Science.gov

Sample records for actual engine testing

  1. J-2 Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Smokeless flame juts from the diffuser of a unique vacuum chamber in which the upper stage rocket engine, the hydrogen fueled J-2, was tested at a simulated space altitude in excess of 60,000 feet. The smoke you see is actually steam. In operation, vacuum is established by injecting steam into the chamber and is maintained by the thrust of the engine firing through the diffuser. The engine was tested in this environment for start, stop, coast, restart, and full-duration operations. The chamber was located at Rocketdyne's Propulsion Field Laboratory, in the Santa Susana Mountains, near Canoga Park, California. The J-2 engine was developed by Rocketdyne for the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. Liquid rocket engine test facility engineering challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Hartwig; Ziegenhagen, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Liquid rocket engines for launch vehicles and space crafts as well as their subsystems need to be verified and qualified during hot-runs. A high test cadence combined with a flexible test team helps to reduce the cost for test verification during development/qualification as well as during acceptance testing for production. Test facility intelligence allows to test subsystems in the same manner as during complete engine system tests and will therefore reduce development time and cost. This paper gives an overview of the maturing of test engineering know how for rocket engine test stands as well as high altitude test stands for small propulsion thrusters at EADS-ST in Ottobrunn and Lampoldshausen and is split into two parts: Part 1 gives a historical overview of the EADS-ST test stands at Ottobrunn and Lampoldshausen since the beginning of Rocket propulsion activities in the 1960s. Part 2 gives an overview of the actual test capabilities and the test engineering know-how for test stand construction/adaptation and their use during running programs. Examples of actual realised facility concepts are given to demonstrate cost saving potential for test programs in both cases for development/qualification issues as well as for production purposes.

  3. Virtual Turbine Engine Test Bench Using MGET Test Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Seonghee; Kong, Changduk; Ki, Jayoung

    2015-05-01

    Test device using virtual engine simulator can help reduce the number of engine tests through tests similar to the actual engine tests and repeat the test under the same condition, and thus reduce the engine maintenance and operating costs [1]. Also, as it is possible to easily implement extreme conditions in which it is hard to conduct actual tests, it can prevent engine damages that may happen during the actual engine test under such conditions. In this study, an upgraded MGET test device was developed that can conduct both real and virtual engine test by applying real-time engine model to the existing MGET test device that was developed and has been sold by the Company. This newly developed multi-purpose MGET test device is expected to be used for various educational and research purposes.

  4. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 October 2016 – 26 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Liquid Rocket Engine Testing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Liquid Rocket Engine Testing SFTE Symposium 21 October 2016 Jake Robertson, Capt USAF AFRL...Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance 16493 Liquid Rocket Engine TestingEngines and their components are extensively static- tested in development • This

  5. Flight Test Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Although the scope of flight test engineering efforts may vary among organizations, all point to a common theme: flight test engineering is an interdisciplinary effort to test an asset in its operational flight environment. Upfront planning where design, implementation, and test efforts are clearly aligned with the flight test objective are keys to success. This chapter provides a top level perspective of flight test engineering for the non-expert. Additional research and reading on the topic is encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of specific considerations involved in each phase of flight test engineering.

  6. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING, D.L.

    2007-04-13

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 2224 Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cesium-137 sulfate and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  7. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING, D.L.

    2006-10-18

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 222-S Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cs-137 sulfate, and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  8. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  9. Actualization of Competencies of Graduates-Engineers in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivashova, Valentina A.; Dub, Galina V.; Kenina, Diana S.; Kosintseva, Yulia F.; Migatcheva, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of the empirical research relevant to the labor market competencies of graduates with the major in engineering. Subjective preferences of employers shape requirements for the personal and professional characteristics of a graduate. In authors' opinion, the professional competences of engineers stated in educational…

  10. What do tests of formal reasoning actually measure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    Tests of formal operational reasoning derived from Piagetian theory have been found to be effective predictors of academic achievement. Yet Piaget's theory regarding the underlying nature of formal operations and their employment in specific contexts has run into considerable empirical difficulty. The primary purpose of this study was to present the core of an alternative theory of the nature of advanced scientific reasoning. That theory, referred to as the multiple-hypothesis theory, argues that tests of formal operational reasoning actually measure the extent to which persons have acquired the ability to initiate reasoning with more than one specific antecedent condition, or if they are unable to imagine more than one antecedent condition, they are aware that more than one is possible; therefore conclusions that are drawn are tempered by this possibility. As a test of this multiple-hypothesis theory of advanced reasoning and the contrasting Piagetian theory of formal operations, a sample of 922 college students were first classified as concrete operational, transitional, or formal operational, based upon responses to standard Piagetian measures of formal operational reasoning. They were then administered seven logic tasks. Actual response patterns to the tasks were analyzed and found to be similar to predicted response patterns derived from the multiple-hypothesis theory and were different from those predicted by Piagetian theory. Therefore, support was obtained for the multiple-hypothesis theory. The terms intuitive and reflective were suggested to replace the terms concrete operational and formal operational to refer to persons at varying levels of intellectual development.

  11. Space Electronic Test Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Rodney D.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch at NASA Glenn Research center has the important duty of controlling electronic test engineering services. These services include test planning and early assessment of Space projects, management and/or technical support required to safely and effectively prepare the article and facility for testing, operation of test facilities, and validation/delivery of data to customer. The Space Electronic Test Engineering Branch is assigned electronic test engineering responsibility for the GRC Space Simulation, Microgravity, Cryogenic, and Combustion Test Facilities. While working with the Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch I am working on several different assignments. My primary assignment deals with an electrical hardware unit known as Sunny Boy. Sunny Boy is a DC load Bank that is designed for solar arrays in which it is used to convert DC power form the solar arrays into AC power at 60 hertz to pump back into the electricity grid. However, there are some researchers who decided that they would like to use the Sunny Boy unit in a space simulation as a DC load bank for a space shuttle or even the International Space Station hardware. In order to do so I must create a communication link between a computer and the Sunny Boy unit so that I can preset a few of the limits (such power, set & constant voltage levels) that Sunny Boy will need to operate using the applied DC load. Apart from this assignment I am also working on a hi-tech circuit that I need to have built at a researcher s request. This is a high voltage analog to digital circuit that will be used to record data from space ion propulsion rocket booster tests. The problem that makes building this circuit so difficult is that it contains high voltage we must find a way to lower the voltage signal before the data is transferred into the computer to be read. The solution to this problem was to transport the signal using infrared light which will lower

  12. Diesel Engine Idling Test

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordon Fielding

    2006-02-01

    In support of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology Program Office goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of millions of gallons of diesel fuel consumed during heavy vehicle idling periods, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted tests to characterize diesel engine wear rates caused by extended periods of idling. INL idled two fleet buses equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 50 engines, each for 1,000 hours. Engine wear metals were characterized from weekly oil analysis samples and destructive filter analyses. Full-flow and the bypass filter cartridges were removed at four stages of the testing and sent to an oil analysis laboratory for destructive analysis to ascertain the metals captured in the filters and to establish wear rate trends. Weekly samples were sent to two independent oil analysis laboratories. Concurrent with the filter analysis, a comprehensive array of other laboratory tests ascertained the condition of the oil, wear particle types, and ferrous particles. Extensive ferrogram testing physically showed the concentration of iron particles and associated debris in the oil. The tests results did not show the dramatic results anticipated but did show wear trends. New West Technologies, LLC, a DOE support company, supplied technical support and data analysis throughout the idle test.

  13. Jet engine testing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Zweifel, T.L.

    1987-03-24

    An apparatus is described for testing jet engines mounted on an aircraft, the jet engines of the type having a high speed rotor and a low speed rotor, comprising: representative signal means for providing first representative signals representative of rotation rates of the low speed rotor in the jet engines and second representative signals representative of rotation rates of the high speed rotor in the jet engines; equivalent signal means coupled to receive the second representative signals for deriving equivalent signals representative of low speed rotor rotation rates of normally operating jet engines having high speed rotor rotation rates represented by the second representative signals; first difference signal means coupled to receive the first representative signals and the equivalent signals for providing first difference signals representative of differences between the first representative signals and the equivalent signals; means for providing threshold signals; first detector means coupled to the threshold signal means and the first difference signal means for comparing the threshold signals and the first difference signals to provide first detected signals representative of values of the first difference signals relative to the threshold signals; and engine failure indicator means coupled to receive the detected signals for determination of engine failures.

  14. Engine Test and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chown Chou

    1999-01-01

    Although the importance of aerosols and their precursors are now well recognized, the characterization of current subsonic engines for these emissions is far from complete. Furthermore, since the relationship of engine operating parameters to aerosol emissions is not known, extrapolation to untested and unbuilt engines necessarily remains highly uncertain. 1997 NASA LaRC engine test, as well as the parallel 1997 NASA LaRC flight measurement, attempts to address both issues by expanding measurements of aerosols and aerosol precursors with fuels containing different levels of fuel sulfur content. The specific objective of the 1997 engine test is to obtain a database of sulfur oxides emissions as well as the non-volatile particulate emission properties as a function of fuel sulfur and engine operating conditions. Four diagnostic systems, extractive and non-intrusive (optical), will be assembled for the gaseous and particulate emissions characterization measurements study. NASA is responsible for the extractive gaseous emissions measurement system which contains an array of analyzers dedicated to examining the concentrations of specific gases (NO, NO(x), CO, CO2, O2, THC, SO2) and the smoke number. University of Missouri-Rolla uses the Mobile Aerosol Sampling System to measure aerosol/particulate total concentration, size distribution, volatility and hydration property. Air Force Research Laboratory uses the Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer to measure SO2, SO3/H2SO4, and HN03 Aerodyne Research, Inc. uses Infrared Tunable Diode Laser system to measure SO2, SO3, NO, H2O, and CO2.

  15. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  16. Ion Engine Test Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image of a xenon ion engine, photographed through a port of the vacuum chamber where it was being tested at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, shows the faint blue glow of charged atoms being emitted from the engine. The ion propulsion engine is the first non-chemical propulsion to be used as the primary means of propelling a spacecraft. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Ion propulsion was first proposed in the 1950s and NASA performed experiments on this highly efficient propulsion system in the 1960s, but it was not used aboard an American spacecraft until the 1990s. Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA. The almost imperceptible thrust from the ion propulsion system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs.

  17. Using lysimeters to test the Penman Monteith actual evapotranspiration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Asher, Jiftah; Volinski, Roman; Zilberman, Arkadi; Bar Yosef, Beni; Silber, Avner

    2015-04-01

    Differences in actual transpiration (ETa) of banana plants were quantified in a lysimeter experiment. ETA was computed using instantaneous data from two weighing lysimeters and compared to PM (Penman-Monteith) model for ETa. Two critical problems were faced in this test. A) Estimating canopy and aerodynamic resistances ("rc" and "ra" respectively ) and B) converting the lysimeter changes in water volume ( LYv cm3 ) to ETa length units ( cm ). The two unknowns " rc" and "ra" were obtained from continuous measurements of the differences between canopy and air temperature (Tc - Ta). This difference was established by means of the infrared thermometry which was followed by numerical and analytical calculation of ETa using the modification suggested by R. Jackson to the PM model. The conversion of lysimeter volumetric units (LYv) to ETa length units was derived from the slope of cumulative LYv/ETa. This relationship was significantly linear (r2=0.97and 0.98.). Its slope was interpreted as "evaporating leaf area" which accounted for 1.8E4 cm2 in lysimeter 1 and 2.3E4 cm2.in lysimeter 2 . The comparison between LYv and PM model was acceptable even under very low ETa. The average of two lysimeters was 1.1mm/day (1.4 mm/day , LYv 1 and 0.8 LYv 2) while ETa calculated on the basis of PM model was 1.2 mm/day. It was concluded that although lysimeters are most accurate systems to measure ETa one of its disadvantages ( beside the high cost) is the volumetric output that in many cases should be supported by a one dimensional energy balance system. The PM model was found to be a reliable complementary tool to convert lysimeters volumetric output into conventional length units of ETa.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Thermoeconomic Evaluation Criteria for an Actual Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Gülcan; Açıkkalp, Emin; Savaş, Ahmet Fevzi; Yamık, Hasan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an actual heat engine is investigated by using different thermoeconomic evaluation criteria in the literature. A criteria that has not been investigated in detail is considered and it is called as ecologico-economical criteria (F_{EC}). It is the difference of power cost and exergy destruction rate cost of the system. All four criteria are applied to an irreversible Carnot heat engine, results are presented numerically and some suggestions are made.

  19. AJ26 Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center conducts the second in a series of verification tests on an Aerojet AJ26 engine that will power the first stage of the Orbital Sciences Corporatio...

  20. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: BIOLOGICAL TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Engineering Bulletin is intended to provide site managers with information on ecological assessment and biological toxicity testing, applicability of biological toxicity testing, planning effective biological toxicity assessments, descriptions of test methods, limitations, c...

  1. Solar-thermal engine testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Stephen; Salvail, Pat

    2002-01-01

    A solar-thermal engine serves as a high-temperature solar-radiation absorber, heat exchanger, and rocket nozzle, collecting concentrated solar radiation into an absorber cavity and transferring this energy to a propellant as heat. Propellant gas can be heated to temperatures approaching 4,500 °F and expanded in a rocket nozzle, creating low thrust with a high specific impulse (Isp). The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) solar-thermal engine is made of 100 percent chemically vapor deposited (CVD) rhenium. The engine ``module'' consists of an engine assembly, propellant feedline, engine support structure, thermal insulation, and instrumentation. Engine thermal performance tests consist of a series of high-temperature thermal cycles intended to characterize the propulsive performance of the engines and the thermal effectiveness of the engine support structure and insulation system. A silicone-carbide electrical resistance heater, placed inside the inner shell, substitutes for solar radiation and heats the engine. Although the preferred propellant is hydrogen, the propellant used in these tests is gaseous nitrogen. Because rhenium oxidizes at elevated temperatures, the tests are performed in a vacuum chamber. Test data will include transient and steady state temperatures on selected engine surfaces, propellant pressures and flow rates, and engine thrust levels. The engine propellant-feed system is designed to supply GN2 to the engine at a constant inlet pressure of 60 psia, producing a near-constant thrust of 1.0 lb. Gaseous hydrogen will be used in subsequent tests. The propellant flow rate decreases with increasing propellant temperature, while maintaining constant thrust, increasing engine Isp. In conjunction with analytical models of the heat exchanger, the temperature data will provide insight into the effectiveness of the insulation system, the structural support system, and the overall engine performance. These tests also provide experience on operational aspects

  2. EUV Engineering Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Replogle, W.C.; Klebanoff, L.E.; Wronosky, J.B.; Hale, L.C.; Chapman, H.N.; Taylor, J.S.; Folta, J.A.; Montcalm, C.; Hudyma, R.M.

    2000-02-14

    The Engineering Test Stand (ETS) is an EUV laboratory lithography tool. The purpose of the ETS is to demonstrate EUV full-field imaging and provide data required to support production-tool development. The ETS is configured to separate the imaging system and stages from the illumination system. Environmental conditions can be controlled independently in the two modules to maximize EUV throughput and environmental control. A source of 13.4 nm radiation is provided by a laser plasma source in which a YAG laser beam is focused onto a xenon-cluster target. A condenser system, comprised of multilayer-coated mirrors and grazing-incidence mirrors, collects the EUV radiation and directs it onto a-reflecting reticle. A four-mirror, ring-field optical system, having a numerical aperture of 0.1, projects a 4x-reduction image onto the wafer plane. This design corresponds to a resolution of 70nm at a k{sub 1} of 0.52. The ETS is designed to produce full-field images in step: and-scan mode using vacuum-compatible, one-dimension-long-travel magnetically levitated stages for both reticle and wafer. Reticle protection is incorporated into the ETS design. This paper provides a system overview of the ETS design and specifications.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTUAL WASTE TEST WITH TANK 5F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.; Crapse, K. P.; Fink, S. D.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2007-08-30

    The initial phase of bulk waste removal operations was recently completed in Tank 5F. Video inspection of the tank indicates several mounds of sludge still remain in the tank. Additionally, a mound of white solids was observed under Riser 5. In support of chemical cleaning and heel removal programs, samples of the sludge and the mound of white solids were obtained from the tank for characterization and testing. A core sample of the sludge and Super Snapper sample of the white solids were characterized. A supernate dip sample from Tank 7F was also characterized. A portion of the sludge was used in two tank cleaning tests using oxalic acid at 50 C and 75 C. The filtered oxalic acid from the tank cleaning tests was subsequently neutralized by addition to a simulated Tank 7F supernate. Solids and liquid samples from the tank cleaning test and neutralization test were characterized. A separate report documents the results of the gas generation from the tank cleaning test using oxalic acid and Tank 5F sludge. The characterization results for the Tank 5F sludge sample (FTF-05-06-55) appear quite good with respect to the tight precision of the sample replicates, good results for the glass standards, and minimal contamination found in the blanks and glass standards. The aqua regia and sodium peroxide fusion data also show good agreement between the two dissolution methods. Iron dominates the sludge composition with other major contributors being uranium, manganese, nickel, sodium, aluminum, and silicon. The low sodium value for the sludge reflects the absence of supernate present in the sample due to the core sampler employed for obtaining the sample. The XRD and CSEM results for the Super Snapper salt sample (i.e., white solids) from Tank 5F (FTF-05-07-1) indicate the material contains hydrated sodium carbonate and bicarbonate salts along with some aluminum hydroxide. These compounds likely precipitated from the supernate in the tank. A solubility test showed the material

  4. Systems Engineering, Quality and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2015-01-01

    AS9100 has little to say about how to apply a Quality Management System (QMS) to aerospace test programs. There is little in the quality engineering Body of Knowledge that applies to testing, unless it is nondestructive examination or some type of lab or bench testing. If one examines how the systems engineering processes are implemented throughout a test program; and how these processes can be mapped to AS9100, a number of areas for involvement of the quality professional are revealed.

  5. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  6. Manned engineering test satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Hiromi; Satou, Masao; Tomoeda, Hisao; Obara, Hiroaki; Oomura, Katsutoshi

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual design of manned engineering satellites is presented. The mission scenarios for developing manned engineering satellites involve: (1) selecting mission equipment to enable preferential development and validation of mandatory technologies among those for Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS); (2) selecting mission equipment to enable development and validation of independent domestic technologies as well as utilizing to the utmost the manned space technology acquired through the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM); and (3) installing the most effective mission on the basis of relationships with Extravehicular Activity (EVA), robot, and retrieval-type spacecraft technologies, and trends of overseas manned space technology. The results of reviews on the system and subsystems, such as attitude and orbit control, structure, thermal control, electric power, communication, and data processing subsystems are outlined. The results of reviews on the structure, weight, and reentry phase operation are presented.

  7. Solar-Thermal Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Stephen; Salvail, Pat; Haynes, Davy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A solar-thermal engine serves as a high-temperature solar-radiation absorber, heat exchanger, and rocket nozzle. collecting concentrated solar radiation into an absorber cavity and transferring this energy to a propellant as heat. Propellant gas can be heated to temperatures approaching 4,500 F and expanded in a rocket nozzle, creating low thrust with a high specific impulse (I(sub sp)). The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) solar-thermal engine is made of 100 percent chemical vapor deposited (CVD) rhenium. The engine 'module' consists of an engine assembly, propellant feedline, engine support structure, thermal insulation, and instrumentation. Engine thermal performance tests consist of a series of high-temperature thermal cycles intended to characterize the propulsive performance of the engines and the thermal effectiveness of the engine support structure and insulation system. A silicone-carbide electrical resistance heater, placed inside the inner shell, substitutes for solar radiation and heats the engine. Although the preferred propellant is hydrogen, the propellant used in these tests is gaseous nitrogen. Because rhenium oxidizes at elevated temperatures, the tests are performed in a vacuum chamber. Test data will include transient and steady state temperatures on selected engine surfaces, propellant pressures and flow rates, and engine thrust levels. The engine propellant-feed system is designed to Supply GN2 to the engine at a constant inlet pressure of 60 psia, producing a near-constant thrust of 1.0 lb. Gaseous hydrogen will be used in subsequent tests. The propellant flow rate decreases with increasing propellant temperature, while maintaining constant thrust, increasing engine I(sub sp). In conjunction with analytical models of the heat exchanger, the temperature data will provide insight into the effectiveness of the insulation system, the structural support system, and the overall engine performance. These tests also provide experience on operational

  8. Engine Certification and Compliance Testing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory (NVFEL) tests a portion of all heavy-duty diesel and small gasoline engines intended for sale in the United States to confirm compliance with EPA’s exhaust emissions standards.

  9. TF41 Engine Fan Disk Seeded Fault Crack Propagation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Uncontained engine failures, although rare in occurrence, can have a catastrophic effect on aircraft performance and safety. Engine disk cracks can eventually lead to these type of failures. A number of techniques to detect engine disk cracks have been developed in recent years. However, these technologies have only been validated by disk spin pit tests, not actual engine tests. Due to this, a project was established to perform seeded fault engine tests on a TF41 engine disk fan. A defect was machined in the first stage fan disk of a TF41 engine. The disk was run in a spin pit to initiate a crack. Once initiated, the disk was run in an actual engine test facility. The engine was cycled by a number of start and stops with the goal of propagating the crack to disk burst through low cycle fatigue. Various crack detection techniques were installed on the engine and run real-time during the test to validate their abilities to detect disk cracks. These techniques were based on methods such as change in mass imbalance using vibration or shaft displacement, change in blade position, acoustic emission, and torsional resonance. At the completion of 4474 test cycles, the crack in the TF41 disk was determined to have grown approximately 0.025 inches. This was far less the predicted crack growth based on a fracture mechanics analysis and finite element stress analysis.

  10. ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    De Boisblanc, D.R.; Thomas, M.E.; Jones, R.M.; Hanson, G.H.

    1958-10-21

    Heterogeneous reactors of the type which is both cooled and moderated by the same fluid, preferably water, and employs highly enriched fuel are reported. In this design, an inner pressure vessel is located within a main outer pressure vessel. The reactor core and its surrounding reflector are disposed in the inner pressure vessel which in turn is surrounded by a thermal shield, Coolant fluid enters the main pressure vessel, fiows downward into the inner vessel where it passes through the core containing tbe fissionable fuel assemblies and control rods, through the reflector, thence out through the bottom of the inner vessel and up past the thermal shield to the discharge port in the main vessel. The fuel assemblles are arranged in the core in the form of a cross having an opening extending therethrough to serve as a high fast flux test facility.

  11. Pulse Detonation Engine Test Bed Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A detonation is a supersonic combustion wave. A Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) repetitively creates a series of detonation waves to take advantage of rapid burning and high peak pressures to efficiently produce thrust. NASA Glenn Research Center's Combustion Branch has developed a PDE test bed that can reproduce the operating conditions that might be encountered in an actual engine. It allows the rapid and cost-efficient evaluation of the technical issues and technologies associated with these engines. The test bed is modular in design. It consists of various length sections of both 2- and 2.6- in. internal-diameter combustor tubes. These tubes can be bolted together to create a variety of combustor configurations. A series of bosses allow instrumentation to be inserted on the tubes. Dynamic pressure sensors and heat flux gauges have been used to characterize the performance of the test bed. The PDE test bed is designed to utilize an existing calorimeter (for heat load measurement) and windowed (for optical access) combustor sections. It uses hydrogen as the fuel, and oxygen and nitrogen are mixed to simulate air. An electronic controller is used to open the hydrogen and air valves (or a continuous flow of air is used) and to fire the spark at the appropriate times. Scheduled tests on the test bed include an evaluation of the pumping ability of the train of detonation waves for use in an ejector and an evaluation of the pollutants formed in a PDE combustor. Glenn's Combustion Branch uses the National Combustor Code (NCC) to perform numerical analyses of PDE's as well as to evaluate alternative detonative combustion devices. Pulse Detonation Engine testbed.

  12. Test bed ion engine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.; Deininger, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    A test bed ion (TBI) engine was developed to serve as a tool in exploring the limits of electrostatic ion thruster performance. A description of three key ion engine components, the decoupled extraction and amplified current (DE-AC) accelerator system, field enhanced refractory metal (FERM) hollow cathode and divergent line cusp (DLC) discharge chamber, whose designs and operating philosophies differ markedly from conventional thruster technology is given. Significant program achievements were: (1) high current density DE-AC accelerator system operation at low electric field stress with indicated feasibility of a 60 mA/sq cm argon ion beam; (2) reliable FERM cathode start up times of 1 to 2 secs. and demonstrated 35 ampere emission levels; (3) DLC discharge chamber plasma potentials negative of anode potential; and (4) identification of an efficient high plasma density engine operating mode. Using the performance projections of this program and reasonable estimates of other parameter values, a 1.0 Newton thrust ion engine is identified as a realizable technology goal. Calculations show that such an engine, comparable in beam area to a J series 30 cm thruster, could, operating on Xe or Hg, have thruster efficiencies as high as 0.76 and 0.78 respectively, with a 100 eV/ion discharge loss.

  13. 40 CFR 87.60 - Testing engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Testing engines. 87.60 Section 87.60... POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES Test Procedures § 87.60 Testing engines. (a) Use the equipment... reference in § 87.8), as applicable, to demonstrate whether engines meet the gaseous emission...

  14. 40 CFR 87.60 - Testing engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Testing engines. 87.60 Section 87.60... POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES Test Procedures § 87.60 Testing engines. (a) Use the equipment... reference in § 87.8), as applicable, to demonstrate whether engines meet the gaseous emission...

  15. Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-20

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

  16. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  17. Full-engine field test

    SciTech Connect

    Gianola, M.

    1988-10-01

    For purposes of both final verification and optimization of TG 20 and TG 50 combustion systems, test programs have been carried out directly on full engines operating in the field, as well as in the test bench. These programs were carried out in two separate phases: the first one directed to determine the behavior at load by means of experimental data acquisition, including temperature distribution on the combustor exit plane for different burner arrangements, and the second one directed to optimize the ignition process and the acceleration sequence. This paper, after a brief description of the instrumentation used for each test, reports the most significant results burning both fuel oil and natural gas. Moreover, some peculiar operational problems are mentioned, along with their diagnosis and the corrections applied to the combustion system to solve them.

  18. Testing two temporal upscaling schemes for the estimation of the time variability of the actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.

    2015-10-01

    Temporal availability of grapes actual evapotranspiration is an emerging issue since vineyards farms are more and more converted from rainfed to irrigated agricultural systems. The manuscript aims to verify the accuracy of the actual evapotranspiration retrieval coupling a single source energy balance approach and two different temporal upscaling schemes. The first scheme tests the temporal upscaling of the main input variables, namely the NDVI, albedo and LST; the second scheme tests the temporal upscaling of the energy balance output, the actual evapotranspiration. The temporal upscaling schemes were implemented on: i) airborne remote sensing data acquired monthly during a whole irrigation season over a Sicilian vineyard; ii) low resolution MODIS products released daily or weekly; iii) meteorological data acquired by standard gauge stations. Daily MODIS LST products (MOD11A1) were disaggregated using the DisTrad model, 8-days black and white sky albedo products (MCD43A) allowed modeling the total albedo, and 8-days NDVI products (MOD13Q1) were modeled using the Fisher approach. Results were validated both in time and space. The temporal validation was carried out using the actual evapotranspiration measured in situ using data collected by a flux tower through the eddy covariance technique. The spatial validation involved airborne images acquired at different times from June to September 2008. Results aim to test whether the upscaling of the energy balance input or output data performed better.

  19. PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-11-01

    Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

  20. Engineering test facility design definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercaw, R. W.; Seikel, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF) is the major focus of the Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Program to facilitate commercialization and to demonstrate the commercial operability of MHD/steam electric power. The ETF will be a fully integrated commercial prototype MHD power plant with a nominal output of 200 MW sub e. Performance of this plant is expected to meet or surpass existing utility standards for fuel, maintenance, and operating costs; plant availability; load following; safety; and durability. It is expected to meet all applicable environmental regulations. The current design concept conforming to the general definition, the basis for its selection, and the process which will be followed in further defining and updating the conceptual design.

  1. Testing of the Strutjet RBCC Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulman, Mel; Neill, Todd; Yam, Clement

    1999-01-01

    The testing of the Strutjet Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine is described in this presentation. Since 1996 Aerojet has conducted thousands of tests on its Strutjet RBCC Engine. The Strutjet is specifically designed as an RBCC engine. The tests included: (1) Inlet, (2) Rocket Checkouts, (3) Direct Connect Mach 6 and 8, and (4) Freejet M = 0, 2.4, 4.1. The modes tested include: (1) Air Augmented Rocket (AAR), (2) Ramjet (3) Scramjet (4) Scram/Rocket (5) Ascent/Rocket. The Strutjet RBCC engine has been tested across the complete airbreathing trajectory. The presentation shows the results of the tests, through diagrams, charts and pictures.

  2. Ignition-Spark Detector for Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhr, G.

    1985-01-01

    Optical fiber views sparks directly. In fuel or oxidizer tube, optical fiber collects light from ignition spark. Fibers also used to collect light from combustion reactions for spectrographic analysis. Useful in engine testing, detector helps determine reason for engine failure.

  3. All Systems Go for Engine Icing Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    All the pieces came together to recently produce a successful first run of a ground test investigating how ice can accumulate inside a hot jet engine. A full-size engine, spray bars to create the i...

  4. Commercial Rocket Engine Readied for Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center recently installed an Aerojet AJ26 rocket engine for qualification testing as part of a partnership that highlights the space agency’s commitment to...

  5. Aircraft and Engine Development Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Control in Flight * Integrated Inlet- engine * Power/weight Exceeds Unity F-lll * Advanced Engines * Augmented Turbofan * High Turbine Temperature...residence times). Also, fabrication of a small scale "hot" engine with rotating components such as compressors and turbines with cooled blades , is...capabil- ities are essential to meet the needs of current and projected aircraft and engine programs. The required free jet nozzles should be capable of

  6. The feasibility of external blind DNA proficiency testing. II. Experience with actual blind tests.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Joseph L; Lin, George; Ho, Monica; Chen, Yingyu; Gaensslen, R E

    2003-01-01

    The background and goals of a national study to determine the feasibility of blind proficiency testing in U.S. forensic DNA laboratories are discussed. Part of the project involved designing and executing a series of fifteen blind proficiency tests. Execution included biological specimen donor recruitment and case evidence manufacturing. Simulated cases were submitted to DNA laboratories by law enforcement agencies and in some cases by other forensic-science laboratories. Replicate-manufactured evidence was submitted to reference laboratories to simulate the workings of a larger-scale program. Ten tests were straightforward, and essentially tested analytical ability. Five tests involved selecting on the basis of case facts appropriate bloodstains for typing from a bloodstain pattern. We describe in detail our experience in designing and conducting these blind proficiency test trials, and relate those experiences to the overall issue of blind proficiency testing as a quality-assurance tool in forensic DNA laboratories. In this feasibility test series, one blind test was detected by a laboratory, a second one was shown to the lab by law enforcement, and a third was never completed because of lapses in communication. Turnaround times were relatively fast in the independent/commercial labs and relatively slow in the larger public laboratories. Two cross-state case-to-case CODIS "hits" were "planted" among the first series of ten blind tests. One pair was detected. One member of the second pair went to a lab that was not CODIS-ready.

  7. ACTUAL WASTE TESTING OF GYCOLATE IMPACTS ON THE SRS TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.

    2014-05-28

    Glycolic acid is being studied as a replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste Tank Farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the Tank Farm were addressed via a literature review and simulant testing, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the actual-waste tests to determine the impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The objectives of this study are to address the following: Determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H-evaporator feed. Determine the impact of glycolate on the sorption of fissile (Pu, U, etc.) components onto sodium aluminosilicate solids. The first objective was accomplished through actual-waste testing using Tank 43H and 38H supernatant and Tank 51H sludge at Tank Farm storage conditions. The second objective was accomplished by contacting actual 2H-evaporator scale with the products from the testing for the first objective. There is no anticipated impact of up to 10 g/L of glycolate in DWPF recycle to the Tank Farm on tank waste component solubilities as investigated in this test. Most components were not influenced by glycolate during solubility tests, including major components such as aluminum, sodium, and most salt anions. There was potentially a slight increase in soluble iron with added glycolate, but the soluble iron concentration remained so low (on the order of 10 mg/L) as to not impact the iron to fissile ratio in sludge. Uranium and plutonium appear to have been supersaturated in 2H-evaporator feed solution mixture used for this testing. As a result, there was a reduction of soluble uranium and plutonium as a function of time. The change in soluble uranium concentration was

  8. Altitude Testing of Large Liquid Propellant Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Bryon; Raines, Nickey

    2008-01-01

    Altitude Testing of the J2-X engine at 100,000 feet (start capability). Chemical Steam Generation for providing vacuum. Project Started Mar 07. Test Stand Activation around Late 2010. J-2X Testing around early 2011.

  9. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  10. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.

  11. Comparing Perceptions with Actual Reports of Close Friend's HIV Testing Behavior Among Urban Tanzanian Men.

    PubMed

    Mulawa, Marta; Yamanis, Thespina J; Balvanz, Peter; Kajula, Lusajo J; Maman, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Men have lower rates of HIV testing and higher rates of AIDS-related mortality compared to women in sub-Saharan Africa. To assess whether there is an opportunity to increase men's uptake of testing by correcting misperceptions about testing norms, we compare men's perceptions of their closest friend's HIV testing behaviors with the friend's actual testing self-report using a unique dataset of men sampled within their social networks (n = 59) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We examine the accuracy and bias of perceptions among men who have tested for HIV (n = 391) and compare them to the perceptions among men who never tested (n = 432). We found that testers and non-testers did not differ in the accuracy of their perceptions, though non-testers were strongly biased towards assuming that their closest friends had not tested. Our results lend support to social norms approaches designed to correct the biased misperceptions of non-testers to promote men's HIV testing.

  12. Testing Ceramics for Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Adaptation of diesel engine allows prestressed ceramic materials evaluated under realistic pressure, temperature, and stress without introducing extraneous stress. Ceramic specimen part of prechamber of research engine. Specimen held in place by clamp, introduces required axial compressive stress. Specimen -- cylindrical shell -- surrounded by chamber vented or pressurized to introduce requisite radial stress in ceramic. Pressure chamber also serves as safety shield in case speimen disintegrates. Materials under consideration as cylinder liners for diesel engines.

  13. Strontium and Actinide Separations from High Level Nuclear Waste Solutions using Monosodium Titanate - Actual Waste Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.B.; Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs,D.T.; Walker, D.D.; Fondeur, F.F.; Norato, M.A.; Pulmano, R.L.; Fink, S.D.

    2005-11-01

    Pretreatment processes at the Savannah River Site will separate {sup 90}Sr, alpha-emitting and radionuclides (i.e., actinides) and {sup 137}Cs prior to disposal of the high-level nuclear waste. Separation of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides occurs by ion exchange/adsorption using an inorganic material, monosodium titanate (MST). Previously reported testing with simulants indicates that the MST exhibits high selectivity for strontium and actinides in high ionic strength and strongly alkaline salt solutions. This paper provides a summary of data acquired to measure the performance of MST to remove strontium and actinides from actual waste solutions. These tests evaluated the effects of ionic strength, mixing, elevated alpha activities, and multiple contacts of the waste with MST. Tests also provided confirmation that MST performs well at much larger laboratory scales (300-700 times larger) and exhibits little affinity for desorption of strontium and plutonium during washing.

  14. Viscosity test standards for engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a compilation of 10 ASTM standards that cover both low and high temperature viscosity tests for automotive engine oils, with respect to low temperature flow properties and performance requirements under high temperature, high shear rate conditions. Society of Automotive Engineer's Engine Oil Viscosity Classification SAE J300 is included to provide low temperature high shear rate method.

  15. Legacy of earthworms' engineering effects enlarges the actual effects of earthworms on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Obdřej; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms were recognized as key factor responsible for changes from early to late successional plant communities. They incorporate organic matter into the soil and creates there persistent structures, which improves conditions for plant growth. Earthworm activity might be therefore expected to be more important in early stages of the succession, when earthworm colonization of previously earthworm free soil starts, than in the late stages of the succession, where the soil was previously modified by earthworms. However, earthworms affect plants also via other effects such as increase of nutrient availability. The relative importance of soil structure modification and other earthworm effects on plants is poorly known, despite it is important for both theoretical and applied ecology. To test the effect of earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Aporrectodea caliginosa) on plants we performed microcosm laboratory experiment, where earthworms were affecting early successional (Poa compressa, Medicago lupulina, and Daucus carota) and late successional (Arrhenatherum elatius, Lotus corniculatus, and Plantago laceolata) plat species in soil previously unaffected by earthworms and in soil with previous long term effect of earthworms. These soils were taken from the early and late successional monitoring sites of the Sokolov coal mining district with known history. Earthworms increased plant biomass proportionally more in late successional soil. It was mainly because they increased availability of nutrients (nitrate and potassium) and plants get higher advantage out of this in late successional soil. Earthworms increased plant biomass of both early and late successional species, but late successional species suppressed early successional species in competition. This suppression was more intensive in presence of earthworms and in late successional soil. We therefore found multiplicative effect between earthworm soil engineering activity and their other effects, which might be

  16. Thin film temperature sensors, phase 3. [for engine-test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.; Claing, R. G.; Anderson, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A thin film thermocouple system installation suitable for engine test evaluation was designed, and an engine test plan was prepared. Film adherence, durability, accuracy, and drift characteristics were improved. Film thickness was increased to 14 microns, and drift was reduced to less than 0.02 percent of Fahrenheit temperature per hour on actual turbine blades at 1255 K.

  17. A combined cycle engine test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engers, R.; Cresci, D.; Tsai, C.

    Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines intended for missiles and/or space launch applications incorporate features of rocket propulsion systems operating in concert with airbreathing engine cycles. Performance evaluation of these types of engines, which are intended to operate from static sea level take-off to supersonic cruise or accerlerate to orbit, requires ground test capabilities which integrate rocket component testing with airbreathing engine testing. A combined cycle engine test facility has been constructed in the General Applied Science Laboratories, Inc. (GASL) Aeropropulsion Test Laboratory to meet this requirement. The facility was designed to support the development of an innovative combined cycle engine concept which features a rocket based ramjet combustor. The test requirements included the ability to conduct tests in which the propulsive force was generated by rocket only, the ramjet only and simultaneous rocket and ramjet power (combined cycle) to evaluate combustor operation over the entire engine cycle. The test facility provides simulation over the flight Mach number range of 0 to 8 and at various trajectories. The capabilities of the combined cycle engine test facility are presented.

  18. A combined cycle engine test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Engers, R.; Cresci, D.; Tsai, C.

    1995-09-01

    Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines intended for missiles and/or space launch applications incorporate features of rocket propulsion systems operating in concert with airbreathing engine cycles. Performance evaluation of these types of engines, which are intended to operate from static sea level take-off to supersonic cruise or accerlerate to orbit, requires ground test capabilities which integrate rocket component testing with airbreathing engine testing. A combined cycle engine test facility has been constructed in the General Applied Science Laboratories, Inc. (GASL) Aeropropulsion Test Laboratory to meet this requirement. The facility was designed to support the development of an innovative combined cycle engine concept which features a rocket based ramjet combustor. The test requirements included the ability to conduct tests in which the propulsive force was generated by rocket only, the ramjet only and simultaneous rocket and ramjet power (combined cycle) to evaluate combustor operation over the entire engine cycle. The test facility provides simulation over the flight Mach number range of 0 to 8 and at various trajectories. The capabilities of the combined cycle engine test facility are presented.

  19. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2009-02-28

    This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

  20. F-1 Engine Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    The gas generator from an F-1 engine is test-fired at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., on Jan. 24, 2013. Data from the 30 second test will be used in the development of advance...

  1. Space Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A cloud of extremely hot steam boils out of the flame deflector at the A-1 test stand during a test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) at the John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi.

  2. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  3. Engine testing of thermographic phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W.; Cates, M.R.; Beshears, D.L.; Muhs, J.D.; Capps, G.J.; Smith, D.B. ); Turley, W.D.; Lewis, W. . Energy Measurements Group); Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M. ); O'Brian, W.F.; Roby, R.J.; Anderson, T.T. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    A thermographic phosphor technique is being developed for nonintrusive high temperature analysis of the hostile environments associated with turbomachinery. This unique noncontact measurement system will eventually be applied to high-speed, rotating surfaces whose direct analysis has been unobtainable with current temperature-sensing devices and systems. Two experiments are reported which involve static surface temperature measurements in a Pratt Whitney PW2037 turbine engine, and dynamic surface temperature measurements in a Pratt Whitney JT15D turbofan jet engine. The thermographic phosphor materials applied to these engine environments were europium-doped yttrium oxide (T{sub 2}O{sub 3}:E{sub u}) and europium-doped yttrium vanadate (YVO{sub 4}:E{sub u}). The excitation energy was supplied by a tripled neodymium YAG (Nd:YAG) laser at 355 nm. 11 refs., 14 figs.

  4. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-07-10

    In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

  5. Noise control in jet engine test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of Industrial Acoustics Company (IAC) ability to design test facilities is presented. This approach called for an advanced pre-rigging concept together with a fully electronic instrumentation system which aided by computers and extremely advanced equipment, measures, calculates and displays the numerous parameters required to test, pass off and rate the engine for flight, in the engineering units. Within IAC this total concept capability is known as the Turkey Facility. By this we mean we have the ability to design and manufacture every facet in connection with engine testing. This starts with the civil engineering requirements relative to the concrete foundations, follows through to the intake and exhaust silencing systems, and terminates with the automated power-plant test equipment which is capable of diagnosing all aspects of engine performance to determine an accept or reject situation.

  6. AJ26 rocket engine testing news briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Operators at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center are completing modifications to the E-1 Test Stand to begin testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines in early summer of 2010. Modifications include construction of a 27-foot-deep flame deflector trench. The AJ26 rocket engines will be used to power Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Taurus II space vehicles to provide commercial cargo transportation missions to the International Space Station for NASA. Stennis has partnered with Orbital to test all engines for the transport missions.

  7. J-2X Engine Tested at Stennis

    NASA Video Gallery

    Another key component of NASA's new Space Launch System, the J-2X rocket engine, is put to a 500-second firing test at NASA's Stennis Space Center on Nov. 9 The J-2X rocket engine will help carry t...

  8. A study of airplane engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Victor R

    1920-01-01

    This report is a study of the results obtained from a large number of test of an Hispano-Suiza airplane engine in the altitude laboratory of the Bureau of Standards. It was originally undertaken to determine the heat distribution in such an engine, but many other factors are also considered as bearing on this matter.

  9. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTING FOR INCLUSION & COPRECIPITATION WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    WARRANT, R.W.

    2006-12-11

    Fractional crystallization is being considered as a pretreatment method to support supplemental treatment of retrieved single-shell tank (SST) saltcake waste at the Hanford Site. The goal of the fractional crystallization process is to optimize the separation of the radioactivity (radionuclides) from the saltcake waste and send it to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant and send the bulk of the saltcake to the supplemental treatment plant (bulk vitrification). The primary factors that influence the separation efficiency are (1) solid/liquid separation efficiency, (2) contaminant inclusions, and (3) co-precipitation. This is a report of testing for factors (2) and (3) with actual tank waste samples. For the purposes of this report, contaminant inclusions are defined as the inclusion of supernatant, containing contaminating radionuclides, in a pocket within the precipitating saltcake crystals. Co-precipitation is defined as the simultaneous precipitation of a saltcake crystal with a contaminating radionuclide. These two factors were tested for various potential fractional crystallization product salts by spiking the composite tank waste samples (SST Early or SST Late, external letter CH2M-0600248, ''Preparation of Composite Tank Waste Samples for ME-21 Project'') with the desired target salt and then evaporating to precipitate that salt. SST Early represents the typical composition of dissolved saltcake early in the retrieval process, and SST Late represents the typical composition during the later stages of retrieval.

  10. Advanced Expander Test Bed Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    performance data will be provided to NASA -LeRC for verifying the ROCETS computer model and evaluating various RLI0 modifications. 22 SECTION IV CURRENT...RL10 modeling data for the ROCETS computer program. 23 NASA Report Documentation Page Nafi~aj AfWflWuIC Wd Sow@ Ad-lvhlsto, 1 eport No. 2. Government... NASA have identified the need for a new Space Transfer Vehicle (STV) Propulsion System. The new system will be an oxygen/hydrogen expander cycle engine

  11. NASA Tests Rocket Engine for Commercial Vehicle

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi conducted a successful test firing Wednesday of the liquid-fuel AJ26 engine that will power the first stage of Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Taurus II ...

  12. 8. TEST STAND 15, INVERTED ENGINE FIRING TEST, CIRCA 1963. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. TEST STAND 1-5, INVERTED ENGINE FIRING TEST, CIRCA 1963. Original is a color print. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. 24. SATURN V Fl ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SATURN V F-l ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND 1A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 40 CFR 1065.401 - Test engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1065.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.401 Test engine... engines, use good engineering judgment to select the engine configuration within the engine family that...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.401 - Test engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test engine selection. 1065.401... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.401 Test engine selection. While all engine configurations within a certified engine family must comply with the...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.401 - Test engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test engine selection. 1065.401... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.401 Test engine selection. While all engine configurations within a certified engine family must comply with the...

  17. 14 CFR 33.84 - Engine overtorque test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine overtorque test. 33.84 Section 33.84... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.84 Engine overtorque test. (a) If approval of a maximum engine overtorque is sought for an engine incorporating a free power...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.401 - Test engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test engine selection. 1065.401... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.401 Test engine selection. While all engine configurations within a certified engine family must comply with the...

  19. 14 CFR 33.84 - Engine overtorque test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine overtorque test. 33.84 Section 33.84... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.84 Engine overtorque test. (a) If approval of a maximum engine overtorque is sought for an engine incorporating a free power...

  20. Ramjet engine test facility (RJTF). Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan constructed a ramjet engine test facility (RJTF) at the Kakuda Research Center in 1994. It can duplicate engine test conditions in the range of flight Mach numbers from 4 to 8. The facility can supply non-vitiated air for M4 and M6 to identify the contamination effect in the vitiated air, to provide the basis for evaluating engine performance in the M8 flight condition. This paper outlines the unique features and operating characteristics of the RJTF. The quality of air stream obtained during facility calibration, and the facility-engine interaction are described. Finally the authors review tests of an H2-fueled scramjet that are currently underway.

  1. Testing data evaluation strategies for estimating precipitation and actual evaporation from precision lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Frederik; Durner, Wolfgang; Fank, Johann; Pütz, Thomas; Wollschläger, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Weighing lysimeters have long been recognized as valuable tools not only for monitoring of groundwater recharge and solute transport, but also for the determination of the soil water balance and quantification of water exchange processes at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. If well embedded into an equally-vegetated environment, they reach a hitherto unprecedented accuracy in estimating precipitation (P) by rain, dew, fog, rime and snow, as well as actual evapotranspiration (ET). At the same time, they largely avoid errors made by traditional micrometeorological instruments, such as the wind error of Hellman rain samplers or the influence of subsurface heterogeneity on readings from in situ instrumentation of soil water state variables. Beginning in 2008, the Helmholtz Association established a network of terrestrial environmental observatories (TERENO) that aim at long-term monitoring of climate and land-use change consequences. A total of 126 identically designed large weighing lysimeters, operating at a sampling frequency of 1 min-1, were installed for this purpose, which raises the demand for standardized data processing methods. In theory, estimating P and ET from these measurements is straightforward: An increase in the combined mass of the soil monolith and the collected seepage water indicates P, while a decrease indicates ET. However, in practice, lysimeter data are prone to numerous sources of error, including, but not limited to, outliers, systematic errors due to plant growth and removal, data gaps, and stochastic fluctuations. The latter pose a particularly challenging problem - if we would directly calculate P and ET from a time-series that is affected by random noise, every positive fluctuation would be interpreted as P and every negative one as ET. Consequently, we would overestimate both quantities by far. The aim of this study was to evaluate algorithms that focus on eliminating the effect of these fluctuations and to estimate actual fluxes

  2. Oxides of Nitrogen Emissions from the Testing of TF41-A-2B Engines at Naval Air Station, Lemoore, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    for each engine test run. The procedure involves the use of a correlation coefficient which relates the weight (pounds) of NOx emissions to the...individual engines. This report establishes a correlation coefficient for the TF41-A-2B engine based on actual emissions data and the run sheets from 27...engine tests conducted in test cells at NAS Lemoore, CA. The correlation coefficient , equal to 0.01515 pounds of NOx formed per pound of fuel consumed

  3. 12. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. DETAIL OF CONTROL CONSOLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. DETAIL OF CONTROL CONSOLE FOR ENGINE TEST CELL 4. LOOKING NORTH. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  4. 14 CFR 33.95 - Engine-propeller systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine-propeller systems tests. 33.95... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.95 Engine-propeller systems tests. If the engine is designed to operate with a propeller, the following tests must be made with...

  5. 14 CFR 33.95 - Engine-propeller systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine-propeller systems tests. 33.95... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.95 Engine-propeller systems tests. If the engine is designed to operate with a propeller, the following tests must be made with...

  6. Multispectral scanner system for ERTS: Four band scanner system. Volume 2: Engineering model panoramic pictures and engineering tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This document is Volume 2 of three volumes of the Final Report for the four band Multispectral Scanner System (MSS). The results are contained of an analysis of pictures of actual outdoor scenes imaged by the engineering model MSS for spectral response, resolution, noise, and video correction. Also included are the results of engineering tests on the MSS for reflectance and saturation from clouds. Finally, two panoramic pictures of Yosemite National Park are provided.

  7. Vehicle testing of Cummins turbocompound diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brands, M. C.; Werner, J. R.; Hoehne, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Two turbocompound diesel engines were installed in Class VIII heavy-duty vehicles to determine the fuel consumption potential and performance characteristics. One turbocompound powered vehicle was evaluated at the Cummins Pilot Center where driveability, fuel consumption, torsional vibration, and noise were evaluated. Fuel consumption testing showed a 14.8% benefit for the turbocompound engine in comparison to a production NTC-400 used as a baseline. The turbocompound engine also achieved lower noise levels, improved driveability, improved gradeability, and marginally superior engine retardation. The second turbocompound engine was placed in commercial service and accumulated 50,000 miles on a cross-country route without malfunction. Tank mileage revealed a 15.92% improvement over a production NTCC-400 which was operating on the same route.

  8. Altitude Testing of Large Liquid Propellant Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Bryon T.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration entered a new age on January 14, 2004 with President Bush s announcement of the creation the Vision for Space Exploration that will take mankind back to the Moon and on beyond to Mars. In January, 2006, after two years of hard, dedicated labor, engineers within NASA and its contractor workforce decided that the J2X rocket, based on the heritage of the Apollo J2 engine, would be the new engine for the NASA Constellation Ares upper stage vehicle. This engine and vehicle combination would provide assured access to the International Space Station to replace that role played by the Space Shuttle and additionally, would serve as the Earth Departure Stage, to push the Crew Excursion Vehicle out of Earth Orbit and head it on a path for rendezvous with the Moon. Test as you fly, fly as you test was chosen to be the guiding philosophy and a pre-requisite for the engine design, development, test and evaluation program. An exhaustive survey of national test facility assets proved the required capability to test the J2X engine at high altitude for long durations did not exist so therefore, a high altitude/near space environment testing capability would have to be developed. After several agency concepts the A3 High Altitude Testing Facility proposal was selected by the J2X engine program on March 2, 2007 and later confirmed by a broad panel of NASA senior leadership in May 2007. This facility is to be built at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center located near Gulfport, Mississippi. 30 plus years of Space Shuttle Main Engine development and flight certification testing makes Stennis uniquely suited to support the Vision For Space Exploration Return to the Moon. Propellant handling infrastructure, engine assembly facilities, a trained and dedicated workforce and a broad and varied technical support base will all ensure that the A3 facility will be built on time to support the schedule needs of the J2X engine and the ultimate flight

  9. Structural dynamic testing of the Engineering Test Satellite-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, K.; Mitsuma, H.; Matsushita, T.; Izumi, H.

    The Engineering Test Satellite-IV (ETS-IV) was the first large scale spacecraft developed and launched successfully in Japan on a new N-II launch vehicle. This paper presents an approach taken for the structural development of the ETS-IV. Extensive structural tests were performed to demonstrate that the ETS-IV spacecraft meets all design requirements and will survive all critical environments. Details of the static load test, vibration tests, acoustic test, and pyrotechnic shock test were described. The test results were compared with analyses and measured flight data.

  10. 14 CFR 33.88 - Engine overtemperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine overtemperature test. 33.88 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.88 Engine overtemperature test. (a) Each engine must run for 5 minutes at maximum permissible rpm with the gas temperature...

  11. 14 CFR 33.88 - Engine overtemperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine overtemperature test. 33.88 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.88 Engine overtemperature test. (a) Each engine must run for 5 minutes at maximum permissible rpm with the gas temperature...

  12. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, I. S.; Pegg, I. L.; Rielley, Elizabeth; Carranza, Isidro; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan-Tao T.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Cecil, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  13. 14 CFR 34.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.62 Test...

  14. 75 FR 34653 - Engine-Testing Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine-Testing Procedures CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1000 to End, revised as of July 1, 2009, on page 587, in Sec. 1065.340, reinstate...

  15. Electronic materials testing in commercial aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Dieter

    A device for the electronic testing of materials used in commercial aircraft engines is described. The instrument can be used for ferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, and nonferromagnetic metallic materials, and it functions either optically or acoustically. The design of the device is described and technical data are given. The device operates under the principle of controlled self-inductivity. Its mode of operation is described.

  16. 1. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST ¼ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST ¼ OF THE X-15 ENGINE TEST COMPLEX. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 8. X15 ENGINE TESTING. A color print showing the engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. X-15 ENGINE TESTING. A color print showing the engine during test firing. View from the rear of the test stand looking northwest. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Air-Breathing Engine Test Facilities Register,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Ontario Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 4 8 + (1) 2-4 of Canada Ltd. St. Hubert and Longueuil , Quebec (1) Rolls Royce (Canada) Ltd. 2 2 2-5 Lachine and Montreal...ORGANISATION NAME Pratt & Whitney Aircraft of Canada Ltd. ADDRESS Longueuil , Quebec, Canada CONTACT Manager, Test Support Engineering Phone 677-9411...CELLS IDENTIFICATION ORGANISATION LOCATION TEST CELL DESIGNATION Pratt & Whitney Longueuil 1 - 11 A Aircraft of Canada Ltd. Quebec Longueuil , Quebec

  19. Software Estimates Costs of Testing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Simulation-Based Cost Model (SiCM) is a computer program that simulates pertinent aspects of the testing of rocket engines for the purpose of estimating the costs of such testing during time intervals specified by its users. A user enters input data for control of simulations; information on the nature of, and activity in, a given testing project; and information on resources. Simulation objects are created on the basis of this input. Costs of the engineering-design, construction, and testing phases of a given project are estimated from numbers and labor rates of engineers and technicians employed in each phase, the duration of each phase; costs of materials used in each phase; and, for the testing phase, the rate of maintenance of the testing facility. The three main outputs of SiCM are (1) a curve, updated at each iteration of the simulation, that shows overall expenditures vs. time during the interval specified by the user; (2) a histogram of the total costs from all iterations of the simulation; and (3) table displaying means and variances of cumulative costs for each phase from all iterations. Other outputs include spending curves for each phase.

  20. 14 CFR 33.84 - Engine overtorque test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.84 Engine overtorque test. (a) If..., a gearbox oil temperature equal to the maximum temperature when the maximum engine overtorque could occur in service; and for all other engines, an oil temperature within the normal operating range. (4)...

  1. 14 CFR 33.84 - Engine overtorque test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.84 Engine overtorque test. (a) If..., a gearbox oil temperature equal to the maximum temperature when the maximum engine overtorque could occur in service; and for all other engines, an oil temperature within the normal operating range. (4)...

  2. Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Carrie L.; Brown, Barbara L.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical models of system components have long been used to allow simulators to predict system behavior to various stimuli. Recent efforts to monitor, diagnose, and control real-time systems using component models have experienced similar success. NASA Kennedy is continuing the development of a tool for implementing real-time knowledge-based diagnostic and control systems called KATE (Knowledge based Autonomous Test Engineer). KATE is a model-based reasoning shell designed to provide autonomous control, monitoring, fault detection, and diagnostics for complex engineering systems by applying its reasoning techniques to an exchangeable quantitative model describing the structure and function of the various system components and their systemic behavior.

  3. Temperature distortion generator for turboshaft engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, G. A.; Barth, R. L.; Biesiadny, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The procedures and unique hardware used to conduct an experimental investigation into the response of a small-turboshaft-engine compression system to various hot gas ingestion patterns are presented. The temperature distortion generator described herein uses gaseous hydrogen to create both steady-state and time-variant, or transient, temperature distortion at the engine inlet. The range of transient temperature ramps produced by the distortion generator during the engine tests was from less than 111 deg K/sec (200 deg R/sec) to above 611 deg K/sec (1100 deg R/sec); instantaneous temperatures to 422 deg K (760 deg R) above ambient were generated. The distortion generator was used to document the maximum inlet temperatures and temperature rise rates that the compression system could tolerate before the onset of stall for various circumferential distortions as well as the compressor system response during stall.

  4. AJ26 rocket engine testing news briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center) stands in front of a 'pathfinder' rocket engine with Orbital Sciences Corp. President and Chief Operating Officer J.R. Thompson (left) and Aerojet President Scott Seymour during a Feb. 24 news briefing at the south Mississippi facility. The leaders appeared together to announce a partnership for testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines at Stennis. The engines will be used to power Orbital's Taurus II space vehicles to provide commercial cargo transportation missions to the International Space Station for NASA. During the event, the Stennis partnership with Orbital was cited as an example of the new direction of NASA to work with commercial interests for space travel and transport.

  5. Bin-scale tests dry test bin assembly [Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report consists of engineering drawings of the following areas of the WIPP facility: dry test bin assembly; internal bin manifold modified design; dry test bin details; humid bin RCB lid; SWB lid modification for RCB lid assembly and details; TRUPACT II standard waste box assembly; waste handling building 411 ground floor slab-sump plans and sections; and waste handling floor building 411 ground floor slab plan.

  6. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  7. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  8. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  9. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  10. 14 CFR 34.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test procedure (propulsion engines). 34.62... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.62 Test...

  11. 40 CFR 87.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test procedure (propulsion engines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.62 Test procedure...

  12. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.91... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system and component tests. (a) For those systems or components that cannot be adequately substantiated in...

  13. Software Estimates Costs of Testing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. L.

    2003-01-01

    Simulation-Based Cost Model (SiCM), a discrete event simulation developed in Extend , simulates pertinent aspects of the testing of rocket propulsion test articles for the purpose of estimating the costs of such testing during time intervals specified by its users. A user enters input data for control of simulations; information on the nature of, and activity in, a given testing project; and information on resources. Simulation objects are created on the basis of this input. Costs of the engineering-design, construction, and testing phases of a given project are estimated from numbers and labor rates of engineers and technicians employed in each phase, the duration of each phase; costs of materials used in each phase; and, for the testing phase, the rate of maintenance of the testing facility. The three main outputs of SiCM are (1) a curve, updated at each iteration of the simulation, that shows overall expenditures vs. time during the interval specified by the user; (2) a histogram of the total costs from all iterations of the simulation; and (3) table displaying means and variances of cumulative costs for each phase from all iterations. Other outputs include spending curves for each phase.

  14. Designing, engineering, and testing wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce basic structural engineering concepts in a clear, simple manner while actively involving students. This project emphasizes the fact that a good design uses materials efficiently. The test structure in this experiment can easily be built and has various design options. Even when the structure is loaded to collapsing, only one or two pieces usually break, leaving the remaining pieces intact and reusable.

  15. Rotary Engine Friction Test Rig Development Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    unless so designated by other authorized documents. Citation of manufacturer’s or trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval...used to determine friction characteristics from experimental measurements. A computer-aided design model of an engine friction test rig was designed ...focused research from other technical areas, including ceramic components, advanced bearing designs , etc., since an electric motor is used to spin the

  16. The primary test of measuremental system for the actual emittance of relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Fu; Tai-bin Du; Xin Chen

    1995-12-31

    Recent, a new measuremental system has been established basically in Tsinghua University PRA. This system is able to measure the lower emittance of the electron beams from the RF accelerators for the FEL. It consists of a scanning magnetic field, a slit, a fluorescent screen, and a TV camera, an image processing system, a CAD 386 computer. Using it an actual phase diagram is obtained for 4-10 Mev electron beams, The principle and structure of the facility were reported in the Proceeding of the 15th FEL Conference. This paper describes the performance of the main components and the results of first measurement for the electron gun and 4Mev standing wave LINAC, Some new suggests are related too.

  17. Air-Breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  18. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... engine tests: (i) Engine speed setpoints for each mode shall be within 2 percent of the speed of the... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air...

  19. Air-breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie depicts the Rocketdyne static test of an air-breathing rocket. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's advanced Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  20. 14 CFR 21.128 - Tests: aircraft engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tests: aircraft engines. 21.128 Section 21... engines. (a) Each person manufacturing aircraft engines under a type certificate only shall subject each engine (except rocket engines for which the manufacturer must establish a sampling technique) to...

  1. 14 CFR 21.128 - Tests: aircraft engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tests: aircraft engines. 21.128 Section 21... engines. (a) Each person manufacturing aircraft engines under a type certificate only shall subject each engine (except rocket engines for which the manufacturer must establish a sampling technique) to...

  2. Testing of high-octane fuels in the single-cylinder airplane engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeber, Fritz

    1940-01-01

    One of the most important properties of aviation fuels for spark-ignition engines is their knock rating. The CFR engine tests of fuels of 87 octane and above does not always correspond entirely to the actual behavior of these fuels in the airplane engine. A method is therefore developed which, in contrast to the octane number determination, permits a testing of the fuel under various temperatures and fuel mixture conditions. The following reference fuels were employed: 1) Primary fuels; isooctane and n-heptane; 2) Secondary fuels; pure benzene and synthetic benzine.

  3. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  4. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  5. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  6. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  7. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Emissions shall be measured using one of the test cycles...

  8. AiResearch QCGAT engine performance and emissions tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Results of aerodynamic performance and emission tests, conducted on a specially designed QCGAT engine in the 17,793-N (4,000 lb) thrust class, are presented. Performance of the AiResearch QCGAT engine was excellent throughout all testing. No serious mechanical malfunctions were encountered, and no significant test time was lost due to engine-related problems. Emissions were drastically reduced over similar engines, and the engine exhibited good smoke performance.

  9. 14 CFR 33.95 - Engine-propeller systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine-propeller systems tests. 33.95 Section 33.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.95 Engine-propeller...

  10. 14 CFR 34.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test procedure (propulsion engines). 34.62 Section 34.62 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... (propulsion engines). (a)(1) The engine shall be tested in each of the following engine operating modes...

  11. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.91 Section 33.91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system...

  12. Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horii, M.; Funakawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) is being developed as the third Japanese three-axis stabilized engineering test satellite to establish the 2-ton geostationary operational satellite bus system and to demonstrate the high performance satellite communication technology for future operational satellites. The satellite is expected to be stationed at 154 deg east latitude. It will be launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan by a type H-II launch vehicle. The Deep Space Network (DSN) will support the prelaunch compatibility test, data interface verification testing, and launch rehersals. The DSN primary support period is from launch through the final AEF plus 1 hour. Contingency support is from final AEF plus 1 hour until launch plus 1 month. The coverage will consist of all the 26-m antennas as prime and the 34-m antennas at Madrid and Canberra as backup. Maximum support will consist of two 8-hour tracks per station for a 7-day period, plus the contingency support, if required. Information is given in tabular form for DSN support, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  13. Characterization of Flow Bench Engine Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voris, Alex; Riley, Lauren; Puzinauskas, Paul

    2015-11-01

    This project was an attempt at characterizing particle image velocimetry (PIV) and swirl-meter test procedures. The flow direction and PIV seeding were evaluated for in-cylinder steady state flow of a spark ignition engine. For PIV seeding, both wet and dry options were tested. The dry particles tested were baby powder, glass particulate, and titanium dioxide. The wet particles tested were fogs created with olive oil, vegetable oil, DEHS, and silicon oil. The seeding was evaluated at 0.1 and 0.25 Lift/Diameter and at cylinder pressures of 10, 25 and 40 inches of H2O. PIV results were evaluated through visual and fluid momentum comparisons. Seeding particles were also evaluated based on particle size and cost. It was found that baby powder and glass particulate were the most effective seeding options for the current setup. The oil fogs and titanium dioxide were found to deposit very quickly on the mock cylinder and obscure the motion of the particles. Based on initial calculations and flow measurements, the flow direction should have a negligible impact on PIV and swirl-meter results. The characterizations found in this project will be used in future engine research examining the effects of intake port geometry on in-cylinder fluid motion and exhaust gas recirculation tolerances. Thanks to NSF site grant #1358991.

  14. Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2008-07-10

    This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

  15. Building Test Cases through Model Driven Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Helaine; Lopes, Denivaldo; Abdelouahab, Zair; Hammoudi, Slimane; Claro, Daniela Barreiro

    Recently, Model Driven Engineering (MDE) has been proposed to face the complexity in the development, maintenance and evolution of large and distributed software systems. Model Driven Architecture (MDA) is an example of MDE. In this context, model transformations enable a large reuse of software systems through the transformation of a Platform Independent Model into a Platform Specific Model. Although source code can be generated from models, defects can be injected during the modeling or transformation process. In order to delivery software systems without defects that cause errors and fails, the source code must be submitted to test. In this paper, we present an approach that takes care of test in the whole software life cycle, i.e. it starts in the modeling level and finishes in the test of source code of software systems. We provide an example to illustrate our approach.

  16. 10. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL 4, MOUNTING STAND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL 4, MOUNTING STAND. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  17. 13. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. EQUIPMENT ROOM SERVING CELLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. EQUIPMENT ROOM SERVING CELLS 2 AND 4. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  18. 11. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CONTROL ROOM FOR CELLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CONTROL ROOM FOR CELLS 2 AND 4. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  19. 9. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL ACCESS ELEVATOR, CELLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL ACCESS ELEVATOR, CELLS 2 AND 4, BASEMENT LEVEL. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  20. J-2X Engine Ready For Second Test Series

    NASA Video Gallery

    Time-lapse video of the installation of J-2X engine 10001 in the A-2 test-stand at Stennis, complete with clamshell assembly and nozzle extension. With these enhancements test engineers will measur...

  1. J-2X Rocket Engine, 40-Second Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA conducted a 40-second test of the J-2X rocket engine Sept. 28, the most recent in a series of tests of the next-generation engine selected as part of the Space Launch System architecture that ...

  2. 7. Historic aerial photo of rocket engine test facility complex, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic aerial photo of rocket engine test facility complex, June 1962. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-60674. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Upgrading Engine Test Cells for Improved Troubleshooting and Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    being developed. To enable this, test cell fault detection and isolation capabilities will need to utilize all of the relevant engine and test...improved engine fault detection and isolation capabilities, various approaches for automated sensor validation, performance diagnostics and

  4. Physical Property and Rheological Testing of Actual Transuranic Waste from Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, Joel M. ); Gao, Johnway ); Delegard, Calvin H. ); Bagaasen, Larry M. ); Wells, Beric E. )

    2003-08-25

    Composites of sludge from Hanford tanks 241-B-203 (B-203), 241-T-203 (T-203), 241-T-204 (T-204), and 241-T-110 (T-110) were prepared at the Hanford 222-S Laboratory and transferred to the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for measurement of the composites' physical properties. These tank composites were prepared from core samples retieved from these tanks. These core samples may not be representative of the entire contents of the tank but provide some indication of the properties of the waste in these underground storage tanks. Dilutions in water were prepared from the composite samples. The measurements included paint filter tests, viscosity, shear strength, settling and centrifuging behavior, a qualitative test of stickiness, total solids concentration, and extrusion tests to estimate shear strength.

  5. 40 CFR 89.609 - Final admission of modification nonroad engines and test nonroad engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... working day hold period, the nonroad engine is stored at a location where the Administrator has reasonable... nonroad engines and test nonroad engines. 89.609 Section 89.609 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Importation of Nonconforming Nonroad Engines § 89.609 Final admission...

  6. How Are Mate Preferences Linked with Actual Mate Selection? Tests of Mate Preference Integration Algorithms Using Computer Simulations and Actual Mating Couples

    PubMed Central

    Conroy-Beam, Daniel; Buss, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Prior mate preference research has focused on the content of mate preferences. Yet in real life, people must select mates among potentials who vary along myriad dimensions. How do people incorporate information on many different mate preferences in order to choose which partner to pursue? Here, in Study 1, we compare seven candidate algorithms for integrating multiple mate preferences in a competitive agent-based model of human mate choice evolution. This model shows that a Euclidean algorithm is the most evolvable solution to the problem of selecting fitness-beneficial mates. Next, across three studies of actual couples (Study 2: n = 214; Study 3: n = 259; Study 4: n = 294) we apply the Euclidean algorithm toward predicting mate preference fulfillment overall and preference fulfillment as a function of mate value. Consistent with the hypothesis that mate preferences are integrated according to a Euclidean algorithm, we find that actual mates lie close in multidimensional preference space to the preferences of their partners. Moreover, this Euclidean preference fulfillment is greater for people who are higher in mate value, highlighting theoretically-predictable individual differences in who gets what they want. These new Euclidean tools have important implications for understanding real-world dynamics of mate selection. PMID:27276030

  7. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the...

  8. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the...

  9. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the...

  10. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407... Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the air... repeated, as long as the engine is preconditioned by running the previous mode. In the case of the...

  11. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the...

  12. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.336-79 Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer...

  13. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.336-79 Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer...

  14. 2. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, SHOWING TANK (BUILDING 1929) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, SHOWING TANK (BUILDING 1929) AND GARAGE (BUILDING 1930) AT LEFT REAR. Looking to west. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. Vapor-alcohol control tests with compressed ethanol-gas mixtures: scientific basis and actual performance.

    PubMed

    Dubowski, K M; Essary, N A

    1996-10-01

    Commercial compressed vapor-alcohol mixtures ("dry gas") were evaluated to ascertain their suitability for control tests in breath-alcohol analysis. Dry gas control tests were conducted at nominal vapor-alcohol concentrations (VACs) of 0.045, 0.085, and 0.105 g/210 L (n = 50 at each VAC) with Alcotest 7110 MK III and Intoxilyzer 1400 evidential breath-alcohol testers. The measurement results were analyzed by standard statistical methods, and their correlation with certified dry gas VAC target values was examined. Also measured and examined statistically were the VACs of National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable Research Gas mixtures (dry gas) ethanol standards at 97.8 and 198 ppm (n = 30-50 at each VAC). With the Alcotest 7110 MK III programmed to report VACs normalized to standard atmospheric pressure at 760 torr and the intoxilyzer 1400 programmed to report VACs at ambient atmospheric pressure, the predicted effects of ambient atmospheric pressure were confirmed experimentally. We developed and validated the following conversion factor for VAC units at 34 degrees C and 760 torr: ppm/2605 = g/210 L and g/210 L x 2605 = ppm. We found that the dry gas vapor-alcohol control samples conformed to established formal specifications and concluded that they compared favorably with simulator effluents for control tests of breath-alcohol analyzers, which are capable of adjusting VAC results for ambient atmospheric pressure.

  16. Evolving desiderata for validating engineered-physics systems without full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, James R; Booker, Jane M; Hemez, Francois M; Ross, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Theory and principles of engineered-physics designs do not change over time, but the actual engineered product does evolve. Engineered components are prescient to the physics and change with time. Parts are never produced exactly as designed, assembled as designed, or remain unperturbed over time. For this reason, validation of performance may be regarded as evolving over time. Desired use of products evolves with time. These pragmatic realities require flexibility, understanding, and robustness-to-ignorance. Validation without full-scale testing involves engineering, small-scale experiments, physics theory and full-scale computer-simulation validation. We have previously published an approach to validation without full-scale testing using information integration, small-scale tests, theory and full-scale simulations [Langenbrunner et al. 2008]. This approach adds value, but also adds complexity and uncertainty due to inference. We illustrate a validation example that manages evolving desiderata without full-scale testing.

  17. Modeling and testing of fractionation effects with refrigerant blends in an actual residential heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Biancardi, F.R.; Pandy, D.R.; Sienel, T.H.; Michels, H.H.

    1997-12-31

    The heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry is actively evaluating and testing hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant blends as a means of complying with current and impending national and international environmental regulations restricting the use and disposal of conventional chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants that contribute to the global ozone-depletion effects. While analyses and system performance tools have shown that HFC refrigerant blends offer certain performance, capacity, and operational advantages, there are significant possible service and operational issues that are raised by the use of blends. Many of these issues occur due to the fractionation of the blends. Therefore, the objective of this program was to conduct analyses and experimental tests aimed at understanding these issues, develop approaches or techniques to predict these effects, and convey to the industry safe and reliable approaches. As a result, analytical models verified by laboratory data have been developed that predict the fractionation effects of HFC refrigerant blends (1) when exposed to selected POE lubricants, (2) during the system charging process from large liquid containers, and (3) during system start-up, operation, and shutdown within various system components (where two-phase refrigerant exists) and during selected system and component leakage scenarios. Model predictions and experimental results are presented for HFC refrigerant blends containing R-32, R-134a, and R-125 and the data are generalized for various operating conditions and scenarios.

  18. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  19. An Actual Design of AC Filter for Static Var Compensator and Verification Results from the Field Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Yuji; Takasaki, Shinji; Irokawa, Shoichi; Takeda, Hideo; Takagi, Kikuo; Noro, Yasuhiro; Ametani, Akihiro

    AC filter design method for SVC and HVDC is commonly known in the relevant CIGRE technical brochure and IEC technical report. However the conventional method requires many iterative calculations of the harmonic voltages and currents until the calculation results become within the regulation levels by changing filter parameters based on the experience. In this respect, a new improved design method is proposed, which enables efficient evaluation on the complex impedance plane to confirm as to whether the proposed filter impedance is in the permissible range. In an actual project of Okuura SVC of Kyusyu Electric Power Co., Inc., the new method was applied to the AC filter design. This paper describes on the actual procedure of the AC filter design with the new method, the actual references of the harmonic performance calculation, and the field test measurement results on Okuura SVC. The calculation results and the filed measurement results are consistent with each other, thus the validity of the new design method is verified on its accuracy and effectiveness.

  20. 40 CFR 610.61 - Engine dynamometer tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Engine dynamometer tests. 610.61... ECONOMY RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Special Test Procedures § 610.61 Engine dynamometer tests. The Administrator will choose a test procedure or procedures from various...

  1. 40 CFR 610.61 - Engine dynamometer tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine dynamometer tests. 610.61... ECONOMY RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Special Test Procedures § 610.61 Engine dynamometer tests. The Administrator will choose a test procedure or procedures from various...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1337-96 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 86.1337... Procedures § 86.1337-96 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) The following steps shall be taken for each test: (1... per test portion. (c) If a dynamometer test run is determined to be void, corrective action may...

  3. 40 CFR 610.61 - Engine dynamometer tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer tests. 610.61... ECONOMY RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Special Test Procedures § 610.61 Engine dynamometer tests. The Administrator will choose a test procedure or procedures from various...

  4. X-1E Engine Ground Test Run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1E during a ground engine test run on the NACA High-Speed Flight Station ramp near the Rogers Dry Lake. The rocket technician is keeping the concrete cool by hosing it with water during the test. This also helps in washing away any chemicals that might spill. The test crew worked close to the aircraft during ground tests. There were four versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Supersonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on January 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On October 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager, became the first aircraft to exceed the speed of sound, reaching about

  5. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system and..., reliability, and durability. (c) Each unpressurized hydraulic fluid tank may not fail or leak when subjected... hydraulic fluid tank must meet the requirements of § 33.64. (d) For an engine type certificated for use...

  6. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system and..., reliability, and durability. (c) Each unpressurized hydraulic fluid tank may not fail or leak when subjected... hydraulic fluid tank must meet the requirements of § 33.64. (d) For an engine type certificated for use...

  7. Anticipated and Actual Reactions to Receiving HIV Positive Results Through Self-Testing Among Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Ibitoye, Mobolaji; Frasca, Timothy; Brown, William; Balan, Iván

    2014-01-01

    We explored anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV positive results through self-testing with a diverse group of 84 gay and bisexual men in New York City. Grounded Theory was used to investigate these reactions in a two-phase study, one hypothetical, followed by a practical phase in which self-tests were distributed and used. Three major themes emerged when participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to an HIV positive self-test result: managing emotional distress, obtaining HIV medical care, and postponing sexual activity. When participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to a partner’s HIV positive self-test result, five themes emerged: provide emotional support; refrain from engaging in sex with casual partner; avoid high-risk sexual activity with both main and casual partners; seek medical services; and obtain a confirmatory test result. Although none of the participants tested positive, seven of their partners did. Participants provided emotional support and linked their partners to support services. The availability of HIV self-testing kits offers potential opportunities to tackle HIV infection among individuals with high-risk practices. PMID:24858480

  8. 40 CFR 86.1724-99 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.1724-99... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General... Trucks § 86.1724-99 Test vehicles and engines. The provisions of § 86.096-24 and subsequent model...

  9. 40 CFR 86.000-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.000-24 Test vehicles and engines. Section... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines....

  10. 40 CFR 86.001-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.001-24 Test vehicles and engines. Section... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines....

  11. 40 CFR 86.000-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.000-24 Test vehicles and engines. (a... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines....

  12. 40 CFR 86.001-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.001-24 Test vehicles and engines. Section... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines....

  13. 40 CFR 86.001-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.001-24 Test vehicles and engines. Section... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines....

  14. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air filters... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Locomotive and engine testing... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures §...

  15. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1724-99 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.1724-99... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General... Trucks § 86.1724-99 Test vehicles and engines. The provisions of § 86.096-24 and subsequent model...

  17. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  18. 14 CFR 33.88 - Engine overtemperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.88 Engine overtemperature... this run, the turbine assembly must be within serviceable limits. (b) In addition to the test... this run, the turbine assembly may exhibit distress beyond the limits for an overtemperature...

  19. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air filters... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Locomotive and engine testing; overview... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures §...

  20. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air filters... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Locomotive and engine testing... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures §...

  1. Modern Experimental Techniques in Turbine Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bruckner, R. J.; Bencic, T. J.; Braunscheidel, E. P.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes application of two modern experimental techniques, thin-film thermocouples and pressure sensitive paint, to measurement in turbine engine components. A growing trend of using computational codes in turbomachinery design and development requires experimental techniques to refocus from overall performance testing to acquisition of detailed data on flow and heat transfer physics to validate these codes for design applications. The discussed experimental techniques satisfy this shift in focus. Both techniques are nonintrusive in practical terms. The thin-film thermocouple technique improves accuracy of surface temperature and heat transfer measurements. The pressure sensitive paint technique supplies areal surface pressure data rather than discrete point values only. The paper summarizes our experience with these techniques and suggests improvements to ease the application of these techniques for future turbomachinery research and code verifications.

  2. Application of differential similarity to finding nondimensional groups important in tests of cooled engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sucec, J.

    1977-01-01

    The method of differential similarity is applied to the partial differential equations and boundary conditions which govern the temperature, velocity, and pressure fields in the flowing gases and the solid stationary components in air-cooled engines. This procedure yields the nondimensional groups which must have the same value in both the test rig and the engine to produce similarity between the test results and the engine performance. These results guide the experimentalist in the design and selection of test equipment that properly scales quantities to actual engine conditions. They also provide a firm fundamental foundation for substantiation of previous similarity analyses which employed heuristic, physical reasoning arguments to arrive at the nondimensional groups.

  3. 40 CFR 86.1337-2007 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 86.1337... Procedures § 86.1337-2007 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) The following steps shall be taken for each test... start portion and one for the hot start portion. (c) If a dynamometer test run is determined to be...

  4. Criterion-Referenced Test Items for Small Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herd, Amon

    This notebook contains criterion-referenced test items for testing students' knowledge of small engines. The test items are based upon competencies found in the Missouri Small Engine Competency Profile. The test item bank is organized in 18 sections that cover the following duties: shop procedures; tools and equipment; fasteners; servicing fuel…

  5. 1. Photographic copy of original engineering drawing for Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of original engineering drawing for Test Stand 'C.' California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering 'New Test Stand Plan -- Edwards Test Station' drawing no. E18/2-3, 18 January 1957. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand C, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. DESCRIPTION OF RISK REDUCTION ENGINEERING LABORATORY TEST AND EVALUATION FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An onsite team of multidisciplined engineers and scientists conduct research and provide technical services in the areas of testing, design, and field implementation for both solid and hazardous waste management. Engineering services focus on the design and implementation of...

  7. High Altitude Small Engine Test Techniques at the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Wyzykowski, John; Chiapetta, Santo

    2001-01-01

    A High Altitude Test was performed in the Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a Pratt and Whitney Canada PW545 jet engine. This engine was tested to develop a highaltitude database on small, high-bypass ratio, engine performance and operability. Industry is interested in the use of high-bypass engines for Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles (UAV's) to perform high altitude surveillance. The tests were a combined effort between Pratt & Whitney Canada (PWC) and NASA Glenn Research Center. A large portion of this test activity was to collect performance data with a highly instrumented low-pressure turbine. Low-pressure turbine aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers was collected and compared to analytical models developed by NASA and PWC. This report describes the test techniques implemented to obtain high accuracy turbine performance data in an altitude test facility, including high accuracy airflow at high altitudes, very low mass flow, and low air temperatures. Major accomplishments from this test activity were to collect accurate and repeatable turbine performance data at high altitudes to within 1 percent. Data were collected at 19,800m, 16,750m, and 13,700m providing documentation of diminishing LPT performance with reductions in Reynolds number in an actual engine flight environment. The test provided a unique database for the development of engine analysis codes to be used for future LPT performance improvements.

  8. Initial testing of a variable-stroke Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, L.G.

    1985-02-01

    In support of the US Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems Program, NASA Lewis Research Center is evaluating variable-stroke control for Stirling engines. The engine being tested is the Advenco Stirling engine; this engine was manufactured by Philips Research Laboratories of the Netherlands and uses a variable-angle swash-plate drive to achieve variable stroke operation. This report describes the engine, presents initial steady-state test data taken at Lewis, and describes a major drive system failure and subsequent modifications. Computer simulation results are presented to show potential part-load efficiency gains with variable-stroke control.

  9. Initial testing of a variable-stroke Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, L. G.

    1985-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems Program, NASA Lewis Research Center is evaluating variable-stroke control for Stirling engines. The engine being tested is the Advenco Stirling engine; this engine was manufactured by Philips Research Laboratories of the Netherlands and uses a variable-angle swash-plate drive to achieve variable stroke operation. The engine is described, initial steady-state test data taken at Lewis are presented, a major drive system failure and subsequent modifications are described. Computer simulation results are presented to show potential part-load efficiency gains with variable-stroke control.

  10. Alternative Chemical Cleaning Methods for High Level Waste Tanks: Actual Waste Testing with SRS Tank 5F Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    King, William D.; Hay, Michael S.

    2016-08-30

    Solubility testing with actual High Level Waste tank sludge has been conducted in order to evaluate several alternative chemical cleaning technologies for the dissolution of sludge residuals remaining in the tanks after the exhaustion of mechanical cleaning and sludge sluicing efforts. Tests were conducted with archived Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive sludge solids that had been retrieved from Tank 5F in order to determine the effectiveness of an optimized, dilute oxalic/nitric acid cleaning reagent toward dissolving the bulk non-radioactive waste components. Solubility tests were performed by direct sludge contact with the oxalic/nitric acid reagent and with sludge that had been pretreated and acidified with dilute nitric acid. For comparison purposes, separate samples were also contacted with pure, concentrated oxalic acid following current baseline tank chemical cleaning methods. One goal of testing with the optimized reagent was to compare the total amounts of oxalic acid and water required for sludge dissolution using the baseline and optimized cleaning methods. A second objective was to compare the two methods with regard to the dissolution of actinide species known to be drivers for SRS tank closure Performance Assessments (PA). Additionally, solubility tests were conducted with Tank 5 sludge using acidic and caustic permanganate-based methods focused on the “targeted” dissolution of actinide species.

  11. Actual or potential neighborhood resources and access to them: testing hypotheses of social capital for the health of female caregivers.

    PubMed

    Carpiano, Richard M

    2008-08-01

    This study considers three commonly overlooked aspects of neighborhood social capital: actual or potential network resources, access to such resources, and their potentially negative implications, as they bear on the health of adult female caregivers of children. Drawing upon Bourdieu's social capital theory and urban and community sociology research, two sets of related hypotheses are formulated and tested. The first set examines specific resources that inhere within neighborhood social relations by testing hypotheses concerning four forms of social capital (social support, social leverage, informal social control, and neighborhood organization participation) and their respective associations with daily smoking and perceived health. The second set assesses the importance of one's access to the neighborhood networks that possess such resources by testing hypotheses regarding how residents' neighborhood attachment moderates the association between social capital forms and these health outcomes in positive and negative ways. Analyses of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A.FANS) linked with tract level census data indicate that specific social capital forms were directly associated with positive and negative health outcomes. Neighborhood attachment significantly moderated relationships between several social capital forms and health, indicating that a female caregiver's degree of network integration matters in both health promoting and health damaging ways. In addition to illustrating the utility of a Bourdieusian perspective for formulating explicit, testable hypotheses regarding how social capital may matter for health, these findings suggest that future public health studies of neighborhood social capital need to consider (1) the actual or potential resources that inhere within relationships, and (2) the role of access to such resources for promoting or compromising health.

  12. Double-blind photo lineups using actual eyewitnesses: an experimental test of a sequential versus simultaneous lineup procedure.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gary L; Steblay, Nancy K; Dysart, Jennifer E

    2015-02-01

    Eyewitnesses (494) to actual crimes in 4 police jurisdictions were randomly assigned to view simultaneous or sequential photo lineups using laptop computers and double-blind administration. The sequential procedure used in the field experiment mimicked how it is conducted in actual practice (e.g., using a continuation rule, witness does not know how many photos are to be viewed, witnesses resolve any multiple identifications), which is not how most lab experiments have tested the sequential lineup. No significant differences emerged in rates of identifying lineup suspects (25% overall) but the sequential procedure produced a significantly lower rate (11%) of identifying known-innocent lineup fillers than did the simultaneous procedure (18%). The simultaneous/sequential pattern did not significantly interact with estimator variables and no lineup-position effects were observed for either the simultaneous or sequential procedures. Rates of nonidentification were not significantly different for simultaneous and sequential but nonidentifiers from the sequential procedure were more likely to use the "not sure" response option than were nonidentifiers from the simultaneous procedure. Among witnesses who made an identification, 36% (41% of simultaneous and 32% of sequential) identified a known-innocent filler rather than a suspect, indicating that eyewitness performance overall was very poor. The results suggest that the sequential procedure that is used in the field reduces the identification of known-innocent fillers, but the differences are relatively small.

  13. Engineered Barrier Testing at the INEEL Engineered Barriers Test Facility: FY-1997 and FY-1999

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, K. N.; Porro, I.

    1998-09-01

    Engineered barriers of two designs are being tested at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility (EBTF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the test facility, barrier designs, and instruments used to monitor the test plots. Wetting tests conducted on the test plots in FY-97 are described and data collected from monitoring the test plots before, during and after the wetting tests are used to evaluate the performance of the covers during FY-97 and FY-98. Replicates of two engineered barrier designs were constructed in the EBTF cells. The first design comprises a thick, vegetated soil cover. The second design incorporates a capillary/biobarrier within the vegtated soil cover. The capillary barrier uses the textural break between an upper, fine textured soil and a lower, coarser-textured gravel layer to inhibit drainage under unsaturated conditions while increasing soil moisture storage in the root zone. Evaporation and transpiration by plants (although the test plots have not yet been vegetated) are used to recycle water stored in the soil back to the atmosphere. A geotextile fabric is used to maintain separation of the soil and gravel layers. A thick layer of cobbles beneath the gravel layer serves as a biobarrier to prevent intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into underlying waste (there is no waste in the test plots). Each test plot was instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes and neutron probe access tubes to measure moisture contents, tensiometers, heat dissipation sensors, and thermocouple psychrometers to measure matric potentials, thermocouples to measure soil temperature, and ion-exchange resin beads to monitor tracer movement. Each drainage sump is equipped with a tipping bucket instrument and pressure transducer to measure drainage. Precipitation is measured using a heated rain gauge located at the EBTF. Instrument calibration equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction

  14. TESTING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ENGINEERED FORMS OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE (MST)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-05-14

    Engineered forms of MST and mMST were prepared at ORNL using an internal gelation process. Samples of these two materials were characterized at SRNL to examine particle size and morphology, peroxide content, tapped densities, and Na, Ti, and C content. Batch contact tests were also performed to examine the performance of the materials. The {sup E}mMST material was found to contain less than 10% of the peroxide found in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. This was also evidenced in batch contact testing with both simulated and actual waste, where little difference in performance was seen between the two engineered materials, {sup E}MST and {sup E}mMST. Based on these results, attempts were made to increase the peroxide content of the materials by post-treatment with hydrogen peroxide. The peroxide treatment resulted in a slight ({approx}10%) increase in peroxide content; however, the peroxide:Ti molar ratio was still much lower ({approx}0.1 X) than what is seen in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. Testing with simulated waste showed the performance of the peroxide treated materials was improved. Batch contact tests were also performed with an earlier (2003) prepared lot of {sup E}MST to examine the effect of ionic strength on the performance of the material. In general the results showed a decrease in removal performance with increasing ionic strength, which is consistent with previous testing with MST. A Sr loading isotherm was also determined, and the {sup E}MST material was found to reach a Sr loading as high as 13.2 wt % after 100 days of contact at a phase ratio of 20000 mL/g. At the typical MST phase ratio of 2500 mL/g (0.4 g/L), a Sr loading of 2.64 wt % was reached after 506 hours of contact. Samples of {sup E}MST and the post-peroxide treated {sup E}mMST were also tested in a column configuration using simulated waste solution. The breakthrough curves along with analysis of the sorbent beds at the conclusion of the experiments showed that the peroxide treated

  15. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Locomotive and engine testing; overview. 92.104 Section 92.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR....104 Locomotive and engine testing; overview. (a) The test procedures described here...

  16. Hyper-X Engine Design and Ground Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voland, R. T.; Rock, K. E.; Huebner, L. D.; Witte, D. W.; Fischer, K. E.; McClinton, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    The Hyper-X Program, NASA's focused hypersonic technology program jointly run by NASA Langley and Dryden, is designed to move hypersonic, air-breathing vehicle technology from the laboratory environment to the flight environment, the last stage preceding prototype development. The Hyper-X research vehicle will provide the first ever opportunity to obtain data on an airframe integrated supersonic combustion ramjet propulsion system in flight, providing the first flight validation of wind tunnel, numerical and analytical methods used for design of these vehicles. A substantial portion of the integrated vehicle/engine flowpath development, engine systems verification and validation and flight test risk reduction efforts are experimentally based, including vehicle aeropropulsive force and moment database generation for flight control law development, and integrated vehicle/engine performance validation. The Mach 7 engine flowpath development tests have been completed, and effort is now shifting to engine controls, systems and performance verification and validation tests, as well as, additional flight test risk reduction tests. The engine wind tunnel tests required for these efforts range from tests of partial width engines in both small and large scramjet test facilities, to tests of the full flight engine on a vehicle simulator and tests of a complete flight vehicle in the Langley 8-Ft. High Temperature Tunnel. These tests will begin in the summer of 1998 and continue through 1999. The first flight test is planned for early 2000.

  17. 40 CFR 87.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test procedure (propulsion engines). 87.62 Section 87.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) Definitions. Test Procedures § 87.62 Test procedure (propulsion engines). Link to...

  18. 29. Historic view of twentythousandpound rocket test stand with engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic view of twenty-thousand-pound rocket test stand with engine installation in test cell of Building 202, September 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45870. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  19. 30. Historic view of twentythousandpound rocket test stand with engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Historic view of twenty-thousand-pound rocket test stand with engine installation in test cell of Building 202, looking down from elevated location, September 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45872. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. 1. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing structure of Test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing structure of Test Stand 'B' (4215/E-16), also known as the 'Short Snorter.' California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering 'Structural Addition - Bldg. E-12, Edwards Test Station,' drawing no. E12/1-1, 8 August 1957. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand B, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. Laboratory Tests of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-24

    and stabilize it. f. Repeat steps c and d. g. Repeat steps e and f until maximum engine speed is achieved h. Decrease the engine speed 200 rpm for...diesel engines or 400 rpm for *gasoline, and stabilize it. i. Repeat steps c and d. j. Repeat steps h and i until original speed is achieved. k. Stop the...load to 1/4 full load. d. Repeat step b. e. Repeat steps c and d for 1/2, 3/4, and full loads. f. Increase engine speed 200 rpm and reduce the load

  2. Conceptual study on manned engineering test satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Tooru; Inomata, Masabumi; Inagaki, Jun; Oono, Shigeru

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual study of spacecraft used for validating technologies which will be necessary for manned space development conducted by Japan in the future is presented. An Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and two-phase liquid loop radiator experiment equipment were selected as the major and optional equipment to be installed onboard the manned engineering test satellites, respectively. Mission items for ECLSS experiment equipment were extracted and traded off from the following on-ground technologies: (1) technology for removing toxic substances, offensive substances, and fine particles from the atmosphere; (2) N2 and O2 partial pressure control and CO2 removal technologies; (3) gas sensing technology; and (4) temperature and humidity control technology. Comparison was conducted on three base-line configurations such as follows: (1) pressurized module (expendable) plus bus section (expendable); (2) pressurized module (retrievable) plus bus section (expendable); and (3) pressurized module (expendable) plus bus section (expendable) plus recovery section. The results of the review on the satellite system base on configuration of the above case (1) are outlined.

  3. Component test program for variable-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, A. G.; Whitlow, J. B.; Stitt, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    Variable cycle engine (VCE) concepts for a supersonic cruise aircraft were studied. These VCE concepts incorporate unique critical components and flow path arrangements that provide good performance at both supersonic and subsonic cruise and appear to be economically and environmentally viable. Certain technologies were identified as critical to the successful development of these engine concepts and require considerable development and testing. The feasibility and readiness of the most critical VCE technologies, was assessed, a VCE component test program was initiated. The variable stream control engine (VSCE) component test program, tested and evaluated an efficient low emission duct burner and a quiet coannular ejector nozzle at the rear of a rematched F100 engine.

  4. Hydrogen-Fuel Engine Component Tests Near Completion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen is burned off at the E1 Test Stand the night of Oct. 7 during a cold-flow test of the fuel turbopump of the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC). The gaseous hydrogen spins the pump's turbine during the test, which was conducted to verify the pump's performance. Engineers plan one more test before sending the pump to The Boeing Co. for inspection. It will then be returned to SSC for engine system assembly. The IPD is the first reusable hydrogen-fueled advanced engine in development since the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  5. 40 CFR 86.1337-2007 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 86.1337... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust...

  6. 40 CFR 86.096-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.096-24... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Provisions for...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled,...

  7. 40 CFR 86.098-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.098-24... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Provisions for...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled,...

  8. 40 CFR 86.001-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.001-24... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Provisions for...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled,...

  9. 40 CFR 86.001-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.001-24... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Provisions for...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled,...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1337-96 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 86.1337... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust...

  11. 40 CFR 86.096-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.096-24... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Provisions for...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled,...

  12. 40 CFR 86.098-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.098-24... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Provisions for...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled,...

  13. 40 CFR 86.000-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.000-24... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Provisions for...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled,...

  14. 40 CFR 86.000-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.000-24... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Provisions for...-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled,...

  15. [Relation of actual nutritional characteristics to the health status of retirees and persons of preretirement age employed in mechanical engineering production].

    PubMed

    Grigorov, Iu G; Kozlovskaia, S G; Semes'ko, T M; Medovar, B Ia

    1988-01-01

    Actual nutrition and health state were investigated in 406 males of pre-pension and pension age (40-70 years) engaged in physical work (III category of difficulty) at an engineering plant. The chemical composition of their food was evaluated with respect to 74 chemical elements. The state of the workers' health was evaluated by the data obtained from the registers kept at the Plant medical unit. A relationship has been established between the character of the actual nutrition and the presence of an age-dependent disease, as well as the role of certain nutrients in the development of this or that disease in different age periods. A conclusion has been made on the necessity of the development of differential physiological requirements in the nutrients and energy for elder subjects engaged in the social industry, and inclusion of the rational nutrition into the complex of measures for prevention of age-dependent diseases.

  16. The engine testing process at Chrysler

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, K.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes how the company`s 2.7-L V6 engine program for the 1998 LH will move from the first developmental engine to production in just over two years. Chrysler`s Large Car Platform team is developing a new 2.7-L V6 for the 1998 Dodge Intrepid/Chrysler Concorde (LH platform) successor. The four-valve-per-cylinder engine will replace the base overhead-valve, 3.3-L engine in the LH, and eventually the Mitsubishi-supplied six-cylinder in the Chrysler Cirrus/Dodge Stratus (JA platform). There were many reasons for development of the new LH engine: reduced NVH, improved reliability, and better performance. Other goals were 10% better vehicle fuel economy, so weight had to be shed by the powertrain, and new emission standards (LEV and ULEV) had to be met.

  17. Thermal lag test engines evaluated and compared to equivalent Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Tailer, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal lag engines run both free piston and with pistons kinematically linked. Free piston, a thermal lag engine may be the simplest of all piston engines as it is valveless and has only one moving part, the piston. Horizontal and vertical thermal lag engines with substantially identical cooled pistons and cylinders are tested and evaluated, particularly as to power density. The horizontal engine has an elongated, small diameter heated chamber and the vertical engine has a large diameter flat heated chamber. Both heated chambers may be altered in volume to maximize engine power at optimum compression ratios. The power density of unpressurized thermal lag engines is compared to that of early commercial Stirling cycle unpressurized air engines. The comparison indicates the potential for applying well-known modern Stirling technology to thermal lag engines.

  18. All Shuttle Centaur engine and nozzle support plug vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Loads applied to the RL10 engines while in flight in the orbiter payload bay are significantly different from the load environment experienced in Atlas and Titan/Centaur applications. To predict the engine loads, a NASTRAN analysis was conducted. As part of this effort a vibration test program was accomplished to provide input to the analysis, and to verify engine durability. This program was completed in two phases. The first phase provided data and characteristics which were used as input to the analysis. The second phase subjected the engine to limit loads, and included hot firings before and after the vibration test. The test hardware, performance, and results are described.

  19. Environmental Testing of the NEXT PM1R Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John S.; Anderson, John R.; VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Soulas, George C.

    2007-01-01

    The NEXT propulsion system is an advanced ion propulsion system presently under development that is oriented towards robotic exploration of the solar system using solar electric power. The subsystem includes an ion engine, power processing unit, feed system components, and thruster gimbal. The Prototype Model engine PM1 was subjected to qualification-level environmental testing in 2006 to demonstrate compatibility with environments representative of anticipated mission requirements. Although the testing was largely successful, several issues were identified including the fragmentation of potting cement on the discharge and neutralizer cathode heater terminations during vibration which led to abbreviated thermal testing, and generation of particulate contamination from manufacturing processes and engine materials. The engine was reworked to address most of these findings, renamed PM1R, and the environmental test sequence was repeated. Thruster functional testing was performed before and after the vibration and thermal-vacuum tests. Random vibration testing, conducted with the thruster mated to the breadboard gimbal, was executed at 10.0 Grms for 2 min in each of three axes. Thermal-vacuum testing included three thermal cycles from 120 to 215 C with hot engine re-starts. Thruster performance was nominal throughout the test program, with minor variations in a few engine operating parameters likely caused by facility effects. There were no significant changes in engine performance as characterized by engine operating parameters, ion optics performance measurements, and beam current density measurements, indicating no significant changes to the hardware as a result of the environmental testing. The NEXT PM1R engine and the breadboard gimbal were found to be well-designed against environmental requirements based on the results reported herein. The redesigned cathode heater terminations successfully survived the vibration environments. Based on the results of this test

  20. Test plan for engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    This test plan describes experimental details of an engineering-scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration to be performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in fiscal year (FY)-93. This demonstration will investigate, in the engineering scale, the feasibility of using electrostatic enclosures and devices to control the spread of contaminants during transuranic waste handling operations. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the FY-93 experiments are included in this plan.

  1. SpaceX Test Fires Engine Prototype

    NASA Video Gallery

    One of NASA's industry partners, SpaceX, fires its new SuperDraco engine prototype in preparation for the ninth milestone to be completed under SpaceX's funded Space Act Agreement (SAA) with NASA's...

  2. NASA Now: Engineering Design: Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Norman W. Schaeffler, a NASA aerospace research engineer, describes how wind tunnels work and how aircraft designers use them to understand aerodynamic forces at low speeds. Learn the advantage...

  3. Blue Origin Tests BE-3 Engine

    NASA Video Gallery

    Blue Origin successfully fires the thrust chamber assembly for its new 100,000 pound thrust BE-3 liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen rocket engine. As part of the company's Reusable Booster System (RBS)...

  4. Single shaft automotive gas turbine engine characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automotive gas turbine incorporating a single stage centrifugal compressor and a single stage radial inflow turbine is described. Among the engine's features is the use of wide range variable geometry at the inlet guide vanes, the compressor diffuser vanes, and the turbine inlet vanes to achieve improved part load fuel economy. The engine was tested to determine its performance in both the variable geometry and equivalent fixed geometry modes. Testing was conducted without the originally designed recuperator. Test results were compared with the predicted performance of the nonrecuperative engine based on existing component rig test maps. Agreement between test results and the computer model was achieved.

  5. Annual Certification Test Data for Vehicles and Engines

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Annual Certification Test Results Report (often referred to as Federal Register Test Results Report) includes light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty engine reports of projected emission levels at the end of the useful life of a vehicle.

  6. Which Is More Useful in Predicting Hospital Mortality -Dichotomised Blood Test Results or Actual Test Values? A Retrospective Study in Two Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Rudge, Gavin; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary; Nangalia, Vishal; Prytherch, David; Holder, Roger; Briggs, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine blood tests are an integral part of clinical medicine and in interpreting blood test results clinicians have two broad options. (1) Dichotomise the blood tests into normal/abnormal or (2) use the actual values and overlook the reference values. We refer to these as the “binary” and the “non-binary” strategy respectively. We investigate which strategy is better at predicting the risk of death in hospital based on seven routinely undertaken blood tests (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, and white blood cell count) using tree models to implement the two strategies. Methodology A retrospective database study of emergency admissions to an acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010, involving 10,050 emergency admissions with routine blood tests undertaken within 24 hours of admission. We compared the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve for predicting in-hospital mortality using the binary and non-binary strategy. Results The mortality rate was 6.98% (701/10050). The mean predicted risk of death in those who died was significantly (p-value <0.0001) lower using the binary strategy (risk = 0.181 95%CI: 0.193 to 0.210) versus the non-binary strategy (risk = 0.222 95%CI: 0.194 to 0.251), representing a risk difference of 28.74 deaths in the deceased patients (n = 701). The binary strategy had a significantly (p-value <0.0001) lower area under the ROC curve of 0.832 (95% CI: 0.819 to 0.845) versus the non-binary strategy (0.853 95% CI: 0.840 to 0.867). Similar results were obtained using data from another hospital. Conclusions Dichotomising routine blood test results is less accurate in predicting in-hospital mortality than using actual test values because it underestimates the risk of death in patients who died. Further research into the use of actual blood test values in clinical decision making is required especially as the infrastructure to implement this potentially promising

  7. Thousands gather to watch a Space Shuttle Main Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Approximately 13,000 people fill the grounds at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center for the first-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. The test marked Stennis Space Center's 20th anniversary celebration of the first Space Shuttle mission.

  8. 40 CFR 87.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure (propulsion engines). 87.62 Section 87.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.62 Test procedure...

  9. 9. Historic aerial photo of rocket engine test facility complex, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic aerial photo of rocket engine test facility complex, June 11, 1965. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-65-1270. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  10. 10. Historic photo of rendering of rocket engine test facility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic photo of rendering of rocket engine test facility complex, April 28, 1964. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-69472. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  11. 13. Historic drawing of rocket engine test facility layout, including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic drawing of rocket engine test facility layout, including Buildings 202, 205, 206, and 206A, February 3, 1984. NASA GRC drawing number CF-101539. On file at NASA Glenn Research Center. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. 11. Historic photo of cutaway rendering of rocket engine test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic photo of cutaway rendering of rocket engine test facility complex, June 11, 1965. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-74433. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  13. 8. Historic aerial photo of rocket engine test facility complex, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic aerial photo of rocket engine test facility complex, June 11, 1965. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-65-1271. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. 5. Historic photo of scale model of rocket engine test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic photo of scale model of rocket engine test facility, June 18, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45264. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 6. Historic photo of rocket engine test facility Building 202 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic photo of rocket engine test facility Building 202 complex in operation at night, September 12, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45924. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. 40 CFR 1065.405 - Test engine preparation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... evaporative hydrocarbons for eventual combustion in the engine and the test sequence involves a cold-start or hot-start duty cycle, attach a canister to the engine before running an emission test. You may omit using an evaporative canister for any hot-stabilized duty cycles. You may request to omit using...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.405 - Test engine preparation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... evaporative hydrocarbons for eventual combustion in the engine and the test sequence involves a cold-start or hot-start duty cycle, attach a canister to the engine before running an emission test. You may omit using an evaporative canister for any hot-stabilized duty cycles. You may request to omit using...

  18. Testing a dual-mode ramjet engine with kerosene combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V. M.; Karasev, V. N.; Kartovitskii, L. L.; Krymov, E. A.; Skachkov, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    Results of life firing tests of a dual-mode ramjet engine intended for operation in the speed range M = 3-6 are discussed. The tests were carried out on a test bench under freestream conditions typical of Mach 6 flight at 27.6-km altitude. In the tests, the adopted design and technological solutions were verified, and efficient operation of the ramjet engine with kerosene combustion during 110 s was demonstrated.

  19. The Nutating Engine-Prototype Engine Progress Report and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.; Boruta, Mike

    2006-01-01

    A prototype of a new, internal combustion (IC) engine concept has been completed. The Nutating Engine features an internal disk nutating (wobbling) on a Z-shaped power shaft. The engine is exceedingly compact, and several times more power dense than any conventional (reciprocating or rotary) IC engine. This paper discusses lessons learned during the prototype engine's development and provides details of its construction. In addition, results of the initial performance tests of the various components, as well as the complete engine, are summarized.

  20. Stand for testing the electrical race car engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, M.; Franiasz, J.; Mierzwa, P.; Wylenzek, D.

    2015-11-01

    An engine test stand created especially for research of electrical race car is described in the paper. The car is an aim of Silesian Greenpower project whose participants build and test electrical vehicles to take part in international races in Great Britain. The engine test stand is used to test and measure the characteristics of vehicles and their engines. It has been designed particularly to test the electric cars engineered by students of Silesian Greenpower project. The article contains a description how the test stand works and shows its versatility in many areas. The paper presents both construction of the test stand, control system and sample results of conducted research. The engine test stand was designed and modified using PLM Siemens NX 8.5. The construction of the test stand is highly modular, which means it can be used both for testing the vehicle itself or for tests without the vehicle. The test stand has its own wheel, motor, powertrain and braking system with second engine. Such solution enables verifying various concepts without changing the construction of the vehicle. The control system and measurement system are realized by enabling National Instruments product myRIO (RIO - Reconfigurable Input/Output). This controller in combination with powerful LabVIEW environment performs as an advanced tool to control torque and speed simultaneously. It is crucial as far as the test stand is equipped in two motors - the one being tested and the braking one. The feedback loop is realized by an optical encoder cooperating with the rotor mounted on the wheel. The results of tests are shown live on the screen both as a chart and as single values. After performing several tests there is a report generated. The engine test stand is widely used during process of the Silesian Greenpower vehicle design. Its versatility enables powertrain testing, wheels and tires tests, thermal analysis and more.

  1. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; McLaurine, S.B.; Martin, P.F.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1989-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 14}C, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and U), stable major components (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 203}Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, {sup 125}I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by {sup 99}Tc, {sup 75}Se, and finally U, {sup 14}C, and {sup 110m}Ag. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. Rover nuclear rocket engine program: Overview of rover engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finseth, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The results of nuclear rocket development activities from the inception of the ROVER program in 1955 through the termination of activities on January 5, 1973 are summarized. This report discusses the nuclear reactor test configurations (non cold flow) along with the nuclear furnace demonstrated during this time frame. Included in the report are brief descriptions of the propulsion systems, test objectives, accomplishments, technical issues, and relevant test results for the various reactor tests. Additionally, this document is specifically aimed at reporting performance data and their relationship to fuel element development with little or no emphasis on other (important) items.

  3. Phase 1 Development Testing of the Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Nicholas L.; Eddleman, David E.; Calvert, Marty R.; Bullard, David B.; Martin, Michael A.; Wall, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Development Breadboard Engine (BBE) is a pressure-fed liquid oxygen/pump-fed liquid hydrogen (LOX/LH2) expander cycle engine that was built and operated by NASA at Marshall Space Flight Center's East Test Area. The breadboard engine was conceived as a technology demonstrator for the additive manufacturing technologies for an advanced upper stage prototype engine. The components tested on the breadboard engine included an ablative chamber, injector, main fuel valve, turbine bypass valve, a main oxidizer valve, a mixer and the fuel turbopump. All parts minus the ablative chamber were additively manufactured. The BBE was successfully hot fire tested seven times. Data collected from the test series will be used for follow on demonstration tests with a liquid oxygen turbopump and a regeneratively cooled chamber and nozzle.

  4. Development free-piston Stirling test-bed engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochat, G. R.; Vitale, N. G.; Moynihan, T. M.

    The free-piston Stirling Technology Demonstrator Engine (TDE) designed and instrumented to provide data to aid in understanding free-piston Stirling engine operation and performance, is described. It is noted that the system includes instrumentation to measure the internal thermodynamic operation and to permit calculation of system power flows. Near-term testing of the engine will assess three mechanisms for engine loss. It is pointed out that recent testing has demonstrated that the power and efficiency are strong functions of heater head temperature. A maximum power output of 1,800 watts and a thermodynamic efficiency of 30% have been demonstrated at 450 C and 40 bar.

  5. Development of Intake Swirl Generators for Turbo Jet Engine Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    As a test object a Larxac 04 turbofan engine was chosen which is used as propulsion in the Alpha Jet aircraft . This twospool engine features a two...a__ OPI: !’fIC-TID N .18.1 DEVELOPMENT OF NAR 8WZRL GENERATORS FOR TURBO JET ENGINE TU TING by H.P. Gensmlor*, W. Meyer**, L. Fottner*** Dipl.-Ing...at the Universitit der Bundeswehr MUnchen. The test facility is designed for turbo jet engines up to an maximum thrust of 30kN and a maximum mass

  6. 75 FR 37310 - Engine-Testing Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... the entries for ``Hydrocarbon composition'' to read as follows: Sec. 1065.710 Gasoline... Units General testing testing \\1\\ * * * * * Hydrocarbon composition: Olefins m\\3\\/m\\3\\....... Maximum,...

  7. 40 CFR 89.609 - Final admission of modification nonroad engines and test nonroad engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Importation of Nonconforming Nonroad Engines § 89.609 Final admission of... all emission tests; (4) The applicable deterioration factor assigned by EPA, if any; (5) The emission test results adjusted by the applicable deterioration factor; (6) All information required under §...

  8. 40 CFR 89.609 - Final admission of modification nonroad engines and test nonroad engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Importation of Nonconforming Nonroad Engines § 89.609 Final admission of... all emission tests; (4) The applicable deterioration factor assigned by EPA, if any; (5) The emission test results adjusted by the applicable deterioration factor; (6) All information required under §...

  9. Viking '75 spacecraft design and test summary. Volume 3: Engineering test summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmberg, N. A.; Faust, R. P.; Holt, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The engineering test program for the lander and the orbiter are presented. The engineering program was developed to achieve confidence that the design was adequate to survive the expected mission environments and to accomplish the mission objective.

  10. NASA Teams With Army in Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photograph depicts one of over thirty tests conducted on the Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) test stand 115, a joint effort between NASA's MSFC and the U.S. Army AMCOM of Redstone Arsenal. The engine tests were conducted to evaluate an irnovative, 'self-cooled', vortex combustion chamber, which relies on tangentially injected propellants from the chamber wall producing centrifugal forces that keep the relatively cold liquid propellants near the wall.

  11. Definition study for variable cycle engine testbed engine and associated test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vdoviak, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The product/study double bypass variable cycle engine (VCE) was updated to incorporate recent improvements. The effect of these improvements on mission range and noise levels was determined. This engine design was then compared with current existing high-technology core engines in order to define a subscale testbed configuration that simulated many of the critical technology features of the product/study VCE. Detailed preliminary program plans were then developed for the design, fabrication, and static test of the selected testbed engine configuration. These plans included estimated costs and schedules for the detail design, fabrication and test of the testbed engine and the definition of a test program, test plan, schedule, instrumentation, and test stand requirements.

  12. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  13. Recent tests on the Carter small reciprocating steam engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiceniuk, T.; Wingenbach, W.

    1982-07-01

    The Jay Carter Enterprises (JCE) Paratransit Vehicle steam engine was tested over a range of conditions which might be experienced by the power converter subsystem of the Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment. Some difficulties were encountered getting the engine ready for testing. These difficulties were related to the five year dormancy of the entire system and to incomplete development work that had been going on at the time of cessation of steam engine work at JCE. Other difficulties were related to the fact that the particular expander being tested never ran before and possessed some manufacturing defects. Nevertheless, the engine was operated successfully and results of testing do verify results of computer simulations of the engine in regard to the effect of temperature and power level variations. Engine efficiency was good but generally lower than expected and performance dropped as testing continued. The effect of change in expansion ratio was not demonstrated because of deterioration in engine performance. Post-test inspection revealed numerous correctable defects.

  14. Recent tests on the Carter small reciprocating steam engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiceniuk, T.; Wingenbach, W.

    1982-01-01

    The Jay Carter Enterprises (JCE) Paratransit Vehicle steam engine was tested over a range of conditions which might be experienced by the power converter subsystem of the Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment. Some difficulties were encountered getting the engine ready for testing. These difficulties were related to the five year dormancy of the entire system and to incomplete development work that had been going on at the time of cessation of steam engine work at JCE. Other difficulties were related to the fact that the particular expander being tested never ran before and possessed some manufacturing defects. Nevertheless, the engine was operated successfully and results of testing do verify results of computer simulations of the engine in regard to the effect of temperature and power level variations. Engine efficiency was good but generally lower than expected and performance dropped as testing continued. The effect of change in expansion ratio was not demonstrated because of deterioration in engine performance. Post-test inspection revealed numerous correctable defects.

  15. Human Factors Engineering. Part 1. Test Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-15

    Design (Subjective Testing Techniques ) AMC Regulation 70-13 Test Incident ,ind Related Reporting AR 602-2 Manpower and Personnel Integration :MANDRINT...collection techniques , to the particular item being tested. An HFE Test Planning Checklist for ensuring that applicable steps are followed is provided in...speed reduction techniques and direct readout devices &re used in the analysis of the recorded noise data, the frequency response characteristics of

  16. Uprated OMS Engine Status-Sea Level Testing Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertolino, J. D.; Boyd, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) is pressure fed, utilizing storable propellants. Performance uprating of this engine, through the use of a gas generator driven turbopump to increase operating pressure, is being pursued by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Component level design, fabrication, and test activities for this engine system have been on-going since 1984. More recently, a complete engine designated the Integrated Component Test Bed (ICTB), was tested at sea level conditions by Aerojet. A description of the test hardware and results of the sea level test program are presented. These results, which include the test condition operating envelope and projected performance at altitude conditions, confirm the capability of the selected Uprated OME (UOME) configuration to meet or exceed performance and operational requirements. Engine flexibility, demonstrated through testing at two different operational mixture ratios, along with a summary of projected Space Shuttle performance enhancements using the UOME, are discussed. Planned future activities, including ICTB tests at simulated altitude conditions, and recommendations for further engine development, are also discussed.

  17. Computer aided design of jet engine test cell exhaust systems

    SciTech Connect

    Collings, D.

    1982-01-01

    A computerized design procedure that provides a multi-directional analysis of available data is a proven method of developing accurate cost models and performing system trade-offs. The application to the engineering of exhaust silencing systems for jet engine test cells is discused.

  18. Tests Of A Stirling-Engine Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dochat, George

    1995-01-01

    Report describes acceptance tests of power converter consisting of pair of opposed free-piston Stirling engines driving linear alternators. Stirling engines offer potential for extremely long life, high reliability, high efficiency at low hot-to-cold temperature ratios, and relatively low heater-head temperatures.

  19. 40 CFR 86.1724-99 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test vehicles and engines. 86.1724-99... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Provisions for the Voluntary National Low Emission Vehicle Program for Light-Duty Vehicles and...

  20. Ground test facility for SEI nuclear rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, C.D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.; Shipers, L.R.

    1992-08-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) has been identified as a critical technology in support of the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). In order to safely develop a reliable, reusable, long-lived flight engine, facilities are required that will support ground tests to qualify the nuclear rocket engine design. Initial nuclear fuel element testing will need to be performed in a facility that supports a realistic thermal and neutronic environment in which the fuel elements will operate at a fraction of the power of a flight weight reactor/engine. Ground testing of nuclear rocket engines is not new. New restrictions mandated by the National Environmental Protection Act of 1970, however, now require major changes to be made in the manner in which reactor engines are now tested. These new restrictions now preclude the types of nuclear rocket engine tests that were performed in the past from being done today. A major attribute of a safely operating ground test facility is its ability to prevent fission products from being released in appreciable amounts to the environment. Details of the intricacies and complications involved with the design of a fuel element ground test facility are presented in this report with a strong emphasis on safety and economy.

  1. Testing for the J-2X Upper Stage Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzell, James C.

    2010-01-01

    NASA selected the J-2X Upper Stage Engine in 2006 to power the upper stages of the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. Based on the proven Saturn J-2 engine, this new engine will provide 294,000 pounds of thrust and a specific impulse of 448 seconds, making it the most efficient gas generator cycle engine in history. The engine's guiding philosophy emerged from the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) in 2005. Goals established then called for vehicles and components based, where feasible, on proven hardware from the Space Shuttle, commercial, and other programs, to perform the mission and provide an order of magnitude greater safety. Since that time, the team has made unprecedented progress. Ahead of the other elements of the Constellation Program architecture, the team has progressed through System Requirements Review (SRR), System Design Review (SDR), Preliminary Design Review (PDR), and Critical Design Review (CDR). As of February 2010, more than 100,000 development engine parts have been ordered and more than 18,000 delivered. Approximately 1,300 of more than 1,600 engine drawings were released for manufacturing. A major factor in the J-2X development approach to this point is testing operations of heritage J-2 engine hardware and new J-2X components to understand heritage performance, validate computer modeling of development components, mitigate risk early in development, and inform design trades. This testing has been performed both by NASA and its J-2X prime contractor, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR). This body of work increases the likelihood of success as the team prepares for testing the J-2X powerpack and first development engine in calendar 2011. This paper will provide highlights of J-2X testing operations, engine test facilities, development hardware, and plans.

  2. 40 CFR 1065.405 - Test engine preparation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hot-start duty cycle, attach a canister to the engine before running an emission test. You may omit using an evaporative canister for any hot-stabilized duty cycles. You may request to omit using...

  3. High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southwick, Robert D.; Gallops, George W.; Kerr, Laura J.; Kielb, Robert P.; Welsh, Mark G.; DeLaat, John C.; Orme, John S.

    1998-01-01

    The High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Program, managed and funded by the NASA Lewis Research Center, is a cooperative effort between NASA and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). The program objective is to develop and flight demonstrate an advanced high stability integrated engine control system that uses real-time, measurement-based estimation of inlet pressure distortion to enhance engine stability. Flight testing was performed using the NASA Advanced Controls Technologies for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) F-15 aircraft at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The flight test configuration, details of the research objectives, and the flight test matrix to achieve those objectives are presented. Flight test results are discussed that show the design approach can accurately estimate distortion and perform real-time control actions for engine accommodation.

  4. J-2X Engine Test Goes Full Duration

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA conducted a 260-second J-2X engine test at the Stennis Space Center in southern Mississippi on June 13 marking another step in developing the Space Launch System, the next-generation rocket th...

  5. Miniaturized High Speed Controls for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and Test)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    AO/A-006 108 MINIATURIZED HIGH SPEED CONTROLS FOR TURBINE ENGINES (FABRICATION AND TEST ) D. G. Burnell, et al Colt lndustries, Incorporated Prepared...Speed Controlsma193-Ag97 for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and May 1973RIN ORD REugR 1974 Test ) 6.PRFRIA GOG EOTNME 7. AUTHOR(.) 6- CONTRACT OR GRANT... y asd Id..,tify by block numnb.) ’-This report summarizes the design and development of con- trol components and high speed fuel pump technology for

  6. Development of the Larzac Engine Rig for Compressor Stall Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    similarly to an iris or a camera shutter and achieved its throttling by the gradual reduction of the effective area of the by-pass exit annulus...inserted into the engine core nozzle or the iris gradually closed at the by-pass duct exit until engine stall was achieved. The gradual activation of...exhaust poppet damper frequently used in fan and compressor test rigs. During testing with the by-pass blockage mechanism, the stability of the fan was

  7. 6. "EXPERIMENTAL ROCKET ENGINE TEST STATION AT AFFTC." A low ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. "EXPERIMENTAL ROCKET ENGINE TEST STATION AT AFFTC." A low oblique aerial view of Test Area 1-115, looking south, showing Test Stand 1-3 at left, Instrumentation and Control building 8668 at center, and Test Stand 15 at right. The test area is under construction; no evidence of railroad line in photo. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. HIDEC F-15 adaptive engine control system flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, James W.

    1987-01-01

    NASA-Ames' Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) flight test program aims to develop fully integrated airframe, propulsion, and flight control systems. The HIDEC F-15 adaptive engine control system flight test program has demonstrated that significant performance improvements are obtainable through the retention of stall-free engine operation throughout the aircraft flight and maneuver envelopes. The greatest thrust increase was projected for the medium-to-high altitude flight regime at subsonic speed which is of such importance to air combat. Adaptive engine control systems such as the HIDEC F-15's can be used to upgrade the performance of existing aircraft without resort to expensive reengining programs.

  9. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  10. Engine-Scale Combustor Rig Designed, Fabricated, and Tested for Combustion Instability Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    2000-01-01

    Low-emission combustor designs are prone to combustor instabilities. Because active control of these instabilities may allow future combustors to meet both stringent emissions and performance requirements, an experimental combustor rig was developed for investigating methods of actively suppressing combustion instabilities. The experimental rig has features similar to a real engine combustor and exhibits instabilities representative of those in aircraft gas turbine engines. Experimental testing in the spring of 1999 demonstrated that the rig can be tuned to closely represent an instability observed in engine tests. Future plans are to develop and demonstrate combustion instability control using this experimental combustor rig. The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is leading the Combustion Instability Control program to investigate methods for actively suppressing combustion instabilities. Under this program, a single-nozzle, liquid-fueled research combustor rig was designed, fabricated, and tested. The rig has many of the complexities of a real engine combustor, including an actual fuel nozzle and swirler, dilution cooling, and an effusion-cooled liner. Prior to designing the experimental rig, a survey of aircraft engine combustion instability experience identified an instability observed in a prototype engine as a suitable candidate for replication. The frequency of the instability was 525 Hz, with an amplitude of approximately 1.5-psi peak-to-peak at a burner pressure of 200 psia. The single-nozzle experimental combustor rig was designed to preserve subcomponent lengths, cross sectional area distribution, flow distribution, pressure-drop distribution, temperature distribution, and other factors previously found to be determinants of burner acoustic frequencies, mode shapes, gain, and damping. Analytical models were used to predict the acoustic resonances of both the engine combustor and proposed experiment. The analysis confirmed that the test rig

  11. Labyrinth seal testing for lift fan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobek, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    An abradable buffered labyrinth seal for the control of turbine gas path leakage in a tip-turbine driven lift fan was designed, tested, and analyzed. The seal configuration was not designed to operate in any specific location but was sized to be evaluated in an existing test rig. The final sealing diameter selected was 28 inches. Results of testing indicate that the flow equations predicted seal air flows consistent with measured values. Excellent sealing characteristics of the abradable coating on the stator land were demonstrated when a substantial seal penetration of .030 inch into the land surface was encountered without appreciable wear on the labyrinth knife edges.

  12. Engineering and Design: Laboratory Investigations and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Requirements for Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste (HTRW) and Ordnance and Explosive Waste (OEW) Activities . b. ER 1110-1-261, Quality Assurance of...Laboratory Testing Procedures. c. ER 1110-1-263, Chemical Data Quality Management for Hazardous Waste Remedial Activities . d. ER 1110-1-2002, Cement...Slag, and Pozzolan Acceptance Testing. e. ER 1110-2-8154, Water Quality Management at Corps Civil Works Projects. f. ER 200-2-3, Environmental

  13. Reducing the Time and Cost of Testing Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Producing a new aircraft engine currently costs approximately $1 billion, with 3 years of development time for a commercial engine and 10 years for a military engine. The high development time and cost make it extremely difficult to transition advanced technologies for cleaner, quieter, and more efficient new engines. To reduce this time and cost, NASA created a vision for the future where designers would use high-fidelity computer simulations early in the design process in order to resolve critical design issues before building the expensive engine hardware. To accomplish this vision, NASA's Glenn Research Center initiated a collaborative effort with the aerospace industry and academia to develop its Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), an advanced engineering environment for the analysis and design of aerospace propulsion systems and components. Partners estimate that using NPSS has the potential to dramatically reduce the time, effort, and expense necessary to design and test jet engines by generating sophisticated computer simulations of an aerospace object or system. These simulations will permit an engineer to test various design options without having to conduct costly and time-consuming real-life tests. By accelerating and streamlining the engine system design analysis and test phases, NPSS facilitates bringing the final product to market faster. NASA's NPSS Version (V)1.X effort was a task within the Agency s Computational Aerospace Sciences project of the High Performance Computing and Communication program, which had a mission to accelerate the availability of high-performance computing hardware and software to the U.S. aerospace community for its use in design processes. The technology brings value back to NASA by improving methods of analyzing and testing space transportation components.

  14. Space Shuttle Main Engine instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump technology test bed testing results summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbl, Mary E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the test results from the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP). The turbopump was tested on Engine 3001, a highly instrumented engine, in an effort to characterize the turbopump and the engine system. Seven tests, for a total duration of 766 seconds, were performed over a five month time period. The testing was performed at a wide variety of engine conditions. Changes in engine mixture ratio, power level, engine inlet oxidizer pressure, engine inlet fuel pressure, and engine start sequence were made. A discussion of all the HPOTP pressure and temperature data obtained are presented with comparisons to supporting analyses made where applicable. The effect of the various engine conditions on the measured data is addressed. This paper also discusses the challenges that were overcome to obtain the data. The significant instrumentation related problems encountered during the design, fabrication, and testing of this turbopump are summarized. Only those issues that affected the data obtained or the instrumentation itself are discussed. The relevance of the data to other noninstrumented turbomachinery is outlined. Conclusions and recommendations resulting from the test series will be presented.

  15. Energy efficient engine sector combustor rig test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubiel, D. J.; Greene, W.; Sundt, C. V.; Tanrikut, S.; Zeisser, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Energy Efficient Engine program, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft has successfully completed a comprehensive combustor rig test using a 90-degree sector of an advanced two-stage combustor with a segmented liner. Initial testing utilized a combustor with a conventional louvered liner and demonstrated that the Energy Efficient Engine two-stage combustor configuration is a viable system for controlling exhaust emissions, with the capability to meet all aerothermal performance goals. Goals for both carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were surpassed and the goal for oxides of nitrogen was closely approached. In another series of tests, an advanced segmented liner configuration with a unique counter-parallel FINWALL cooling system was evaluated at engine sea level takeoff pressure and temperature levels. These tests verified the structural integrity of this liner design. Overall, the results from the program have provided a high level of confidence to proceed with the scheduled Combustor Component Rig Test Program.

  16. Test results of the highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; Leopard, J. L.; Lightfoot, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Test results of a highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are presented. The instrumented engine, when combined with instrumented high pressure turbopumps, contains over 750 special measurements, including flowrates, pressures, temperatures, and strains. To date, two different test series, accounting for a total of sixteen tests and 1,667 seconds, have been conducted with this engine. The first series, which utilized instrumented turbopumps, characterized the internal operating environment of the SSME for a variety of operating conditions. The second series provided system-level validation of a high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump that had been retrofitted with a fluid-film bearing in place of the usual pump-end ball bearings. Major findings from these two test series are highlighted in this paper. In addition, comparisons are made between model predictions and measured test data.

  17. Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-12-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

  18. Environmental Testing of the NEXT PM1 Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synder, John S.; Anderson, John R.; VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Soulas, George C.

    2008-01-01

    The NEXT propulsion system is an advanced ion propulsion system presently under development that is oriented towards robotic exploration of the solar system using solar electric power. The Prototype Model engine PM1 was subjected to qualification-level environmental testing to demonstrate compatibility with environments representative of anticipated mission requirements. Random vibration testing, conducted with the thruster mated to the breadboard gimbal, was executed at 10.0 Grms for 2 minutes in each of three axes. Thermal-vacuum testing included a deep cold soak of the engine to temperatures of -168 C and thermal cycling from -120 to 203 C. Although the testing was largely successful, several issues were identified including the fragmentation of potting cement on the discharge and neutralizer cathode heater terminations during vibration which led to abbreviated thermal testing, and generation of particulate contamination from manufacturing processes and engine materials. Thruster performance was nominal throughout the test program, with minor variations in some engine operating parameters likely caused by facility effects. In general, the NEXT PM1 engine and the breadboard gimbal were found to be well-designed against environmental requirements based on the results reported herein. After resolution of the findings from this test program the hardware environmental qualification program can proceed with confidence.

  19. U.S. Air Force Turbine Engine Emission Survey. Volume II. Individual Engine Test Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-01

    1» I MI HU III.I11M1,|IHIIPH|I»^^—»^ II 111.11 l|. I I | mi | . I I. I.,.L ENGINE J85 -5 17 ^ ^_._. rr •Wl...AD-AÜbl 665 UNCLASSIFIED SCOTT ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY INC PLUMSTEAOVILLE PA F/G 21/5 U.S. AIR FORCE TURBINE ENGINE EMISSION SURVEY...i run’ LEVEL CEEDOTR-7834 U.S. AIR FORCE TURBINE ENGINE EMISSION SURVEY VOL II INDIVIDUAL ENGINE TEST REPORTS v o-< 3 „ fi-^\\^92 ANTHONY F

  20. Spacecraft Testing Programs: Adding Value to the Systems Engineering Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Keith J.; Schaible, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Testing has long been recognized as a critical component of spacecraft development activities - yet many major systems failures may have been prevented with more rigorous testing programs. The question is why is more testing not being conducted? Given unlimited resources, more testing would likely be included in a spacecraft development program. Striking the right balance between too much testing and not enough has been a long-term challenge for many industries. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the barriers, enablers, and best practices for developing and sustaining a strong test program and testing team. This paper will also explore the testing decision factors used by managers; the varying attitudes toward testing; methods to develop strong test engineers; and the influence of behavior, culture and processes on testing programs. KEY WORDS: Risk, Integration and Test, Validation, Verification, Test Program Development

  1. Lean mixture engine testing and evaluation program. [for automobile engine pollution and fuel performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Hoehn, F. W.; Griffin, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental results for fuel consumption and emissions are presented for a 350 CID (5.7 liter) Chevrolet V-8 engine modified for lean operation with gasoline. The lean burn engine achieved peak thermal efficiency at an equivalence ratio of 0.75 and a spark advance of 60 deg BTDC. At this condition the lean burn engine demonstrated a 10% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption compared with the stock engine; however, NOx and hydrocarbon emissions were higher. With the use of spark retard and/or slightly lower equivalence ratios, the NOx emissions performance of the stock engine was matched while showing a 6% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption. Hydrocarbon emissions exceeded the stock values in all cases. Diagnostic data indicate that lean performance in the engine configuration tested is limited by ignition delay, cycle-to-cycle pressure variations, and cylinder-to-cylinder distribution.

  2. Aircraft Engine Noise Research and Testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will begin with a brief introduction to the NASA Glenn Research Center as well as an overview of how aircraft engine noise research fits within the organization. Some of the NASA programs and projects with noise content will be covered along with the associated goals of aircraft noise reduction. Topics covered within the noise research being presented will include noise prediction versus experimental results, along with engine fan, jet, and core noise. Details of the acoustic research conducted at NASA Glenn will include the test facilities available, recent test hardware, and data acquisition and analysis methods. Lastly some of the actual noise reduction methods investigated along with their results will be shown.

  3. 40 CFR 1048.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1048.305 Section 1048.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  4. 40 CFR 1048.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1048.305 Section 1048.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  5. 40 CFR 1048.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1048.305 Section 1048.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  6. 40 CFR 1048.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1048.305 Section 1048.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  7. 40 CFR 1048.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1048.305 Section 1048.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  8. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

  9. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-02-19

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  10. Engineering and Design: Standard Penetration Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Penetration TestDe Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s) Project Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name...jsfi I I US* of drlXXi~ mucl -r*ueusiog In I Decrm8e8 hcrea8ea Zither Increases Increases Increeses Decrea8es lncreeaes Increases Increeaes Zither &creases DecrU8e* nem8*s hcruses Xnt-ses tieee Utber k~ee Enclosure 2

  11. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  12. Measurement Uncertainty Within the Uniform Engine Test Programme

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Also, included on the figures are the results for tBCC corrected to standard sea level Conditions ( Test Condition I). There is felt to be sufficient...AD-A219 033 IL307CpAGARD-AG-0 AGARDograph No. 307 Measurement Uncertainty Within the Uniform Engine Test Programme -D ’ ?T’UIQN ST.’ITMENr A MAR 0 71...THE UNIFORM ENGINE TEST PROGRAMME Report of the Sub-Group on Uncertainty Assessment Edited by J.PK. Vleghert National Aerospace Laboratory Anthony

  13. ISTAR: Project Status and Ground Test Engine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jason Eugene

    2003-01-01

    Review of the current technical and programmatic status of the Integrated System Test of an Airbreathing Rocket (ISTAR) project. November 2002 completed Phase 1 of this project: which worked the conceptual design of the X-43B demonstrator vehicle and Flight Test Engine (FTE) order to develop realistic requirements for the Ground Test Engine (GTE). The latest conceptual FTE and X-43B configuration is briefly reviewed. The project plan is to reduce risk to the GTE and FTE concepts through several tests: thruster, fuel endothermic characterization, engine structure/heat exchanger, injection characterization rig, and full scale direct connect combustion rig. Each of these will be discussed along with the project schedule. This discussion is limited due to ITAR restrictions on open literature papers.

  14. Software for Estimating Costs of Testing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Merion M.

    2002-01-01

    A high-level parametric mathematical model for estimating the costs of testing rocket engines and components at Stennis Space Center has been implemented as a Microsoft Excel program that generates multiple spreadsheets. The model and the program are both denoted, simply, the Cost Estimating Model (CEM). The inputs to the CEM are the parameters that describe particular tests, including test types (component or engine test), numbers and duration of tests, thrust levels, and other parameters. The CEM estimates anticipated total project costs for a specific test. Estimates are broken down into testing categories based on a work-breakdown structure and a cost-element structure. A notable historical assumption incorporated into the CEM is that total labor times depend mainly on thrust levels. As a result of a recent modification of the CEM to increase the accuracy of predicted labor times, the dependence of labor time on thrust level is now embodied in third- and fourth-order polynomials.

  15. Software for Estimating Costs of Testing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Merlon M.

    2004-01-01

    A high-level parametric mathematical model for estimating the costs of testing rocket engines and components at Stennis Space Center has been implemented as a Microsoft Excel program that generates multiple spreadsheets. The model and the program are both denoted, simply, the Cost Estimating Model (CEM). The inputs to the CEM are the parameters that describe particular tests, including test types (component or engine test), numbers and duration of tests, thrust levels, and other parameters. The CEM estimates anticipated total project costs for a specific test. Estimates are broken down into testing categories based on a work-breakdown structure and a cost-element structure. A notable historical assumption incorporated into the CEM is that total labor times depend mainly on thrust levels. As a result of a recent modification of the CEM to increase the accuracy of predicted labor times, the dependence of labor time on thrust level is now embodied in third- and fourth-order polynomials.

  16. Software for Estimating Costs of Testing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Merlon M.

    2003-01-01

    A high-level parametric mathematical model for estimating the costs of testing rocket engines and components at Stennis Space Center has been implemented as a Microsoft Excel program that generates multiple spreadsheets. The model and the program are both denoted, simply, the Cost Estimating Model (CEM). The inputs to the CEM are the parameters that describe particular tests, including test types (component or engine test), numbers and duration of tests, thrust levels, and other parameters. The CEM estimates anticipated total project costs for a specific test. Estimates are broken down into testing categories based on a work-breakdown structure and a cost-element structure. A notable historical assumption incorporated into the CEM is that total labor times depend mainly on thrust levels. As a result of a recent modification of the CEM to increase the accuracy of predicted labor times, the dependence of labor time on thrust level is now embodied in third- and fourth-order polynomials.

  17. X-34 40K Fastrac II Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a photo of an X-34 40K Fastrac II duration test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center test stand 116 (TS116) in June 1997. Engine ignition is started with Tea-Gas which makes the start burn green. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  18. 14 CFR 21.128 - Tests: aircraft engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tests: aircraft engines. 21.128 Section 21.128 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate § 21.128 Tests:...

  19. 14 CFR 21.128 - Tests: aircraft engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tests: aircraft engines. 21.128 Section 21.128 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate § 21.128 Tests:...

  20. 14 CFR 21.128 - Tests: aircraft engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tests: aircraft engines. 21.128 Section 21.128 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate § 21.128 Tests:...

  1. Pretest uncertainty analysis for chemical rocket engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1987-01-01

    A parametric pretest uncertainty analysis has been performed for a chemical rocket engine test at a unique 1000:1 area ratio altitude test facility. Results from the parametric study provide the error limits required in order to maintain a maximum uncertainty of 1 percent on specific impulse. Equations used in the uncertainty analysis are presented.

  2. Engine Gimbal Requirements for Ground Testing of J-2X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalcik, Julia; Leahy, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Apollo-era J-2 that powered the second and third stages of the Saturn V, the current J-2X is the liquid hydrogen and oxygen high-altitude rocket engine in development for both the Ares I Upper Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage. During my summer 2009 internship, J-2X was at a stage in its design maturity where verification testing needed to be considered for the benefit of adequate test facility preparation. My task was to focus on gimbal requirements and gimbal related hot-fire test plans. Facility capabilities were also of interest, specifically for hot-fire testing slated to occur at test stands A-1, A-2, and A-3 at Stennis Space Center(SSC) in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Gimbal requirements and stage interface conditions were investigated by applying a top-to-bottom systems engineering approach, which involved system level requirements, engine level requirements from both government and engine contractor perspectives, component level requirements, and the J-2X to Upper Stage and Earth Departure Stage interface control documents. Previous hydrogen and oxygen liquid rocket engine gimbal verification methods were researched for a glimpse at lessons learned. Discussion among the J-2X community affected by gimballing was organized to obtain input relative to proper verification of their respective component. Implementing suggestions such as gimbal pattern, angulated dwell time, altitude testing options, power level, and feed line orientation, I was able to match tests to test stands in the A Complex at SSC. Potential test capability gaps and risks were identified and pursued. The culmination of all these efforts was to coordinate with SSC to define additional facility requirements for both the A-3 altitude test stand that is currently under construction and the A-1 sea level test stand which is being renovated

  3. Aviation Engine Test Facilities (AETF) fire protection study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, R. C.; Burns, R. E.; Leonard, J. T.

    1989-07-01

    An analysis is presented to the effectiveness of various types of fire fighting agents in extinguishing the kinds of fires anticipated in Aviation Engine Test Facilities (AETF), otherwise known as Hush Houses. The agents considered include Aqueous Film-Forming Foam, Halon 1301, Halon 1211 and water. Previous test work has shown the rapidity with which aircraft, especially high performance aircraft, can be damaged by fire. Based on this, tentative criteria for this evaluation included a maximum time of 20 s from fire detection to extinguishment and a period of 30 min in which the agent would prevent reignition. Other issues examined included: toxicity, corrosivity, ease of personnel egress, system reliability, and cost effectiveness. The agents were evaluated for their performance in several fire scenarios, including: under frame fire, major engine fire, engine disintegration fire, high-volume pool fire with simultaneous spill fire, internal electrical fire, and runaway engine fire.

  4. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep; Pfefferle, William

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines

  5. Source Emission Test of Gas Turbine Engine Test Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    emission testing be conducted in accordance with Appendix A and B to Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60 (40 CFR 60). Determination of gas...recovery, calculations and quality assurance were done in accordance with the methods and procedures outlined in 40 CFR 60 and 87. Five sampling...hook probe nozzle, heated inconel probe, heated glass filter, impingers and a pumping and metering device. The nozzle was sized prior to each stack test

  6. The Design and Testing of a Miniature Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosentino, Gary B.; Murray, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf jet propulsion in the 50 - 500 lb thrust class sparse. A true twin-spool turbofan in this range does not exist. Adapting an off-the-shelf turboshaft engine is feasible. However the approx.10 Hp SPT5 can t quite make 50 lbs. of thrust. Packaging and integration is challenging, especially the exhaust. Building on our engine using a 25 Hp turboshaft seems promising if the engine becomes available. Test techniques used, though low cost, adequate for the purpose.

  7. Turbine engine altitude chamber and flight testing with liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    In the late fifties the Lewis Research Center evaluated experimentally the use of hydrogen using three different turbojet engines in altitude test chambers. One of these engines was later flown experimentally using liquid hydrogen fuel. This paper is a brief overview of the significant aspects of this exploratory research and gives a few implications of the results to modern turbine engines. A subsequent contract dealing with a positive displacement pump operating on liquid hydrogen is discussed and some aspects of liquid hydrogen propellant systems, reflected by rocket booster experience are treated briefly. Areas requiring further research and technology effort are delineated.

  8. A Hydrogen Containment Process for Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a new total hydrogen containment process to enable the testing required for NTP engine development. This H2 removal process comprises of two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a shell-and-tube type of heat exchanger. This new process is demonstrated by simulation of the steady state operation of the engine firing at nominal conditions.

  9. Conceptual design of the MHD Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bents, D. J.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Rigo, H. S.; Pearson, C. V.; Warinner, D. K.; Hatch, A. M.; Borden, M.; Giza, D. A.

    The reference conceptual design of the MHD engineering test facility, a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commerical feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates are included and the engineering issues that should be reexamined are identified.

  10. Conceptual design of the MHD Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Rigo, H. S.; Pearson, C. V.; Warinner, D. K.; Hatch, A. M.; Borden, M.; Giza, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the MHD engineering test facility, a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commerical feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates are included and the engineering issues that should be reexamined are identified.

  11. Modal Test Experiences with a Jet Engine Fan Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HOLLKAMP, J. J.; GORDON, R. W.

    2001-11-01

    High cycle fatigue in jet engine blades is caused by excessive vibration. Understanding the dynamic response of the bladed disk system is important in determining vibration levels. Modal testing is a useful tool in understanding the dynamic behavior of structures. However, modal tests are not conducted on bladed disks because of the difficulties involved. One problem is that the overall dynamic behavior is sensitive to small perturbations. Another problem is that multiple inputs and high-resolution techniques are required to separate modes that are nearly repeated. Two studies of engine blade response were recently completed in which bench modal tests were successfully performed on simplified fan models. The modal test procedures for the first study were successful in extracting the modal parameters. But the tests in the second study were more demanding. Ultimately, an approach was devised that accurately extracted the modal parameters. This paper describes the challenges and the evolution of the test procedures.

  12. Testing of a variable-stroke Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Allen, David J.

    1986-01-01

    Testing of a variable-stroke Stirling engine at NASA Lewis has been completed. In support of the DOE Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems Program, the engine was tested for about 70 hours total with both He and H2 as working fluids over a range of pressures and strokes. A direct comparison was made of part-load efficiencies obtained with variable-stroke (VS) and variable-pressure operation. Two failures with the variable-angle swash-plate drive system limited testing to low power levels. These failures are not thought to be caused by problems inherent with the VS concept but do emphasize the need for careful design in the area of the crossheads.

  13. Testing of a variable-stroke Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, L. G.; Allen, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Testing of a variable-stroke Stirling engine at NASA Lewis has been completed. In support of the DOE Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems Program, the engine was tested for about 70 hours total with both He and H2 working fluids over a range of pressures and strokes. A direct comparison was made of part-load efficiencies obtained with variable-stroke (VS) and variable-pressure operation. Two failures with the variable-angle swash-plate drive system limited testing to low power levels. These failures are not thought to be caused by problems inherent with the VS concept but do emphasize the need for careful design in the area of the crossheads.

  14. Deimos Methane-Oxygen Rocket Engine Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, S.; Souverein, L. J.; Twigt, D. J.

    This paper presents the results of the first DEIMOS Liquid Methane/Oxygen rocket engine test campaign. DEIMOS is an acronym for `Delft Experimental Methane Oxygen propulsion System'. It is a project performed by students under the auspices of DARE (Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering). The engine provides a theoretical design thrust of 1800 N and specific impulse of 287 s at a chamber pressure of 40 bar with a total mass flow of 637 g/s. It has links to sustainable development, as the propellants used are one of the most promising so-called `green propellants'-combinations, currently under scrutiny by the industry, and the engine is designed to be reusable. This paper reports results from the provisional tests, which had the aim of verifying the engine's ability to fire, and confirming some of the design assumptions to give confidence for further engine designs. Measurements before and after the tests are used to determine first estimates on feed pressures, propellant mass flows and achieved thrust. These results were rather disappointing from a performance point of view, with an average thrust of a mere 3.8% of the design thrust, but nonetheless were very helpful. The reliability of ignition and stability of combustion are discussed as well. An initial assessment as to the reusability, the flexibility and the adaptability of the engine was made. The data provides insight into (methane/oxygen) engine designs, leading to new ideas for a subsequent design. The ultimate goal of this project is to have an operational rocket and to attempt to set an amateur altitude record.

  15. Analysis of Flame Deflector Spray Nozzles in Rocket Engine Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachdev, Jai S.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Allgood, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a unified tightly coupled multi-phase computational framework is described for the analysis and design of cooling spray nozzle configurations on the flame deflector in rocket engine test stands. An Eulerian formulation is used to model the disperse phase and is coupled to the gas-phase equations through momentum and heat transfer as well as phase change. The phase change formulation is modeled according to a modified form of the Hertz-Knudsen equation. Various simple test cases are presented to verify the validity of the numerical framework. The ability of the methodology to accurately predict the temperature load on the flame deflector is demonstrated though application to an actual sub-scale test facility. The CFD simulation was able to reproduce the result of the test-firing, showing that the spray nozzle configuration provided insufficient amount of cooling.

  16. 7. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND AFTER AN ENGINE FIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND AFTER AN ENGINE FIRE OR EXPLOSION. Wreckage of engine is still fixed in its clamp; X-15 vehicle lies on the ground detached from engine. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Engineering tissue alternatives to animals: applying tissue engineering to basic research and safety testing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Anthony; Brown, Robert; Shakesheff, Kevin

    2009-07-01

    The focus for the rapid progress in the field of tissue engineering has been the clinical potential of the technology to repair, replace, maintain or enhance the function of a particular tissue or organ. However, tissue engineering has much wider applicability in basic research and safety testing, which is often not recognized owing to the clinical focus of tissue engineers. Using examples from a recent National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council symposium, which brought together tissue engineers and scientists from other research communities, this review highlights the potential of tissue engineering to provide scientifically robust alternatives to animals to address basic research questions and improve drug and chemical development in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  18. Actual-Waste Tests of Enhanced Chemical Cleaning for Retrieval of SRS HLW Sludge Tank Heels and Decomposition of Oxalic Acid - 12256

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Christopher J.; King, William D.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge. During ECC actual waste testing, the introduction of ozone was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels. This testing did not identify physical or chemical changes in the ECC product sludge that would impact downstream processing. The results from these tests confirm observations made by AREVA NP during larger scale testing with waste simulants. This testing, however, had a decreased utilization of ozone, requiring approximately 5 moles of ozone per mole of oxalate decomposed. Decomposition of oxalates in sludge dissolved in 2 wt% OA to levels near 100 ppm oxalate using ECC process conditions required 8 to 12.5 hours without the aid of UV light and 4.5 to 8 hours with the aid of UV light. The pH and ORP were tracked during decomposition testing. Sludge components were tracked during OA decomposition, showing that most components have the highest soluble levels in the initial dissolved sludge and early decomposition samples and exhibit lower soluble levels as OA decomposition progresses. The Deposition Tank storage conditions that included pH adjustment to approximately 1 M free hydroxide tended to bring the soluble concentrations in the ECC product to nearly the same level for each test regardless of storage time, storage temperature, and contact with other tank sludge material. (authors)

  19. Tests of the Daimler D-IVa Engine at a High Altitude Test Bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, W G

    1920-01-01

    Reports of tests of a Daimler IVa engine at the test-bench at Friedrichshafen, show that the decrease of power of that engine, at high altitudes, was established, and that the manner of its working when air is supplied at a certain pressure was explained. These tests were preparatory to the installation of compressors in giant aircraft for the purpose of maintaining constant power at high altitudes.

  20. R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule.

  1. Full scale technology demonstration of a modern counterrotating unducted fan engine concept. Engine test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Unducted Fan (UDF) engine is an innovative aircraft engine concept based on an ungeared, counterrotating, unducted, ultra-high-bypass turbofan configuration. This engine is being developed to provide a high thrust-to-weight ratio power plant with exceptional fuel efficiency for subsonic aircraft application. This report covers the successful ground testing of this engine. A test program exceeding 100-hr duration was completed, in which all the major goals were achieved. The following accomplishments were demonstrated: (1) full thrust (25,000 lb); (2) full counterrotating rotor speeds (1393+ rpm); (3) low specific fuel consumption (less than 0.24 lb/hr/lb); (4) new composite fan design; (5) counterrotation of structures, turbines, and fan blades; (6) control system; (7) actuation system; and (8) reverse thrust.

  2. Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2010-01-01

    Testing of air breathing propulsion systems in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center depends on compressed air turbines for power. The drive rig turbines exhaust directly to the wind tunnel test section, and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the model being tested. In order to mitigate this acoustic contamination, a muffler can be attached downstream of the drive rig turbine. The modern engine designs currently being tested produce much less noise than traditional engines, and consequently a lower noise floor is required of the facility. An acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate this extraneous noise is presented, and a noise reduction of 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz was documented, significantly improving the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A PRE-PROTOTYPE RAMGEN ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron Koopman

    2003-07-01

    The research and development effort of a new kind of compressor and engine is presented. The superior performance of these two products arises from the superior performance of rotating supersonic shock-wave compression. Several tasks were performed in compliance with the DOE award objectives. A High Risk Technology review was conducted and evaluated by a team of 20 senior engineers and scientists representing various branches of the federal government. The conceptual design of a compression test rig, test rotors, and test cell adaptor was completed. The work conducted lays the foundation for the completed design and testing of the compression test rig, and the design of a supersonic shock-wave compressor matched to a conventional combustor and turbine.

  4. Free-piston stirling engine endurance test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dochat, G.; Rauch, J.; Antonelli, G.

    1983-01-01

    The Free-Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) has the potential to be a long-lived, highly reliable, power conversion device attractive for many product applications such as space, residential, or remote-site power. The purpose of endurance testing the FPSE is to demonstrate its potential for long life. The endurance program was directed at obtaining 1000 operational hours under various test conditions: low power, full stroke, duty cycle, and stop/start. Critical performance parameters were measured to note any change and/or trend. Inspections were conducted to measure and compare critical seal/bearing clearance. The engine performed well throughout the program, completing the 1000 hours. Hardware inspection, including the critical clearances, showed no significant change in hardware or clearance dimensions. The performance parameters did not exhibit any increasing or decreasing trends. The test program confirms the potential for long-life FPSE applications. Additional testing is planned to increase the test hours to 10,000.

  5. Development of the Engineering Test Satellite-3 (ETS-3) ion engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, S.

    1984-01-01

    The ion engine system onboard the ETS-3 is discussed. The system consists of two electron bombardment type mercury ion engines with 2 mN thrust and 2,000 sec specific impulse and a power conditioner with automatic control functions. The research and development of the system, development of its EM, PM and FM, the system test and the technical achievements leading up to final launch are discussed.

  6. Disk Crack Detection for Seeded Fault Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Huageng; Rodriguez, Hector; Hallman, Darren; Corbly, Dennis; Lewicki, David G. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Work was performed to develop and demonstrate vibration diagnostic techniques for the on-line detection of engine rotor disk cracks and other anomalies through a real engine test. An existing single-degree-of-freedom non-resonance-based vibration algorithm was extended to a multi-degree-of-freedom model. In addition, a resonance-based algorithm was also proposed for the case of one or more resonances. The algorithms were integrated into a diagnostic system using state-of-the- art commercial analysis equipment. The system required only non-rotating vibration signals, such as accelerometers and proximity probes, and the rotor shaft 1/rev signal to conduct the health monitoring. Before the engine test, the integrated system was tested in the laboratory by using a small rotor with controlled mass unbalances. The laboratory tests verified the system integration and both the non-resonance and the resonance-based algorithm implementations. In the engine test, the system concluded that after two weeks of cycling, the seeded fan disk flaw did not propagate to a large enough size to be detected by changes in the synchronous vibration. The unbalance induced by mass shifting during the start up and coast down was still the dominant response in the synchronous vibration.

  7. Software for Preprocessing Data from Rocket-Engine Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Chiu-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Three computer programs have been written to preprocess digitized outputs of sensors during rocket-engine tests at Stennis Space Center (SSC). The programs apply exclusively to the SSC E test-stand complex and utilize the SSC file format. The programs are the following: Engineering Units Generator (EUGEN) converts sensor-output-measurement data to engineering units. The inputs to EUGEN are raw binary test-data files, which include the voltage data, a list identifying the data channels, and time codes. EUGEN effects conversion by use of a file that contains calibration coefficients for each channel. QUICKLOOK enables immediate viewing of a few selected channels of data, in contradistinction to viewing only after post-test processing (which can take 30 minutes to several hours depending on the number of channels and other test parameters) of data from all channels. QUICKLOOK converts the selected data into a form in which they can be plotted in engineering units by use of Winplot (a free graphing program written by Rick Paris). EUPLOT provides a quick means for looking at data files generated by EUGEN without the necessity of relying on the PV-WAVE based plotting software.

  8. Software for Preprocessing Data From Rocket-Engine Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Chiu-Fu

    2002-01-01

    Three computer programs have been written to preprocess digitized outputs of sensors during rocket-engine tests at Stennis Space Center (SSC). The programs apply exclusively to the SSC "E" test-stand complex and utilize the SSC file format. The programs are the following: 1) Engineering Units Generator (EUGEN) converts sensor-output-measurement data to engineering units. The inputs to EUGEN are raw binary test-data files, which include the voltage data, a list identifying the data channels, and time codes. EUGEN effects conversion by use of a file that contains calibration coefficients for each channel; 2) QUICKLOOK enables immediate viewing of a few selected channels of data, in contradistinction to viewing only after post test processing (which can take 30 minutes to several hours depending on the number of channels and other test parameters) of data from all channels. QUICKLOOK converts the selected data into a form in which they can be plotted in engineering units by use of Winplot (a free graphing program written by Rick Paris); and 3) EUPLOT provides a quick means for looking at data files generated by EUGEN without the necessity of relying on the PVWAVE based plotting software.

  9. English Skills for Engineers Required by the English Technical Writing Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyouno, Noboru

    Japanese English education has focused mainly on teaching passive skills such as reading and listening, whereas actual business activities in society require active skills such as writing and speaking in addition to the passive skills. This educational situation is estimated to be a reason Japanese engineers are less confident in writing and speaking than in reading and listening. This paper focuses on details of the English Technical Writing Test provided by the Japan Society of Technical Communication and emphasizes the importance of the active skills, mainly focusing on what skills should be taught in the future and how to develop these skills. This paper also stresses the necessity of learning rhetoric-related skills, concept of information words, as well as paragraph reading and writing skills based on the concept of the 3Cs (Correct, Clear, and Concise) as a means to develop technical writing skills for engineers.

  10. Standard and modified electrode engineering-scale in situ vitrification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.E.; Tixier, J.S. ); Winkelman, R.G. )

    1992-09-01

    This report describes engineering-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) electrode tests conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE).(a) The purpose of these tests was to establish baseline data to serve as a foundation on which to improve the design of standard graphite rod electrodes, which are currently used in all applications. Changes in electrode design are proposed as one method to increase ISV melt depths that typically reach about 5 m. Melt depths of 10 m are needed to remediate some contaminated soil sites within the DOE complex. To establish baseline data, we performed a thermal distribution analysis and tested three electrode designs: (1) the standard graphite rod electrodes, (2) a modified design referred to as the composite graphite/molybdenum electrode, and (3) a second modified design, the dilated-tip graphite electrode. In total we performed six tests, two of each design. Within the scope of these tests, there were four specific objectives. Our first objective was to determine the influence of electrode design on monolith mass and shape. Our second objective was to determine the correlation between the actual test results and the results of the numerical heat distribution analysis using the TEMPEST code. Our third objective was to qualitatively evaluate the melt resistance and the electrode contact resistance that resulted from the three electrode designs. Finally, our fourth objective was to verify the reproducibility of the engineering-scale test results.

  11. Artificial intelligence techniques for ground test monitoring of rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Moonis; Gupta, U. K.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed which can detect anomalies in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) sensor data significantly earlier than the redline algorithm currently in use. The training of such an expert system focuses on two approaches which are based on low frequency and high frequency analyses of sensor data. Both approaches are being tested on data from SSME tests and their results compared with the findings of NASA and Rocketdyne experts. Prototype implementations have detected the presence of anomalies earlier than the redline algorithms that are in use currently. It therefore appears that these approaches have the potential of detecting anomalies early eneough to shut down the engine or take other corrective action before severe damage to the engine occurs.

  12. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Cryogen System Engineering Checkout Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, A. D; Cady, E. C.; Jenkins, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    The Solar Thermal Upper Stage technology (STUSTD) program is a solar thermal propulsion technology program cooperatively sponsored by a Boeing led team and by NASA MSFC. A key element of its technology program is development of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage and supply system which employs multi-layer insulation, liquid acquisition devices, active and passive thermodynamic vent systems, and variable 40W tank heaters to reliably provide near constant pressure H2 to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity of space operation. The LH2 storage and supply system is designed to operate as a passive, pressure fed supply system at a constant pressure of about 45 psia. During operation of the solar thermal engine over a small portion of the orbit the LH2 storage and supply system propulsively vents through the enjoy at a controlled flowrate. During the long coast portion of the orbit, the LH2 tank is locked up (unvented). Thus, all of the vented H2 flow is used in the engine for thrust and none is wastefully vented overboard. The key to managing the tank pressure and therefore the H2 flow to the engine is to manage and balance the energy flow into the LH2 tank with the MLI and tank heaters with the energy flow out of the LH2 tank through the vented H2 flow. A moderate scale (71 cu ft) LH2 storage and supply system was installed and insulated at the NASA MSFC Test Area 300. The operation of the system is described in this paper. The test program for the LH2 system consisted of two parts: 1) a series of engineering tests to characterize the performance of the various components in the system: and 2) a 30-day simulation of a complete LEO and GEO transfer mission. This paper describes the results of the engineering tests, and correlates these results with analytical models used to design future advanced Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicles.

  13. Construction Progress of the F-1 Engine Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of

  14. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  15. Long term testing of peanut oil in engines

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrum, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Durability tests of engines using crude peanut oil blended with no. 2 diesel were conducted, using the E.M.A. screening procedure. Direct and indirect injection designs were operated on 20:80 and 80:28 fuel blends. Time-dependent exhaust temperature changes, mechanical wear, and crank-case oil viscosity changes were evaluated.

  16. Stennis Holds Last Planned Space Shuttle Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With 520 seconds of shake, rattle and roar on July 29, 2009 NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center marked the end of an era for testing the space shuttle main engines that have powered the nation's Space Shuttle Program for nearly three decades.

  17. 40 CFR 1054.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1054.305 Section 1054.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  18. 40 CFR 1054.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1054.305 Section 1054.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  19. 40 CFR 1054.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1054.305 Section 1054.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  20. 40 CFR 1054.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1054.305 Section 1054.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  1. 40 CFR 1054.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1054.305 Section 1054.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the test engine in...

  2. Testing of bellows for engineering systems. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, H.E. Jr.; McNabb, B.

    1981-04-01

    Techniques were developed for performing elastic, creep, fatigue, and squirm tests on several specific geometries of Hastelloy X and type 347 stainless steel bellows. The fatigue cycle studies was complex and included time, temperature strain, and internal pressure as variables. A programmable calculator was used to control the test and record data. Fatigue failures occurred by typical high-temperature deformation modes, and observed lifetimes were close to those predicted by the designer. In creep tests where bellows length was restrained, individual convolutions widened while the gaps between convolutions contracted. Deformation during creep was often very inhomogeneous. Nevertheless, this test program showed that bellows can be designed and characterized for engineering service.

  3. Review of actual proficiency-testing performance under CLIA '67 (March 14, 1990) rules: perspective from the first year's data.

    PubMed

    Lanphear, B J; Burmeister, B J; Ehrmeyer, S S; Laessig, R H; Hassemer, D J

    1992-07-01

    Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1967 the Health Care Financing Administration's proficiency-testing requirement applies to approximately 12,000 hospital, reference, and large-clinic laboratories in the United States. The Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene is approved by the Health Care Financing Administration to provide proficiency testing in all specialties and subspecialties. The focus of the program is to provide highly specialized service and support to a limited number of participants in order to assess intralaboratory performance correctly. We report the findings over the four proficiency-testing events in 1991 for the subspecialty of routine chemistry, which serves approximately 470 participants. Failure rates for individual analytes on single proficiency testing events ranged from 0% to 13%. After four events or one year, if the mandated evaluation criteria and failure rules were strictly applied, as many as 11% of the laboratories could have found themselves involuntarily suspended from offering all routine chemistry testing.

  4. Optimization applications in aircraft engine design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    Starting with the NASA-sponsored STAEBL program, optimization methods based primarily upon the versatile program COPES/CONMIN were introduced over the past few years to a broad spectrum of engineering problems in structural optimization, engine design, engine test, and more recently, manufacturing processes. By automating design and testing processes, many repetitive and costly trade-off studies have been replaced by optimization procedures. Rather than taking engineers and designers out of the loop, optimization has, in fact, put them more in control by providing sophisticated search techniques. The ultimate decision whether to accept or reject an optimal feasible design still rests with the analyst. Feedback obtained from this decision process has been invaluable since it can be incorporated into the optimization procedure to make it more intelligent. On several occasions, optimization procedures have produced novel designs, such as the nonsymmetric placement of rotor case stiffener rings, not anticipated by engineering designers. In another case, a particularly difficult resonance contraint could not be satisfied using hand iterations for a compressor blade, when the STAEBL program was applied to the problem, a feasible solution was obtained in just two iterations.

  5. Fuel effects on the TF30 engine (Alternate test procedure)

    SciTech Connect

    Karpovich, P.A.; Musters, A.I.

    1984-09-01

    The objective of the Alternate Test Procedure (ATP) is to develop the capability to qualify new fuels for Navy aircraft use with a minimum of testing. The effect of fuel composition and properties on engine performance and component life has been shown to vary significantly from one engine configuration to another. The PandWA approach to the ATP has been to define fuel effects on the TF30 engine and then apply the methodology to other engines of interest to the Navy. Investigations of the TF30 conducted under the ATP Program and other Navy and Air Force Contracts have produced one of the most complete fuel effect characterizations available for any gas turbine engine. Major fuel effects which have been quantified are the relationships of lubricity to main fuel control reliability, viscosity and volatility to main burner and augmentor ignition limits, and hydrogen content to smoke and combustor life. The effects of fuel properties and composition on combustion efficiency and elastomeric seal life were found to be of secondary importance. Remaining uncertainties are the effects of fuel properties on turbine life and fuel nozzle fouling rate.

  6. Optical Methods For Automatic Rating Of Engine Test Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, James R.; Moss, Brian C.

    1989-03-01

    In recent years, increasing commercial and legislative pressure on automotive engine manufacturers, including increased oil drain intervals, cleaner exhaust emissions and high specific power outputs, have led to increasing demands on lubricating oil performance. Lubricant performance is defined by bench engine tests run under closely controlled conditions. After test, engines are dismantled and the parts rated for wear and accumulation of deposit. This rating must be consistently carried out in laboratories throughout the world in order to ensure lubricant quality meeting the specified standards. To this end, rating technicians evaluate components, following closely defined procedures. This process is time consuming, inaccurate and subject to drift, requiring regular recalibration of raters by means of international rating workshops. This paper describes two instruments for automatic rating of engine parts. The first uses a laser to determine the degree of polishing of the engine cylinder bore, caused by the reciprocating action of piston. This instrument has been developed to prototype stage by the NDT Centre at Harwell under contract to Exxon Chemical, and is planned for production within the next twelve months. The second instrument uses red and green filtered light to determine the type, quality and position of deposit formed on the piston surfaces. The latter device has undergone feasibility study, but no prototype exists.

  7. Rapid engine test to measure injector fouling in diesel engines using vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Korus, R.A.; Jaiduk, J.; Peterson, C.L.

    1985-11-01

    Short engine tests were used to determine the rate of carbon deposition on direct injection diesel nozzles. Winter rape, high-oleic and high-linoleic safflower blends with 50% diesel were tested for carbon deposit and compared to that with D-2 Diesel Control Fuel. Deposits were greatest with the most unsaturated fuel, high-linoleic safflower, and least with winter rape. All vegetable oil blends developed power similar to diesel fueled engines with a 6 to 8% greater fuel consumption. 8 references.

  8. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  9. From an automated flight-test management system to a flight-test engineer's workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.; Brumbaugh, Randal W.; Hewett, M. D.; Tartt, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    The capabilities and evolution is described of a flight engineer's workstation (called TEST-PLAN) from an automated flight test management system. The concept and capabilities of the automated flight test management systems are explored and discussed to illustrate the value of advanced system prototyping and evolutionary software development.

  10. Test/QA plan for the verification testing of diesel exhaust catalysts, particulate filters and engine modification control technologies for highway and nonroad use diesel engines

    EPA Science Inventory

    This ETV test/QA plan for heavy-duty diesel engine testing at the Southwest Research Institute’s Department of Emissions Research (DER) describes how the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), as listed in 40 CFR Part 86 for highway engines and 40 CFR Part 89 for nonroad engines, will be ...

  11. An Integrated Architecture for Aircraft Engine Performance Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics: Engine Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Aidan W.; Simon, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based architecture for performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique analyzes residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for fault detection and isolation purposes. Diagnostic results from the application of the approach to test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine are presented. The approach is found to avoid false alarms when presented nominal fault-free data. Additionally, the approach is found to successfully detect and isolate gas path seeded-faults under steady-state operating scenarios although some fault misclassifications are noted during engine transients. Recommendations for follow-on maturation and evaluation of the technique are also presented.

  12. An Integrated Architecture for Aircraft Engine Performance Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics: Engine Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Aidan W.; Simon, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based architecture for performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique analyzes residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for fault detection and isolation purposes. Diagnostic results from the application of the approach to test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine are presented. The approach is found to avoid false alarms when presented nominal fault-free data. Additionally, the approach is found to successfully detect and isolate gas path seeded-faults under steady-state operating scenarios although some fault misclassifications are noted during engine transients. Recommendations for follow-on maturation and evaluation of the technique are also presented.

  13. On the Accuracy of Flechettes by Dynamic Wind Tunnel Tests, by Theory and Analysis, and by Actual Firings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS Destroy this report when it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. The findings in this report are not to be...The accuracy and dispersion of flechettes are investigated 1) by an exploratory firing program, 2) by a supersonic dynamic testing wind tunnel program...Firing Program are summarized in Appendix A. A dynamic wind tunnel testing program was also carried out by the university on various flechette designs

  14. 40 CFR 1065.410 - Maintenance limits for stabilized test engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engineering grade tools to identify bad engine components. Any equipment, instruments, or tools used for... no longer use it as an emission-data engine. Also, if your test engine has a major mechanical failure... your test engine has a major mechanical failure that requires you to take it apart, you may no...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.410 - Maintenance limits for stabilized test engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engineering grade tools to identify bad engine components. Any equipment, instruments, or tools used for... no longer use it as an emission-data engine. Also, if your test engine has a major mechanical failure... your test engine has a major mechanical failure that requires you to take it apart, you may no...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.410 - Maintenance limits for stabilized test engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... engineering grade tools to identify bad engine components. Any equipment, instruments, or tools used for... no longer use it as an emission-data engine. Also, if your test engine has a major mechanical failure... your test engine has a major mechanical failure that requires you to take it apart, you may no...

  17. Description of the NACA Universal Test Engine and Some Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Marsden

    1927-01-01

    This report describes the 5-inch bore by 7-inch stroke single cylinder test engine used at the Langley Field Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in laboratory research on internal-combustion engine problems and presents some results of tests made therewith. The engine is arranged for variation over wide ranges, of the compression ratio and lift and timing of both inlet and exhaust valves while the engine is in operation. Provision is also made for the connection of a number of auxiliaries. These features tend to make the engine universal in character, and especially suited for the study of certain problems involving change in compression ratio, valve timing, and lift.

  18. A personal sampler for aircraft engine cold start particles: laboratory development and testing.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Alfredo; Leith, David

    2003-01-01

    Industrial hygienists in the U.S. Air Force are concerned about exposure of their personnel to jet fuel. One potential source of exposure for flightline ground crews is the plume emitted during the start of aircraft engines in extremely cold weather. The purpose of this study was to investigate a personal sampler, a small tube-and-wire electrostatic precipitator (ESP), for assessing exposure to aircraft engine cold start particles. Tests were performed in the laboratory to characterize the sampler's collection efficiency and to determine the magnitude of adsorption and evaporation artifacts. A low-temperature chamber was developed for the artifact experiments so tests could be performed at temperatures similar to actual field conditions. The ESP collected particles from 0.5 to 20 micro m diameter with greater than 98% efficiency at particle concentrations up to 100 mg/m(3). Adsorption artifacts were less than 5 micro g/m(3) when sampling a high concentration vapor stream. Evaporation artifacts were significantly lower for the ESP than for PVC membrane filters across a range of sampling times and incoming vapor concentrations. These tests indicate that the ESP provides more accurate exposure assessment results than traditional filter-based particle samplers when sampling cold start particles produced by an aircraft engine.

  19. Space Shuttle Main Engine Debris Testing Methodology and Impact Tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Stephens, Walter

    2005-01-01

    In the wake of the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster every effort is being made to determine the susceptibility of Space Shuttle elements to debris impacts. Ice and frost debris is formed around the aft heat shield closure of the orbiter and liquid hydrogen feedlines. This debris has been observed to liberate upon lift-off of the shuttle and presents potentially dangerous conditions to the Space Shuttle Main Engine. This paper describes the testing done to determine the impact tolerance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzle coolant tubes to ice strikes originating from the launch pad or other parts of the shuttle.

  20. Energy Efficient Engine combustor test hardware detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrus, D. L.; Chahrour, C. A.; Foltz, H. L.; Sabla, P. E.; Seto, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) Combustor Development effort was conducted as part of the overall NASA/GE E3 Program. This effort included the selection of an advanced double-annular combustion system design. The primary intent was to evolve a design which meets the stringent emissions and life goals of the E3 as well as all of the usual performance requirements of combustion systems for modern turbofan engines. Numerous detailed design studies were conducted to define the features of the combustion system design. Development test hardware was fabricated, and an extensive testing effort was undertaken to evaluate the combustion system subcomponents in order to verify and refine the design. Technology derived from this development effort will be incorporated into the engine combustion system hardware design. This advanced engine combustion system will then be evaluated in component testing to verify the design intent. What is evolving from this development effort is an advanced combustion system capable of satisfying all of the combustion system design objectives and requirements of the E3. Fuel nozzle, diffuser, starting, and emissions design studies are discussed.

  1. Testing and performance characteristics of a 1-kW free piston Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1 kW single cylinder free piston Stirling engine, configured as a research engine, was tested with helium working gas. The engine features a posted displacer and dashpot load. The test results show the engine power output and efficiency to be lower than those observed during acceptance tests by the manufacturer. Engine tests results are presented for operation at the two heater head temperatures and with two regenerator porosities, along with flow test results for the heat exchangers.

  2. LOX/Methane Main Engine Igniter Tests and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.; Ajmani, Kumund

    2008-01-01

    The LOX/methane propellant combination is being considered for the Lunar Surface Access Module ascent main engine propulsion system. The proposed switch from the hypergolic propellants used in the Apollo lunar ascent engine to LOX/methane propellants requires the development of igniters capable of highly reliable performance in a lunar surface environment. An ignition test program was conducted that used an in-house designed LOX/methane spark torch igniter. The testing occurred in Cell 21 of the Research Combustion Laboratory to utilize its altitude capability to simulate a space vacuum environment. Approximately 750 ignition test were performed to evaluate the effects of methane purity, igniter body temperature, spark energy level and frequency, mixture ratio, flowrate, and igniter geometry on the ability to obtain successful ignitions. Ignitions were obtained down to an igniter body temperature of approximately 260 R with a 10 torr back-pressure. The data obtained is also being used to anchor a CFD based igniter model.

  3. A Systems Engineering Approach to Quality Assurance for Aerospace Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2014-01-01

    On the surface, it appears that AS9100 has little to say about how to apply a Quality Management System (QMS) to major aerospace test programs (or even smaller ones). It also appears that there is little in the quality engineering Body of Knowledge (BOK) that applies to testing, unless it is nondestructive examination (NDE), or some type of lab or bench testing associated with the manufacturing process. However, if one examines: a) how the systems engineering (SE) processes are implemented throughout a test program; and b) how these SE processes can be mapped to the requirements of AS9100, a number of areas for involvement of the quality professional are revealed. What often happens is that quality assurance during a test program is limited to inspections of the test article; what could be considered a manufacturing al fresco approach. This limits the quality professional and is a disservice to the programs and projects, since there are a number of ways that quality can enhance critical processes, and support efforts to improve risk reduction, efficiency and effectiveness. The Systems Engineering (SE) discipline is widely used in aerospace to ensure the progress from Stakeholder Expectations (the President, Congress, the taxpayers) to a successful, delivered product or service. Although this is well known, what is not well known is that these same SE processes are implemented in varying complexity, to prepare for and implement test projects that support research, development, verification and validation, qualification, and acceptance test projects. Although the test organization's terminology may vary from the SE terminology, and from one test service provider to another, the basic process is followed by successful, reliable testing organizations. For this analysis, NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 7123.1, NASA Systems Engineering Processes and Requirements is used to illustrate the SE processes that are used for major aerospace testing. Many of these processes

  4. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers

    SciTech Connect

    Kalish, Y. )

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  5. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalish, Y.

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  6. High altitude aerodynamic platform concept evaluation and prototype engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A design concept has been developed for maintaining a 150-pound payload at 60,000 feet altitude for about 50 hours. A 600-pound liftoff weight aerodynamic vehicle is used which operates at sufficient speeds to withstand prevailing winds. It is powered by a turbocharged four-stoke cycle gasoline fueled engine. Endurance time of 100 hours or more appears to be feasible with hydrogen fuel and a lighter payload. A prototype engine has been tested to 40,000 feet simulated altitude. Mismatch of the engine and the turbocharger system flow and problems with fuel/air mixture ratio control characteristics prohibited operation beyond 40,000 feet. But there seems to be no reason why the concept cannot be developed to function as analytically predicted.

  7. Mechanisms Engineering Test Loop - Phase 1 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kultgen, D.; Grandy, C.; Hvasta, M.; Lisowski, D.; Toter, W.; Borowski, A.

    2016-09-01

    This report documents the current status of the Mechanisms Engineering Test Loop (METL) as of the end of FY2016. Currently, METL is in Phase I of its design and construction. Once operational, the METL facility will test small to intermediate-scale components and systems in order to develop advanced liquid metal technologies. Testing different components in METL is essential for the future of advanced fast reactors as it will provide invaluable performance data and reduce the risk of failures during plant operation.

  8. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  9. Initial comparison of single cylinder Stirling engine computer model predictions with test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R. C., Jr.; Thieme, L. G.; Miao, D.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA developed digital computer code for a Stirling engine, modelling the performance of a single cylinder rhombic drive ground performance unit (GPU), is presented and its predictions are compared to test results. The GPU engine incorporates eight regenerator/cooler units and the engine working space is modelled by thirteen control volumes. The model calculates indicated power and efficiency for a given engine speed, mean pressure, heater and expansion space metal temperatures and cooler water inlet temperature and flow rate. Comparison of predicted and observed powers implies that the reference pressure drop calculations underestimate actual pressure drop, possibly due to oil contamination in the regenerator/cooler units, methane contamination in the working gas or the underestimation of mechanical loss. For a working gas of hydrogen, the predicted values of brake power are from 0 to 6% higher than experimental values, and brake efficiency is 6 to 16% higher, while for helium the predicted brake power and efficiency are 2 to 15% higher than the experimental.

  10. Joint US/Russia TU-144 Engine Ground Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Waldo A.; Balser, Jeffrey S.; McCartney, Timothy P.; Richter, Charles A.; Woike, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Two engine research experiments were recently completed in Moscow, Russia using an engine from the Tu-144 supersonic transport airplane. This was a joint project between the United States and Russia. Personnel from the NASA Lewis Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines, Pratt & Whitney, the Tupolev Design Bureau, and EBP Aircraft LTD worked together as a team to overcome the many technical and cultural challenges. The objective was to obtain large scale inlet data that could be used in the development of a supersonic inlet system for a future High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The-first experiment studied the impact of typical inlet structures that have trailing edges in close proximity to the inlet/engine interface plane on the flow characteristics at that plane. The inlet structure simulated the subsonic diffuser of a supersonic inlet using a bifurcated splitter design. The centerbody maximum diameter was designed to permit choking and slightly supercritical operation. The second experiment measured the reflective characteristics of the engine face to incoming perturbations of pressure amplitude. The basic test rig from the first experiment was used with a longer spacer equipped with fast actuated doors. All the objectives set forth at the beginning of the project were met.

  11. 40 CFR 86.341-79 - Diesel engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diesel engine dynamometer test run. 86... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.341-79 Diesel engine dynamometer test run. (a) This section applies to Diesel engines only....

  12. 40 CFR 86.341-79 - Diesel engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diesel engine dynamometer test run. 86... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.341-79 Diesel engine dynamometer test run. (a) This section applies to Diesel engines only....

  13. 40 CFR 1048.301 - When must I test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-line Engines § 1048.301 When must I test my production-line engines? (a) If you produce engines... is evidence of a nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this...

  14. 40 CFR 1048.301 - When must I test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-line Engines § 1048.301 When must I test my production-line engines? (a) If you produce engines... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  15. 40 CFR 1048.301 - When must I test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-line Engines § 1048.301 When must I test my production-line engines? (a) If you produce engines... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  16. 40 CFR 1048.301 - When must I test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-line Engines § 1048.301 When must I test my production-line engines? (a) If you produce engines... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  17. 40 CFR 1048.301 - When must I test my production-line engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-line Engines § 1048.301 When must I test my production-line engines? (a) If you produce engines... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  18. Engineers conduct key water test for A-3 stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Water cascades from the A-2 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center as engineers challenge the limits of the high-pressure water system as part of the preparation process for the A-3 Test Stand under construction. Jeff Henderson, test director for Stennis' A Complex, led a series of tests Nov. 16-20, flowing water simultaneously on the A-1 and A-2 stands, followed by the A-1 and B-1 stands, to determine if the high-pressure industrial water facility pumps and the existing pipe system can support the needs of the A-3 stand. The stand is being built to test rocket engines that will carry astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit and will need about 300,000 gallons of water per minute when operating, but the Stennis system never had been tested to that level. The recent tests were successful in showing the water facility pumps can operate at that capacity - reaching 318,000 gallons per minute in one instance. However, officials continue to analyze data to determine if the system can provide the necessary pressure at that capacity and if the delivery system piping is adequate. 'We just think if there's a problem, it's better to identify and address it now rather than when A-3 is finished and it has to be dealt with,' Henderson said.

  19. Test results and facility description for a 40-kilowatt stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelm, G. G.; Cairelli, J. E.; Walter, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A 40 kilowatt Stirling engine, its test support facilities, and the experimental procedures used for these tests are described. Operating experience with the engine is discussed, and some initial test results are presented

  20. Testing of the United Stirling 4-95 solar Stirling engine on test bed concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelving, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives with the testing, test set-ups, component designs, and the results of the testing of the solar Stirling engine in a parabolic dish system are presented. The most important tests are characterization of receivers, full day performance of complete system, cavity and aperture window test including influence from windeffects, control system tests, radiator system tests and special temperature measurements with infrared camera. The influence on performance of flux distribution depnding on concentrator alignment, and the optimum receiver operating criteria when balancing flux and temperatures on cooled receiver surface while avoiding flux on uncooled surfaces are also discussed.

  1. A Systems Engineering Approach to Quality Assurance for Aerospace Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2015-01-01

    On the surface, it appears that AS91001 has little to say about how to apply a Quality Management System (QMS) to major aerospace test programs (or even smaller ones). It also appears that there is little in the quality engineering Body of Knowledge (BOK)2 that applies to testing, unless it is nondestructive examination (NDE), or some type of lab or bench testing associated with the manufacturing process. However, if one examines: a) how the systems engineering (SE) processes are implemented throughout a test program; and b) how these SE processes can be mapped to the requirements of AS9100, a number of areas for involvement of the quality professional are revealed. What often happens is that quality assurance during a test program is limited to inspections of the test article; what could be considered a manufacturing al fresco approach. This limits the quality professional and is a disservice to the programs and projects, since there are a number of ways that quality can enhance critical processes, and support efforts to improve risk reduction, efficiency and effectiveness.

  2. Comparison of Predicted Exercise Capacity Equations and the Effect of Actual versus Ideal Body Weight among Subjects Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, H Reza; Sclafani, Joseph J; Emmons, Ethan E; Morris, Michael J; Leclerc, Kenneth M; Slim, Ahmad M

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oxygen uptake at maximal exercise (VO2 max) is considered the best available index for assessment of exercise capacity. The purpose of this study is to determine if the use of actual versus ideal body weight in standard regression equations for predicted VO2 max results in differences in predicted VO2 max. Methods. This is a retrospective chart review of patients who were predominantly in active military duty with complaints of dyspnea or exercise tolerance and who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) from 2007 to 2009. Results. A total of 230 subjects completed CPET on a bicycle ergometer with a male predominance (62%) and an average age of 37 ± 15 years. There was significant discordance between the measured VO2 max and predicted VO2 max when measured by the Hansen and Wasserman reference equations (P < 0.001). Specifically, there was less overestimation when predicted VO2 max was based on ideal body weight as opposed to actual body weight. Conclusion. Our retrospective analysis confirmed the wide variations in predicted versus measured VO2 max based on varying prediction equations and showed the potential advantage of using ideal body weight as opposed to actual body weight in order to further standardize reference norms.

  3. Convert Ten Foot Environmental Test Chamber into an Ion Engine Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanVelzer, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The 10 Foot Space Simulator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been used for the last 40 years to test numerous spacecraft, including the Ranger series, several Mariner class, among many others and finally, the Spirit and Opportunity Mars Rovers. The request was made to convert this facility to an Ion Engine test facility, with a possible long term life test. The Ion engine was to propel the Prometheus spacecraft to Jupiter's moons. This paper discusses the challenges that were met, both from a procedural and physical standpoint. The converted facility must operate unattended, support a 30 Kw Ion Engine, operate economically, and be easily converted back to former operation as a spacecraft test facility.

  4. TESTING OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS ACTUAL WASTE TANK 5F AND TANK 12H SLUDGES

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.

    2011-08-22

    Forty three of the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have internal structures that hinder removal of the last approximately five thousand gallons of waste sludge solely by mechanical means. Chemical cleaning can be utilized to dissolve the sludge heel with oxalic acid (OA) and pump the material to a separate waste tank in preparation for final disposition. This dissolved sludge material is pH adjusted downstream of the dissolution process, precipitating the sludge components along with sodium oxalate solids. The large quantities of sodium oxalate and other metal oxalates formed impact downstream processes by requiring additional washing during sludge batch preparation and increase the amount of material that must be processed in the tank farm evaporator systems and the Saltstone Processing Facility. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) was identified as a potential method for greatly reducing the impact of oxalate additions to the SRS Tank Farms without adding additional components to the waste that would extend processing or increase waste form volumes. In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate an alternative to the baseline 8 wt. % OA chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. The baseline OA technology results in the addition of significant volumes of oxalate salts to the SRS tank farm and there is insufficient space to accommodate the neutralized streams resulting from the treatment of the multiple remaining waste tanks requiring closure. ECC is a promising alternative to bulk OA cleaning, which utilizes a more dilute OA (nominally 2 wt. % at a pH of around 2) and an oxalate destruction technology. The technology is being adapted by AREVA from their decontamination technology for Nuclear Power Plant secondary side scale removal. This report contains results from the SRNL small scale testing of the ECC process

  5. Subscale Injector Testing to Support J-2X Engine Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Elam, Sandy; Weber, Jim; Miller, Ken

    2008-01-01

    The J-2X engine being pursued for the Ares I will be a derivative of the J-2 engine developed by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR). As part of the engine development, a subscale injector was fabricated by PWR and hot-fire tested at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to evaluate performance data. This subscale injector had a reduced injector diameter and fewer elements than the full scale design, but the element density (#elements / injector area), and element geometries nearly identical to the full scale design. Three different materials were used for the LOX posts in order to test for durability. The subscale injector included 46 standard elements and 6 baffle elements, corresponding to the ratio of baffled elements to core elements in the full scale design. The baffle elements were included to demonstrate thermal compatibility of the baffles and to more closely represent the full scale performance. Fifteen hot-fire tests were conducted totaling over 200 seconds of mainstage time on the injector. Chamber pressures with oxygen/hydrogen propellants ranged from 870-1380 psig with mixture ratios ranging from 4.8-6.1. Fuel manifold inlet temperatures were varied from 190 to 300 R. Modular, water cooled, calorimeter chamber assemblies were used to provide heating rate data and evaluate the effects of characteristic length (L*). Performance was evaluated relative to the resulting characteristic velocity (C*) efficiency. Performance met the value required in order to proceed with this design for the full scale hardware. Hardware inspections show no evidence of cracking at the tip of the LOX post for any of the materials tested. Minor erosion of the baffle element tips was observed in the early testing. A design change was quickly implemented and tested, and this change resolved the issue. Development of the J-2X is continuing with this element density and design.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 4: Supplementary engineering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    The reference conceptual design of the Magnetohydrodynamic Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates, and identification of engineering issues that should be reexamined are also given. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program are integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant. Supplementary Engineering Data (Issues, Background, Performance Assurance Plan, Design Details, System Design Descriptions and Related Drawings) is presented.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 4: Supplementary engineering data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the Magnetohydrodynamic Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates, and identification of engineering issues that should be reexamined are also given. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program are integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant. Supplementary Engineering Data (Issues, Background, Performance Assurance Plan, Design Details, System Design Descriptions and Related Drawings) is presented.

  8. Water Mist Fire Tests For Class 2 & 3 Engine Rooms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    system, the fire-test-procedure working group at FP39 focused on water mist systems. Only limited data(3) were available to the working group on water...sources described in Table 2. The working group initially felt that, given the limited testing experience, a protocol was appropriate for spaces 10 m x 10...greater than 5 m, no data were available to the working group at FP39. (Note that Class II engine rooms are between 500 m3 and 3000 M3 in volume, while

  9. Scientific investigation plan for initial engineered barrier system field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wunan Lin

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) is to describe tests known as Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) and identified by Work Breakdown Structure as WBS 1.2.2.2.4. The IEBSFT are precursors to the Engineered Barrier System Field Test (EBSFT), WBS 1.2.2.2.4, to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT and IEBSFT are designed to provide information on the interaction between waste packages (simulated by heated containers) and the surrounding rock mass, its vadose water, and infiltrated water. Heater assemblies will be installed in drifts or boreholes openings and heated to measure moisture movement during heat-up and subsequent cool-down of the rock mass. In some of the tests, infiltration of water into the heated rock mass will be studied. Throughout the heating and cooling cycle, instruments installed in the rock will monitor such parameters as temperature, moisture content, concentration of some chemical species, and stress and strain. Rock permeability measurements, rock and fluid (water and gas) sampling, and fracture pattern measurements will also be made before and after the test.

  10. The methods of formaldehyde emission testing of engine: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Geng, Peng; Cao, Erming; Wei, Lijiang

    2015-12-01

    A number of measurements have been provided to detect formaldehyde in the atmosphere, but there are no clear unified standards in engine exhaust. Nowadays, formaldehyde, an unregulated emission from methanol engine, has been attracting increasing attention by researchers. This paper presents the detection techniques for formaldehyde emitted from the engines applied in recent market, introducing the approaches in terms of unregulated emission tests of formaldehyde, which involved gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, chromatography-mass spectrometry, chromatography-spectrum, Fourier infrared spectroscopy and spectrophotometry. The author also introduces the comparison regarding to the advantages of the existing detection techniques based on the principle, to compare with engine exhaust sampling method, the treatment in advance of detection, obtaining approaches accessing to the qualitative and quantitative analysis of chromatograms or spectra. The accuratest result obtained was chromatography though it cannot be used continuously. It also can be utilized to develop high requirements of emissions and other regulations. Fourier infrared spectroscopy has the advantage of continuous detection for a variety of unregulated emissions and can be applied to the bench in variable condition. However, its accuracy is not as good as chromatography. As the conclusion, a detection technique is chosen based on different requirements.

  11. Fault Tree Based Diagnosis with Optimal Test Sequencing for Field Service Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.; George, Laurence L.; Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    When field service engineers go to customer sites to service equipment, they want to diagnose and repair failures quickly and cost effectively. Symptoms exhibited by failed equipment frequently suggest several possible causes which require different approaches to diagnosis. This can lead the engineer to follow several fruitless paths in the diagnostic process before they find the actual failure. To assist in this situation, we have developed the Fault Tree Diagnosis and Optimal Test Sequence (FTDOTS) software system that performs automated diagnosis and ranks diagnostic hypotheses based on failure probability and the time or cost required to isolate and repair each failure. FTDOTS first finds a set of possible failures that explain exhibited symptoms by using a fault tree reliability model as a diagnostic knowledge to rank the hypothesized failures based on how likely they are and how long it would take or how much it would cost to isolate and repair them. This ordering suggests an optimal sequence for the field service engineer to investigate the hypothesized failures in order to minimize the time or cost required to accomplish the repair task. Previously, field service personnel would arrive at the customer site and choose which components to investigate based on past experience and service manuals. Using FTDOTS running on a portable computer, they can now enter a set of symptoms and get a list of possible failures ordered in an optimal test sequence to help them in their decisions. If facilities are available, the field engineer can connect the portable computer to the malfunctioning device for automated data gathering. FTDOTS is currently being applied to field service of medical test equipment. The techniques are flexible enough to use for many different types of devices. If a fault tree model of the equipment and information about component failure probabilities and isolation times or costs are available, a diagnostic knowledge base for that device can be

  12. Space Shuttle Main Engine modal test correlation and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stec, Robert C.; Gupta, Viney K.; Chaney, Lisa; Haworth, John M.

    1993-04-01

    A cost-effective software testbed under development is described for updating and validating Finite-Element Models (FEMs) to certify large-scale Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) STARDYNE and NASTRAN FEMs against modal test data. The long-term objectives of the testbed are to provide timely support and certification of SSME components using modal testing: certify large-scale structures such as the SSME using modal survey tests, update FEMs for model validation against test frequencies and mode shapes, verify the load factors for design loads assumed to determine structural integrity, demonstrate the Rocketdyne software testbed based on state-of-the art methods - optimization, static/dynamic reduction, sparse Lanczos solvers and iterative perturbation algorithms, and to identify future enhancements and applications for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-Rocketdyne testbed "FEMOPT" developed for Space Station and SSME model certification.

  13. Effects of Test Cell Recirculation on High-Bypass Turbofan Engines during Simulated Altitude Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    methods used to describe and correct for test cell recirculation have led to this investigation, which is in line with the objectives previously stated...between pressure profiles on the cell wall and those on the model surfaces, which is in line with previous observations. Removal of the diffuser...AEDC-TR-85-55 , , . ’ . . . .L Effects of Test Cell Recirculation on High-Bypass Turbofan Engines During Simulated Altitude Tests OCT 0 9

  14. 40 CFR 86.335-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. 86... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.335-79 Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. (a) The following test sequence shall be followed...

  15. 40 CFR 86.335-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. 86... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.335-79 Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. (a) The following test sequence shall be followed...

  16. 40 CFR 1042.305 - Preparing and testing production-line engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Preparing and testing production-line... AND VESSELS Testing Production-line Engines § 1042.305 Preparing and testing production-line engines. This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the...

  17. 40 CFR 1042.305 - Preparing and testing production-line engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Preparing and testing production-line... AND VESSELS Testing Production-line Engines § 1042.305 Preparing and testing production-line engines. This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the...

  18. 40 CFR 1042.305 - Preparing and testing production-line engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preparing and testing production-line... AND VESSELS Testing Production-line Engines § 1042.305 Preparing and testing production-line engines. This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the...

  19. 40 CFR 1042.305 - Preparing and testing production-line engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preparing and testing production-line... AND VESSELS Testing Production-line Engines § 1042.305 Preparing and testing production-line engines. This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the...

  20. 40 CFR 1042.305 - Preparing and testing production-line engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Preparing and testing production-line... AND VESSELS Testing Production-line Engines § 1042.305 Preparing and testing production-line engines. This section describes how to prepare and test production-line engines. You must assemble the...

  1. 40 CFR 1068.415 - How do I test my engines/equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .../equipment to represent normal in-use operation for the family. (e) Test engines/equipment in the same order... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I test my engines/equipment....415 How do I test my engines/equipment? (a) Use the test procedures specified in the...

  2. 40 CFR 1068.415 - How do I test my engines/equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .../equipment to represent normal in-use operation for the family. (e) Test engines/equipment in the same order... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I test my engines/equipment....415 How do I test my engines/equipment? (a) Use the test procedures specified in the...

  3. Predictive tests to evaluate oxidative potential of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiazza, Mara; Carella, Emanuele; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Corazzari, Ingrid; Viola, Franca; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress constitutes one of the principal injury mechanisms through which particulate toxicants (asbestos, crystalline silica, hard metals) and engineered nanomaterials can induce adverse health effects. ROS may be generated indirectly by activated cells and/or directly at the surface of the material. The occurrence of these processes depends upon the type of material. Many authors have recently demonstrated that metal oxides and carbon-based nanoparticles may influence (increasing or decreasing) the generation of oxygen radicals in a cell environment. Metal oxide, such as iron oxides, crystalline silica, and titanium dioxide are able to generate free radicals via different mechanisms causing an imbalance within oxidant species. The increase of ROS species may lead to inflammatory responses and in some cases to the development of cancer. On the other hand carbon-based nanomaterials, such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes, carbon black as well as cerium dioxide are able to scavenge the free radicals generated acting as antioxidant. The high numbers of new-engineered nanomaterials, which are introduced in the market, are exponentially increasing. Therefore the definition of toxicological strategies is urgently needed. The development of acellular screening tests will make possible the reduction of the number of in vitro and in vivo tests to be performed. An integrated protocol that may be used to predict the oxidant/antioxidant potential of engineered nanoparticles will be here presented.

  4. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweig, Herbert R.; Fischler, Stanley; Wagner, William R.

    1993-01-01

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  5. Monopropellant hydrazine resistoject: Engineering model fabrication and test task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murch, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The monopropellant hydrazine resistojet, termed the electrothermal hydrazine thruster (EHT) by TRW systems, thermally decomposes anhydrous hydrazine propellant to produce a high-temperature, low-molecular-weight gas for expulsion through a propulsive nozzle. The EHT developed for this program required about 3-5 watts of electrical power and produced 0.020 to 0.070 pound of thrust over the inlet pressure range of 100 to 400 psia. The thruster was designed for both pulsed and steady state operation. A summary of the GSFC original requirements and GSFC modified requirements, and the performance of the engineering model EHT is given. The experimental program leading to the engineering model EHT design, modifications necessary to achieve the required thruster life capability, and the results of the life test prgram. Other facets of the program, including analyses, preliminary design, specifications, data correlation, and recommendations for a flight model are discussed.

  6. Engine cyclic durability by analysis and material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Halford, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of calculating turbine engine component durability is addressed. Nonlinear, finite-element structural analyses, cyclic constitutive behavior models, and an advanced creep-fatigue life prediction method called strainrange partitioning were assessed for their applicability to the solution of durability problems in hot-section components of gas turbine engines. Three different component or subcomponent geometries are examined: a stress concentration in a turbine disk; a louver lip of a half-scale combustor liner; and a squealer tip of a first-stage high-pressure turbine blade. Cyclic structural analyses were performed for all three problems. The computed strain-temperature histories at the critical locations of the combustor linear and turbine blade components were imposed on smooth specimens in uniaxial, strain-controlled, thermomechanical fatigue tests of evaluate the structural and life analysis methods.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD, is summarized. Main elements of the design, systems, and plant facilities are illustrated. System design descriptions are included for closed cycle cooling water, industrial gas systems, fuel oil, boiler flue gas, coal management, seed management, slag management, plant industrial waste, fire service water, oxidant supply, MHD power ventilating

  8. GOAL - A test engineer oriented language. [Ground Operations Aerospace Language for coding automatic test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a test engineer oriented language has been under way at the Kennedy Space Center for several years. The result of this effort is the Ground Operations Aerospace Language, GOAL, a self-documenting, high-order language suitable for coding automatic test, checkout and launch procedures. GOAL is a highly readable, writable, retainable language that is easily learned by nonprogramming oriented engineers. It is sufficiently powerful for use at all levels of Space Shuttle ground processing, from line replaceable unit checkout to integrated launch day operations. This paper will relate the language development, and describe GOAL and its applications.

  9. Pop tests of storable biopropellant liquid apogee engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yukio; Tadano, Makoto; Sato, Masahiro; Kusaka, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Iihara, Sigeyasu; Ban, Hiroyuki

    1994-10-01

    A pressure-fed, blowdown, hydrazine/NTO apogee propulsion system had been selected for the ETS-6. One of the problems encountered during the development of the engine was the occurrence of pops (popping) at the higher operating chamber pressures. Pops are irregular high amplitude pressure pulses. It is generally agreed that pops is a liquid spray/gas two-phase explosion triggered by a local explosion near the jet impingement region. The effects of operating parameters on pops observed in the development tests of the apogee engine for the ETS-6 were inconsistent with those reported earlier for single impingement injectors; pops with the apogee engine injectors was more likely to occur at higher chamber pressures, higher injection velocities, and higher propellant temperatures. Pops data were correlated fairly well in chamber pressures (bar-P(sub c)) vs. fuel Reynolds number (R(sub ef)) plane. However, the range of operating parameters for the above correlation were very narrow since they were obtained during injector screening tests for a particular application to the apogee engine. It was also felt that the above correlation was too simplistic to capture any effect of design parameters of multi-element injectors. In the present study, the demarcation between pops and the pops-free region was determined in broader operating ranges and design parameters. The range of bar-P(sub c) and R(sub ef) was extended by exchanging graphite nozzle throat inserts with different throat diameters. The injectors were carefully selected to obtain effects, if any, of (1) film cooling fraction, (2) secondary mixing, and (3) number of elements and/or fuel orifice diameters. It was found that there was a threshold fuel Reynolds number below which no pops were observed at any chamber pressures and that the pops region curve in the bar-P(sub c)-R(sub ef) plane had two branches: upper branches and lower branches.

  10. Development of an Evaluation System for Vertical Vibration of Railway Vehicles with Field-Portable Actuators (2nd Report, Excitation Tests of an Actual Commuter Vehicle)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigami, Tadao; Tomioka, Takahiro

    Bending vibration characteristics of railway vehicles have been investigated in general under excitation tests, in which a carbody was directly excited by a shaker. It is however very difficult with their results to evaluate the ride quality of passengers under conditions that the vehicle runs on a certain track. The authors are therefore developing an evaluation system for vertical vibration of railway vehicles. This system consists of an excitation system equipped with linear actuators, the elastic supporting device installed between wheels and rails, and analytical techniques to estimate the power spectral density (PSD) and the ride quality level (LT) which feature the ride quality. In this paper, we describe the excitation tests performed using an actual commuter car and the estimated PSD and LT are compared with what substantially measured under the running conditions.

  11. On the use of cyclostationary indicators in IC engine quality control by cold tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvecchio, S.; D'Elia, G.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the use of first- and second-order cyclostationary (CS1 and CS2) tools to process the vibration signals picked up from internal combustion (IC) engines during cold tests. This type of analysis is needed in order to detect and diagnose irregular operations for quality control purposes. The effectiveness of indicators such as Mean Instantaneous Power (MIP), Degree of Cyclostationarity (DCSα) and Indicator of Cyclostationarity (ICSnx) in detecting assembly faults has been tested on real signals concerning three faulty conditions: inverted piston, connecting rod with incorrectly tightened screws, connecting rod without one bearing cap. In the past several authors have mainly used cyclostationary metrics for diagnostics purposes in rolling bearings and gear systems. Moreover, a signal model, qualitatively reproducing the features of actual cold test signals, has been formulated and used in order to preliminarily study the influence of signal parameters on the Indicators of Cyclostationarity. The results indicate that the cyclostationary tools - mainly CS2 tools - are effective in detecting and diagnosing all tested faulty conditions. In particular, indicator IC⌢S2x is highly sensitive to faults and it is suitable as pass/fail tool in quality control at the end of the engine assembly line. As a further second-order cyclostationary metric, the MIP is effective for detection, as well for fault identification, since it is able to localize regular and fault events within the engine cycle. In addition DCSα effectively characterizes the CS2 periodicities, giving the cyclic order distribution. Since these CS2 tools require a moderate computation cost, they can be considered ready for on-line industrial applications.

  12. The B.A.R. Demonstration Project: A Comparative Evaluation Trial of Computer-Based, Multimedia Simulation Testing and "Hands-on," Actual Equipment Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Thomas G.

    A general evaluation design was developed to examine the effectiveness of a computer-based, multimedia simulation test on California smog check mechanics. The simulation test operated on an Apple Macintosh IIci, with a single touchscreen color monitor controlling a videodisc player; it had three parts: introduction-tutorial-help, data, and test.…

  13. Thermal Environmental Testing of NSTAR Engineering Model Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.; Becker, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium program will fly a xenon ion propulsion system on the Deep Space 1 Mission. Tests were conducted under NASA's Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) Program with 3 different engineering model ion thrusters to determine thruster thermal characteristics over the NSTAR operating range in a variety of thermal environments. A liquid nitrogen-cooled shroud was used to cold-soak the thruster to -120 C. Initial tests were performed prior to a mature spacecraft design. Those results and the final, severe, requirements mandated by the spacecraft led to several changes to the basic thermal design. These changes were incorporated into a final design and tested over a wide range of environmental conditions.

  14. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) Implementation in Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Franzl, Richard; Walker, Mark; Kapadia, Ravi; Venkatesh, Meera

    2010-01-01

    A pilot operational ISHM capability has been implemented for the E-2 Rocket Engine Test Stand (RETS) and a Chemical Steam Generator (CSG) test article at NASA Stennis Space Center. The implementation currently includes an ISHM computer and a large display in the control room. The paper will address the overall approach, tools, and requirements. It will also address the infrastructure and architecture. Specific anomaly detection algorithms will be discussed regarding leak detection and diagnostics, valve validation, and sensor validation. It will also describe development and use of a Health Assessment Database System (HADS) as a repository for measurements, health, configuration, and knowledge related to a system with ISHM capability. It will conclude with a discussion of user interfaces, and a description of the operation of the ISHM system prior, during, and after testing.

  15. Practical flight test method for determining reciprocating engine cooling requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, D. T.; Miley, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that efficient and effective cooling of air-cooled reciprocating aircraft engines is a continuing problem for the general aviation industry. Miley et al. (1981) have reported results of a study regarding the controlling variables for cooling and installation aerodynamics. The present investigation is concerned with experimental methods which were developed to determine cooling requirements of an instrumented prototype or production aircraft, taking into account a flight test procedure which has been refined and further verified with additional testing. It is shown that this test procedure represents a straightforward means of determining cooling requirements with minimal instrumentation. Attention is given to some background information, the development history of the NACA cooling correlation method, and the proposed modification of the NACA cooling correlation.

  16. Testing to Characterize the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward; Schreiber, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a high efficiency generator, is being considered for space missions. Lockheed Martin designed and fabricated an engineering unit (EU), the ASRG EU, under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit is currently undergoing extended operation testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center to generate performance data and validate life and reliability predictions for the generator and the Stirling convertors. It has also undergone performance tests to characterize generator operation while varying control parameters and system inputs. This paper summarizes and explains test results in the context of designing operating strategies for the generator during a space mission and notes expected differences between the EU performance and future generators.

  17. Capturing flight system test engineering expertise: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, Irene Wong

    1991-01-01

    Within a few years, JPL will be challenged by the most active mission set in history. Concurrently, flight systems are increasingly more complex. Presently, the knowledge to conduct integration and test of spacecraft and large instruments is held by a few key people, each with many years of experience. JPL is in danger of losing a significant amount of this critical expertise, through retirement, during a period when demand for this expertise is rapidly increasing. The most critical issue at hand is to collect and retain this expertise and develop tools that would ensure the ability to successfully perform the integration and test of future spacecraft and large instruments. The proposed solution was to capture and codity a subset of existing knowledge, and to utilize this captured expertise in knowledge-based systems. First year results and activities planned for the second year of this on-going effort are described. Topics discussed include lessons learned in knowledge acquisition and elicitation techniques, life-cycle paradigms, and rapid prototyping of a knowledge-based advisor (Spacecraft Test Assistant) and a hypermedia browser (Test Engineering Browser). The prototype Spacecraft Test Assistant supports a subset of integration and test activities for flight systems. Browser is a hypermedia tool that allows users easy perusal of spacecraft test topics. A knowledge acquisition tool called ConceptFinder which was developed to search through large volumes of data for related concepts is also described and is modified to semi-automate the process of creating hypertext links.

  18. The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven'' through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle's exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

  19. A&M. TAN609. Jet engine test pad and control building. Camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-609. Jet engine test pad and control building. Camera facing southeast. Date: July 19, 1954. INEEL negative no. 11344 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Pacer Comet 4: Automated Jet Engine Testing of a TF33-P100 Pratt & Whitney Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rex Bolding

    Pacer Comet 4 found its life out of necessity to replace an obsolescent Pacer Comet 3 engine test system at Tinker AFB in Oklahoma City, OK. Pacer Comet 3 (PC3) was created and installed in the early 1980's to test jet engines from a wide range of planes. PC3 had several problems from a maintenance standpoint: contractors designed and installed the system but the contract did not include the OEM data package. Without drawings or design knowledge, fixing the smallest of problems could turn into a multi-day project. In addition to high cost, as the OEM companies of proprietary parts went out of business, it became impossible to find a replacement for a failed part. These issues set the framework for the Pacer Comet 4 (PC4) system. PC4 was created as an organic AF and Department of Defense collaboration to fix the issues with PC3. PC4 provides the customer with a complete data package including multiple drawing sets and data sheets for all parts used, as well as design files for all PCBs created in house. PC4 has a standard to use commercially available off the shelf parts (COTS). The reason for this is sustainability in maintenance. If a part is to fail, it should be able to be purchased from any manufacturer that meets the specs of the original product. No proprietary parts are used, except as directed by the engine's OEM. This thesis will focus on the design and installation of the on-frame data acquisition PC4 system for the Pratt & Whitney TF33-P100A-QEC engine that is currently in use on the E3 Sentry. This thesis will show efficiency improvements for maintenance sustainability (70% cabling reduction) as well as discuss performance improvements in both test and production environments.

  1. Development Testing of 1-Newton ADN-Based Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anflo, K.; Gronland, T.-A.; Bergman, G.; Nedar, R.; Thormählen, P.

    2004-10-01

    With the objective to reduce operational hazards and improve specific and density impulse as compared with hydrazine, the Research and Development (R&D) of a new monopropellant for space applications based on AmmoniumDiNitramide (ADN), was first proposed in 1997. This pioneering work has been described in previous papers1,2,3,4 . From the discussion above, it is clear that cost savings as well as risk reduction are the main drivers to develop a new generation of reduced hazard propellants. However, this alone is not enough to convince a spacecraft builder to choose a new technology. Cost, risk and schedule reduction are good incentives, but a spacecraft supplier will ask for evidence that this new propulsion system meets a number of requirements within the following areas: This paper describes the ongoing effort to develop a storable liquid monopropellant blend, based on AND, and its specific rocket engines. After building and testing more than 20 experimental rocket engines, the first Engineering Model (EM-1) has now accumulated more than 1 hour of firing-time. The results from test firings have validated the design. Specific impulse, combustion stability, blow-down capability and short pulse capability are amongst the requirements that have been demonstrated. The LMP-103x propellant candidate has been stored for more than 1 year and initial material compatibility screening and testing has started. 1. Performance &life 2. Impact on spacecraft design &operation 3. Flight heritage Hereafter, the essential requirements for some of these areas are outlined. These issues are discussed in detail in a previous paper1 . The use of "Commercial Of The Shelf" (COTS) propulsion system components as much as possible is essential to minimize the overall cost, risk and schedule. This leads to the conclusion that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 5 has been reached for the thruster and propellant. Furthermore, that the concept of ADN-based propulsion is feasible.

  2. 40 CFR 86.096-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission data engines. (i) Engines will be chosen to be run for emission data based upon engine family... emission control systems. One engine of each engine system combination must be run for smoke emission data... features as the injection system, fuel system, compression ratio, rated speed, rated horsepower,...

  3. 40 CFR 86.096-24 - Test vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission data engines. (i) Engines will be chosen to be run for emission data based upon engine family... emission control systems. One engine of each engine system combination must be run for smoke emission data... features as the injection system, fuel system, compression ratio, rated speed, rated horsepower,...

  4. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., except constant speed engines, engines rated under 19 kW, and propulsion marine diesel engines. (2) The 5... this subpart shall be used for propulsion marine diesel engines. (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of... rated under 19 kW; or (B) Propulsion marine diesel engines, provided the propulsion marine...

  5. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., except constant speed engines, engines rated under 19 kW, and propulsion marine diesel engines. (2) The 5... this subpart shall be used for propulsion marine diesel engines. (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of... rated under 19 kW; or (B) Propulsion marine diesel engines, provided the propulsion marine...

  6. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., except constant speed engines, engines rated under 19 kW, and propulsion marine diesel engines. (2) The 5... this subpart shall be used for propulsion marine diesel engines. (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of... rated under 19 kW; or (B) Propulsion marine diesel engines, provided the propulsion marine...

  7. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., except constant speed engines, engines rated under 19 kW, and propulsion marine diesel engines. (2) The 5... this subpart shall be used for propulsion marine diesel engines. (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of... rated under 19 kW; or (B) Propulsion marine diesel engines, provided the propulsion marine...

  8. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Oxygen materials compatibility testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    Particle impact and frictional heating tests of metals in high pressure oxygen, are conducted in support of the design of an advanced rocket engine oxygen turbopump. Materials having a wide range of thermodynamic properties including heat of combustion and thermal diffusivity were compared in their resistance to ignition and sustained burning. Copper, nickel and their alloys were found superior to iron based and stainless steel alloys. Some materials became more difficult to ignite as oxygen pressure was increased from 7 to 21 MPa (1000 to 3000 psia).

  9. Radiological effluents released from nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests at the Nevada Test Site 1959 through 1969: Fact Book

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 25 and Area 26, about 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, from July 1959 through September 1969. This document presents a brief history of the nuclear rocket engine tests, information on the off-site radiological monitoring, and descriptions of the tests.

  10. Demonstration of a heavy-duty vehicle chassis screening test for compliance testing heavy-duty engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.N.; McKain, D.L.; Hoppie, J.A.; Lyons, D.W.; Gautam, M.

    1998-07-01

    Emissions testing of new heavy-duty engines is performed to ensure compliance with governmental emissions standards. This testing involves operating the engine through the heavy-duty diesel transient Federal Test Procedure (FTP). While in-use engine emissions testing would be beneficial in aiding regions to meet standards dictated by the Clean Air Act, the process of removing the engine from the vehicle, fitting it to an engine dynamometer, testing, and refitting the engine in the chassis, combined with costs associated with removing the vehicle from service, is prohibitively expensive. A procedure for screening engine emissions testing with the engine in the vehicle using a chassis dynamometer was developed to mimic the FTP. Data from two engines and vehicles (a 195 hp Navistar T 444E in a single axle straight truck and a 370 hp Cummins N-14 in a tandem drive axle tractor) is presented as well as correlation between engine and chassis emissions tests. Also included was data gathered to gauge the effects of engine tampering and malfunctioning on emissions levels. It was concluded that engine and chassis emissions levels were well correlated with respect to oxides of nitrogen, but less well so with respect to particulate matter.

  11. MoSi2-Base Hybrid Composite Passed Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan

    1998-01-01

    important property measured was impact resistance. Aircraft engine components require sufficient toughness to resist manufacturing defects, assembly damage, stress concentrations at notches, and foreign object damage. Engine company designers indicated that impact resistance would have to be measured before they would seriously consider these types of composites. The Charpy V-notch test was chosen to assess impact resistance, and both monolithic and composite versions Of MOSi2 were tested from -300 to 1400 C. The results (see the following graphs) show that nitride-particulate-reinforced MoSi2 exhibited impact resistance higher than that of many monolithic ceramics and intermetallics, and that the fiber-reinforced composites had even higher values, approaching that of cast superalloys.

  12. Energy Efficient Engine high pressure turbine component test performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timko, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The high pressure turbine for the General Electric Energy Efficient Engine is a two stage design of moderate loading. Results of detailed system studies led to selection of this configuration as the most appropriate in meeting the efficiency goals of the component development program. To verify the design features of the high pressure turbine, a full scale warm air turbine test rig with cooling flows simulated was run. Prior to this testing, an annular cascade test was run to select vane unguided turn for the first stage nozzle. Results of this test showed that the base configuration exceeded the lower unguided turning configuration by 0.48 percent in vane kinetic energy efficiency. The air turbine test program, consisting of extensive mapping and cooling flow variation as well as design point evaluation, demonstrated a design point efficiency level of 90.0 percent based on the thermodynamic definition. In terms of General Electric cycle definition, this efficiency was 92.5 percent. Based on this test, it is concluded that efficiency goals for the Flight Propulsion System were met.

  13. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  14. 40 CFR 90.1204 - Maintenance, aging and testing of engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Maintenance, aging and testing of... Voluntary In-Use Testing § 90.1204 Maintenance, aging and testing of engines. (a) Prior to aging the engines... assure that the engines and equipment were properly used and maintained during the field aging...

  15. 40 CFR 90.1204 - Maintenance, aging and testing of engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maintenance, aging and testing of... Voluntary In-Use Testing § 90.1204 Maintenance, aging and testing of engines. (a) Prior to aging the engines... assure that the engines and equipment were properly used and maintained during the field aging...

  16. 40 CFR 90.1204 - Maintenance, aging and testing of engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance, aging and testing of... Voluntary In-Use Testing § 90.1204 Maintenance, aging and testing of engines. (a) Prior to aging the engines... assure that the engines and equipment were properly used and maintained during the field aging...

  17. 40 CFR 90.1204 - Maintenance, aging and testing of engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maintenance, aging and testing of... Voluntary In-Use Testing § 90.1204 Maintenance, aging and testing of engines. (a) Prior to aging the engines... assure that the engines and equipment were properly used and maintained during the field aging...

  18. 40 CFR 90.1204 - Maintenance, aging and testing of engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maintenance, aging and testing of... Voluntary In-Use Testing § 90.1204 Maintenance, aging and testing of engines. (a) Prior to aging the engines... assure that the engines and equipment were properly used and maintained during the field aging...

  19. 40 CFR 1048.310 - How must I select engines for production-line testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... production-line testing? 1048.310 Section 1048.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.310 How must I select engines for production-line testing? (a) Use... end of the assembly line for each engine family. (c) Calculate the required sample size for...

  20. 40 CFR 1051.301 - When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-Line Vehicles and Engines § 1051.301 When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines? (a... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  1. 40 CFR 1048.310 - How must I select engines for production-line testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... production-line testing? 1048.310 Section 1048.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.310 How must I select engines for production-line testing? (a) Use... end of the assembly line for each engine family. (c) Calculate the required sample size for...

  2. 40 CFR 1051.301 - When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-Line Vehicles and Engines § 1051.301 When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines? (a... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  3. 40 CFR 1051.301 - When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-Line Vehicles and Engines § 1051.301 When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines? (a... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  4. 40 CFR 1048.310 - How must I select engines for production-line testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... production-line testing? 1048.310 Section 1048.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.310 How must I select engines for production-line testing? (a) Use... end of the assembly line for each engine family. (c) Calculate the required sample size for...

  5. 40 CFR 1051.301 - When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-Line Vehicles and Engines § 1051.301 When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines? (a... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  6. 40 CFR 1051.301 - When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When must I test my production-line... Production-Line Vehicles and Engines § 1051.301 When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines? (a... nonconformity, we may require you to test production-line engines under this subpart, or under 40 CFR part...

  7. 40 CFR 1048.310 - How must I select engines for production-line testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... production-line testing? 1048.310 Section 1048.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.310 How must I select engines for production-line testing? (a) Use... end of the assembly line for each engine family. (c) Calculate the required sample size for...

  8. Flight testing the digital electronic engine control in the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The digital electronic engine control (DEEC) is a full-authority digital engine control developed for the F100-PW-100 turbofan engine which was flight tested on an F-15 aircraft. The DEEC hardware and software throughout the F-15 flight envelope was evaluated. Real-time data reduction and data display systems were implemented. New test techniques and stronger coordination between the propulsion test engineer and pilot were developed which produced efficient use of test time, reduced pilot work load, and greatly improved quality data. The engine pressure ratio (EPR) control mode is demonstrated. It is found that the nonaugmented throttle transients and engine performance are satisfactory.

  9. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Altitude Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test using an obsolete Allied Signal ALF502-R5 engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test article used was the exact engine that experienced a loss of power event after the ingestion of ice crystals while operating at high altitude during a 1997 Honeywell flight test campaign investigating the turbofan engine ice crystal icing phenomena. The test plan included test points conducted at the known flight test campaign field event pressure altitude and at various pressure altitudes ranging from low to high throughout the engine operating envelope. The test article experienced a loss of power event at each of the altitudes tested. For each pressure altitude test point conducted the ambient static temperature was predicted using a NASA engine icing risk computer model for the given ambient static pressure while maintaining the engine speed.

  10. NASA/GE quiet engine C acoustic test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Pass, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic investigation and evaluation of the C propulsion turbofan engine are discussed. The engine was built as a part of the Quiet Engine Program. The objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to determine the noise levels produced turbofan bypass engines, (2) to demonstrate the technology and innovations which will reduce the production and radiation of noise in turbofan engines, and (3) to acquire experimental acoustic and aerodynamic data for high bypass turbofan engines to provide a better understanding of noise production mechanisms. The goals of the program called for a turbofan engine 15 to 20 PNdB quieter than currently available engines in the same thrust class.

  11. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  12. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  13. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  14. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  15. A standardized way to select, evaluate, and test an analog-to-digital converter for ultrawide bandwidth radiofrequency signals based on user's needs, ideal, published,and actual specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Daniel Y.; Rowe, Neil C.

    2012-06-01

    The most important adverse impact on the Electronic Warfare (EW) simulation is that the number of signal sources that can be tested simultaneously is relatively small. When the number of signal sources increases, the analog hardware, complexity and costs grow by the order of N2, since the number of connections among N components is O(N*N) and the signal communication is bi-directional. To solve this problem, digitization of the signal is suggested. In digitizing a radiofrequency signal, an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) is widely used. Most research studies on ADCs are conducted from designer/test engineers' perspective. Some research studies are conducted from market's perspective. This paper presents a generic way to select, evaluate and test ultra high bandwidth COTS ADCs and generate requirements for digitizing continuous time signals from the perspective of user's needs. Based on user's needs, as well as vendor's published, ideal and actual specifications, a decision can be made in selecting a proper ADC for an application. To support our arguments and illustrate the methodology, we evaluate a Tektronix TADC-1000, an 8-bit and 12 gigasamples per second ADC. This project is funded by JEWEL lab, NAWCWD at Point Mugu, CA.

  16. Acoustic-Structure Interaction in Rocket Engines: Validation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Joji, Scott S.; Parks, Russel A.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    While analyzing a rocket engine component, it is often necessary to account for any effects that adjacent fluids (e.g., liquid fuels or oxidizers) might have on the structural dynamics of the component. To better characterize the fully coupled fluid-structure system responses, an analytical approach that models the system as a coupled expansion of rigid wall acoustic modes and in vacuo structural modes has been proposed. The present work seeks to experimentally validate this approach. To experimentally observe well-coupled system modes, the test article and fluid cavities are designed such that the uncoupled structural frequencies are comparable to the uncoupled acoustic frequencies. The test measures the natural frequencies, mode shapes, and forced response of cylindrical test articles in contact with fluid-filled cylindrical and/or annular cavities. The test article is excited with a stinger and the fluid-loaded response is acquired using a laser-doppler vibrometer. The experimentally determined fluid-loaded natural frequencies are compared directly to the results of the analytical model. Due to the geometric configuration of the test article, the analytical model is found to be valid for natural modes with circumferential wave numbers greater than four. In the case of these modes, the natural frequencies predicted by the analytical model demonstrate excellent agreement with the experimentally determined natural frequencies.

  17. Impact Testing of Composites for Aircraft Engine Fan Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Revilock, Duane M.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Nie, Walter Z.; Mackenzie, S. Ben; Todd, Kevin B.

    2001-01-01

    Before composite materials can be considered for use in the fan case of a commercial jet engine, the performance of a composite structure under blade-out loads needs to be demonstrated. The objective of this program is to develop an efficient test and analysis method for evaluating potential composite case concepts. Ballistic impact tests were performed on laminated glass/epoxy composites in order to identify potential failure modes and to provide data for analysis. Flat 7x7 in. panels were impacted with cylindrical titanium projectiles, and 15 in. diameter half-rings were impacted with wedge-shaped titanium projectiles. Composite failure involved local fiber fracture as well as tearing and delamination on a larger scale. A 36 in. diameter full-ring subcomponent was proposed for larger scale testing. Explicit, transient, finite element analyses were used to evaluate impact dynamics and subsequent global deformation for the proposed full-ring subcomponent test. Analyses on half-ring and quarter ring configurations indicated that less expensive smaller scale tests could be used to screen potential composite concepts when evaluation of local impact damage is the primary concern.

  18. Engineering evaluation of SSME dynamic data from engine tests and SSV flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An engineering evaluation of dynamic data from SSME hot firing tests and SSV flights is summarized. The basic objective of the study is to provide analyses of vibration, strain and dynamic pressure measurements in support of MSFC performance and reliability improvement programs. A brief description of the SSME test program is given and a typical test evaluation cycle reviewed. Data banks generated to characterize SSME component dynamic characteristics are described and statistical analyses performed on these data base measurements are discussed. Analytical models applied to define the dynamic behavior of SSME components (such as turbopump bearing elements and the flight accelerometer safety cut-off system) are also summarized. Appendices are included to illustrate some typical tasks performed under this study.

  19. Wireless Data-Acquisition System for Testing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chujen; Lonske, Ben; Hou, Yalin; Xu, Yingjiu; Gang, Mei

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless data-acquisition system has been developed as a potential replacement for a wired data-acquisition system heretofore used in testing rocket engines. The traditional use of wires to connect sensors, signal-conditioning circuits, and data acquisition circuitry is time-consuming and prone to error, especially when, as is often the case, many sensors are used in a test. The system includes one master and multiple slave nodes. The master node communicates with a computer via an Ethernet connection. The slave nodes are powered by rechargeable batteries and are packaged in weatherproof enclosures. The master unit and each of the slave units are equipped with a time-modulated ultra-wide-band (TMUWB) radio transceiver, which spreads its RF energy over several gigahertz by transmitting extremely low-power and super-narrow pulses. In this prototype system, each slave node can be connected to as many as six sensors: two sensors can be connected directly to analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) in the slave node and four sensors can be connected indirectly to the ADCs via signal conditioners. The maximum sampling rate for streaming data from any given sensor is about 5 kHz. The bandwidth of one channel of the TM-UWB radio communication system is sufficient to accommodate streaming of data from five slave nodes when they are fully loaded with data collected through all possible sensor connections. TM-UWB radios have a much higher spatial capacity than traditional sinusoidal wave-based radios. Hence, this TM-UWB wireless data-acquisition can be scaled to cover denser sensor setups for rocket engine test stands. Another advantage of TM-UWB radios is that it will not interfere with existing wireless transmission. The maximum radio-communication range between the master node and a slave node for this prototype system is about 50 ft (15 m) when the master and slave transceivers are equipped with small dipole antennas. The range can be increased by changing to

  20. 40 CFR 1054.310 - How must I select engines for production-line testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... production-line testing? 1054.310 Section 1054.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.310 How must I select engines for production-line testing? (a) Test... engine families with projected U.S.-directed production volume of at least 1,600, the test periods...

  1. 40 CFR 1054.310 - How must I select engines for production-line testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... production-line testing? 1054.310 Section 1054.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.310 How must I select engines for production-line testing? (a) Test... engine families with projected U.S.-directed production volume of at least 1,600, the test periods...

  2. 40 CFR 1054.310 - How must I select engines for production-line testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... production-line testing? 1054.310 Section 1054.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.310 How must I select engines for production-line testing? (a) Test... engine families with projected U.S.-directed production volume of at least 1,600, the test periods...

  3. 40 CFR 1054.310 - How must I select engines for production-line testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... production-line testing? 1054.310 Section 1054.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... EQUIPMENT Production-line Testing § 1054.310 How must I select engines for production-line testing? (a) Test... engine families with projected U.S.-directed production volume of at least 1,600, the test periods...

  4. High frequency data acquisition system for space shuttle main engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewallen, Pat

    1987-01-01

    The high frequency data acquisition system developed for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) single engine test facility at the National Space Technology Laboratories is discussed. The real time system will provide engineering data for a complete set of SSME instrumentation (approx. 100 measurements) within 4 hours following engine cutoff, a decrease of over 48 hours from the previous analog tape based system.

  5. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  6. Underground tank vitrification: Engineering-scale test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, B.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Bonner, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    Contamination associated with underground tanks at US Department of Energy sites and other sites may be effectively remediated by application of in situ vitrification (ISV) technology. In situ vitrification converts contaminated soil and buried wastes such as underground tanks into a glass and crystalline block, similar to obsidian with crystalline phases. A radioactive engineering-scale test performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in September 1989 demonstrated the feasibility of using ISV for this application. A 30-cm-diameter (12-in.-diameter) buried steel and concrete tank containing simulated tank sludge was vitrified, producing a solid block. The tank sludge used in the test simulated materials in tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous components of the tank sludge were immobilized or removed and captured in the off-gas treatment system. The steel tank was converted to ingots near the bottom of the block and the concrete walls were dissolved into the resulting glass and crystalline block. Although one of the four moving electrodes froze'' in place about halfway into the test, operations were able to continue. The test was successfully completed and all the tank sludge was vitrified. 7 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Characteristics, finite element analysis, test description, and preliminary test results of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Smith, G.

    1991-10-01

    The Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program has as one of its program elements the development and evaluation of conversion device technologies applicable to dish-electric systems. The primary research and development combines a conversion device (heat engine), solar receiver, and generator mounted at the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator. The Stirling-cycle heat engine was identified as the conversion device for dish-electric with the most potential for meeting the program's goals for efficiency, reliability, and installed cost. To advance the technology toward commercialization, Sandia National Laboratories has acquired a Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., kinematic Stirling engine, STM4-120, for evaluation. The engine is being bench-tested at Sandia's Engine Test Facility and will be combined later with a solar receiver for on-sun evaluation. This report presents the engine characteristics, finite element analyses of critical engine components, test system layout, instrumentation, and preliminary performance results from the bench test.

  8. 24. CLOSEUP OF MOUNT FOR F1 ENGINE ON STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CLOSE-UP OF MOUNT FOR F-1 ENGINE ON STATIC TEST TOWER WITH STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND IN DISTANCE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing - Historical Lecture: Simulated Altitude Testing at AEDC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    The span of history covered is from 1958 to the present. The outline of this lecture draws from historical examples of liquid propulsion testing done at AEDC primarily for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) in the Saturn/Apollo Program and for USAF Space and Missile Systems dual-use customers. NASA has made dual use of Air Force launch vehicles, Test Ranges and Tracking Systems, and liquid rocket altitude test chambers / facilities. Examples are drawn from the Apollo/ Saturn vehicles and the testing of their liquid propulsion systems. Other examples are given to extend to the family of the current ELVs and Evolved ELVs (EELVs), in this case, primarily to their Upper Stages. The outline begins with tests of the XLR 99 Engine for the X-15 aircraft, tests for vehicle / engine induced environments during flight in the atmosphere and in Space, and vehicle staging at high altitude. The discussion is from the author's perspective and background in developmental testing.

  10. Engineering data transfer test with EDCARS using MIL-R-28002 (Raster). Laboratory Acceptance Test and User Application Test

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-17

    This paper documents the results of a sequence of tests conducted to evaluate the DoD Computer-aided Acquisition and Logistic Support (CALS) data interchange capability of the Air Force Engineering Data Computer-Assisted Retrieval System (EDCARS). The CALS initiative specifies a standard digital interface to streamline the interchange of technical data between the DoD and the commercial sector. The CALS Test Network (CTN) is tasked to conduct tests of military standards which specify this digital interface. The testing results outlined in this report are intended to evaluate the EDCARS systems`s ability to sport CALS data interchanges and establish the level of technical data interoperability implemented at this DoD engineering data repository.

  11. 45 CFR 13.7 - Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports... Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects. The reasonable cost (or the reasonable portion of the cost) for any study, exhibit, analysis, engineering report, test, project...

  12. 40 CFR 86.341-79 - Diesel engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diesel engine dynamometer test run. 86.341-79 Section 86.341-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR....341-79 Diesel engine dynamometer test run. (a) This section applies to Diesel engines only....

  13. 40 CFR 86.341-79 - Diesel engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine dynamometer test run. 86.341-79 Section 86.341-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR....341-79 Diesel engine dynamometer test run. (a) This section applies to Diesel engines only....

  14. 45 CFR 13.7 - Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports... Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects. The reasonable cost (or the reasonable portion of the cost) for any study, exhibit, analysis, engineering report, test, project...

  15. 45 CFR 13.7 - Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports... Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects. The reasonable cost (or the reasonable portion of the cost) for any study, exhibit, analysis, engineering report, test, project...

  16. 45 CFR 13.7 - Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports... Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects. The reasonable cost (or the reasonable portion of the cost) for any study, exhibit, analysis, engineering report, test, project...

  17. 45 CFR 13.7 - Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports... Studies, exhibits, analyses, engineering reports, tests and projects. The reasonable cost (or the reasonable portion of the cost) for any study, exhibit, analysis, engineering report, test, project...

  18. A&M. Jet engine test pad and control building (TAN609). Camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Jet engine test pad and control building (TAN-609). Camera facing westerly. Engine pad at left, control section (pumice block) on right. Date: September 19, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-2766 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

  20. 40 CFR 86.1910 - How must I prepare and test my in-use engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... engines? 86.1910 Section 86.1910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Manufacturer-Run In-Use Testing Program for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines § 86.1910 How must I prepare and test my...

  1. 40 CFR 86.1910 - How must I prepare and test my in-use engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engines? 86.1910 Section 86.1910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Manufacturer-Run In-Use Testing Program for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines § 86.1910 How must I prepare and test...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1910 - How must I prepare and test my in-use engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engines? 86.1910 Section 86.1910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Manufacturer-Run In-Use Testing Program for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines § 86.1910 How must I prepare and test...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1910 - How must I prepare and test my in-use engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... engines? 86.1910 Section 86.1910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Manufacturer-Run In-Use Testing Program for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines § 86.1910 How must I prepare and test...

  4. 40 CFR 86.1910 - How must I prepare and test my in-use engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... engines? 86.1910 Section 86.1910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Manufacturer-Run In-Use Testing Program for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines § 86.1910 How must I prepare and test...

  5. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  6. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  7. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  8. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  9. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  10. Measurement uncertainty for the Uniform Engine Testing Program conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelwahab, Mahmood; Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Silver, Dean

    1987-01-01

    An uncertainty analysis was conducted to determine the bias and precision errors and total uncertainty of measured turbojet engine performance parameters. The engine tests were conducted as part of the Uniform Engine Test Program which was sponsored by the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD). With the same engines, support hardware, and instrumentation, performance parameters were measured twice, once during tests conducted in test cell number 3 and again during tests conducted in test cell number 4 of the NASA Lewis Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The analysis covers 15 engine parameters, including engine inlet airflow, engine net thrust, and engine specific fuel consumption measured at high rotor speed of 8875 rpm. Measurements were taken at three flight conditions defined by the following engine inlet pressure, engine inlet total temperature, and engine ram ratio: (1) 82.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.0, (2) 82.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.3, and (3) 20.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.3. In terms of bias, precision, and uncertainty magnitudes, there were no differences between most measurements made in test cells number 3 and 4. The magnitude of the errors increased for both test cells as engine pressure level decreased. Also, the level of the bias error was two to three times larger than that of the precision error.

  11. 14 CFR 33.96 - Engine tests in auxiliary power unit (APU) mode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine tests in auxiliary power unit (APU) mode. 33.96 Section 33.96 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines §...

  12. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  13. Improved CPAS Photogrammetric Capabilities for Engineering Development Unit (EDU) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.; Bretz, David R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on two key improvements to the photogrammetric analysis capabilities of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for the Orion vehicle. The Engineering Development Unit (EDU) system deploys Drogue and Pilot parachutes via mortar, where an important metric is the muzzle velocity. This can be estimated using a high speed camera pointed along the mortar trajectory. The distance to the camera is computed from the apparent size of features of known dimension. This method was validated with a ground test and compares favorably with simulations. The second major photogrammetric product is measuring the geometry of the Main parachute cluster during steady-state descent using onboard cameras. This is challenging as the current test vehicles are suspended by a single-point attachment unlike earlier stable platforms suspended under a confluence fitting. The mathematical modeling of fly-out angles and projected areas has undergone significant revision. As the test program continues, several lessons were learned about optimizing the camera usage, installation, and settings to obtain the highest quality imagery possible.

  14. Engineering tools for understanding the hydrodynamics of dissolution tests.

    PubMed

    Kukura, Joseph; Arratia, Paulo E; Szalai, Edit S; Muzzio, Fernando J

    2003-02-01

    In this article, three well-established engineering tools are used to examine hydrodynamics in dissolution testing apparatuses. The application of these tools would provide detailed information about the flow, shear, and homogeneity in dissolution tests. Particle image velocimetry successfully measures two-dimensional cross-sections of the velocity field in an experimental device under both laminar and turbulent conditions. The velocity field is also calculated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which can rapidly provide data that is difficult or impossible to obtain experimentally. The occurrence of segregated regions within a USP Apparatus II under mild agitation conditions is revealed by CFD simulations and confirmed by laser-induced fluorescence experiments. The results clearly demonstrate that under current operation settings, the USP Apparatus II operates in a regime where the flow is in incipient turbulence, which is a highly time-dependent condition that might explain possible inconsistencies in dissolution results. It is further demonstrated that proposed changes advocating lower speeds or smaller vessels displace the system toward laminar flow conditions characterized by segregation, compromising the robustness of the test and making it vulnerable to variability with respect to sample location.

  15. Geophysical Methods for Non-Destructive Testing in Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederleithinger, E.

    2013-12-01

    Many non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for civil engineering (e. g. ultrasonics, radar) are similar to geophysical techniques. They just differ in scale, material under investigation and vocabulary used. In spite of the fact that the same principles of physics and mathematics apply to both fields, exchange has been limited in the past. But since a few years more and more geophysical knowledge is used in civil engineering. One of the focal points in research is to improve ultrasonic testing of concrete to be able to image the inside even of large, complex structures and to detect any deterioration as early as possible. One of the main issues is the heterogeneity of concrete, including aggregates, reinforcement, cracks and many other features. Our current research focuses on three points. One is the application of state of the art geophysical migration techniques as Reverse Time Migration (RTM) to image vertical faces or the backside of voids and ducts in thick concrete structures, which isn't possible with conventional techniques used in NDT. Second, we have started to use seismic interferometric techniques to interpolate ultrasonic traces, which can't be measured directly for technical reasons. Third, we are using coda wave interferometry to detect concrete degradation due to load, fatigue, temperature or other influences as early as possible. Practical examples of the application of these techniques are given and potential future research directions will be discussed. It will be shown, how a subset of these techniques can be used for innovative monitoring systems for civil infrastructure. Imaging the interior of a concrete body by ultrasonics and reverse time migration(simulated data).

  16. Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Culp

    2007-01-26

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

  17. Role of testing in requalifying Transamerica Delaval, Inc. , engines for nuclear service

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, J.F.; Dingee, D.A.; Laity, W.W.

    1985-03-01

    This paper discusses the role of testing in requalifying Transamerica Delaval, Inc. (TDI) diesel generators for use as emergency standby power sources at nuclear power plants. ''Lead'' engine tests (to confirm the design adequacy of key engine components under conditions that could induce high-cycle fatigue) and ''following'' engine tests (for engines of the same model and equipped with the same components as the ''lead'' engine) have been conducted at several nuclear power plants. The tests conducted by Duke Power Company (Catawba Nuclear Station Unit 1) and Long Island Lighting Company (Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Unit 1) are discussed. 2 refs.

  18. "I Actually Contributed to Their Research": The Influence of an Abbreviated Summer Apprenticeship Program in Science and Engineering for Diverse High-School Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgin, Stephen R.; McConnell, William J.; Flowers, Alonzo M., III

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of a research apprenticeship program that we developed for diverse high-school students often underrepresented in similar programs and in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professions. Through the apprenticeship program, students spent 2 weeks in the summer engaged in biofuels-related research…

  19. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) engine test firing on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This 1964 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph shows a ground engine test underway on the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 1. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot control in pitch, yaw

  20. Testing of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; O'Connor, Ed; Riga, Ken; Anderson, Molly; Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand is under contract with the NASA Johnson Space Center to develop a scalable, evaporative heat rejection system called the Multi-Fluid Evaporator (MFE). It is being designed to support the Orion Crew Module and to support future Constellation missions. The MFE would be used from Earth sea level conditions to the vacuum of space. The current Shuttle configuration utilizes an ammonia boiler and flash evaporator system to achieve cooling at all altitudes. The MFE system combines both functions into a single compact package with significant weight reduction and improved freeze-up protection. The heat exchanger core is designed so that radial flow of the evaporant provides increasing surface area to keep the back pressure low. The multiple layer construction of the core allows for efficient scale up to the desired heat rejection rate. The full scale MFE prototype will be constructed with four core sections that, combined with a novel control scheme, manage the risk of freezing the heat exchanger cores. A sub-scale MFE engineering development unit (EDU) has been built, and is identical to one of the four sections of a full scale prototype. The EDU has completed testing at Hamilton Sundstrand. The overall test objective was to determine the thermal performance of the EDU. The first set of tests simulated how each of the four sections of the prototype would perform by varying the chamber pressure, evaporant flow rate, coolant flow rate and coolant temperature. A second set of tests was conducted with an outlet steam header in place to verify that the outlet steam orifices prevent freeze-up in the core while also allowing the desired thermal turn-down ratio. This paper discusses the EDU tests and results.