to simplify the problem, and to aid in constructing an approximate nonlinear dynamic model of turbojet engine performance useful for predicting aircraft motion.

  1. Advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lays, E. J.; Murray, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    Concepts are discussed that project turbine engine cost savings through use of geometrically constrained components designed for low rotational speeds and low stress to permit manufacturing economies. Aerodynamic development of geometrically constrained components is recommended to maximize component efficiency. Conceptual engines, airplane applications, airplane performance, engine cost, and engine-related life cycle costs are presented. The powerplants proposed offer encouragement with respect to fuel efficiency and life cycle costs, and make possible remarkable airplane performance gains.

  2. Electrodermal responses to implied versus actual violence on television.

    PubMed

    Kalamas, A D; Gruber, M L

    1998-01-01

    The electrodermal response (EDR) of children watching a violent show was measured. Particular attention was paid to the type of violence (actual or implied) that prompted an EDR. In addition, the impact of the auditory component (sounds associated with violence) of the show was evaluated. Implied violent stimuli, such as the villain's face, elicited the strongest EDR. The elements that elicited the weakest responses were the actual violent stimuli, such as stabbing. The background noise and voices of the sound track enhanced the total number of EDRs. The results suggest that implied violence may elicit more fear (as measured by EDRs) than actual violence does and that sounds alone contribute significantly to the emotional response to television violence. One should not, therefore, categorically assume that a show with mostly actual violence evokes less fear than one with mostly implied violence.

  3. 40. Photocopy of plan of the Castillo c. 1779 (Actual ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Photocopy of plan of the Castillo c. 1779 (Actual Negative 4'x5') STAR PLAN, COURTYARD FACADE PROFILE AND DEFENSIVE LINKS - Castillo de San Marcos, 1 Castillo Drive, Saint Augustine, St. Johns County, FL

  4. High speed packet switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report prepared by Proteon, Inc. of Westborough, Massachusetts under contract NAS 5-30629 entitled High-Speed Packet Switching (SBIR 87-1, Phase 2) prepared for NASA-Greenbelt, Maryland. The primary goal of this research project is to use the results of the SBIR Phase 1 effort to develop a sound, expandable hardware and software router architecture capable of forwarding 25,000 packets per second through the router and passing 300 megabits per second on the router's internal busses. The work being delivered under this contract received its funding from three different sources: the SNIPE/RIG contract (Contract Number F30602-89-C-0014, CDRL Sequence Number A002), the SBIR contract, and Proteon. The SNIPE/RIG and SBIR contracts had many overlapping requirements, which allowed the research done under SNIPE/RIG to be applied to SBIR. Proteon funded all of the work to develop new router interfaces other than FDDI, in addition to funding the productization of the router itself. The router being delivered under SBIR will be a fully product-quality machine. The work done during this contract produced many significant findings and results, summarized here and explained in detail in later sections of this report. The SNIPE/RIG contract was completed. That contract had many overlapping requirements with the SBIR contract, and resulted in the successful demonstration and delivery of a high speed router. The development that took place during the SNIPE/RIG contract produced findings that included the choice of processor and an understanding of the issues surrounding inter processor communications in a multiprocessor environment. Many significant speed enhancements to the router software were made during that time. Under the SBIR contract (and with help from Proteon-funded work), it was found that a single processor router achieved a throughput significantly higher than originally anticipated. For this reason, a single processor router was

  5. 40 CFR 1042.505 - Testing engines using discrete-mode or ramped-modal duty cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cycle also for commercial variable-speed propulsion marine engines that are used with (or intended to be... electrically coupled propellers. Use this duty cycle also for variable-speed propulsion marine engines that are... part 1039, Appendix II, paragraph (a) for constant-speed auxiliary engines. (5)...

  6. 40 CFR 1042.505 - Testing engines using discrete-mode or ramped-modal duty cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cycle also for commercial variable-speed propulsion marine engines that are used with (or intended to be... electrically coupled propellers. Use this duty cycle also for variable-speed propulsion marine engines that are... part 1039, Appendix II, paragraph (a) for constant-speed auxiliary engines. (5)...

  7. Research on motor rotational speed measurement in regenerative braking system of electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chaofeng; Chen, Liao; Chen, Long; Jiang, Haobin; Li, Zhongxing; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Rotational speed signals acquisition and processing techniques are widely used in rotational machinery. In order to realized precise and real-time control of motor drive and regenerative braking process, rotational speed measurement techniques are needed in electric vehicles. Obtaining accurate motor rotational speed signal will contribute to the regenerative braking force control steadily and realized higher energy recovery rate. This paper aims to develop a method that provides instantaneous speed information in the form of motor rotation. It addresses principles of motor rotational speed measurement in the regenerative braking systems of electric vehicle firstly. The paper then presents ideal and actual Hall position sensor signals characteristics, the relation between the motor rotational speed and the Hall position sensor signals is revealed. Finally, Hall position sensor signals conditioning and processing circuit and program for motor rotational speed measurement have been carried out based on measurement error analysis.

  8. Actuarial and actual analysis of surgical results: empirical validation.

    PubMed

    Grunkemeier, G L; Anderson, R P; Starr, A

    2001-06-01

    This report validates the use of the Kaplan-Meier (actuarial) method of computing survival curves by comparing 12-year estimates published in 1978 with current assessments. It also contrasts cumulative incidence curves, referred to as "actual" analysis in the cardiac-related literature with Kaplan-Meier curves for thromboembolism and demonstrates that with the former estimate the percentage of events that will actually occur.

  9. An Investigation of the Surge Behavior of a High-Speed Ten-Stage Axial Flow Compressor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    aircraft engine consisted of both a 3-stage low- prssure fan and a 10-stage high-pressure compressor along with the necessary ducting. The test compression...section built from the engine did not include the fan , but it did include the inlet case section, the high-pressure compressor, the diffuser, and...that occur as a result of the fan in the actual engine. Actual flow" path simulation and variable geometry were also incorporated into the discharge

  10. Development of the Junkers-diesel Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasterstadt,

    1930-01-01

    The working process of the Junkers engine has resulted from a series of attempts to attain high performance and to control the necessarily rapid and complete combustion at extremely high speeds. The two main problems of Diesel engines in aircraft are addressed; namely, incomplete combustion and the greater weight of Diesel engine parts compared to gasoline engines.

  11. 46 CFR 121.620 - Propulsion engine control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Propulsion engine control systems. 121.620 Section 121... Propulsion engine control systems. (a) A vessel must have two independent means of controlling each propulsion engine. Control must be provided for the engine speed, direction of shaft rotation, and...

  12. 46 CFR 121.620 - Propulsion engine control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Propulsion engine control systems. 121.620 Section 121... Propulsion engine control systems. (a) A vessel must have two independent means of controlling each propulsion engine. Control must be provided for the engine speed, direction of shaft rotation, and...

  13. 46 CFR 121.620 - Propulsion engine control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Propulsion engine control systems. 121.620 Section 121... Propulsion engine control systems. (a) A vessel must have two independent means of controlling each propulsion engine. Control must be provided for the engine speed, direction of shaft rotation, and...

  14. 40 CFR 94.107 - Determination of maximum test speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Determination of maximum test speed. 94.107 Section 94.107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Test Procedures §...

  15. 40 CFR 94.107 - Determination of maximum test speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of maximum test speed. 94.107 Section 94.107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Test Procedures §...

  16. High-speed civil transport study: Special factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Studies relating to environmental factors associated with high speed civil transports were conducted. Projected total engine emissions for year 2015 fleets of several subsonic/supersonic transport fleet scenarios, discussion of sonic boom reduction methods, discussion of community noise level requirements, fuels considerations, and air traffic control impact are presented.

  17. Method and apparatus for rapid thrust increases in a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. E.; Corley, R. C.; Fraley, T. O.; Saunders, A. A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Upon a landing approach, the normal compressor stator schedule of a fan speed controlled turbofan engine is temporarily varied to substantially close the stators to thereby increase the fuel flow and compressor speed in order to maintain fan speed and thrust. This running of the compressor at an off-design speed substantially reduces the time required to subsequently advance the engine speed to the takeoff thrust level by advancing the throttle and opening the compressor stators.

  18. TWO-SPEED DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Brunson, G.S. Jr.

    1961-04-01

    A two-speed device is described comprising a two-part stop engageable with a follower. The two-pant stop comprises first and second members in threaded engagement with each other. The first member is restrained against rotation but is free to move longitudinally, and the second member is free to move arially and rotatively. Means are provided to impart rotation to the second member. The follower is engageable first with an end of one member and then with the corresponding end of the other member after some relative longitudinal movement of the members with respect to one another due to the rotation of the second member and the holding of the first member against rotation.

  19. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  20. High speed nozzles task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, Awatef

    1995-01-01

    Supersonic cruise exhaust nozzles for advanced applications are optimized for a high nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) at design supersonic cruise Mach number and altitude. The performance of these nozzles with large expansion ratios are severely degraded for operations at subsonic speeds near sea level for NPR significantly less than the design values. The prediction of over-expanded 2DCD nozzles performance is critical to evaluating the internal losses and to the optimization of the integrated vehicle and propulsion system performance. The reported research work was aimed at validating and assessing existing computational methods and turbulence models for predicting the flow characteristics and nozzle performance at over-expanded conditions. Flow simulations in 2DCD nozzles were performed using five different turbulence models. The results are compared with the experimental data for the wall pressure distribution and thrust and flow coefficients at over-expanded static conditions.

  1. Speeding up evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter

    Proteins and cells offer great opportunities for green chemistry and renewable energy. However, few of these possible applications have been put into practice because of details that turn out to be major barriers to cost-efficient implementation and that prove difficult to solve by genetic engineering. A better understanding of molecular evolution promises a novel approach to addressing these important challenges. While major advances have been made, major gaps remain in understanding the evolution of proteins. Different approaches to accelerating molecular evolution into targeted directions will be discussed, including recent progress on evolution in non-homogeneous environments.

  2. Valve operating mechanism for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, K.; Nagahiro, K.; Ajiki, Y.; Katoh, M.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a valve operating mechanism of operating valves of an internal combustion engine, comprising: a camshaft rotatable in synchronism with rotation of the internal combustion engine and having an array of three cams each having a different cam profile and including a high-speed cam position at one end of the array; three cam followers held in sliding contact with the cams, respectively, for operating the valves according to the cam profiles of the cams; and means for selectively interconnecting and disconnecting the cam followers to operate the valves at different valve timings in different speed ranges of the internal combustion engine, the speed ranges including a high-speed range in which all of the valves are controlled by the cam profile of the high-speed cam.

  3. Speeded naming or naming speed? The automatic effect of object speed on performance.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Chajut, Eran; Hassin, Ran R; Algom, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We test the hypothesis that naming an object depicted in a picture and reading aloud an object's name are affected by the object's speed. We contend that the mental representations of everyday objects and situations include their speed, and that the latter influences behavior in instantaneous and systematic ways. An important corollary is that high-speed objects are named faster than low-speed objects, although object speed is irrelevant to the naming task at hand. The results of a series of 7 studies with pictures and words support these predictions.

  4. Virtual Turbine Engine Test Bench Using MGET Test Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Seonghee; Kong, Changduk; Ki, Jayoung

    2015-05-01

    Test device using virtual engine simulator can help reduce the number of engine tests through tests similar to the actual engine tests and repeat the test under the same condition, and thus reduce the engine maintenance and operating costs [1]. Also, as it is possible to easily implement extreme conditions in which it is hard to conduct actual tests, it can prevent engine damages that may happen during the actual engine test under such conditions. In this study, an upgraded MGET test device was developed that can conduct both real and virtual engine test by applying real-time engine model to the existing MGET test device that was developed and has been sold by the Company. This newly developed multi-purpose MGET test device is expected to be used for various educational and research purposes.

  5. Minimum Climb to Cruise Noise Trajectories Modeled for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    1998-01-01

    The proposed U.S. High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) will revolutionize commercial air travel by providing economical supersonic passenger service to destinations worldwide. Unlike the high-bypass turbofan engines that propel today's subsonic airliners, HSCT engines will have much higher jet exhaust speeds. Jet noise, caused by the turbulent mixing of high-speed exhaust with the surrounding air, poses a significant challenge for HSCT engine designers. To resolve this challenge, engineers have designed advanced mixer rejector nozzles that reduce HSCT jet noise to airport noise certification levels by entraining and mixing large quantities of ambient air with the engines' jet streams. Although this works well during the first several minutes of flight, far away from the airport, as the HSCT gains speed and climbs, poor ejector inlet recovery and ejector ram drag contribute to poor thrust, making it advantageous to turn off the ejector. Doing so prematurely, however, can cause unacceptable noise levels to propagate to the ground, even when the aircraft is many miles from the airport. This situation lends itself ideally to optimization, where the aircraft trajectory, throttle setting, and ejector setting can be varied (subject to practical aircraft constraints) to minimize the noise propagated to the ground. A method was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center that employs a variation of the classic energy state approximation: a trajectory analysis technique historically used to minimize climb time or fuel burned in many aircraft problems. To minimize the noise on the ground at any given throttle setting, high aircraft altitudes are desirable; but the HSCT may either climb quickly to high altitudes using a high, noisy throttle setting or climb more slowly at a lower, quieter throttle setting. An optimizer has been programmed into NASA's existing aircraft and noise analysis codes to balance these options by dynamically choosing the best altitude-velocity path and

  6. Fast Whole-Engine Stirling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Tew, Roy C.; Demko, Rikako

    2006-01-01

    This presentation discusses the simulation approach to whole-engine for physical consistency, REV regenerator modeling, grid layering for smoothness, and quality, conjugate heat transfer method adjustment, high-speed low cost parallel cluster, and debugging.

  7. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  8. Open Rotor: New Option for Jet Engines

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dale Van Zante describes how the open rotor propulsion system will be tested in a wind tunnel at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Open rotor aircraft engines use high-speed propellers and are c...

  9. NASA Now: Engineering Design: Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Norman W. Schaeffler, a NASA aerospace research engineer, describes how wind tunnels work and how aircraft designers use them to understand aerodynamic forces at low speeds. Learn the advantage...

  10. Study of high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A systems study to identify the economic potential for a high-speed commercial transport (HSCT) has considered technology, market characteristics, airport infrastructure, and environmental issues. Market forecasts indicate a need for HSCT service in the 2000/2010 time frame conditioned on economic viability and environmental acceptability. Design requirements focused on a 300 passenger, 3 class service, and 6500 nautical mile range based on the accelerated growth of the Pacific region. Compatibility with existing airports was an assumed requirement. Mach numbers between 2 and 25 were examined in conjunction with the appropriate propulsion systems, fuels, structural materials, and thermal management systems. Aircraft productivity was a key parameter with aircraft worth, in comparison to aircraft price, being the airline-oriented figure of merit. Aircraft screening led to determination that Mach 3.2 (TSJF) would have superior characteristics to Mach 5.0 (LNG) and the recommendation that the next generation high-speed commercial transport aircraft use a kerosene fuel. The sensitivity of aircraft performance and economics to environmental constraints (e.g., sonic boom, engine emissions, and airport/community noise) was identified together with key technologies. In all, current technology is not adequate to produce viable HSCTs for the world marketplace. Technology advancements must be accomplished to meet environmental requirements (these requirements are as yet undetermined for sonic boom and engine emissions). High priority is assigned to aircraft gross weight reduction which benefits both economics and environmental aspects. Specific technology requirements are identified and national economic benefits are projected.

  11. Design and Test of Fan/Nacelle Models Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J. (Technical Monitor); Weir, Donald

    2003-01-01

    The Quiet High-Speed Fan program is a cooperative effort between Honeywell Engines & Systems (formerly AlliedSignal Engines & Systems) and the NASA Glenn Research Center. Engines & Systems has designed an advanced high-speed fan that will be tested on the Ultra High Bypass Propulsion Simulator in the NASA Glenn 9 x 15 foot wind tunnel, currently scheduled for the second quarter of 2000. An Engines & Systems modern fan design will be used as a baseline. A nacelle model is provided that is characteristic of a typical, modern regional aircraft nacelle and meets all of the program test objectives.

  12. MM-122: High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Bill; Anders, Kurt; Manchec, John; Yang, Eric; Overgaard, Dan; Kalkwarf, Mike

    1992-01-01

    The rapidly expanding Pacific Rim market along with other growing markets indicates that the future market potential for a high speed civil transport is great indeed. The MM-122 is the answer to the international market desire for a state of the art, long range, high speed civil transport. It will carry 250 passengers a distance of 5200 nm at over twice the speed of sound. The MM-122 is designed to incorporate the latest technologies in the areas of control systems, propulsions, aerodynamics, and materials. The MM-122 will accomplish these goals using the following design parameters. First, a double delta wing planform with highly swept canards and an appropriately area ruled fuselage will be incorporated to accomplish desired aerodynamic characteristics. Propulsion will be provided by four low bypass variable cycle turbofan engines. A quad-redundant fly-by-wire flight control system will be incorporated to provide appropriate static stability and level 1 handling qualities. Finally, the latest in conventional metallic and modern composite materials will be used to provide desired weight and performance characteristics. The MM-122 incorporates the latest in technology and cost minimization techniques to provide a viable solution to this future market potential.

  13. Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detore, Jack; Conway, Scott

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) type aircraft is examined to determine which aircraft are most likely to achieve high subsonic cruise speeds and have hover qualities similar to a helicopter. Two civil mission profiles are considered: a 600-n.mi. mission for a 15- and a 30-passenger payload. Applying current technology, only the 15- and 30-passenger tiltfold aircraft are capable of attaining the 450-knot design goal. The two tiltfold aircraft at 450 knots and a 30-passenger tiltrotor at 375 knots were further developed for the Task II technology analysis. A program called High-Speed Total Envelope Proprotor (HI-STEP) is recommended to meet several of these issues based on the tiltrotor concept. A program called Tiltfold System (TFS) is recommended based on the tiltrotor concept. A task is identified to resolve the best design speed from productivity and demand considerations based on the technology that emerges from the recommended programs. HI-STEP's goals are to investigate propulsive efficiency, maneuver loads, and aeroelastic stability. Programs currently in progress that may meet the other technology needs include the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) (NASA Lewis) and the Advanced Structural Concepts Program funded through NASA Langley.

  14. Futuristic concepts in engines and components

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This publication includes papers on two-stroke engines and components, Brayton Stirling and Otto Cycles, alternative cycles, advanced combustion, and other related topics. Contents include: Paving the way to controlled combustion engines (CCE); A new class of stratified-charge internal combustion engine; Internal combustion (IC) engine with minimum number of moving parts; New type of heat engine -- externally heated air engine; A porous media burner for reforming methanol for fuel cell powered electric vehicles; Using a Stirling engine simulation program as a regenerator design aid; In-cylinder regenerated engines; High speed electronic fuel injection for direct injected rotary engine; and The characteristics of fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of the side exhaust port rotary engine.

  15. Focused Mission High Speed Combatant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-09

    hull types to determine which hull type best meets the requirements for the Focused Mission High Speed Combatant. The first step in the analysis...MAPC, uses parametric models and scaling to create high level designs of various hull types. The inputs are desired speed , range, payload, sea state...reached 10 SWATH vessels exhibit superior seakeeping at near zero speed compared to other hull forms 5 Assumes 2 equal-sized GE Gas Turbines 11

  16. Matter Flashed at Ultra Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    function of time (the light curve). The small size of the telescope is compensated by its rapidity of slewing, which allowed astronomers to begin observations very soon after each GRB's detection (39 and 41 seconds after the alert, respectively), and to monitor the very early stages of their light curve. The two gamma-ray bursts were located 9.3 and 11.5 billion light-years away, respectively. ESO PR Photo 26b/07 ESO PR Photo 26b/07 Light Curve of a Gamma-ray Burst For both events, the afterglow light curve initially rose, then reached a peak, and eventually started to decline, as is typical of GRB afterglows. The peak is, however, only rarely detected. Its determination is very important, since it allows a direct measurement of the expansion velocity of the explosion of the material. For both bursts, the velocity turns out to be very close to the speed of light, precisely 99.9997% of this value. Scientists use a special number, called the Lorentz factor, to express these high velocities. Objects moving much slower than light have a Lorentz factor of about 1, while for the two GRBs it is about 400. "Matter is thus moving with a speed that is only different from that of light by three parts in a million," says Stefano Covino, co-author of the study. "While single particles in the Universe can be accelerated to still larger velocities - i.e. much larger Lorentz factors - one has to realise that in the present cases, it is the equivalent of about 200 times the mass of the Earth that acquired this incredible speed." "You certainly wouldn't like to be in the way," adds team member Susanna Vergani. The measurement of the Lorentz factor is an important step in understanding gamma-ray burst explosions. This is in fact one of the fundamental parameters of the theory which tries to explain these gigantic explosions, and up to now it was only poorly determined. "The next question is which kind of 'engine' can accelerate matter to such enormous speeds," says Covino. More Information

  17. 14 CFR 23.67 - Climb: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Wing flaps retracted; and (v) Climb speed not less than 1.2 VS1. (2) For each airplane that meets the... continuous power; (iii) Landing gear retracted; (iv) Wing flaps retracted; and (v) Climb speed not less than... position; (ii) Remaining engine(s) at takeoff power; (iii) Landing gear retracted; (iv) Wing flaps in...

  18. 14 CFR 23.67 - Climb: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Wing flaps retracted; and (v) Climb speed not less than 1.2 VS1. (2) For each airplane that meets the... continuous power; (iii) Landing gear retracted; (iv) Wing flaps retracted; and (v) Climb speed not less than... position; (ii) Remaining engine(s) at takeoff power; (iii) Landing gear retracted; (iv) Wing flaps in...

  19. Pay as You Speed, ISA with incentive for not speeding: results and interpretation of speed data.

    PubMed

    Lahrmann, Harry; Agerholm, Niels; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Berthelsen, Kasper K; Harms, Lisbeth

    2012-09-01

    To simulate a market introduction of Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) and to study the effect of a Pay as You Speed (PAYS) concept, a field trial with 153 drivers was conducted during 2007-2009. The participants drove under PAYS conditions for a shorter or a longer period. The PAYS concept consisted of informative ISA linked with economic incentive for not speeding, measured through automatic count of penalty points whenever the speed limit was exceeded. The full incentive was set to 30% of a participant's insurance premium. The participants were exposed to different treatments, with and without incentive crossed with informative ISA present or absent. The results showed that ISA is an efficient tool for reducing speeding particularly on rural roads. The analysis of speed data demonstrated that the proportion of distance driven above the speed where the ISA equipment responded (PDA) was a sensitive measure for reflecting the effect of ISA, whereas mean free flow speed and the 85th percentile speed, were less sensitive to ISA effects. The PDA increased a little over time but still remained at a low level; however, when ISA was turned off, the participants' speeding relapsed to the baseline level. Both informative ISA and incentive ISA reduced the PDA, but there was no statistically significant interaction. Informative reduced it more than the incentive.

  20. Two speed axle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, C.F.; Krisher, J.A.; Pifer, R.L.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes a two speed axle assembly comprising an input sun gear, an output sun gear, a plant carrier mounted for rotation about the input and output sun gears, at least one compound planetary gear rotatably mounted on the planet carrier and drivingly connected to the input sun gear and the output sun gear, first clutch means for selectively locking the planet carrier relative to the input sun gear for rotation therewith including means normally loading the first clutch means whereby the planet carrier rotates the input sun gear, second clutch means for alternatively locking the planet carrier against rotation whereby the compound planet gear rotates on the planet carrier in response to rotation of the input sun gear, and inflatable bladder means adapted when selectively inflated to load the second clutch means and simultaneously unload the normally loaded first clutch means whereby the planet carrier is unlocked relative to the input sun gear and locked against rotation, including means selectively supplying hydraulic fluid under pressure to the bladder means, means supplying hydraulic fluid comprising accumulator means, pump means remote from the axle assembly for pressurizing the hydraulic fluid and maintaining a supply of the fluid under at least a minimum pressure in the accumulator means, and valve means for selectively admitting the pressurized fluid from the accumulator means to the bladder means to inflate the bladder means and relieving the pressure to deflate the bladder means.

  1. Neutron Speed Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, A.

    Neutron speed echo (NSPE) technique is in a way a generalization of the neutron spin echo (NSE) technique. Similar to NSE spectrometers, the resolution of such NSPE spectrometer is extremely high and is not connected with the monochromatization of the incoming beam. However, in contrast to NSE spectrometers, the operation of proposed spectrometer does not necessarily require a polarized neutron beam. Such decoupling the polarization and the resolution is in clear contrast to NSE technique. Because the resolution of a NSPE spectrometer can be a few orders higher than the resolution of NSE spectrometers, one can achieve the energy resolution of about 10-14 eV by the use of ultra cold neutrons; a fact that can be used in some fundamental physics experiments. Though the scattering on the sample impose limitations on the resolution of a NSPE spectrometer, the use of the proposed technique in a low-resolution mode can be useful in the combination with triple-axis spectrometers and allow for the significant improvement of their energy resolution, however, without the use of polarized neutrons. This fact opens new possibilities for the study of magnetic phenomena in solids, where the NSE method is principally not applicable because of the neutron precession in the sample, especially by combining polarization analysis with high-resolution spectroscopy. The proposed technique also allows for an easy implementation of the principle of the NSE focusing, when the resolution ellipse is aligned along a dispersion curve.

  2. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the design and marketability of a next generation supersonic transport. Apogee Aeronautics Corporation has designated its High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT): Supercruiser HS-8. Since the beginning of the Concorde era, the general consensus has been that the proper time for the introduction of a next generation Supersonic Transport (SST) would depend upon the technical advances made in the areas of propulsion (reduction in emissions) and material composites (stronger, lighter materials). It is believed by many in the aerospace industry that these beforementioned technical advances lie on the horizon. With this being the case, this is the proper time to begin the design phase for the next generation HSCT. The design objective for a HSCT was to develop an aircraft that would be capable of transporting at least 250 passengers with baggage at a distance of 5500 nmi. The supersonic Mach number is currently unspecified. In addition, the design had to be marketable, cost effective, and certifiable. To achieve this goal, technical advances in the current SST's must be made, especially in the areas of aerodynamics and propulsion. As a result of these required aerodynamic advances, several different supersonic design concepts were reviewed.

  3. Locomotion speeds of various dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Mary; Lee, Scott

    2009-03-01

    Most students have a passing curiosity about dinosaurs. Piquing this interest is an excellent tool to engage students. A methodology for estimating the locomotion speed of an animal based upon their footprint tracks is developed. Using this technique, an analysis of the locomotion speeds of various dinosaurs is performed. The tracks studied include 28 theropods (meat-eating dinosaurs), 23 sauropods (the ``long-necked'' herbivores), 28 non-armored, non-sauropod herbivores and 10 armored, non-sauropod herbivores. The theropods show the fastest locomotion speed as well as the greatest variety of speeds while the armored dinosaurs are the slowest.

  4. Locomotion Speeds of Various Dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, M. T.; Lee, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    A methodology for estimating the locomotion speed of an animal based upon their footprint tracks is developed. Using this technique, an analysis of the locomotion speeds of various dinosaurs is performed. The tracks studied include 28 theropods (meat-eating dinosaurs), 23 sauropods (the ``long-necked'' herbivores), 28 non-armored, non-sauropod herbivores and 10 armored, non-sauropod herbivores. The theropods show the fastest locomotion speed as well as the greatest variety of speeds while the armored dinosaurs are the slowest.

  5. Lifing of Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The successful development of advanced aerospace engines depends greatly on the capabilities of high performance materials and structures. Advanced materials, such as nickel based single crystal alloys, metal foam, advanced copper alloys, and ceramics matrix composites, have been engineered to provide higher engine temperature and stress capabilities. Thermal barrier coatings have been developed to improve component durability and fuel efficiency, by reducing the substrate hot wall metal temperature and protecting against oxidation and blanching. However, these coatings are prone to oxidation and delamination failures. In order to implement the use of these materials in advanced engines, it is necessary to understand and model the evolution of damage of the metal substrate as well as the coating under actual engine conditions. The models and the understanding of material behavior are utilized in the development of a life prediction methodology for hot section components. The research activities were focused on determining the stress and strain fields in an engine environment under combined thermo-mechanical loads to develop life prediction methodologies consistent with the observed damage formation of the coating and the substrates.

  6. High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds. Tests were conducted on several types of porous parachutes, a paraglider, and a simulated retrorocket. Mach numbers ranged from 1.8-3.0, porosity from 20-80 percent, and camera speeds from 1680-3000 feet per second (fps) in trials with porous parachutes. Trials of reefed parachutes were conducted at Mach number 2.0 and reefing of 12-33 percent at camera speeds of 600 fps. A flexible parachute with an inflatable ring in the periphery of the canopy was tested at Reynolds number 750,000 per foot, Mach number 2.85, porosity of 28 percent, and camera speed of 36oo fps. A vortex-ring parachute was tested at Mach number 2.2 and camera speed of 3000 fps. The paraglider, with a sweepback of 45 degrees at an angle of attack of 45 degrees was tested at Mach number 2.65, drag coefficient of 0.200, and lift coefficient of 0.278 at a camera speed of 600 fps. A cold air jet exhausting upstream from the center of a bluff body was used to simulate a retrorocket. The free-stream Mach number was 2.0, free-stream dynamic pressure was 620 lb/sq ft, jet-exit static pressure ratio was 10.9, and camera speed was 600 fps. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030973. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  7. Speed Listening: Exploring an Analogue of Speed Reading. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, William P.

    To determine whether the impressive rates for speed reading (e.g., 500 words per minute) can be approximated in speed listening, two experiments compared the comprehension level of material heard at a normal speaking rate with that heard at accelerated rates. In the first experiment, the major demonstration experiment, three groups of college…

  8. Factors of airplane engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Victor R

    1921-01-01

    This report is based upon an analysis of a large number of airplane-engine tests. It contains the results of a search for fundamental relations between many variables of engine operation. The data used came from over 100 groups of tests made upon several engines, primarily for military information. The types of engines were the Liberty 12 and three models of the Hispano-Suiza. The tests were made in the altitude chamber, where conditions simulated altitudes up to about 30,000 feet, with engine speeds ranging from 1,200 to 2,200 r.p.m. The compression ratios of the different engines ranged from under 5 to over 8 to 1. The data taken on the tests were exceptionally complete, including variations of pressure and temperature, besides the brake and friction torques, rates of fuel and air consumption, the jacket and exhaust heat losses.

  9. 40 CFR 86.1332-90 - Engine mapping procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... which the wide-open throttle torque drops off to zero, or the maximum speed as calculated for ungoverned... mapping speed shall be no less than either that speed at which wide-open throttle torque drops off to zero...-up procedures for 1 minute ±30 seconds. (ii) Operate the engine at a torque equivalent to...

  10. Engineering Practice and Engineering Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, William T.; Kline, Ronald

    2000-01-01

    Offers ways of applying science and technology studies to the teaching of engineering ethics. Suggests modifications of both detailed case studies on engineering disasters and hypothetical, ethical dilemmas employed in engineering ethics classes. (Author/CCM)

  11. Axial flow rotary engine

    SciTech Connect

    Loran, W.; Robinson, M.A.

    1989-07-18

    This paper describes an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a housing having an intake port at one end thereof and an exhaust port at the other end thereof; a compression chamber in the housing near the one end; compressor means in the compression chamber; a compressor transfer port opening through the downstream outlet wall; an expansion chamber in the housing near the other end thereof to receive combusted gases; work means in the expansion chamber driven by expanding, combusted gases; means rotating the compressor outlet wall at the same rotational drive speed as the expander inlet wall; an expansion chamber inlet port opening extending through the upstream inlet wall; a cylindrical combustion chamber block rotatable in the housing intermediate the compression chamber and the expansion chamber; at least two combustion chambers in the block; means rotating the block at a reduced speed relative to the speed of rotation of the compressor outlet wall and the expander inlet wall; means for igniting the charge of compressed gas during the intermediate portion of each revolution of the combustion chamber block. The combustion chambers being substantially hemispherical; the speed of rotation of the compressor outlet wall is in the same ratio to the speed of rotation of the combustion chamber block as the number of combustion chambers in the block is to the number of combustion chambers less one.

  12. Design and Construction of a High-Speed Magnetic Tape Duplicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskin, Richard K.

    Engineering procedures used in the design and construction of a high-speed, multichannel magnetic tape duplicator are described. The completed duplicator, a common mandrel duplicator, in which a single drive motor turns a common capstan shaft at high speeds and moves both master and copy tapes simultaneously, performs satisfactorily yet suggests…

  13. Models of Speed Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    visual search for the detection of speed deviation. 2. Perception of moving objects. 3. Exploring the role of eye movements in various visual tasks.

  14. High frequency dynamic engine simulation. [TF-30 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerman, J. A.; Fischer, K. E.; Mclaughlin, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    A digital computer simulation of a mixed flow, twin spool turbofan engine was assembled to evaluate and improve the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation to disturbance frequencies of at least 100 Hz. One dimensional forms of the dynamic mass, momentum and energy equations were used to model the engine. A TF30 engine was simulated so that dynamic characteristics could be evaluated against results obtained from testing of the TF30 engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation were improved by modifying the compression system model. Modifications to the compression system model were established by investigating the influence of size and number of finite dynamic elements. Based on the results of this program, high frequency engine simulations using finite dynamic elements can be assembled so that the engine dynamic configuration is optimum with respect to dynamic characteristics and computer execution time. Resizing of the compression systems finite elements improved the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation but showed that additional refinements are required to obtain close agreement simulation and actual engine dynamic characteristics.

  15. Speed adaptation as Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Jose F; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2008-10-01

    If the purpose of adaptation is to fit sensory systems to different environments, it may implement an optimization of the system. What the optimum is depends on the statistics of these environments. Therefore, the system should update its parameters as the environment changes. A Kalman-filtering strategy performs such an update optimally by combining current estimations of the environment with those from the past. We investigate whether the visual system uses such a strategy for speed adaptation. We performed a matching-speed experiment to evaluate the time course of adaptation to an abrupt velocity change. Experimental results are in agreement with Kalman-modeling predictions for speed adaptation. When subjects adapt to a low speed and it suddenly increases, the time course of adaptation presents two phases, namely, a rapid decrease of perceived speed followed by a slower phase. In contrast, when speed changes from fast to slow, adaptation presents a single phase. In the Kalman-model simulations, this asymmetry is due to the prevalence of low speeds in natural images. However, this asymmetry disappears both experimentally and in simulations when the adapting stimulus is noisy. In both transitions, adaptation now occurs in a single phase. Finally, the model also predicts the change in sensitivity to speed discrimination produced by the adaptation.

  16. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  17. Propeller speed and phase sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collopy, Paul D. (Inventor); Bennett, George W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A speed and phase sensor counterrotates aircraft propellers. A toothed wheel is attached to each propeller, and the teeth trigger a sensor as they pass, producing a sequence of signals. From the sequence of signals, rotational speed of each propeller is computer based on time intervals between successive signals. The speed can be computed several times during one revolution, thus giving speed information which is highly up-to-date. Given that spacing between teeth may not be uniform, the signals produced may be nonuniform in time. Error coefficients are derived to correct for nonuniformities in the resulting signals, thus allowing accurate speed to be computed despite the spacing nonuniformities. Phase can be viewed as the relative rotational position of one propeller with respect to the other, but measured at a fixed time. Phase is computed from the signals.

  18. The need for speed: global optic flow speed influences steering

    PubMed Central

    Kountouriotis, Georgios K.; Mole, Callum D.; Merat, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    How do animals follow demarcated paths? Different species are sensitive to optic flow and one control solution is to maintain the balance of flow symmetry across visual fields; however, it is unclear whether animals are sensitive to changes in asymmetries when steering along curved paths. Flow asymmetries can alter the global properties of flow (i.e. flow speed) which may also influence steering control. We tested humans steering curved paths in a virtual environment. The scene was manipulated so that the ground plane to either side of the demarcated path produced larger or smaller asymmetries in optic flow. Independent of asymmetries and the locomotor speed, the scene properties were altered to produce either faster or slower globally averaged flow speeds. Results showed that rather than being influenced by changes in flow asymmetry, steering responded to global flow speed. We conclude that the human brain performs global averaging of flow speed from across the scene and uses this signal as an input for steering control. This finding is surprising since the demarcated path provided sufficient information to steer, whereas global flow speed (by itself) did not. To explain these findings, existing models of steering must be modified to include a new perceptual variable: namely global optic flow speed. PMID:27293789

  19. Progressive Digressions: Home Schooling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Maslow's (1971) theory of primary creativeness is used as the basis for a self-actualization model of education. Examples of how to use the model in creative homeschooling are provided. Key elements include digressive and immersion learning, self-directed learning, and the integration of work and play. Teaching suggestions are provided. (Contains…

  20. A Taxometric Analysis of Actual Internet Sports Gambling Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Julia; LaBrie, Richard A.; Shaffer, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents findings from the first taxometric study of actual gambling behavior to determine whether we can represent the characteristics of extreme gambling as qualitatively distinct (i.e., taxonic) or as a point along a dimension. We analyzed the bets made during a 24-month study period by the 4,595 most involved gamblers among a…

  1. William Brennan and the Failed "Theory" of Actual Malice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillmor, Donald M.

    This paper contains an analysis of Justice William Brennan's Supreme Court opinions concerning cases on freedom of expression and his interpretations of Alexander Meiklejohn's theory of actual malice in cases of libel. Particular attention is paid to Brennan's landmark contribution to the law of libel, his opinion in "New York Times v.…

  2. MLCMS Actual Use, Perceived Use, and Experiences of Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon; Grönlund, Åke

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning involves use of mobile devices to participate in learning activities. Most e-learning activities are available to participants through learning systems such as learning content management systems (LCMS). Due to certain challenges, LCMS are not equally accessible on all mobile devices. This study investigates actual use, perceived…

  3. Venture actualization in nursing. An analysis of innovation.

    PubMed

    Neidlinger, S H; Bartleson, B J; Drews, N; Hukari, D

    1992-01-01

    From innovations shared by nurse executives and nurse intrapreneurs in acute care hospitals, The Venture Actualization in Nursing Model emerged. Derived from a nursing perspective, this model captures the steps of the nurse innovation process, linking the nurse executive and nurse intrapreneur role components to the process that leads to venture success.

  4. Comparison of Actual Surgical Outcomes and 3D Surgical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Scott; Cevidanes, Lucia; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The advent of imaging software programs have proved to be useful for diagnosis, treatment planning, and outcome measurement, but precision of 3D surgical simulation still needs to be tested. This study was conducted to determine if the virtual surgery performed on 3D models constructed from Cone-beam CT (CBCT) can correctly simulate the actual surgical outcome and to validate the ability of this emerging technology to recreate the orthognathic surgery hard tissue movements in 3 translational and 3 rotational planes of space. Methods Construction of pre- and post-surgery 3D models from CBCTs of 14 patients who had combined maxillary advancement and mandibular setback surgery and 6 patients who had one-piece maxillary advancement surgery was performed. The post-surgery and virtually simulated surgery 3D models were registered at the cranial base to quantify differences between simulated and actual surgery models. Hotelling T-test were used to assess the differences between simulated and actual surgical outcomes. Results For all anatomic regions of interest, there was no statistically significant difference between the simulated and the actual surgical models. The right lateral ramus was the only region that showed a statistically significant, but small difference when comparing two- and one-jaw surgeries. Conclusions Virtual surgical methods were reliably reproduced, oral surgery residents could benefit from virtual surgical training, and computer simulation has the potential to increase predictability in the operating room. PMID:20591553

  5. 24 CFR 200.96 - Certificates of actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and... Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Cost Certification § 200.96 Certificates of actual... before final endorsement, except that in the case of an existing project that does not...

  6. 24 CFR 200.96 - Certificates of actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and... Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Cost Certification § 200.96 Certificates of actual... before final endorsement, except that in the case of an existing project that does not...

  7. Computer/PERT technique monitors actual versus allocated costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houry, E.; Walker, J. D.

    1967-01-01

    A computer method measures the users performance in cost-type contracts utilizing the existing nasa program evaluation review technique without imposing any additional reporting requirements. progress is measured by comparing actual costs with a value of work performed in a specific period.

  8. Student Exposure to Actual Patients in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Marie A.; McCall, Charles Y.; Francisco, George E., Jr.; Poirier, Sylvie

    1997-01-01

    Two clinical courses for first-year dental students were designed to develop students' interaction skills through actual patient case presentations and discussions and an interdisciplinary teaching approach. Results indicate students preferred the case presentations, with or without lecture, to the lecture-only approach and felt they learned more…

  9. Fair Equality of Opportunity in Our Actual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Fair equality of opportunity, a principle that governs the competition for desirable jobs, can seem irrelevant in our actual world, for two reasons. First, parents have broad liberty to raise their children as they see fit, which seems to undermine the fair equality of opportunity-based commitment to eliminating the effects of social circumstances…

  10. Actualizing Concepts in Home Management: Proceedings of a National Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Home Economics Association, Washington, DC.

    The booklet prints the following papers delivered at a national conference: Actualizing Concepts in Home Management: Decision Making, Dorothy Z. Price; Innovations in Teaching: Ergonomics, Fern E. Hunt; Relevant Concepts of Home Management: Innovations in Teaching, Kay P. Edwards; Standards in a Managerial Context, Florence S. Walker; Organizing:…

  11. High-speed Oil Engines for Vehicles. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausfelder, Ludwig

    1927-01-01

    Further progress toward the satisfactory solution of the difficult problem of the distribution and atomization of the injected fuel was made by extensive experimentation with various fuel valves, nozzles, and atomizing devices. Valuable information was also obtained through numerous experimental researches on the combustion of oils and the manner of introducing the combustion air into the cylinder, as well as on the physical processes of atomization, the determination of the size of drops, etc. These researches led to the conclusion that it is possible, even without producing great turbulence in the combustion chamber and at moderate pump pressure, if the degree of atomization and the penetrative power of the fuel jet are adapted to the shape of the combustion chamber and to the dimensions of the cylinder.

  12. Wind farm production cost: Optimum turbine size and farm capacity in the actual market

    SciTech Connect

    Laali, A.R.; Meyer, J.L.; Bellot, C.; Louche, A.

    1996-12-31

    Several studies are undertaken in R&D Division of EDF in collaboration with ERASME association in order to have a good knowledge of the wind energy production costs. These studies are performed in the framework of a wind energy monitoring project and concern the influence of a few parameters like wind farm capacity, turbine size and wind speed on production costs, through an analysis of the actual market trend. Some 50 manufacturers and 140 different kind of wind turbines are considered for this study. The minimum production cost is situated at 800/900 kW wind turbine rated power. This point will probably move to more important powers in the future. This study is valid only for average conditions and some special parameters like particular climate conditions or lack of infrastructure for a special site the could modify the results shown on the curves. The variety of wind turbines (rated power as a function of rotor diameter, height and specific rated power) in the actual market is analyzed. A brief analysis of the market trend is also performed. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 2 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 2 compares various catagories of flight plans and flight tracking data produced by a simulation system developed for the Federal Aviation Administrations by SRI International. (Flight tracking data simulate actual flight tracks of all aircraft operating at a given time and provide for rerouting of flights as necessary to resolve traffic conflicts.) The comparisons of flight plans on the forecast to flight plans on the verifying analysis confirm Task 1 findings that wind speeds are generally underestimated. Comparisons involving flight tracking data indicate that actual fuel burn is always higher than planned, in either direction, and even when the same weather data set is used. Since the flight tracking model output results in more diversions than is known to be the case, it was concluded that there is an error in the flight tracking algorithm.

  14. The Diesel as a Vehicle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Kurt

    1928-01-01

    The thorough investigation of a Dorner four-cylinder, four-stroke-cycle Diesel engine with mechanical injection led me to investigate more thoroughly the operation of the Diesel as a vehicle engine. Aside from the obvious need of reliability of functioning, a high rotative speed, light weight and economy in heat consumption per horsepower are also indispensable requirements.

  15. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Reader, G.T.; Hooper

    1983-01-01

    The Stirling engine was invented by a Scottish clergyman in 1816, but fell into disuse with the coming of the diesel engine. Advances in materials science and the energy crisis have made a hot air engine economically attractive. Explanations are full and understandable. Includes coverage of the underlying thermodynamics and an interesting historical section. Topics include: Introduction to Stirling engine technology, Theoretical concepts--practical realities, Analysis, simulation and design, Practical aspects, Some alternative energy sources, Present research and development, Stirling engine literature.

  16. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  17. REDUCTION OF EMISSIONS FROM A HIGH SPEED FERRY

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson,G.; Gautam, M; Clark, N; Lyons, D; Carder, D; Riddle, W; Barnett, R; Rapp, B; George, S

    2003-08-24

    Emissions from marine vessels are being scrutinized as a major contributor to the total particulate matter (TPM), oxides of sulfur (SOx) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) environmental loading. Fuel sulfur control is the key to SOx reduction. Significant reductions in the emissions from on-road vehicles have been achieved in the last decade and the emissions from these vehicles will be reduced by another order of magnitude in the next five years: these improvements have served to emphasize the need to reduce emissions from other mobile sources, including off road equipment, locomotives, and marine vessels. Diesel-powered vessels of interest include ocean going vessels with low- and medium-speed engines, as well as ferries with high speed engines, as discussed below. A recent study examined the use of intake water injection (WIS) and ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) to reduce the emissions from a high-speed passenger ferry in southern California. One of the four Detroit Diesel 12V92 two-stroke high speed engines that power the Waverider (operated by SCX, inc.) was instrumented to collect intake airflow, fuel flow, shaft torque, and shaft speed. Engine speed and shaft torque were uniquely linked for given vessel draft and prevailing wind and sea conditions. A raw exhaust gas sampling system was utilized to measure the concentration of NOx, carbon dioxide (CO2), and oxygen (O2) and a mini dilution tunnel sampling a slipstream from the raw exhaust was used to collect TPM on 70 mm filters. The emissions data were processed to yield brake-specific mass results. The system that was employed allowed for redundant data to be collected for quality assurance and quality control. To acquire the data, the Waverider was operated at five different steady state speeds. Three modes were in the open sea off Oceanside, CA, and idle and harbor modes were also used. Data have showed that the use of ULSD along with water injection (WIS) could significantly reduce the emissions of NOx and PM

  18. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 3 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 3 compares flight plans developed on the Suitland forecast with actual data observed by the aircraft (and averaged over 10 degree segments). The results show that the average difference between the forecast and observed wind speed is 9 kts. without considering direction, and the average difference in the component of the forecast wind parallel to the direction of the observed wind is 13 kts. - both indicating that the Suitland forecast underestimates the wind speeds. The Root Mean Square (RMS) vector error is 30.1 kts. The average absolute difference in direction between the forecast and observed wind is 26 degrees and the temperature difference is 3 degree Centigrade. These results indicate that the forecast model as well as the verifying analysis used to develop comparison flight plans in Tasks 1 and 2 is a limiting factor and that the average potential fuel savings or penalty are up to 3.6 percent depending on the direction of flight.

  19. Annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan observed by ASCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Y.; Shimada, S.; Ohsawa, T.; Kozai, K.; Kogaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface wind speeds and these statistics can be applied for many marine industrial activities. For example, the averaged wind speed is crucial information for a site selection of an offshore wind farm. It has widely been recognized that a total amount of the offshore wind generation is strongly depended on the annual average wind speeds. A advanced scatterometer (ASCAT), which is a kind of scatterometer aboard METOP-A and B, has observed sea surface wind speeds at the height of 10 m above the sea surface approximately twice a day using active microwaves. The annual average wind speed can be calculated from the observed wind speed. For an actual use of the annual average wind speed, generalities and representativeness of the wind speed must be clarified. To investigate annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan (120°E to 165°E, 19°N to 49°N), the annual average wind speeds and these standard deviations are calculated from 5 years of ASCAT observations from 2010 through 2014. It is found that there are some sea areas where standard deviations are relatively higher than their surroundings. Annual average wind speed maps indicate that the high standard deviation is caused by strong winds from Eurasia in the winter of 2011 in part of North Pacific Ocean and Sea of Okhotsk. Additionally standard deviations for only winter are also higher than for summer in those sea areas. Therefore the strong wind speed in the winter of a particular year can easily affect to the annual average wind speed. Meanwhile off the coast of Niigata and Hokkaido, there are also higher standard deviation areas than their surroundings. Differences between monthly maximum wind speeds for the winter and minimum wind speeds for the summer in these areas are larger and the large differences seem to be a cause of the high standard deviations.

  20. High speed commercial transport fuels considerations and research needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. M.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    NASA is currently evaluating the potential of incorporating High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft in the commercial fleet in the beginning of the 21st century. NASA sponsored HSCT enabling studies currently underway with airframers and engine manufacturers, are addressing a broad range of technical, environmental, economic, and related issues. Supersonic cruise speeds for these aircraft were originally focused in the Mach 2 to 5 range. At these flight speeds, both jet fuels and liquid methane were considered potential fuel candidates. For the year 2000 to 2010, cruise Mach numbers of 2 to 3+ are projected for aircraft fuel with thermally stable liquid jet fuels. For 2015 and beyond, liquid methane fueled aircraft cruising at Mach numbers of 4+ may be viable candidates. Operation at supersonic speeds will be much more severe than those encountered at subsonic flight. One of the most critical problems is the potential deterioration of the fuel due to the high temperature environment. HSCT fuels will not only be required to provide the energy necessary for flight, but will also be subject to aerodynamic heating and, will be required to serve as the primary heat sink for cooling the engine and airframe. To define fuel problems for high speed flight, a fuels workshop was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center. The purpose of the workshop was to gather experts on aviation fuels, airframe fuel systems, airport infrastructure, and combustion systems to discuss high speed fuel alternatives, fuel supply scenarios, increased thermal stability approaches and measurements, safety considerations, and to provide directional guidance for future R and D efforts. Subsequent follow-up studies defined airport infrastructure impacts of high speed fuel candidates. The results of these activities are summarized. In addition, an initial case study using modified in-house refinery simulation model Gordian code (1) is briefly discussed. This code can be used to simulate different

  1. The history and evolution of optically accessible research engines and their impact on our understanding of engine combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-01

    The development and application of optically accessible engines to further our understanding of in-cylinder combustion processes is reviewed, spanning early efforts in simplified engines to the more recent development of high-pressure, high-speed engines that retain the geometric complexities of modern production engines. Limitations of these engines with respect to the reproduction of realistic metal test engine characteristics and performance are identified, as well as methods that have been used to overcome these limitations. Finally, the role of the work performed in these engines on clarifying the fundamental physical processes governing the combustion process and on laying the foundation for predictive engine simulation is summarized.

  2. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  3. Development of Air Speed Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1920-01-01

    Report describes the development of a suitable speed nozzle for the first few thousand airplanes made by the United States during the recent war in Europe, and to furnish a basis for more mature instruments in the future. Requirements for the project were to provide a suitable pressure collector for aircraft speed meters and to develop a speed nozzle which would be waterproof, powerful, unaffected by slight pitch and yaw, rugged and easy to manufacture, and uniform in structure and reading, so as not to require individual calibration.

  4. High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Tests were conducted on several types of porous parachutes, a paraglider, and a simulated retrorocket. Mach numbers ranged from 1.8-3.0, porosity from 20-80 percent, and camera speeds from 1680-3000 feet per second (fps) in trials with porous parachutes. Trials of reefed parachutes were conducted at Mach number 2.0 and reefing of 12-33 percent at camera speeds of 600 fps. A flexible parachute with an inflatable ring in the periphery of the canopy was tested at Reynolds number 750,000 per foot, Mach number 2.85, porosity of 28 percent, and camera speed of 36oo fps. A vortex-ring parachute was tested at Mach number 2.2 and camera speed of 3000 fps. The paraglider, with a sweepback of 45 degrees at an angle of attack of 45 degrees was tested at Mach number 2.65, drag coefficient of 0.200, and lift coefficient of 0.278 at a camera speed of 600 fps. A cold air jet exhausting upstream from the center of a bluff body was used to simulate a retrorocket. The free-stream Mach number was 2.0, free-stream dynamic pressure was 620 lb/sq ft, jet-exit static pressure ratio was 10.9, and camera speed was 600 fps.

  5. Valve operating mechanism for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, K.; Nagahiro, K.; Ajiki, Y.; Katoh, M.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes a valve operating mechanism for operating valves of a particular cylinder of an internal combustion engine, comprising: a camshaft rotatable in synchronism with rotation of the internal combustion engine and having at least one cam; cam followers, one of which slidably engages with the cam for selectively operating the valves according to a cam profile of the cam; and means for selectively interconnecting and disconnecting the cam followers to operate the valves differently in different speed ranges of the internal combustion engine, the speed ranges including a range in which all of the valves remain inoperative.

  6. Energy Implications of Retrofitting Retail Sector Rooftop Units with Stepped-Speed and Variable-Speed Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, D.; Romero, R.; Herrmann, L.; Benne, K.

    2012-04-01

    Commercial retailers understand that retrofitting constant-speed RTU fan motors with stepped- or variable-speed alternatives could save significant energy in most U.S. climate zones. However, they lack supporting data, both real-world and simulation based, on the cost effectiveness and climate zone-specific energy savings associated with this measure. Thus, building managers and engineers have been unable to present a compelling business case for fan motor upgrades to upper management. This study uses whole-building energy simulation to estimate the energy impact of this type of measure so retailers can determine its economic feasibility.

  7. Study of T53 engine vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Vibration characteristics for overhauled T53 engines, including rejection rate, principal sources of vibration, and normal procedures taken by the overhaul center to reduce engine vibration are summarized. Analytical and experimental data were compared to determine the engine's dynamic response to unbalance forces with results showing that the engine operates through bending critical speeds. Present rigid rotor balancing techniques are incapable of compensating for the flexible rotor unbalance. A comparison of typical test cell and aircraft vibration levels disclosed significant differences in the engine's dynamic response. A probable spline shift phenomenon was uncovered and investigated. Action items to control costs and reduce vibration levels were identified from analytical and experimental studies.

  8. Kuwaiti Engineers' Perspectives of the Engineering Senior Design (Capstone) Course as Related to Their Professional Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlSagheer, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    This study looks into transfer of learning and its application in the actual employment of engineering students after graduation. At Kuwait University, a capstone course is being offered that aims to ensure that students amalgamate all kinds of engineering skills to apply to their work. Within a basic interpretive, qualitative study-design…

  9. Feasibility study for convertible engine torque converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility study has shown that a dump/fill type torque converter has excellent potential for the convertible fan/shaft engine. The torque converter space requirement permits internal housing within the normal flow path of a turbofan engine at acceptable engine weight. The unit permits operating the engine in the turboshaft mode by decoupling the fan. To convert to turbofan mode, the torque converter overdrive capability bring the fan speed up to the power turbine speed to permit engagement of a mechanical lockup device when the shaft speed are synchronized. The conversion to turbofan mode can be made without drop of power turbine speed in less than 10 sec. Total thrust delivered to the aircraft by the proprotor, fan, and engine during tansient can be controlled to prevent loss of air speed or altitude. Heat rejection to the oil is low, and additional oil cooling capacity is not required. The turbofan engine aerodynamic design is basically uncompromised by convertibility and allows proper fan design for quiet and efficient cruise operation. Although the results of the feasibility study are exceedingly encouraging, it must be noted that they are based on extrapolation of limited existing data on torque converters. A component test program with three trial torque converter designs and concurrent computer modeling for fluid flow, stress, and dynamics, updated with test results from each unit, is recommended.

  10. Air-Breathing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  11. Experience with low cost jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A summary is given of the results of a NASA program for reducing the cost of turbojet and turbofan engines. The design, construction, and testing of a simple turbojet, designed for use in missiles, is described. Low cost axial stage fabrication, the design of a fan jet engine suitable for propulsion of light aircraft, and application of such engines to provide higher flight speeds, are discussed.

  12. 14 CFR 33.96 - Engine tests in auxiliary power unit (APU) mode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... operating in the APU mode under the maximum conditions of engine speed, torque, temperature, air bleed, and.../deceleration rate, speed, torque, and temperature as specified by the applicant. The propeller must be...

  13. Estimating actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation using standard meteorological data: a pragmatic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, T. A.; Peel, M. C.; Lowe, L.; Srikanthan, R.; McVicar, T. R.

    2012-10-01

    This guide to estimating daily and monthly actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation covers topics that are of interest to researchers, consulting hydrologists and practicing engineers. Topics include estimating actual evaporation from deep lakes and from farm dams and for catchment water balance studies, estimating potential evaporation as input to rainfall-runoff models, and reference crop evapotranspiration for small irrigation areas, and for irrigation within large irrigation districts. Inspiration for this guide arose in response to the authors' experiences in reviewing research papers and consulting reports where estimation of the actual evaporation component in catchment and water balance studies was often inadequately handled. Practical guides using consistent terminology that cover both theory and practice are not readily available. Here we provide such a guide, which is divided into three parts. The first part provides background theory and an outline of conceptual models of potential evaporation of Penman, Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor, and discussions of reference crop evaporation and then Class-A pan evaporation. The last two sub-sections in this first part include techniques to estimate actual evaporation from (i) open-surface water and (ii) landscapes and catchments (Morton and the advection-aridity models). The second part addresses topics confronting a practicing hydrologist, e.g. estimating actual evaporation for deep lakes, shallow lakes and farm dams, lakes covered with vegetation, catchments, irrigation areas and bare soil. The third part addresses six related issues (i) hard-wired evaporation estimates, (ii) evaporation estimates without wind data, (iii) at-site meteorological data, (iv) dealing with evaporation in a climate change environment, (v) 24-h versus day-light hour estimation of meteorological variables, and (vi) uncertainty in evaporation estimates. This paper is supported by supplementary material that includes

  14. Estimating actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation using standard meteorological data: a pragmatic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, T. A.; Peel, M. C.; Lowe, L.; Srikanthan, R.; McVicar, T. R.

    2013-04-01

    This guide to estimating daily and monthly actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation covers topics that are of interest to researchers, consulting hydrologists and practicing engineers. Topics include estimating actual evaporation from deep lakes and from farm dams and for catchment water balance studies, estimating potential evaporation as input to rainfall-runoff models, and reference crop evapotranspiration for small irrigation areas, and for irrigation within large irrigation districts. Inspiration for this guide arose in response to the authors' experiences in reviewing research papers and consulting reports where estimation of the actual evaporation component in catchment and water balance studies was often inadequately handled. Practical guides using consistent terminology that cover both theory and practice are not readily available. Here we provide such a guide, which is divided into three parts. The first part provides background theory and an outline of the conceptual models of potential evaporation of Penman, Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor, as well as discussions of reference crop evapotranspiration and Class-A pan evaporation. The last two sub-sections in this first part include techniques to estimate actual evaporation from (i) open-surface water and (ii) landscapes and catchments (Morton and the advection-aridity models). The second part addresses topics confronting a practicing hydrologist, e.g. estimating actual evaporation for deep lakes, shallow lakes and farm dams, lakes covered with vegetation, catchments, irrigation areas and bare soil. The third part addresses six related issues: (i) automatic (hard wired) calculation of evaporation estimates in commercial weather stations, (ii) evaporation estimates without wind data, (iii) at-site meteorological data, (iv) dealing with evaporation in a climate change environment, (v) 24 h versus day-light hour estimation of meteorological variables, and (vi) uncertainty in evaporation

  15. Experimental performance of the regenerator for the Chrysler upgraded automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J. M.; Nussle, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Automobile gas turbine engine regenerator performance was studied in a regenerator test facility that provided a satisfactory simulation of the actual engine operating environment but with independent control of airflow and gas flow. Velocity and temperature distributions were measured immediately downstream of both the core high-pressure-side outlet and the core low-pressure-side outlet. For the original engine housing, the regenerator temperature effectiveness was 1 to 2 percent higher than the design value, and the heat transfer effectiveness was 2 to 4 percent lower than the design value over the range of test conditions simulating 50 to 100 percent of gas generator speed. Recalculating the design values to account for seal leakage decreased the design heat transfer effectiveness to values consistent with those measured herein. A baffle installed in the engine housing high-pressure-side inlet provided more uniform velocities out of the regenerator but did not improve the effectiveness. A housing designed to provide more uniform axial flow to the regenerator was also tested. Although temperature uniformity was improved, the effectiveness values were not improved. Neither did 50-percent flow blockage (90 degree segment) applied to the high-pressure-side inlet change the effectiveness significantly.

  16. Initial comparison of single cylinder Stirling engine computer model predictions with test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R. C., Jr.; Thieme, L. G.; Miao, D.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA developed digital computer code for a Stirling engine, modelling the performance of a single cylinder rhombic drive ground performance unit (GPU), is presented and its predictions are compared to test results. The GPU engine incorporates eight regenerator/cooler units and the engine working space is modelled by thirteen control volumes. The model calculates indicated power and efficiency for a given engine speed, mean pressure, heater and expansion space metal temperatures and cooler water inlet temperature and flow rate. Comparison of predicted and observed powers implies that the reference pressure drop calculations underestimate actual pressure drop, possibly due to oil contamination in the regenerator/cooler units, methane contamination in the working gas or the underestimation of mechanical loss. For a working gas of hydrogen, the predicted values of brake power are from 0 to 6% higher than experimental values, and brake efficiency is 6 to 16% higher, while for helium the predicted brake power and efficiency are 2 to 15% higher than the experimental.

  17. T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housing refurbishment-plasma spray project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissler, George W.; Yuhas, John S.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of reclaiming T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housings with an 88 wt percent aluminum to 12 wt percent silicon alloy applied by a plasma spray process. Tensile strength testing was conducted on as-sprayed and thermally cycled test specimens which were plasma sprayed with 0.020 to 0.100 in. coating thicknesses. Satisfactory tensile strength values were observed in the as-sprayed tensile specimens. There was essentially no decrease in tensile strength after thermally cycling the tensile specimens. Furthermore, compressor housings were plasma sprayed and thermally cycled in a 150-hr engine test and a 200-hr actual flight test during which the turbine engine was operated at a variety of loads, speeds and torques. The plasma sprayed coating system showed no evidence of degradation or delamination from the compressor housings. As a result of these tests, a procedure was designed and developed for the application of an aluminum-silicon alloy in order to reclaim T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housings.

  18. A Comparative Propulsion System Analysis for the High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Haller, William J.; Senick, Paul F.; Jones, Scott M.; Seidel, Jonathan A.

    2005-01-01

    Six of the candidate propulsion systems for the High-Speed Civil Transport are the turbojet, turbine bypass engine, mixed flow turbofan, variable cycle engine, Flade engine, and the inverting flow valve engine. A comparison of these propulsion systems by NASA's Glenn Research Center, paralleling studies within the aircraft industry, is presented. This report describes the Glenn Aeropropulsion Analysis Office's contribution to the High-Speed Research Program's 1993 and 1994 propulsion system selections. A parametric investigation of each propulsion cycle's primary design variables is analytically performed. Performance, weight, and geometric data are calculated for each engine. The resulting engines are then evaluated on two airframer-derived supersonic commercial aircraft for a 5000 nautical mile, Mach 2.4 cruise design mission. The effects of takeoff noise, cruise emissions, and cycle design rules are examined.

  19. Optical engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T T

    1998-01-01

    The Optical Engineering thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in the summer of 1996 with the following main objectives: (1) to foster and stimulate leading edge optical engineering research and efforts key to carrying out LLNL's mission and enabling major new programs; (2) to bring together LLNL's broad spectrum of high level optical engineering expertise to support its programs. Optical engineering has become a pervasive and key discipline, with applications across an extremely wide range of technologies, spanning the initial conception through the engineering refinements to enhance revolutionary application. It overlaps other technologies and LLNL engineering thrust areas.

  20. Speed of Sound and Ultrasound Absorption in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Dzida, Marzena; Zorębski, Edward; Zorębski, Michał; Żarska, Monika; Geppert-Rybczyńska, Monika; Chorążewski, Mirosław; Jacquemin, Johan; Cibulka, Ivan

    2017-02-08

    A complete review of the literature data on the speed of sound and ultrasound absorption in pure ionic liquids (ILs) is presented. Apart of the analysis of data published to date, the significance of the speed of sound in ILs is regarded. An analysis of experimental methods described in the literature to determine the speed of sound in ILs as a function of temperature and pressure is reported, and the relevance of ultrasound absorption in acoustic investigations is discussed. Careful attention was paid to highlight possible artifacts, and side phenomena related to the absorption and relaxation present in such measurements. Then, an overview of existing data is depicted to describe the temperature and pressure dependences on the speed of sound in ILs, as well as the impact of impurities in ILs on this property. A relation between ions structure and speeds of sound is presented by highlighting existing correlation and evaluative methods described in the literature. Importantly, a critical analysis of speeds of sound in ILs vs those in classical molecular solvents is presented to compare these two classes of compounds. The last part presents the importance of acoustic investigations for chemical engineering design and possible industrial applications of ILs.