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Sample records for actual evapotranspiration eta

  1. Alternate corrections for estimating actual wetland evapotranspiration from potential evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barclay, Shoemaker W.; Sumner, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Corrections can be used to estimate actual wetland evapotranspiration (AET) from potential evapotranspiration (PET) as a means to define the hydrology of wetland areas. Many alternate parameterizations for correction coefficients for three PET equations are presented, covering a wide range of possible data-availability scenarios. At nine sites in the wetland Everglades of south Florida, USA, the relatively complex PET Penman equation was corrected to daily total AET with smaller standard errors than the PET simple and Priestley-Taylor equations. The simpler equations, however, required less data (and thus less funding for instrumentation), with the possibility of being corrected to AET with slightly larger, comparable, or even smaller standard errors. Air temperature generally corrected PET simple most effectively to wetland AET, while wetland stage and humidity generally corrected PET Priestley-Taylor and Penman most effectively to wetland AET. Stage was identified for PET Priestley-Taylor and Penman as the data type with the most correction ability at sites that are dry part of each year or dry part of some years. Finally, although surface water generally was readily available at each monitoring site, AET was not occurring at potential rates, as conceptually expected under well-watered conditions. Apparently, factors other than water availability, such as atmospheric and stomata resistances to vapor transport, also were limiting the PET rate. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  2. Establishing seasonal chronicles of actual evapotranspiration under sloping conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouna Chebbi, R.; Prévot, L.; Jacob, F.; Voltz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of daily and seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) is strongly needed for hydrological and agricultural purposes. Although the eddy covariance method is well suited for such estimation of land surface fluxes, this method suffers from limitations when establishing long time series. Missing data are often encountered, resulting from bad meteorological conditions, rejection by quality control tests, power failures… Numerous gap fill techniques have been proposed in the literature but there applicability in sloping conditions is not well known. In order to estimate ETa over long periods (agricultural cycle) on crops cultivated in sloping areas, a pluri-annual experiment was conducted in the Kamech catchment, located in North-eastern Tunisia. This Mediterranean site is characterized by a large heterogeneity in topography, soils and crops. Land surface fluxes were measured using eddy covariance systems. Measurements were collected on the two opposite sides of the Kamech V-shaped catchment, within small fields having slopes steeper than 5%. During three different years, four crops were studied: durum wheat, oat, fava bean and pasture. The topography of the catchment and the wind regime induced upslope and downslope flows over the study fields. In this study, we showed that gap filling of the turbulent fluxes (sensible and latent heat) can be obtained through linear regressions against net radiation. To account for the effect of the topography, linear regressions were calibrated by distinguishing upslope and downslope flows. This significantly improved the quality of the reconstructed data over 30 minute intervals. This gap filling technique also improved the energy balance closure at the daily time scale. As a result, seasonal chronicles of daily ETa throughout the growth cycle of the study crops in the Kamech watershed were established, thus providing useful information about the water use of annual crops in a semi-arid rainfed and hilly area.

  3. A drought index based on actual evapotranspiration from the Bouchet hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeha; Rhee, Jinyoung

    2016-10-01

    Global drought assessment has mainly depended on precipitation-based drought indices that may also take into account potential evapotranspiration (ETp). In this study, we combined the actual evapotranspiration (ETa) estimated from the Bouchet hypothesis and the structure of the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index to develop a fully ET-based drought index, the Standardized Evapotranspiration Deficit Index (SEDI). We found that SEDI, without using precipitation data, produces results that are consistent with the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) for drought identification in the South-Central United States. We also found a competitive performance of SEDI through comparisons between the Vegetation Health Index with SEDI, PDSI, and SPI. We suggest the high applicability of the SEDI based on the Bouchet hypothesis as an independent drought index for regions with strong land-atmosphere coupling or as an alternative drought index to fully precipitation-dependent indices for assessing agricultural droughts.

  4. Using lysimeters to test the Penman Monteith actual evapotranspiration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Asher, Jiftah; Volinski, Roman; Zilberman, Arkadi; Bar Yosef, Beni; Silber, Avner

    2015-04-01

    Differences in actual transpiration (ETa) of banana plants were quantified in a lysimeter experiment. ETA was computed using instantaneous data from two weighing lysimeters and compared to PM (Penman-Monteith) model for ETa. Two critical problems were faced in this test. A) Estimating canopy and aerodynamic resistances ("rc" and "ra" respectively ) and B) converting the lysimeter changes in water volume ( LYv cm3 ) to ETa length units ( cm ). The two unknowns " rc" and "ra" were obtained from continuous measurements of the differences between canopy and air temperature (Tc - Ta). This difference was established by means of the infrared thermometry which was followed by numerical and analytical calculation of ETa using the modification suggested by R. Jackson to the PM model. The conversion of lysimeter volumetric units (LYv) to ETa length units was derived from the slope of cumulative LYv/ETa. This relationship was significantly linear (r2=0.97and 0.98.). Its slope was interpreted as "evaporating leaf area" which accounted for 1.8E4 cm2 in lysimeter 1 and 2.3E4 cm2.in lysimeter 2 . The comparison between LYv and PM model was acceptable even under very low ETa. The average of two lysimeters was 1.1mm/day (1.4 mm/day , LYv 1 and 0.8 LYv 2) while ETa calculated on the basis of PM model was 1.2 mm/day. It was concluded that although lysimeters are most accurate systems to measure ETa one of its disadvantages ( beside the high cost) is the volumetric output that in many cases should be supported by a one dimensional energy balance system. The PM model was found to be a reliable complementary tool to convert lysimeters volumetric output into conventional length units of ETa.

  5. Actual evapotranspiration modeling using the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Maupin, Molly A.; Kenny, Joan F.; Perry, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Remote-sensing technology and surface-energy-balance methods can provide accurate and repeatable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) when used in combination with local weather datasets over irrigated lands. Estimates of ETa may be used to provide a consistent, accurate, and efficient approach for estimating regional water withdrawals for irrigation and associated consumptive use (CU), especially in arid cropland areas that require supplemental water due to insufficient natural supplies from rainfall, soil moisture, or groundwater. ETa in these areas is considered equivalent to CU, and represents the part of applied irrigation water that is evaporated and/or transpired, and is not available for immediate reuse. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study demonstrated the application of the remote-sensing-based Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to estimate 10-year average ETa at 1-kilometer resolution on national and regional scales, and compared those ETa values to the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Use Information Program’s 1995 county estimates of CU. The operational version of the operational SSEB (SSEBop) method is now used to construct monthly, county-level ETa maps of the conterminous United States for the years 2000, 2005, and 2010. The performance of the SSEBop was evaluated using eddy covariance flux tower datasets compiled from 2005 datasets, and the results showed a strong linear relationship in different land cover types across diverse ecosystems in the conterminous United States (correlation coefficient [r] ranging from 0.75 to 0.95). For example, r for woody savannas (0.75), grassland (0.75), forest (0.82), cropland (0.84), shrub land (0.89), and urban (0.95). A comparison of the remote-sensing SSEBop method for estimating ETa and the Hamon temperature method for estimating potential ET (ETp) also was conducted, using regressions of all available county averages of ETa for 2005 and 2010, and yielded correlations of r = 0

  6. Evaluation of six potential evapotranspiration models for estimating crop potential and actual evapotranspiration in arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sien; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Jianhua; Du, Taisheng; Tong, Ling; Ding, Risheng

    2016-12-01

    Using potential evapotranspiration (PET) to estimate crop actual evapotranspiration (AET) is a critical approach in hydrological models. However, which PET model performs best and can be used to predict crop AET over the entire growth season in arid regions still remains unclear. The six frequently-used PET models, i.e. Blaney-Criddle (BC), Hargreaves (HA), Priestley-Taylor (PT), Dalton (DA), Penman (PE) and Shuttleworth (SW) models were considered and evaluated in the study. Five-year eddy covariance data over the maize field and vineyard in arid northwest China were used to examine the accuracy of PET models in estimating daily crop AET. Results indicate that the PE, SW and PT models underestimated daily ET by less than 6% with RMSE lower than 35 W m-2 during the four years, while the BC, HA and DA models under-predicted daily ET approximately by 10% with RMSE higher than 40 W m-2. Compared to BC, HA and DA models, PE, SW and PT models were more reliable and accurate for estimating crop PET and AET in arid regions. Thus the PE, SW and PT models were recommended for predicting crop evapotranspiration in hydrological models in arid regions.

  7. Remotely sensed actual evapotranspiration: implications for groundwater management in Botswana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, W. J.; Meijerink, A. M. J.

    In order to determine evapotranspiration losses from the groundwater of an aquifer in Botswana during the dry season, the multi-step Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) was applied using sequential Landsat TM and NOAA-AVHRR data. During satellite overpasses, continuous data on surface temperatures and soil moisture were available from a meteorological tower and field observations for calibration and partial validation of the results. The SEBAL method yielded high actual evapotranspiration (E a) rates (1.5 - 3 mm/d), if relatively dense savannah vegetation was present, even when the water-table was over 30 m deep, as is the case in the upper part of the aquifer. No relationship between Ea and depth to water-table was found, except in the valleys, where riverine forests are fed by a system of discharging groundwater flow. The patterns on a vegetation map, based on a supervised classification using TM data, including thermal bands, showed similarity with the E a patterns. The spatial distributions of vegetation types and of E a have been interpreted as important uptake of water by deep roots; this is supported by increasing evidence from other parts of the world. Sap flow was measured in tall bushes near the tower site. The upper part (2 m) of the soil was dry. The results have implications for the groundwater recharge mechanism and the management of groundwater. Further validation studies have been initiated.

  8. Soil water availability as controlling factor for actual evapotranspiration in urban soil-vegetation-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Simon; Reisdorff, Christoph; Gröngröft, Alexander; Jensen, Kai; Eschenbach, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The City of Hamburg is characterized by a large number of greens, parks and roadside trees: 600.000 trees cover about 14% of the city area, and moreover, 245.000 roadside trees can be found here. Urban vegetation is generally known to positively contribute to the urban micro-climate via cooling by evapotranspiration (ET). The water for ET is predominantly stored in the urban soils. Hence, the actual evapotranspiration (ETa) is - beside atmospheric drivers - determined by soil water availability at the soil surface and in the rooting zones of the respective vegetation. The overall aim of this study is to characterize soil water availability as a regulative factor for ETa in urban soil-vegetation systems. The specific questions addressed are: i) What is the spatio-temporal variation in soil water availability at the study sites? ii) Which soil depths are predominantly used for water uptake by the vegetation forms investigated? and iii) Which are the threshold values of soil water tension and soil water content (Θ), respectively, that limit ETa under dry conditions on both grass-dominated and tree-dominated sites? Three study areas were established in the urban region of Hamburg, Germany. We selected areas featuring both single tree stands and grass-dominated sites, both representing typical vegetation forms in Hamburg. The areas are characterized by relatively dry soil conditions. However, they differ in regard to soil water availability. At each area we selected one site dominated by Common Oak (Quercus ruber L.) with ages from 40 to 120 years, and paired each oak tree site with a neighboring grass-dominated site. All field measurements were performed during the years 2013 and 2014. At each site, we continuously measured soil water tension and Θ up to 160 cm depth, and xylem sap flux of each of three oak trees per site in a 15 min-resolution. Furthermore, we measured soil hydraulic properties as pF-curve, saturated and unsaturated conductivity at all sites

  9. Modeling actual evapotranspiration with routine meteorological variables in the data-scarce region of the Tibetan Plateau: Comparisons and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yinsheng; Xu, Chong-Yu; Szilagyi, Jozsef

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative estimation of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) by in situ measurements and mathematical modeling is a fundamental task for physical understanding of ETa as well as the feedback mechanisms between land and the ambient atmosphere. However, the ETa information in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) has been greatly impeded by the extremely sparse ground observation network in the region. Approaches for estimating ETa solely from routine meteorological variables are therefore important for investigating spatiotemporal variations of ETa in the data-scarce region of the TP. Motivated by this need, the complementary relationship (CR) and Penman-Monteith approaches were evaluated against in situ measurements of ETa on a daily basis in an alpine steppe region of the TP. The former includes the Nonlinear Complementary Relationship (Nonlinear-CR) as well as the Complementary Relationship Areal Evapotranspiration (CRAE) models, while the latter involves the Katerji-Perrier and the Todorovic models. Results indicate that the Nonlinear-CR, CRAE, and Katerji-Perrier models are all capable of efficiently simulating daily ETa, provided their parameter values were appropriately calibrated. The Katerji-Perrier model performed best since its site-specific parameters take the soil water status into account. The Nonlinear-CR model also performed well with the advantage of not requiring the user to choose between a symmetric and asymmetric CR. The CRAE model, even with a relatively low Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) value, is also an acceptable approach in this data-scarce region as it does not need information of wind speed and ground surface conditions. In contrast, application of the Todorovic model was found to be inappropriate in the dry regions of the TP due to its significant overestimation of ETa as it neglects the effect of water stress on the bulk surface resistance. Sensitivity analysis of the parameter values demonstrated the relative importance of each parameter in the

  10. Actual evapotranspiration (water use) assessment of the Colorado River Basin at the Landsat resolution using the operational simplified surface energy balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Russell L, Scott; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating consumptive water use in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) is important for assessing and managing limited water resources in the basin. Increasing water demand from various sectors may threaten long-term sustainability of the water supply in the arid southwestern United States. We have developed a first-ever basin-wide actual evapotranspiration (ETa) map of the CRB at the Landsat scale for water use assessment at the field level. We used the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for estimating ETa using 328 cloud-free Landsat images acquired during 2010. Our results show that cropland had the highest ETa among all land cover classes except for water. Validation using eddy covariance measured ETa showed that the SSEBop model nicely captured the variability in annual ETa with an overall R2 of 0.78 and a mean bias error of about 10%. Comparison with water balance-based ETa showed good agreement (R2 = 0.85) at the sub-basin level. Though there was good correlation (R2 = 0.79) between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based ETa (1 km spatial resolution) and Landsat-based ETa (30 m spatial resolution), the spatial distribution of MODIS-based ETa was not suitable for water use assessment at the field level. In contrast, Landsat-based ETa has good potential to be used at the field level for water management. With further validation using multiple years and sites, our methodology can be applied for regular production of ETa maps of larger areas such as the conterminous United States.

  11. On the downscaling of actual evapotranspiration maps based on combination of MODIS and landsat-based actual evapotranspiration estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

     Downscaling is one of the important ways of utilizing the combined benefits of the high temporal resolution of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images and fine spatial resolution of Landsat images. We have evaluated the output regression with intercept method and developed the Linear with Zero Intercept (LinZI) method for downscaling MODIS-based monthly actual evapotranspiration (AET) maps to the Landsat-scale monthly AET maps for the Colorado River Basin for 2010. We used the 8-day MODIS land surface temperature product (MOD11A2) and 328 cloud-free Landsat images for computing AET maps and downscaling. The regression with intercept method does have limitations in downscaling if the slope and intercept are computed over a large area. A good agreement was obtained between downscaled monthly AET using the LinZI method and the eddy covariance measurements from seven flux sites within the Colorado River Basin. The mean bias ranged from −16 mm (underestimation) to 22 mm (overestimation) per month, and the coefficient of determination varied from 0.52 to 0.88. Some discrepancies between measured and downscaled monthly AET at two flux sites were found to be due to the prevailing flux footprint. A reasonable comparison was also obtained between downscaled monthly AET using LinZI method and the gridded FLUXNET dataset. The downscaled monthly AET nicely captured the temporal variation in sampled land cover classes. The proposed LinZI method can be used at finer temporal resolution (such as 8 days) with further evaluation. The proposed downscaling method will be very useful in advancing the application of remotely sensed images in water resources planning and management.

  12. Towards an Operational Monitoring of Actual Evapotranspiration With Modis Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, W.; Gieske, A.; Bastiaanssen, W.; Holtslag, B.; Wolski, P.; Arneth, A.; Wohland, P.

    2002-12-01

    Estimation of regional scale evapotranspiration (ET) is of major importance in hydrological, meteorological and climatological modeling. The estimation of available energy and the partitioning into turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes is crucial in this process. Despite closure problems, point-based measurements of these quantities are considered fairly accurate. However, in heterogeneous terrain these measurements are not representative for regional estimates, a reason to incorporate remotely sensed data. Nowadays, models quantifying the soil-vegetation water loss (ET) approach the level of uncertainty in ET measurements. Progress toward operational monitoring of ET at scales of interest, has been hampered until recently due to lack of suitable sensors. This changed with the late availability of multi-band imagery from MODIS, developed for monitoring global change. Its data are used by algorithms for analysis of biophysical and geophysical products and, in parallel, models that use these products are developed from currently available satellite data sets. The model we used to test this is the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) which needs remotely sensed inputs of surface temperature, reflection and vegetation density. The model, which has mainly been validated using NOAA-AVHRR and Landsat data, is suitable for a variety of resolutions to estimate regional ET for heterogeneous areas. Algorithms developed from AVHRR datasets are used on MODIS data without modifications, justified by the radiometric similarity of AVHRR channels 1, 2, 4, and 5 and MODIS channels 1, 2, 31, and 32. Solar radiation, windspeed and air temperature are the only ancillary data required. MODIS data from 13 and 29 September 2001 are applied to a study site at Maun, Botswana. The area of 300 by 400 kilometer is heterogeneous, comprising densely vegetated swamps, grasslands and savannah. Model output resulted in 1 km scale instantaneous estimates of Rn, G, H and LE as well

  13. Bowen ratio measurements above various vegetation covers and its comparison with actual evapotranspiration estimated by SoilClim model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavinka, P.; Trnka, M.; Fischer, M.; Kucera, J.; Mozny, M.; Zalud, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The principle of Bowen ratio is one of the available techniques for measurements of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) as one of essential water balance fractions. The main aims of submitted study were: (i) to compare the water balance of selected crops, (ii) to compare outputs of SoilClim model with observed parameters (including ETa on Bowen ratio basis). The measurements were conducted at two experimental stations in the Czech Republic (Polkovice 49°23´ (N), 17°17´ (E), 205 m a.s.l.; Domanínek 49°32´ (N), 16°15´ (E), 544 m a.s.l.) during the years 2009 and 2010. Together with Bowen ratio the global solar radiation, radiation balance, soil heat flux, volumetric soil moisture and temperature within selected depths, precipitation and wind speed were measured. The measurements were conducted simultaneously above various covers within the same soil conditions: spring barley vs. winter wheat, spring barley vs. winter rape; grass vs. poplars; harvested field after tillage vs. harvested field after cereals without any tillage. The observed parameters from different covers were compared with SoilClim estimates. SoilClim model is modular software for water balance and soil temperature modelling and finally could be used for soil Hydric and Thermic regimes (according to USDA classification) identification. The core of SoilClim is based on modified FAO Penman-Monteith methodology. Submitted study proved the applicability of SoilClim model for ETa, soil moisture within two defined layers and soil temperature (in 0.5 m depth) estimates for various crops, covers, selected soil types and climatic conditions. Acknowledgement: We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (no. 521/09/P479) and the project NAZV QI91C054. The study was also supported by Research plan No. MSM6215648905 "Biological and technological aspects of sustainability of controlled ecosystems and their adaptability to climate change".

  14. Divergence of actual and reference evapotranspiration observations for irrigated sugarcane with windy tropical conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standardized reference evapotranspiration (ET) and ecosystem-specific vegetation coefficients are frequently used to estimate actual ET. However, equations for calculating reference ET have not been well validated in more humid environments. We measured ET (ETEC) using Eddy Covariance (EC) towers a...

  15. Testing two temporal upscaling schemes for the estimation of the time variability of the actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.

    2015-10-01

    Temporal availability of grapes actual evapotranspiration is an emerging issue since vineyards farms are more and more converted from rainfed to irrigated agricultural systems. The manuscript aims to verify the accuracy of the actual evapotranspiration retrieval coupling a single source energy balance approach and two different temporal upscaling schemes. The first scheme tests the temporal upscaling of the main input variables, namely the NDVI, albedo and LST; the second scheme tests the temporal upscaling of the energy balance output, the actual evapotranspiration. The temporal upscaling schemes were implemented on: i) airborne remote sensing data acquired monthly during a whole irrigation season over a Sicilian vineyard; ii) low resolution MODIS products released daily or weekly; iii) meteorological data acquired by standard gauge stations. Daily MODIS LST products (MOD11A1) were disaggregated using the DisTrad model, 8-days black and white sky albedo products (MCD43A) allowed modeling the total albedo, and 8-days NDVI products (MOD13Q1) were modeled using the Fisher approach. Results were validated both in time and space. The temporal validation was carried out using the actual evapotranspiration measured in situ using data collected by a flux tower through the eddy covariance technique. The spatial validation involved airborne images acquired at different times from June to September 2008. Results aim to test whether the upscaling of the energy balance input or output data performed better.

  16. Microclimate and actual evapotranspiration in a humid coastal-plain environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennehy, K.F.; McMahon, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Continuous hourly measurements of twelve meteorologic variables recorded during 1983 and 1984 were used to examine the microclimate and actual evapotranspiration at a low-level radioactive-waste burial site near Barnwell, South Carolina. The study area is in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of southwestern South Carolina. Monthly, daily, and hourly trends in net radiation, incoming and reflected short-wave radiation, incoming and emitted long-wave radiation, soil-heat flux, dry- and wet-bulb temperatures, soil temperatures, wind direction and speed, and precipitation were used to characterize the microclimate. Average daily air temperatures ranged from -9 to 32?? Celsius during the period of study. Net radiation varied from about -27 to 251 watts m-2 and was dominated by incoming short-wave radiation throughout the year. The peak net radiation during a summer day generally occurred 2-3h before the peak vapor pressure deficit. In the winter, these peaks occurred at about the same time of day. Monthly precipitation varied from 15 to 241 mm. The Bowen ratio method was used to estimate hourly evapotranspiration, which was summed to also give daily and monthly evapotranspiration. Actual evapotranspiration varied from 0.0 to 0.7 mm h-1, 0.8-5 mm d-1, and 20-140 mm month-1 during 1983 and 1984. The maximum rate of evapotranspiration generally occurred at the same time of day as maximum net radiation, suggesting net radiation was the main driving force for evapotranspiration. Precipitation exceeded evapotranspiration during 14 months of the 2yr study period. Late fall, winter, and early spring contained the majority of these months. The maximum excess precipitation was 115 mm in February 1983. ?? 1987.

  17. A coupled remote sensing and simplified surface energy balance approach to estimate actual evapotranspiration from irrigated fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, G.B.; Budde, M.; Verdin, J.P.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate crop performance monitoring and production estimation are critical for timely assessment of the food balance of several countries in the world. Since 2001, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring crop performance and relative production using satellite-derived data and simulation models in Africa, Central America, and Afghanistan where ground-based monitoring is limited because of a scarcity of weather stations. The commonly used crop monitoring models are based on a crop water-balance algorithm with inputs from satellite-derived rainfall estimates. These models are useful to monitor rainfed agriculture, but they are ineffective for irrigated areas. This study focused on Afghanistan, where over 80 percent of agricultural production comes from irrigated lands. We developed and implemented a Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to monitor and assess the performance of irrigated agriculture in Afghanistan using a combination of 1-km thermal data and 250m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, both from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. We estimated seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) over a period of six years (2000-2005) for two major irrigated river basins in Afghanistan, the Kabul and the Helmand, by analyzing up to 19 cloud-free thermal and NDVI images from each year. These seasonal ETa estimates were used as relative indicators of year-to-year production magnitude differences. The temporal water-use pattern of the two irrigated basins was indicative of the cropping patterns specific to each region. Our results were comparable to field reports and to estimates based on watershed-wide crop water-balance model results. For example, both methods found that the 2003 seasonal ETa was the highest of all six years. The method also captured water management scenarios where a unique year-to-year variability was identified in addition to water-use differences between

  18. A Coupled Remote Sensing and Simplified Surface Energy Balance Approach to Estimate Actual Evapotranspiration from Irrigated Fields

    PubMed Central

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Budde, Michael; Verdin, James P.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate crop performance monitoring and production estimation are critical for timely assessment of the food balance of several countries in the world. Since 2001, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring crop performance and relative production using satellite-derived data and simulation models in Africa, Central America, and Afghanistan where ground-based monitoring is limited because of a scarcity of weather stations. The commonly used crop monitoring models are based on a crop water-balance algorithm with inputs from satellite-derived rainfall estimates. These models are useful to monitor rainfed agriculture, but they are ineffective for irrigated areas. This study focused on Afghanistan, where over 80 percent of agricultural production comes from irrigated lands. We developed and implemented a Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to monitor and assess the performance of irrigated agriculture in Afghanistan using a combination of 1-km thermal data and 250-m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, both from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. We estimated seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) over a period of six years (2000-2005) for two major irrigated river basins in Afghanistan, the Kabul and the Helmand, by analyzing up to 19 cloud-free thermal and NDVI images from each year. These seasonal ETa estimates were used as relative indicators of year-to-year production magnitude differences. The temporal water-use pattern of the two irrigated basins was indicative of the cropping patterns specific to each region. Our results were comparable to field reports and to estimates based on watershed-wide crop water-balance model results. For example, both methods found that the 2003 seasonal ETa was the highest of all six years. The method also captured water management scenarios where a unique year-to-year variability was identified in addition to water-use differences between

  19. Remote Sensing of Actual Evapotranspiration at Basin Scale in the Northern Tibetan Plateau Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Lei; Zou, Mijun; Ma, Yaoming; Su, Zhongbo; Ma, Weiqiang; Hu, Yuanyuan; Han, Cunbo; Wang, Binbin

    2016-08-01

    Evapotranspiration(ET), as one of the most uncertain components of the water cycle, was derived in the Nagqu river basin of the northern Tibetan Plateau based on multi-sensor remote sensing data and field observations under clear-sky condition. Improved land surface albedo, improved downward shortwave radiation flux and reconstructed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were coupled into the topographical enhanced surface energy balance system (TESEBS) model to estimate actual ET. The model-estimated results were compared with those determined by the combinatory method which were treated as actual ET. The results indicated that the model-estimated ET agreed well with actual ET with correlation coefficient, mean bias error and root mean square error of 0.836, 0.087 and 0.140 respectively.

  20. Estimation of Actual Evapotranspiration by Remote Sensing: Application in Thessaly Plain, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsouni, Alexia; Kontoes, Charalabos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Elias, Panagiotis; Mamassis, Nikos

    2008-06-01

    Remote sensing can assist in improving the estimation of the geographical distribution of evapotranspiration, and consequently water demand in large cultivated areas for irrigation purposes and sustainable water resources management. In the direction of these objectives, the daily actual evapotranspiration was calculated in this study during the summer season of 2001 over the Thessaly plain in Greece, a wide irrigated area of great agricultural importance. Three different methods were adapted and applied: the remotesensing methods by Granger (2000) and Carlson and Buffum (1989) that use satellite data in conjunction with ground meteorological measurements and an adapted FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation) Penman-Monteith method (Allen at al. 1998), which was selected to be the reference method. The satellite data were used in conjunction with ground data collected on the three closest meteorological stations. All three methods, exploit visible channels 1 and 2 and infrared channels 4 and 5 of NOAA-AVHRR (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) sensor images to calculate albedo and NDVI (Normalised Difference Vegetation Index), as well as surface temperatures. The FAO Penman-Monteith and the Granger method have used exclusively NOAA-15 satellite images to obtain mean surface temperatures. For the Carlson-Buffum method a combination of NOAA-14 and ΝΟΑΑ-15 satellite images was used, since the average rate of surface temperature rise during the morning was required. The resulting estimations show that both the Carlson-Buffum and Granger methods follow in general the variations of the reference FAO Penman-Monteith method. Both methods have potential for estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration, whereby the degree of the relative agreement with the reference FAO Penman-Monteith method depends on the crop growth stage. In particular, the Carlson- Buffum method performed better during the first

  1. Interannual covariability between actual evapotranspiration and PAL and GIMMS NDVIs of northern Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suzuki, Rikie; Masuda, Kooiti; Dye, Dennis G.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the covariability between interannual changes in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and actual evapotranspiration (ET). To reduce possible uncertainty in the NDVI time series, two NDVI datasets derived from Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL) data and the Global Inventory Monitoring and Modeling Studies (GIMMS) group were used. Analyses were conducted using data over northern Asia from 1982 to 2000. Interannual changes over 19 years in the PAL-NDVI and GIMMS-NDVI were compared with interannual changes in ET estimated from model-assimilated atmospheric data and gridded precipitation data. For both NDVI datasets, the annual maximum correlation with ET occurred in June, which is the beginning of the vegetation growing season. The PAL and GIMMS datasets showed a significant, positive correlation between interannual changes in the NDVI and ET over most of the vegetated land area in June. These results suggest that interannual changes in vegetation activity predominantly control interannual changes in ET in June. Based on analyses of interannual changes in temperature, precipitation, and the NDVI in June, the study area can be roughly divided into two regions, the warmth-dominated northernmost region and the wetness-dominated southern region, indicating that interannual changes in vegetation and the resultant interannual changes in ET are controlled by warmth and wetness in these two regions, respectively.

  2. Development and Validation of a MODIS-based Actual Evapotranspiration for Ecosystems in Semi-arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, T. S.; Kim, J.

    2009-12-01

    Although remote sensing shows promise for estimating global or regional evapotranspiration (ET), direct measurement from satellite systems is still challenging due to the numerous variables required for many of the existing ET algorithms and models. However, remote sensing does provide reasonable estimates of the evaporative fraction (EF), which is defined as the ratio of ET to available energy. In the current study, spatially distributed estimates of actual evapotranspiration are pursued through estimation of EF using a simple remote sensing technique based on an Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and diurnal changes in land surface temperature (LST) obtained from the MODIS AQUA platform. Combining the diurnal change in surface temperature with an interpretation of the triangular-shaped space (temperature-EVI) allows for a direct approximation of the evaporative fraction. A mean daytime potential evapotranspiration (PET) is estimated using a previously developed procedure based on the Priestley-Taylor’s equation and MODIS data products. Finally, regional estimates of actual evapotranspiration are made by combining the derived evaporative fraction and the MODIS-based PET estimates. Both estimated PET and actual ET are validated against flux tower observations in southern Arizona for 2004. Initial results show good approximation of ET in riparian zones using the satellite-based algorithms, but more uncertainty is observed in rangeland (upland) areas. Ongoing work includes improvement in the EF/ET estimation and investigating the factors controlling ET in the diverse landscapes in semi-arid regions.

  3. A comparison of two downscaling procedures to increase the spatial resolution of mapping actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahour, Milad; Tolpekin, Valentyn; Stein, Alfred; Sharifi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    This research addressed the effects of downscaling cokriging Land Surface Temperature (LST) on estimation of Actual Evapotranspiration (AET) from remote sensing images. Two procedures were followed. We first applied downscaling cokriging to a coarse resolution LST product of MODIS at 1000 m. With its outcome, daily AET of a medium spatial resolution (250 m) was obtained using the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS). Second, we downscaled a coarse AET map to medium spatial resolution (250 m). For both procedures, the 250 m resolution MODIS NDVI product was used as a co-variable. Validation was carried out using Landsat 8 images, from which LST was derived from the thermal bands. The two procedures were applied to an agricultural area with a traditional irrigation network in Iran. We obtained an average LST value of 305.8 K as compared to a downscaled LST value of 307.0 K. Reference AET estimated with SEBS using Landsat 8 data was equal to 5.756 mm day-1, as compared with a downscaled AET value of 5.571 mm day-1. The RMSE between reference AET and downscaled AET was equal to 1.26 mm day-1 (r = 0.49) and between reference and downscaled LST to 3.67 K (r = 0.48). The study showed that AET values obtained with the two downscaling procedures were similar to each other, but that AET showed a higher spatial variability if obtained with downscaled LST. We concluded that LST had a large effect on producing AET maps from Remote Sensing (RS) images, and that downscaling cokriging was helpful to provide daily AET maps at medium spatial resolution.

  4. Using MODIS Thermal Data for Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration From Irrigated Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senay, G. B.; Budde, M.; Verdin, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    Accurate crop performance monitoring and production estimation are critical for timely assessment of the food balance of several countries in the world. Recently, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring crop performance and to some extent relative production using satellite derived data and simulation models in Africa, Central America and Afghanistan where ground-based monitoring is limited due to a scarcity of weather stations. The commonly used crop monitoring models use a crop water balance algorithm with inputs from satellite-derived rainfall. While these models provide useful monitoring for rain-fed agriculture, they are ineffective for irrigated areas. This study has focused on Afghanistan where over 80 percent of the agricultural production comes from irrigated agriculture. We implemented a simplified energy balance approach to monitor and assess the performance of irrigated agriculture in Afghanistan using the combination of 1-km thermal data and 250-m NDVI from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Up to 19 cloud free thermal and NDVI images were used for each year to estimate seasonal actual evapotranspiration (AET) for two major irrigation river basins (Kabul and Helmand) over 6 years (2000- 2005). Seasonal AET estimates were used as relative indicators of year-to-year production magnitude differences. The temporal water-use pattern of the different irrigated basins was indicative of the cropping patterns specific to the region. The results were comparable to field reports and watershed-wide crop water balance based estimates in that the 2003 seasonal AET was the highest of all six years. The advantage of this method over crop water balance methods is that the energy balance approach also helps identify spatial extents of irrigated fields and their spatial variability as opposed to a lumped watershed-wide assessment that can be obtained from large-scale water-balance models.

  5. Actual evapotranspiration and deficit: Biologically meaningful correlates of vegetation distribution across spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.

    1998-01-01

    Correlative approaches to understanding the climatic controls of vegetation distribution have exhibited at least two important weaknesses: they have been conceptually divorced across spatial scales, and their climatic parameters have not necessarily represented aspects of climate of broad physiological importance to plants. Using examples from the literature and from the Sierra Nevada of California, I argue that two water balance parameters-actual evapotranspiration (AET) and deficit (D)-are biologically meaningful, are well correlated with the distribution of vegetation types, and exhibit these qualities over several orders of magnitude of spatial scale (continental to local). I reach four additional conclusions. (1) Some pairs of climatic parameters presently in use are functionally similar to AET and D; however, AET and D may be easier to interpret biologically. (2) Several well-known climatic parameters are biologically less meaningful or less important than AET and D, and consequently are poorer correlates of the distribution of vegetation types. Of particular interest, AET is a much better correlate of the distributions of coniferous and deciduous forests than minimum temperature. (3) The effects of evaporative demand and water availability on a site's water balance are intrinsically different. For example, the 'dry' experienced by plants on sunward slopes (high evaporative demand) is not comparable to the 'dry' experienced by plants on soils with low water-holding capacities (low water availability), and these differences are reflected in vegetation patterns. (4) Many traditional topographic moisture scalars-those that additively combine measures related to evaporative demand and water availability are not necessarily meaningful for describing site conditions as sensed by plants; the same holds for measured soil moisture. However, using AET and D in place of moisture scalars and measured soil moisture can solve these problems.

  6. Spatiotemporal downscaling approaches for monitoring 8-day 30 m actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yinghai; Im, Jungho; Park, Seonyoung; Gong, Huili

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of actual evapotranspiration (ET) is critical for water resources management at both regional and local scales. Although the MODIS ET product (MOD16A2) provides viable sources for ET monitoring at 8-day intervals, the spatial resolution (1 km) is too coarse for local scale applications. In this study, we propose a machine learning and spatial temporal fusion (STF)-integrated approach in order to generate 8-day 30 m ET based on both MOD16A2 and Landsat 8 data with three schemes. Random forest machine learning was used to downscale MODIS 1 km ET to 30 m resolution based on nine Landsat-derived indicators including vegetation indices (VIs) and land surface temperature (LST). STF-based models including Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model and Spatio-Temporal Image Fusion Model were used to derive synthetic Landsat surface reflectance (scheme 1)/VIs (scheme 2)/ET (scheme 3) on Landsat-unavailable dates. The approach was tested over two study sites in the United States. The results showed that fusion of Landsat VIs produced the best accuracy of predicted ET (R2 = 0.52-0.97, RMSE = 0.47-3.0 mm/8 days and rRMSE = 6.4-37%). High density of cloud-clear Landsat image acquisitions and low spatial heterogeneity of Landsat VIs benefit the ET prediction. The downscaled 30 m ET had good agreement with MODIS ET (RMSE = 0.42-3.4 mm/8 days, rRMSE = 3.2-26%). Comparison with the in situ ET measurements showed that the downscaled ET had higher accuracy than MODIS ET.

  7. Spatio-temporal Characteristics of Actual Evapotranspiration Trends in sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, M. T.; Funk, C. C.; Michaelsen, J.

    2010-12-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (AET) is an important moisture flux linking the Earth’s surface to the atmospheric hydrologic cycle. Global warming is expected to intensify this cycle, leading to moisture deficits over the sub-tropics, which will influence climate at higher latitudes. The spatio-temporal characterization of tropical AET is critical to understanding regional and global climate. To date, many studies on the temporal characteristics of AET across sub-Saharan Africa have employed vegetation-based indices derived from satellite imagery. Although these studies implicitly reflect trends in AET, they quantify the magnitude of change. In this study, we used the latest developments in remote sensing and land-surface modeling to characterize the magnitude and timing of AET in sub-Saharan Africa. We considered several models were evaluated from 1981-2000 using monthly discharge and precipitation from ten sub-basins representative of hydrology in sub-Saharan Africa. Discharge data was provided by the Global Runoff Data Centre, while precipitation data was comprised of ECMWF, NCAR, NOAA/GDAS, and CMAP reanalysis fields synthesized in the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). The AET models included the Community Land Model, Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, Noah, and two hybrids that we developed driven by a dynamic vegetation component defined in Fisher et al. 2008. The dynamic canopy components in our hybrid models were driven by the LTDR AVHRR daily corrected reflectance data over the evaluation period. The evaluation revealed that VIC was superior to the other models in capturing the magnitude and variability of runoff in the sub-basins. A trend analysis was then performed on VIC AET from 1979-2009 using standard parametric and non-parametric techniques. Linear and median trend analysis was performed on seasonal and annual AET totals to measure the magnitude of change. The analysis revealed several alarming patterns, including large and

  8. Nodal Network Modelling by Integrating Remote Sensing Derived Actual Evapotranspiration with Spatial Water Balance in a Demand Driven Irrigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Kaleem; Hafeez, Mohsin; Sixsmith, Josh; Faux, Ralph

    2010-05-01

    The long-term sustainability of water for agriculture is in doubt in many regions of the world. The major withdrawals of water are for agriculture, industry, and domestic consumption. Irrigated agriculture is major consumer of fresh water, but a large part of the water devour for irrigation is wasted due to poor management of irrigation systems. Improving water management in irrigated areas and assessment of irrigation performance are critical activities for this endeavour. These activities are needed not only to improve water productivity, but also to increase the sustainability of irrigated agriculture and improving the irrigation efficiency. The improvement of the water use efficiency entail the complete understanding of various components of water balances such as rainfall, surface water, groundwater and evapotranspiration (ET). Evapotranspiration is the overriding aspect of water balance at farm to catchment scale. Many models have been used to measure the Evapotranspiration rate, either empirical or functional. The major disadvantage of this approach is that most methods generate only point values, resulting in estimates that are not representative of large areas. These methods are based on crop factors under ideal conditions and cannot therefore represent actual crop ET. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful mean to estimate ET over various spatial and temporal scales. The use of remote sensing techniques to estimate ET is achieved by solving the energy balance thermodynamics fluxes at the surface of the earth. For improved irrigation system management and operation, a holistic approach of integrating remote sensing derived ET from SAM-ET (spatial algorithm for mapping evapotranspiration) algorithm, for Australian agro-ecosystem with spatial water balance by using nodal network model was applied to evaluate agricultural water management in Coleambally Irrigation Area (CIA), New South Wales, Australia. It covers approximately 79,000 ha of intensive

  9. Evaluation of a Modified Priestly-Taylor Model for Actual Evapotranspiration in sub- Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, M. T.; Michaelsen, J.; Funk, C.; Artan, G.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change and the intensification of the water cycle is an important field of study, as global warming is expected to lead to dramatic increases in the frequency and magnitude of storms, floods, and droughts worldwide. In sub-tropical Africa, it is expected that the increase in evaporation and subsequent decrease in surface runoff will increase water demand in an already climate sensitive region. Studies also show that modeled soil moisture, a surrogate for evapotranspiration (ET), can improve rainfall and streamflow forecasts in these areas. Our objective, here therefore, is to evaluate a new ET model (Fisher et al., 2008) at inter- seasonal catchment scales. The Fisher et al. (2008) model uses functional eco-physiological relationships to adjust the Priestly-Taylor formulation of potential ET. It has performed well against several flux towers at tropical, sub-tropical, and temperate latitudes (R2=0.90). Although the model was extrapolated using remote sensing and climate reanalysis data, the validation was performed using site specific monthly average net radiation (Rn), monthly surface vapor pressure, and maximum monthly surface temperature. Two additional inputs are required for the model that can be acquired from remote sensing: the monthly average normalized difference vegetation index and soil-adjusted vegetation index. The vegetation indices will be calculated from a new atmospherically corrected AVHRR dataset of global daily reflectance at 0.05° resolution (NASA Land Long Term Data Record). The climate variables will be extracted from the bias-corrected European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis dataset at 0.05° resolution. The model will be evaluated at a seasonal timestep from 1981-1999 using cumulative runoff and lagged precipitation for seven major catchments in sub-Saharan Africa. It is expected that the highest model performance will be in areas where Rn is the dominant control on ET and advection is relatively small

  10. Evaluation of SEBS for estimation of actual evapotranspiration using ASTER satellite data for irrigation areas of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weiqiang; Hafeez, Mohsin; Ishikawa, Hirohiko; Ma, Yaoming

    2013-05-01

    Spatial knowledge of land surface evapotranspiration (ET) is of prime interest for environmental applications, such as optimizing irrigation water use, irrigation system performance, crop water deficit, drought mitigation strategies, and accurate initialization of climate prediction models especially in arid and semiarid catchments where water shortage is a critical problem. The recent drought in Australia and concerns about climate change have highlighted the need to manage water resources more sustainably especially in the Murrumbidgee catchment which utilizes bulk water for food production. This study deals with the application of a Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) algorithm based on Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) data and field observations has been proposed and tested for deriving ET over Coleambally Irrigation Area, located in the southwest of NSW, Australia. We have used 12 ASTER scenes covering the time period of 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2009 for estimating the actual ET over the study area. To validate the proposed methodology, the ground-measured ET was compared to the ASTER-derived actual ET values for the study area. The derived ET value over the study area is much closer to the field measurement. From the remote sensing results and observations, the root mean square error is 0.89 and the mean absolute percentage difference is 2.87 %, which demonstrate the reasonability of SEBS ET estimation for the study area.

  11. Actual evapotranspiration for a reference crop within measured and future changing climate periods in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katerji, Nader; Rana, Gianfranco; Ferrara, Rossana Monica

    2016-05-01

    The study compares two formulas for calculating the daily evapotranspiration ET0 for a reference crop. The first formula was proposed by Allen et al. (AL), while the second one was proposed by Katerji and Perrier with the addition of the carbon dioxide (CO2) effect on evapotranspiration (KP). The study analyses the impact of the calculation by the two formulas on the irrigation requirement (IR). Both formulas are based on the Penman-Monteith equation but adopt different approaches for parameterising the canopy resistance r c . In the AL formula, r c is assumed constant and not sensitive to climate change, whereas in the KP formula, r c is first parameterised as a function of climatic variables, then ET0 is corrected for the air CO2 concentration. The two formulas were compared in two periods. The first period involves data from two sites in the Mediterranean region within a measured climate change period (1981-2006) when all the input climatic variables were measured. The second period (2070-2100) involves data from a future climate change period at one site when the input climatic variables were forecasted for two future climate scenarios (A2 and B2). The annual cumulated values of ET0 calculated by the AL formula are systematically lower than those determined by the KP formula. The differences between the ET0 estimation with the AL and KP formulas have a strong impact on the determination of the IR for the reference crop. In fact, for the two periods, the annual values of IR when ET0 is calculated by the AL formula are systematically lower than those calculated by the KP formula. For the actual measured climate change period, this reduction varied from 26 to 28 %, while for the future climate change period, it varied based on the scenario from 16 % (A2) to 20 % (B2).

  12. Integration of Remote Sensing derived Actual Evapotranspiration with Meteorological Data for Real Time Demand Forecasting in Semi-arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. K.; Hafeez, M. M.; Chemin, Y.; Faux, R.; Sixsmith, J.

    2010-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is major consumer of fresh water, but a large part of the water devour for irrigation is wasted due to poor management of irrigation systems. Improving water management in irrigated areas require the analysis of real time water demand in order to determine the possibilities in which it may be modified and rationalised. Real time water demand information in irrigated areas is a key for planning about sustainable use of irrigation water. These activities are needed not only to improve water productivity, but also to increase the sustainability of irrigated agriculture by saving irrigation water. Demand forecasting entail the complete understanding of spatial and expected temporal variability of metrological parameters and evapotranspiration (ET). ET is the overriding aspect for irrigation demand forecasting at farm to catchment scale. Many models have been used to measure the ET rate, either empirical or functional. The major disadvantage of this approach is that most methods generate only point values, resulting in estimates that are not representative of large areas. These methods are based on crop factors under ideal conditions and cannot therefore represent actual crop ET. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful mean to estimate ET over various spatial and temporal scales. For improved irrigation system management and operation, a holistic approach of integrating remote sensing derived ET from SAM-ET (spatial algorithm for mapping ET) algorithm, for Australian agro-ecosystem, with forecasted meteorological data and field application loss functions for major crops were used to forecast actual water demand in Coleambally Irrigation Area (CIA), New South Wales, Australia. It covers approximately 79,000 ha of intensive irrigation and comprise of number of secondary and tertiary canals. In order to capture the spatial variability, CIA has been divided into 22 nodes based on direction of flow and connectivity. All hydrological data of inflow (i

  13. Drivers of actual evapotranspiration and runoff in East Africa during the mid-Holocene: assessments from an ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fer, Istem; Jeltsch, Florian; Tietjen, Britta; Trauth, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the evolution and response of the hydrological cycle under changing climate is of vital importance for human populations all around the world. Especially so in regions like East Africa, where society largely depends on the availability of water and the hydrologic conditions are highly sensitive to changes in the distribution and amount of precipitation. In this endeavor, studying past hydrological changes provides us realistic scenarios and data to better understand and predict the extent of the future hydrological changes. However while studying the past, paleovegetation, which plays a pivotal role in the paleo-hydrological cycle, is difficult to determine from fossil pollen records as pollen data can provide very limited information on spatial distribution and composition of the vegetation cover. Here ecosystem models driven by paleo-climate conditions can provide spatially-extensive information on the coupled dynamics of past vegetation and hydrological measures such as actual evapotranspiration (AET), potential evapotranspiration (PET) and runoff. In this study, we looked at AET and runoff estimates of an ecosystem model as these are important elements of water transfer in the hydrological cycle and critical for water balance calculations. We applied the ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS, for present-day with data from Climatic Research Unit CRU TS3.20 climate dataset, and for mid-Holocene (6 kyrs BP) with data from an atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate model EC-Earth. Climate data for both periods were downscaled to a 10 arc min resolution in order to better resolve the impacts of the complex topography on vegetation distribution, AET and runoff. Comparison of the simulated AET and runoff values for East Africa, show similar patterns as annual AET estimates for the period 1961-1990 by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and with the observed runoff data from Cogley (1998), respectively. Comparison of simulated present

  14. Utility of Penman-Monteith, Priestley-Taylor, reference evapotranspiration, and pan evaporation methods to estimate pasture evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.; Jacobs, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was measured at 30-min resolution over a 19-month period (September 28, 2000-April 23, 2002) from a nonirrigated pasture site in Florida, USA, using eddy correlation methods. The relative magnitude of measured ETa (about 66% of long-term annual precipitation at the study site) indicates the importance of accurate ET a estimates for water resources planning. The time and cost associated with direct measurements of ETa and the rarity of historical measurements of ETa make the use of methods relying on more easily obtainable data desirable. Several such methods (Penman-Monteith (PM), modified Priestley-Taylor (PT), reference evapotranspiration (ET 0), and pan evaporation (Ep)) were related to measured ETa using regression methods to estimate PM bulk surface conductance, PT ??, ET0 vegetation coefficient, and Ep pan coefficient. The PT method, where the PT ?? is a function of green-leaf area index (LAI) and solar radiation, provided the best relation with ET a (standard error (SE) for daily ETa of 0.11 mm). The PM method, in which the bulk surface conductance was a function of net radiation and vapor-pressure deficit, was slightly less effective (SE=0.15 mm) than the PT method. Vegetation coefficients for the ET0 method (SE=0.29 mm) were found to be a simple function of LAI. Pan coefficients for the Ep method (SE=0.40 mm) were found to be a function of LAI and Ep. Historical or future meteorological, LAI, and pan evaporation data from the study site could be used, along with the relations developed within this study, to provide estimates of ETa in the absence of direct measurements of ETa. Additionally, relations among PM, PT, and ET0 methods and ETa can provide estimates of ETa in other, environmentally similar, pasture settings for which meteorological and LAI data can be obtained or estimated. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evapotranspiration Modeling and Measurements at Ecosystem Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirca, C.; Snyder, R. L.; Mereu, S.; Kovács-Láng, E.; Ónodi, G.; Spano, D.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, the availability of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) data is greatly increased. ETo, in conjunction with coefficients accounting for the difference between the vegetation and the reference surface, provides estimation of the actual evapotranspiration (ETa). The coefficients approach was applied in the past mainly for crops, due the lack of experimental data and difficulties to account for terrain and vegetation variability in natural ecosystems. Moreover, the assessment of ETa over large spatial scale by measurements is often time consuming, and requires several measurement points with relatively expensive and sophisticated instrumentation and techniques (e.g. eddy covariance). The Ecosystem Water Program (ECOWAT) was recently developed to help estimates of ETa of ecosystems by accounting for microclimate, vegetation type, plant density, and water stress. ETa on natural and semi-natural ecosystems has several applications, e.g. water status assessment, fire danger estimation, and ecosystem management practices. In this work, results obtained using ECOWAT to assess ETa of a forest ecosystem located in Hungary are reported. The site is a part of the EU-FP7 INCREASE project, which aims to study the effects of climate change on European shrubland ecosystems. In the site, a climate manipulation experiment was setted up to have a warming and a drought treatment (besides the control). Each treatment was replicated three times We show how the ECOWAT model performed when the predicted actual evapotranspiration is compared with actual evapotranspiration obtained from Surface Renewal method and with soil moisture measurements. ECOWAT was able to capture the differences in the water balance at treatment level, confirming its potential as a tool for water status assessment. For the Surface Renewal method, high frequency temperature data were collected to estimate the sensible heat flux (H'). The net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux density (G) were also

  16. Testing an Energy Balance Model for Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Data. [Hannover, West Germany barley and wheat fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurney, R. J.; Camillo, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An energy-balance model is used to estimate daily evapotranspiration for 3 days for a barley field and a wheat field near Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany. The model was calibrated using once-daily estimates of surface temperatures, which may be remotely sensed. The evaporation estimates were within the 95% error bounds of independent eddy correlation estimates for the daytime periods for all three days for both sites, but the energy-balance estimates are generally higher; it is unclear which estimate is biassed. Soil moisture in the top 2 cm of soil, which may be remotely sensed, may be used to improve these evaporation estimates under partial ground cover. Sensitivity studies indicate the amount of ground data required is not excessive.

  17. Determination of actual crop evapotranspiration (ETc) and dual crop coefficients (Kc) for cotton, wheat and maize in Fergana Valley: integration of the FAO-56 approach and BUDGET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenjabaev, Shavkat; Dernedde, Yvonne; Frede, Hans-Georg; Stulina, Galina

    2014-05-01

    Determination of the actual crop evapotranspiration (ETc) during the growing period is important for accurate irrigation scheduling in arid and semi-arid regions. Development of a crop coefficient (Kc) can enhance ETc estimations in relation to specific crop phenological development. This research was conducted to determine daily and growth-stage-specific Kc and ETc values for cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) for silage at fields in Fergana Valley (Uzbekistan). The soil water balance model - Budget with integration of the dual crop procedure of the FAO-56 was used to estimate the ETc and separate it into evaporation (Ec) and transpiration (Tc) components. An empirical equation was developed to determine the daily Kc values based on the estimated Ec and Tc. The ETc, Kc determination and comparison to existing FAO Kc values were performed based on 10, 5 and 6 study cases for cotton, wheat and maize, respectively. Mean seasonal amounts of crop water consumption in terms of ETc were 560±50, 509±27 and 243±39 mm for cotton, wheat and maize, respectively. The growth-stage-specific Kc for cotton, wheat and maize was 0.15, 0.27 and 0.11 at initial; 1.15, 1.03 and 0.56 at mid; and 0.45, 0.89 and 0.53 at late season stages. These values correspond to those reported by the FAO-56. Development of site specific Kc helps tremendously in irrigation management and furthermore provides precise water applications in the region. The developed simple approach to estimate daily Kc for the three main crops grown in the Fergana region was a first attempt to meet this issue. Keywords: Actual crop evapotranspiration, evaporation and transpiration, crop coefficient, model BUDGET, Fergana Valley.

  18. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance based algorithms to estimate actual evapotranspiration over the western and southern regions of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Shereif H.; Alazba, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In countries with absolute water scarcity such as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), large-scale actual evapotranspiration estimation is of great concern in water use practices. Herein, spatial and temporal distribution of actual evapotranspiration (AET) in the western and southern regions of KSA during 1992-2014 was estimated using the SEBAL model with field observations. Zonal statistics for each land use-cover type were also identified, in order to understand their effects on water consumption. In addition, daily and seasonal water consumption for major crops was computed. Results revealed a gradual increase in monthly AET values from January to April and subsequent decline from May to December. The maximum monthly AET values were observed for irrigated cropland in southwestern, central, and southeastern regions of Asir Province, central and southwestern regions of Al-Baha Province, central and the plains region of Jazan Province, southern portion of Makkah Province, and limited areas in the northern regions of Madinah Province. The annual AET ranged from 418.8 to 3442.3 mm yr-1. The normal distribution of mean annual AET values ranged from 717 to 1020 mm yr-1. Forty-two percent of the study area had an annual AET that ranged from 717 to 1020 mm yr-1. The second highest range of frequencies was concentrated around 1020-1322 mm yr-1, representing the majority of agricultural land. The consumptive water use of the different land cover types in study area indicated that irrigated cropland which occupied 14.6% of the study area had AET rates much higher than other land uses. Water bodies are the next highest, with forest and shrubland and sparse vegetation slightly lower, and very low AET rates from bare soil. Daily and seasonal water consumption of major cropping systems varied spatially depending on cropping practices and climatic conditions.

  19. Estimating riparian and agricultural evapotranspiration by reference crop evapotranspiration and MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagler, Pamela L.; Glenn, Edward P.; Nguyen, Uyen; Scott, Russell; Doody, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Dryland river basins frequently support both irrigated agriculture and riparian vegetation and remote sensing methods are needed to monitor water use by both crops and natural vegetation in irrigation districts. We developed an algorithm for estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor on the EOS-1 Terra satellite and locally-derived measurements of reference crop ET (ETo). The algorithm was calibrated with five years of ETa data from three eddy covariance flux towers set in riparian plant associations on the upper San Pedro River, Arizona, supplemented with ETa data for alfalfa and cotton from the literature. The algorithm was based on an equation of the form ETa = ETo [a(1 − e−bEVI) − c], where the term (1 − e−bEVI) is derived from the Beer-Lambert Law to express light absorption by a canopy, with EVI replacing leaf area index as an estimate of the density of light-absorbing units. The resulting algorithm capably predicted ETa across riparian plants and crops (r2 = 0.73). It was then tested against water balance data for five irrigation districts and flux tower data for two riparian zones for which season-long or multi-year ETa data were available. Predictions were within 10% of measured results in each case, with a non-significant (P = 0.89) difference between mean measured and modeled ETa of 5.4% over all validation sites. Validation and calibration data sets were combined to present a final predictive equation for application across crops and riparian plant associations for monitoring individual irrigation districts or for conducting global water use assessments of mixed agricultural and riparian biomes.

  20. Estimation of Evapotranspiration of Almond orchards using Remote Sensing based SEBAL model in Central Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Ustin, S.; Kefauver, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the main components of the hydrologic cycle and its impact to hydrology, agriculture,forestry and environmental studies is very crucial. SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land) is an image-processing model comprised of twenty-five computational sub-models that computes actual evapotranspiration (ETa) and other energy exchanges as a component of energy balance which is used to derive the surface radiation balance equation for the net surface radiation flux (Rn) on a pixel-by-pixel basis. For this study, SEBAL method is applied to Level 1B dataset of visible, near-infrared and thermal infrared radiation channels of MASTER instrument on-board NASA-DC 8 flight. This paper uses the SEBAL method to (1) investigate the spatial distribution property of land surface temperature (Ls), NDVI, and ETa over the San Joaquin valley. (2) Estimate actual evapotranspiration of almond class on pixel-by-pixel basis in the Central valley, California. (3) Comparison of actual Evapotranspiration obtained from SEBAL model with reference evapotranspiration (Eto) using Penman Monteiths method based on the procedures and available data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) stations. The results of the regression between extracted land surface temperature, NDVI and, evapotranspiration show negative (-) correlation. On the other hand Ls possessed a slightly stronger negative correlation with the ETa than with NDVI for Almond class. The correlation coefficient of actual ETa estimates from remote sensing with Reference ETo from Penmann Monteith are 0.8571. ETa estimated for almond crop from SEBAL were found to be almost same with the CIMIS_Penman Monteith method with bias of 0.77 mm and mean percentage difference is 0.10%. These results indicate that combination of MASTER data with surface meteorological data could provide an efficient tool for the estimation of regional actual ET used for water resources and irrigation scheduling

  1. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-09-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of forest stands in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The tested approach for calculating the water use by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results reveal that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  2. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of a forest stand in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The approach tested for calculating the water consumption by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time-series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results show that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  3. Mapping Seasonal Evapotranspiration and Root Zone Soil Moisture using a Hybrid Modeling Approach over Vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, H. M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Estimates of actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa) at field scale over the growing season are required for improving agricultural water management, particularly in water limited and drought prone regions. Remote sensing data from multiple platforms such as airborne and Landsat-based sensors can be used to provide these estimates. Combining these data with surface energy balance models can provide ETa estimates at sub- field scale as well as information on vegetation stress and soil moisture conditions. However, the temporal resolution of airborne and Landsat data does not allow for a continuous ETa monitoring over the course of the growing season. This study presents the application of a hybrid ETa modeling approach developed for monitoring daily ETa and root zone available water at high spatial resolutions. The hybrid ETa modeling approach couples a thermal-based energy balance model with a water balance-based scheme using data assimilation. The two source energy balance (TSEB) model is used to estimate instantaneous ETa which can be extrapolated to daily ETa using a water balance model modified to use the reflectance-based basal crop coefficient for interpolating ETa in between airborne and/or Landsat overpass dates. Moreover, since it is a water balance model, the soil moisture profile is also estimated. The hybrid ETa approach is applied over vineyard fields in central California. High resolution airborne and Landsat imagery were used to drive the hybrid model. These images were collected during periods that represented different vine phonological stages in 2013 growing season. Estimates of daily ETa and surface energy balance fluxes will be compared with ground-based eddy covariance tower measurements. Estimates of soil moisture at multiple depths will be compared with measurements.

  4. Assessing the performance of two models on calculating maize actual evapotranspiration in a semi-humid and drought-prone region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wang, J. L.; Zhao, C. X.; McGiffen, M. E.; Liu, J. B.; Wang, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    The two-step and one-step models for calculating evapotranspiration of maize were evaluated in a semi-humid and drought-prone region of northern China. Data were collected in the summers of 2013 and 2014 to determine relative model accuracy in calculating maize evaopotranspiration. The two-step model predicted daily evaoptranspiration with crop coefficients proposed by FAO and crop coefficient calibrated by local field data; the one-step model predicted daily evapotranspiration with coefficients derived by other researcher and coefficients calibrated by local field data. The predicted daily evapotranspiration in 2013 and 2014 growing seasons with the above two different models was both compared with the observed evapotranspiration with eddy covariance method. Furthermore, evapotranspiration in different growth stages of 2013 and 2014 maize growing seasons was predicted using the models with the local calibrated coefficients. The results indicated that calibration of models was necessary before using them to predict daily evapotranspiration. The model with the calibrated coefficients performed better with higher coefficient of determination and index of agreement and lower mean absolute error and root mean square error than before. And the two-step model better predicted daily evapotranspiration than the one-step model in our experimental field. Nevertheless, as to prediction ET of different growth stages, there still had some uncertainty when predicting evapotranspiration in different year. So the comparisons suggested that model prediction of crop evapotranspiration was practical, but requires calibration and validation with more data. Thus, considerable improvement is needed for these two models to be practical in predicting evapotranspiration for maize and other crops, more field data need to be measured, and an in-depth study still needs to be continued.

  5. Estimation of total available water in the soil layer by integrating actual evapotranspiration data in a remote sensing-driven soil water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Isidro; González-Piqueras, Jose; Carrara, Arnaud; Villodre, Julio; Calera, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    The total available water (τ) by plants that could be stored in its root soil layer is a key parameter when applying soil water balance models. Since the transpiration rate of a vegetation stand could be the best proxy about the soil water content into the root soil layer, we propose a methodology for estimating τ by using as basic inputs the evapotranspiration rate of the stand and time series of multispectral imagery. This methodology is based on the inverted formulation of the soil water balance model. The inversion of the model was addressed by using an iterative approach, which optimizes the τ parameter to minimize the difference between measured and modeled ET. This methodology was tested for a Mediterranean holm oak savanna (dehesa) for which eddy covariance measurements of actual ET were available. The optimization procedure was performed by using a continuous dataset (in 2004) of daily ET measurements and 16 sets of 8 daily ET measurements, resulting in τ values of 325 and 305 mm, respectively. The use of these τ values in the RSWB model for the validation period (2005-2008) allowed us to estimate dehesa ET with a RMSE = 0.48 mm/day. The model satisfactorily reproduces the water stress process. The sensitivity of τ estimates was evaluated regarding two of the more uncertain parameters in the RSWB model. These parameters are the average fraction of τ that can be depleted from the root zone without producing moisture stress (pτ) and the soil evaporation component. The results of this analysis indicated relatively little influence from the evaporation component and the need for adequate knowledge about pτ for estimating τ.

  6. A 3-D Generalization of the Budyko Framework Captures the Mutual Interdependence Between Long-Term Mean Annual Precipitation, Actual and Potential Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.

    2012-12-01

    We study the behavior of the 3-D parameter space defined by Φ =PET/P (so-called Aridity Index), Ψ =AET/P, and Ω =AET/PET, where P denotes mean annual precipitation, and PET and AET denote mean annual potential and actual evapotranspiration, respectively. Using information from the CLIMWAT 2.0 database (www.fao.org/nr/water/infores_databases_climwat.html) for P and PET, we estimate AET using both Budyko's and Turc's equations. Our results indicate that the well-known Budyko function that relates Φ vs.Ψ corresponds to a particular bi-dimensional cross-section of a broader coupling existing between Φ, Ψ and Ω (Figure 1a), and in turn of the mutual interdependence between P, PET and AET. The behavior of the three bi-dimensional projections are clearly parameterized by the remaining ortogonal parameter, such that: (i) the relation Φ vs. Ψ is defined by physically consistent varying values of Ω (Figure 1b); (ii) the relation Ω vs. Ψ is defined by physically consistent varying values of the Aridity Index,Φ (Figure 1c), and (iii) the relation Ω vs. Φ is defined by physically consistent varying values of Ψ (Figure 1d). Interestingly, we show that Φ and Ω are related by a power law, Φ~Ω-θ, with scaling exponent θ=1.15 (R2=0.91, n=3420) for the whole world (Figure 1d). Mathematical functions that model the three bi-dimensional projections and the surface defining the interdependence between Φ, Ψ and Ω will be presented. Our results provide a new framework to understand the coupling between the long-term mean annual water and energy balances in river basins, and the hydrological effects brought about by climate change, while taking into account the mutual interdependence between the three non-dimensional parameters Φ, Ψ and Ω, and in turn between P, PET and AET. Figure 1. (a) Three-dimensional rendering of sample values of Φ =PET/P (so-called Aridity Index), Ψ =AET/P, and Ω=AET/PET. Bi-dimensional projections of: (b) relation Φ vs.

  7. Vegetation index methods for estimating evapotranspiration by remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glenn, Edward P.; Nagler, Pamela L.; Huete, Alfredo R.

    2010-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the largest term after precipitation in terrestrial water budgets. Accurate estimates of ET are needed for numerous agricultural and natural resource management tasks and to project changes in hydrological cycles due to potential climate change. We explore recent methods that combine vegetation indices (VI) from satellites with ground measurements of actual ET (ETa) and meteorological data to project ETa over a wide range of biome types and scales of measurement, from local to global estimates. The majority of these use time-series imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer on the Terra satellite to project ET over seasons and years. The review explores the theoretical basis for the methods, the types of ancillary data needed, and their accuracy and limitations. Coefficients of determination between modeled ETa and measured ETa are in the range of 0.45–0.95, and root mean square errors are in the range of 10–30% of mean ETa values across biomes, similar to methods that use thermal infrared bands to estimate ETa and within the range of accuracy of the ground measurements by which they are calibrated or validated. The advent of frequent-return satellites such as Terra and planed replacement platforms, and the increasing number of moisture and carbon flux tower sites over the globe, have made these methods feasible. Examples of operational algorithms for ET in agricultural and natural ecosystems are presented. The goal of the review is to enable potential end-users from different disciplines to adapt these methods to new applications that require spatially-distributed ET estimates.

  8. Evaluation of the relation between evapotranspiration and normalized difference vegetation index for downscaling the simplified surface energy balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haynes, Jonathan V.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2012-01-01

    The Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model uses satellite imagery to estimate actual evapotranspiration (ETa) at 1-kilometer resolution. SSEB ETa is useful for estimating irrigation water use; however, resolution limitations restrict its use to regional scale applications. The U.S. Geological Survey investigated the downscaling potential of SSEB ETa from 1 kilometer to 250 meters by correlating ETa with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument (MODIS). Correlations were studied in three arid to semiarid irrigated landscapes of the Western United States (Escalante Valley near Enterprise, Utah; Palo Verde Valley near Blythe, California; and part of the Columbia Plateau near Quincy, Washington) during several periods from 2002 to 2008. Irrigation season ETa-NDVI correlations were lower than expected, ranging from R2 of 0.20 to 0.61 because of an eastward 2–3 kilometer shift in ETadata. The shift is due to a similar shift identified in the land-surface temperature (LST) data from the MODIS Terra satellite, which is used in the SSEB model. Further study is needed to delineate the Terra LST shift, its effect on SSEB ETa, and the relation between ETa and NDVI.

  9. Comment on 'Shang S. 2012. Calculating actual crop evapotranspiration under soil water stress conditions with appropriate numerical methods and time step. Hydrological Processes 26: 3338-3343. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.8405'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yatheendradas, Soni; Narapusetty, Balachandrudu; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Funk, Christopher; Verdin, James

    2014-01-01

    A previous study analyzed errors in the numerical calculation of actual crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub a)) under soil water stress. Assuming no irrigation or precipitation, it constructed equations for ET(sub a) over limited soil-water ranges in a root zone drying out due to evapotranspiration. It then used a single crop-soil composite to provide recommendations about the appropriate usage of numerical methods under different values of the time step and the maximum crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub c)). This comment reformulates those ET(sub a) equations for applicability over the full range of soil water values, revealing a dependence of the relative error in numerical ET(sub a) on the initial soil water that was not seen in the previous study. It is shown that the recommendations based on a single crop-soil composite can be invalid for other crop-soil composites. Finally, a consideration of the numerical error in the time-cumulative value of ET(sub a) is discussed besides the existing consideration of that error over individual time steps as done in the previous study. This cumulative ET(sub a) is more relevant to the final crop yield.

  10. Actual evapotranspiration estimation in a Mediterranean mountain region by means of Landsat-5 TM and TERRA/AQUA MODIS imagery and Sap Flow measurements in Pinus sylvestris forest stands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristóbal, J.; Poyatos, R.; Ninyerola, M.; Pons, X.; Llorens, P.

    2009-04-01

    Evapotranspiration monitoring has important implications on global and regional climate modelling, as well as in the knowledge of the hydrological cycle and in the assessment of environmental stress that affects forest and agricultural ecosystems. An increase of evapotranspiration while precipitation remains constant, or is reduced, could decrease water availability for natural and agricultural systems and human needs. Consequently, water balance methods, as the evapotranspiration modelling, have been widely used to estimate crop and forest water needs, as well as the global change effects. Nowadays, radiometric measurements provided by Remote Sensing and GIS analysis are the technologies used to compute evapotranspiration at regional scales in a feasible way. Currently, the 38% of Catalonia (NE of the Iberian Peninsula) is covered by forests, and one of the most important forest species is Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) which represents the 18.4% of the area occupied by forests. The aim of this work is to model actual evapotranspiration in Pinus sylvestris forest stands, in a Mediterranean mountain region, using remote sensing data, and compare it with stand-scale sap flow measurements measured in the Vallcebre research area (42° 12' N, 1° 49' E), in the Eastern Pyrenees. To perform this study a set of 30 cloud-free TERRA-MODIS images and 10 Landsat-5 TM images of path 198 and rows 31 and 32 from June 2003 to January 2005 have been selected to perform evapotranspiration modelling in Pinus sylvestris forest stands. TERRA/AQUA MODIS images have been downloaded by means of the EOS Gateway. We have selected two different types of products which contain the remote sensing data we have used to model daily evapotranspiration, daily LST product and daily calibrated reflectances product. Landsat-5 TM images have been corrected by means of conventional techniques based on first order polynomials taking into account the effect of land surface relief using a Digital

  11. Drought trends indicated by evapotranspiration deficit over the contiguous United States during 1896-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeha; Rhee, Jinyoung

    2016-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) has received a great attention in drought assessment as it is closely related to atmospheric water demand. The hypothetical potential ET (ETp) has been predominantly used, nonetheless it does not actually exist in the hydrologic cycle. In this work, we used a complementary method for ET estimation to obtain wet-environment ET (ETw) and actual ET (ETa) from routinely observed climatic data. By combining ET deficits (ETw minus ETa) and the structure of the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), we proposed a novel ET-based drought index, the Standardized Evapotranspiration Deficit Index (SEDI). We carried out historical drought identification for the contiguous United States using temperature datasets of the PRISM Climate Group. SEDI presented spatial distributions of drought areas similar to the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) for major drought events. It indicates that SEDI can be used for validating other drought indices. Using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test, we found a significant decreasing trend of SEDI (increasing drought risk) similar to PDSI and SPI in the western United States. This study suggests a potential of ET-based indices for drought quantification even with no involvement of precipitation data.

  12. Automated calculation of the evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of peatland sites using diurnal groundwater table fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Eike; Bechtold, Michel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2014-05-01

    values were determined from precipitation events and the related water level increase. Parameter values in this routine were systematically varied to obtain the lowest standard error of Sy. Errors were obtained by bootstrapping. The resulting Sy-values correspond well to peatland type and soil properties. After rule-based filtering of the time series, in a third step, the actual evapotranspiration ETa is calculated by the original White-method and a modification by Hays (2003). Daily values of ETa and ET0 are used to derive crop coefficients, which are then aggregated to monthly and annual Kc-values. Applying the method to a large number of sites resulted in plausible crop coefficients which compare well to previously published values of peatland evapotranspiration, as far as information on similar vegetation is available.

  13. Feasibility analysis of using inverse modeling for estimating field-scale evapotranspiration in maize and soybean fields from soil water content monitoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foolad, Foad; Franz, Trenton E.; Wang, Tiejun; Gibson, Justin; Kilic, Ayse; Allen, Richard G.; Suyker, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using inverse vadose zone modeling for estimating field-scale actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was explored at a long-term agricultural monitoring site in eastern Nebraska. Data from both point-scale soil water content (SWC) sensors and the area-average technique of cosmic-ray neutron probes were evaluated against independent ETa estimates from a co-located eddy covariance tower. While this methodology has been successfully used for estimates of groundwater recharge, it was essential to assess the performance of other components of the water balance such as ETa. In light of recent evaluations of land surface models (LSMs), independent estimates of hydrologic state variables and fluxes are critically needed benchmarks. The results here indicate reasonable estimates of daily and annual ETa from the point sensors, but with highly varied soil hydraulic function parameterizations due to local soil texture variability. The results of multiple soil hydraulic parameterizations leading to equally good ETa estimates is consistent with the hydrological principle of equifinality. While this study focused on one particular site, the framework can be easily applied to other SWC monitoring networks across the globe. The value-added products of groundwater recharge and ETa flux from the SWC monitoring networks will provide additional and more robust benchmarks for the validation of LSM that continues to improve their forecast skill. In addition, the value-added products of groundwater recharge and ETa often have more direct impacts on societal decision-making than SWC alone. Water flux impacts human decision-making from policies on the long-term management of groundwater resources (recharge), to yield forecasts (ETa), and to optimal irrigation scheduling (ETa). Illustrating the societal benefits of SWC monitoring is critical to insure the continued operation and expansion of these public datasets.

  14. Evapotranspiration Calculator Desktop Tool

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Evapotranspiration Calculator estimates evapotranspiration time series data for hydrological and water quality models for the Hydrologic Simulation Program - Fortran (HSPF) and the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM).

  15. Modeling landscape evapotranspiration by integrating land surface phenology and a water balance algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, Gabriel B.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to present an improved modeling technique called Vegetation ET (VegET) that integrates commonly used water balance algorithms with remotely sensed Land Surface Phenology (LSP) parameter to conduct operational vegetation water balance modeling of rainfed systems at the LSP’s spatial scale using readily available global data sets. Evaluation of the VegET model was conducted using Flux Tower data and two-year simulation for the conterminous US. The VegET model is capable of estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) of rainfed crops and other vegetation types at the spatial resolution of the LSP on a daily basis, replacing the need to estimate crop- and region-specific crop coefficients.

  16. Evapotranspiration partitioning, stomatal conductance, and components of the water balance: A special case of a desert ecosystem in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenzhi; Liu, Bing; Chang, Xuexiang; Yang, Qiyue; Yang, Yuting; Liu, Zhiling; Cleverly, James; Eamus, Derek

    2016-07-01

    Partitioning evapotranspiration (ET) into its components reveals details of the processes that underlie ecosystem hydrologic budgets and their feedback to the water cycle. We measured rates of actual evapotranspiration (ETa), canopy transpiration (Tc), soil evaporation (Eg), canopy-intercepted precipitation (EI), and patterns of stomatal conductance of the desert shrub Calligonum mongolicum in northern China to determine the water balance of this ecosystem. The ETa was 251 ± 8 mm during the growing period, while EI, Tc, and Eg accounted for 3.2%, 63.9%, and 31.3%, respectively, of total water use (256 ± 4 mm) during the growing period. In this unique ecosystem, groundwater was the main water source for plant transpiration and soil evaporation, Tc and exceeded 60% of the total annual water used by desert plants. ET was not sensitive to air temperature in this unique desert ecosystem. Partitioning ET into its components improves our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie adaptation of desert shrubs, especially the role of stomatal regulation of Tc as a determinant of ecosystem water balance.

  17. Forecast of enhanced activity of eta-Aquariids in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Watanabe, J.

    2014-07-01

    We tried to simulate distributions for Eta-Aquariids (ETA) of dust trails from 1P/Halley, we found out that some dust trails formed by meteoroids ejected in -1197 and -910 would approach the Earth in 2013. It means that the enhancement of eta-Aquariids would be expected. Actually, the enhanced activity of eta-Aquariids was observed in 2013. Its peak time corresponded with the time when the dust trails approached the Earth based on our simulation. Therefore, it was sure that the enhancement was caused by these dust trails.

  18. Annual evapotranspiration retrieved solely from satellites' vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helman, David; Lensky, Itamar; Givati, Amir

    2015-04-01

    We present a simple model to retrieve annual actual evapotranspiration (ETannual) solely from satellites. The model is based on empirical relationships between vegetation indices (NDVI & EVI from MODIS) and ETannual from 16 fluxnet sites. These sites represent a wide range of plant functional types and ETannual. A multiple regression model is applied separately for (a) annuals vegetation systems (i.e., croplands and grasslands), and (b) combined annuals and perennials vegetation systems (i.e., woodlands, forests, savanna and shrublands). It explained 80% of the variance in ETannual for annuals, and 91% for combined annuals and perennials systems. We used this model to retrieve ETannual at 250 m spatial resolution for the Eastern Mediterranean from 2000 to 2013. The models estimates were highly correlated (R = 0.96, N = 7) with ETannual calculated from water catchments balances along the rainfall gradient of Israel. Models estimates were also comparable to the coarser resolution ET products of MSG (LSA-SAF MSG ETA, 3.1 km) and MODIS (MOD16, 1 km) in 148 Eastern Mediterranean basins, with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.79 (N = 148), for both.

  19. The complementary relationship (CR) approach aids evapotranspiration estimation in the data scarce region of Tibetan Plateau: symmetric and asymmetric perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, N.; Zhang, Y.; Szilagyi, J.; Xu, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    While the land surface latent and sensible heat release in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) could greatly influence the Asian monsoon circulation, the actual evapotranspiration (ETa) information in the TP has been largely hindered by its extremely sparse ground observation network. Thus the complementary relationship (CR) theory lends great potential in estimating the ETa since it relies on solely routine meteorological observations. With the in-situ energy/water flux observation over the highest semiarid alpine steppe in the TP, the modifications of specific components within the CR were first implemented. We found that the symmetry of the CR could be achieved for dry regions of TP when (i) the Priestley-Taylor coefficient, (ii) the slope of the saturation vapor pressure curve and (iii) the wind function were locally calibrated by using the ETa observations in wet days, an estimate of the wet surface temperature and the Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory, respectively. In this way, the error of the simulated ETa by the symmetric AA model could be decreased to a large extent. Besides, the asymmetric CR was confirmed in TP when the D20 above-ground and/or E601B sunken pan evaporation (Epan) were used as a proxy of the ETp. Thus daily ETa could also be estimated by coupling D20 above-ground and/or E601B sunken pans through CR. Additionally, to overcome the modification of the specific components in the CR, we also evaluated the Nonlinear-CR model and the Morton's CRAE model. The former does not need the pre-determination of the asymmetry of CR, while the latter does not require the wind speed data as input. We found that both models are also able to simulate the daily ETa well provided their parameter values have been locally calibrated. The sensitivity analysis shows that, if the measured ETa data are absence to calibrate the models' parameter values, the Nonlinear-CR model may be a particularly good way for estimating ETabecause of its mild sensitivity to the parameter

  20. Search for B Meson Decays to eta' eta' K

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-05-05

    The authors describe searches for decays of B mesons to the charmless final states {eta}'{eta}'K. The data consist of 228 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The 90% confidence level upper limits for the branching fractions are {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{eta}'K{sup 0}) < 31 x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'{eta}'K{sup +}) < 25 x 10{sup -6}.

  1. {eta}-{eta}{sup '}--glue Mixing from the Chiral Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Vento, Vicente

    2011-05-23

    The {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing from the chiral Lagrangian is reviewed. It is shown how the Feldman-Kroll-Stech ansatz can be derived from the chiral Lagrangian. The inclusion of the glueball is also discussed.

  2. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  3. Observation of D+ --> etae + nue.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Ernst, J; Ecklund, K M; Severini, H; Love, W; Savinov, V; Aquines, O; Lopez, A; Mehrabyan, S; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J

    2009-02-27

    Using a 281 pb-1 data sample collected at the psi(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we report the first observation of D+ --> etae + nue. We also set upper limits for D+ --> eta'e + nue and D + --> varphie + nue that are about 2 orders of magnitude more restrictive than those obtained by previous experiments.

  4. eta. sub 6 Production

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsik . Dept. of Physics); White, A.R. )

    1991-10-01

    We suggest that a short-lived axion-like particle {eta}{sub 6} with mass around 30 GeV should be produced diffractively at hadron colliders. This is the lightest particle belonging to a new color- sextet quark sector of QCD which could be responsible for dynamical symmetry breaking of the electroweak interaction.

  5. Evaluating the SSEBop approach for evapotranspiration mapping with landsat data using lysimetric observations in the semi-arid Texas High Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senay, G. B.; Gowda, P. H.; Bohms, S.; Howell, T. A.; Friedrichs, M.; Marek, T. H.; Verdin, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) approach was applied on 14 Landsat 5 thermal infrared images for mapping daily actual evapotranspiration (ETa) fluxes during the spring and summer seasons (March-October) in 2006 and 2007. Data from four large lysimeters, managed by the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory were used for evaluating the SSEBop estimated ETa. Lysimeter fields are arranged in a 2 × 2 block pattern with two fields each managed under irrigated and dryland cropping systems. The modeled and observed daily ETa values were grouped as "irrigated" and "dryland" at four different aggregation periods (1-day, 2-day, 3 day and "seasonal") for evaluation. There was a strong linear relationship between observed and modeled ETa with R2 values ranging from 0.87 to 0.97. The root mean square error (RMSE), as percent of their respective mean values, were reduced progressively with 28, 24, 16 and 12% at 1-day, 2-day, 3-day, and seasonal aggregation periods, respectively. With a further correction of the underestimation bias (-11%), the seasonal RMSE reduced from 12 to 6%. The random error contribution to the total error was reduced from 86 to 20% while the bias' contribution increased from 14 to 80% when aggregated from daily to seasonal scale, respectively. This study shows the reliable performance of the SSEBop approach on the Landsat data stream with a transferable approach for use with the recently launched LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) data. Thus, SSEBop can produce quick, reliable and useful ET estimations at various time scales with higher seasonal accuracy for use in regional water management decisions.

  6. Searches for Charmless Decays B0 --> eta omega, B0 --> eta K0, B+ --> eta rho+, and B+ --> eta' pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2004-08-13

    The authors report results for measurements of the decay branching fractions of B{sup 0} to the charmless final states {eta}{omega} and {eta}K{sup 0}, and of B{sup +} to {eta}{rho}{sup +} and {eta}'{pi}{sup +}. None of these decays have been observed definitively. Measurements of the related decays B{sup +} --> {eta}K{sup +}, B{sup +} --> {eta}{pi}{sup +}, and B --> {eta}'K were published recently. Charmless decays with kaons are usually expected to be dominated by b --> s loop (''penguin'') transitions, while b --> u tree transitions are typically larger for the decays with pions and {rho} mesons. However the B --> {eta}K decays are especially interesting since they are suppressed relative to the abundant B --> {eta}'K decays due to destructive interference between two penguin amplitudes. The CKM-suppressed b --> u amplitudes may interfere significantly with penguin amplitudes, possibly leading to large direct CP violation in B{sup +} --> {eta}{rho}{sup +} and B{sup +} --> {eta}'{pi}{sup +}; numerical estimates are available in a few cases. The authors search for such direct CP violation by measuring the charge asymmetry A{sub ch} {equivalent_to} ({Gamma}{sup -} - {Gamma}{sup +})/({Gamma}{sup -} + {Gamma}{sup +}) in the rates {Gamma}{sup {+-}} = {Gamma}(B{sup {+-}} --> f{sup {+-}}), for each observed charged final state f{sup {+-}}. Charmless B decays are becoming useful to test the accuracy of theoretical predictions. Phenomenological fits to the branching fractions and charge asymmetries can be used to understand the importance of tree and penguin contributions and may provide sensitivity to the CKM angle {gamma}.

  7. Evapotranspiration and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Gurney, R.

    1982-01-01

    There are three things required for evapotranspiration to occur: (1) energy (580 cal/gm) for the change of phase of the water; (2) a source of the water, i.e., adequate soil moisture in the surface layer or in the root zone of the plant; and (3) a sink for the water, i.e., a moisture deficit in the air above the ground. Remote sensing can contribute information to the first two of these conditions by providing estimates of solar insolation, surface albedo, surface temperature, vegetation cover, and soil moisture content. In addition there have been attempts to estimate precipitation and shelter air temperature from remotely sensed data. The problem remains to develop methods for effectively using these sources of information to make large area estimates of evapotranspiration.

  8. Characteristics of the complementary relationship-based evapotranspiration models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroizumi, T.; Nakamichi, T.; Miura, T.

    2010-12-01

    Three complementary relationship-based evapotranspiration models were applied in six urban areas of Japan. The models are the CRAE model by Morton, the AA model by Brutsaert and Stricker, and the MAA model by Otsuki et al. The characteristics of these models and the validity of their use in urban areas were evaluated by a comparison with the estimation results from rural areas located near each urban area and with the results of previous measurement studies. The main findings are as follows: 1) the amounts of estimated evapotranspiration in urban areas differed significantly, whereas the difference in the amounts in rural areas was relatively small. 2) all three models underestimated the actual evapotranspiration in urban areas from humid surfaces, like water and green spaces. 3) when evaluated comprehensively on a daily basis, however, the three models overestimated the actual evapotranspiration in urban areas. 4) the MAA model was able to estimate the actual evapotranspiration reasonably well in urban areas with errors of 30-230 mm per year. Moreover, it was found that Priestley and Taylor’s coefficient and ground heat storage flux estimation for urban areas are necessary for obtaining reliable estimations.

  9. B-meson decays to eta' rho, eta' f0, and eta' K*

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    We present measurements of B-meson decays to the final states {eta}{prime} {rho}, {eta}{prime} f{sub 0}, and {eta}{prime} K*, where K* stands for a vector, scalar, or tensor strange meson. We observe a significant signal or evidence for {eta}{prime} {rho}{sup +} and all the {eta}{prime}K* channels. We also measure, where applicable, the charge asymmetries, finding results consistent with no direct CP violation in all cases. The measurements are performed on a data sample consisting of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Our results favor the theoretical predictions from perturbative QCD and QCD Factorization and we observe an enhancement of the tensor K*{sub 2} (1430) with respect to the vector K*(892) component.

  10. The seismology of eta Bootes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarque, Pierre; Guenther, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    Some p-mode frequencies and other observations were used to determine the mass, the age and the helium abundance of eta Bootes. It is shown how, by direct application, the p-mode frequencies and stellar seismological tools help in constraining the physical parameters of eta Boo. The existence of mode bumping is confirmed and it is discussed how it may be used to refine the estimate of the eta Boo's age. The effect of the OPAL equation of state on the p-mode frequencies is described.

  11. Riparian evapotranspiration in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Brent M.; Rus, David L.

    2013-01-01

    With increasing demands being placed on the water resources of Nebraska, characterizing evapotranspiration (ET) from riparian vegetation has gained importance to water users and managers. This report summarizes and compares the results from several studies of the ET from cottonwood-dominated riparian forests, riparian grasslands, and common reed, Phragmites australis, in Nebraska. Reported results show that the highest seasonal ET amounts were associated with Phragmites australis, followed by riparian forests, with riparian grasslands experiencing the lowest total ET of the studied vegetation communities.

  12. ETA: Helping to Improve American Worklife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This booklet serves as an introduction to the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and describes the ETA's development and the services it provides to employers and jobseekers. It details programs, field services, history, prime objectives, and the 1978 legislation concerning ETA and CETA. Special areas discussed in detail are the…

  13. {eta}{sub 6} Production

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsik; White, A.R.

    1991-10-01

    We suggest that a short-lived axion-like particle {eta}{sub 6} with mass around 30 GeV should be produced diffractively at hadron colliders. This is the lightest particle belonging to a new color- sextet quark sector of QCD which could be responsible for dynamical symmetry breaking of the electroweak interaction.

  14. All Pillars Point to Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Eta Carinae Starforming RegionSimulated Infrared View of Comet Tempel 1 (artist's concept)

    These false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the 'South Pillar' region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope 'busted open' this murky cloud to reveal star embryos (yellow or white) tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust (pink). Hot gases are green and foreground stars are blue. Not all of the newfound star embryos can be easily spotted.

    Though the nebula's most famous and massive star, Eta Carinae, is too bright to be observed by infrared telescopes, the downward-streaming rays hint at its presence above the picture frame. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from Eta Carinae and its siblings have shredded the cloud to pieces, leaving a mess of tendrils and pillars. This shredding process triggered the birth of the new stars uncovered by Spitzer.

    The inset visible-light picture (figure 2) of the Carina Nebula shows quite a different view. Dust pillars are fewer and appear dark because the dust is soaking up visible light. Spitzer's infrared detectors cut through this dust, allowing it to see the heat from warm, embedded star embryos, as well as deeper, more buried pillars. The visible-light picture is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

    Eta Carina is a behemoth of a star, with more than 100 times the mass of our Sun. It is so massive that it can barely hold itself together. Over the years, it has brightened and faded as material has shot away from its surface. Some astronomers think Eta Carinae might die in a supernova blast within our lifetime.

    Eta Carina's home, the Carina Nebula, is located in the southern portion of our Milky Way galaxy, 10,000 light-years from Earth. This colossal cloud of gas and dust

  15. Evapotranspiration crop coefficients for mixed riparian plant community and transpiration crop coefficients for Common reed, Cottonwood and Peach-leaf willow in the Platte River Basin, Nebraska-USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmak, S.; Kabenge, I.; Rudnick, D.; Knezevic, S.; Woodward, D.; Moravek, M.

    2013-02-01

    SummaryApplication of two-step approach of evapotranspiration (ET) crop coefficients (Kc) to "approximate" a very complex process of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) for field crops has been practiced by water management community. However, the use of Kc, and in particular the concept of growing degree days (GDD) to estimate Kc, have not been sufficiently studied for estimation of evaporative losses from riparian vegetation. Our study is one of the first to develop evapotranspiration crop coefficient (KcET) curves for mixed riparian vegetation and transpiration (TRP) crop coefficients (KcTRP) for individual riparian species as a function GDD through extensive field campaigns conducted in 2009 and 2010 in the Platte River Basin in central Nebraska, USA. KcTRP values for individual riparian vegetation species [Common reed (Phragmites australis), Cottonwood (Populus deltoids) and Peach-leaf willow (Salix amygdaloides)] were quantified from the TRP rates obtained using scaled-up canopy resistance from measured leaf-level stomatal resistance and reference evapotranspiration. The KcET and KcTRP curves were developed for alfalfa-reference (KcrET and KcrTRP) surface. The seasonal average mixed riparian plant community KcrET was 0.89 in 2009 and 1.27 in 2010. In 2009, the seasonal average KcrTRP values for Common reed, Cottonwood and Peach-leaf willow were 0.57, 0.51 and 0.62, respectively. In 2010, the seasonal average KcrTRP were 0.69, 0.62 and 0.83 for the same species, respectively. In general, TRP crop coefficients had less interannual variability than the KcrET. Response of the vegetation to flooding in 2010 played an important role on the interannual variability of KcrET values. We demonstrated good performance and reliability of developed GDD-based KcrTRP curves by using the curves developed for 2009 to predict TRP rates of individual species in 2010. Using the KcrTRP curves developed during the 2009 season, we were able to predict the TRP rates for Common reed

  16. Search for radiative decays of {upsilon}(1S) into {eta} and {eta}'

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.

    2007-10-01

    We report on a search for the radiative decay of {upsilon}(1S) to the pseudoscalar mesons {eta} and {eta}{sup '} in (21.2{+-}0.2)x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(1S) decays collected with the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The {eta} meson was reconstructed in the three modes {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}, {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, or {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The {eta}{sup '} meson was reconstructed in the mode {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} with {eta} decaying through any of the above three modes, and also {eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{sup 0}, where {rho}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Five out of the seven submodes are found to have very low backgrounds. In four of them we find no signal candidates and in one [{upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}, {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}, {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}] there are two good signal candidates, which is insufficient evidence to claim a signal. The other two submodes ({eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{rho}) are background limited, and show no excess of events in their signal regions. We combine the results from different channels and obtain upper limits at the 90% C.L. which are B({upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta})<1.0x10{sup -6} and B({upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '})<1.9x10{sup -6}. Our limits are an order of magnitude tighter than the previous ones and below the predictions made by some theoretical models.

  17. Global Terrestrial Evapotranspiration from Optical and Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Li; Zhang, Chaolei; Hu, Guangcheng; Zhou, Jie; Cui, Yaokui; Lu, Jing; Wang, Kun; Liu, Qinhuo; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrial actual evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the terrestrial water cycle and links the hydrological, energy, and carbon cycles. Considering the diverse landscapes and multi-climatic features, a hybrid remotely sensed ET estimation model named ETMonitor was developed to estimate the daily actual evapotranspiration globally at a spatial resolution of 1 km. The ETMonitor model uses a variety of biophysical parameters derived from microwave and optical remote sensing observations as input data to estimate the daily ET for all sky conditions. This dataset provides important support to the large-scale evaluation of the environment, and some preliminary applications were conducted for regional- to global-scale mapping and monitoring of water consumption and drought severity.

  18. Annual evapotranspiration retrieved solely from satellites' vegetation indices for the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helman, D.; Lensky, I. M.; Givati, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present a simple model to retrieve actual evapotranspiration (ET) solely from satellites (PaVI-E). The model is based on empirical relationships between vegetation indices (NDVI and EVI from MODIS) and total annual ET (ETAnnual) from 16 FLUXNET sites representing a wide range of plant functional types and ETAnnual. The model was applied separately for (a) annual vegetation systems (i.e., croplands and grasslands) and (b) systems with combined annual and perennial vegetation (i.e., woodlands, forests, savannah and shrublands). It explained most of the variance in ETAnnual in those systems (71% for annuals, and 88% for combined annuals and perennials systems) while multiple regression and modified Temperature and Greenness models using also land surface temperature did not improve its performance (p > 0.1). PaVI-E was used to retrieve ETAnnual at 250 m spatial resolution for the Eastern Mediterranean from 2000 to 2014. Models' estimates were highly correlated (R = 0.92, p < 0.01) with ETAnnual calculated from water catchments balances along rainfall gradient in the Eastern Mediterranean. They were also comparable to the coarser resolution ET products of MSG (LSA-SAF MSG ETa, 3.1 km) and MODIS (MOD16, 1 km) at 148 Eastern Mediterranean basins with correlation coefficients (R) of 0.75 and 0.77 and relative bias of 5.2 and -5.2%, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). The proposed model is expected to contribute to hydrological study in the Eastern Mediterranean assisting in water resource management, which is one of the most valuable resources of this region.

  19. Annual evapotranspiration retrieved from satellite vegetation indices for the eastern Mediterranean at 250 m spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helman, D.; Givati, A.; Lensky, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present a model to retrieve actual evapotranspiration (ET) from satellites' vegetation indices (Parameterization of Vegetation Indices for ET estimation model, or PaVI-E) for the eastern Mediterranean (EM) at a spatial resolution of 250 m. The model is based on the empirical relationship between satellites' vegetation indices (normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from MODIS) and total annual ET (ETAnnual) estimated at 16 FLUXNET sites, representing a wide range of plant functional types and ETAnnual. Empirical relationships were first examined separately for (a) annual vegetation systems (i.e. croplands and grasslands) and (b) systems with combined annual and perennial vegetation (i.e. woodlands, forests, savannah and shrublands). Vegetation indices explained most of the variance in ETAnnual in those systems (71 % for annuals, and 88 % for combined annual and perennial systems), while adding land surface temperature data in a multiple-variable regression and a modified version of the Temperature and Greenness model did not result in better correlations (p > 0.1). After establishing empirical relationships, PaVI-E was used to retrieve ETAnnual for the EM from 2000 to 2014. Models' estimates were highly correlated (R = 0.92, p < 0.01) with ETAnnual calculated from water catchment balances along rainfall gradient of the EM. They were also comparable to the coarser-resolution ET products of the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF MSG ETa, 3.1 km) and MODIS (MOD16, 1 km) at 148 EM basins with R of 0.75 and 0.77 and relative biases of 5.2 and -5.2 %, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). In the absence of high-resolution (< 1 km) ET models for the EM the proposed model is expected to contribute to the hydrological study of this region, assisting in water resource management, which is one of the most valuable resources of this region.

  20. A Citizen's Guide to Evapotranspiration Covers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide explains Evapotranspiration Covers which are Evapotranspiration (ET) covers are a type of cap placed over contaminated material, such as soil, landfill waste, or mining tailings, to prevent water from reaching it.

  1. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Evapotranspiration (ET) covers.

    PubMed

    Rock, Steve; Myers, Bill; Fiedler, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) cover systems are increasingly being used at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, hazardous waste landfills, at industrial monofills, and at mine sites. Conventional cover systems use materials with low hydraulic permeability (barrier layers) to minimize the downward migration of water from the surface to the waste (percolation), ET cover systems use water balance components to minimize percolation. These cover systems rely on soil to capture and store precipitation until it is either transpired through vegetation or evaporated from the soil surface. Compared to conventional membrane or compacted clay cover systems, ET cover systems are expected to cost less to construct. They are often aesthetic because they employ naturalized vegetation, require less maintenance once the vegetative system is established, including eliminating mowing, and may require fewer repairs than a barrier system. All cover systems should consider the goals of the cover in terms of protectiveness, including the pathways of risk from contained material, the lifecycle of the containment system. The containment system needs to be protective of direct contact of people and animals with the waste, prevent surface and groundwater water pollution, and minimize release of airborne contaminants. While most containment strategies have been based on the dry tomb strategy of keeping waste dry, there are some sites where adding or allowing moisture to help decompose organic waste is the current plan. ET covers may work well in places where complete exclusion of precipitation is not needed. The U.S. EPA Alternative Cover Assessment Program (ACAP), USDOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others have researched ET cover design and efficacy, including the history of their use, general considerations in their design, performance, monitoring, cost, current status, limitations on their use, and project specific examples. An on-line database has been developed with information

  3. Potential Evapotranspiration on Tutuila, American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scott K.; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Nullet, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Data from nine widely distributed climate stations were used to assess the distribution of potential evapotranspiration on the tropical South Pacific island of Tutuila, American Samoa. Seasonal patterns of climate data in this study differed in detail from available long-term data because the monitoring period of each station in this study was only 1 to 5 years, but overall climate conditions during the monitoring period (1999-2004) are representative of normal conditions. Potential evapotranspiration shows a diurnal pattern. On average, potential evapotranspiration in the daytime, when net radiation is the dominant controlling factor, constitutes 90 percent or more of the total daily potential evapotranspiration at each station. Positive heat advection from the ocean contributes to potential evapotranspiration at at least one station, and possibly other stations, in this study. Seasonal variation of potential evapotranspiration is linked to seasonal daylight duration. Spatial variation of potential evapotranspiration, however, is linked primarily to orographic cloud cover. Potential evapotranspiration on Tutuila is lowest in the interior of the island, where rainfall is higher, cloud cover is more frequent, and net radiation is lower than along the coasts. Potential evapotranspiration is highest along the southern and eastern coasts of the island, where rainfall is lower and cloud cover less frequent. The gradient from areas of high to low potential evapotranspiration is steepest in November and December, when island-wide potential evapotranspiration is highest, and less steep in June and July, when island-wide potential evapotranspiration is lowest. Comparison of potential evapotranspiration to rainfall indicates that evapotranspiration processes on Tutuila have the potential to remove from 23 to 61 percent of the water brought by rainfall. In lower-rainfall coastal locations, potential evapotranspiration can be 50 percent or more of rainfall, whereas in higher

  4. Measurement of branching fractions and charge asymmetries in B+ decays to eta pi+, eta K+, eta rho+, and eta' pi+, and search for B0 decays to eta K0 and eta omega.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morg An, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Derrington, I M; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Mohapatra, A K; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-23

    We present measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for six B-meson decay modes with an eta or eta(') meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 232 x 10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) B Factory at SLAC. We measure the branching fractions (in units of 10(-6)): B(B+ -->eta pi(+))=5.1+/-0.6+/-0.3, B(B+ etaK+)=3.3+/-0.6+/-0.3, B(B0-->etaK0)=1.5+/-0.7+/-0.1 (<2.5 at 90% C.L.), B(B+-->eta rho(+))=8.4+/-1.9+/-1.1, B(B0-->eta omiga)=1.0+/-0.5+/-0.2 (<1.9 at 90% C.L.), and B(B+-->eta(')pi(+))=4.0+/-0.8+/-0.4, where the first uncertainty is statistical and second systematic. For the charged modes we also determine the charge asymmetries, all found to be compatible with zero.

  5. Recent results on eta and eta-prime photoproduction on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Barry Ritchie

    2004-06-01

    The experimental situation on eta and eta' photoproduction on the proton is reviewed, emphasizing progress made since 2001. New preliminary results for eta' photoproduction on the proton from Jefferson Lab are presented. Experimental results are compared with several theoretical approaches, with an emphasis on consequences for understanding baryon spectroscopy.

  6. Eta Squared, Partial Eta Squared, and Misreporting of Effect Size in Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Timothy R.; Hullett, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    Alerts communication researchers to potential errors stemming from the use of SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) to obtain estimates of eta squared in analysis of variance (ANOVA). Strives to clarify issues concerning the development and appropriate use of eta squared and partial eta squared in ANOVA. Discusses the reporting of…

  7. Interstellar Material towards eta UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Jenkins, E. B.; Welty, D. E.; Johns-Krull, C.

    1999-05-01

    The star eta UMa (B3 V, vsini=205 km s(-1) , d=31 pc, l=101(o) , b=+65(o) ) samples nearby interstellar gas in a high latitude direction relatively devoid of material. IMAPS, Hubble GHRS Echelle, and ground based optical data are combined to present a comprehensive picture of the interstellar material (ISM) in this direction. Two main components dominate: the blue-shifted component which appears to be ionized, and the dominant, red-shifted, component which exhibits a low electron density ( ~ 0.2 cm(-3) ). However, the Mg(o/Mg^+) ratio and C(+) fine-structure lines yield different ionizations, depending on the adopted temperature, similar to differences found in the diffuse material towards 23 Ori (Welty et al. 1999). The IMAPS and GHRS data give C, N, O, and Fe column densities, which form the basis for calculating the gas-to-dust mass ratio for the main component using a ``missing mass'' calculation combined with an assumed reference abundance (Frisch et al. 1999). Comparing the eta UMa value with other diffuse cloud values then further constrains uncertainties in N(H(o) ) values for this sightline.

  8. Pseudoscalar glueball and {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Vento, Vicente

    2010-02-01

    We have performed a dynamical analysis of the mixing in the pseudoscalar channel with the goal of understanding the existence and behavior of the pseudoscalar glueball. Our philosophy has not been to predict precise values of the glueball mass but to exploit an adequate effective theory to the point of breaking and to analyze which kind of mechanisms restore compatibility with data. Our study has led to analytical solutions which allow a clear understanding of the phenomena. The outcome of our calculation leads to a large mass glueball M{sub {Theta}>}2000 MeV, to a large glue content of the {eta}{sup '}, and to mixing angles in agreement with previous numerical studies.

  9. Observation of B-->eta'K* and evidence for B+-->eta'rho+.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-02-02

    We present an observation of B-->eta'K*. The data sample corresponds to 232x10(6) BB[over ] pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We measure the branching fractions (in units of 10(-6)) B(B(0)-->eta'K*0)=3.8+/-1.1+/-0.5 and B(B+-->eta'K*+)=4.9(1.7)(+1.9)+/-0.8, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. A simultaneous fit results in the observation of B-->eta'K* with B(B-->eta'K*)=4.1(-0.9)(+1.0)+/-0.5. We also search for B-->eta'rho and eta'f(0)(980)(f(0)-->pi+pi-) with results and 90% confidence level upper limits B(B+-->eta'rho+)=8.7(-2.8-1.3)(+3.1+2.3) (<14), B(B(0)-->eta'rho0)<3.7, and B(B(0)-->eta'f(0)(980)(f(0)-->pi+pi-))<1.5. Charge asymmetries in the channels with significant yields are consistent with zero.

  10. The yeast non-Mendelian factor [ETA+] is a variant of [PSI+], a prion-like form of release factor eRF3.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P; Derkatch, I L; Uptain, S M; Patino, M M; Lindquist, S; Liebman, S W

    1999-01-01

    The yeast non-Mendelian factor [ETA+] is lethal in the presence of certain mutations in the SUP35 and SUP45 genes, which code for the translational release factors eRF3 and eRF1, respectively. One such mutation, sup35-2, is now shown to contain a UAG stop codon prior to the essential region of the gene. The non-Mendelian inheritance of [ETA+] is reminiscent of the yeast [PSI+] element, which is due to a self-propagating conformation of Sup35p. Here we show that [ETA+] and [PSI+] share many characteristics. Indeed, like [PSI+], the maintenance of [ETA+] requires the N-terminal region of Sup35p and depends on an appropriate level of the chaperone protein Hsp104. Moreover, [ETA+] can be induced de novo by excess Sup35p, and [ETA+] cells have a weak nonsense suppressor phenotype characteristic of weak [PSI+]. We conclude that [ETA+] is actually a weak, unstable variant of [PSI+]. We find that although some Sup35p aggregates in [ETA+] cells, more Sup35p remains soluble in [ETA+] cells than in isogenic strong [PSI+] cells. Our data suggest that the amount of soluble Sup35p determines the strength of translational nonsense suppression associated with different [PSI+] variants. PMID:10064585

  11. Eta Carinae and Its Ejecta, the Homunculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae (Eta Car), its interacting winds and historical ejecta provide an unique astrophysical laboratory that permits addressing a multitude of questions ranging from stellar evolution, colliding winds, chemical enrichment, nebular excitation to the formation of molecules and dust. Every 5.54 years, Eta Car changes from high excitation to several-months-long low excitation caused by modulation of the massive interacting winds due to a very eccentric binary orbit. The surrounding Homunculus (Figure 1) and Little Homunculus, thrown out in the 1840s Great Eruption and the 1890s Lesser Eruption, respond to the changing flux, providing clues to many physical phenomena of great interest to astrophysicists.

  12. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    , even in the very brightest stars. Faced with this problem, the Danish/ESO group came up with an entirely new method. It relies on the fact that the oscillations are sound waves which deposit energy in the various stellar layers and therefore intermittently heat the star very slightly. For example, each mode changes the temperature on the surface of the Sun by about 0.005 degrees during the oscillation. But how to measure such small temperature changes? It turns out that this is possible by recording the strengths of the spectral lines, specifically, the absorption lines due to hydrogen. Their strengths change slightly with the changes in temperature (see Appendix). Although this is still a very small effect, it should be easier to measure than the velocity shifts. Yes, Eta Bootis does! To test their method, the astronomers used the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT) with the ESO Multi-Mode Instrument (EMMI) to observe a bright star for a few hours. This was too short to detect actual oscillations, but it did show that the technique works: it was in principle possible to measure the temperature accurately enough. The target for the real observations was the 2.68-magnitude, naked-eye star Eta Bootis (Greek letter "eta"). It has the common name of Muphrid and is located just north of the celestial equator in Bootes, one of the oldest constellation names still in use (it was mentioned already in the Odyssey). This particular star is somewhat more evolved and bigger than the Sun and, according to stellar theory, should have stronger oscillations than the Sun, hence increasing the chance that they could be detected. The observations were performed with the 2.5-metre Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) during six, mostly clear nights in April 1994. A careful data analysis has now shown that the temperature of Eta Bootis is indeed changing periodically, around a mean value of about 6000 K. It seems to be oscillating in at least ten different modes simultaneously, with

  13. Evaluation of Pan Coefficients for Estimating Reference Evapotranspiration in Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, H.

    2006-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important process of water transfer in the hydrosphere and atmosphere, which plays an active role in the hydrological cycle. Evaporation pan (Epan) data are often used to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ETref) for use in water resource planning. Generally, ETref is estimated as the product of the Epan data and a pan coefficient (Kpan). However, reliable estimation of ETref using Epan depends on the accurate determination of pan coefficients Kpan. Many different methods for estimating ETref have been developed, among which the Penman-Monteith method is demonstrated to be especially excellent by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In this study, the Penman-Monteith reference evapotranspiration, pan evaporation, and pan coefficient are calculated, compared and regionally mapped at nine meteorological stations during 1990-2004 in Southern Taiwan. The results show the reference evapotranspiration and pan evaporation have similar regional distribution patterns in the southern Taiwan both with the highest values being in the lower region and the lowest values being in the upper region. In addition, the pan coefficient, Kpan, varies both regionally and seasonally. Smallest Kpan values are found in the upper reach of the southern Taiwan, meaning that the relative difference between the reference evapotranspiration and pan evaporation is the biggest in the region, the largest Kpan values are obtained in the western area of southern Taiwan. This distribution pattern provides valuable information for regional hydrological studies since it is one of the most important factors determining regional actual evapotranspiration.

  14. Assessing Macroscopic Evapotranspiration Function Response to Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharun, M.; Vervoort, R. W.; Turnbull, T.; Henry, J.; Adams, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) by forests can reach up to 100% of rainfall in Australia, and is a substantial component of the water balance. Transpiration is a major part of the ET and it is well-known that transpiration depends on a combination of physiological and environmental controls. As a consequence of well-ventilated canopies of eucalypt forests and close decoupling to the atmosphere, atmospheric conditions exert a large control over transpiration. We measured a suit of environmental variables including temperature, humidity, radiation, and soil moisture concurrently with transpiration in a range of eucalypt forests. We observed that atmospheric demand (VPD) exerts the strongest control over transpiration. Experimental evidence also showed a strong dependency of the control on soil moisture abundance in the top soil layer. In many eco-hydrological models actual ET is represented with a linear transformation of potential ET based on the soil moisture condition, a so-called macroscopic approach. Such ET functions lump various soil and plant factors, are not experimentally supported and therefore quite poorly validated. Different combinations of atmospheric demand and soil moisture availability lead to diverse behaviour of the macroscopic ET function. Based on our observations in this study, we propose a novel approach that improves portray of transpiration, evaporation, drainage and hence the loss of water from the root zone. We used a modified version of the Norwegian HBV model to test our approach over a medium size catchment (150 km2) in south east Australia.

  15. NOAA AVHRR and its uses for rainfall and evapotranspiration monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Yann H.; Imbernon, J.; Dedieu, G.; Hautecoeur, O.; Lagouarde, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    NOAA-7 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Global Vegetation Indices (GVI) were used during the 1986 rainy season (June-September) over Senegal to monitor rainfall. The satellite data were used in conjunction with ground-based measurements so as to derive empirical relationships between rainfall and GVI. The regression obtained was then used to map the total rainfall corresponding to the growing season, yielding good results. Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) derived from High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) data were also compared with actual evapotranspiration (ET) data and proved to be closely correlated with it with a time lapse of 20 days.

  16. Influence of potential evapotranspiration on the water balance of sugarcane fields in Maui, Hawaii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The year-long warm temperatures and other climatic characteristics of the Pacific Ocean Islands have made Hawaii an optimum place for growing sugarcane; however, irrigation is essential to satisfy the large water demand of sugarcane. Under the Hawaiian tropical weather, actual evapotranspiration (A...

  17. Simple weighing lysimeters for measuring reference and crop evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of cotton crop evapotranspiration is important in scheduling irrigations, optimizing crop production, and modeling evapotranspiration and crop growth. The ability to measure, estimate, and predict evapotranspiration and cotton crop water requirements can result in better satisfying the cr...

  18. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, P. C. D.; Dunne, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. `Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman-Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  19. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, Paul C.D.; Dunne, Krista A.

    2016-01-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. ‘Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman–Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  20. Variation of Evapotranspiration as Function of Surface Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringgaard, R.; Herbst, M.; Friborg, T.; Soegaard, H.

    2009-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is tightly coupled with vegetation type and coverage. Many studies examining the partitioning of evapotranspiration into soil evaporation and plant transpiration have found that transpiration may account for up to 90% of total evapotranspiration depending on leaf area index and stomatal conductance. This is especially true in temperate humid climates, where conditions favor development of high-LAI vegetation and a large soil moisture pool from which the plants can draw water during most of the growing season. This makes explicit treatment of surface type/evapotranspiration relationships an important part of large-scale water balance and hydrological studies. The present study is part of the catchment-scale hydrological observatory “HOBE” situated on the west coast of Denmark. The main goals of the observatory is to better the scientific understating of large scale hydrological processes and to examine in detail the issue of scaling plot measurements to catchment scale. To estimate actual evapotranspiration, eddy-covariance systems have been installed on the most important surface types in the catchment - at an agricultural site (68% of the total area), over a spruce plantation (16%) and over wet grassland (7%). This presentation will introduce the first full-year time series of evapotranspiration from the three sites, with special emphasis on the difference in evaporative response through the seasons from the different surface types. The catchment covers about 2500km2 extending inland ca. 65 km. The landscape is very flat throughout the catchment, rising to only about 80 meters furthest inland. The geology is dominated by loose glacial and melt water deposits, with soils being comprised mostly of coarse sand. The climate can be characterized as maritime with winter temperatures around 1°C and summer temperatures around 16°C. Mean annual precipitation is around 800 mm. The weather is dominated by the prevailing westerlies from the Atlantic

  1. An ETAS model with varying productivity rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, D. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present an epidemic type aftershock sequenc (ETAS) model where the offspring rates vary both spatially and temporally. This is achieved by distinguishing between those space-time volumes where the interpoint space and time distances are small, and those where they are considerably larger. We also question the nature of the background component in the ETAS model. Is it simply a temporal boundary correction (t = 0) or does it represent an additional tectonic process not described by the aftershock component? The form of these stochastic models should not be considered to be fixed. As we accumulate larger and better earthquake catalogues, GPS data, strain rates, etc., we have the ability to ask more complex questions about the nature of the process. By fitting modified models consistent with such questions, we should gain a better insight into the earthquake process. Hence, we consider a sequence of incrementally modified ETAS type models rather than `the' ETAS model.

  2. Evaluating a satellite-based seasonal evapotranspiration product and identifying its relationship with other satellite-derived products and crop yield: A case study for Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Tsegaye; Senay, Gabriel B.; Berhan, Getachew; Regassa, Teshome; Beyene, Shimelis

    2015-08-01

    Satellite-derived evapotranspiration anomalies and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are currently used for African agricultural drought monitoring and food security status assessment. In this study, a process to evaluate satellite-derived evapotranspiration (ETa) products with a geospatial statistical exploratory technique that uses NDVI, satellite-derived rainfall estimate (RFE), and crop yield data has been developed. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the ETa using the NDVI and RFE, and identify a relationship between the ETa and Ethiopia's cereal crop (i.e., teff, sorghum, corn/maize, barley, and wheat) yields during the main rainy season. Since crop production is one of the main factors affecting food security, the evaluation of remote sensing-based seasonal ETa was done to identify the appropriateness of this tool as a proxy for monitoring vegetation condition in drought vulnerable and food insecure areas to support decision makers. The results of this study showed that the comparison between seasonal ETa and RFE produced strong correlation (R2 > 0.99) for all 41 crop growing zones in Ethiopia. The results of the spatial regression analyses of seasonal ETa and NDVI using Ordinary Least Squares and Geographically Weighted Regression showed relatively weak yearly spatial relationships (R2 < 0.7) for all cropping zones. However, for each individual crop zones, the correlation between NDVI and ETa ranged between 0.3 and 0.84 for about 44% of the cropping zones. Similarly, for each individual crop zones, the correlation (R2) between the seasonal ETa anomaly and de-trended cereal crop yield was between 0.4 and 0.82 for 76% (31 out of 41) of the crop growing zones. The preliminary results indicated that the ETa products have a good predictive potential for these 31 identified zones in Ethiopia. Decision makers may potentially use ETa products for monitoring cereal crop

  3. Eta Carinae - A Demanding Mistress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, a number of observers and modelers have increasingly focused on this massive system that is approaching its end stage, a supernova? a hypernova? When? The discovery by Augusto Damineli that Eta Carinae had a 5.5-year period proved timely as the newly-installed STIS was primed to observe its properties in the visible and ultraviolet. Initial observations occurred on January 1998, and through multiple programs, including the multi-cycle Hubble Treasury program, have sampled changes across two cycles. Now a multi-cycle program, focused on mapping variations in the extended wind-wind collision zones through early 2015, will test 3-D models of the interacting winds. In parallel, studies have been accomplished in X-rays with RXTE and CHANDRA, now in the far infrared with Herschel and from the ground with VLT. Each new observation is helping to peel back the veil of mystery on this massive binary system, but also opening up more questions to be answered. Timely inclusion of laboratory studies and models have greatly enhanced the observational results. We will summarize the latest results including submitted papers and very recent results with Herschel.

  4. Recharge and Evapotranspiration Assessment In Kalahari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubczynski, M.; Obakeng, O.

    2006-12-01

    Sustainability of groundwater resources in Kalahri is constrained not only by recharge to the aquifers but also by discharge from them. Natural groundwater discharge takes place in 3 different ways, as aquifer groundwater outflow, direct tree root water uptake called groundwater transpiration (Tg) and as upward vapor-liquid water movement called groundwater evaporation (Eg), the latter two called groundwater evapotranspiration (ETg). The evaluation of ETg and recharge was the main goal of this study. Due to generally large depth of groundwater table in Kalahari, >60 m, Eg was assumed as negligible component of groundwater balances while in contrast Tg has been considered significant already since 90-ties. This was because of fragments of tree roots of Boscia albitrunca and Acacia erioloba found in borehole cores at depth of >60 m. Some of those roots reach groundwater, which allow them to remain green throughout dry seasons. This study was carried out using hydrological monitoring consisting of 10 multi-sensor towers and 17 groundwater monitoring points. Soil moisture movement was investigated by profile monitoring. The deepest profile was down to 76 m depth. The soil moisture results revealed complicated pattern characterized by a combination of diffuse and preferential flow. The actual evapotranspiration was estimated by the Bowen-ratio and temperature-profile methods which provided overestimated results as compared with rainfall so the recharge could not be deduced directly. Therefore recharge was derived indirectly, through 1D lumped parameter model that used rainfall and PET as input and heads as calibration reference. That model indicated recharge 0-50 mm/yr. For understanding tree impact upon groundwater recharge, tree sap velocity was monitored for 2 years using the Granier method on 41 trees of 9 species in 8 plots of 30x30m. The estimated plot transpirations showed large spatio-temporal variability, 3-71 mm/yr and occasionally exceeded recharge. In order

  5. Eta Squared and Partial Eta Squared as Measures of Effect Size in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John T. E.

    2011-01-01

    Eta squared measures the proportion of the total variance in a dependent variable that is associated with the membership of different groups defined by an independent variable. Partial eta squared is a similar measure in which the effects of other independent variables and interactions are partialled out. The development of these measures is…

  6. Effect of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing on D{yields}PV decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2010-08-01

    Charmed meson decays to a light pseudoscalar (P) and light vector (V) meson are analyzed taking account of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing. A frequently-used octet-singlet mixing angle of 19.5 degree sign is compared with a value of 11.7 degree sign favored by a recent analysis of D{yields}PP decays.

  7. Eta Carinae: Orientation of The Orbital Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Ivarsson, S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Verner, E.; Hillier, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence continues to build that Eta Carinae is a massive binary system with a hidden hot companion in a highly elliptical orbit. We present imaging and spectroscopic evidence that provide clues to the orientation of the orbital plane. The circumstellar ejecta, known as the Homunculus and Little Homunculus, are hourglass-shaped structures, one encapsulated within the other, tilted at about 45 degrees from the sky plane. A disk region lies between the bipolar lobes. Based upon their velocities and proper motions, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, very bright emission clumps 0.1 to 0.3" Northwest from Eta Carinae, lie in the disk. UV flux from the hot companion, Eta Car B, photoexcites the Weigelt blobs. Other clumps form a complete chain around the star, but are not significantly photoexcited. The strontium filament, a 'neutral' emission structure, lies in the same general direction as the Weigelt blobs and exhibits peculiar properties indicative that much mid-UV, but no hydrogen-ionizing radiation impinges on this structure. It is shielded by singly-ionized iron. P Cygni absorptions in Fe I I lines, seen directly in line of sight from Eta Carinae, are absent in the stellar light scattered by the Weigelt blobs. Rather than a strong absorption extending to -600 km/s, a low velocity absorption feature extends from -40 to -150 km/s. No absorbing Fe II exists between Eta Carinae and Weigelt D, but the outer reaches of the wind are intercepted in line of sight from Weigelt D to the observer. This indicates that the UV radiation is constrained by the dominating wind of Eta Car A to a small cavity carved out by the weaker wind of Eta Car B. Since the high excitation nebular lines are seen in the Weigelt blobs at most phases, the cavity, and hence the major axis of the highly elliptical orbit, must lie in the general direction of the Weigelt blobs. The evidence is compelling that the orbital major axis of Eta Carinae is projected at -45 degrees position angle on the sky. Moreover

  8. Eta or eta-like vs sigma coordinate: A review of available evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesinger, Fedor; Antico, Pablo Luis; Veljovic, Katarina; Mourão, Caroline; Chou, Sin Chan

    2013-04-01

    During the time of the operational use of the Eta model at NCEP numerous tests were made of the impact of the eta coordinate by comparing results against those obtained with the model's sigma switch turned on. These tests invariably showed an advantage of the eta, with the advantage persisting as the resolution kept being increased over the years. Yet, a NOAA-wide announcement in the summer of 2002 of the operational implementation of the NMM at NCEP, using terrain-following coordinate, stated that "This choice [of the vertical coordinate] will avoid the problems . . . with strong downslope winds and will improve placement of precipitation in mountainous terrain." In spite of the NCEP's operational Eta being "frozen" since the summer of 2003, an about a 5-month parallel in 2006 showed the latter not to have been confirmed, since the Eta kept its advantage in precipitation placement scores. Similar results, albeit at a lower resolution, came from tests with a NASA GISS eta-like model (Russell, Mon. Wea. Rev., 2007). The Eta developments within its user community continued with the major novelty being the introduction of "sloping steps", somewhat of a simplified version of the shaved cells of Adcroft et al. (Mon. Wea. Rev., 1997). Simulation of a major downslope windstorm over the Andes using thus and in other ways upgraded Eta code is shown in (Mesinger et al., Meteor. Atmos. Phys., 2012). For tests of the impact of the discretization change in more general situations a ten year experiment was ran, driving the Eta with the ERA-Interim Reanalysis of 1990-1999, over a large South American domain, at 50-km resolution. Compared to CRU data, monthly precipitation values were improved in the majority of months, while not decreasing in accuracy in the remaining ones. The 2-m temperatures improved quite considerably in three months in which the errors of the standard Eta were the largest, to the extent that the errors were reduced by more than a half; again with little

  9. Evapotranspiration estimation in heterogeneous urban vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. L.; Nouri, H.; Beecham, S.; Anderson, S.; Sutton, P.; Chavoshi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Finding a valid approach to measure the water requirements of mixed urban vegetation is a challenge. Evapotranspiration (ET) is the main component of a plant's water requirement. A better understanding of the ET of urban vegetation is essential for sustainable urbanisation. Increased implementation of green infrastructure will be informed by this work. Despite promising technologies and sophisticated facilities, ET estimation of urban vegetation remains insufficiently characterized. We reviewed the common field, laboratory and modelling techniques for ET estimation, mostly agriculture and forestry applications. We opted for 3 approaches of ET estimation: 1) an observational-based method using adjustment factors applied to reference ET, 2) a field-based method of Soil Water Balance (SWB) and 3) a Remote Sensing (RS)-based method. These approaches were applied to an experimental site to evaluate the most suitable ET estimation approach for an urban parkland. To determine in-situ ET, 2 lysimeters and 4 Neutron Moisture Meter probes were installed. Based on SWB principles, all input water (irrigation, precipitation and upward groundwater movements) and output water (ET, drainage, soil moisture and runoff) were measured monthly for 14 months. The observation based approach and the ground-based approach (SWB) were compared. Our predictions were compared to the actual irrigation rates (data provided by the City Council). Results suggest the observational-based method is the most appropriate urban ET estimation. We examined the capability of RS to estimate ET for urban vegetation. Image processing of 5 WorldView2 satellite images enabled modelling of the relationship between urban vegetation and vegetation indices derived from high resolution images. Our results indicate that an ETobservational-based -NDVI modelling approach is a reliable method of ET estimation for mixed urban vegetation. It also has the advantage of not depending on extensive field data collection.

  10. Shift of annual water balance in the Budyko space for catchments with groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Sheng; Zhou, Yangxiao

    2016-09-01

    The Budyko framework represents the general relationship between the evapotranspiration ratio (F) and the aridity index (φ) for the mean annual steady-state water balance at the catchment scale. It is interesting to investigate whether this standard F - φ space can also be applied to capture the shift of annual water balance in catchments with varying dryness. Previous studies have made significant progress in incorporating the storage effect into the Budyko framework for the non-steady conditions, whereas the role of groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration was not investigated. This study investigates how groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration causes the shift of the annual water balance in the standard Budyko space. A widely used monthly hydrological model, the ABCD model, is modified to incorporate groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration into the zone with a shallow water table and delayed groundwater recharge into the zone with a deep water table. This model is applied in six catchments in the Erdos Plateau, China, to estimate the actual annual evapotranspiration. Results show that the variations in the annual F value with the aridity index do not satisfy the standard Budyko formulas. The shift of the annual water balance in the standard Budyko space is a combination of the Budyko-type response in the deep groundwater zone and the quasi-energy limited condition in the shallow groundwater zone. Excess evapotranspiration (F > 1) could occur in dry years, which is contributed by the significant supply of groundwater for evapotranspiration. Use of groundwater for irrigation can increase the frequency of the F > 1 cases.

  11. First insights into disassembled "evapotranspiration"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormański, Jarosław; Kleniewska, Małgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatyłowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present an initial data analysis obtained from a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them fromthe total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its component transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project

  12. Evapotranspiration from the Lower Walker River Basin, West-Central Nevada, Water Years 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allander, Kip K.; Smith, J. LaRue; Johnson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    evapotranspiration station in a saltcedar grove, measurements indicated a possible decrease in evapotranspiration of about 50 percent due to defoliation of the saltcedar by the saltcedar leaf beetle. Total evapotranspiration from the evapotranspiration units identified in the Lower Walker River basin was about 231,000 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr). Of this amount, about 45,000 acre-ft/yr originated from direct precipitation, resulting in net evapotranspiration of about 186,000 acre-ft/yr. More than 80 percent of net evapotranspiration in the Lower Walker River basin was through evaporation from Walker Lake. Total evaporation from Walker Lake was about 161,000 acre-ft/yr and net evaporation was about 149,000 acre-ft/yr. Some previous estimates of evaporation from Walker Lake based on water-budget analysis actually represent total evaporation minus ground-water inflow to the lake. Historical evaporation rates determined on the basis of water budget analysis were less than the evaporation rate measured directly during this study. The difference could represent ground-water inflow to Walker Lake of 16,000 to 26,000 acre-ft/yr or could indicate that ground-water inflow to Walker Lake is decreasing over time as the lake perimeter recedes.

  13. Evapotranspiration information reporting: II. Recommended documentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and journal authors, reviewers, and readers can benefit from more complete documentation of published evapotranspiration (ET) information, including a description of field procedures, instrumentation, data filtering, model parameterization, and site review. This information is important ...

  14. Estimating potential evapotranspiration with improved radiation estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is of great importance to estimation of surface energy budget and water balance calculation. The accurate estimation of PET will facilitate efficient irrigation scheduling, drainage design, and other agricultural and meteorological applications. However, accuracy o...

  15. Remote Sensing of Snow and Evapotranspiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The use of snowmelt runoff models from both the U.S. and Japan for simulating discharge on basins in both countries is discussed as well as research in snowpack properties and evapotranspiration using remotely sensed data.

  16. 77 FR 2088 - Information Collection Request for the ETA 9128, Reemployment and Eligibility Assessments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... Information Collection Request for the ETA 9128, Reemployment and Eligibility Assessments Workloads Report, and the ETA 9129, Reemployment and Eligibility Assessments Outcomes Report: Extension Without Change... the ETA 9128, Reemployment and Eligibility Assessments Workloads Report and the ETA 9129,...

  17. Endothelin ETA receptor antagonism in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Suzanne A; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2014-08-15

    Since the discovery of the endothelin system in 1988, it has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological phenomena. In the cardiovascular system, endothelin-1 (ET-1) acts through intracellular pathways of two endothelin receptors (ETA and ETB) located mainly on smooth muscle and endothelial cells to regulate vascular tone and provoke mitogenic and proinflammatory reactions. The endothelin ETA receptor is believed to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular disease including systemic hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), dilated cardiomyopathy, and diabetic microvascular dysfunction. Growing evidence from recent experimental and clinical studies indicates that the blockade of endothelin receptors, particularly the ETA subtype, grasps promise in the treatment of major cardiovascular pathologies. The simultaneous blockade of endothelin ETB receptors might not be advantageous, leading possibly to vasoconstriction and salt and water retentions. This review summarizes the role of ET-1 in cardiovascular modulation and the therapeutic potential of endothelin receptor antagonism.

  18. Model Error Estimation for the CPTEC Eta Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; daSilva, Arlindo

    1999-01-01

    Statistical data assimilation systems require the specification of forecast and observation error statistics. Forecast error is due to model imperfections and differences between the initial condition and the actual state of the atmosphere. Practical four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) methods try to fit the forecast state to the observations and assume that the model error is negligible. Here with a number of simplifying assumption, a framework is developed for isolating the model error given the forecast error at two lead-times. Two definitions are proposed for the Talagrand ratio tau, the fraction of the forecast error due to model error rather than initial condition error. Data from the CPTEC Eta Model running operationally over South America are used to calculate forecast error statistics and lower bounds for tau.

  19. Wetlands Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J. M.; Myers, D. A.; Anderson, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    The application of remote sensing methods to estimate evapotranspiration has the advantage of good spatial resolution and excellent spatial coverage, but may have the disadvantage of infrequent sampling and considerable expense. The GOES satellites provide enhanced temporal resolution with hourly estimates of solar radiation and have a spatial resolution that is significantly better than that available from most ground-based pyranometer networks. As solar radiation is the primary forcing variable in wetland evapotranspiration, the opportunity to apply GOES satellite data to wetland hydrologic analyses is great. An accuracy assessment of the remote sensing product is important and the subsequent validation of the evapotranspiration estimates are a critical step for the use of this product. A wetland field experiment was conducted in the Paynes Prairie Preserve, North Central Florida during a growing season characterized by significant convective activity. Evapotranspiration and other surface energy balance components of a wet prairie community dominated by Panicum hemitomon (maiden cane), Ptilimnium capillaceum (mock bishop's weed), and Eupatorium capillifolium (dog fennel) were investigated. Incoming solar radiation derived from GOES-8 satellite observations, in combination with local meteorological measurements, were used to model evapotranspiration from a wetland. The satellite solar radiation, derived net radiation and estimated evapotranspiration estimates were compared to measured data at 30-min intervals and daily times scales.

  20. The ultraviolet spectrum of Eta Carinae

    SciTech Connect

    Viotti, R.; Rossi, L.; Cassatella, A.; Altamore, A.; Baratta, G.B. International Ultraviolet Explorer Observatory, Madrid Roma I Universita, Rome Osservatorio Astronomico, Rome )

    1989-12-01

    An atlas of the high-resolution UV spectrum of Eta Car from 1200 to 1974 A and from 2200 to 3230 A is presented, based on IUE observations made between 1978 and 1980. The fluxes and equivalent widths of the emission and absorption features, and the stellar continuum in line-free regions are presented. The profiles displayed by the most intense emission suggest line formation in an asymmetric envelope. Many of the observed features may be explained if Eta Car is an intermediate, possible binary, F-type hypergiant in a short living stage, which holds a massive wind heated by dissipation of mechanical energy. 61 refs.

  1. Study of high momentum eta' production in B --> eta'Xs.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-08-06

    We measure the branching fraction for the charmless semi-inclusive process B --> eta'Xs, where the eta' meson has a momentum in the range 2.0 to 2.7 GeV/c in the upsilon4S center-of-mass frame and Xs represents a system comprising a kaon and zero to four pions. We find B(B --> eta'Xs) = [3.9 +/- 0.8(stat) +/- 0.5(syst) +/- 0.8(model)] x 10(-4). We also obtain the Xs mass spectrum and find that it fits models predicting high masses.

  2. 20 CFR 658.602 - ETA national office responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE JOB SERVICE SYSTEM Review and Assessment of State Agency Compliance With Job Service Regulations § 658.602 ETA national office responsibility. The ETA national office shall: (a) Monitor ETA regional offices' carrying out of JS regulations; (b) From time to time, conduct...

  3. 20 CFR 658.602 - ETA national office responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE JOB SERVICE SYSTEM Review and Assessment of State Agency Compliance With Job Service Regulations § 658.602 ETA national office responsibility. The ETA national office shall: (a) Monitor ETA regional offices' carrying out of JS regulations; (b) From time to time, conduct...

  4. 20 CFR 658.602 - ETA national office responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE JOB SERVICE SYSTEM Review and Assessment of State Agency Compliance With Job Service Regulations § 658.602 ETA national office responsibility. The ETA national office shall: (a) Monitor ETA regional offices' carrying out of JS regulations; (b) From time to time, conduct...

  5. 20 CFR 658.602 - ETA national office responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE JOB SERVICE SYSTEM Review and Assessment of State Agency Compliance With Job Service Regulations § 658.602 ETA national office responsibility. The ETA national office shall: (a) Monitor ETA regional offices' carrying out of JS regulations; (b) From time to time, conduct...

  6. 20 CFR 655.1292 - Authority of ETA-OFLC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Department of Labor's (the Department or DOL) Employment & Training Administration (ETA), who, in turn, may... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority of ETA-OFLC. 655.1292 Section 655... Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1292 Authority of ETA-OFLC. Temporary agricultural...

  7. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ETAs SM as Treasury's Financial Agent. A Federally-insured financial institution that elects to offer... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary,...

  8. Study of B Meson Decays with Excited eta and eta-prime Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /Energy Sci. Network /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-04-18

    Using 383 million B{bar B} pairs from the BABAR data sample, they report results for branching fractions of six charged B-meson decay modes, where a charged kaon recoils against a charmless resonance decaying to K{bar K}* or {eta}{pi}{pi} final states with mass in the range (1.2-1.8) GeV/c{sup 2}. They observe a significant enhancement at the low K{bar K}* invariant mass which is interpreted as B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1475)K{sup +}, find evidence for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1295)K{sup +}, and place upper limits on the decays B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1405)K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285)K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 1}(1420)K{sup +}, and B{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1680)K{sup +}.

  9. A SEA CHANGE IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Martin, John C.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ferland, Gary J.; Walborn, Nolan R.

    2010-07-01

    Major stellar-wind emission features in the spectrum of {eta} Car have recently decreased by factors of order 2 relative to the continuum. This is unprecedented in the modern observational record. The simplest, but unproven, explanation is a rapid decrease in the wind density.

  10. Superluminous supernovae: no threat from eta Carinae.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Melott, Adrian L; Fields, Brian D; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J

    2008-02-01

    Recently, Supernova 2006gy was noted as the most luminous ever recorded, with a total radiated energy of approximately 10(44) Joules. It was proposed that the progenitor may have been a massive evolved star similar to eta Carinae, which resides in our own Galaxy at a distance of about 2.3 kpc. eta Carinae appears ready to detonate. Although it is too distant to pose a serious threat as a normal supernova, and given that its rotation axis is unlikely to produce a gamma-ray burst oriented toward Earth, eta Carinae is about 30,000 times nearer than 2006gy, and we re-evaluate it as a potential superluminous supernova. We have found that, given the large ratio of emission in the optical to the X-ray, atmospheric effects are negligible. Ionization of the atmosphere and concomitant ozone depletion are unlikely to be important. Any cosmic ray effects should be spread out over approximately 10(4) y and similarly unlikely to produce any serious perturbation to the biosphere. We also discuss a new possible effect of supernovae-e-ndocrine disruption induced by blue light near the peak of the optical spectrum. This is a possibility for nearby supernovae at distances too large to be considered "dangerous" for other reasons. However, due to reddening and extinction by the interstellar medium, eta Carinae is unlikely to trigger such effects to any significant degree.

  11. Measuring Evapotranspiration in Urban Irrigated Lawns in Two Kansas Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Bremer, D.; Ham, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Conservation of water is becoming increasingly critical in many metropolitan areas. The use of automated irrigation systems for the maintenance of lawns and landscapes is rising and these systems are typically maladjusted to apply more water than necessary, resulting in water wastage. Provision of accurate estimates of actual lawn water use may assist urbanites in conserving water through better adjustment of automatic irrigation systems. Micrometeorological methods may help determine actual lawn water use by measuring evapotranspiration (ET) from urban lawns. From April - August of 2011, four small tripod-mounted weather stations (tripods, five total) were deployed in twelve residential landscapes in the Kansas cities of Manhattan (MHK) and Wichita (ICT) in the USA (six properties in each city). Each tripod was instrumented to estimate reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo) via the FAO-56 method. During tripod deployment in residential lawns, actual evapotranspiration (ETactual) was measured nearby using a stationary, trailer-mounted eddy covariance (EC) station. The EC station sampled well-watered turf at the K-State Rocky Ford Turfgrass Center within 5 km of the study properties in MHK, and was also deployed at a commercial sod farm 15 - 40 km from the study residences in the greater ICT metro area. The fifth tripod was deployed in the source area of the EC station to estimate ETo in conjunction with tripods in the lawns (i.e., to serve as a reference). Data from EC allowed for computation of a so-called lawn coefficient (Kc) by determining the ratio of ETo from the tripods in residential lawns to ETo from the EC station (ETo,EC); hence, Kc = ETo,tripod / ETo,EC. Using this method, ETactual can be estimated for individual tripods within a lawn. Data suggests that it may be more accurate to quantify ET within individual lawns by microclimate (i.e., determine coefficients for "shaded" and "open/unshaded" portions of a lawn). By finding microclimate coefficients

  12. D sub s sup + decays to. eta. pi. sup + and. eta. prime. pi. sup +

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Henderson, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Yamamoto, H.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Jensen, T.; Kagan, H.; Kas

    1992-03-02

    Using the CLEO II detector, we have accurately measured {ital D}{sub {ital s}} decay branching ratios relative to the {phi}{pi}{sup +} mode for the {eta}{pi}{sup +} and {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +} states, for which there are conflicting claims; our results are 0.54{plus minus}0.09{plus minus}0.06 and 1.20{plus minus}0.15{plus minus}0.11, respectively.

  13. Evapotranspiration Cycles in a High Latitude Agroecosystem: Potential Warming Role

    PubMed Central

    Ruairuen, Watcharee

    2015-01-01

    As the acreages of agricultural lands increase, changes in surface energetics and evapotranspiration (ET) rates may arise consequently affecting regional climate regimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate summertime ET dynamics and surface energy processes in a subarctic agricultural farm in Interior Alaska. The study includes micrometeorological and hydrological data. Results covering the period from June to September 2012 and 2013 indicated consistent energy fractions: LE/Rnet (67%), G/Rnet (6%), H/Rnet (27%) where LE is latent heat flux, Rnet is the surface net radiation, G is ground heat flux and H is the sensible heat flux. Additionally actual surface evapotranspiration from potential evaporation was found to be in the range of 59 to 66%. After comparing these rates with those of most prominent high latitude ecosystems it is argued here that if agroecosystem in high latitudes become an emerging feature in the land-use, the regional surface energy balance will significantly shift in comparison to existing Arctic natural ecosystems. PMID:26368123

  14. Quasifree photoproduction of eta mesons off the neutron.

    PubMed

    Jaegle, I; Mertens, T; Anisovich, A V; Bacelar, J C S; Bantes, B; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Beloglazov, Y A; Castelijns, R; Crede, V; Dutz, H; Ehmanns, A; Elsner, D; Essig, K; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fuchs, M; Funke, Ch; Gothe, R; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Höffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Kleber, V; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Langheinrich, J; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Messchendorp, J G; Metag, V; Morales, C; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V A; Novinski, D; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Radkov, A; Roy, A; Sarantsev, A V; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, C; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S V; Sokhoyan, V; Süle, A; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Thoma, U; Trnka, D; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, Ch; Wendel, Ch

    2008-06-27

    Quasifree photoproduction of eta mesons off nucleons bound in the deuteron has been measured with the CBELSA/TAPS detector for incident photon energies up to 2.5 GeV at the Bonn ELSA accelerator. The eta mesons have been detected in coincidence with recoil protons and recoil neutrons, which allows a detailed comparison of the quasifree n(gamma,eta)n and p(gamma,eta)p reactions. The excitation function for eta production off the neutron shows a pronounced bumplike structure at W=1.68 GeV (E{gamma} approximately 1 GeV), which is absent for the proton.

  15. Concerning the relationship between evapotranspiration and soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetzel, Peter J.; Chang, Jy-Tai

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the evapotranspiration and soil moisture during the drying, supply-limited phase is studied. A second scaling parameter, based on the evapotranspirational supply and demand concept of Federer (1982), is defined; the parameter, referred to as the threshold evapotranspiration, occurs in vegetation-covered surfaces just before leaf stomata close and when surface tension restricts moisture release from bare soil pores. A simple model for evapotranspiration is proposed. The effects of natural soil heterogeneities on evapotranspiration computed from the model are investigated. It is observed that the natural variability in soil moisture, caused by the heterogeneities, alters the relationship between regional evapotranspiration and the area average soil moisture.

  16. Some Comments on the Decays of eta (550)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Veltman, M.; Yellin, J.

    1966-07-01

    Various decay modes of the {eta}(500) are discussed. The relations, through SU{sub 3} and the Gell-Mann, Sharp, Wagner model, between the {eta}-decay modes and the modes {eta} {yields} {pi}{pi}{gamma), {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} are investigated taking into account {eta}-{eta}{sup *} mixing. The present experimental values for the neutral branching ratios plus the shape of the {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot are shown to require a 25% {vert_bar}{Delta}{rvec I}{vert_bar} = 3 contribution to the {eta} {yields} 3{pi} amplitude. The connection between a possible charge asymmetry in {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} and the branching ratio {Gamma}{sub {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}}/{Gamma}{sub {eta}}{sup all} is investigated in the framework of a model proposed earlier by several authors. It is shown that there is no conflict between the existing data and this model. The Dalitz plot distribution of {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} is discussed under various assumptions about the properties of the interaction responsible for the decay. (auth)

  17. etas_solve: A robust program to estimate the ETAS parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Y.; Kasahara, A.

    2015-12-01

    The epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model introduced by Ogata (1988) has been widely used to quantitatively describe seismicity (e.g. Ogata, 1992; Llenos et al., 2009). However, only a few programs for estimation of the ETAS parameters are publicly available, and it is difficult to automatically apply some of them to observed data due to initial value dependence (e.g. Ogata, 2006). A robust ETAS estimation program is required to meet the recent enhancement of earthquake catalogs. In this study, we developed a new program, etas_solve, that is based on Newton's method and calculates exact gradient and Hessian by using the automatic differentiation technique (Griewank, 1989). The program also supports auxiliary window in time and magnitude (Wang et al., 2010).To demonstrate robustness of the developed program, we tested the dependence of estimated parameters on the choice of initial value by running the program from 1,024 randomly chosen initial values, and then compared the results with that of SAPP (Ogata 2006). We used aftershock data of 26th July 2003 earthquake of M6.2 at the northern Miyagi japan, which is shipped with SAPP, as a testing data. We found that estimation values with etas_solve were independent of the initial value for the testing data, while that with SAPP were varied with the initial value. Although there was initial value dependence in the SAPP's results, the estimated values by SAPP with small (≤10-5) gradient coincided with the solution by etas_solve. etas_solve took longer computation time per iteration than SAPP due to the exact Hessian calculation, but total execution time was comparable to that of SAPP since less number of iterations for convergence was required. In addition, etas_solve was faster than SAPP on multicore machines (around 8-fold speed up with a 16 core machine) since etas_solve is parallelized by OpenMP.etas_solve is written in Fortran and distributed under GNU General Public License at https

  18. Glue content and mixing angle of the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} system: The effect of the isoscalar 0{sup -} continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrallah, N.F.

    2004-12-01

    Masses and topological charges of the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons are expressed in terms of the singlet-octet mixing angle {theta}. Contributions of the pseudoscalar 0{sup -} continuum are evaluated in a model independent way. Applications to the decay {eta}{yields}3{pi} and to the radiative decay of vector mesons involving {eta} and {eta}{sup '} are considered. Agreement with experiment is, in general, good and the results quite stable for -30.5 deg. < or approx. {theta} < or approx. -18.5 deg.

  19. Global daily reference evapotranspiration modeling and evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, G.B.; Verdin, J.P.; Lietzow, R.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and reliable evapotranspiration (ET) datasets are crucial in regional water and energy balance studies. Due to the complex instrumentation requirements, actual ET values are generally estimated from reference ET values by adjustment factors using coefficients for water stress and vegetation conditions, commonly referred to as crop coefficients. Until recently, the modeling of reference ET has been solely based on important weather variables collected from weather stations that are generally located in selected agro-climatic locations. Since 2001, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) has been producing six-hourly climate parameter datasets that are used to calculate daily reference ET for the whole globe at 1-degree spatial resolution. The U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science has been producing daily reference ET (ETo) since 2001, and it has been used on a variety of operational hydrological models for drought and streamflow monitoring all over the world. With the increasing availability of local station-based reference ET estimates, we evaluated the GDAS-based reference ET estimates using data from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS). Daily CIMIS reference ET estimates from 85 stations were compared with GDAS-based reference ET at different spatial and temporal scales using five-year daily data from 2002 through 2006. Despite the large difference in spatial scale (point vs. ∼100 km grid cell) between the two datasets, the correlations between station-based ET and GDAS-ET were very high, exceeding 0.97 on a daily basis to more than 0.99 on time scales of more than 10 days. Both the temporal and spatial correspondences in trend/pattern and magnitudes between the two datasets were satisfactory, suggesting the reliability of using GDAS parameter-based reference ET for regional water and energy balance studies in many parts of the world

  20. Partitioning evapotranspiration into green and blue water sources in the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Senay, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we combined two actual evapotranspiration datasets (ET), one obtained from a root zone water balance model and another from an energy balance model, to partition annual ET into green (rainfall-based) and blue (surface/groundwater) water sources. Time series maps of green water ET (GWET) and blue water ET (BWET) are produced for the conterminous United States (CONUS) over 2001–2015.

  1. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    DOE PAGES

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental η–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an η–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound η, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the η–mesic nucleus 25Mgηmore » and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more η–mesic nuclei is suggested.« less

  2. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental η–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an η–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound η, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the η–mesic nucleus 25Mgη and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more η–mesic nuclei is suggested.

  3. HUBBLE SHOWS EXPANSION OF ETA CARINAE DEBRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The furious expansion of a huge, billowing pair of gas and dust clouds are captured in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope comparison image of the supermassive star Eta Carinae. To create the picture, astronomers aligned and subtracted two images of Eta Carinae taken 17 months apart (April 1994, September 1995). Black represents where the material was located in the older image, and white represents the more recent location. (The light and dark streaks that make an 'X' pattern are instrumental artifacts caused by the extreme brightness of the central star. The bright white region at the center of the image results from the star and its immediate surroundings being 'saturated' in one of the images.)Photo Credit: Jon Morse (University of Colorado), Kris Davidson (University of Minnesota), and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  4. Eta Carinae and Other Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  5. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, David J.

    2014-06-01

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  6. GHRS Observations of LISM towards eta UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The star eta UMa (l=101(deg) , b=+65(deg) , d=31 pc) samples local interstellar matter (LISM) in a high latitude region. The Sun is ``above'' most of the mass of the Local Fluff cloud complex, yielding low total interstellar column densities towards eta UMa. Thus cloud properties can be determined with minimal confusion caused by velocity component blending in this sightline. The physical properties of the cloud surrounding the solar system become the boundary conditions of the solar system. A key property of the surrounding cloud is the proton density, since the Alfven velocity regulates the formation of a bow shock around the heliosphere, and since charge exchange between interstellar p(+) and H(deg) yields a pile-up of H(deg) at the heliopause. As a result, the interstellar electron density in the surrounding cloud is an important parameter in understanding the configuration of the outer heliosphere regions. We present GHRS Echelle A and Echelle B data on C({deg) *}, C(deg) , Mg(deg) and Mg(+) . These data allow us to compare electron densities as estimated from the ratios N(C({deg) *})/N(C(deg) ) versus N(Mg(deg) )/N(Mg(+) ) for a relatively simple sightline. These electron densities are also compared to electron densities determined from optical Ca(+) observations towards eta UMa by Frisch and Welty (in preparation).

  7. A Step Toward Eta-sub-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    2014-04-01

    The Kepler mission observed exoplanet transits for 4 full years (greater than its expected lifetime of 3.5 years) until it became inoperable for its original purpose, as a result of a reaction wheel failure. Kepler was spectacularly successful in its goal of observing exoplanet transits of host star disks for the purpose of measuring the statistics of such transits in its target star sample. The Kepler data, when fully analyzed, will determine the statistics of planets in the underlying population, and in particular the expected number of terrestrial planets in habitable zone orbits per solar-type star, the quantity known as eta-sub-Earth. This report is an initial examination of Kepler's third catalog (Feb. 2012) of planets and candidate planets. I find that the apparent projected value of eta-sub-Earth is several times smaller than I had found from the second catalog, but that the data are now approaching the point where intrinsic biases can be uncovered. When all bias factors are eventually found, it is likely that the true value of eta-sub-Earth will be substantially greater than its current apparent value.

  8. Estimation of regional evapotranspiration for clear sky days over the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Y.; Stisen, S.; Sandholt, I.; Jensen, K. H.

    2009-04-01

    The triangle method combined with thermal inertia for estimation of regional evapotranspiration based on Feng Yun-2C(FY-2C) satellite data and MODIS products over the North China Plain is presented. FY-2C, China's first operational geostationary meteorological satellite which features 5 spectral bands (1 VIS and 4 IR), can acquire one full disc image of China (60° N - 60° S ,45° E - 165° E) per hour every day. Two thermal red channels (IR1: 10.3-11.3 μm) and (IR2:11.5-12.5 μm) were used for surface temperature estimation using a split window algorithm originally proposed for the MSG-SEVIRI sensor assuming the channel response function range of the two split-window channels for MSG SEVIRI and FY-2C are similar and that the center of channels are the same. For application of the improved triangle method taking thermal inertia into account, the surface-air temperature gradient in the Ts-NDVI space, was replaced by the surface temperature temporal change estimated from the Land Surface Temperature at hours 8:00 and 12:00 in local time (ΔTs). Combined with the 16 days composite MODIS Vegetation Indices product (MOD 13) at spatial resolution of 5 km, evaporative fraction was estimated by interpolation in the ΔTs-NDVI triangular-shaped parameter space. Subsequently, regional actual evapotranspiration was estimated based on the derived evaporative fraction and available energy estimated from satellite data. In the piedmont plain with high NDVI and low ΔTs, evapotranspiration rate is high because of irrigation of winter wheat. In the coastal plain NDVI is low and also ΔTs is low as high evapotranspiration rates are sustained water supply from shallow water table. Ground-based measurements of evapotranspiration were retrieved from a lysimeter at the Luancheng eco-agricultural station of China Academy of Sciences. These data are representative for evapotranspiration in the piedmont plain and were used for validation of the actual evapotranspiration retrievals from

  9. Long-term lysimeter data on evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term crop evapotranspiration (ET) data measured using large weighing lysimeters have only been gathered in a few places in the world, yet are of great importance for ground truthing of many models of plant water use, mesoscale climate, remote sensing estimation of ET, climate change and climate...

  10. A review of approaches for evapotranspiration partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) into evaporation from the soil surface (E) and transpiration (T) is challenging but important in order to assess biomass production and the allocation of increasingly scarce water resources. Generally T is the desired component with the water being used to enh...

  11. Spatial and temporal variation in evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial and temporal variation in evapotranspiration occurs at multiple scales as the result of several different spatial and temporal patterns in precipitation, soil water holding capacity, cloudiness (available energy), types of crops, and residue and tillage management practices. We have often as...

  12. Field measurement of cotton seedling evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information on cotton evapotranspiration (ET) during the seedling growth stage and under field conditions is scarce because ET is a difficult parameter to measure. Our objective was to use weighable lysimeters to measure daily values of cotton seedling ET. We designed and built plastic weighable mic...

  13. Study of B meson decays with excited eta and eta' mesons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-08-29

    Using 383 x 10(6) BBover pairs from the BABAR data sample, we report results for branching fractions of six charged B-meson decay modes, where a charged kaon recoils against a charmless resonance decaying to KKover* or etapipi final states with mass in the range (1.2-1.8) GeV/c2. We observe a significant enhancement at the low KKover* invariant mass which is interpreted as B+-->eta(1475)K+, find evidence for the decay B+-->eta(1295)K+, and place upper limits on the decays B+-->eta(1405)K+, B+-->f1(1285)K+, B+-->f1(1420)K+, and B+-->phi(1680)K+.

  14. Interaction of eta mesons with nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P; Upadhyay, N J; Jain, B K

    2013-06-01

    Back in the mid-1980s, a new branch of investigation related to the interaction of eta mesons with nuclei came into existence. It started with the theoretical prediction of possible exotic states of eta mesons and nuclei bound by the strong interaction and later developed into an extensive experimental program to search for such unstable states as well as understand the underlying interaction via eta-meson producing reactions. The vast literature of experimental as well as theoretical works that studied various aspects of eta-producing reactions such as the π(+)n → ηp, pd → (3)Heη, p (6)Li → (7)Be η and γ (3)He → η X, to name a few, had but one objective in mind: to understand the eta-nucleon (ηN) and hence the η-nucleus interaction which could explain the production data and confirm the existence of some η-mesic nuclei. In spite of these efforts, there remain uncertainties in the knowledge of the ηN and hence the η-nucleus interaction. Therefore, this review is an attempt to bind together the findings in these works and draw some global and specific conclusions which can be useful for future explorations.The ηN scattering length (which represents the strength of the η-nucleon interaction) using different theoretical models and analyzing the data on η production in pion, photon and proton induced reactions was found to be spread out in a wide range, namely, 0.18 ≤ Re aηN ≤ 1.03 fm and 0.16 ≤ Rm aηN ≤ 0.49 fm. Theoretical searches of heavy η-mesic nuclei based on η-nucleus optical potentials and lighter ones based on Faddeev type few-body approaches predict the existence of several quasibound and resonant states. Although some hints of η-mesic states such as (3)(η)He and (25)(η)Mg do exist from previous experiments, the promise of clearer signals for the existence of η-mesic nuclei lies in the experiments to be performed at the J-PARC, MAMI and COSY facilities in the near future. This review is aimed at giving an overall status

  15. Measurement of the eta'-meson mass using J/psi-->gammaeta'.

    PubMed

    Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A

    2008-10-31

    We measure the mass of the eta;{'} meson using psi(2S)-->pi;{+}pi;{-}J/psi, J/psi-->gammaeta;{'} events acquired with the CLEO-c detector operating at the CESR e;{+}e;{-} collider. Using three decay modes, eta;{'}-->rho;{0}gamma, eta;{'}-->pi;{+}pi;{-}eta with eta-->gammagamma, and eta;{'}-->pi;{+}pi;{-}eta with eta-->pi;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0}, we find M_{eta;{'}}=957.793+/-0.054+/-0.036 MeV, in which the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This result is consistent with but substantially more precise than the current world average.

  16. Estimation evapotranspiration over the large landscape by using remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianmao; Liu, Ronghua; Guo, Qile; Fei, Dunyue; Wang, Qian; Liu, Junwei

    2014-11-01

    Evapotranspiration is the important process of plant physiological and ecological, estimating and monitoring evapotranspiration are very useful for evaluation of the influence on the crop growth situation. Determination evapotranspiration over natural surface, the utilization of satellite remote sensing is indispensable. In this paper, a new method is established based on high resolution remote sensing data(TM/ETM) combination Penman-Monteith regional daily evapotranspiration calculation model. The key of the algorithm is used to calculate the Temperature-Vegetation Coverage Index (TVCI) based on an empirical parameterisation of the relationship between surface temperature (Ts) and vegetation index (NDVI), Ts and NDVI in combination can provide information on vegetation and moisture conditions at the surface. Two methods used to calculate the TVCI. The "Universal triangle" method was used to estimate TVCI according to Carlson et al. (1995). Using a trapezoid (triangle) correlation between surface temperature and fractional vegetation cover, we constructed an improved `Actual triangle' method to estimate TVCI, then coupling the Penman- Monteith equation (1998) to estimate daily ET. Daily ET based on the `Actual triangle' methods was compared well with methods by the `soil water lost method', while daily ET based on the `Universal triangle' methods was underestimated. So, it is suitable to use `Actual triangle' method to estimate TVCI instead of `Universal triangle' method in the North China Plain even if the method was applied under different climate conditions. These results indicate that the method is feasible, and VTCI is a close real-time drought monitoring approach. It is based on satellite derived information and combination with the meteorology data, and the potential for operational application of the method is therefore large.

  17. Evaluation of Water Stress Coefficient Methods to Estimate Actual Corn Evapotranspiration in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract for Kullberg Hydrology Days: Abstract. Increased competition for water resources is placing pressure on the agricultural sector to remain profitable while reducing water use. Remote sensing techniques have been developed to monitor crop water stress and produce information for evapotranspi...

  18. Estimation of actual evapotranspiration using measured and calculated values of bulk surface resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently the United Nations-Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recommends using the Penman-Monteith method for estimating ET over all other meteorological methods. The principal limitation of using the generalized form of the Penman-Monteith equation is in obtaining accurate values for the bu...

  19. Daily potential evapotranspiration and diurnal climate forcings: influence on the numerical modelling of soil water dynamics and evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqing; Graham, Wendy D.; Jacobs, Jennifer M.

    2005-07-01

    A physically based, variably saturated flow model was developed to predict soil water dynamics, evapotranspiration (ET) from the vadose zone, and recharge to (or exfiltration from) the saturated zone using mean daily atmospheric forcings and to identify the value of diurnal climate forcings on those predictions. The vadose zone flow is modelled using the Galerkin finite element technique to solve Richards' equation in one-dimension. The model was able to accurately predict measured soil moisture, water table elevation and actual ET at Paynes Prairie State Preserve in Florida. The forecast Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies of actual ET, water table and average soil moisture content increased modestly, from 0.605-0.653, 0.888-0.916 to 0.902-0.913, respectively, when the average daily ET forcing was replaced with a diurnal evaporation cycle. Several additional numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of the evaporation cycle disaggregation approach on modelled ET and soil moisture content for different soil textures, vegetation surfaces, and water table depth. The results show that the enhanced predictive value of the diurnal ET cycle increases with decreasing vegetation, decreasing clay content, and increasing water table depth. Using numerical studies, actual evaporation is shown to be higher for daily average evaporation as compared to the diurnal cycle evaporation for specific ranges of shallow water table depth. For clay soils, this range occurs from approximately 40 to 300 cm below land surface for bare soils and from approximately 40 to well below 300 cm below land surface for vegetated soils. The range for sandy soils is approximately 80-200 cm below land surface for both bare and vegetated soils. Within this range, the maximum difference of the actual to potential evapotranspiration ratio for the clay soil, resulting from using different forcing methods, is 20 and 10% for bare soil and vegetated conditions, respectively. The forcing method

  20. Measurement of the gamma gamma* --> eta and gamma gamma* --> eta' transition form factors

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez et al, P.

    2011-02-07

    We study the reactions e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sup (/)} in the single-tag mode and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sup (/)} transition form factors in the momentum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  1. Using satellite-based evapotranspiration estimates to improve the structure of a simple conceptual rainfall-runoff model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tirthankar; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Serrat-Capdevila, Aleix; Valdes, Juan B.

    2017-02-01

    Daily, quasi-global (50° N-S and 180° W-E), satellite-based estimates of actual evapotranspiration at 0.25° spatial resolution have recently become available, generated by the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM). We investigate the use of these data to improve the performance of a simple lumped catchment-scale hydrologic model driven by satellite-based precipitation estimates to generate streamflow simulations for a poorly gauged basin in Africa. In one approach, we use GLEAM to constrain the evapotranspiration estimates generated by the model, thereby modifying daily water balance and improving model performance. In an alternative approach, we instead change the structure of the model to improve its ability to simulate actual evapotranspiration (as estimated by GLEAM). Finally, we test whether the GLEAM product is able to further improve the performance of the structurally modified model. Results indicate that while both approaches can provide improved simulations of streamflow, the second approach also improves the simulation of actual evapotranspiration significantly, which substantiates the importance of making diagnostic structural improvements to hydrologic models whenever possible.

  2. Search for the CP forbidden decay eta-->4pi(0)

    PubMed

    Prakhov; Tippens; Allgower; Bekrenev; Berger; Briscoe; Clajus; Comfort; Craig; Grosnick; Huber; Isenhower; Knecht; Koetke; Koulbardis; Kozlenko; Kruglov; Kycia; Lolos; Lopatin; Manley; Marusic; Manweiler; McDonald; Nefkens; Olmsted

    2000-05-22

    We report the first determination of the upper limit for the branching ratio of the CP forbidden decay eta-->4pi(0). No events were observed in a sample of 3.0x10(7) eta decays. The experiment was performed with the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer installed in a separated pi(-) beam at the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron). At the 90% confidence limit, B(eta-->4pi(0))

  3. The Course of Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smet, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Actualization is traditionally seen as the process following syntactic reanalysis whereby an item's new syntactic status manifests itself in new syntactic behavior. The process is gradual in that some new uses of the reanalyzed item appear earlier or more readily than others. This article accounts for the order in which new uses appear during…

  4. Simple analytical model of evapotranspiration in the presence of roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare M.; Hough, L. A.; Castaing, Jean-Christophe; Frétigny, Christian; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    Evaporation of water out of a soil involves complicated and well-debated mechanisms. When plant roots are added into the soil, water transfer between the soil and the outside environment is even more complicated. Indeed, plants provide an additional process of water transfer. Water is pumped by the roots, channeled to the leaf surface, and released into the surrounding air by a process called transpiration. Prediction of the evapotranspiration of water over time in the presence of roots helps keep track of the amount of water that remains in the soil. Using a controlled visual setup of a two-dimensional model soil consisting of monodisperse glass beads, we perform experiments on actual roots grown under different relative humidity conditions. We record the total water mass loss in the medium and the position of the evaporating front that forms within the medium. We then develop a simple analytical model that predicts the position of the evaporating front as a function of time as well as the total amount of water that is lost from the medium due to the combined effects of evaporation and transpiration. The model is based on fundamental principles of evaporation fluxes and includes empirical assumptions on the quantity of open stomata in the leaves, where water transpiration occurs. Comparison between the model and experimental results shows excellent prediction of the position of the evaporating front as well as the total mass loss from evapotranspiration in the presence of roots. The model also provides a way to predict the lifetime of a plant.

  5. Measurement of the Phase Difference Between eta00 and eta+- to a Precision of 1^0

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Y.W.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Swallow, E.C.; Bock, G.J.; Coleman, R.N.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Stanfield, K.C.; Stefanski, R.; Yamanaka, T.; Gollin, G.D.; /Princeton U.

    1986-03-09

    We propose to add an additional regenerator to the E731 spectrometer in the MC beamline to enable us to measure the phase difference between the CP violation parameters {eta}{sub 00} and {eta}{sub +-} to an accuracy of 1{sup o}. Very general considerations indicate that CPT conservation requires the phase difference, {Delta}{phi} = Arg({eta}{sub 00}) - Arg({eta}{sub +-}), to be smaller than one degree. The current experimental value is {Delta}{phi} = (9.4 {+-} 5.1){sup o}.

  6. Employment and Training Administration (ETA) Glossary of Program Terms and Definitions. Second Edition and Change 1. ETA Glossary Issuances Nos. 2 and 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The official source of definitions for all the major Employment and Training Administration (ETA) programs, this glossary provides a ready reference and an up-to-date list of ETA program terms and definitions contained in laws, federal regulations, and ETA issuances used by sponsors and various ETA service offices on a daily basis; and identifies…

  7. 75 FR 53982 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 207, Nonmonetary Determination Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 207, Nonmonetary... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background: The ETA 207 Report, Nonmonetary Determination Activities, contains... proposed extension collection of the ETA 207, Nonmonetary Determinations Activities Report. Comments...

  8. 77 FR 70833 - Comment Request for Information Collection on the ETA 9048, Worker Profiling and Reemployment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection on the ETA 9048, Worker Profiling and Reemployment Services Activity, and the ETA 9049, Worker Profiling and Reemployment Services Outcomes, Extension Without Revisions AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration (ETA), Labor....

  9. A LIGHTHOUSE EFFECT IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Madura, Thomas I.; Groh, Jose H.

    2012-02-20

    We present a new model for the behavior of scattered time-dependent, asymmetric near-UV emission from the nearby ejecta of {eta} Car. Using a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulation of {eta} Car's binary colliding winds, we show that the 3D binary orientation derived by Madura et al. in 2012 is capable of explaining the asymmetric near-UV variability observed in the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Camera F220W images of Smith et al.. Models assuming a binary orientation with i Almost-Equal-To 130 Degree-Sign -145 Degree-Sign , {omega} Almost-Equal-To 230 Degree-Sign -315 Degree-Sign , P.A.{sub z} Almost-Equal-To 302 Degree-Sign -327 Degree-Sign are consistent with the observed F220W near-UV images. We find that the hot binary companion does not significantly contribute to the near-UV excess observed in the F220W images. Rather, we suggest that a bore-hole effect and the reduction of Fe II optical depths inside the wind-wind collision cavity carved in the extended photosphere of the primary star lead to the time-dependent directional illumination of circumbinary material as the companion moves about in its highly elliptical orbit.

  10. Hadronic decays of the eta/sub c/

    SciTech Connect

    Koenigsmann, K.

    1980-08-01

    Results on hadronic decays of the eta/sub c/ candidate state are presented. A mass value of M = (2978 +- 9) MeV is obtained. The branching fraction for the decay into eta ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is presented and an upper limit for the decay into ..pi../sup 0/K/sup +/K/sup -/ is given. 6 figures.

  11. Software Users Manual (SUM): Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    This software user manual describes the implementation and use the Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool. The ETA Tool is a software program that augments the analysis and reporting capabilities of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) testability analysis software package called the Testability Engineering And Maintenance System (TEAMS) Designer. An initial diagnostic assessment is performed by the TEAMS Designer software using a qualitative, directed-graph model of the system being analyzed. The ETA Tool utilizes system design information captured within the diagnostic model and testability analysis output from the TEAMS Designer software to create a series of six reports for various system engineering needs. The ETA Tool allows the user to perform additional studies on the testability analysis results by determining the detection sensitivity to the loss of certain sensors or tests. The ETA Tool was developed to support design and development of the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle. The diagnostic analysis provided by the ETA Tool was proven to be valuable system engineering output that provided consistency in the verification of system engineering requirements. This software user manual provides a description of each output report generated by the ETA Tool. The manual also describes the example diagnostic model and supporting documentation - also provided with the ETA Tool software release package - that were used to generate the reports presented in the manual

  12. Conversations with Early Leaders of Eta Sigma Gamma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey K.; Seabert, Denise M.; Goldsmith, Mal

    2007-01-01

    Anniversaries are often a time to reflect on the past. With that in mind, interviews were conducted with early key leaders of Eta Sigma Gamma to explore their perspectives of the organization's growth and development as well as their hopes for the future of ESG. The individuals interviewed included the surviving founders of Eta Sigma Gamma, the…

  13. [eta][prime] meson mass in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramashi, Y.; Fukugita, M.; Mino, H.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A. , Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 Yukawa Institute, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606 Faculty of Engineering, Yamanashi University, Kofu 404 Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 )

    1994-05-30

    It is shown that the mass difference between [eta][prime] and pseudoscalar octet mesons can be calculated in quenched lattice QCD with the aid of a variant wall source technique. The estimated mass difference increases as the quark mass decreases, and its value extrapolated to the zero-quark-mass limit, [ital m][sub [eta][prime

  14. Branching Fraction and P-violation Charge Asymmetry Measurements for B-meson Decays to eta K+-, eta pi+-, eta'K, eta' pi+-, omega K, and omega pi+-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-06-28

    The authors present measurements of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} and {omega}K{sup 0}, and of the branching fractions and CP-violation charge asymmetries for B{sup +} meson decays to {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}{prime}K{sup +}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}, and {omega}K{sup +}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 383 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The measurements agree with previous results; they find no evidence for direct CP violation.

  15. Fidelity and processivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    Washington, M T; Johnson, R E; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    1999-12-24

    The yeast RAD30 gene functions in error-free replication of UV-damaged DNA, and RAD30 encodes a DNA polymerase, pol eta, that has the ability to efficiently and correctly replicate past a cis-syn-thymine-thymine dimer in template DNA. To better understand the role of pol eta in damage bypass, we examined its fidelity and processivity on nondamaged DNA templates. Steady-state kinetic analyses of deoxynucleotide incorporation indicate that pol eta has a low fidelity, misincorporating deoxynucleotides with a frequency of about 10(-2) to 10(-3). Also pol eta has a low processivity, incorporating only a few nucleotides before dissociating. We suggest that pol eta's low fidelity reflects a flexibility in its active site rendering it more tolerant of DNA damage, while its low processivity limits its activity to reduce errors.

  16. Evapotranspiration and microclimate at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site in northwestern Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; DeVries, M.P.; Sturrock, Alex M.

    1989-01-01

    From July 1982 through June 1984, a study was made of the evapotranspiration and microclimate at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Bureau County, Illinois. Vegetation at the site consists of mixed pasture grasses, primarily awnless brome (Bromus inermis) and red clover (Trifoleum pratense). Three methods were used to estimate evapotranspiration: (1) an energy budget with the Bowen ratio, (2) an aerodynamic profile, and (3) a soil-based water budget. For the aerodynamic-profile method, sensible-heat flux was estimated by a profile equation and evapotranspiration was then calculated as the residual in the energy-balance equation. Estimates by the energy-budget and aerodynamic-profile methods were computed from hourly data and then summed by days and months. Yearly estimates (for March through November) by these methods were in close agreement: 648 and 626 millimeters, respectively. Daily estimates reach a maximum of about 6 millimeters. The water-budget method produced only monthly estimates based on weekly or biweekly soil-moisture content measurements. The yearly evapotranspiration estimated by this method (which actually included only the months of April through October) was 655 millimeters. The March-through-November average for the three methods of 657 millimeters was equivalent to 70 percent of total precipitation. Continuous measurements were made of incoming and reflected shortwave radiation, incoming and emitted longwave radiation, net radiation, soil-heat flux, soil temperature, horizontal windspeed, and wet- and dry-bulb air temperature. Windspeed and air temperature were measured at heights of 0.5 and 2.0 meters (and also at 1.0 meter after September 1983). Soilmoisture content of the soil zone was measured with a gamma-attenuation gage. Annual precipitation (938 millimeters) and average temperature (10.8 degrees Celsius) at the Sheffield site were virtually identical to long-term averages from nearby National Weather Service

  17. The Artificial Neural Network Estimation for Daily and Hourly Rice Evapotranspiration in the Region of Red Soil, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yuanshu; Ruthaikarn, Buaphean; Jin, Xinyi; Pang, Bo

    The evapotranspiration estimation is a key item for irrigation program. It has the important practical significance for high stable yield and water-saving in the region of red soil, South China. Penman-Monteith equation, recommended by FAO, is verified to be the most effective calculation to actual evaporation in many regions of the world. The only default is it has to use complete meteorological factors. To solve this problem, we are trying to find out a artificial neural network model (ANN) which can easily get its information and easy to calculate as well as guaranteed accuracy. A Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) system and automatic weather station were employed for simultaneous measurement of actual evapotranspiration above the rice field. The frequency of 20-min recording provided the possibility for the estimation of daily and hourly evapotranspiration. The determined coefficient from the artificial neural network model on daily scale R2 is 0.9642, while hourly scale R2 is 0.9880. The reason was that the hourly scale training samples was greater than the daily scale measures. In general, the model gives an effective and feasible way for the evaluation of paddy rice evapotranspiration by the conventional parameters.

  18. Measurement of Branching Fractions in Radiative BDecays to eta K gamma and Search for B Decays to eta' K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-31

    The authors present measurements of the B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} branching fractions and upper limits for the B {yields} {eta}'K{gamma} branching fractions. For B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} they also measure the time-integrated charge asymmetry. The data sample, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represents 232 x 10{sup 6} produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions and upper limits at 90% C.L. in units of 10{sup -6} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = 11.3{sub -2.6}{sup +2.8} {+-} 0.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = 10.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.5, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}{gamma}) < 6.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'K{sup +}{gamma}) < 4.2. The charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} is {Alpha}{sub ch} = -0.09 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.01. The first errors are statistical and the second systematic.

  19. Unprecedented coordination modes and demetalation pathways for unbridged polyenyl ligands. Ruthenium eta1,eta4-cycloheptadienyl complexes from allyl/alkyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Older, Christina M; McDonald, Robert; Stryker, Jeffrey M

    2005-10-19

    Cationic (eta6-hexamethylbenzene)ruthenium(II) mediates the [3 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition of allyl and alkyne ligands, leading to the unexpected isolation of eta1,eta4-cycloheptadienyl complexes, an unprecedented coordination mode for transition metal complexes of simple organic rings. The nonconjugated, eta1,eta4-coordinated complex is obtained as the kinetic reaction product from treatment of the unsubstituted allyl complex with excess ethyne; this complex rearranges slowly at 80 degrees C to the thermodynamically more stable conjugated eta5-cycloheptadienyl isomer. The eta1,eta4-coordinated isomer is fluxional at room temperature, undergoing rapid and reversible equilibration with a cycloheptatriene hydride intermediate via facile beta-hydride elimination/reinsertion. The reinsertion process is remarkably regioselective, returning the nonconjugated eta1,eta4-cycloheptadienyl isomer exclusively at room temperature. For reactions incorporating dimethylacetylene dicarboxylate (DMAD) as one or both of the alkyne components, eta1,eta4-coordination appears to be both kinetically and thermodynamically favored, despite undergoing equilibration among all possible eta1,eta4-cycloheptadienyl and cycloheptatriene hydride isomers prior to arriving at one observed eta1,eta4-isomer. For this series, no isomerization to eta5-coordination is observed even upon prolonged heating. In contrast, the cyclization incorporating both DMAD and phenylacetylene proceeds directly to the eta5-cycloheptadienyl isomer at or below room temperature, indicating that eta5-coordination remains energetically accessible to this system. The DMAD-based cyclization reactions produce structurally diverse minor byproducts, including both eta1,eta4-methanocyclohexadiene and acyclic eta3,eta2-heptadienyl isomers, which have been isolated and rigorously characterized. The unusual eta1,eta4-coordination of the seven-membered ring leads to unique new organic products upon oxidative demetalation by iodinolysis

  20. Investigating Landsat-derived forest evapotranspiration in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khand, K. B.; Numata, I.; Kjaersgaard, J.; Cochrane, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Nearly half of annual rainfall in the Amazon rainforest region is returned to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration (ET). However, this land-atmosphere water vapor feedback in Amazonia has been continuously disturbed by anthropogenic influence and climate change such as severe drought events. While forest ET dynamics in the Amazon have been studied from both point estimates (or in-situ measurements) and regional land-surface models as well as coarse-spatial satellite data, finer spatial data is required to address the spatial variability of forest ET associated with both forest disturbances and extreme climate events. We use Landsat-based METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration) model to generate high-resolution (30 m) ET products and investigate its potential to characterize local and regional ET behavior by comparison to ET calculated from flux tower data. METRIC estimates actual ET as residual of the surface energy balance and is applied to capture the spatial variability of forest ET. The flux tower data were collected at two sites with different forest types: Para with wet equatorial forest and Rondônia with seasonally dry tropical forest. Our study was conducted on the dry season of the years 2003 and 2005 for Para, and 2000 through 2002 for Rondônia as a function of data availability of both cloud-free Landsat images and meteorological data for METRIC processing. Daily gridded actual ET estimates from METRIC during the dry season were obtained using a cubic spline interpolation of ETrF (fraction of reference ET) values between the satellite image dates and multiplying by daily reference ET. Across the all study years, differences between the daily ET estimates for the selected image dates from METRIC and the flux towers were less than 1.2 mm/day, while on monthly basis, these averaged daily ET differences were much lower (< 0.5 mm). At Para, the correlation (R2) between the daily ET rates from METRIC and the

  1. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Charge Asymmetries in B{sup +} Decays to {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}K{sup +}, {eta}{rho}{sup +}, and {eta}{sup '}{pi}{sup +}, and Search for B{sup 0} Decays to {eta}K{sup 0} and {eta}{omega}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.

    2005-09-23

    We present measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for six B-meson decay modes with an {eta} or {eta}{sup '} meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 232x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} B Factory at SLAC. We measure the branching fractions (in units of 10{sup -6}): B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup +})=5.1{+-}0.6{+-}0.3, B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}K{sup +})=3.3{+-}0.6{+-}0.3, B(B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}K{sup 0})=1.5{+-}0.7{+-}0.1 (<2.5 at 90% C.L.), B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}{rho}{sup +})=8.4{+-}1.9{+-}1.1, B(B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}{omega})=1.0{+-}0.5{+-}0.2 (<1.9 at 90% C.L.), and B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}{sup '}{pi}{sup +})=4.0{+-}0.8{+-}0.4, where the first uncertainty is statistical and second systematic. For the charged modes we also determine the charge asymmetries, all found to be compatible with zero.

  2. eta Carinae Continues to Evolve (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) Eta Carinae affords us a unique opportunity to study the pre-supernova evolution of the most massive stars. For at least the last half century, it has maintained a 5.5-year spectroscopic cycle that culminates with abrupt decreases in the strong stellar wind emission features. Over the last 15 years, the star has brightened at an accelerated rate and altered its spectrum, in addition to the spectroscopic cycle, indicating an ongoing change in state. We present Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopy and synthetic photometry from the most recent spectroscopic event (2014.5) that shows notable differences with past events and provides clues to the on-going evolution of the star.

  3. The Rapid Brightening of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John C.; Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    Eta Carinae is one of the most dynamic and well-observed massive stars. Its bipolar Homunculus Nebula and other observations imply it has a strong latitude dependent stellar wind. The significant brightening of the star itself over the last two decades has been commonly explained as an evolution of the latitude structure of the wind , change in mass-loss rate, and/or clearing of circumstellar material in our direct line sight. Hubble Space Telescope images (with a much higher spatial resolution than ground-based images) document an increase in contrast between the brightness of the star and the Homunculus reflection nebula. We present measurements of the nebula's brightness, sampling the changing brightness of the star viewed from angles differing from our own direct line of sight. We also present ultraviolet photometry of the star synthesized from recent HST/STIS observations.

  4. The HST Treasury Project on Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Gull, T. R.; Martin, J. C.; Humphreys, R. M.; Damineli, A.; Weis, K.; Stahl, O.; Hillier, D. J.; Corcoran, M.; Hamann, F.; Walborn, N.; Johansson, S.; Hartman, H.; Bautista, M.

    2003-12-01

    This program is valuable for a broad range of stellar and nebular astrophysics, as well as data processing techniques and instrument characteristics. While observing this object's mysterious 5.5-year cycle, we obtained data on several distinct, complex, unfamiliar classes of spectra which cannot be observed well elsewhere. The stellar wind parameters lie outside normal experience, the Weigelt ejecta produce narrow-line spectra unlike any other known object, and the other spectra are also unusual. Altogether our results pertain to stellar instabilities close to the Eddington limit, extreme stellar winds, unexplored nebular/atomic excitation processes, nebular gas dynamics, and instrument performance. The project also represents an extreme application of HST spectroscopy. Since η Car and its ejecta are spatially, spectrally, and temporally complex, they require the best available performance of HST/STIS across its full wavelength range. Such observations will probably not be attainable again within the next 15 years. They also require improved data processing techniques which we have developed, useful for HST/STIS programs on other objects. The Eta Car Treasury data archive will be pertinent to a variety of significant problems mentioned above -- not just η Carinae. (See a related poster concerning the Archive.) Here we report that (1) the predicted event did indeed occur during May--July 2003; (2) we obtained the planned data; (3) they show numerous fascinating and difficult-to-explain phenomena; and (4) we sketch improved reduction routines to achieve maximum resolution with STIS/CCD data in general. We also show examples of the spectral structure and variations in Eta Carinae. This project is supported by STScI grant GO-9420.

  5. Structure and mechanism of human DNA polymerase [eta

    SciTech Connect

    Biertümpfel, Christian; Zhao, Ye; Kondo, Yuji; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Gregory, Mark; Lee, Jae Young; Masutani, Chikahide; Lehmann, Alan R.; Hanaoka, Fumio; Yang, Wei

    2010-11-03

    The variant form of the human syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) is caused by a deficiency in DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}), a DNA polymerase that enables replication through ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers. Here we report high-resolution crystal structures of human Pol{eta} at four consecutive steps during DNA synthesis through cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers. Pol{eta} acts like a 'molecular splint' to stabilize damaged DNA in a normal B-form conformation. An enlarged active site accommodates the thymine dimer with excellent stereochemistry for two-metal ion catalysis. Two residues conserved among Pol{eta} orthologues form specific hydrogen bonds with the lesion and the incoming nucleotide to assist translesion synthesis. On the basis of the structures, eight Pol{eta} missense mutations causing XPV can be rationalized as undermining the molecular splint or perturbing the active-site alignment. The structures also provide an insight into the role of Pol{eta} in replicating through D loop and DNA fragile sites.

  6. Detection of a Hot Binary Companion of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Massa, D.; Hillier, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1 180 Angsroms) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Observations were obtained at two epochs of the 2024-day orbit: 2003 June during ingress to the 2003.5 X-ray eclipse and 2004 April several months after egress. These data show that essentially all the far-UV flux from eta Car shortward of Lyman alpha disappeared at least two days before the start of the X-ray eclipse (2003 June 29), implying that the hot companion, eta Car By was also eclipsed by the dense wind or extended atmosphere of eta Car A. Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. N II 1084-1086 emission disappears at the same time as the far-UV continuum, indicating that this feature originates from eta Car B itself or in close proximity to it. The strong N II emission also raises the possibility that the companion star is nitrogen rich. The observed FUV flux levels and spectral features, combined with the timing of their disappearance, are consistent with eta Carinae being a massive binary system.

  7. Detection of a Hot Binary Companion of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnebom, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Massa, D. L.; Hillier, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Observations were obtained at two epochs of the 2024-day orbit: 2003 June during ingress to the 2003.5 X-ray eclipse and 2004 April several months after egress. These data show that essentially all the far-UV flux from eta Car shortward of Lyman alpha disappeared at least two days before the start of the X-ray eclipse (2003 June 29), implying that the hot companion, eta Car B, was also eclipsed by the dense wind or extended atmosphere of eta Car A. Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. N II 1084-1086 emission disappears at the same time as the far-UV continuum, indicating that this feature originates from eta Car B itself or in close proximity to it. The strong N II emission also raises the possibility that the companion star is nitrogen rich. The observed FUV flux levels and spectral features, combined with the timing of their disappearance, is consistent with eta Carinae being a massive binary system

  8. Comparison of NOAA Experimental Forecasted Reference Evapotranspiration and Observed CIMIS Reference Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krone-Davis, P.; Melton, F. S.; Snell, H. D.; Palmer, C.; Rosevelt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Consumptive use of water through evapotranspiration from irrigated agricultural crops is one of the primary uses of water resources in California and other states in the western U.S. Information on reference evapotranspiration from agricultural weather networks is currently used by water managers and agricultural producers in water use planning and irrigation scheduling. The development of forecasts of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) offers promise for improving agricultural water management and scheduling of water deliveries, especially during the warmer summer months. The NOAA National Weather Service has developed an experimental daily Forecasted Reference Evapotranspiration (FRET) data product, which provides forecasts of ETo at lead times of up to 8-days. We present a comparison between the FRET data over the California Central Valley and observations of ETo from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), a network of 139 agricultural weather stations in California. We also present results from a comparison between FRET and the 2 km daily interpolated ETo data products from the Spatial CIMIS model over the period from September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2012.

  9. A new DSSAT-CSM evapotranspiration module: ASCE standardized reference evapotranspiration with dual crop coefficient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the DSSAT-CSM series of crop models have been used for decades, new focus has been put on improving evapotranspiration (ET) simulation in crop models. A new ET module was added to the model code to calculate potential ET, which combines the ASCE Standardized Reference ET (both grass and alf...

  10. Rainfall as proxy for evapotranspiration predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collischonn, Bruno; Collischonn, Walter

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we evaluated the relationship between evapotranspiration and precipitation, based on the data recently made available by the Brazilian Meteorological Institute. ETP tend to be lower in rainy periods and vice-versa. This relationship was assessed both in physical and statistical ways, identifying the contribution of each explaining variable of ETP. We derived regression equations between monthly rainfall and ETP, which can be useful in studies where ETP time series are not available, such as reservoir design, irrigation management and flow forecast.

  11. Nitrogen Controls on Climate Model Evapotranspiration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Robert E.; Berry, Joseph A.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Collatz, G. James; Field, Christopher B.; Fung, Inez Y.; Goulden, Michael; Hoffmann, William A.; Jackson, Robert B.; Myneni, Ranga; Sellers, Piers J.; Shaikh, Muhammad

    2002-02-01

    Most evapotranspiration over land occurs through vegetation. The fraction of net radiation balanced by evapotranspiration depends on stomatal controls. Stomates transpire water for the leaf to assimilate carbon, depending on the canopy carbon demand, and on root uptake, if it is limiting. Canopy carbon demand in turn depends on the balancing between visible photon-driven and enzyme-driven steps in the leaf carbon physiology. The enzyme-driven component is here represented by a Rubisco-related nitrogen reservoir that interacts with plant-soil nitrogen cycling and other components of a climate model. Previous canopy carbon models included in GCMs have assumed either fixed leaf nitrogen, that is, prescribed photosynthetic capacities, or an optimization between leaf nitrogen and light levels so that in either case stomatal conductance varied only with light levels and temperature.A nitrogen model is coupled to a previously derived but here modified carbon model and includes, besides the enzyme reservoir, additional plant stores for leaf structure and roots. It also includes organic and mineral reservoirs in the soil; the latter are generated, exchanged, and lost by biological fixation, deposition and fertilization, mineralization, nitrification, root uptake, denitrification, and leaching. The root nutrient uptake model is a novel and simple, but rigorous, treatment of soil transport and root physiological uptake. The other soil components are largely derived from previously published parameterizations and global budget constraints.The feasibility of applying the derived biogeochemical cycling model to climate model calculations of evapotranspiration is demonstrated through its incorporation in the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme land model and a 17-yr Atmospheric Model Inter comparison Project II integration with the NCAR CCM3 GCM. The derived global budgets show land net primary production (NPP), fine root carbon, and various aspects of the nitrogen cycling are

  12. Study of evapotranspiration and evaporation beneath the canopy in a buckwheat field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haofang; Zhang, Chuan; Oue, Hiroki; Wang, Guoqing; He, Bin

    2015-11-01

    The determination of evaporation and transpiration separately is very important in improving water use efficiency and developing exact irrigation scheduling. Hourly crop evapotranspiration ( ET c) and soil evaporation ( E g) beneath the buckwheat canopy were measured using Bowen ratio energy balance method and micro-lysimeters, respectively. The total ET c and E g in the whole growth season of buckwheat were 187.4 and 72.1 mm, respectively. Crop coefficient of buckwheat plant was simulated by days after sowing (DAS) and leaf area index (LAI), the average values for four growth stages were 0.58, 0.59, 1.10, and 0.74; and soil evaporation coefficient (the ratio of soil evaporation to reference evapotranspiration) was modeled by soil water content at 5-cm depth by dividing the LAI into two stages. The relationship between the ratio of soil evaporation to actual evapotranspiration ( E g/ ET c) and LAI was decided. It was found that E g/ ET c decreased from 1 to 0.3 with the increase in LAI.

  13. The Role of Evapotranspiration on Soil Moisture Depletion in a Small Alaskan Subarctic Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruairuen, W.; Fochesatto, G. J.; Sparrow, E. B.; Schnabel, W.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    At high latitudes the period for agriculture production is very short (110 frost-free days) and strongly depends on the availability of soil water content for vegetables to grow. In this context the evapotranspiration (ET) cycle is key variable underpinning mass and energy balance modulating therefore moisture gradients and soil dryness. Evapotranspiration (ET) from field-grown crops water stress is virtually unknown in the subarctic region. Understanding ET cycles in high latitude agricultural ecosystem is essential in terms of water management and sustainability and projection of agricultural activity. To investigate the ET cycle in farming soils a field experiment was conducted in the summer of 2012 and 2013 at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station combining micrometeorological and hydrological measurements. In this case experimental plots of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) plants were grown. The experiment evaluated several components of the ET cycle such as actual evapotranspiration, reference evaporation, pan evaporation as well as soil water content and temperature profiles to link them to the vegetable growing functions. We investigated the relationship of soil moisture content and crop water use across the growing season as a function of the ET cycle. Soil water depletion was compared to daily estimates of water loss by ET during dry and wet periods. We also investigated the dependence of ET on the atmospheric boundary layer flow patterns set by the synoptic large scale weather patterns.

  14. Estimation of the parameters of ETAS models by Simulated Annealing.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2015-02-12

    This paper proposes a new algorithm to estimate the maximum likelihood parameters of an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequences (ETAS) model. It is based on Simulated Annealing, a versatile method that solves problems of global optimization and ensures convergence to a global optimum. The procedure is tested on both simulated and real catalogs. The main conclusion is that the method performs poorly as the size of the catalog decreases because the effect of the correlation of the ETAS parameters is more significant. These results give new insights into the ETAS model and the efficiency of the maximum-likelihood method within this context.

  15. Estimation of the parameters of ETAS models by Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm to estimate the maximum likelihood parameters of an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequences (ETAS) model. It is based on Simulated Annealing, a versatile method that solves problems of global optimization and ensures convergence to a global optimum. The procedure is tested on both simulated and real catalogs. The main conclusion is that the method performs poorly as the size of the catalog decreases because the effect of the correlation of the ETAS parameters is more significant. These results give new insights into the ETAS model and the efficiency of the maximum-likelihood method within this context.

  16. Estimation of the parameters of ETAS models by Simulated Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm to estimate the maximum likelihood parameters of an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequences (ETAS) model. It is based on Simulated Annealing, a versatile method that solves problems of global optimization and ensures convergence to a global optimum. The procedure is tested on both simulated and real catalogs. The main conclusion is that the method performs poorly as the size of the catalog decreases because the effect of the correlation of the ETAS parameters is more significant. These results give new insights into the ETAS model and the efficiency of the maximum-likelihood method within this context. PMID:25673036

  17. Remote sensing of evapotranspiration using automated calibration: Development and testing in the state of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Aaron H.

    Thermal remote sensing is a powerful tool for measuring the spatial variability of evapotranspiration due to the cooling effect of vaporization. The residual method is a popular technique which calculates evapotranspiration by subtracting sensible heat from available energy. Estimating sensible heat requires aerodynamic surface temperature which is difficult to retrieve accurately. Methods such as SEBAL/METRIC correct for this problem by calibrating the relationship between sensible heat and retrieved surface temperature. Disadvantage of these calibrations are 1) user must manually identify extremely dry and wet pixels in image 2) each calibration is only applicable over limited spatial extent. Producing larger maps is operationally limited due to time required to manually calibrate multiple spatial extents over multiple days. This dissertation develops techniques which automatically detect dry and wet pixels. LANDSAT imagery is used because it resolves dry pixels. Calibrations using 1) only dry pixels and 2) including wet pixels are developed. Snapshots of retrieved evaporative fraction and actual evapotranspiration are compared to eddy covariance measurements for five study areas in Florida: 1) Big Cypress 2) Disney Wilderness 3) Everglades 4) near Gainesville, FL. 5) Kennedy Space Center. The sensitivity of evaporative fraction to temperature, available energy, roughness length and wind speed is tested. A technique for temporally interpolating evapotranspiration by fusing LANDSAT and MODIS is developed and tested. The automated algorithm is successful at detecting wet and dry pixels (if they exist). Including wet pixels in calibration and assuming constant atmospheric conductance significantly improved results for all but Big Cypress and Gainesville. Evaporative fraction is not very sensitive to instantaneous available energy but it is sensitive to temperature when wet pixels are included because temperature is required for estimating wet pixel

  18. 77 FR 35060 - Employment and Training Administration; Proposed Information Collection Request for the ETA 538...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

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  19. 76 FR 386 - Proposed Information Collection Request for the ETA 586, Interstate Arrangement for Combining...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Information Collection Request for the ETA 586, Interstate Arrangement for Combining Employment and Wages... Employment and Wages, Form ETA 586. A copy of the proposed information collection request (ICR) can be... compensation including benefits paid under the CWC arrangement. The ETA 586 report provides the ETA/Office...

  20. Adequacy of selected evapotranspiration approximations for hydrologic simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) approximations, usually based on computed potential ET (PET) and diverse PET-to-ET conceptualizations, are routinely used in hydrologic analyses. This study presents an approach to incorporate measured (actual) ET data, increasingly available using micrometeorological methods, to define the adequacy of ET approximations for hydrologic simulation. The approach is demonstrated at a site where eddy correlation-measured ET values were available. A baseline hydrologic model incorporating measured ET values was used to evaluate the sensitivity of simulated water levels, subsurface recharge, and surface runoff to error in four ET approximations. An annually invariant pattern of mean monthly vegetation coefficients was shown to be most effective, despite the substantial year-to-year variation in measured vegetation coefficients. The temporal variability of available water (precipitation minus ET) at the humid, subtropical site was largely controlled by the relatively high temporal variability of precipitation, benefiting the effectiveness of coarse ET approximations, a result that is likely to prevail at other humid sites.

  1. Combining surface reanalysis and remote sensing data for monitoring evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, M.; Tu, K.; Funk, C.; Michaelsen, J.; Williams, Pat; Williams, C.; Ardö, J.; Marie, B.; Cappelaere, B.; Grandcourt, A.; Nickless, A.; Noubellon, Y.; Scholes, R.; Kutsch, W.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact on the world's poor. In the Sahel, a climatically sensitive region where rain-fed agriculture is the primary livelihood, expected decreases in water supply will increase food insecurity. Studies on climate change and the intensification of the water cycle in sub-Saharan Africa are few. This is due in part to poor calibration of modeled actual evapotranspiration (AET), a key input in continental-scale hydrologic models. In this study, a model driven by dynamic canopy AET was combined with the Global Land Data Assimilation System realization of the NOAH Land Surface Model (GNOAH) wet canopy and soil AET for monitoring purposes in sub-Saharan Africa. The performance of the hybrid model was compared against AET from the GNOAH model and dynamic model using eight eddy flux towers representing major biomes of sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvements in model performance are at humid sites with dense vegetation, while performance at semi-arid sites is poor, but better than individual models. The reduction in errors using the hybrid model can be attributed to the integration of a dynamic vegetation component with land surface model estimates, improved model parameterization, and reduction of multiplicative effects of uncertain data.

  2. Evapotranspiration and microclimate at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site in northwestern Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; DeVries, M.P.; Sturrock, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    From July 1982 through June 1984, a study was made of the microclimate and evapotranspiration at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Bureau County, Illinois. Vegetation at the site consists of mixed pasture grasses, primarily brome (Bromus inermis) and red clover (Trifoleum pratense). Three methods were used to estimate evapotranspiration: (1) an energy-budget with the Bowen ratio, (2) an aerodynamic-profile, and (3) a soil-based water-budget. For the aerodynamic-profile method, sensible-heat flux was estimated by a profile equation and evapotranspiration was then calculated as the residual in the energy-balance equation. Estimates by the energy-budget and aerodynamic-profile methods were computed from hourly data, then summed by days and months. Yearly estimates for March through November, by these methods, were quite close--648 and 626 millimeters, respectively. Daily estimates range up to a maximum of about 6 millimeters. The water-budget method produced only monthly estimates based on weekly or biweekly soil-moisture content measurements. The yearly evapotranspiration estimated by this method (which actually included only the months of April through October) was 655 millimeters. The March-through-November average for the three methods of 657 millimeters was equivalent to 70 percent of precipitation. Continuous measurements were made of incoming and reflected shortwave radiation, incoming and emitted longwave radiation, net radiation, soil-heat flux, soil temperature, horizontal windspeed, and wet- and dry-bulb air temperature. Windspeed and air temperature were measured at heights of 0.5 and 2.0 meters (and also at 1.0 meter after September 1983). Soil-moisture content of the soil zone was measured with a gamma-attenuation gage. Annual precipitation (938 millimeters) and average temperature (10.8 degrees Celsius) were virtually identical to long-term averages from nearby National Weather Service stations. Solar radiation averaged 65

  3. Seasonal evapotranspiration patterns in mangrove forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Jordan G.; DeLonge, Marcia S.; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2014-04-01

    Diurnal and seasonal controls on water vapor fluxes were investigated in a subtropical mangrove forest in Everglades National Park, Florida. Energy partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes was highly variable during the 2004-2005 study period. During the dry season, the mangrove forest behaved akin to a semiarid ecosystem as most of the available energy was partitioned into sensible heat, which gave Bowen ratio values exceeding 1.0 and minimum latent heat fluxes of 5 MJ d-1. In contrast, during the wet season the mangrove forest acted as a well-watered, broadleaved deciduous forest, with Bowen ratio values of 0.25 and latent heat fluxes reaching 18 MJ d-1. During the dry season, high salinity levels (> 30 parts per thousand, ppt) caused evapotranspiration to decline and correspondingly resulted in reduced canopy conductance. From multiple linear regression, daily average canopy conductance to water vapor declined with increasing salinity, vapor pressure deficit, and daily sums of solar irradiance but increased with air temperature and friction velocity. Using these relationships, appropriately modified Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor models reliably reproduced seasonal trends in daily evapotranspiration. Such numerical models, using site-specific parameters, are crucial for constructing seasonal water budgets, constraining hydrological models, and driving regional climate models over mangrove forests.

  4. National Weather Service Forecast Reference Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, H. D.; Palmer, C. K.; Krone-Davis, P.; Melton, F. S.; Hobbins, M.

    2013-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS), Weather Forecasting Offices (WFOs) are producing daily reference evapotranspiration (ETrc) forecasts or FRET across the Western Region and in other selected locations since 2009, using the Penman - Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration equation for a short canopy (12 cm grasses), adopted by the Environmental Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE-EWRI, 2004). The sensitivity of these daily calculations to fluctuations in temperatures, humidity, winds, and sky cover allows forecasters with knowledge of local terrain and weather patterns to better forecast in the ETrc inputs. The daily FRET product then evolved into a suite of products, including a weekly ETrc forecast for better water planning and a tabular point forecast for easy ingest into local water management-models. The ETrc forecast product suite allows water managers, the agricultural community, and the public to make more informed water-use decisions. These products permit operational planning, especially with the impending drought across much of the West. For example, the California Department of Water Resources not only ingests the FRET into their soil moisture models, but uses the FRET calculations when determining the reservoir releases in the Sacramento and American Rivers. We will also focus on the expansion of FRET verification, which compares the daily FRET to the observations of ETo from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) across California's Central Valley for the 2012 water year.

  5. Albedo Accuracy Impact On Evapotranspiration Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattar, C.; Franch, B.; Sobrino, J. A.; Corbari, C.; Jimenez-Munoz, J. C.; Olivera, L.; Skerbaba, D.; Soria, G.; Oltra-Carrio, R.; Julien, Y.; Manchini, M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we analyze the influence of estimating the land surface albedo directly from the surface reflectance or through the BRDF integration in the estimation of energy balance components such as the net radiation, latent and heat flux and consequently in the land surface evapotranspiration. To this end, we processed remote sensing and in-situ meteorological data measured at the agricultural test site of Barrax in the framework of Earth Observation: optical Data calibration and Information eXtraction (EODIX) project. Remote sensing images were acquisitioned for different View Zenith Angles (VZA) by the Airborne Hyperspectral Images (AHS). Results have shown that albedo estimations derived from BRDF model present stability through every image while albedo estimations using single reflectance presented high variation depending on the VZA. The highest difference was observed in the backward scattering direction along the hot spot region obtaining a RMSE of 0.11 through the AHS image which implied a relative error of 65%. This work has analyzed the error committed by many evapotranspiration studies that assume the surface as Lambertian and estimate the albedo from a surface reflectance weighted average.

  6. Satellite-based monitoring of cotton evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalezios, Nicolas; Dercas, Nicholas; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    Water for agricultural use represents the largest share among all water uses. Vulnerability in agriculture is influenced, among others, by extended periods of water shortage in regions exposed to droughts. Advanced technological approaches and methodologies, including remote sensing, are increasingly incorporated for the assessment of irrigation water requirements. In this paper, remote sensing techniques are integrated for the estimation and monitoring of crop evapotranspiration ETc. The study area is Thessaly central Greece, which is a drought-prone agricultural region. Cotton fields in a small agricultural sub-catchment in Thessaly are used as an experimental site. Daily meteorological data and weekly field data are recorded throughout seven (2004-2010) growing seasons for the computation of reference evapotranspiration ETo, crop coefficient Kc and cotton crop ETc based on conventional data. Satellite data (Landsat TM) for the corresponding period are processed to estimate cotton crop coefficient Kc and cotton crop ETc and delineate its spatiotemporal variability. The methodology is applied for monitoring Kc and ETc during the growing season in the selected sub-catchment. Several error statistics are used showing very good agreement with ground-truth observations.

  7. Estimating seasonal evapotranspiration from temporal satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Liu, Shu-Guang; Tieszen, Larry L.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Verma, Shashi B.

    2012-01-01

    Estimating seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) has many applications in water resources planning and management, including hydrological and ecological modeling. Availability of satellite remote sensing images is limited due to repeat cycle of satellite or cloud cover. This study was conducted to determine the suitability of different methods namely cubic spline, fixed, and linear for estimating seasonal ET from temporal remotely sensed images. Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model in conjunction with the wet METRIC (wMETRIC), a modified version of the METRIC model, was used to estimate ET on the days of satellite overpass using eight Landsat images during the 2001 crop growing season in Midwest USA. The model-estimated daily ET was in good agreement (R2 = 0.91) with the eddy covariance tower-measured daily ET. The standard error of daily ET was 0.6 mm (20%) at three validation sites in Nebraska, USA. There was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) among the cubic spline, fixed, and linear methods for computing seasonal (July–December) ET from temporal ET estimates. Overall, the cubic spline resulted in the lowest standard error of 6 mm (1.67%) for seasonal ET. However, further testing of this method for multiple years is necessary to determine its suitability.

  8. Dynamic Modeling of an Evapotranspiration Cap

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Steven Piet; Rafael Soto; Gerald Sehlke; Harold Heydt; John Visser

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is scheduled to design and install hundreds of landfill caps/barriers over the next several decades and these caps will have a design life expectancy of up to 1,000 years. Other landfill caps with 30 year design lifetimes are reaching the end of their original design life; the changes to these caps need to be understood to provide a basis for lifetime extension. Defining the attributes that make a successful cap (one that isolates the waste from the environment) is crucial to these efforts. Because cap systems such as landfill caps are dynamic in nature, it is impossible to understand, monitor, and update lifetime predictions without understanding the dynamics of cap degradation, which is most often due to multiple interdependent factors rather than isolated independent events. In an attempt to understand the dynamics of cap degradation, a computer model using system dynamics is being developed to capture the complex behavior of an evapotranspiration cap. The specific objectives of this project are to capture the dynamic, nonlinear feedback loop structures underlying an evapotranspiration cap and, through computer simulation, gain a better understanding of long-term behavior, influencing factors, and, ultimately, long-term cap performance.

  9. Landfill Gas Effects on Evapotranspirative Landfill Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, M. A.; Mattson, E.; Ankeny, M.; Kelsey, J.

    2005-05-01

    The performance of an evapotranspirative landfill cover can be adversely affected by transport of landfill gases to the plant root zone. Healthy plant communities are critical to the success and effectiveness of these vegetated landfill covers. Poor vegetative cover can result in reduced transpiration, increased percolation, and increased erosion regardless of the thickness of the cover. Visual inspections of landfill covers indicate that vegetation-free areas are not uncommon at municipal waste landfills. Data from soil profiles beneath these areas suggest that anaerobic conditions in the plant-rooting zone are controlling plant distribution. On the same landfill, aerobic conditions exist at similar depths beneath well-vegetated areas. The movement of methane and carbon dioxide, generated by degradation of organic wastes, into the overlying soil cover displaces oxygen in the root zone. Monitoring data from landfills in semi-arid areas indicate that barometric pumping can result in hours of anaerobic conditions in the root zone. Microbial consumption of oxygen in the root zone reduces the amount of oxygen available for plant root respiration but consumption of oxygen and methane also produce water as a reaction byproduct. This biogenic water production can be on the order of centimeters of water per year which, while increasing water availability, also has a negative feedback on transport of landfill gases through the cover. Accounting for these processes can improve evapotranspirative landfill cover design at other sites.

  10. Evaluation of different methods to estimate daily reference evapotranspiration in ungauged basins in Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro Fontoura, Jessica; Allasia, Daniel; Herbstrith Froemming, Gabriel; Freitas Ferreira, Pedro; Tassi, Rutineia

    2016-04-01

    Evapotranspiration is a key process of hydrological cycle and a sole term that links land surface water balance and land surface energy balance. Due to the higher information requirements of the Penman-Monteith method and the existing data uncertainty, simplified empirical methods for calculating potential and actual evapotranspiration are widely used in hydrological models. This is especially important in Brazil, where the monitoring of meteorological data is precarious. In this study were compared different methods for estimating evapotranspiration for Rio Grande do Sul, the Southernmost State of Brazil, aiming to suggest alternatives to the recommended method (Penman-Monteith-FAO 56) for estimate daily reference evapotranspiration (ETo) when meteorological data is missing or not available. The input dataset included daily and hourly-observed data from conventional and automatic weather stations respectively maintained by the National Weather Institute of Brazil (INMET) from the period of 1 January 2007 to 31 January 2010. Dataset included maximum temperature (Tmax, °C), minimum temperature (Tmin, °C), mean relative humidity (%), wind speed at 2 m height (u2, m s-1), daily solar radiation (Rs, MJ m- 2) and atmospheric pressure (kPa) that were grouped at daily time-step. Was tested the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Penman-Monteith method (PM) at its full form, against PM assuming missing several variables not normally available in Brazil in order to calculate daily reference ETo. Missing variables were estimated as suggested in FAO56 publication or from climatological means. Furthermore, PM was also compared against the following simplified empirical methods: Hargreaves-Samani, Priestley-Taylor, Mccloud, McGuiness-Bordne, Romanenko, Radiation-Temperature, Tanner-Pelton. The statistical analysis indicates that even if just Tmin and Tmax are available, it is better to use PM estimating missing variables from syntetic data than

  11. Evaluation of alternative methods for estimating reference evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration is an important component in water-balance and irrigation scheduling models. While the FAO-56 Penman-Monteith method has become the de facto standard for estimating reference evapotranspiration (ETo), it is a complex method requiring several weather parameters. Required weather ...

  12. Prediction of the Reference Evapotranspiration Using a Chaotic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-guang; Zou, Shan; Luo, Zhao-hui; Zhang, Wei; Kong, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the most important hydrological variables in the context of water resources management. An attempt was made to understand and predict the dynamics of reference evapotranspiration from a nonlinear dynamical perspective in this study. The reference evapotranspiration data was calculated using the FAO Penman-Monteith equation with the observed daily meteorological data for the period 1966–2005 at four meteorological stations (i.e., Baotou, Zhangbei, Kaifeng, and Shaoguan) representing a wide range of climatic conditions of China. The correlation dimension method was employed to investigate the chaotic behavior of the reference evapotranspiration series. The existence of chaos in the reference evapotranspiration series at the four different locations was proved by the finite and low correlation dimension. A local approximation approach was employed to forecast the daily reference evapotranspiration series. Low root mean square error (RSME) and mean absolute error (MAE) (for all locations lower than 0.31 and 0.24, resp.), high correlation coefficient (CC), and modified coefficient of efficiency (for all locations larger than 0.97 and 0.8, resp.) indicate that the predicted reference evapotranspiration agrees well with the observed one. The encouraging results indicate the suitableness of chaotic approach for understanding and predicting the dynamics of the reference evapotranspiration. PMID:25133221

  13. Evapotranspiration information reporting: I. Factors governing measurement accuracy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More and more evapotranspiration (ET) models, ET crop coefficients, and associated measurements of ET are being reported in the literature and used to develop, calibrate, and test important ET process models. Evapotranspiration data are derived from a range of measurement systems including lysimeter...

  14. {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta} Prime {yields}{eta}{gamma}{gamma}: A primer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, Rafel

    2012-10-23

    The electromagnetic rare decays {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} are analysed for the first time and their predicted branching ratios given. The vector meson exchange dominant contribution is treated using Vector Meson Dominance and the scalar component is estimated by means of the Linear Sigma Model. The agreement between our calculation and the measurement of the related process {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} is a check of the procedure. Scalar meson effects are seen to be irrelevant for {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}, while a significant scalar contribution due to the {sigma}(500) resonance seems to emerge in the case of {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}. Future measurements coming from KLOE-2, Crystal Ball, WASA, and BES-III will elucidate if any of these processes carry an important scalar contribution or they are simply driven by the exchange of vector mesons.

  15. Measurement of prominent eta-decay branching fractions.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A; Mehrabyan, S; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Ernst, J; Ecklund, K M; Severini, H; Love, W; Savinov, V

    2007-09-21

    The decay psi(2S) --> etaJ/psi is used to measure, for the first time, all prominent eta-meson branching fractions with the same experiment in the same dataset, thereby providing a consistent treatment of systematics across branching fractions. We present results for eta decays to gamma gamma, pi(+)pi(-)pi(0), 3pi(0), pi(+)pi(-)gamma and e(+)e(-)gamma, accounting for 99.9% of all eta decays. The precision of several of the branching fractions and their ratios is improved. Two channels, pi(+)pi(-)gamma and e(+)e(-)gamma, show results that differ at the level of three standard deviations from those previously determined.

  16. Rare Eta Decays with a TPC for Optical Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramberg, Erik; Redtop Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The eta meson is almost unique in the particle universe since it is a Goldstone boson and the dynamics of its decay are strongly constrained. Because the eta has no charge, decays that violate conservation laws can occur without interfering with a corresponding current. The integrated eta meson samples collected in earlier experiments have been less than 108 events, limiting considerably the search for such rare decays. A new experiment, REDTOP, is being proposed at the proton booster of Fermilab with the intent of collecting more than 1012 triggers/year for studies of rare eta decays. Such statistics are sufficient for investigating several symmetry violations, and for searches for new particles beyond the Standard Model. The physics program, the accelerators system, and the detector for REDTOP will be discussed.

  17. Measurement of the /eta/ parameter in /mu//sup +/ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Bossingham, R.R.

    1989-04-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on the muon plus decay; muon decay spectrum; previous determinations of /eta/; experimental apparatus; distortions of the spectrum; and data analysis and results. 31 figs. (LSP)

  18. Eta bound states in nuclei: a probe of flavour-singlet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Steven D. Bass; Anthony W. Thomas

    2005-07-01

    We argue that eta bound states in nuclei are sensitive to the singlet component in the eta. The bigger the singlet component, the more attraction and the greater the binding. Thus, measurements of eta bound states will yield new information about axial U(1) dynamics and glue in mesons. Eta - etaprime mixing plays an important role in understanding the value of the eta-nucleon scattering length.

  19. Effects of spatial variability and scale on areal -average evapotranspiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of spatial variability and scale on areally-averaged evapotranspiration. A spatially-distributed water and energy balance model is employed to determine the effect of explicit patterns of model parameters and atmospheric forcing on modeled areally-averaged evapotranspiration over a range of increasing spatial scales. The analysis is performed from the local scale to the catchment scale. The study area is King's Creek catchment, an 11.7 sq km watershed located on the native tallgrass prairie of Kansas. The dominant controls on the scaling behavior of catchment-average evapotranspiration are investigated by simulation, as is the existence of a threshold scale for evapotranspiration modeling, with implications for explicit versus statistical representation of important process controls. It appears that some of our findings are fairly general, and will therefore provide a framework for understanding the scaling behavior of areally-averaged evapotranspiration at the catchment and larger scales.

  20. Spectrophotometric Time Series of eta Carinae's Great Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Matheson, Thomas; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Walborn, Nolan; Welch, Doug

    2013-02-01

    eta Carinae (eta Car) is one of the most massive binaries in the Milky Way teDH97, and its expanding circumstellar nebula has been studied in detail teSmith06. It was seen as the second brightest star in the sky during its 1800s ``Great Eruption'' (GE), but only visual estimates of its brightness were recorded teSF11. In 2011 we discovered several light echoes (LEs) which appear to be from the 1838-1858 eta Car eruptions teRest12_eta. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) teRest12_eta. These differences between the GE and the extragalactic transients presumed to be its analogues raise questions about traditional scenarios for the outburst and warrant continued monitoring of its echoes. We propose to obtain a spectrophotometric time series of the GE from it different directions, allowing the original eruption of eta Car to be studied as a function of time as well as latitude. A detailed spectroscopic study of the LEs of eta Car could help us understand (episodic) mass- loss in the most massive evolved stars and their connection to the most energetic core-collapse supernovae that are being discovered in synoptic surveys. Very recently (September 2012), a SN impostor discovered in 2009 (SN 2009ip) was observed to transition to a real SN explosion teSmith12. This discovery highlights the importance of studying eta Car's GE in great detail.

  1. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  2. The 1981 mass-loss phase of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidelman, William P.; Galen, Tamara A.; Wallerstein, George

    1993-07-01

    A visual-region coude spectrogram of Eta Carinae taken in 1981 May is described, and the portion of the spectrum containing H-alpha is reproduced. This was taken during one of Eta Car's 'abnormal' stages, which have been suggested by Zanella et al. (1984) to be times of large mass loss from this unique object. The 1981 spectrum is compared with the 'normal' spectrum as observed in 1985.

  3. Seasonal contributions of vegetation types to suburban evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Emily B.; Hiller, Rebecca V.; McFadden, Joseph P.

    2011-03-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important term of energy and water budgets in urban areas and is responsible for multiple ecosystem services provided by urban vegetation. The spatial heterogeneity of urban surface types with different seasonal water use patterns (e.g., trees and turfgrass lawns) complicates efforts to predict and manage urban evapotranspiration rates, necessitating a surface type, or component-based, approach. In a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States, we simultaneously measured ecosystem evapotranspiration and its main component fluxes using eddy covariance and heat dissipation sap flux techniques to assess the relative contribution of plant functional types (evergreen needleleaf tree, deciduous broadleaf tree, cool season turfgrass) to seasonal and spatial variations in evapotranspiration. Component-based evapotranspiration estimates agreed well with measured water vapor fluxes, although the imbalance between methods varied seasonally from a 20% overestimate in spring to an 11% underestimate in summer. Turfgrasses represented the largest contribution to annual evapotranspiration in recreational and residential land use types (87% and 64%, respectively), followed by trees (10% and 31%, respectively), with the relative contribution of plant functional types dependent on their fractional cover and daily water use. Recreational areas had higher annual evapotranspiration than residential areas (467 versus 324 mm yr-1, respectively) and altered seasonal patterns of evapotranspiration due to greater turfgrass cover (74% versus 34%, respectively). Our results suggest that plant functional types capture much of the variability required to predict the seasonal patterns of evapotranspiration among cities, as well as differences in evapotranspiration that could result from changes in climate, land use, or vegetation composition.

  4. Measurement of {eta} meson decays into lepton-antilepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J.; Zabierowski, J.; Bargholtz, Chr.; Geren, L.; Lindberg, K.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Bashkanov, M.; Clement, H.; Meier, R.; Skorodko, T.; Wagner, G. J.; Bogoslawsky, D.; Ivanov, G.; Jiganov, E.; Kuznetsov, A.; Morosov, B.; Petukhov, Y.; Povtorejko, A.

    2008-02-01

    A search for rare lepton decays of the {eta} meson was performed using the WASA detector at CELSIUS. Two candidates for double Dalitz decay {eta}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -} events are reported with a background of 1.3{+-}0.2 events. This allows to set an upper limit to the branching ratio of 9.7x10{sup -5} (90% CL). The branching ratio for the decay {eta}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma} is determined to (7.8{+-}0.5{sub stat}{+-}0.8{sub syst})x10{sup -3} in agreement with world average value. An upper limit (90% CL) for the branching ratio for the {eta}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} decay is 2.7x10{sup -5} and a limit for the sum of the {eta}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays is 3.6x10{sup -4}.

  5. Regional fuzzy chain model for evapotranspiration estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güçlü, Yavuz Selim; Subyani, Ali M.; Şen, Zekai

    2017-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the main hydrological cycle components that has extreme importance for water resources management and agriculture especially in arid and semi-arid regions. In this study, regional ET estimation models based on the fuzzy logic (FL) principles are suggested, where the first stage includes the ET calculation via Penman-Monteith equation, which produces reliable results. In the second phase, ET estimations are produced according to the conventional FL inference system model. In this paper, regional fuzzy model (RFM) and regional fuzzy chain model (RFCM) are proposed through the use of adjacent stations' data in order to fill the missing ones. The application of the two models produces reliable and satisfactory results for mountainous and sea region locations in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, but comparatively RFCM estimations have more accuracy. In general, the mean absolute percentage error is less than 10%, which is acceptable in practical applications.

  6. Estimating evapotranspiration in natural and constructed wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lott, R. Brandon; Hunt, Randall J.

    2001-01-01

    Difficulties in accurately calculating evapotranspiration (ET) in wetlands can lead to inaccurate water balances—information important for many compensatory mitigation projects. Simple meteorological methods or off-site ET data often are used to estimate ET, but these approaches do not include potentially important site-specific factors such as plant community, root-zone water levels, and soil properties. The objective of this study was to compare a commonly used meterological estimate of potential evapotranspiration (PET) with direct measurements of ET (lysimeters and water-table fluctuations) and small-scale root-zone geochemistry in a natural and constructed wetland system. Unlike what has been commonly noted, the results of the study demonstrated that the commonly used Penman combination method of estimating PET underestimated the ET that was measured directly in the natural wetland over most of the growing season. This result is likely due to surface heterogeneity and related roughness efffects not included in the simple PET estimate. The meterological method more closely approximated season-long measured ET rates in the constructed wetland but may overestimate the ET rate late in the growing season. ET rates also were temporally variable in wetlands over a range of time scales because they can be influenced by the relation of the water table to the root zone and the timing of plant senescence. Small-scale geochemical sampling of the shallow root zone was able to provide an independent evaluation of ET rates, supporting the identification of higher ET rates in the natural wetlands and differences in temporal ET rates due to the timing of senescence. These discrepancies illustrate potential problems with extrapolating off-site estimates of ET or single measurements of ET from a site over space or time.

  7. Mapping Evapotranspiration in Hawai';i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giambelluca, T. W.; Shuai, X.; Barnes, M.; Longman, R. J.; Miura, T.; Chen, Q.; Alliss, R. J.; Frazier, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrological cycle in Hawai';i determines the timing and amount of water flows that affect aquatic and near-shore marine ecosystems, and provides water for domestic and industrial uses. Rainfall and fog interception are the principal water sources, while evaporation and transpiration reduce the amount available for streamflow and groundwater recharge. Evapotranspiration (ET) is controlled by climate, vegetation, soil, and water availability, and hence is highly variable in space and time. Understanding of the magnitude and variability of ET is essential for protecting Hawai';i's ecosystems and planning for water resource development and utilization. In this study, ET was estimated at high spatial resolution (250 m), for each hour of the mean diurnal cycle of each month, using the Penman-Monteith approach. Soil evaporation, wet canopy evaporation, and transpiration were estimated separately and summed to get ET. Solar and net radiation were estimated using cloudiness and surface characteristics from satellite remote sensing, clear-sky radiation simulations, and ground-based observations. Other spatial data sets developed or acquired for use in estimating ET included air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, soil moisture, fractional canopy wetness, fractional vegetation cover, vegetation height, leaf area index, land cover type, and maximum stomatal conductance. More than 12,000 digital maps were produced of climate and hydrological variables in including evapotranspiration and its components. Results show that across the State of Hawai';i mean annual solar radiation varies from 130 to 296 W m-2. Low solar radiation is found along cloudy windward slopes below the trade-wind inversion level and in terrain-shaded valleys, while the highest values occur at the high mountain summits of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. ET has a complex spatial pattern reflecting variations in net radiation, moisture availability, and vegetation characteristics. With a few exceptions

  8. Evidence for the eta_b(1S) in the Decay Upsilon(2S)-> gamma eta_b(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-14

    We have performed a search for the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6 million {Upsilon}(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 610.5{sub -4.3}{sup +4.5}(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) MeV, corresponding to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9392.9{sub -4.8}{sup +4.6}(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for the decay {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S) is determined to be (4.2{sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(syst)) x 10{sup -4}. The ratio {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S))/{Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S)) = 0.89{sub -0.23}{sup +0.25}(stat){sub -0.16}{sup +0.12}(syst) is consistent with the ratio expected for magnetic dipole transitions to the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson.

  9. A non-Mendelian factor, [eta(+)], causes lethality of yeast omnipotent-suppressor strains.

    PubMed

    Liebman, S W; All-Robyn, J A

    1984-10-01

    Omnipotent suppressors cause translational ambiguity and have been associated with poor growth and inviability. We now report that a non-Mendelian element, [eta(+)], causes this inviability. In [eta(-)] strains the suppressors are not inviable. The [eta(+)] genetic element segregates to about 70% of the meiotic progeny, although almost all of the spores probably have the [eta(+)] phenotype for the first few divisions. Growth on 5 mM guanidine hydrochloride efficiently causes [eta(+)] strains to become [eta(-)]. The [eta(+)] factor has many similarities with the previously described [psi(+)] factor (Cox 1965, 1971). However, [eta(+)] and [psi(+)] differ in their patterns of inheritance, and by the fact that [psi(+)] affects ochre specific and not omnipotent suppressors, while the converse is true of [eta(+)].

  10. Study of Climate effect on evapotranspiration change procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asady, A.; Sharifan, H.

    2009-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the most important of parameters in water cycle. This parameter changes in climate different conditions. In this manner the probability of ET is important for design of irrigation systems. This study investigated climate effect on evapotranspiration changes procedure. Thus ET was estimated by Hargreaves-Samani (H-S) method in the some of regions: Gorgan(semi wet,), Gonbad (semi dry) , Maraveh-Tappeh (semi dry to dry). Then diagrams of ET were drawn for different probabilities. Investigation shown that if climate was drier, irrigation periods increased and difference of ET averages decreased. Keyword : Evapotranspiration, Probability, Hargreave-Samani method, Climate, water use.

  11. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: FY 1988 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Thiede, M.E.; Evans, R.D.; Downs, J.L.; Waugh, W.J.

    1990-05-01

    In FY 1988, evapotranspiration studies in support of the Protective Barrier Development Program focused on developing instruments to measure evapotranspiration and on conducting natural analog studies. This report describes a has exchange chamber being developed that will control internal temperature and relative humidity to simulate outdoor conditions. This device will measure evapotranspiration rates unambiguously from any surface and measure carbon dioxide exchange rates, which will provide information on plant growth processes. The report also describes ecophysiological experiments that were conducted to determine water and carbon dynamics of shrubs. 5 refs., 24 figs.

  12. Image of the Eta Carinae Nebula Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This image is an x-ray view of Eta Carinae Nebula showing bright stars taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. The Eta Carinae Nebula is a large and complex cloud of gas, crisscrossed with dark lanes of dust, some 6,500 light years from Earth. Buried deep in this cloud are many bright young stars and a very peculiar variable star. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  13. Potential Evapotranspiration Trends over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maske, B. B.; Goncalves, L.

    2013-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key variable for energy and mass flux estimation from the land surface, and consequent water balance over regional to global scales. It also affects the atmosphere dynamics from weather to climate scales due to its link between the hydrological and energy cycles. Many studies investigating global ET trends have found a consistently positive signal in the period between 1982-1997 followed by a decline until 2008, which proved consistent with the acceleration of the hydrological cycle, caused by the global increase of temperature and radiative forcing. The large El nino in 1998, for instance, resulted in a negative trend of ET due in part to the limitation of soil moisture availability. However some researchers emphasize the importance of treating ET trends regionally and thus already found two distinct scenarios with inclusion of the regional dimension of evapotranspiration drivers for global studies: one where ET decreases following decreasing in pan evaporation in regions with ample supply of water and, the other scenario with a positive trend in observed ET following decreasing in pan evaporation, with indication of the latter being induced only by the tendency of precipitation. Studies about ET trend in the western United States, using data from the hydrologic model Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC), also found significant seasonal variations associated with changes of temperature, snow accumulation and melting. Moreover, Canada researchers indicate strong correlation between ET variations and temperature, although temperature alone can not be related to changes of ET, since it not considers the heat flux in soil and cycles of freezing and melting of snow. Considering the importance of understanding variations of ET regionally, this study aims to analyze ET trends over South America. The data used are potential evapotranspiration estimated by the Penman-Monteith method, computed using data from meteorological stations for the

  14. Evapotranspiration parameterizations at a grass site in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizou, M.; Sumner, David M.; Nnadi, F.

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the fact that grasslands account for about 40% of the ice-free global terrestrial land cover, their contribution to the surface exchanges of energy and water in local and regional scale is so far uncertain. In this study, the sensitivity of evapotranspiration (ET) and other energy fluxes to wetness variables, namely the volumetric Soil Water Content (SWC) and Antecedent Precipitation Index (API), over a non-irrigated grass site in Central Florida, USA (28.049 N, 81.400 W) were investigated. Eddy correlation and soil water content measurements were taken by USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) at the grass study site, within 100 m of a SFWMD (South Florida Water Management District) weather station. The soil is composed of fine sands and it is mainly covered by Paspalum notatum (bahia grass). Variable soil wetness conditions with API bounds of about 2 to 160 mm and water table levels of 0.03 to 1.22 m below ground surface, respectively, were observed throughout the year 2004. The Bowen ratio exhibited an average of 1 and values larger than 2 during few dry days. The daytime average ET was classified into two stages, first stage (energy-limited) and second stage (water- limited) based on the water availability. The critical values of API and SWC were found to be about 56 mm and 0.17 respectively, with the second one being approximately 33% of the SWC at saturation. The ET values estimated by the simple Priestley-Taylor (PT) method were compared to the actual values. The PT coefficient varied from a low bound of approximately 0.4 to a peak of 1.21. Simple relationships for the PT empirical factor were employed in terms of SWC and API to improve the accuracy of the second stage observations. The results of the ET parameterizations closely match eddy-covariance flux values on daily and longer time steps.

  15. Tracing the wind interface of the massive binary Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Krister

    2007-07-01

    The binarity of Eta Carinae has been debated for a long time, but most recent evidence favors a binary star interpretation. However, very little is known about the nature of the companion star. Over Eta Carinae's spectroscopic period many observable wind lines in the NUV/Optical region, have been shown to exhibit peculiar line profiles with unusual velocity shifts relative to the system velocity. Some of the lines are exclusively blue-shifted over the entire 5.54 yr cycle and their ionization/excitation imply formation in the interface between the two massive stars. Especially, the He I emission lines are mainly formed in the wind interface region. Since the wind momentum is much larger for the primary star than its companion, the wind interface is located fairly close to the companion. Consequently, by tracing the He I emission we can construct a radial velocity curve that will describe the motion of the companion star and will derive the relation between the masses of the binary system stars. Furthermore, we will measure velocity and intensity variations in H I and Fe II to further investigate the ionization/excitation structure throughout Eta Carinae's wind. The analysis of the central source of Eta Carinae, due to the closeness of the two stars in the binary system {30 AU} and the intervening matter in line-of-sight towards Eta Carinae, is extremely dependent on data obtained with high angular resolving power. The HST archival data is crucial for the continuance of this project.

  16. Searching for Radial Velocity Variations in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Gull, T. R.; Ivarsson, S.; Nielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (see poster by Sonneborn et al.). Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. The N II 1084-86 emission feature indicates that the star may be nitrogen rich. The FUV continuum and the S IV 1073 P-Cygni wind line suggest that the effective temperature of eta Car B is at least 25,000 K. FUV spectra of eta Carinae were obtained with the FUSE satellite at 9 epochs between 2000 February and 2005 July. The data consists of 12 observations taken with the LWRS aperture (30x30 arcsec), three with the HIRS aperture (1.25x20 arcsec), and one MRDS aperture (4x20 arcsec). In this paper we discuss the analysis of these spectra to search for radial velocity variations associated with the 5.54-year binary orbit of Eta Car AB.

  17. Spatially distributed evapotranspiration and recharge estimation for sand regions of Hungary in the context of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Péter; Kalicz, Péter; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Water balance of sand regions of Hungary was analysed using remote-sensing based evapotranspiration (ET) maps (1*1 km spatial resolution) by CREMAP model over the 2000-2008 period. The mean annual (2000-2008) net groundwater recharge (R) estimated as the difference in mean annual precipitation (P) and ET, taking advantage that for sand regions the surface runoff is commonly negligible. For the examined nine-year period (2000-2008) the ET and R were about 90 percent and 10 percent of the P. The mean annual ET and R were analysed in the context of land cover types. A Budyko-model was used in spatially-distributed mode for the climate change impact analysis. The parameters of the Budyko-model (α) was calculated for pixels without surplus water. For the extra-water affected pixels a linear model with β-parameters (actual evapotranspiration / pan-evapotranspiration) was used. These parameter maps can be used for evaluating future ET and R in spatially-distributed mode (1*1 km resolution). By using the two parameter maps (α and β) and data of regional climate models (mean annual temperature and precipitation) evapotranspiration and net groundwater recharge projections have been done for three future periods (2011-2040, 2041-2070, 2071-2100). The expected ET and R changes have been determined relative to a reference period (1981-2010). According to the projections, by the end of the 21th century, ET may increase while in case of R a heavy decrease can be detected for the sand regions of Hungary. This research has been supported by Agroclimate.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project. Keywords: evapotranspiration, net groundwater recharge, climate change, Budyko-model

  18. Water Footprint of a Super-intensive Olive Grove Under Mediterranean Climate using Ground-based Evapotranspiration Measurements and Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, A. M.; Paço, T. A.; Silvestre, J. C.; Gonzalez, L. F.; Santos, F. L.; Pereira, L. S.

    2012-04-01

    measurements were used to calculate water footprint instead of the common procedure (using evapotranspiration estimates), this might have also introduced some differences. The potential of using remote sensing techniques for the assessment of water footprint of crops has been discussed in recent literature. It can provide estimates of actual evapotranspiration, of precipitation, of surface runoff and of irrigation needs when associated with modelling. In this study we further compare the water footprint estimates using in situ evapotranspiration measurements and water footprint estimates using remote sensing techniques. A comparison with the irrigation records for this particular olive orchard will be used to validate the approaches.

  19. The hysteretic evapotranspiration - vapor pressure deficit relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.; Yang, D.

    2013-12-01

    Diurnal hysteresis between evapotranspiration (ET) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was reported in many ecosystems but justification for its onset and magnitude remain incomplete with biotic and abiotic factors invoked as possible explanations. To place these explanations within a mathematical framework, ';rate-dependent' hysteresis originating from a phase angle difference between periodic input and output time series is first considered. Lysimeter evaporation (E) measurements from wet bare soils and model calculations using the Penman equation demonstrate that the E-VPD hysteresis emerges without any biotic effects due to a phase angle difference (or time lag) between net radiation the main driver of E, and VPD. Modulations originating from biotic effects on the ET-VPD hysteresis were then considered. The phase angle difference representation earlier employed was mathematically transformed into a storage problem and applied to the soil-plant system. The transformed system shows that soil moisture storage within the root zone can produce an ET-VPD hysteresis prototypical of those generated by phase-angle differences. To explore the interplay between all the lags in the soil-plant-atmosphere system and phase angle differences among forcing and response variables, a detailed soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC) model was developed and applied to a grassland ecosystem. The results of the SPAC model suggest that the hysteresis magnitude depends on the radiation-VPD lag. The soil moisture dry-down simulations also suggest that modeled root water potential and leaf water potential are both better indicators of the hysteresis magnitude than soil moisture, suggesting that plant water status is the main factor regulating the hysteretic relation between ET and VPD. Hence, the genesis and magnitude of the ET-VPD hysteresis are controlled directly by both biotic factors and abiotic factors such as time lag between radiation and VPD originating from boundary layer processes

  20. Fact Sheet on Evapotranspiration Cover Systems for Waste Containment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Fact Sheet updates the 2003 Fact Sheet on Evapotranspiration Covers and provides information on the regulatory setting for ET covers, general considerations in their design, performance, and monitoring, and status at the time of writing (2011).

  1. Evapotranspiration-based irrigation scheduling of lettuce and broccoli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimation of crop evapotranspiration supports efficient irrigation water management, which in turn supports water conservation, mitigation of groundwater depletion/degradation, energy savings, and crop quality maintenance. Past research in California has revealed strong relationships between fract...

  2. Catchments' hedging strategy on evapotranspiration for climatic variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Ding, Wei; Li, Yu; Tang, Yin; Wang, Dingbao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we test the hypothesis that natural catchments utilize hedging strategy for evapotranspiration and water storage carryover with uncertain future precipitation. The hedging strategy for evapotranspiration in catchments under different levels of water availability is analytically derived with marginal utility principle. It is found that there exists hedging between evapotranspiration for present and future only with a portion of water availability. Observation data sets of 160 catchments in the United States covering the period from 1983 to 2003 demonstrate the existence of hedging in catchment hydrology and validate the proposed hedging strategy. We also find that more water is allocated to carryover storage for hedging against the future evapotranspiration deficit in the catchments with larger aridity indexes or with larger variability in future precipitation, i.e., long-term climate and precipitation variability control the degree of hedging.

  3. Value of using remotely sensed evapotranspiration for SWAT model calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrologic models are useful management tools for assessing water resources solutions and estimating the potential impact of climate variation scenarios. A comprehensive understanding of the water budget components and especially the evapotranspiration (ET) is critical and often overlooked for adeq...

  4. Comparison of Crop Evapotranspiration Estimates from Reference Evapotranspiration Equations and a Variational Data Assimilation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, S. M.; Michalik, T.; Multsch, S.; Breuer, L.

    2015-12-01

    Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) is a key component of water resources management in irrigation of farmlands as it determines the crop water consumption. Numerous methods have been used to estimate ETc for scheduling irrigation and evaluating the soil water balance. However, there is a significant difference in ETc estimates from various models, which leads to a large uncertainty in the soil water balance, crop water consumption, and irrigation scheduling. In this study, several commonly-used ETc equations (Turc, Priestley-Taylor, Hargreaves-Samani, Penman-Monteith) are compared with the variational data assimilation approach (VDA) of Bateni et al. (2013). The ETc equations initially estimate the reference evapotranspiration (ETo), which is the evapotranspiration from a healthy and actively-transpiring grass field with ample water in the soil. Thereafter, ETc is calculated by multiplying ETo by the crop coefficient (Kc), which accounts for the crop type and soil water stress. To properly apply the Kc to non-standard conditions, a daily water balance estimation for the root zone is required, which is done by two soil water budget models (Cropwat, Hydrus-1D) that compute incoming and outgoing water flows in the soil profile. In contrast to these methods that estimate ETc in two steps, the VDA approach directly predicts ETc by assimilating sequences of land surface temperature into the heat diffusion equation and thus it is expected to provide more accurate ETc estimates. All approaches are applied over three cropland sites namely, Bondville, Fermi, and Mead in the summer of 2006 and 2007. These sites are part of the AmeriFlux network and provide a wide variety of hydrological conditions. The results show that the variational data assimilation approach performs better compared to other equations.

  5. Estimating the ETAS model from an early aftershock sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omi, Takahiro; Ogata, Yosihiko; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-02-01

    Forecasting aftershock probabilities, as early as possible after a main shock, is required to mitigate seismic risks in the disaster area. In general, aftershock activity can be complex, including secondary aftershocks or even triggering larger earthquakes. However, this early forecasting implementation has been difficult because numerous aftershocks are unobserved immediately after the main shock due to dense overlapping of seismic waves. Here we propose a method for estimating parameters of the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model from incompletely observed aftershocks shortly after the main shock by modeling an empirical feature of data deficiency. Such an ETAS model can effectively forecast the following aftershock occurrences. For example, the ETAS model estimated from the first 24 h data after the main shock can well forecast secondary aftershocks after strong aftershocks. This method can be useful in early and unbiased assessment of the aftershock hazard.

  6. Excited Ejecta in Light of Sight from Eta Car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G.; Gull, T. R.; Danks, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the NUV spectrum of Eta Car, we have resolved many narrow absorption lines of neutral and singly-ionized elements with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We report for the first time the detection of interstellar vanadium in absorption, and many highly-excited absorption lines of Fe, Cr, Ti, Ni, Co, Mn, and Mg. These elements, normally tied up in dust grains in the ISM, are located within wall of the Homunculus within 20,000 A.U. of Eta Car. Stellar radiation and stellar wind are interacting with the wall. Dust is likely being modified and/or destroyed. Previous Homunculus studies have demonstrated that nitrogen is overabundant and that carbon and oxygen emission lines are weak, or non-existent. Are the large column densities of these heavy elements due to abundance effects, excitation mechanisms, or modified grains? We may gain insight as Eta Car goes through its spectroscopic minimum in the summer of 2003.

  7. Is the Ejecta of ETA Carinae Overabundant or Overexcited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore; Davidson, Kris; Johansson, Sveneric; Damineli, Augusto; Ishibashi, Kaxunori; Corcoran, Michael; Hartman, Henrick; Viera, Gladys; Nielsen, Krister

    2003-01-01

    The ejecta of Eta Carinae, revealed by HST/STIS, are in a large range of physical conditions. As Eta Carinae undergoes a 5.52 period, changes occur in nebular emission and nebular absorption. "Warm" neutral regions, partially ionized regions, and fully ionized regions undergo significant changes. Over 2000 emission lines, most of Fe-like elements, have been indentified in the Weigelt blobs B and D. Over 500 emission lines have been indentified in the Strontium Filament. An ionized Little Homunculus is nestled within the neutral-shelled Homunculus. In line of sight, over 500 nebular absorption lines have been identified with up to twenty velocity components. STIS is following changes in many nebular emission and absorption lines as Eta Carinae approaches the minimum, predicted to be in June/July 2003, during the General Assembly. Coordinated observations with HST, CHANDRA, RXTE, FUSE, UVES/VLT, Gemini and other observatories are following this minimum.

  8. Magnetic reconnection in toroidal eta(i) mode turbulence

    PubMed

    Zeiler; Drake; Rogers

    2000-01-03

    Based on three-dimensional simulations of the Braginskii equations we show that for typical plasma-edge parameters the saturation of electromagnetic toroidal eta(i) mode turbulence is controlled by the self-generation and subsequent annihilation of radial magnetic field perturbations. This should be contrasted with the electrostatic limit, where the growth of the linear eta(i) mode is terminated by the onset of sheared flow modes driven by the radial plasma streams. The impact of the saturation amplitude on the transport level is substantial and is not in accord with simple mixing length arguments, suggesting that electromagnetic effects should generally be included in simulations of eta(i) mode turbulence.

  9. Eta Carinae's first full orbit in the Fermi era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Olaf; Reitberger, Klaus; Reimer, Anita; Takahashi, Hiromitsu

    2015-08-01

    Eta Carinae, the so-far only colliding wind binary system shining brightly at high-energy gamma-rays, has been observed over the first complete orbit since launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. This allows us to compare the spatial, temporal and spectral characteristics of the gamma-ray emission to earlier studies and confront predictions about anticipated observational signatures when concluding the full orbit and entering into the next. By analyzing 2024 days of LAT data we were able to improve the spatial association between the nominal location of eta Carinae and the observed gamma-ray location, confirming the two-component spectrum, as well as the spectro-variability seen predominatly above 10 GeV. The observed source characteristics strengthens the case that eta Car remains unique for the otherwise elusive class of gamma-ray sources whose emission can be related to a colliding stellar wind scenario.

  10. Evapotranspiration and runoff in a forest watershed, western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, A.; Shimizu, T.; Miyabuchi, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    2003-10-01

    Both water and heat balances were studied in a conifer plantation watershed in south-west Japan, within the warm-temperate East Asia monsoon area. Forest cover in the watershed consists mainly of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) plantations. Precipitation and runoff have been observed since 1991, so evapotranspiration can be compared with the water balance. Two meteorological observation towers were built to monitor evapotranspiration in the watershed. The annual average precipitation, amount of runoff and losses were 2166, 1243 and 923 mm, respectively. The evapotranspiration (latent heat flux) agreed well with the water balance losses. The average annual evapotranspiration at the tower built in the centre of the watershed was 902 mm; evapotranspiration at the other tower, further upslope, was 875 mm. The observed evapotranspiration was 39% to 40% of the average precipitation (2166 mm). The mean net radiation was c. 2·6 GJ m-2 year-1, and is considered a representative value of the net radiation (Rn) in coniferous plantations in this region. This region is classified in the humid zone based on the ratio of net radiation (Rn) to the energy required to evaporate the rainfall (R). The mean annual evaporation of canopy-intercepted water was 356 mm or about 15% of the average precipitation. Copyright

  11. NASA GLDAS Evapotranspiration Data and Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Hualan; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; Teng, William L.; Vollmer, Bruce; Rodell, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the water lost to the atmosphere by evaporation and transpiration. ET is a shared component in the energy and water budget, therefore, a critical variable for global energy and water cycle and climate change studies. However, direct ET measurements and data acquisition are difficult and expensive, especially at the global level. Therefore, modeling is one common alternative for estimating ET. With the goal to generate optimal fields of land surface states and fluxes, the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) has been generating quality-controlled, spatially and temporally consistent, terrestrial hydrologic data, including ET and other variables that affect evaporation and transpiration, such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind, soil moisture, heat flux, and solar radiation. This poster presents the long-term ET climatology (mean and monthly), derived from the 61-year GLDAS-2 monthly 1.0 deg x 1.0 deg. NOAH model Experiment-1 data, and describes the basic characteristics of spatial and seasonal variations of the climatology. The time series of GLDAS-2 precipitation and radiation, and ET are also discussed to show the improvement of GLDAS-2 forcing data and model output over those from GLDAS-1.

  12. Estimating Evapotranspiration with Land Data Assimilation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Kumar, S. V.; Mocko, D. M.; Tian, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in both land surface models (LSM) and land surface data assimilation, especially over the last decade, have substantially advanced the ability of land data assimilation systems (LDAS) to estimate evapotranspiration (ET). This article provides a historical perspective on international LSM intercomparison efforts and the development of LDAS systems, both of which have improved LSM ET skill. In addition, an assessment of ET estimates for current LDAS systems is provided along with current research that demonstrates improvement in LSM ET estimates due to assimilating satellite-based soil moisture products. Using the Ensemble Kalman Filter in the Land Information System, we assimilate both NASA and Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM) soil moisture products into the Noah LSM Version 3.2 with the North American LDAS phase 2 (NLDAS-2) forcing to mimic the NLDAS-2 configuration. Through comparisons with two global reference ET products, one based on interpolated flux tower data and one from a new satellite ET algorithm, over the NLDAS2 domain, we demonstrate improvement in ET estimates only when assimilating the LPRM soil moisture product.

  13. A hypocentral version of the space-time ETAS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicun; Zhuang, Jiancang; Zhou, Shiyong

    2015-10-01

    The space-time Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model is extended by incorporating the depth component of earthquake hypocentres. The depths of the direct offspring produced by an earthquake are assumed to be independent of the epicentre locations and to follow a beta distribution, whose shape parameter is determined by the depth of the parent event. This new model is verified by applying it to the Southern California earthquake catalogue. The results show that the new model fits data better than the original epicentre ETAS model and that it provides the potential for modelling and forecasting seismicity with higher resolutions.

  14. Start of Eta Car's X-ray Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Liburd, Jamar; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Chris; Pollock, Andrew; Owocki, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Eta Car's X-ray spectrum in the 2-10 keV band using quicklook data from the XRay Telescope on Swift shows that the flux on July 30, 2014 was 4.9 plus or minus 2.0×10(exp-12) ergs s(exp-1)cm(exp-2). This flux is nearly equal to the X-ray minimum flux seen by RXTE in 2009, 2003.5, and 1998, and indicates that Eta Car has reached its X-ray minimum, as expected based on the 2024-day period derived from previous 2-10 keV observations with RXTE.

  15. 76 FR 12760 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Report ETA 902, Disaster Unemployment Assistance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ..., Disaster Unemployment Assistance Activities (OMB Control No. 1205- 0051): Extension Without Change AGENCY... ETA 902, Disaster Unemployment Assistance Activities under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and.... Background The ETA 902 Report, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) Activities, is a monthly...

  16. Determination of the quadratic slope parameter in eta-->3pi(0) decay.

    PubMed

    Tippens, W B; Prakhov, S; Allgower, C E; Bekrenev, V; Berger, E; Briscoe, W J; Clajus, M; Comfort, J R; Craig, K; Efendiev, A; Grosnick, D; Holstein, B R; Huber, G M; Isenhower, D; Knecht, N; Koetke, D; Koulbardis, A; Kozlenko, N; Kruglov, S; Lolos, G J; Lopatin, I; Manley, D M; Marusić, A; Manweiler, R; McDonald, S; Nefkens, B M; Olmsted, J; Papandreou, Z; Phaisangittisakul, N; Price, J W; Pulver, M; Ramirez, A F; Sadler, M E; Shafi, A; Spinka, H; Stanislaus, S; Starostin, A; Staudenmaier, H M

    2001-11-05

    We have determined the quadratic slope parameter alpha for eta-->3pi(0) to be alpha = -0.031(4) from a 99% pure sample of 10(6)eta-->3pi(0) decays produced in the reaction pi(-)p-->n(eta) close to the eta threshold using the Crystal Ball detector at the AGS. The result is four times more precise than the present world data and disagrees with current chiral perturbation theory calculations by about four standard deviations.

  17. Eta Carinae: Changes in the MUV and NUV across the 2003.5 Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Vieira, G.; Bruhweiler, F.; Verner, E.; Eta Car HST Treasury Team

    2004-05-01

    Eta Carinae is intimately surrounded by ejecta from the great event of the 1840's (the Homunculus), an event of the 1890's (the Little Homunculus) and an ongoing, complex wind modulated by a 5.53-year periodicity. Over the several month long minimum, major changes occur in the star and the complex ejecta. During the 2003.5 minimum, we were fortunate to monitor these changes with HST/STIS in CCD long slit mode (52"x0.1" aperture, 40 km/s velocity resolution) and in MAMA echelle modes (0.3"x0.2" aperture; 3 and 10 km/s velocity resolution). Both high spatial and high spectral resolution are key to separating stellar from nebular changes. The stellar UV dropped during the minimum due to foreground gas, not dust, absorption. However, many stellar NUV P-Cygni Fe II lines around 3000A actually brightened. Structures in the vicinity to Eta Carinae dropped in excitation and ionization. One bead of an apparent string encircling Eta Carinae actually became brighter than the star in P-Cygni Fe II lines. Lyman-alpha-pumped Fe II lines faded in the Weigelt blobs and the Little Homunculus. Broad, spatially-extended absorptions of Fe II lines appeared briefly close to the star. Toward Weigelt B and D, a broad nebular absorption developed extending from -140 km/s to -40 km/s. The Si III] and Fe III nebular emissions near 1900A disappeared. In line of sight, the -146 km/s absorption component, associated with the Little Homunculus, dropped in ionization and excitation. The -513 km/s absorption component, associated with the Homunculus and therefore much more distant, showed little change. Many Fe II narrow absorption components between -50 and -380 km/s appeared briefly. The multiplicity of these components and their nearly periodic spacing suggest they are related to the 5.53-year cycle. These observations were done through the STScI under STIS GTO and HST GO funding.

  18. Synthesis, reactivity and molecular structure of phosphino tetramethyl cyclopentadienyl complex (eta5: eta1-C5Me4CH2PPh2)Re(CO)2.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Fernando; Klahn, A Hugo; Oelckers, Beatriz; Garland, María Teresa; Ibáñez, Andres; Perutz, Robin N

    2009-04-28

    The fulvene complex (eta(6)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2))Re(C(6)F(5))(CO)(2) reacts at the exocyclic methylene carbon with potassium diphenylphosphide to yield the anionic species [(eta(5)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PPh(2))Re(C(6)F(5))(CO)(2)](-) (). Protonation of with HCl at 0 degrees C produces the hydride complex trans-(eta(5)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PPh(2))Re(C(6)F(5))(H)(CO)(2) (). Thermolysis of a hexanes solution of , under nitrogen atmosphere, produces the chelated complex (eta(5):eta(1)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PPh(2))Re(CO)(2) () in good yield. The thermolysis under a CO atmosphere affords a mixture of the complexes (eta(5):eta(1)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PPh(2))Re(CO)(2) () and (eta(5)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PPh(2))Re(CO)(3) (). The reaction of with two electron donor ligands yields (eta(5)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PPh(2))Re(CO)(2)(L) (, L = CO; , L = PMe(3); , L = (t)BuNC). Complex also reacts with I(2), HBF(4) and MeOTf to yield the cationic compounds trans-[(eta(5):eta(1)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PPh(2))Re(R)(CO)(2)](+) (, R = I; , R = H; , R = Me). Upon treatment with chloroform, the hydride complex converts to the corresponding chloro derivative . The trans stereochemistry for complexes have been assigned on basis of nu(CO) IR intensities and (13)C-NMR chemical shifts. The reaction of the cationic complexes (, ) with KI and Me(3)NO.2H(2)O yields the neutral species cis-(eta(5):eta(1)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PPh(2))Re(I)(R)(CO) (, R = I, , R = Me). The molecular structure of and have been determined by X-ray crystallography.

  19. 75 FR 53983 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA-5130 Benefit Appeals Report; Comment Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA-5130 Benefit... e-mail: Langley.brian@dol.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The ETA-5130, Benefit... proposed extension collection of the ETA-5130 Benefit Appeals Report, which expires November 30,...

  20. 78 FR 75948 - Comment Request for Information Collection for the ETA 586, Interstate Arrangement for Combining...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection for the ETA 586, Interstate... Administration (ETA), Labor. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (Department), as part of its... requirements on respondents can be properly assessed. Currently, ETA is soliciting comments concerning...

  1. 75 FR 3927 - Proposed Information Collection Request for the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Information Collection Request for the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report; Comment Request on... unemployment compensation programs. The data in the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report, includes... extension for the collection of the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience report. Comments are...

  2. 77 FR 48174 - Comment Request for Information Collection for the ETA 203, Characteristics of the Insured...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection for the ETA 203... Administration (ETA), Labor. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (Department), as part of its... requirements on respondents can be properly assessed. Currently, ETA is soliciting comments concerning...

  3. 76 FR 58540 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 581, Contribution Operations Report; Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Information Collection Request of the ETA 581, Contribution Operations Report; Extension Without Change AGENCY... Insurance (OUI) of the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) has responsibility for the Tax... Contribution Operations report (Form ETA 581) is a comprehensive report of each state's UI tax operations...

  4. Search for eta '(958)-nucleus Bound States by (p,d) Reaction at GSI and FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Friedrich, S.; Geissel, H.; Gellanki, J.; Guo, C.; Gutz, E.; Haettner, E.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Higashi, Y.; Hirenzaki, S.; Hornung, C.; Igarashi, Y.; Ikeno, N.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Jido, D.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knoebel, R.; Kurz, N.; Metag, V.; Mukha, I.; Nagae, T.; Nagahiro, H.; Nanova, M.; Nishi, T.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rappold, C.; Reiter, M. P.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Sun, B.; Suzuki, K.; Szarka, I.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Weick, H.; Widmann, E.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.; Yamakami, H.; Zhao, J.

    The mass of the {\\eta}' meson is theoretically expected to be reduced at finite density, which indicates the existence of {\\eta}'-nucleus bound states. To investigate these states, we perform missing-mass spectroscopy for the (p, d) reaction near the {\\eta}' production threshold. The overview of the experimental situation is given and the current status is discussed.

  5. 29 CFR 500.132 - Applicable Federal standards: ETA and OSHA housing standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicable Federal standards: ETA and OSHA housing... Migrant Workers Housing Safety and Health § 500.132 Applicable Federal standards: ETA and OSHA housing... § 500.131, all migrant housing is subject to either the ETA standards or the OSHA standards, as...

  6. [(8a,9,9a-eta)-9-(eta5-cyclopentadienyl)-9-nickelafluorenyl](eta5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)nickel(II).

    PubMed

    Buchalski, Piotr; Koziol, Andrzej; Suwinska, Kinga

    2008-08-01

    The title compound, [Ni(2)(C(5)H(5))(C(10)H(15))(C(12)H(8))] or [Ni(C(10)H(15)){Ni(C(5)H(5))(C(12)H(8))}], is a rare example (and the first obtained from nickelafluorenyllithium) of an analogue of nickelocene in which the central Ni atom is coordinated to one pentamethylcyclopentadienyl ring and one nickelafluorenyl ring. Both rings lie almost parallel to one another: the dihedral angle between the planes which include these rings is 4.4 (1) degrees . Slip parameter analysis indicates that the bonding mode of the central Ni atom to the nickelacyclic ring is between eta(3) and eta(5). Two-dimensional layers of molecules are formed by C-H...pi interactions.

  7. Mapping Evapotranspiration on Vineyards: The SENTINEL-2 Potentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraolo, Giuseppe; Capodici, Fulvio; D'Urso, Guido; La Loggia, Goffredo; Maltese, Antonino

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of actual evapotranspiration in Sicilian vineyards, is an emerging issue since these agricultural systems. Indeed unlike other agricultural species (Vitis vinifera L.) are generally cultivated under mild water stress, in order to enhance quality (Guadillère et al., 2002. This has significant impacts on the management of the scarce water resources of the region. The choice of the most appropriate methodology for assessing water use in these systems is still an issue of debating, due to the complexity of canopy and root systems and for their high spatial fragmentation. In vineyards, quality and quantity of the final product are dependent on the controlled stress conditions to be set trough irrigation. This paper reports an application of the well-known Penman-Monteith approach, applied in a distributed way, using high resolution remote sensing data to map the potential evapotranspiration (ETp). In 2008 a series of airborne multispectral images were acquired on the "Tenute Rapitalà", a wine farm located in the northwest of Sicily. Five airborne remote sensing scenes were collected using a SKY ARROW 351 650 TC/TCNS aircraft, at a height of about 1000 m a.g.l.. The acquisitions encompassed almost a whole phenological period, between June and September 2008 (approximately one each three weeks). The platform had on board a multi-spectral camera with 3 spectral bands in the green (G, 530-570 nm), red (R, 650-690 nm) and near infrared (NIR, 767-832 nm) wavelengths, and a thermal camera with a broad band in the range 7.5-13 μm. The nominal pixel resolution was approximately 0.7 m for VIS/NIR acquisitions, and 1.7 m for the thermal-IR data. Field data were acquired simultaneously to airborne acquisitions. The former include spectral reflectance in visible, near infrared, middle infrared (VIS, NIR, MIR) regions of the spectrum, leaf area index (LAI), soil moisture at different depths (both in row and below plants). Moreover, meteorological variables and fluxes

  8. Sources of variability of evapotranspiration in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hidalgo, H.G.; Cayan, D.R.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    The variability (1990-2002) of potential evapotranspiration estimates (ETo) and related meteorological variables from a set of stations from the California Irrigation Management System (CIMIS) is studied. Data from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and from the Department of Energy from 1950 to 2001 were used to validate the results. The objective is to determine the characteristics of climatological ETo and to identify factors controlling its variability (including associated atmospheric circulations). Daily ETo anomalies are strongly correlated with net radiation (Rn) anomalies, relative humidity (RH), and cloud cover, and less with average daily temperature (Tavg). The highest intraseasonal variability of ETo daily anomalies occurs during the spring, mainly caused by anomalies below the high ETo seasonal values during cloudy days. A characteristic circulation pattern is associated with anomalies of ETo and its driving meteorological inputs, Rn, RH, and Tavg, at daily to seasonal time scales. This circulation pattern is dominated by 700-hPa geopotential height (Z700) anomalies over a region off the west coast of North America, approximately between 32?? and 44?? latitude, referred to as the California Pressure Anomaly (CPA). High cloudiness and lower than normal ETo are associated with the lowheight (pressure) phase of the CPA pattern. Higher than normal ETo anomalies are associated with clear skies maintained through anomalously high Z700 anomalies offshore of the North American coast. Spring CPA, cloudiness, maximum temperature (Tmax), pan evaporation (Epan), and ETo conditions have not trended significantly or consistently during the second half of the twentieth century in California. Because it is not known how cloud cover and humidity will respond to climate change, the response of ETo in California to increased greenhouse-gas concentrations is essentially unknown; however, to retain the levels of ETo in the current climate, a decline of Rn by about 6

  9. Scaling Potential Evapotranspiration with Greenhouse Warming (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheff, J.; Frierson, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is a supply-independent measure of the evaporative demand of a terrestrial climate, of basic importance in climatology, hydrology, and agriculture. Future increases in PET from greenhouse warming are often cited as key drivers of global trends toward drought and aridity. The present work computes recent and business-as-usual-future Penman-Monteith (i.e. physically-based) PET fields at 3-hourly resolution in 14 modern global climate models. The %-change in local annual-mean PET over the upcoming century is almost always positive, modally low double-digit in magnitude, usually increasing with latitude, yet quite divergent between models. These patterns are understood as follows. In every model, the global field of PET %-change is found to be dominated by the direct, positive effects of constant-relative-humidity warming (via increasing vapor pressure deficit and increasing Clausius-Clapeyron slope.) This direct-warming term very accurately scales as the PET-weighted (warm-season daytime) local warming, times 5-6% per degree (related to the Clausius-Clapeyron equation), times an analytic factor ranging from about 0.25 in warm climates to 0.75 in cold climates, plus a small correction. With warming of several degrees, this product is of low double-digit magnitude, and the strong temperature dependence gives the latitude dependence. Similarly, the inter-model spread in the amount of warming gives most of the spread in this term. Additional spread in the total change comes from strong disagreement on radiation, relative-humidity, and windspeed changes, which make smaller yet substantial contributions to the full PET %-change fields.

  10. Bryophyte Evapotranspiration in a Boreal Forest Chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond-Lamberty, B.; Ewers, B.; Angstmann, J.; Gower, S.

    2008-12-01

    Forest water fluxes, in particular evapotranspiration (ET), are less well constrained than are carbon fluxes, and the effect of changing stand age on forest ET is not well understood. We combined field and lab measurements to estimate the bryophyte contribution to ET in a black spruce-dominated boreal chronosequence in Manitoba, Canada. Site ages were 17, 42, 76 and 156 years, and each site contained separate well- and poorly-drained stands (bogs). Field plots (N=4) were surveyed for moss diversity and microtopography; meteorological variables were recorded continuously. Field measurements were made 3-4 times during the growing season using a custom chamber attached to a LI-COR 6400. In addition, large tubs of moss were incubated in a controlled-environment chamber and water loss rates measured via weighing; these tubs were also measured using the same protocol as performed in the field. In the lab, fully-saturated feathermoss and Sphagnum lost water at rates as high as 1.5 and 4.5 mm day-1, respectively, at 25 °C. Over the entire year, modeled bryophyte ET ranged from 0.2-0.3 and 0.2-0.5 mm day-1 in the well- and poorly-drained stands, respectively. During the growing season, these rates were 0.7-0.8 and 0.6- 1.4 mm day-1. Ignoring bog microtopography would have resulted in underestimation of fluxes by ~10%. There was no clear trend of moss ET flux with stand age, except at the very youngest stands, where bryophyte spatial coverage was low. Our results emphasize the important contribution that bryophytes make to the ET flux of boreal forests.

  11. Evapotranspiration of tropical peat swamp forests.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Kusin, Kitso; Limin, Suwido; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    In Southeast Asia, peatland is widely distributed and has accumulated a massive amount of soil carbon, coexisting with peat swamp forest (PSF). The peatland, however, has been rapidly degraded by deforestation, fires, and drainage for the last two decades. Such disturbances change hydrological conditions, typically groundwater level (GWL), and accelerate oxidative peat decomposition. Evapotranspiration (ET) is a major determinant of GWL, whereas information on the ET of PSF is limited. Therefore, we measured ET using the eddy covariance technique for 4-6 years between 2002 and 2009, including El Niño and La Niña events, at three sites in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. The sites were different in disturbance degree: a PSF with little drainage (UF), a heavily drained PSF (DF), and a drained burnt ex-PSF (DB); GWL was significantly lowered at DF, especially in the dry season. The ET showed a clear seasonal variation with a peak in the mid-dry season and a large decrease in the late dry season, mainly following seasonal variation in net radiation (Rn ). The Rn drastically decreased with dense smoke from peat fires in the late dry season. Annual ET forced to close energy balance for 4 years was 1636 ± 53, 1553 ± 117, and 1374 ± 75 mm yr(-1) (mean ± 1 standard deviation), respectively, at UF, DF, and DB. The undrained PSF (UF) had high and rather stable annual ET, independently of El Niño and La Niña events, in comparison with other tropical rainforests. The minimum monthly-mean GWL explained 80% of interannual variation in ET for the forest sites (UF and DF); the positive relationship between ET and GWL indicates that drainage by a canal decreased ET at DF through lowering GWL. In addition, ET was decreased by 16% at DB in comparison with UF chiefly because of vegetation loss through fires.

  12. A hydrometeorological model for basin-wide seasonal evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Nelson LuíS.; Kan, Akemi

    1999-11-01

    A new methodology is proposed to capture the seasonal behavior of evapotranspiration from precipitation and streamflow data and to develop hydrometeorological evapotranspiration models tailored for each basin. The water budget method for determining evapotranspiration is downscaled to periods between 15 and 160 days that occur between well-marked hydrological recessions. Using these uneven time periods, the error associated with the unknown soil moisture storage is minimized, whereas groundwater storage changes are estimated by means of a classical linear groundwater reservoir whose time constant is obtained by recession analysis. This seasonal water budget (SWB) method is able to reproduce the seasonal signal of evapotranspiration even when it is absent from the precipitation and streamflow records. The estimates are also compatible with calculated monthly net radiation. By selecting short enough water budget periods it is possible to check the relationship between SWB evapotranspiration estimates and net radiation, Penman and Priestley-Taylor potential evaporation, precipitation minus outflow, water vapor deficit, and basin storage. The ratio of SWB evapotranspiration to an upper limit value represented by either net radiation or potential evaporation is well correlated with precipitation minus outflow, water vapor deficit, or both but is very poorly related to basin storage. The calculated regressions lead to a family of hydrometeorological evapotranspiration monthly (HEM) models fitted to the basins in question, in a way analogous to the calibration of rainfall-runoff models. In the two watersheds where the methodology was applied the HEM models were able to preserve mass, with total accumulated differences no larger than 0.25 mm d-1 and root-mean-square errors of the order of 0.7 mm d-1.

  13. 20 CFR 658.603 - ETA regional office responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE JOB SERVICE SYSTEM Review and Assessment of State Agency Compliance With Job Service Regulations § 658.603 ETA regional office responsibility. (a) The Regional Administrator... compliance with JS regulations. (b) The Regional Administrator shall review and approve annual program...

  14. 20 CFR 658.603 - ETA regional office responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE JOB SERVICE SYSTEM Review and Assessment of State Agency Compliance With Job Service Regulations § 658.603 ETA regional office responsibility. (a) The Regional Administrator... compliance with JS regulations. (b) The Regional Administrator shall review and approve annual program...

  15. EMISSIONS PROCESSING FOR THE ETA/ CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA and EPA have created an Air Quality Forecast (AQF) system. This AQF system links an adaptation of the EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality Model with the 12 kilometer ETA model running operationally at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Predication (NCEP). One of the...

  16. The Corrected Eta-Squared Coefficient: A Value Added Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnette, J. Jackson; McLean, James E.

    Eta-Squared (ES) is often used as a measure of strength of association of an effect, a measure often associated with effect size. It is also considered the proportion of total variance accounted for by an independent variable. It is simple to compute and interpret. However, it has one critical weakness cited by several authors (C. Huberty, 1994;…

  17. Detection of the Compressed Primary Stellar Wind in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teodoro, Mairan Macedo; Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2014-01-01

    A series of three HST/STIS spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from eta Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the 3D hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  18. Targeting Inaccurate Atomic Data in the Eta Car Ejecta Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira; Gull, T. R.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.

    2006-01-01

    The input from the laboratory spectroscopist community has on many occasions helped the analysis of the eta Car spectrum. Our analysis has targeted spectra where improved wavelengths and oscillator strengths are needed. We will demonstrate how experimentally derived atomic data have improved our spectral analysis, and illuminate where more work still is needed.

  19. Using Satellite-based Evapotranspiration Estimation to Characterize Agricultural Irrigation Water Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Myint, S. W.; Hendrickx, J. M. H.

    2014-12-01

    The satellite-based evapotranspiration (ET) model permits estimation of water consumption across space and time in a systematic way. Developing tools to monitor water availability and water use is critical to meet future water shortage challenges in the American West. This study applied METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution and with Internalized Calibration) to 2001 Landsat imagery to estimate ET of various crop types in Phoenix. The total annual ET estimates are correlated well with the actual water use at the irrigation district level (r=0.99). We further incorporated a crop type map to estimate annual ET for the major crop types in the region, and to examine variability in crop water use among different irrigation districts. Our results show that alfalfa and double crops consume more water than other crop types with mean annual ET estimations of 1300 to 1580 mm/year, and that cotton uses more water (1162 mm/year) than corn (838 mm/year) and sorghum (829 mm/year) as expected. Crop water use varies from one irrigation district to another due to differences in soil quality, water quality, and farming practices. Results from our study suggest that the ET maps derived from METRIC can be used to quantify the spatial distribution of ET and to characterize agricultural water use by crop types at different spatial scales.

  20. Surface Energy Balance Based Evapotranspiration Mapping in the Texas High Plains.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Prasanna H; Chávez, José L; Howell, Terry A; Marek, Thomas H; New, Leon L

    2008-08-28

    Agriculture on the Texas High Plains (THP) uses approximately 89% of groundwater withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer. Consequently, groundwater levels are declining faster than the recharge rate. Therefore, efficient agricultural water use is essential for economic viability and sustainability of the THP. Accurate regional evapotranspiration (ET) maps would provide valuable information on actual crop water use. In this study, METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at High Resolution using Internalized Calibration), a remote sensing based ET algorithm, was evaluated for mapping ET in the THP. Two Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper images acquired on 27 June (DOY 178) and 29 July (DOY 210) 2005 were used for this purpose. The performance of the ET model was evaluated by comparing the predicted daily ET with values derived from soil moisture budget at four commercial agricultural fields. Daily ET estimates resulted with a prediction error of 12.7±8.1% (mean bias error ± root mean square error) on DOY 178 and -4.7±9.4% on DOY 210 when compared with ET derived from measured soil moisture through the soil water balance. These results are good considering the prevailing advective conditions in the THP. METRIC have the potential to be used for mapping regional ET in the THP region. However, more evaluation is needed under different agroclimatological conditions.

  1. Accuracy assessment of NOAA gridded daily reference evapotranspiration for the Texas High Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moorhead, Jerry; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Hobbins, Michael; Senay, Gabriel; Paul, George; Marek, Thomas; Porter, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides daily reference evapotranspiration (ETref) maps for the contiguous United States using climatic data from North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). This data provides large-scale spatial representation of ETref, which is essential for regional scale water resources management. Data used in the development of NOAA daily ETref maps are derived from observations over surfaces that are different from short (grass — ETos) or tall (alfalfa — ETrs) reference crops, often in nonagricultural settings, which carries an unknown discrepancy between assumed and actual conditions. In this study, NOAA daily ETos and ETrs maps were evaluated for accuracy, using observed data from the Texas High Plains Evapotranspiration (TXHPET) network. Daily ETos, ETrs and the climatic data (air temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation) used for calculating ETref were extracted from the NOAA maps for TXHPET locations and compared against ground measurements on reference grass surfaces. NOAA ETrefmaps generally overestimated the TXHPET observations (1.4 and 2.2 mm/day ETos and ETrs, respectively), which may be attributed to errors in the NLDAS modeled air temperature and wind speed, to which reference ETref is most sensitive. Therefore, a bias correction to NLDAS modeled air temperature and wind speed data, or adjustment to the resulting NOAA ETref, may be needed to improve the accuracy of NOAA ETref maps.

  2. Comparing SEBAL and METRIC: Evapotranspiration Models Applied to Paramount Farms Almond Orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, B. J.; Kefauver, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Two evapotranspiration models were applied to almond and pistachio orchards in California. The SEBAL model, developed by W.G.M. Bastiaanssen, was programmed in MatLab for direct comparison to the METRIC model, developed by R.G. Allen and the IDWR. Remote sensing data from the NASA SARP 2011 Airborne Research Program was used in the application of these models. An evaluation of the models showed that they both followed the same pattern in evapotranspiration (ET) rates for different types of ground cover. The models exhibited a slightly different range of values and appeared to be related (non-linearly). The models both underestimated the actual ET at the CIMIS weather station. However, SEBAL overestimated the ET of the almond orchards by 0.16 mm/hr when applying its crop coefficient to the reference ET. This is compared to METRIC, which underestimated the ET of the almond orchards by only 0.10 mm/hr. Other types of ground cover were similarly compared. Temporal variability in ET rates between the morning and afternoon were also observed.

  3. Statistical Analysis of Meteorological Data to Assess Evapotranspiration and Infiltration at the Rifle Site, CO, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Long, P. E.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Christensen, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    Net infiltration to the vadose zone, especially in arid or semi-arid climates, is an important control on microbial activity and solute and green house gas fluxes. To assess net infiltration, we performed a statistical analysis of meteorological data as the basis for hydrological and climatic investigations and predictions for the Rifle site, Colorado, USA, located within a floodplain in a mountainous region along the Colorado River, with a semi-arid climate. We carried out a statistical analysis of meteorological 30-year time series data (1985-2015), including: (1) precipitation data, taking into account the evaluation of the snowmelt, (2) evaluation of the evapotranspiration (reference and actual), (3) estimation of the multi-time-scalar Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), (4) evaluation of the net infiltration rate, and (5) corroborative analysis of calculated net infiltration rate and groundwater recharge from radioisotopic measurements from samples collected in 2013. We determined that annual net infiltration percentage of precipitation varies from 4.7% to ~18%, with a mean of ~10%, and concluded that calculations of net infiltration based on long-term meteorological data are comparable with those from strontium isotopic investigations. The evaluation of the SPEI showed the intermittent pattern of droughts and wet periods over the past 30 years, with a detectable decreasein the duration of droughts with time. Local measurements within the floodplain indicate a recharge gradient with increased recharge closer to the Colorado River.

  4. Surface Energy Balance Based Evapotranspiration Mapping in the Texas High Plains

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Prasanna H.; Chávez, José L.; Howell, Terry A.; Marek, Thomas H.; New, Leon L.

    2008-01-01

    Agriculture on the Texas High Plains (THP) uses approximately 89% of groundwater withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer. Consequently, groundwater levels are declining faster than the recharge rate. Therefore, efficient agricultural water use is essential for economic viability and sustainability of the THP. Accurate regional evapotranspiration (ET) maps would provide valuable information on actual crop water use. In this study, METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at High Resolution using Internalized Calibration), a remote sensing based ET algorithm, was evaluated for mapping ET in the THP. Two Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper images acquired on 27 June (DOY 178) and 29 July (DOY 210) 2005 were used for this purpose. The performance of the ET model was evaluated by comparing the predicted daily ET with values derived from soil moisture budget at four commercial agricultural fields. Daily ET estimates resulted with a prediction error of 12.7±8.1% (mean bias error ± root mean square error) on DOY 178 and -4.7±9.4% on DOY 210 when compared with ET derived from measured soil moisture through the soil water balance. These results are good considering the prevailing advective conditions in the THP. METRIC have the potential to be used for mapping regional ET in the THP region. However, more evaluation is needed under different agroclimatological conditions. PMID:27873809

  5. The Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetti, J. H.; Ellingson, S. W.; Patterson, C. D.; Taylor, W.; Venugopal, V.; Cutchin, S.; Boor, Z.

    2005-12-01

    The Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) is a radio telescope utilizing a low-cost backend, which implements flexible, reconfigurable computing techniques. It is designed to continuously monitor nearly the entire northern sky at 29-47MHz in a search for low-frequency radio transients (short pulses) from high-energy astrophysical phenomena. This antenna array, which is currently under construction, is located in a relatively radio-quiet area in the Blue Ridge Mountains southwest of Asheville, NC, at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). The array consists of 12 dual-polarization dipole antennas. The core of the array is 10 antenna stations arranged in a 16-m diameter circle with one antenna station at the center. In addition, one antenna station is situated about 50m to the north of the core and another is about 50m to the east of the core. A 26-m dish on the PARI site (about 1km from the ETA core) will be used for follow-up, added aperture, longer baselines, and additional radio frequency interference (RFI) mitigation. Preliminary observations with one test antenna station have detected the expected Galactic emission in this frequency range; ETA will be Galactic-noise limited. The ETA backend will utilize off-the-shelf components and a cluster of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for detecting pulses of various lengths, dispersion measures, and directions (synthesized delay beams), while incorporating various RFI countermeasures. Potential sources of radio transients that might be observed by ETA include gamma-ray bursts (prompt emission), supernovae (prompt emission), coalescing compact-object binaries (e.g., neutron star -- neutron star, neutron star -- black hole), and exploding primordial black holes. This array should detect giant pulses from the Crab Pulsar, and possibly other pulsars. ETA is a collaboration of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Physics Department at Virginia Tech, and PARI. ETA work at Virginia

  6. Spatial and temporal variation in evapotranspiration using Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, W. E.; Cooper, D. I.; Hipps, L. E.; Kustas, W. P.; Neale, C. M. U.; Prueger, J. H.

    2006-02-01

    The Los Alamos Raman lidar has been used to make high resolution (25 m) estimates of the evapotranspiration rate over adjacent corn and soybean canopies. The lidar makes three-dimensional measurements of the water vapor content of the atmosphere directly above the canopy that are inverted using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. This may be used to examine the relationship between evapotranspiration and surface moisture/soil type. Lidar estimates of evapotranspiration reveal a high degree of spatial variability over corn and soybean fields that may be associated with small elevation changes in the area. The spatial structure of the variability is characterized using a structure function and correlation function approach. The power law relationship found by other investigators for soil moisture is not clear in the data for evapotranspiration, nor is the data a straight line over the measured lags. The magnitude of the structure function and the slope changes with time of day, with a probable connection to the amount of evapotranspiration and the spatial variability of the water vapor source. The data used was taken during the soil moisture-atmosphere coupling experiment (SMACEX) conducted in the Walnut Creek Watershed near Ames, Iowa in June and July 2002.

  7. In-medium mathaccent "7016relax K- and eta -meson Interactions and Bound States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, A.; Friedman, E.; Barnea, N.; Cieplý, A.; Mareš, J.; Gazda, D.

    The role played by subthreshold meson-baryon dynamics is demonstrated in kaonic-atom, Kbar-nuclear and eta-nuclear bound-state calculations within in-medium models of Kbar-N and eta-N interactions. New analyses of kaonic atom data reveal appreciable multi-nucleon contributions. Calculations of eta-nuclear bound states show, in particular, that the eta-N scattering length is not a useful indicator of whether or not eta mesons bind in nuclei nor of the widths anticipated for such states.

  8. Measurement of Wetland Evapotranspiration in Southern Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, T.; Lopez, C.; Shoemaker, W. B.

    2009-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is defined as a composite flux of surface water directly evaporated by solar energy, and ground water transpired by plants. Factors limiting ET include the available energy, available water, and the vapor transport resistance offered by the atmosphere and vegetation. ET is surprisingly understudied considering its dominance in the hydrologic cycle transporting as much as 80% to over 100% of rainfall back into the atmosphere as water vapor. Uncertainties in spatial and temporal ET estimates limit the reliability of hydrologic water budgets and therefore can complicate development of sustainable water-use strategies and resolution of conflicts over water. In response to ET uncertainties, a monitoring station was constructed over a wet-prairie wetland in Big Cypress National Preserve in southern Florida to measure latent heat flux (the energy equivalent of ET), rainfall, air and water temperature, wind speed and direction, wind gusts, solar radiation, net radiation, soil-heat flux, relative humidity, and depth-of-water above or below land surface. The monitoring station was located on a 12' tower for atmospheric sampling at distances roughly 6' to 8' above the wet prairie canopy. Data are presented for a full year; specifically, June 16th, 2007 to June 16th, 2008. The eddy covariance method was applied to measure ET. The mean daily ET total was about 2.8 millimeters per day. Maximum values of about 3.5 to 5 millimeters per day were measured during the summer months (April to September) when solar radiation was greatest. Minimum values of 0 to about 2.5 millimeters per day were measured during the winter months (October to March) when solar radiation was relatively small. Sub-daily ET variations were explained mostly by available energy; formulated as the difference between net radiation, the soil-heat flux, and changes in heat-energy stored in the soil and surface-water. The annual ET total was about 1050 millimeters per year (41 inches per

  9. Evaporation and reference evapotranspiration trends in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Wild, Martin; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Calbó, Josep; Revuelto, Jesús; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Moran-Tejeda, Enrique; Martín-Hernández, Natalia; Peñuelas, Josep

    2015-04-01

    Interest is growing in the trends of atmospheric evaporation demand, increasing the need for long-term time series. In this study, we first describe the development of a dataset on evaporation in Spain based on long-term series of Piché and pan measurement records. Piché measurements have been reported for >50 stations since the 1960s. Measurements of pan evaporation, which is a much more widely studied variable in the literature, are also available, but only since 1984 for 21 stations. Particular emphasis was placed on the homogenization of this dataset (for more details, we refer to Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2014, Clim Res, 61: 269-280). Both the mean annual Piché and pan series over Spain showed evaporative increases during the common study period (1985-2011). Furthermore, using the annual Piché records since the 1960s, an evaporation decline was detected from the 1960s to the mid-1980s, which resulted in a non-significant trend over the entire 1961-2011 period. Our results indicate agreement between the decadal variability of reference evapotranspiration (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2014, Glob Planet Chang, 121: 26-40) and surface solar radiation (Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2013, Glob Planet Chang, 100: 343-352) and the evaporation from Piché and pan measurements since the mid-1980s, especially during summer. Nevertheless, this agreement needs attention, as Piché evaporimeters are inside meteorological screens and not directly exposed to radiation. Thus, as Piché readings are mainly affected by the aerodynamic term in Penman's evaporation equation and pan records are affected by both the heat balance and aerodynamic terms, the results suggest that both terms must be highly and positively correlated in Spain. In order to check this hypothesis, the radiative and aerodynamic components were estimated using the Penman's equation. The results show that the relationship with the radiative components is weaker than that with the aerodynamic component for both pan and

  10. Investigation of Climate Change Impact on Water Resources for an Alpine Basin in Northern Italy: Implications for Evapotranspiration Modeling Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Ravazzani, Giovanni; Ghilardi, Matteo; Mendlik, Thomas; Gobiet, Andreas; Corbari, Chiara; Mancini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the future effects of climate change on water availability requires an understanding of how precipitation and evapotranspiration rates will respond to changes in atmospheric forcing. Use of simplified hydrological models is required beacause of lack of meteorological forcings with the high space and time resolutions required to model hydrological processes in mountains river basins, and the necessity of reducing the computational costs. The main objective of this study was to quantify the differences between a simplified hydrological model, which uses only precipitation and temperature to compute the hydrological balance when simulating the impact of climate change, and an enhanced version of the model, which solves the energy balance to compute the actual evapotranspiration. For the meteorological forcing of future scenario, at-site bias-corrected time series based on two regional climate models were used. A quantile-based error-correction approach was used to downscale the regional climate model simulations to a point scale and to reduce its error characteristics. The study shows that a simple temperature-based approach for computing the evapotranspiration is sufficiently accurate for performing hydrological impact investigations of climate change for the Alpine river basin which was studied. PMID:25285917

  11. Investigation of climate change impact on water resources for an Alpine basin in northern Italy: implications for evapotranspiration modeling complexity.

    PubMed

    Ravazzani, Giovanni; Ghilardi, Matteo; Mendlik, Thomas; Gobiet, Andreas; Corbari, Chiara; Mancini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the future effects of climate change on water availability requires an understanding of how precipitation and evapotranspiration rates will respond to changes in atmospheric forcing. Use of simplified hydrological models is required because of lack of meteorological forcings with the high space and time resolutions required to model hydrological processes in mountains river basins, and the necessity of reducing the computational costs. The main objective of this study was to quantify the differences between a simplified hydrological model, which uses only precipitation and temperature to compute the hydrological balance when simulating the impact of climate change, and an enhanced version of the model, which solves the energy balance to compute the actual evapotranspiration. For the meteorological forcing of future scenario, at-site bias-corrected time series based on two regional climate models were used. A quantile-based error-correction approach was used to downscale the regional climate model simulations to a point scale and to reduce its error characteristics. The study shows that a simple temperature-based approach for computing the evapotranspiration is sufficiently accurate for performing hydrological impact investigations of climate change for the Alpine river basin which was studied.

  12. NOAA Introduces its First-Generation Reference Evapotranspiration Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbins, M.; Geli, H. M.; Lewis, C.; Senay, G. B.; Verdin, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    NOAA is producing daily, gridded operational, long-term, reference evapotranspiration (ETo) data for the National Water Census (NWC). The NWC is a congressional mandate to provide water managers with accurate, up-to-date, scientifically defensible reporting on the national water cycle; as such, it requires a high-quality record of actual ET, which we derive as a fraction of NOAA's land-based ETo a fraction determined by remotely sensed (RS) LST and/or surface reflectance in an operational version of the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop). This methodology permits mapping of ET on a routine basis with a high degree of consistency at multiple spatial scales. This presentation addresses the ETo input to this process. NOAA's ETo dataset is generated from the American Society of Civil Engineers Standardized Penman-Monteith equation driven by hourly, 0.125-degree (~12-km) data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). Coverage is CONUS-wide from Jan 1, 1979, to within five days of the present. The ETo is verified against agro-meteorological stations in western CONUS networks, while a first-order, second-moment uncertainty analysis indicates when, where, and to what extent each driver contributes to ETo variability (and so potentially require the most attention). As the NWC's mandate requires a nationwide coverage, the ETo dataset must also be verified outside of the measure's traditional, agricultural/irrigated areas of application. In this presentation, we summarize the verification of the gridded ETo product and demonstrate the drivers of ETo variability in space and time across CONUS. Beyond its primary use as a component of ET in the NWC, we further explore potential uses of the ETo product as an input to drought models and as a stand-alone index of fast-developing agricultural drought, or 'flash drought.' NOAA's product is the first consistently modeled, daily, continent-wide ETo dataset that is both up-to-date and as temporally

  13. Validating HYLARSMET: a Hydrologically Consistent Land Surface Model for Soil Moisture and Evapotranspiration Modelling over Southern Africa using Remote Sensing and Meteorological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Scott; Pegram, Geoff; Mengitsu, Michael; Everson, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Timeous knowledge of the spatial distribution of soil moisture and evapotranspiration over a large region in fine detail has great value for coping with two weather extremes: flash floods and droughts, since the state of the wetness of the land surface has a major impact on runoff response. Also, the ability to monitor the wetness of the soil and the actual evapotranspiration over large regions, without having to laboriously take expensive samples, is a bonus for agricultural managers who need to predict crop yields. We present samples of the daily national Soil Moisture and Evapotranspiration estimates on a grid of 7300 locations centred in 12 km squares, then move on to the results of a validation study for soil moisture and evapotranspiration estimated using the PyTOPKAPI hydrological model in Land Surface Modelling mode, a system called HYLARSMET. The HYLARSMET estimates are compared with detailed evapotranspiration and soil moisture measurements made at the Baynesfield experimental farm in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa, run by the University of KZN. The HYLARSMET evapotranspiration estimates compared very well with the measured estimates for the two chosen crop types, in spite of the fact that the HYLARSMET estimates were not designed to explicitly account for the crop types at each site. The same seasonality effects were evident in all 3 estimates, and there was a stronger ET relationship between HYLARSMET and the Soybean site (Pearson r = 0.81) than for Maize, (r = 0.59). The soil moisture relationship was stronger between the two in situ measured estimates (r = 0.98 at 0.5 m depth) than it was between HYLARSMET and the field estimates (r about 0.52 in both cases). Overall there was a reasonably good relationship between HYLARSMET and the in situ measurements of ET and SM at each site, indicating the value of the modelling procedure.

  14. Direct measurement of evapotranspiration from a forest using a superconducting gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Camp, Michel; Viron, Olivier; Pajot-Métivier, Gwendoline; Casenave, Fabien; Watlet, Arnaud; Dassargues, Alain; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2016-10-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) controls the flux between the land surface and the atmosphere. Assessing the ET ecosystems remains a key challenge in hydrology. We have found that the ET water mass loss can be directly inferred from continuous gravity measurements: as water evaporates and transpires from terrestrial ecosystems, the mass distribution of water decreases, changing the gravity field. Using continuous superconducting gravity measurements, we were able to identify daily gravity changes at the level of, or smaller than, 10-9 nm s-2 (or 10-10 g) per day. This corresponds to 1.7 mm of water over an area of 50 ha. The strength of this method is its ability to enable a direct, traceable and continuous monitoring of actual ET for years at the mesoscale with a high accuracy.

  15. Eta model simulations using two radiation schemes in clear-sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade Campos, Diêgo; Chou, Sin Chan; Spyrou, Christos; Chagas, Júlio Cesar Santos; Bottino, Marcus Jorge

    2017-01-01

    This work evaluates the performance of two radiation parameterization schemes in 30-day clear-sky runs of the Eta model over a region in Southeast Brazil. Two versions of the Eta model are compared: a version using the radiation scheme developed by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) and a recently developed version using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for GCM (RRTMG). These simulations are compared against CMSAF satellite data and surface station data. The simulation using RRTMG produced downward surface shortwave radiation fluxes closer to observations and reduced the systematic positive bias of the Eta simulation using the GFDL scheme. The 2-m temperature negative bias found in the Eta-GFDL simulations is reduced in the Eta-RRTMG simulations, which results from a larger net total radiation in the Eta-RRTMG simulations. The new version has better accuracy than the Eta using the GFDL scheme for most of the evaluated variables, particularly for clear-sky conditions.

  16. Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-rule violation and B{yields}{eta}{sup (')}K branching ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.-F.; Charng, Y.-Y.; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2008-07-01

    We show that the few-percent Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-rule violating effects in the quark-flavor basis for the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing can enhance the chiral scale associated with the {eta}{sub q} meson a few times. This enhancement is sufficient for accommodating the dramatically different data of the B{yields}{eta}{sup '}K and B{yields}{eta}K branching ratios. We comment on other proposals for resolving this problem, including flavor-singlet contributions, axial U(1) anomaly, and nonperturbative charming penguins. Discrimination of the above proposals by means of the B{yields}{eta}{sup (')}l{nu} and B{sub s}{yields}{eta}{sup (')}ll data is suggested.

  17. Methods to estimate irrigated reference crop evapotranspiration - a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Jat, M K; Shankar, V

    2012-01-01

    Efficient water management of crops requires accurate irrigation scheduling which, in turn, requires the accurate measurement of crop water requirement. Irrigation is applied to replenish depleted moisture for optimum plant growth. Reference evapotranspiration plays an important role for the determination of water requirements for crops and irrigation scheduling. Various models/approaches varying from empirical to physically base distributed are available for the estimation of reference evapotranspiration. Mathematical models are useful tools to estimate the evapotranspiration and water requirement of crops, which is essential information required to design or choose best water management practices. In this paper the most commonly used models/approaches, which are suitable for the estimation of daily water requirement for agricultural crops grown in different agro-climatic regions, are reviewed. Further, an effort has been made to compare the accuracy of various widely used methods under different climatic conditions.

  18. Urban heat island-induced increases in evapotranspirative demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipper, Samuel C.; Schatz, Jason; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Loheide, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    Although the importance of vegetation in mitigating the urban heat island (UHI) is known, the impacts of UHI-induced changes in micrometeorological conditions on vegetation are not well understood. Here we show that plant water requirements are significantly higher in urban areas compared to rural areas surrounding Madison, WI, driven by increased air temperature with minimal effects of decreased air moisture content. Local increases in impervious cover are strongly associated with increased evapotranspirative demand in a consistent manner across years, with most increases caused by elevated temperatures during the growing season rather than changes in changes in growing season length. Potential evapotranspiration is up to 10% higher due to the UHI, potentially mitigating changes to the water and energy balances caused by urbanization. Our results indicate that local-scale land cover decisions (increases in impervious cover) can significantly impact evapotranspirative demand, with likely implications for water and carbon cycling in urban ecosystems.

  19. Regional evaluation of evapotranspiration in the Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, E.R.

    2000-01-01

    Nine sites in the Florida Everglades were selected and instrumented for collection of data necessary for evapotranspiration-determination using the Bowen-ratio energy-budget method. The sites were selected to represent the sawgrass or cattail marshes, wet prairie, and open-water areas that constitute most of the natural Everglades system. At each site, measurements necessary for evapotranspiration (ET) calculation and modeling were automatically made and stored on-site at 15- or 30-minute intervals. Data collected included air temperature and humidity at two heights, wind speed and direction, incoming solar radiation, net solar radiation, water level and temperature, soil moisture content, soil temperature, soil heat flux, and rainfall. Data summarized in this report were collected from January 1996 through December 1997, and the development of site-specific and regional models of ET for this period is described. Latent heat flux is the energy flux density equivalent of the ET rate. Modified Priestley-Taylor models of latent heat flux as a function of selected independent variables were developed at each site. These models were used to fill in periods of missing latent heat flux measurement, and to develop regional models of the entire Everglades region. The regional models may be used to estimate ET in wet prairie, sawgrass or cattail marsh, and open-water portions of the natural Everglades system. The models are not applicable to forested areas or to the brackish areas adjacent to Florida Bay. Two types of regional models were developed. One type of model uses measurements of available energy at a site, together with incoming solar energy and water depth, to estimate hourly ET. This available-energy model requires site data for net radiation, water heat storage, and soil heat flux, as well as data for incoming solar radiation and water depth. The other type of model requires only incoming solar energy, air temperature, and water depth data to provide estimates of

  20. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central…

  1. Does dinitrogen hydrogenation follow different mechanisms for [(eta5-C5Me4H)2Zr]2(mu2,eta2,eta2-N2) and {[PhP(CH2SiMe2NSiMe2CH2)PPh]Zr}2(mu2,eta2,eta2-N2) complexes? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Bobadova-Parvanova, Petia; Wang, Qingfang; Quinonero-Santiago, David; Morokuma, Keiji; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2006-09-06

    The mechanisms of dinitrogen hydrogenation by two different complexes--[(eta(5)-C(5)Me(4)H)(2)Zr](2)(mu(2),eta(2),eta(2)-N(2)), synthesized by Chirik and co-workers [Nature 2004, 427, 527], and {[P(2)N(2)]Zr}(2)(mu(2),eta(2),eta(2)-N(2)), where P(2)N(2) = PhP(CH(2)SiMe(2)NSiMe(2)CH(2))(2)PPh, synthesized by Fryzuk and co-workers [Science 1997, 275, 1445]--are compared with density functional theory calculations. The former complex is experimentally known to be capable of adding more than one H(2) molecule to the side-on coordinated N(2) molecule, while the latter does not add more than one H(2). We have shown that the observed difference in the reactivity of these dizirconium complexes is caused by the fact that the former ligand environment is more rigid than the latter. As a result, the addition of the first H(2) molecule leads to two different products: a non-H-bridged intermediate for the Chirik-type complex and a H-bridged intermediate for the Fryzuk-type complex. The non-H-bridged intermediate requires a smaller energy barrier for the second H(2) addition than the H-bridged intermediate. We have also examined the effect of different numbers of methyl substituents in [(eta(5)-C(5)Me(n)H(5)(-)(n))(2)Zr](2)(mu(2),eta(2),eta(2)-N(2)) for n = 0, 4, and 5 (n = 5 is hypothetical) and [(eta(5)-C(5)H(2)-1,2,4-Me(3))(eta(5)-C(5)Me(5))(2)Zr](2)(mu(2),eta(2),eta(2)-N(2)) and have shown that all complexes of this type would follow a similar H(2) addition mechanism. We have also performed an extensive analysis on the factors (side-on coordination of N(2) to two Zr centers, availability of the frontier orbitals with appropriate symmetry, and inflexibility of the catalyst ligand environment) that are required for successful hydrogenation of the coordinated dinitrogen.

  2. Assessing reference evapotranspiration in a subhumid climate in NE Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolz, Reinhard; Eitzinger, Josef; Cepuder, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Computing reference evapotranspiration and multiplying it with a specific crop coefficient as recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is the most widely accepted approach to estimate plant water requirements. The standardized form of the well-known FAO Penman-Monteith equation, published by the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE-EWRI), is recommended as a standard procedure for calculating reference evapotranspiration. Applied and validated under different climatic conditions it generally achieved good results compared to other methods. However, several studies documented deviations between measured and calculated reference evapotranspiration depending on local environmental conditions. Consequently, it seems advisable to evaluate the model under local environmental conditions. Evapotranspiration was determined at a subhumid site in Austria (48°12'N, 16°34'E; 157 m asl) using a large weighing lysimeter operated at (limited) reference conditions and compared with calculations according to ASCE-EWRI. The lysimeter had an inner diameter of 1.9 m and a hemispherical bottom with a maximum depth of 2.5 m. Seepage water was measured at a free draining outlet using a tipping bucket. Lysimeter mass changes were sensed by a weighing facility with an accuracy of ±0.1 mm. Both rainfall and evapotranspiration were determined directly from lysimeter data using a simple water balance equation. Meteorological data for the ASCE-EWRI model were obtained from a weather station of the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics, Austria (ZAMG). The study period was from 2005 to 2010, analyses were based upon daily time steps. Daily calculated reference evapotranspiration was generally overestimated at small values, whereas it was rather underestimated when evapotranspiration was large, which is supported also by other studies. In the given case, advection of sensible heat proved

  3. Drought impacts and resilience on crops via evapotranspiration estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Joris; Asadollahi Dolatabad, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the global needs for food and water is at a critical level. It has been estimated that 12.5 % of the global population suffers from malnutrition and 768 million people still do not have access to clean drinking water. This need is increasing because of population growth but also by climate change. Changes in precipitation patterns will result either in flooding or droughts. Consequently availability, usability and affordability of water is becoming challenge and efficient use of water and water management is becoming more important, particularly during severe drought events. Drought monitoring for agricultural purposes is very hard. While meteorological drought can accurately be monitored using precipitation only, estimating agricultural drought is more difficult. This is because agricultural drought is dependent on the meteorological drought, the impacts on the vegetation, and the resilience of the crops. As such not only precipitation estimates are required but also evapotranspiration at plant/plot scale. Evapotranspiration (ET) describes the amount of water evaporated from soil and vegetation. As 65% of precipitation is lost by ET, drought severity is highly linked with this variable. In drought research, the precise quantification of ET and its spatio-temporal variability is therefore essential. In this view, remote sensing based models to estimate ET, such as SEBAL and SEBS, are of high value. However the resolution of current evapotranspiration products are not good enough for monitoring the impact of the droughts on the specific crops. This limitation originates because plot scales are in general smaller than the resolution of the available satellite ET products. As such remote sensing estimates of evapotranspiration are always a combination of different land surface types and cannot be used for plant health and drought resilience studies. The goal of this research is therefore to enable adequate resolutions of daily evapotranspiration estimates

  4. Parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization for a satellite-based evapotranspiration model across multiple sites using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Ma, Jinzhu; Zhu, Gaofeng; Ma, Ting; Han, Tuo; Feng, Li Li

    2017-01-01

    Global and regional estimates of daily evapotranspiration are essential to our understanding of the hydrologic cycle and climate change. In this study, we selected the radiation-based Priestly-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model and assessed it at a daily time scale by using 44 flux towers. These towers distributed in a wide range of ecological systems: croplands, deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, grasslands, mixed forests, savannas, and shrublands. A regional land surface evapotranspiration model with a relatively simple structure, the PT-JPL model largely uses ecophysiologically-based formulation and parameters to relate potential evapotranspiration to actual evapotranspiration. The results using the original model indicate that the model always overestimates evapotranspiration in arid regions. This likely results from the misrepresentation of water limitation and energy partition in the model. By analyzing physiological processes and determining the sensitive parameters, we identified a series of parameter sets that can increase model performance. The model with optimized parameters showed better performance (R2 = 0.2-0.87; Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) = 0.1-0.87) at each site than the original model (R2 = 0.19-0.87; NSE = -12.14-0.85). The results of the optimization indicated that the parameter β (water control of soil evaporation) was much lower in arid regions than in relatively humid regions. Furthermore, the optimized value of parameter m1 (plant control of canopy transpiration) was mostly between 1 to 1.3, slightly lower than the original value. Also, the optimized parameter Topt correlated well to the actual environmental temperature at each site. We suggest that using optimized parameters with the PT-JPL model could provide an efficient way to improve the model performance.

  5. Sub-canopy evapotranspiration from floating vegetation and open water in a swamp forest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among previous studies, there are large discrepancies in the difference between evapotranspiration from wetland vegetation and evaporation from open water. In this study, we investigate evapotranspiration differences between water and vegetation in a scenario that has otherwise not been extensively ...

  6. Operational evapotranspiration based on Earth observation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Ghilain, Nicolas; Arboleda, Alirio; Barrios, Jose-Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Geostationary satellites have the potential to follow fast evolving atmospheric and Earth surface phenomena such those related to cloud cover evolution and diurnal cycle. Since about 15 years, EUMETSAT has set up a network named 'Satellite Application Facility' (SAF, http://www.eumetsat.int/website/home/Satellites/GroundSegment/Safs/index.html) to complement its ground segment. The Land Surface Analysis (LSA) SAF (http://landsaf.meteo.pt/) is devoted to the development of operational products derived from the European meteorological satellites. In particular, an evapotranspiration (ET) product has been developed by the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium. Instantaneous and daily integrated results are produced in near real time and are freely available respectively since the end of 2009 and 2010. The products cover Europe, Africa and the Eastern part of South America with the spatial resolution of the SEVIRI sensor on-board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. The ET product algorithm (Ghilain et al., 2011) is based on a simplified Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme, forced with MSG derived radiative products (LSA SAF short and longwave surface fluxes, albedo). It has been extensively validated against in-situ validation data, mainly FLUXNET observations, demonstrating its good performances except in some arid or semi-arid areas. Research has then been pursued to develop an improved version for those areas. Solutions have been found in reviewing some of the model parameterizations and in assimilating additional satellite products (mainly vegetation indices and land surface temperature) into the model. The ET products will be complemented with related latent and sensible heat fluxes, to allow the monitoring of land surface energy partitioning. The new algorithm version should be tested in the LSA-SAF operational computer system in 2016 and results should become accessible to beta-users/regular users by the end of 2016/early 2017. In

  7. A calibration-free evapotranspiration mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, J.

    2010-12-01

    With the availability of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data the spatial distribution of the resulting daytime land surface temperature (Ts) can be tracked at a resolution of about 1-km. A simple, self-calibrating linear transformation of the Ts values into evapotranspiration (ET) rates is possible if the following criteria are met: a) the vertical gradient of the air temperature near the surface is directly proportional to Ts; b) net energy available for sensible and latent heat transfer at the surface is quasi-constant in space; c) heat conduction into the soil is negligible, and; d) land-surface properties do not change drastically over space. The validity of a) has been proved by such models as SEBAL and METRIC. Requirement b) is fulfilled over a flat or rolling terrain provided the probability distribution of the surface albedo values of the MODIS cells has a narrow spread, which is the case for the two study areas (Hungary and Nebraska) with a characteristic vegetation-period mean of about 16% and a standard deviation of 1.4%. Heat conduction into the soil can be considered negligible for periods longer than a day, thus the 8-day composited Ts values employed in the present study comply with this requirement. Finally, for periods longer than a day, the assumption of near-neutral atmospheric conditions is justified which entails that spatial variations in surface properties have a significantly dampened effect on the flux-transfer coefficient (i.e., aerodynamic resistance) value which therefore can be considered as quasi-constant in space. The linear transformation of the Ts values into ET rates in this study has been performed on a monthly basis. The transformation requires specifying two anchor points in the Ts - ET plane with the help of standard atmospheric variables, such as air temperature and humidity, as well as incident global radiation, or in lieu of it, sunshine duration. From March to November ET has been mapped for Hungary

  8. Evapotranspiration from areas of native vegetation in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, W.R.; Woodham, W.M.; Lopez, Miguel Angel

    1996-01-01

    The micrometeorological methods of energy-balance Bowen ratio and eddy correlation probably are suitable for determining evapotranspiration from unforested sites, but the aerodynamic effects of tall tree canopies need to be considered when the methods are used for forested sites. Potential evapotranspiration methods might not yield reliable estimates of evapotranspiration for all areas of native vegetation. Estimates of annual evapotranspiration ranged from 970 millimeters for a cypress swamp site to 1,060 millimeters for a pine flatwood site.

  9. Isolation of omnipotent suppressors in an [eta+] yeast strain.

    PubMed

    All-Robyn, J A; Kelley-Geraghty, D; Griffin, E; Brown, N; Liebman, S W

    1990-03-01

    Omnipotent suppressors decrease translational fidelity and cause misreading of nonsense codons. In the presence of the non-Mendelian factor [eta+], some alleles of previously isolated omnipotent suppressors are lethal. Thus the current search was conducted in an [eta+] strain in an effort to identify new suppressor loci. A new omnipotent suppressor, SUP39, and alleles of sup35, sup45, SUP44 and SUP46 were identified. Efficiencies of the dominant suppressors were dramatically reduced in strains that were cured of non-Mendelian factors by growth on guanidine hydrochloride. Wild-type alleles of SUP44 and SUP46 were cloned and these clones were used to facilitate the genetic analyses. SUP44 was shown to be on chromosome VII linked to cyh2, and SUP46 was clearly identified as distinct from the linked sup45.

  10. Isolation of omnipotent suppressors in an (eta sup + ) yeast strain

    SciTech Connect

    All-Robyn, J.A.; Kelley-Geraghty, D.; Griffin, E.; Brown, N.; Liebman, S.W. )

    1990-03-01

    Omnipotent suppressors decrease translational fidelity and cause misreading of nonsense codons. In the presence of the non-Mendelian factor (eta{sup +}), some alleles of previously isolated omnipotent suppressors are lethal. Thus the current search was conducted in an (eta{sup +}) strain in an effort to identify new suppressor loci. Revertants were isolated using UV irradiation. A new omnipotent suppressor, SUP39, and alleles of sup35, sup45, SUP44 and SUP46 were identified. Efficiencies of the dominant suppressors were dramatically reduced in strains that were cured of non-Mendelian factors by growth on guanidine hydrochloride. Wild-type alleles of SUP44 and SUP46 were cloned and these clones were used to facilitate the genetic analyses. SUP44 was shown to be on chromosome VII linked to cyh2, and SUP46 was clearly identified as distinct from the linked sup45.

  11. ETA-Graphics—an interface to endoreversible thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, K.; Hoffmann, K. H.

    2015-03-01

    Endoreversible thermodynamics is a theory for the description of irreversible thermodynamic processes. In this theory a non-equilibrium system is divided into a set of reversible subsystems which interact irreversibly with one another by exchanging energy and extensive quantities. These extensities act as carriers for the energy. ETA-Graphics is a graphics-based interface to endoreversible thermodynamics that can be used as an educational aid. It enables students to visually design endoreversible systems by drawing reversible subsystems and connecting them with irreversible (or reversible) interactions. Through special dialogs users specify the properties of the system, e.g., in form of transport laws for energy and extensive quantities. Based on the input ETA-Graphics allows students to analyse the endoreversible systems and their properties. Therefore, performance measures, i.e., efficiency and total power output, are calculated. Additionally, graphical representations of the results are shown.

  12. Observation of B0-->omega K0, B+-->eta pi+, and B+-->eta K+ and study of related decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Lee, C L; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-02-13

    We present measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for seven B-meson decays with an eta, eta', or omega meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 89x10(6) BB pairs produced from e(+)e(-) annihilation at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We measure the following branching fractions in units of 10(-6): B(B+-->eta pi(+))=5.3+/-1.0+/-0.3, B(B+-->eta K+)=3.4+/-0.8+/-0.2, B(B0-->eta K0)=2.9+/-1.0+/-0.2 (<5.2, 90% C.L.), B(B+-->eta(')pi(+))=2.7+/-1.2+/-0.3 (<4.5, 90% C.L.), B(B+-->omega pi(+))=5.5+/-0.9+/-0.5, B(B+-->omega K+)=4.8+/-0.8+/-0.4, and B(B0-->omega K0)=5.9(+1.6)(-1.3)+/-0.5. The charge asymmetries are A(ch)(B+-->eta pi(+))=-0.44+/-0.18+/-0.01, A(ch)(B+-->eta K+)=-0.52+/-0.24+/-0.01, A(ch)(B+-->omega pi(+))=0.03+/-0.16+/-0.01, and A(ch)(B+-->omega K+)=-0.09+/-0.17+/-0.01.

  13. The eta Carinae Treasury Project and the HST/STIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, John C.; Davidson, Kris

    2006-01-01

    The HST Eta Carinae Treasury Project made extensive use of the HST/STIS from 1998 to the time of its failure in 2004. As one of the most prolific users of that instrument, the Treasury Project used the cross-dispersed spatial resolution of the STIS as few projects did. We present several enhancements to the existing STIS data reduction methods that are applicable to non-Treasury Project data in the STIS archive.

  14. Photoproduction of η and η' mesons with EtaMAID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiator, Lothar; Kashevarov, Viktor; Ostrick, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The unitary isobar model EtaMAID has been updated with an extended list of nucleon resonances, fitted to recent and new data for differential cross sections and polarization observables. The nonresonant background is described by Regge trajectories of ω,ρ and a1, b1 mesons and in addition Regge cuts, where vector and axial vector mesons are exchanged together with Pomeron and f2 mesons.

  15. DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-08-10

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  16. Divergence of reference evapotranspiration estimates under advective tropical conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standardized reference evapotranspiration (ET) and crop specific coefficients are frequently used to assess crop water use in irrigated agriculture. However, equations for calculating reference ET have not been well validated in more humid environments where optimal crop yields can depend on supplem...

  17. Ecosystem evapotranspiration: Challenges in measurements, estimates, and modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) processes at the leaf-to-landscape scales in multiple land uses have important controls and feedbacks for the local, regional and global climate and water resource systems. Innovative methods, tools, and technologies for improved understanding and quantification of ET and cro...

  18. Bushland evapotranspiration and agricultural remote sensing system (BEARS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-resolution daily evapotranspiration (ET) maps would greatly assist irrigation scheduling and hydrologic modeling. Numerous remote sensing-based ET algorithms that vary in complexity are available for estimating spatially and temporally variable daily ET at a regional scale. However, implementat...

  19. Remote sensing estimation of evapotranspiration for SWAT Model Calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrological models are used to assess many water resource problems from water quantity to water quality issues. The accurate assessment of the water budget, primarily the influence of precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET), is a critical first-step evaluation, which is often overlooked in hydro...

  20. Utility of thermal remote sensing for determining evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) from thermal remote sensing is a surface boundary condition that is strongly linked to the partitioning of the available energy between latent (evapotranspiration) and sensible heat flux. Numerous modeling approaches have been developed ranging in level of complexity ...

  1. Determining the oxygen isotope composition of evapotranspiration with eddy covariance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The oxygen isotope componsition of evapotranspiration (dF) represents an important tracer in the study of biosphere-atmosphere interactions, hydrology, paleoclimate, and carbon cycling. Here we demonstrate direct measurement of dF based on eddy covariance (EC) and tunable diode laser (EC-TDL) techni...

  2. Crop evapotranspiration calculation using infrared thermometers aboard center pivots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling using remotely sensed surface temperature can result in equal or greater crop yield and crop water use efficiency compared with irrigation scheduling using in-situ soil water profile measurements. Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) is useful for irrigation scheduling, and can be cal...

  3. Evapotranspiration: Mass balance measurements compared with flux estimation methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be measured by mass balance methods and estimated by flux sensing methods. The mass balance methods are typically restricted in terms of the area that can be represented (e.g., surface area of weighing lysimeter (LYS) or equivalent representative area of neutron probe (NP...

  4. Daily time series evapotranspiration maps for Oklahoma and Texas panhandle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important process in ecosystems’ water budget and closely linked to its productivity. Therefore, regional scale daily time series ET maps developed at high and medium resolutions have large utility in studying the carbon-energy-water nexus and managing water resources. ...

  5. Evapotranspiration measurement and modeling in Mid-South irrigated rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly 75% of US rice is grown in the humid mid-South. Rice requires more water to produce than other crops (corn, soybean, and cotton). The identification of rice evapotranspiration and irrigation demand is paramount to understand regional water use and water allocation. Drill-seeded, commercial si...

  6. Estimation of evapotranspiration rate in irrigated lands using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umirzakov, Gulomjon; Windhorst, David; Forkutsa, Irina; Brauer, Lutz; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2013-04-01

    Agriculture in the Aral Sea basin is the main consumer of water resources and due to the current agricultural management practices inefficient water usage causes huge losses of freshwater resources. There is huge potential to save water resources in order to reach a more efficient water use in irrigated areas. Therefore, research is required to reveal the mechanisms of hydrological fluxes in irrigated areas. This paper focuses on estimation of evapotranspiration which is one of the crucial components in the water balance of irrigated lands. Our main objective is to estimate the rate of evapotranspiration on irrigated lands and partitioning of evaporation into transpiration using stable isotopes measurements. Experiments has done in 2 different soil types (sandy and sandy loam) irrigated areas in Ferghana Valley (Uzbekistan). Soil samples were collected during the vegetation period. The soil water from these samples was extracted via a cryogenic extraction method and analyzed for the isotopic ratio of the water isotopes (2H and 18O) based on a laser spectroscopy method (DLT 100, Los Gatos USA). Evapotranspiration rates were estimated with Isotope Mass Balance method. The results of evapotranspiration obtained using isotope mass balance method is compared with the results of Catchment Modeling Framework -1D model results which has done in the same area and the same time.

  7. Partitioning evapotranspiration into evaporation and transpiration in a corn field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a main component of the hydrology cycle. It consists of soil water evaporation (E) and plant transpiration (T). Accurate partitioning of ET into E and T is challenging. We measured soil water E using heat pulse sensors and a micro-Bowen ratio system, T using stem flow gaug...

  8. Seasonal energy and evapotranspiration partitioning in a desert vineyard

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The challenge of partitioning energy and evapotranspiration (ET) components was addressed over a season (bud break till harvest) in a wine grape vineyard located in an extreme arid region. A below canopy energy balance approach was applied to continuously estimate evaporation from the soil (E) while...

  9. Religion, evolution, and mental health: attachment theory and ETAS theory.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, Kevin J; Galek, Kathleen

    2010-09-01

    This article reviews the historical origins of Attachment Theory and Evolutionary Threat Assessment Systems Theory (ETAS Theory), their evolutionary basis and their application in research on religion and mental health. Attachment Theory has been most commonly applied to religion and mental health in research on God as an attachment figure, which has shown that secure attachment to God is positively associated with psychological well-being. Its broader application to religion and mental health is comprehensively discussed by Kirkpatrick (2005). ETAS Theory explains why certain religious beliefs--including beliefs about God and life-after-death--should have an adverse association, an advantageous association, or no association at all with mental health. Moreover, it makes specific predictions to this effect, which have been confirmed, in part. The authors advocate the application of ETAS Theory in research on religion and mental health because it explains how religious and other beliefs related to the dangerousness of the world can directly affect psychiatric symptoms through their affects on specific brain structures.

  10. High Velocity Absorption during Eta Car B's Periastron Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Groh, J. H.; Hillier, J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, S. P.; Okazaki, A. T.; Damineli, A.; Teodoro, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.

    2010-01-01

    Eta Car is one of the most luminous massive stars in the Galaxy, with repeated eruptions with a 5.5 year periodicity. These events are caused by the periastron passage of a massive companion in an eccentric orbit. We report the VLT/CRIRES detection of a strong high-velocity, (<1900 km/s) , broad absorption wing in He I at 10833 A during the 2009.0 periastron passage. Previous observations during the 2003.5 event have shown evidence of such high-velocity absorption in the He I 10833 transition, allowing us to conclude that the high-velocity gas is crossing the line-of-sight toward Eta Car over a time period of approximately 2 months. Our analysis of HST/STlS archival data with observations of high velocity absorption in the ultraviolet Si IV and C IV resonance lines, confirm the presence of a high-velocity material during the spectroscopic low state. The observations provide direct detection of high-velocity material flowing from the wind-wind collision zone around the binary system, and we discuss the implications of the presence of high-velocity gas in Eta Car during periastron

  11. Iron Mining Eta Carinae's Archived Spectra and Benchmarking Atomic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urech, Alexander; Bautista, M.; Gull, T. R.; Hartman, H.; Fivet, V.

    2013-01-01

    Fe II has proven to be one of the most conspicuous species in UV, visible, and IR spectra. The complexity of this atomic system still challenges current theoretical methods. Comparisons of available atomic data with different astronomical spectra is the focus of the current research. Spectra from the Orion and the Eta Carinae nebulae are being used in these studies. Orions spectrum contains over 70 emission line for [Fe II] which have been used in the systematical benchmarking of Einstein transition probabilities (A-values) for forbidden transitions of the interest species against calculations from literature and our own. The spectra from many other sources must be compared to end with accurate data, which is why examination of Eta Carinae is also taking place. The Weigelt blobs are close in ejectas thought to originate from the central star of Eta Carinae and are of particular interest in this study. IDL software is being used for measuring the forbidden [Fe II] transitions from these spectra collected with the Hubble Space Telescope/ Space Telescope Image Spectrograph.

  12. Spatial Root Zone Soil Moisture Estimation and Forecasting Using the METRIC Evapotranspiration Product and Multivariate Relevance Vector Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticlavilca, A. M.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Bachour, R.; McKee, M.

    2013-12-01

    Limited access to spatial root zone soil moisture (SM) estimation in agricultural areas restricts enhanced water balance and irrigation scheduling estimations by irrigators and water managers, as well as other possible uses of these soil moisture estimates. Herein, we propose a methodology that allows for spatial SM estimation and forecasts at depths of 0.05, 0.30 and 0.60 m in agricultural areas at a temporal resolution ranging from the present to eight and sixteen days ahead. This methodology is based on a statistical learning model called the Multivariate Relevance Vector Machine (MVRVM). This model is known for its robustness, efficiency, and sparseness. It provides a statistically sound approach to learn from the input-output response patterns contained in the training dataset, and has proven to be superior to traditional algorithms such as Artificial Neural Networks. The MVRVM is used to build a methodology that spatially estimates and predicts current and future soil moisture state based upon historical records of soil moisture and actual crop evapotranspiration. Soil moisture measurements at three different depths acquired by the Utah Water Research Laboratory (UWRL) for agricultural lands in the Lower Sevier River Basin, Utah, are used for this study. The methodology combines the SM data at different depths along with estimates of actual crop evapotranspiration using the Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) algorithm which uses Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery records. The MVRVM produces good results at current, eight and sixteen days with a reduced computational complexity and suitable real-time implementation. Additionally, spatial bootstrapping analysis is used to evaluate over- and under-fitting and uncertainty in model estimates.

  13. TDR Technique for Estimating the Intensity of Evapotranspiration of Turfgrasses

    PubMed Central

    Janik, Grzegorz; Wolski, Karol; Daniel, Anna; Albert, Małgorzata; Skierucha, Wojciech; Wilczek, Andrzej; Szyszkowski, Paweł; Walczak, Amadeusz

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a method for precise estimation of evapotranspiration of selected turfgrass species. The evapotranspiration functions, whose domains are only two relatively easy to measure parameters, were developed separately for each of the grass species. Those parameters are the temperature and the volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm. Evapotranspiration has the character of a modified logistic function with empirical parameters. It assumes the form ETR(θ2.5 cm, T2.5 cm) = A/(1 + B · e−C·(θ2.5 cm · T2.5 cm)), where: ETR(θ2.5 cm, T2.5 cm) is evapotranspiration [mm·h−1], θ2.5 cm is volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm [m3·m−3], T2.5 cm is soil temperature at the depth of 2.5 cm [°C], and A, B, and C are empirical coefficients calculated individually for each of the grass species [mm·h1], and [—], [(m3·m−3·°C)−1]. The values of evapotranspiration calculated on the basis of the presented function can be used as input data for the design of systems for the automatic control of irrigation systems ensuring optimum moisture conditions in the active layer of lawn swards. PMID:26448964

  14. 2{eta} or not 2{eta}? Insights into the Cu CVD process using a Cu(I) precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Maverick, A.W.; Fronczek, F.R.; Kim, A.J.; Butler, L.G.

    1993-12-31

    One of the first successful Cu(I) CVD precursors is (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD), and this species continues to served as a model system. In the CVD process, a significant step is dissociation of the COD ligand. The energetics of this process have been estimated previously. However, it now appears that, in the solid state, (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD) undergoes an exchange process that allows additional insight into the potential energy surface governing the Cu-COD interaction. The solid-state structure of (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD) has been difficult to establish, but a combination of variable temperature X-ray and solid-state {sup 13}C NMR studies leads to the following picture. Cu{sup I} is three-coordinate, bound to the hfac ligand and bound preferentially to one olefin of the COD ligand. There is a small energy barrier associated with motion of the Cu into position for {eta}{sup 2}-binding to the other olefin; the COD and hfac ligands remain approximately stationary. Thus, there are two sites for Cu, now labeled {eta}{sup 2} and {eta}{sup 2}. This new interpretation of the solid-state structure differs from that of our 300 K data set and a previous report. In addition, the exchange process is intimately connected with the Cu-COD dissociation step in the CVD process.

  15. Eta Carinae: An Astrophysical Laboratory to Study Conditions During the Transition Between a Pseudo-Supernova and a Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Darren; Gull, T. R.; Madura, T.

    2014-01-01

    A major puzzle in the studies of supernovae is the pseudo-supernova, or the near-supernovae state. It has been found to precede, in timespans ranging from months to years, a number of recently-detected distant supernovae. One explanation of these systems is that a member of a massive binary underwent a near-supernova event shortly before the actual supernova phenomenon. Luckily, we have a nearby massive binary, Eta Carinae, that provides an astrophysical laboratory of a near-analog. The massive, highly-eccentric, colliding-wind binary star system survived a non-terminal stellar explosion in the 1800's, leaving behind the incredible bipolar, 10"x20" Homunculus nebula. Today, the interaction of the binary stellar winds 1") is resolvable by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Using HST/STIS, several three-dimensional (3D) data cubes (2D spatial, 1D velocity) have been obtained at selected phases during Eta Carinae's 5.54-year orbital cycle. The data cubes were collected by mapping the central 1-2" at 0.05" intervals with a 52"x0.1" aperture. Selected forbidden lines, that form in the colliding wind regions, provide information on electron density of the shocked regions, the ionization by the hot secondary companion of the primary wind and how these regions change with orbital phase. By applying various analysis techniques to these data cubes, we can compare and measure temporal changes due to the interactions between the two massive winds. The observations, when compared to current 3D hydrodynamic models, provide insight on Eta Carinae's recent mass-loss history, important for determining the current and future states of this likely nearby supernova progenitor.

  16. Observation of eta' decays to pi+pi-pi0 and pi+pi-e+e-.

    PubMed

    Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Robichaud, A N; Tatishvili, G; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Onyisi, P U E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tan, B J Y; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Ecklund, K M

    2009-02-13

    Using psi(2S)-->pi;{+}pi;{-}J/psi, J/psi-->gammaeta;{'} events acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e;{+}e;{-} collider, we make the first observations of the decays eta;{'}-->pi;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} and eta;{'}-->pi;{+}pi;{-}e;{+}e;{-}, measuring absolute branching fractions (37_{-9};{+11}+/-4)x10;{-4} and (25_{-9};{+12}+/-5)x10;{-4}, respectively. For eta;{'}-->pi;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0}, this result probes the mechanism of isospin violation and the roles of pi;{0}/eta/eta;{'}-mixing and final state rescattering in strong decays. We also set upper limits on branching fractions for eta;{'} decays to pi;{+}pi;{-}micro;{+}micro;{-}, 2(pi;{+}pi;{-}), pi;{+}pi;{-}2pi;{0}, 2(pi;{+}pi;{-})pi;{0}, 3(pi;{+}pi;{-}), and invisible final states.

  17. Measurements of {psi}(2S) decays into {gamma}KK{pi} and {gamma}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bian, J. G.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Cui, X. Z.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, K. L.

    2006-10-01

    Radiative decays of the {psi}(2S) into {gamma}KK{pi} and {gamma}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are studied using 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions or upper limits on the branching fractions of {psi}(2S) and {chi}{sub cJ} decays are reported. No significant signal for {eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475) is observed in the KK{pi} or {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mass spectra, and upper limits on the branching fractions of {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475), {eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475){yields}KK{pi}, and {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} are determined.

  18. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  19. Actual ET modelling based on the Budyko framework and the sustainability of vegetation water use in the loess plateau.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuerui; Sun, Miao; Zhao, Qi; Wu, Pute; Zhao, Xining; Pan, Wenxiang; Wang, Yubao

    2017-02-01

    Jointly influenced by the natural factors and the artificial protection measures, the ecological environment of Loess Plateau has been significantly improved in recent years, but which has already brought about some water-related problems. To maintain the balance between precipitation and water consumption is an important foundation for sustainable development of the ecology remediation. This study used Budyko Framework to simulate the actual water consumption of 161 sub-basins from 1990 to 2014. Based on the simulation results, the research also analyzed the evolution characteristics of water balance in Loess Plateau from 1990 to 2014. Results show that, with the increase of vegetation coverage, the regional precipitation and actual evapotranspiration were both showing a significant increasing trend, and the increasing rate of precipitation was 1.91mm/a on average, which was greater than the increasing rate of actual evapotranspiration of 1.34mm/a. To further demonstrate the water balance regime in Loess Plateau, the evapotranspiration coefficient (ECC) was used to quantitatively indicate the ratio of the vegetation water consumption and the total precipitation. The average values of ECC were 0.868, 0.863, 0.851 and 0.837 respectively in four sub-periods of 1990-1999, 2000-2004, 2005-2009 and 2010-2014. The above analyses indicate that with the vegetation recovery and ecological restoration, the percentage of evapotranspiration in the total precipitation is keeping decreasing and in turn the percentage of water yield in the total precipitation is keeping increasing. Consequently, it seems more sustainable for vegetation water use in most areas of Loess Plateau currently.

  20. The adaptive CCCG({eta}) method for efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F.F.; Birkett, N.R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Controlled Cholesky factorisation has been shown to be a robust preconditioner for the Conjugate Gradient method. In this scheme the amount of fill-in is defined in terms of a parameter {eta}, the number of extra elements allowed per column. It is demonstrated how an optimum value of {eta} can be automatically determined when solving time dependent p.d.e.`s using an implicit time step method. A comparison between CCCG({eta}) and the standard ICCG solving parabolic problems on general grids shows CCCG({eta}) to be an efficient general purpose solver.

  1. RIP-ET: A riparian evapotranspiration package for MODFLOW-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maddock, Thomas; Baird, Kathryn J.; Hanson, R.T.; Schmid, Wolfgang; Ajami, Hoori

    2012-01-01

    A new evapotranspiration package for the U.S. Geological Survey's groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW, is documented. The Riparian Evapotranspiration Package (RIP-ET) provides flexibility in simulating riparian and wetland transpiration not provided by the Evapotranspiration (EVT) or Segmented Function Evapotranspiration (ETS1) Packages for MODFLOW 2005. This report describes how the RIP-ET package was conceptualized and provides input instructions, listings and explanations of the source code, and an example. Traditional approaches to modeling evapotranspiration (ET) processes assume a piecewise linear relationship between ET flux and hydraulic head. The RIP-ET replaces this traditional relationship with a segmented, nonlinear dimensionless curve that reflects the eco-physiology of riparian and wetland ecosystems. Evapotranspiration losses from these ecosystems are dependent not only on hydraulic head, but on the plant types present. User-defined plant functional groups (PFGs) are used to elucidate the interaction between plant transpiration and groundwater conditions. Five generalized plant functional groups based on transpiration rates, plant rooting depth, and water tolerance ranges are presented: obligate wetland, shallow-rooted riparian, deep-rooted riparian, transitional riparian and bare ground/open water. Plant functional groups can be further divided into subgroups (PFSGs) based on plant size, density or other characteristics. The RIP-ET allows for partial habitat coverage and mixtures of plant functional subgroups to be present in a single model cell. RIP-ET also distinguishes between plant transpiration and bare-ground evaporation. Habitat areas are designated by polygons; each polygon can contain a mixture of PFSGs and bare ground, and is assigned a surface elevation. This process requires a determination of fractional coverage for each of the plant functional subgroups present in a polygon to account for the mixture of coverage types and resulting

  2. [Effects of marshland reclamation on evapotranspiration in the Sanjiang Plain].

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-jun; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Yao; Zhao, Xiao-song; Song, Chang-chun

    2010-04-01

    Extensive reclamation of marshland into cropland has had tremendous effects on the ecological environment in the Sanjiang Plain. Observations over marshland, rice paddy and soybean field were made with eddy covariance measuring systems from May to October in 2005, 2006 and 2007. The objective of this study was to identify the effects of the conversion of marshland to cropland on evapotranspiration in the Sanjiang Plain. The results showed that the diurnal variation curves of latent heat flux were single peaked in marshland, rice paddy and soybean field. The daily maximum latent heat flux increased by 14%-130% in rice paddy in the three measuring years, however, in soybean field, it increased by 3%-77% in 2006 but decreased by 25%-40% in 2005 and 2007 by comparison with that in marshland. This difference was due to the change of leaf area index when marshland was reclaimed into cropland. Seasonal change of latent heat flux was identical for the three land use types. Daily averaged latent heat flux of rice paddy, from May to October, showed 38%-53% increase compared with that of marshland, which resulted from the increase in net radiation and leaf area index. When marshland was reclaimed into soybean field, the variation of daily averaged latent heat flux depended primarily on precipitation. Precipitation was the main factor that controlled evapotranspiration over soybean field which was usually in condition of soil water deficit. Drought caused 11%-17% decrease of daily averaged latent heat flux over soybean field in 2005 and 2007, while sufficient precipitation caused 22% increase in 2006, comparing to marshland. Similarly, during the growing season from June to September, total evapotranspiration of rice paddy increased by 24%-51% compared with that of marshland, and the total evapotranspiration of soybean field decreased by 19%-23% in 2005 and 2007 and increased by 19% in 2006. It is concluded that the evapotranspiration changes significantly when the marshland

  3. Measurements of the mass and width of the eta(c) meson and of an eta(c)(2S) candidate.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-04-09

    The mass m(eta(c)) and total width Gamma(eta(c))(tot) of the eta(c) meson have been measured in two-photon interactions at the SLAC e(+)e(-) asymmetric B Factory with the BABAR detector. With a sample of approximately 2500 reconstructed eta(c)-->K(0)(S)K+/-pi(-/+) decays in 88 fb(-1) of data, the results are m(eta(c))=2982.5+/-1.1(stat)+/-0.9(syst) MeV/c(2) and Gamma(eta(c))(tot)=34.3+/-2.3(stat)+/-0.9(syst) MeV/c(2). Using the same decay mode, a second resonance with 112+/-24 events is observed with a mass of 3630.8+/-3.4(stat)+/-1.0(syst) MeV/c(2) and width of 17.0+/-8.3(stat)+/-2.5(syst) MeV/c(2). This observation is consistent with expectations for the eta(c)(2S) state.

  4. Evaluation of Physically and Empirically Based Models for the Estimation of Green Roof Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digiovanni, K. A.; Montalto, F. A.; Gaffin, S.; Rosenzweig, C.

    2010-12-01

    Green roofs and other urban green spaces can provide a variety of valuable benefits including reduction of the urban heat island effect, reduction of stormwater runoff, carbon sequestration, oxygen generation, air pollution mitigation etc. As many of these benefits are directly linked to the processes of evaporation and transpiration, accurate and representative estimation of urban evapotranspiration (ET) is a necessary tool for predicting and quantifying such benefits. However, many common ET estimation procedures were developed for agricultural applications, and thus carry inherent assumptions that may only be rarely applicable to urban green spaces. Various researchers have identified the estimation of expected urban ET rates as critical, yet poorly studied components of urban green space performance prediction and cite that further evaluation is needed to reconcile differences in predictions from varying ET modeling approaches. A small scale green roof lysimeter setup situated on the green roof of the Ethical Culture Fieldston School in the Bronx, NY has been the focus of ongoing monitoring initiated in June 2009. The experimental setup includes a 0.6 m by 1.2 m Lysimeter replicating the anatomy of the 500 m2 green roof of the building, with a roof membrane, drainage layer, 10 cm media depth, and planted with a variety of Sedum species. Soil moisture sensors and qualitative runoff measurements are also recorded in the Lysimeter, while a weather station situated on the rooftop records climatologic data. Direct quantification of actual evapotranspiration (AET) from the green roof weighing lysimeter was achieved through a mass balance approaches during periods absent of precipitation and drainage. A comparison of AET to estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET) calculated from empirically and physically based ET models was performed in order to evaluate the applicability of conventional ET equations for the estimation of ET from green roofs. Results have

  5. Phosphine-boranes as bidentate ligands: formation of [8,8-eta(2)-(eta(2)-(BH(3)).dppm)-nido-8,7-RhSB(9)H(10)] and [9,9-eta(2)-(eta(2)-(BH(3)).dppm)-nido-9,7,8-RhC(2)B(8)H(11)] from [8,8-(eta(2)-dppm)-8-(eta(1)-dppm)-nido-8,7-RhSB(9)H(10)] and [9,9-(eta(2)-dppm)-9-(eta(1)-dppm)-nido-9,7,8-RhC(2)B(8)H(11)], respectively.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Oleg; Macías, Ramón; Rath, Nigam P; Barton, Lawrence

    2002-11-04

    The two clusters [8,8-(eta(2)-dppm)-8-(eta(1)-dppm)-nido-8,7-RhSB(9)H(10)] (1) and [9,9-(eta(2)-dppm)-9-(eta(1)-dppm)-nido-9,7,8-RhC(2)B(8)H(11)] (2) (dppm = PPh(2)CH(2)PPh(2)), both of which contain pendant PPh(2) groups, react with BH(3).thf to afford the species [8,8-eta(2)-(eta(2)-(BH(3)).dppm)-nido-8,7-RhSB(9)H(10)] (3) and [9,9-eta(2)-(eta(2)-(BH(3)).dppm))-nido-9,7,8-RhC(2)B(8)H(11)] (4), respectively. These two species are very similar in that they both contain the bidentate ligand [(BH(3)).dppm], which coordinates to the Rh center via a PPh(2) group and also via a eta(2)-BH(3) group. Thus, the B atom in the BH(3) group is four-coordinate, bonded to Rh by two bridging hydrogen atoms, to a terminal H atom, and to a PPh(2) group. At room temperature, the BH(3) group is fluxional; the two bridging H atoms and the terminal H atom are equivalent on the NMR time scale. The motion is arrested at low temperature with DeltaG++ = ca. 37 and 42 kJ mol(-1), respectively, for 3 and 4. Both species are characterized completely by NMR and mass spectral measurements as well as by elemental analysis and single-crystal structure determinations.

  6. Mapping daily evapotranspiration at Landsat spatial scales during the BEAREX'08 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Martha C.; Kustas, William P.; Alfieri, Joseph G.; Gao, Feng; Hain, Christopher; Prueger, John H.; Evett, Steven; Colaizzi, Paul; Howell, Terry; Chávez, José L.

    2012-12-01

    Robust spatial information about environmental water use at field scales and daily to seasonal timesteps will benefit many applications in agriculture and water resource management. This information is particularly critical in arid climates where freshwater resources are limited or expensive, and groundwater supplies are being depleted at unsustainable rates to support irrigated agriculture as well as municipal and industrial uses. Gridded evapotranspiration (ET) information at field scales can be obtained periodically using land-surface temperature-based surface energy balance algorithms applied to moderate resolution satellite data from systems like Landsat, which collects thermal-band imagery every 16 days at a resolution of approximately 100 m. The challenge is in finding methods for interpolating between ET snapshots developed at the time of a clear-sky Landsat overpass to provide complete daily time-series over a growing season. This study examines the efficacy of a simple gap-filling algorithm designed for applications in data-sparse regions, which does not require local ground measurements of weather or rainfall, or estimates of soil texture. The algorithm relies on general conservation of the ratio between actual ET and a reference ET, generated from satellite insolation data and standard meteorological fields from a mesoscale model. The algorithm was tested with ET retrievals from the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) surface energy balance model and associated DisALEXI flux disaggregation technique, which uses Landsat-scale thermal imagery to reduce regional ALEXI maps to a finer spatial resolution. Daily ET at the Landsat scale was compared with lysimeter and eddy covariance flux measurements collected during the Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote sensing EXperiment of 2008 (BEAREX08), conducted in an irrigated agricultural area in the Texas Panhandle under highly advective conditions. The simple gap-filling algorithm performed

  7. Sensitivity of the projected hydroclimatic environment of the Delaware River basin to formulation of potential evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2016-01-01

    The Delaware River Basin (DRB) encompasses approximately 0.4 % of the area of the United States (U.S.), but supplies water to 5 % of the population. We studied three forested tributaries to quantify the potential climate-driven change in hydrologic budget for two 25-year time periods centered on 2030 and 2060, focusing on sensitivity to the method of estimating potential evapotranspiration (PET) change. Hydrology was simulated using the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (Williamson et al. 2015). Climate-change scenarios for four Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate models (GCMs) and two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) were used to derive monthly change factors for temperature (T), precipitation (PPT), and PET according to the energy-based method of Priestley and Taylor (1972). Hydrologic simulations indicate a general increase in annual (especially winter) streamflow (Q) as early as 2030 across the DRB, with a larger increase by 2060. This increase in Q is the result of (1) higher winter PPT, which outweighs an annual actual evapotranspiration (AET) increase and (2) (for winter) a major shift away from storage of PPT as snow pack. However, when PET change is evaluated instead using the simpler T-based method of Hamon (1963), the increases in Q are small or even negative. In fact, the change of Q depends as much on PET method as on time period or RCP. This large sensitivity and associated uncertainty underscore the importance of exercising caution in the selection of a PET method for use in climate-change analyses.

  8. Vapor pressure deficit is as important as soil moisture in determining limitations to evapotranspiration during drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novick, K. A.; Williams, C. A.; Phillips, R.; Oishi, A. C.; Sulman, B. N.; Bohrer, G.; Ficklin, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The decoupling between potential evapotranspiration (PET) and actual evapotranspiration (AET) is a useful metric to characterize ecosystem hydrologic stress. As hydrologic stress evolves, PET increases following increases in incident radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). AET, on the other hand, remains stationary or decreases due to declines in surface conductance imposed by decreasing soil water and stomatal closure under high VPD. Historically, it has been difficult to quantify the extent to which soil moisture as compared to VPD ultimately limits AET during hydrologic stress. Part of this difficulty relates to the strong correlation between soil moisture and VPD at timescales over which hydrologic stress evolves (weekly to monthly). Further, while it is relatively easy to manipulate soil moisture in experimental settings, manipulating VPD is much more difficult. Recently, the proliferation of eddy covariance flux sites has produced a rich collection of AET observations at fine timescales (i.e. hourly to daily) over which VPD and soil moisture are more decoupled. In this study, we leverage such data to quantify the extent to which soil moisture versus VPD constrains AET in more than 25 Ameriflux sites spanning a wide climate gradient. We found that AET was most significantly limited by soil moisture in dry sites where the annual PET was much higher than precipitation. VPD limitations to AET dominated in wetter sites, but even among the driest sites, they were of similar magnitude to soil moisture limitations. Our results highlight the critical, if at time underappreciated, role of VPD in determining ecohydrological functioning during periods of hydrologic stress. We also leverage these results together with future projections for VPD, soil moisture, and other relevant meteorological drivers to explore the extent to which the coherence between VPD and soil moisture, and their relative importance for limiting AET, may shift under future climate conditions.

  9. Environmental and biophysical controls on the evapotranspiration over the highest alpine steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yinsheng; Guo, Yanhong; Gao, Haifeng; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Yefan

    2015-10-01

    Characterizing the water and energy flux in the alpine steppe ecosystem in Tibetan Plateau (TP) is of particular importance for elucidating hydrological cycle mechanisms in high altitude areas. In the present study, two years of actual evapotranspiration (ET) values from a semi-arid alpine steppe region (4947 m above sea level) and their environmental and biophysical controls were investigated using the energy balance Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) method. Seasonally, ET was much lower in frozen soil period and transition period mainly because of low soil water availability. However, ample soil water supplied by rainfall during the rainy period substantially increased ET. The available energy played an important role in controlling ET in the rainy period. Also, the leaf-level stomata closure and plant leaf development could impact the ET through changing bulk surface conductance (Gs) in rainy period. Similarly, the land-atmosphere energy exchange was dominated by latent heat flux (λE) in July, but was dominated by sensible heat flux (H) in December and May. Annual ET (plus sublimation) were 362.9 mm and 353.4 mm in the first and second observation year, respectively, which were close to the annual precipitation. On annual scale, the low Gs (3.30-3.62 mm s-1), decoupling factor (Ω, 0.25-0.27) and the ratio of ET to equilibrium evapotranspiration (ET/ETeq, 0.34-0.35) corroborated the overall water-limited conditions for the high-altitude alpine steppe. This research provides not only the ground truth data for future hydrological modeling in the data scarce region of TP but also the insights for elucidating how the environmental and biophysical stress factors control the land surface ET in high-altitude region.

  10. Use of the Aquacrop model for the simulation of wheat evapotranspiration in north-eastern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, A.; Masmoudi, M.; Jacob, F.; Ben Mechlia, N.

    2012-04-01

    Improvement of rainfed cropping systems is based on the use of rainfall water for crop transpiration. This could be achieved by the appropriate partitioning of rainfall between green water and blue water. Under semiarid conditions, the AquaCrop model which has a driving engine based on the direct link between dry matter production and crop evapotranspiration, seems to be a powerful tool to perform this task. For this purposes, an experimental work was conducted on the wheat crop, grown under various farming conditions, to determine how simulation modeling could be used to monitor canopy changes and actual crop evapotranspiration. The study area -CapBon- is located in north eastern Tunisia where rainfall is about 500 mm and ET0 around 1200mm Field monitoring consisted in regular measurements of the leaf area index (LAI), vegetation cover changes (CC) and soil moisture content profiles over the cropping season December 2009-April 2010. The usefulness of using hemispherical and standard images to determine LAI and CC was also investigated for their adoption as a standard methods for the assessment of these important parameter as input data. Results show that good estimates of LAI and CC could be obtained from digital images. Fairly reliable linear relationships were obtained between measurements on samples using a leaf area meter and indirect assessments (r2 = 0.78) Aqua-Crop simulations where also mostly accurate in estimating soil moisture temporal variations and soil water content of well textured soils. However for soils with high clay content, important differences were observed between simulation outputs and direct gravimetric measurements.

  11. [Sr II] Detected in a Nebular Filament Near Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T.; Zethson, T.; Hartman, H.; Johansson, S.; Davidson, K.; Ishibashi, K.

    2000-05-01

    Observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope reveal a peculiar emission line region in the close vicinity to Eta Carinae. The lines of [SrII], [MnII], [CoII], [TiII], [NiII] and [FeI] are detected in the 6400-7000A spectral interval at a blue-shifted velocity of 95 km/sec and seem to be associated with a long, narrow filament with dimensions of <0.5" by 1.1". The filament is notable as it is separate both in velocity and structure from the bright emission of the Integral Nebula. This filament is buried within the Homunculus and is not visible in direct images which are dominated by reflection nebulosities. In our literature searches we have found no evidence of strontium emission lines in nebulae. We are aware of permitted transitions of strontium seen in AGB stars. S-processed elements like strontium are not expected in the ejecta of a massive star like Eta Carinae. Detection of [SrII] and the fact that the [NiII], [MnII] and [CoII] lines are unusually strong compared to [FeI] are quite a surprise. It has long been known that nitrogen is overabundant in the ejecta of Eta Carinae. Is this processed material from the present star(s)? Has there been processed material ejected from a more evolved companion? The situation is decidedly mysterious. This research has been supported by NASA through STScI grants and the STIS GTO funding.

  12. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  13. Soil moisture and evapotranspiration predictions using Skylab data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, V. I. (Principal Investigator); Moore, D. G.; Horton, M. L.; Russell, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Multispectral reflectance and emittance data from the Skylab workshop were evaluated for prediction of evapotranspiration and soil moisture for an irrigated region of southern Texas. Wavelengths greater than 2.1 microns were required to spectrally distinguish between wet and dry fallow surfaces. Thermal data provided a better estimate of soil moisture than did data from the reflective bands. Thermal data were dependent on soil moisture but not on the type of agricultural land use. The emittance map, when used in conjunction with existing models, did provide an estimate of evapotranspiration rates. Surveys of areas of high soil moisture can be accomplished with space altitude thermal data. Thermal data will provide a reliable input into irrigation scheduling.

  14. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, J.B.

    1997-12-31

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

  15. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake Playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the US Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition. 72 refs., 59 figs., 26 tab.

  16. Eta Carinae in the Context of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Damineli, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Eta Car, with its historical outbursts, visible ejecta and massive, variable winds, continues to challenge both observers and modelers. In just the past five years over 100 papers have been published on this fascinating object. We now know it to be a massive binary system with a 5.54-year period. In January 2009, Car underwent one of its periodic low-states, associated with periastron passage of the two massive stars. This event was monitored by an intensive multi-wavelength campaign ranging from -rays to radio. A large amount of data was collected to test a number of evolving models including 3-D models of the massive interacting winds. August 2009 was an excellent time for observers and theorists to come together and review the accumulated studies, as have occurred in four meetings since 1998 devoted to Eta Car. Indeed, Car behaved both predictably and unpredictably during this most recent periastron, spurring timely discussions. Coincidently, WR140 also passed through periastron in early 2009. It, too, is a intensively studied massive interacting binary. Comparison of its properties, as well as the properties of other massive stars, with those of Eta Car is very instructive. These well-known examples of evolved massive binary systems provide many clues as to the fate of the most massive stars. What are the effects of the interacting winds, of individual stellar rotation, and of the circumstellar material on what we see as hypernovae/supernovae? We hope to learn. Topics discussed in this 1.5 day Joint Discussion were: Car: the 2009.0 event: Monitoring campaigns in X-rays, optical, radio, interferometry WR140 and HD5980: similarities and differences to Car LBVs and Eta Carinae: What is the relationship? Massive binary systems, wind interactions and 3-D modeling Shapes of the Homunculus & Little Homunculus: what do we learn about mass ejection? Massive stars: the connection to supernovae, hypernovae and gamma ray bursters Where do we go from here? (future

  17. Stratified X-ray Plasmas around Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael

    At a distance of ˜2.3 kpc, eta Carinae is the best super massive star to study the LBV phenomenon. It is a binary composed of two massive stars on a highly elliptical orbit (e ˜0.9-0.95, P˜5.54 years). The current best estimate is that the primary star has M gtrsim90M_{⊙} and v_{wind} ˜420 km s(-1) , while the companion star has M˜30M_{⊙} and v_{wind} ˜3000 km s(-1) . Strong winds from both stars collide (the wind-wind collision: WWC), which produces hot thermal plasmas of kT˜4 keV and emits strong X-rays. The luminosity increases toward periastron, but it abruptly declines by two orders of magnitudes around periastron. We had an observing campaign of eta Car around periastron in 2009.0, which revealed that the X-ray decline is caused by a hybrid mechanism of a true eclipse and an activity decay of the WWC plasma. During the activity decay, the head-on wind collision seems to shut off, possibly due to the overwhelming momentum of the primary wind. The secondary winds flowing backward may still collide with the twisted primary winds and produce hot X-ray plasma. During the eclipse of the WWC plasma, faint X-ray emission from a different plasma component within ˜500 AU from eta Car emerged. The plasma is as hot as the WWC plasma (˜50 MK) and in strong non-equilibrium ionization state (nt ≤sssim4×10(10) cm(-3) s). The plasma may originate from collision of winds ejected a few orbits ago. Inside the bipolar lobe of eta Car, the Chandra observatory spatially resolved emission from extended hot cool (˜6 MK) plasmas, as well as the X-ray reflection component. The spectrum showed unusually strong lines around the Si and S K-shell energies, which may be originated in the collision of the secondary winds with cold circumstellar material. We discuss the circumstellar hot plasma structures of LBVs based on these results.

  18. Implementation of an Eta Belt Domain on Parallel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouatchou, Jules; Rancic, Miodrag; Norris, Peter; Geiger, Jim

    2001-01-01

    We extend the Eta weather model from a regional domain into a belt domain that does not require meridional boundary conditions. We describe how the extension is achieved and the parallel implementation of the code on the Cray T3E and the SGI Origin 2000. We validate the forecast results on the two platforms and examine how the removal of the meridional boundary conditions affects these forecasts. In addition, using several domains of different sizes and resolutions, we present the scaling performance of the code on both systems.

  19. Student Measurements of the Double Star Eta Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Mark; Cacace, Gabriel; Do, Vivian; Griffith, Nicholas; Malan, Alexandria; Paredes, Hanna; Peticolas, Brian; Stasiak, Kathryne

    2016-10-01

    The double star Eta Cassiopeiae was measured at Vanguard Preparatory School. Digital measurements were made with a 14-inch telescope equipped with a CCD camera. The plate scale was determined to be 0.50 arcseconds per pixel. The separations and position angles were determined to be 13.3 arcseconds and 340.4 degrees, by the use of astronomy software. Previous observations reported in the Washington Double Star Catalog were used as a comparison. The camera angle was found to be the ultimate issue in the skewed data gathered for the double star.

  20. Harmonizing multiple methods for reconstructing historical potential and reference evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belaineh, Getachew; Sumner, David; Carter, Edward; Clapp, David

    2013-01-01

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) and reference evapotranspiration (RET) data are usually critical components of hydrologic analysis. Many different equations are available to estimate PET and RET. Most of these equations, such as the Priestley-Taylor and Penman- Monteith methods, rely on detailed meteorological data collected at ground-based weather stations. Few weather stations collect enough data to estimate PET or RET using one of the more complex evapotranspiration equations. Currently, satellite data integrated with ground meteorological data are used with one of these evapotranspiration equations to accurately estimate PET and RET. However, earlier than the last few decades, historical reconstructions of PET and RET needed for many hydrologic analyses are limited by the paucity of satellite data and of some types of ground data. Air temperature stands out as the most generally available meteorological ground data type over the last century. Temperature-based approaches used with readily available historical temperature data offer the potential for long period-of-record PET and RET historical reconstructions. A challenge is the inconsistency between the more accurate, but more data intensive, methods appropriate for more recent periods and the less accurate, but less data intensive, methods appropriate to the more distant past. In this study, multiple methods are harmonized in a seamless reconstruction of historical PET and RET by quantifying and eliminating the biases of the simple Hargreaves-Samani method relative to the more complex and accurate Priestley-Taylor and Penman-Monteith methods. This harmonization process is used to generate long-term, internally consistent, spatiotemporal databases of PET and RET.

  1. Climate Change Impact on Evapotranspiration, Heat Stress and Chill Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, R. L.; Marras, S.; Spano, D.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide concentration scenarios project an increase in CO2 from 372 ppm to between 500 and 950 ppm by the year 2100, and the potential effect on temperature, humidity, and plant responses to environmental factors are complex and concerning. For 2100, mean daily temperature increase projections range from 1.2oC to 6.8oC depending on greenhouse gas emissions. On the bad side, higher temperatures are often associated with increases in evapotranspiration (ET), heat stress, and pest infestations. On the good side, increased temperature is commonly related to less frost damage, faster growth, and higher production in some cases. One misconception is that global warming will increase evapotranspiration and, hence, agricultural water demand. As the oceans and other water bodies warm, evaporation and humidity are likely to increase globally, but higher humidity tends to reduce plant transpiration and hence ET. Higher CO2 concentrations also tend to reduce ET, and, in the end, the increase in ET due to higher temperature is likely to be offset by a decrease in ET due to higher humidity and CO2. With a decrease in daytime evapotranspiration, the canopy temperature is likely to rise relative to the air temperature, and this implies that heat stress could be worse than predicted by increased air temperature. Daily minimum temperatures are generally increasing about twice as fast as maximum temperatures presumably because of the increasing dew point temperatures as more water vapor is added to the atmosphere. This could present a serious problem to meet the chill requirement for fruit and nut crops. Growing seasons, i.e., from the last spring to the first fall frost, are likely to increase, but the crop growth period is likely to shorten due to higher temperature. Thus, spring frost damage is unlikely to change but there should be fewer damaging fall frost events. In this paper, we will present some ideas on the possible impact of climate change on evapotranspiration and

  2. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: FY 1990 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Thiede, M.E.; Lettau, D.J.; Twaddell, T.R. ); Black, R.A. )

    1992-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are working together to develop for the US Department of Energy (DOE) protective barriers for the near-surface disposal of hazardous waste at the Hanford Site. The proposed barrier design consists of a layer of fine-textured soil overlying a series of layers grading from sand to basalt riprap. A multiyear research program is being conducted to assess the long-term performance of barrier configurations in restricting plants, animals, and water from contacting buried wastes. The purpose of this report is to review work done up to July 31 in FY 1990 on the evapotranspiration subtask of the water infiltration task. As stated in the test plan, specific objectives of PNL's evapotranspiration work were to (1) develop and test an environmentally controlled whole-plant gas exchange system, (2) collect evapotranspiration data at the whole-plant level on the small-tube lysimeters, (3) collect transpiration data on the shrubs at McGee Ranch, (4) collect data necessary to parameterize the plant component of the UNSAT-H code.

  3. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: FY 1990 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Thiede, M.E.; Lettau, D.J.; Twaddell, T.R.; Black, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are working together to develop for the US Department of Energy (DOE) protective barriers for the near-surface disposal of hazardous waste at the Hanford Site. The proposed barrier design consists of a layer of fine-textured soil overlying a series of layers grading from sand to basalt riprap. A multiyear research program is being conducted to assess the long-term performance of barrier configurations in restricting plants, animals, and water from contacting buried wastes. The purpose of this report is to review work done up to July 31 in FY 1990 on the evapotranspiration subtask of the water infiltration task. As stated in the test plan, specific objectives of PNL`s evapotranspiration work were to (1) develop and test an environmentally controlled whole-plant gas exchange system, (2) collect evapotranspiration data at the whole-plant level on the small-tube lysimeters, (3) collect transpiration data on the shrubs at McGee Ranch, (4) collect data necessary to parameterize the plant component of the UNSAT-H code.

  4. Estimation of Regional Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature. Part 1: Measurement of Evapotranspiration at the Environmental Research Center and Determination of Priestley-taylor Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotada, K.; Nakagawa, S.; Kai, K.; Yoshino, M. M.; Takeda, K.; Seki, K.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the distribution of evapotranspiration in the humid region using remote sensing technology, the parameter (alpha) in the Priestley-Taylor model was determined. The daily means of the parameter alpha = 1.14 can be available from summer to autumn and alpha = to approximately 2.0 in winter. The results of the satellite and the airborne sensing done on 21st and 22nd January, 1983, are described. Using the vegetation distribution in the Tsukuba Academic New Town, as well as the radiation temperature obtained by remote sensing and the radiation data observed at the ground surface, the evapotranspiration was calculated for each vegetation type by the Priestley-Taylor method. The daily mean evapotranspiration on 22nd January, 1983, was approximately 0.4 mm/day. The differences in evapotranspiration between the vegetation types were not detectable, because the magnitude of evapotranspiration is very little in winter.

  5. Precipitation and evapotranspiration at the mountain lysimeter station Stoderzinken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndl, Markus; Winkler, Gerfried; Birk, Steffen

    2014-05-01

    Alpine water resources are highly important for the Austrian drinking water supply. In particular, the Northern Calcareous Alps contribute substantially to both the regional and the national drinking water supply. To analyse water balance, runoff and recharge in a representative mountain pasture area in the Northern Calcareous Alps a lysimeter station was established at the mountain Stoderzinken (1830 m a.s.l.) in 2005. This work examines the water balance at the lysimeter station during one summer period. Precipitation and evapotranspiration are determined using various approaches in order to identify potential errors in the measurement or interpretation of the data and thus to assess the uncertainties in the water balance components. For this purpose, data of rain gauges and a distrometer was compared with the precipitation calculated from the water balance of the lysimeter. Furthermore evapotranspiration was calculated using the HAUDE and PENMAN-MONTEITH equations for comparison. Already in previous seasons the distrometer was found to be prone to errors, which was confirmed when compared to the rain gauge data. In contrast, precipitation rates calculated from the lysimeter data were found to agree better with the rain gauge data but showed a trend to higher values. However, the approach to calculate precipitation from the lysimeter data turned out to be unsuitable for time periods with significant contribution of snow melt. Evapotranspiration calculated from lysimeter data are in good agreement with the results from the above-mentioned (semi-)empirical equations during dry periods. Furthermore the differences to the evapotranspiration calculated from the climate data correlate with the amount of precipitation. These results suggest that in alpine catchments the uncertainty in the precipitation data constitutes the major source of error in the calculation of evapotranspiration from the water balance of the lysimeter. However, it should be noted that these

  6. SECULAR CHANGES IN ETA CARINAE'S WIND 1998-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Martin, John C.; Ruiz, Maria Teresa; Walter, Frederick M.

    2012-05-20

    Stellar wind-emission features in the spectrum of eta Carinae have decreased by factors of 1.5-3 relative to the continuum within the last 10 years. We investigate a large data set from several instruments (STIS, GMOS, UVES) obtained between 1998 and 2011 and analyze the progression of spectral changes in direct view of the star, in the reflected polar-on spectra at FOS4, and at the Weigelt knots. We find that the spectral changes occurred gradually on a timescale of about 10 years and that they are dependent on the viewing angle. The line strengths declined most in our direct view of the star. About a decade ago, broad stellar wind-emission features were much stronger in our line-of-sight view of the star than at FOS4. After the 2009 event, the wind-emission line strengths are now very similar at both locations. High-excitation He I and N II absorption lines in direct view of the star strengthened gradually. The terminal velocity of Balmer P Cyg absorption lines now appears to be less latitude dependent, and the absorption strength may have weakened at FOS4. Latitude-dependent alterations in the mass-loss rate and the ionization structure of eta Carinae's wind are likely explanations for the observed spectral changes.

  7. Cautionary Note on Reporting Eta-Squared Values from Multifactor ANOVA Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Charles A.; Block, Richard A.; Aguinis, Herman

    2004-01-01

    The authors provide a cautionary note on reporting accurate eta-squared values from multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs. They reinforce the distinction between classical and partial eta-squared as measures of strength of association. They provide examples from articles published in premier psychology journals in which the authors…

  8. Leptonic decays of the {eta} meson with the WASA detector at CELSIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J.; Calen, H.; Fransson, K.; Jacewicz, M.; Kupsc, A.

    2007-11-07

    Decay channels of the {eta} meson with at least one lepton pair in the final state are discussed. Preliminary results on lepton pair production from the pd{yields}{sup 3}He{eta} reaction from the WASA experiment at CELSIUS are presented.

  9. Corrosion of the eta'(Cu-Sn) phase in dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Marek, M; Okabe, T; Butts, M B; Fairhurst, C W

    1983-11-01

    Previous studies have shown preferential corrosion of the eta'(Cu-Sn) phase in high-copper dental amalgam both in vitro and in vivo, while samples of pure eta' have shown high corrosion resistance. To clarify this contradiction, samples of pure eta' crystals mixed with other phases were prepared and tested. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance was based on the results of coulometry at constant potential and potentiodynamic polarization. The corrosion susceptibility of eta' in the matrix of gamma 1(Ag-Hg) was considerably higher than the susceptibility of isolated eta'. The susceptibility of pure eta' also could be increased by plating it will small amounts of Hg. It was concluded that in dental amalgam, the presence of mercury in the phases surrounding eta' reduces its resistance to corrosion. Although eta' is more resistant to corrosion than gamma 2(Sn-Hg) which appears in low-copper amalgams, it is the least corrosion resistant major phase in high-copper amalgams and can suffer deterioration.

  10. USING MM5V3 WITH ETA ANALYSES FOR AIR-QUALITY MODELING AT THE EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts have been underway since MM5v3 was released in July 1999 to set up air-quality simulations using Eta analyses as background fields. Our previous simulations used a one-way quadruple-nested set of domains with horizontal grid spacing of 108, 36, 12 and 4 km. With Eta a...

  11. 76 FR 27090 - Comment Request for Extension of Information Collection (Without Revisions): Form ETA 9033-A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Revisions): Form ETA 9033-A, Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers for Longshore Activities in... collection by Form ETA 9033-A, OMB Control Number 1205-0352, Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers.... The INA generally prohibits the performance of longshore work by alien crewmembers, however the...

  12. {eta}'(958)-mesic nuclei formation and UA(1) anomaly at finite density

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahiro, Hideko; Takizawa, Makoto; Hirenzaki, Satoru

    2006-07-11

    We discuss the possibility of producing the bound states of the {eta}'(958) meson in nuclei theoretically using the the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. We calculate the formation cross section of the {eta}' bound states with the Green function method for the ({gamma},p) reaction and discuss the experimental feasibility at photon facilities such as SPring-8. We conclude that we can expect to observe resonance peaks in ({gamma},p) spectra for the formation of {eta}' bound states and we can deduce new information on {eta}' properties at finite density. These observations are believed to be essential to know the possible mass shift of {eta}' and deduce new information on the effective restoration of the chiral UA(1) anomaly at finite density.

  13. Near-Field ETAS Constraints and Applications to Seismic Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Mark R.; Rundle, John B.; Glasscoe, Margaret T.

    2015-08-01

    The epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) statistical model of aftershock seismicity combines various earthquake scaling relations to produce synthetic earthquake catalogs, or estimates of aftershock seismicity rates, based on recent earthquake activity. One challenge to ETAS-based hazard assessment is the large number of free parameters involved. In this paper, we introduce an approach to constrain this parameter space from canonical scaling relations, empirical observations, and fundamental physics. We show that ETAS parameters can be estimated as a function of an earthquake's magnitude m based on the finite temporal and spatial extents of the rupture area. This approach facilitates fast ETAS-based estimates of seismicity from large "seed" catalogs, and it is particularly well suited to web-based deployment and otherwise automated implementations. It constitutes a significant improvement over contemporary ETAS by mitigating variability related to instrumentation and subjective catalog selection.

  14. Recurrent X-ray Emission Variations of Eta Carinae and the Binary Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishibashi, K.; Corcoran, M. F.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Drake, S. A.; Damineki, A.; White, S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that, the super-massive star eta Carinae may have a massive stellar companion (Damineli, Conti, and Lopes 1997), although the dense ejecta surrounding the star make this claim hard to test using conventional methods. Settling this question is critical for determining the current evolutionary state and future evolution of the star. We address this problem by an unconventional method: If eta Carinae is a binary, X-ray emission should be produced in shock waves generated by wind-wind collisions in the region between eta Carinae and its companion. Detailed X-ray monitoring of eta Carinae for more that) 2 years shows that the observed emission generally resembles colliding-wind X-ray emission, but with some significant discrepancies. Furthermore, periodic X-ray "flaring" may provide an additional clue to determine the presence of a companion star and for atmospheric pulsation in eta Carinae.

  15. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  16. Use of evapotranspiration model based on energy balance in the Ebinur Lake Wetland Nature Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qingsan; Shi, Qingdong; Wang, Zhi; Gao, Wei; Chang, Shunli

    2009-06-01

    An evapotranspiration model based on the energy balance for different vegetation types in arid area was built in the study, and applied to the natural ecological system of Lake Ebinur wetland nature reserve in Xinjiang. The spatial-temporal dynamic change of the vegetation evapotranspiration in the study area was computed, and the evapotranspiration of three typical vegetations was analyzed and compared. The ground meteorological data were used to test the model. The results show that the evapotranspiration of all the natural system is about 10mm/d, and the maximum is over 20mm/d and occurs between May and August. The evapotranspiration of three typical arid vegetations was estimated in sequence of Populus euphratica Oliv. Tamarix chinensis Lour. Haloxylon ammodendron (Meye)Bge. Finally, it is suggested that the ground surface vegetation types and arid characteristics are most important in the establishment of the evapotranspiration model of natural ecological system based on energy balance in arid areas.

  17. Beam dynamics in the ETA and ATA 10 kA linear induction accelerators: observations and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.; Birx, D.L.; Caporaso, G.J.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hester, R.E.; Melendez, R.; Neil, V.K.; Paul, A.C.; Struve, K.W.

    1981-03-06

    The 10 kA ETA and ATA linear induction accelerators are described. Beam instability is the major concern in these high current machines, and the current status of theoretical understanding, and experimental investigations with the 8 cavity ETA, are reviewed. Modifications to the induction cavities are described that have essentially eliminated the transverse resonant modes seen in the ETA.

  18. 78 FR 32460 - Comment Request for Information Collection for ETA Form 232, Domestic Agricultural In-Season Wage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection for ETA Form 232, Domestic Agricultural In-Season Wage Report and ETA Form 232-A, Wage Survey Interview Record, Extension with Revisions AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration (ETA), Labor. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department...

  19. 77 FR 69503 - Comment Request for Information Collection on the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection on the ETA 218, Benefit... (ETA), Labor. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (Department), as part of its continuing... requirements on respondents can be properly assessed. Currently, ETA is soliciting comments concerning...

  20. 20 CFR 655.1055 - Notice to the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the Attorney General (AG).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... student's work authorization has been formally revoked by the DSO or INS. (c) ETA, upon receipt of the... Administration (ETA) and the Attorney General (AG). 655.1055 Section 655.1055 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND...-Campus Work § 655.1055 Notice to the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the...

  1. Constraints on Decreases in Eta Carinae's Mass-loss from 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations of Its Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star Eta-A in the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present result from large- (+/- 1545 au) and small- (+/- 155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's colliding winds for three Eta-A mass-loss rates ( (dot-M(sub Eta-A) = 2.4, 4.8 and 8.5 × 10(exp -4) M(solar)/ yr), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling and radiative forces. We find that dot-M Eta-A greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star Eta-B switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage (Phi approx.= 0.985-1.02). This switchover starts later and ends earlier the lower the value of dot-M Eta-A and is caused by the encroachment of the wind of Eta-A into the acceleration zone of Eta-B's wind, plus radiative inhibition of Eta-B's wind by Eta-A. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of Eta-A's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in dot-M EtaA should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in dot- M Eta-A was likely by a factor of approx. < 2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in Eta Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line of sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in dot-M Eta-A may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameter of Eta-B, while less likely, cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during Eta-Car's next periastron in 2014 to further

  2. [Spatiotemporal changes of potential evapotranspiration in Songnen Plain of Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-fang; Deng, Jun-li; Guan, De-xin; Jin, Chang-jie; Wang, An-zhi; Wu, Jia-bing; Yuan, Feng-hui

    2011-07-01

    Based on the daily meteorological data from 72 weather stations from 1961-2003, a quantitative analysis was conducted on the spatiotemporal changes of the potential evapotranspiration in the Plain. The Penman-Monteith model was applied to calculate the potential evapotranspiration; the Mann-Kendall test, accumulative departure curve, and climatic change rate were adopted to analyze the change trend of the evapotranspiration; and the spatial analysis function of ArcGIS was used to detect the spatial distribution of the evapotranspiration. In 1961-2003, the mean annual potential evapotranspiration in the Plain was 330 - 860 mm, and presented an overall decreasing trend, with the high value appeared in southwest region, low value in surrounding areas of southwest region, and a ring-belt increasing southwestward. The climatic change rate of the annual potential evapotranspiration was -0.21 mm x a(-1). The annual potential evapotranspiration was the highest in 1982, the lowest in 1995, and increased thereafter. Seasonally, the climatic change rate of the potential evapotranspiration in spring, summer, autumn, and winter was -0.19, 0.01, -0.05, and 0.03 mm x a(-1), respectively, suggesting that the potential evapotranspiration had a weak increase in winter and summer and a slight decrease in spring and autumn.

  3. Evapotranspiration (ET) at Blue Cypress marsh site, daily data, Indian River County, Florida, June 1, 1995 – October 20, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, David M.

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of daily evapotranspiration (ET) measurements/estimates for the time period June 1, 1995 to October 2014. These data are derived from (1) measurements of actual ET conducted at the USGS Blue Cypress marsh station (USGS station number 274143080424100) and (2) estimates of actual ET inferred from statistical regressions between the measurements of actual ET and potential ET. The station is located at a nearly flat wetlands site (27 degrees 41 minutes 43 seconds North / 080 degrees 42 minutes 41 seconds West) within the Blue Cypress Marsh Conservation Area, Indian River County, Florida. The dominant plant cover at the study site is sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense), with secondary amounts of other wetland plant species. Sawgrass height generally varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters. The canopy can be temporarily removed through fire, followed by rapid re-growth. The soils at the site are peats. The water-table generally is above land surface but can be greater than a meter below land surface during droughts. Actual ET measurements derived using the eddy-covariance method are available for January 1, 2000 to September 1, 2005; and December 11, 2009 to October 20, 2014. The contribution of the present Data Release is dissemination of a dataset of actual ET estimates for a period prior to the first period of actual ET measurements (June 1, 1995 to December 31, 1999) and for the time interval between the two periods of actual ET measurement (September 2, 2005 to December 10, 2009). Estimates of actual ET during periods of missing actual ET measurements were obtained using regression-determined, monthly vegetation coefficient multipliers applied to potential ET data. The source of potential ET data was an existing Statewide database developed through an assimilation of satellite- and field-based meterological data. A seamless time series of measured and estimated actual ET for the period June 1, 1999 to December 10, 2014 is

  4. On groundwater fluctuations, evapotranspiration, and understory removal in riparian corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, Maceo C.; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Cleverly, James R.; Thibault, James R.; Schuetz, Jennifer F.; Dahm, Clifford N.

    2009-05-01

    This study utilizes 7 years of continuously monitored groundwater-level data from four sites along the Río Grande riparian corridor in central New Mexico to calculate evapotranspiration from groundwater and assess impacts of understory vegetation removal during a restoration project. Diurnal groundwater fluctuation measurements were used to compare the well-known White method for estimating evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETg) to colocated measurements of total riparian evapotranspiration (ET) measured using the eddy covariance method. On average, the two methods were linearly correlated and had similar variability, but groundwater hydrograph estimates of ETg tended to be larger than tower ET estimates. Average ETg estimates for two wells at one site ranged from 91.45% to 164.77% of measured tower ET estimates, but were also shown to range from 57.35% to 254.34% at another site. Comparisons between the methods improved with deeper water tables, reduced groundwater and river connectivity, and where soil profiles were dominated by coarse-sized particles. Using a range of texture-based estimates of specific yield (Sy) with water table position improves the field application of the White method. River-induced fluctuations in groundwater increased the variability of ETg measurements. Removal of understory vegetation at one site resulted in a small but significant reduction in diel groundwater fluctuation amplitude of 19-21%. Caution is required when understory vegetation removal is used as a means to decrease overall riparian ET. Diel groundwater fluctuation amplitudes can be useful in gauging the hydrological effects of vegetation removal. Riparian groundwater hydrographs are critical to investigating the hydrologic connectivity between river and shallow groundwater, the temporal patterns of vegetative consumption, and monitoring changes to the vegetation community.

  5. Comparison of evapotranspiration rates for flatwoods and ridge citrus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jia, X.; Swancar, A.; Jacobs, J.M.; Dukes, M.D.; Morgan, K.

    2007-01-01

    Florida citrus groves are typically grown in two regions of the state: flatwoods and ridge. The southern flatwoods citrus area has poorly drained fine textured sands with low organic matter in the shallow root zone. Ridge citrus is located in the northern ridge citrus zone and has fine to coarse textured sands with low water-holding capacity. Two commercial citrus groves, selected from each region, were studied from 15 July 2004 to 14 July 2005. The flatwoods citrus (FC) grove had a grass cover and used drainage ditches to remove excess water from the root zone. The ridge citrus (RC) grove had a bare soil surface with weeds periodically eliminated by tillage. Citrus crop evapotranspiration (ETc) rates at the two citrus groves were measured by the eddy correlation method, and components in the energy balance were also examined and compared. The study period had higher than average rainfall, and as a result, the two locations had similar annual ETc rates (1069 and 1044 mm for RC and FC, respectively). The ETc rates were 59% (RC) and 47% (FC) of the rainfall amounts during the study period. The annual reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo) rates were 1180 mm for RC and 1419 mm for FC, estimated using the standardized reference evapotranspiration equation. The citrus crop coefficients (Kc, ratio of ETc to ET o) were different between the two locations because of differences in latitude, ground cover, and rainfall amounts. The Kc values ranged from 0.70 between December and March to 1.05 between July and November for RC, and from 0.65 between November and May to 0.85 between June and October for FC. The results are consistent with other Kc values reported from field studies on citrus in both Florida and elsewhere using these and alternate methods.

  6. Eta vs. sigma: review of past results, Gallus-Klemp test, and large-scale wind skill in ensemble experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesinger, Fedor; Veljovic, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effect of switching between the eta and the sigma coordinate in numerical weather prediction involving topography, five sets of tests were performed. The eta version did better in all of them particularly with precipitation scores and more accurate placement of storms. However, a problem of flow separation in the lee of the bell-shaped topography discovered by Gallus and Klemp seemed to many to suggest the eta coordinate to be ill suited for high-resolution models. Flow separation is shown not to occur following a refinement of the eta discretization. Trying to identify a primary cause of the improvement in 250 hPa winds previously demonstrated in Eta ensemble members over their ECMWF driver members, ten of the Eta members were run switched to sigma. At a critical time, the Eta members in eta mode showed a tendency for more accurate tilt of a 250 hPa trough than the members run in sigma mode. The experiment was rerun for a more recent and higher resolution ECMWF ensemble, and for an increased number of members. The advantage of the Eta over ECMWF is seen again, even though this time, the Eta resolution during the first 10 days of the experiment was about the same as that of driver members. Rerunning the Eta ensemble switched to sigma showed an advantage in the Eta/eta 250 hPa wind scores used, again associated with an upper-air trough's movement across the Rockies. Better positioning of lee lows ahead of these troughs using Eta/eta is suggested to be making significant contributions to its better precipitation scores. Implications of experiments done for regional climate modeling are discussed as well.

  7. Spatiotemporal Variability in Potential Evapotranspiration across an Urban Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. R.; Long, M. R.; Fipps, G.; Swanson, C.; Traore, S.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration in urban and peri-urban environments is difficult to measure and predict. Barriers to accurate assessment include: the wide range of microclimates caused by urban canyons, heat islands, and park cooling; limited instrument fetch; and the patchwork of native soils, engineered soils, and hardscape. These issues combine to make an accurate assessment of the urban water balance difficult, as evapotranspiration calculations require accurate meteorological data. This study examines nearly three years of data collected by a network of 18 weather stations in Dallas, Texas, designed to measure potential evapotranspiration (ETo) in support of the WaterMyYard conservation program (http://WaterMyYard.org). Variability amongst stations peaked during the summer irrigation months, with a maximum standard deviation of 0.3 mm/hr and 4 mm/d. However, we found a significant degree of information overlap in the network. Most stations had a high correlation (>0.75) with at least one other station in the network, and many had a high correlation with at least 10 others. Correlation strength between station ETo measurements did not necessarily decrease with Euclidean distance, as expected, but was more closely related to differences in station elevation and longitude. Stations that had low correlations with others in the network typically had siting and fetch issues. ETo showed a strong temporal persistence; average station autocorrelation was 0.79 at a 1-hour lag and 0.70 at a 24-hour lag. To supplement the larger-scale network data, we deployed a mobile, vehicle-mounted weather station to quantify deviations present in the atmospheric drivers of evapotranspiration: temperature, humidity, wind, and solar radiation. Data were collected at mid-day during the irrigation season. We found differences in mobile and station ETo predictions up to 0.2 mm/hr, primarily driven by wind speed variations. These results suggest that ETo variation at the neighborhood to municipality

  8. SN 1961V - An extragalactic ETA Carinae analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Robert W.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Penrod, G. Donald; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra of the site of the unique type V supernova SN 1961V in NGC 1058 and of two nearby H II regions have been obtained. Broad H-alpha emission with a luminosity of 2 x 10 to the 36th ergs/s is detected at the position, so that SN 1961V becomes the first historical extragalactic object classified as a supernova to be optically recovered. The characteristics and origin of the high-excitation H II regions of the site are discussed. It is argued that SN 1961V was not a supernova, but an exaggerated Eta Carinae-type outburst of a very massive, evolved star near the end of core hydrogen burning.

  9. UNEXPECTED IONIZATION STRUCTURE IN ETA CARINAE'S ''WEIGELT KNOTS''

    SciTech Connect

    Remmen, Grant N.; Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea

    2013-08-10

    The Weigelt knots, dense slow-moving ejecta near {eta} Carinae, are mysterious in structure as well as in origin. Using spatially dithered spectrograms obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS), we have partially resolved the ionization zones of one knot. Contrary to simple models, higher ionization levels occur on the outer side, i.e., farther from the star. They cannot represent a bow shock, and no satisfying explanation is yet available-though we sketch one qualitative possibility. STIS spectrograms provide far more reliable spatial measurements of the Weigelt knots than HST images do, and this technique can also be applied to the knots' proper motion problem. Our spatial measurement accuracy is about 10 mas, corresponding to a projected linear scale of the order of 30 AU, which is appreciably smaller than the size of each Weigelt knot.

  10. Understanding the X-ray Flaring from Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Corcoran, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    We quantify the rapid variations in X-ray brightness ("flares") from the extremely massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae seen during the past three orbital cycles by RXTE. The observed flares tend to be shorter in duration and more frequent as periastron is approached, although the largest ones tend to be roughly constant in strength at all phases. Plausible scenarios include (1) the largest of multi-scale stochastic wind clumps from the LBV component entering and compressing the hard X-ray emitting wind-wind collision (WWC) zone, (2) large-scale corotating interacting regions in the LBV wind sweeping across the WWC zone, or (3) instabilities intrinsic to the WWC zone. The first one appears to be most consistent with the observations, requiring homologously expanding clumps as they propagate outward in the LBV wind and a turbulence-like powerlaw distribution of clumps, decreasing in number towards larger sizes, as seen in Wolf-Rayet winds.

  11. The homunculus of Eta Carinae: An interacting stellar winds paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Adam; Balick, Bruce; Davidson, Kris

    1995-01-01

    We simulate the origin and evolution of the bipolar nebula surrounding Eta Car using numerical two-dimensional gasdynamic models. The generalized interacting stellar winds scenario, wherein a stellar wind interacts with an aspherical circumstellar environment, is adopted. The eruption wind of 1840-1860, which is taken to be spherically symmetric, interacts with a preeruption toroidal density environment. Using reasonable assumptions of initial conditions and eruption parameters based on archival data, we have performed over 30 simulations in an effort to bracket the initial parameters which produce models that best match observations. We find that models with high pole-to-equator density contrasts (greater than 100) and toroidal density configurations nicely account for the observed morphology and kinematics of the homunculus.

  12. Space time ETAS models and an improved extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Yosihiko; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2006-02-01

    For sensitive detection of anomalous seismicity such as quiescence and activation in a given region, we need a suitable statistical reference model that represents a normal seismic activity in the region. The regional occurrence rate of the earthquakes is modeled as a function of previous activity, the specific form of which is based on empirical laws in time and space such as the modified Omori formula and the Utsu-Seki scaling law of aftershock area against magnitude, respectively. This manuscript summarizes the development of the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model and proposes an extended version of the best fitted space-time model that was suggested in Ogata [Ogata, Y., 1998. Space-time point-process models for earthquake occurrences, Ann. Inst. Statist. Math., 50: 379-402.]. This model indicates significantly better fit to seismicity in various regions in and around Japan.

  13. Recovery from a Giant Eruption: The Case of Eta Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea; Martin, John C.; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    Giant eruptions or SN Impostors are far more mysterious than "real" supernovae, because they are scarcer and because they have received far less theoretical effort. One rather special problem is the disequilibrium state of the post-eruption object. It may be partially observable by watching the star's gradual recovery; which, in principle, may offer clues to the basic instability mechanisms. So far, the only example that can be observed well enough is eta Carinae. This object's history offers tantalizing clues and counter-clues. For instance: (1) Before 2000, the recovery timescale seemed to be of order 150 years; but (2) around 2000, many attributes began to change much more rapidly; and (3) the 150-year recovery process has been punctuated by about three abrupt changes of state. This strange combination of facts has received almost no theoretical attention.

  14. The Time Evolution of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, T. I.; Grobe, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    We report new HST/STIS observations that map the high-ionization forbidden line emission in the inner arc second of Eta Car, the first that fully image the extended wind-wind interaction region of the massive colliding wind binary. These observations were obtained after the 2009.0 periastron at orbital phases 0.084, 0.163, and 0.323 of the 5.54-year spectroscopic cycle. We analyze the variations in brightness and morphology of the emission, and find that blue-shifted emission (-400 to -200 km/s is symmetric and elongated along the northeast-southwest axis, while the red-shifted emission (+ 100 to +200 km/s) is asymmetric and extends to the north-northwest. Comparison to synthetic images generated from a 3-D dynamical model strengthens the 3-D orbital orientation found by Madura et al. (2011), with an inclination i = 138 deg, argument of periapsis w = 270 deg, and an orbital axis that is aligned at the same P A on the sky as the symmetry axis of the Homunculus, 312 deg. We discuss the potential that these and future mappings have for constraining the stellar parameters of the companion star and the long-term variability of the system. Plain-Language Abstract: With HST, we resolved the interacting winds of the binary, Eta Carinae. With a 3-D model, we find the binary orbit axis is aligned to the Homunculus axis. This suggests a connection between the binary and Homunculus ejection mechanism.

  15. A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

    2006-04-26

    The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

  16. Measurement of the branching fraction for $\\tau\\to\\eta K\

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    The authors report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 9.9 x 10{sup -5}.

  17. Recruitment of DNA polymerase eta by FANCD2 in the early response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dechen; Dudimah, Fred Duafalia; Zhang, Jun; Pickering, Anna; Paneerselvam, Jayabal; Palrasu, Manikandan; Wang, Hong; Fei, Peiwen

    2013-03-01

    How Fanconi anemia (FA) protein D2 (FANCD2) performs DNA damage repair remains largely elusive. We report here that translesion synthesis DNA polymerase (pol) eta is a novel mediator of FANCD2 function. We found that wild type (wt) FANCD2, not K561R (mt) FANCD2, can interact with pol eta. Upon DNA damage, the interaction of pol eta with FANCD2 occurs earlier than that with PCNA, which is in concert with our finding that FANCD2 monoubiquitination peaks at an earlier time point than that of PCNA monoubiquitination. FANCD2-null FA patient cells (PD20) carrying histone H2B-fused pol eta and wtFANCD2, respectively, show a similar tendency of low Mitomycin C (MMC) sensitivity, while cells transfected with empty vector control or pol eta alone demonstrate a similar high level of MMC sensitivity. It therefore appears that FANCD2 monoubiquitination plays a similar anchor role as histone to bind DNA in regulating pol eta. Collectively, our study indicates that, in the early phase of DNA damage response, FANCD2 plays crucial roles in recruiting pol eta to the sites of DNA damage for repair.

  18. Estimation of annual Groundwater Evapotranspiration from Phreatophyte Vegetation in the Great Basin using Remotely Sensed Vegetation Indices and Ground Based Flux Tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamer, Jordan P.

    Escalating concerns about the future of water resource management in arid regions of the American Southwest have sparked numerous hydrologic studies looking into available water resources for in-basin and inter-basin transfers. Groundwater is the primary water supply source for much of the state of Nevada and the Great Basin, thus accurate estimates of the regional scale groundwater recharge and discharge components are critical for regional groundwater budgets. Groundwater discharge from phreatophyte vegetation by evapotranspiration (ET) is the dominant component of groundwater discharge in many hydrologically closed valleys of the Great Basin, and can be measured directly from eddy-covariance (EC) and Bowen-ratio (BR) flux tower systems. The purpose of this project was to develop a predictive equation based on relationship between annual ET and meteorological data from EC and BR sites in phreatophyte vegetation with remote sensing data. Annual total ET (ET a) measured from forty site/year combinations of flux tower data from Carson Valley, Walker River Basin, Oasis Valley, Snake Valley, Spring Valley, White River Valley, and the lower Colorado River Flow system were correlated with the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite. EVI was extracted from source areas at corresponding locations from 15 mid-summer Landsat TM scenes. ETa was transformed into ET* by subtracting annual precipitation and normalizing by annual reference ET (ETo) (ET*=(ETa-precipitation)/(ETo-precipitation)). ET* correlated well with EVI (r2=0.97), and because it takes basin specific climate measurements into account, it is transferable to many shallow groundwater discharge areas in the Great Basin. This relationship was used to provide a first order estimate of the mean annual groundwater ET (ETg) from four phreatophyte groundwater discharge areas in Nevada using only a mid-summer Landsat EVI image, annual ETo and precipitation data. This simple approach

  19. Estimating basin scale evapotranspiration (ET) by water balance and remote sensing methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, G.B.; Leake, S.; Nagler, P.L.; Artan, G.; Dickinson, J.; Cordova, J.T.; Glenn, E.P.

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important hydrological process that can be studied and estimated at multiple spatial scales ranging from a leaf to a river basin. We present a review of methods in estimating basin scale ET and its applications in understanding basin water balance dynamics. The review focuses on two aspects of ET: (i) how the basin scale water balance approach is used to estimate ET; and (ii) how ‘direct’ measurement and modelling approaches are used to estimate basin scale ET. Obviously, the basin water balance-based ET requires the availability of good precipitation and discharge data to calculate ET as a residual on longer time scales (annual) where net storage changes are assumed to be negligible. ET estimated from such a basin water balance principle is generally used for validating the performance of ET models. On the other hand, many of the direct estimation methods involve the use of remotely sensed data to estimate spatially explicit ET and use basin-wide averaging to estimate basin scale ET. The direct methods can be grouped into soil moisture balance modelling, satellite-based vegetation index methods, and methods based on satellite land surface temperature measurements that convert potential ET into actual ET using a proportionality relationship. The review also includes the use of complementary ET estimation principles for large area applications. The review identifies the need to compare and evaluate the different ET approaches using standard data sets in basins covering different hydro-climatic regions of the world.

  20. [An operational remote sensing algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration based on NOAA PAL dataset].

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying-Yu; He, Yan-Bo; Wang, Jian-Lin; Tian, Guo-Liang

    2009-10-01

    Based on the time series 10-day composite NOAA Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL) dataset (8 km x 8 km), and by using land surface energy balance equation and "VI-Ts" (vegetation index-land surface temperature) method, a new algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration (ET) was constructed. This new algorithm did not need the support from meteorological observation data, and all of its parameters and variables were directly inversed or derived from remote sensing data. A widely accepted ET model of remote sensing, i. e., SEBS model, was chosen to validate the new algorithm. The validation test showed that both the ET and its seasonal variation trend estimated by SEBS model and our new algorithm accorded well, suggesting that the ET estimated from the new algorithm was reliable, being able to reflect the actual land surface ET. The new ET algorithm of remote sensing was practical and operational, which offered a new approach to study the spatiotemporal variation of ET in continental scale and global scale based on the long-term time series satellite remote sensing images.

  1. Effect of elevation resolution on evapotranspiration simulations using MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Kambhammettu, B V N P; Schmid, Wolfgang; King, James P; Creel, Bobby J

    2012-01-01

    Surface elevations represented in MODFLOW head-dependent packages are usually derived from digital elevation models (DEMs) that are available at much high resolution. Conventional grid refinement techniques to simulate the model at DEM resolution increases computational time, input file size, and in many cases are not feasible for regional applications. This research aims at utilizing the increasingly available high resolution DEMs for effective simulation of evapotranspiration (ET) in MODFLOW as an alternative to grid refinement techniques. The source code of the evapotranspiration package is modified by considering for a fixed MODFLOW grid resolution and for different DEM resolutions, the effect of variability in elevation data on ET estimates. Piezometric head at each DEM cell location is corrected by considering the gradient along row and column directions. Applicability of the research is tested for the lower Rio Grande (LRG) Basin in southern New Mexico. The DEM at 10 m resolution is aggregated to resampled DEM grid resolutions which are integer multiples of MODFLOW grid resolution. Cumulative outflows and ET rates are compared at different coarse resolution grids. Results of the analysis conclude that variability in depth-to-groundwater within the MODFLOW cell is a major contributing parameter to ET outflows in shallow groundwater regions. DEM aggregation methods for the LRG Basin have resulted in decreased volumetric outflow due to the formation of a smoothing error, which lowered the position of water table to a level below the extinction depth.

  2. Evapotranspiration and turbulent transport in an irrigated desert orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Thomas E.; Miller, David R.; Huddleston, Ellis W.; Ross, James B.

    2002-10-01

    Micrometeorological measurements were recorded in an irrigated pecan orchard for 2 weeks in the summer of 1996 near Las Cruces, NM. A vertical array of five sonic anemometers recorded three-dimensional wind and temperature data within and above the orchard. The measured energy budget closure error was only 3.2% of net radiation, indicating freedom from local edge advection. The effects of regional (oasis) advection and unsteady winds on evapotranspiration (ET) were considered by comparing the observed latent heat flux values to estimates of ET using the Penman-Monteith and Advection-Aridity approaches. Penman-Monteith underestimated observed ET values by 82%. The Advection-Aridity modifications of potential evapotranspiration (PET) underestimated ET by 11%. Profiles of turbulence statistics demonstrated vertical heterogeneity of turbulence within the canopy. Directly above the canopy, momentum flux profiles showed little divergence. However, at a level of two times the tree heights, sensible heat flux profiles did show divergence, confirming the presence of "oasis" advection resulting from warm, dry air moving above the internal boundary layer. Upward convection from the hot soil surface between the trees diluted the oasis condition to the point where a weak upward sensible heat flux was observed during the midday periods when the soil was not shaded. Convection ratios, and exuberance ratios, generated from quadrant analyses of the heat and momentum flux events, showed that turbulent motions moved freely up and down within this canopy with little attenuation due to the open spaces between the trees.

  3. Variability of Precipitation and Evapotranspiration across an Andean Paramo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes, J. C.; Riveros-Iregui, D.; Avery, W. A.; Gaviria, S.; Peña-Quemba, C.; Herran, G.

    2012-12-01

    Paramos are alpine grasslands that occur mostly in the Andes Mountains of South America. Typically soils in the paramo have a volcanic origin, which leads to high permeability and high water yield and makes the paramo a reliable drinking water supply for many highland cities. Because hydrological measurements in these humid systems are rare, current understanding of the hydrologic behavior of paramos relies on modeling studies with little validation against ground observations. We present measurements of evapotranspiration (ET) and precipitation (P) across Chingaza Paramo, near Bogotá, Colombia. This paramo supplies water for ~80% of Bogotá's population (a total of 8 million people). Meteorological variables such us air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, precipitation, and solar radiation were monitored using five weather stations located at various elevations from 3000m to 3600m. Our results show that ET varies from 500 to 700 mm y-1 as a function of elevation, whereas precipitation commonly exceeds ET, ranging between 1500 and 1800 mm y-1. These spatial differences between P and ET make water yield highly variable across this mountainous environment. Our results demonstrate that while paramos play an important role in the hydrologic cycle of tropical environments, understanding their hydrologic behavior requires characterization and monitoring of the pronounced spatial gradients of precipitation and evapotranspiration.

  4. Evapotranspiration of applied water, Central Valley, California, 1957-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Alex K.

    1982-01-01

    In the Central Valley, Calif., where 57% of the 20,000 square miles of land is irrigated, ground-water recharge from agricultural lands is an important input to digital simulation models of ground-water flow. Several methods of calculating recharge were explored for the Central Valley Aquifer Project and a simplified water budget was designed where net recharge (recharge minus pumpage) equals net surface water diverted minus evapotranspiration of applied water (ETAW). This equation eliminates the need to determine pumpage from the water-table aquifer, assuming that the time lag for infiltration is not longer than the time intervals of interest for modeling. This study evaluates only the evapotranspiration of applied water. Future reports will describe the other components of the water budget. ETAW was calculated by summing the products of ETAW coefficients and respective crop areas for each 7 1/2-minute quadrangle area in the valley, for each of three land-use surveys between 1957 and 1978. In 1975 total ETAW was 15.2 million acre-feet, a 43% increase since 1959. The largest increases were in the south, especially Kern County, which had a sixfold increase, which was caused by the import of surface water in the California Aqueduct. (USGS)

  5. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G.; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-06-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8 mm yr-1). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake.

  6. Remote Sensing of Evapotranspiration and Carbon Uptake at Harvard Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Qilong; Lin, Bing

    2005-01-01

    A land surface vegetation index, defined as the difference of microwave land surface emissivity at 19 and 37 GHz, was calculated for a heavily forested area in north central Massachusetts. The microwave emissivity difference vegetation index (EDVI) was estimated from satellite SSM/I measurements at the defined wavelengths and used to estimate land surface turbulent fluxes. Narrowband visible and infrared measurements and broadband solar radiation observations were used in the EDVI retrievals and turbulent flux estimations. The EDVI values represent physical properties of crown vegetation such as vegetation water content of crown canopies. The collocated land surface turbulent and radiative fluxes were empirically linked together by the EDVI values. The EDVI values are statistically sensitive to evapotranspiration fractions (EF) with a correlation coefficient (R) greater than 0.79 under all-sky conditions. For clear skies, EDVI estimates exhibit a stronger relationship with EF than normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Furthermore, the products of EDVI and input energy (solar and photosynthetically-active radiation) are statistically significantly correlated to evapotranspiration (R=0.95) and CO2 uptake flux (R=0.74), respectively.

  7. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration.

    PubMed

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-06-15

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8 mm yr(-1)). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake.

  8. Projected Changes in Evapotranspiration Rates over Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Alexandre; Guimarães, Sullyandro; Vasconcelos, Francisco, Jr.; Sales, Domingo; da Silva, Emerson

    2015-04-01

    Climate simulations were performed using a regional model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System, RAMS 6.0) driven by data from one of the CMIP5 models (Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model, version 2 - Earth System, HadGEM2-ES) over two CORDEX domains (South America and Central America) for the heavy-emission scenario (RCP8.5). Potential evapotranspiraion data from the RCM and from the CMIP5 global models were analyzed over Northeast Brazil, a semiarid region with a short rainy season (usually February to May in its northern portion due to the seasonal shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone) and over which droughts are frequent. Significant changes in the potential evapotranspiration were found, with most models showing a increasing trend along the 21st century, which are expected to alter the surface water budget, increasing the current water deficit (precipitation is currently much smaller than potential evapotranspiration). Based on the projections from the majority of the models, we expect important impacts over local agriculture and water resources over Northeast Brazil.

  9. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration

    PubMed Central

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G.; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12–23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51–98 vs. 7–8 mm yr−1). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake. PMID:26074373

  10. Effects of changing climate on reference crop evapotranspiration over 1961-2013 in Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ning; Li, Yi; Sun, Changfeng

    2016-10-01

    To know the importance of different climate variables on reference crop evapotranspiration (ET o), a step-by-step sensitivity analysis of ET o to single, two, and multi-climate variables (C) was conducted. ET o in north, south, and entire Xinjiang Province, China, over 1961-2013 was estimated using the Penman-Monteith equation. Trends in the involved six Cs (i.e., minimum temperature—T min, average temperature—T ave, maximum temperature—T max, wind speed at 2 m—U 2, sunshine hour—n, and relative humidity—RH) were detected by the modified Mann-Kendall test. Nineteen scenarios of changed Cs were preset to obtain recalculated ET o values considering the actual trend in each C and the Pearson's correlation relationship between ET o and Cs. The results showed that ET o was mostly sensitive to T max, U 2, and n. Sensitivity of ET o to the two overlapped changes of T min and T max caused larger increases in ET o than T max and T ave, T ave and T max, T max and (-n), T max and RH, T max and (-U 2), and T min and T ave, but the overlapped changes (-U 2) and (-n) caused larger decreases in ET o than the other two C scenarios. The simultaneously increased T max, T min, T ave, and RH plus decreased U 2 and n had caused the actual decreases in ET o in Xinjiang. In general, the effects of decreased U 2 and n on decreasing ET o compensated the effects of increased T max on decreasing ET o in Xinjiang.

  11. Evaluation of different interpolation schemes for precipitation and reference evapotranspiration and the impact on simulated large-scale water balance in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qianwen; Molkenthin, Frank; Wendland, Frank; Herrmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) are two main climate input components for hydrological models, which are often recorded or calculated based on measuring stations. Interpolation schemes are implemented to regionalize data from measuring stations for distributed hydrological models. This study had been conducted for 5 months, with the aim of: (1) evaluating three interpolation schemes for precipitation and reference evapotranspiration (ET0); (2) assessing the impact of the interpolation schemes on actual evapotranspiration and total runoff simulated by a distributed large-scale water balance model - mGROWA. The study case was the Republic of Slovenia, including a high variability in topography and climatic conditions, with daily meteorological data measured in 20 stations for a period of 44 years. ET0 were computed by both FAO Penman-Monteith equation and Hargreaves equation. The former equation is recommended as the standard equation, while the ET0 calculated by the latter one for Slovenia had a certain deviation (+150 mm/a) from it. Ordinary Kriging, Regression Kriging and Linear Regression were selected to regionalize precipitation and ET0. Reliability of the three interpolation schemes had been assessed based on the residual obtained from cross-validation. Monthly regionalized precipitation and ET0 were subsequently used as climate input for mGROWA model simulation. Evaluation of the interpolation schemes showed that the application of Regression Kriging and Linear Regression led to an acceptable interpolation result for reference evapotranspiration, especially in case the FAO Penman-Monteith equation was used. On the other hand, Regression Kriging also provided a more convincing interpolated result for precipitation. Meanwhile, mGROWA simulation results were affected by climate input data sets generated by applying difference interpolation schemes. Therefore, it is essential to select an appropriate interpolation scheme, in order to generate

  12. Evapotranspiration from areas of native vegetation in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, W.R.; Woodham, W.M.; Lopez, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    A study was made to examine the suitability of three different micrometeorological methods for estimating evapotranspiration from selected areas of native vegetation in west-central Florida and to estimate annual evapotranspiration from those areas. Evapotranspiration was estimated using the energy- balance Bowen ratio and eddy correlation methods. Potential evapotranspiration was computed using the Penman equation. The energy-balance Bowen ratio method was used to estimate diurnal evapotrans- piration at unforested sites and yielded reasonable results; however, measurements indicated that the magnitudes of air temperature and vapor-pressure gradients above the forested sites were too small to obtain reliable evapotranspiration measurements with the energy balance Bowen ratio system. Analysis of the surface energy-balance indicated that sensible and latent heat fluxes computed using standard eddy correlation computation methods did not adequately account for available energy. Eddy correlation data were combined with the equation for the surface energy balance to yield two additional estimates of evapotranspiration. Daily potential evapotranspiration and evapotranspira- tion estimated using the energy-balance Bowen ratio method were not correlated at a unforested, dry prairie site, but they were correlated at a marsh site. Estimates of annual evapotranspiration for sites within the four vegetation types, which were based on energy-balance Bowen ratio and eddy correlation measurements, were 1,010 millimeters for dry prairie sites, 990 millimeters for marsh sites, 1,060 millimeters for pine flatwood sites, and 970 millimeters for a cypress swamp site.

  13. Cotton Evapotranspiration and Yield Variations With Canopy Temperature and Irrigation Deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton evapotranspiration and yield vary greatly with irrigation deficit, but indirectly due to cotton's indeterminant phenology. Canopy temperature can be related to yield through the crop water stress index (CWSI); and evapotranspiration can be modeled if the relationship between stress level and ...

  14. Evapotranspiration from successional vegetation in a deforested area of the Lake Wales Ridge, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    The suitability of three evapotranspiration models (Penman-Monteith, Penman, and a modified Priestley-Taylor) was evaluated at a site ofsuccessional vegetation in a deforested area of theLake Wales Ridge, Florida. Eddy correlation mea surements of evapotranspiration made during 22approximately 1-day periods at a temporal resolu tion of 20 minutes from September 1993 to August 1994 were used to calibrate the evapotranspiration models. Three variants of the eddy correlation method that ascribe measurement error to three different sources were considered in the analysis. The Penman-Monteith and modified Priestley- Taylor models were successful in approximating measured 20-minute values of evapotranspiration (r2  0.918). The most suc cessful approaches were the modified Priestley-Taylor model (r2 = 0.972) and a nontraditional and simplified form of the Penman-Monteith model (r2 = 0.967). The Penman approach was unsuccessful as a predictor of evapotranspiration. The evapotranspiration models were used to estimate evapotranspiration between measure ments. When evapotranspiration values measured with a Bowen ratio variant of the eddy correlation method were used for model calibration, estimated daily evapotranspiration rates varied sea sonally ranging from 0.2 millimeters per day (0.008 inch per day) in late December 1993 to5 millimeter per day (0.2 inch per day) in mid-July 1994. Annual evapotranspiration (September 15, 1993, to September 15, 1994) was estimated to be about 680 millimeters (27 inches).Evapotranspiration models calibrated to the stan dard eddy correlation method and to an energy- balance residual variant provided estimates ofannual evapotranspiration that were about 10 per cent lower and higher, respectively. These dataindicate that of the 1,320 millimeters (52 inches)of precipitation during the 1-year period, about 570 to 700 millimeters (22 to 28 inches) recharged the surficial aquifer. Evapotranspiration at this study site probably defines the lower

  15. Remote sensing algorithm for surface evapotranspiration considering landscape and statistical effects on mixed pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing Peng, Zhi; Xin, Xiaozhou; Jiao, Jin Jun; Zhou, Ti; Liu, Qinhuo

    2016-11-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays an important role in surface-atmosphere interactions and can be monitored using remote sensing data. However, surface heterogeneity, including the inhomogeneity of landscapes and surface variables, significantly affects the accuracy of ET estimated from satellite data. The objective of this study is to assess and reduce the uncertainties resulting from surface heterogeneity in remotely sensed ET using Chinese HJ-1B satellite data, which is of 30 m spatial resolution in VIS/NIR bands and 300 m spatial resolution in the thermal-infrared (TIR) band. A temperature-sharpening and flux aggregation scheme (TSFA) was developed to obtain accurate heat fluxes from the HJ-1B satellite data. The IPUS (input parameter upscaling) and TRFA (temperature resampling and flux aggregation) methods were used to compare with the TSFA in this study. The three methods represent three typical schemes used to handle mixed pixels from the simplest to the most complex. IPUS handles all surface variables at coarse resolution of 300 m in this study, TSFA handles them at 30 m resolution, and TRFA handles them at 30 and 300 m resolution, which depends on the actual spatial resolution. Analyzing and comparing the three methods can help us to get a better understanding of spatial-scale errors in remote sensing of surface heat fluxes. In situ data collected during HiWATER-MUSOEXE (Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration over heterogeneous land surfaces of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research) were used to validate and analyze the methods. ET estimated by TSFA exhibited the best agreement with in situ observations, and the footprint validation results showed that the R2, MBE, and RMSE values of the sensible heat flux (H) were 0.61, 0.90, and 50.99 W m-2, respectively, and those for the latent heat flux (LE) were 0.82, -20.54, and 71.24 W m-2, respectively. IPUS yielded the largest errors in ET estimation. The RMSE of LE between the

  16. Monitoring drought occurrences using MODIS evapotranspiration data: Direct impacts on agricultural productivity in Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhoff, Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), including water loss from plant transpiration and land evaporation, is of vital importance for understanding hydrological processes and climate dynamics and remote sensing is considered as the most important tool for estimate ET over large areas. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) offers an interesting opportunity to evaluate ET with spatial resolution of 1 km. The MODIS global evapotranspiration algorithm (MOD16) considers both surface energy fluxes and climatic constraints on ET (water or temperature stress) to predict plant transpiration and soil evaporation based on Penman-Monteith equation. The algorithm is driven by remotely sensed and reanalysis meteorological data. In this study, MOD16 algorithm was applied to Southern Brazil to evaluate drought occurrences and its impacts over the agricultural production. Drought is a chronic potential natural disaster characterized by an extended period of time in which less water is available than expected, typically classified as meteorological, agricultural, hydrological and socioeconomic. With human-induced climate change, increases in the frequency, duration and severity of droughts are expected, leading to negative impacts in several sectors, such as agriculture, energy, transportation, urban water supply, among others. The current drought indicators are primarily based on precipitation, however only a few indicators incorporate ET and soil moisture components. ET and soil moisture play an important role in the assessment of drought severity as sensitive indicators of land drought status. To evaluate the drought occurrences in Southern Brazil from 2000 to 2012, we used the Evaporative Stress Index (ESI). The ESI, defined as 1 (one) minus the ratio of actual ET to potential ET, is one of the most important indices denoting ET and soil moisture responses to surface dryness with effects over natural ecosystems and agricultural areas. Results showed that ESI captured major

  17. Evapotranspiration using a satellite-based surface energy balance with standardized ground control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trezza, Ricardo

    This study evaluated the potential of using the S&barbelow;urface E&barbelow;nergy Ḇalance A&barbelow;lgorithm for Ḻand (SEBAL) as a means for estimating evapotranspiration (ET) for local and regional scales in Southern Idaho. The original SEBAL model was refined during this study to provide better estimation of ET in agricultural areas and to make more reliable estimates of ET from other surfaces as well, including mountainous terrain. The modified version of SEBAL used in this study, termed as SEBALID (ID stands for Idaho) includes standardization of the two SEBAL "anchor" pixels, the use of a water balance model to track top soil moisture, adaptation of components of SEBAL for better prediction of the surface energy balance in mountains and sloping terrain, and use of the ratio between actual ET and alfalfa reference evapotranspiration (ET r) as a means for obtaining the temporal integration of instantaneous ET to daily and seasonal values. Validation of the SEBALID model at a local scale was performed by comparing lysimeter ET measurements from the USDA-ARS facility at Kimberly, Idaho, with ET predictions by SEBAL using Landsat 5 TM imagery. Comparison of measured and predicted ET values was challenging due to the resolution of the Landsat thermal band (120m x 120m) and the relatively small size of the lysimeter fields. In the cases where thermal information was adequate, SEBALID predictions were close to the measured values of ET in the lysimeters. Application of SEBALID at a regional scale was performed using Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 5 TM imagery for the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer (ESPA) region in Idaho during 2000. The results indicated that SEBALID performed well for predicting daily and seasonal ET for agricultural areas. Some unreasonable results were obtained for desert and basalt areas, due to uncertainties of the prediction of surface parameters. In mountains, even though validation of results was not possible, the values of ET obtained

  18. Measurements of the branching fractions of exclusive charmless B meson decays with eta(') or omega mesons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Hall, T L; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffner, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocain, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weidemann, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Vaugnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-11-26

    We present the results of searches for B decays to charmless two-body final states containing eta(') or omega mesons, based on 20.7 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector. We find the branching fractions Beta(B(+)-->eta(')K(+)) = (70+/-8+/-5) x 10(-6), Beta(B(0)-->eta(')K(0)) = (42(+13)(-11) +/- 4) x 10(-6), and Beta(B(+)-->omega pi(+)) = (6.6(+2.1)(-1.8) +/- 0.7) x 10(-6), where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. We give measurements of four additional modes for which the 90% confidence level upper limits are Beta(B(+)-->eta(')pi(+)) < 12 x 10(-6), Beta(B(+)-->omega K(+)) < 4 x 10(-6), Beta(B(0)-->omega K(0)) < 13 x 10(-6), and Beta(B(0)-->omega pi(0)) < 3 x 10(-6).

  19. A PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE ETA- CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST SYSTEM FOR THE SUMMER OF 2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster presents an evaluation of the Eta-CMAQ Air Quality Forecast System's experimental domain using O3 observations obtained from EPA's AIRNOW program and a suite of statistical metrics examining both discrete and categorical forecasts.

  20. Potential crop evapotranspiration and surface evaporation estimates via a gridded weather forcing dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Clayton S.; Allen, L. Niel

    2017-03-01

    Absent local weather stations, a gridded weather dataset can provide information useful for water management in irrigated areas including potential crop evapotranspiration calculations. In estimating crop irrigation requirements and surface evaporation in Utah, United States of America, methodology and software were developed using the ASCE Standardized Penman-Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration equation with input climate drivers from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) gridded weather forcing dataset and a digital elevation model. A simple procedure was devised to correct bias in NLDAS relative humidity and air temperature data based on comparison to weather data from ground stations. Potential evapotranspiration was calculated for 18 crops (including turfgrass), wetlands (large and narrow), and open water evaporation (deep and shallow) by multiplying crop coefficient curves to reference evapotranspiration with annual curve dates set by summation of Hargreaves evapotranspiration, cumulative growing degree days, or number of days. Net potential evapotranspiration was calculated by subtracting effective precipitation estimates from the Daymet gridded precipitation dataset. Analysis of the results showed that daily estimated potential crop evapotranspiration from the model compared well with estimates from electronic weather stations (1980-2014) and with independently calculated potential crop evapotranspiration in adjacent states. Designed for this study but open sourced for other applications, software entitled GridET encapsulated the GIS-based model that provided data download and management, calculation of reference and potential crop evapotranspiration, and viewing and analysis tools. Flexible features in GridET allows a user to specify grid resolution, evapotranspiration equations, cropping information, and additional datasets with the output being transferable to other GIS software.

  1. Mixture of a seismicity model based on the rate-and-state friction and ETAS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, T.

    2015-12-01

    Currently the ETAS model [Ogata, 1988, JASA] is considered to be a standard model of seismicity. However, because the ETAS model is a purely statistical one, the physics-based seismicity model derived from the rate-and-state friction (hereafter referred to as Dieterich model) [Dieterich, 1994, JGR] is frequently examined. However, the original version of the Dieterich model has several problems in the application to real earthquake sequences and therefore modifications have been conducted in previous studies. Iwata [2015, Pageoph] is one of such studies and shows that the Dieterich model is significantly improved as a result of the inclusion of the effect of secondary aftershocks (i.e., aftershocks caused by previous aftershocks). However, still the performance of the ETAS model is superior to that of the improved Dieterich model. For further improvement, the mixture of the Dieterich and ETAS models is examined in this study. To achieve the mixture, the seismicity rate is represented as a sum of the ETAS and Dieterich models of which weights are given as k and 1-k, respectively. This mixture model is applied to the aftershock sequences of the 1995 Kobe and 2004 Mid-Niigata sequences which have been analyzed in Iwata [2015]. Additionally, the sequence of the Matsushiro earthquake swarm in central Japan 1965-1970 is also analyzed. The value of k and parameters of the ETAS and Dieterich models are estimated by means of the maximum likelihood method, and the model performances are assessed on the basis of AIC. For the two aftershock sequences, the AIC values of the ETAS model are around 3-9 smaller (i.e., better) than those of the mixture model. On the contrary, for the Matsushiro swarm, the AIC value of the mixture model is 5.8 smaller than that of the ETAS model, indicating that the mixture of the two models results in significant improvement of the seismicity model.

  2. PKC{eta} is a negative regulator of AKT inhibiting the IGF-I induced proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Shahaf, Galit; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Koifman, Gabriela; Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Frost, Sigal A.; Livneh, Etta

    2012-04-15

    The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, including breast cancer, and its activation appears to be critical for tumor maintenance. Some malignant cells are dependent on activated AKT for their survival; tumors exhibiting elevated AKT activity show sensitivity to its inhibition, providing an Achilles heel for their treatment. Here we show that the PKC{eta} isoform is a negative regulator of the AKT signaling pathway. The IGF-I induced phosphorylation on Ser473 of AKT was inhibited by the PKC{eta}-induced expression in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells. This was further confirmed in shRNA PKC{eta}-knocked-down MCF-7 cells, demonstrating elevated phosphorylation on AKT Ser473. While PKC{eta} exhibited negative regulation on AKT phosphorylation it did not alter the IGF-I induced ERK phosphorylation. However, it enhanced ERK phosphorylation when stimulated by PDGF. Moreover, its effects on IGF-I/AKT and PDGF/ERK pathways were in correlation with cell proliferation. We further show that both PKC{eta} and IGF-I confer protection against UV-induced apoptosis and cell death having additive effects. Although the protective effect of IGF-I involved activation of AKT, it was not affected by PKC{eta} expression, suggesting that PKC{eta} acts through a different route to increase cell survival. Hence, our studies show that PKC{eta} provides negative control on AKT pathway leading to reduced cell proliferation, and further suggest that its presence/absence in breast cancer cells will affect cell death, which could be of therapeutic value.

  3. Drought monitoring over the Horn of Africa using remotely sensed evapotranspiration, soil moisture and vegetation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, J.; Gokmen, M.; Eden, U.; Abou Ali, M.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Index (ETDI) and the Soil Moisture Deficit Index (SMDI), have been proposed to investigate this. The ETDI considers the stress ratio caused by the difference between potential and actual evapotranspiration, while SMDI considers the variation in soil moisture availability to the plant. As there is not a single unique accepted definition of drought, investigation into the impact of drought should not be confined to a single drought index; instead several indices need to be used for this purpose. The objective of this research is to investigate the drought in the Horn of Africa using several remote sensing drought indices and vegetation parameters. In this research the drought will be investigated using SPI, ETDI, SMDI, NDVI and SPI. For this purpose ETDI and SMDI will be estimated from remote sensing products for the period from 2002 till 2011that are created in framework of the WACMOS project. The research involves the comparison of the different drought indices and the research into possible synergies to enhance drought monitoring.

  4. Structural basis for the suppression of skin cancers by DNA polymerase [eta

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Timothy D.; Johnson, Robert E.; Jain, Rinku; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2010-09-13

    DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}) is unique among eukaryotic polymerases in its proficient ability for error-free replication through ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and inactivation of Pol{eta} (also known as POLH) in humans causes the variant form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV). We present the crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol{eta} (also known as RAD30) in ternary complex with a cis-syn thymine-thymine (T-T) dimer and with undamaged DNA. The structures reveal that the ability of Pol{eta} to replicate efficiently through the ultraviolet-induced lesion derives from a simple and yet elegant mechanism, wherein the two Ts of the T-T dimer are accommodated in an active site cleft that is much more open than in other polymerases. We also show by structural, biochemical and genetic analysis that the two Ts are maintained in a stable configuration in the active site via interactions with Gln55, Arg73 and Met74. Together, these features define the basis for Pol{eta}'s action on ultraviolet-damaged DNA that is crucial in suppressing the mutagenic and carcinogenic consequences of sun exposure, thereby reducing the incidence of skin cancers in humans.

  5. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Liping Gin

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  6. Measurement of the gamma gamma* to eta_c transition form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-04-28

    The authors study the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sub c}, {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and obtain {eta}{sub c} mass and width values 2982.2 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 1.6 MeV/c{sup 2} and 31.7 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.8 MeV, respectively. They find {Lambda}({eta}{sub c} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}){Beta}({eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}) = 0.374 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.031 keV, and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sub c} transition form factor in the momentum transfer range from 2 to 50 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  7. Potential evapotranspiration and the likelihood of future drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Hansen, J.; Goldberg, R.; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruedy, R.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that the greenhouse warming predicted by the GISS general-circulation model and other GCMs could lead to severe droughts is investigated by means of numerical simulations, with a focus on the role of potential evapotranspiration E(P). The relationships between precipitation (P), E(P), soil moisture, and vegetation changes in GCMs are discussed; the empirically derived Palmer drought-intensity index and a new supply-demand index (SDDI) based on changes in P - E(P) are described; and simulation results for the period 1960-2060 are presented in extensive tables, graphs, and computer-generated color maps. Simulations with both drought indices predict increasing drought frequency for the U.S., with effects already apparent in the 1990s and a 50-percent frequency of severe droughts by the 2050s. Analyses of arid periods during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic are shown to support the use of the SDDI in GCM drought prediction.

  8. Using the TIMS to estimate evapotranspiration from a forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teskey, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The main goals were: (1) to characterize the evapotranspiration (Et) of two forested watersheds using direct measurement techniques, and (2) to evaluate if remotely sensed surface temperatures could be used to estimate Et from the same watersheds. Two independent approaches for estimating the Et from watersheds were used. The first was derived using the Penman-Monteith Equation. This model requires the direct measurement of the microclimate of the site as well as biological measurements, i.e., stomatal conductance to water vapor and the leaf area of the stand. The primary limitation of this approach is that the measurement of stomatal conductance is time consuming, and in large trees, access to the foliage is difficult so the sample must be limited to the small number of trees. In the study, the sample was limited to the trees which could be measured from a single tower in each stand.

  9. An empirical approach to retrieve Evapotranspiration over Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, R.; Fu, R.; Myneni, R.; Bernardes, S.; Gao, H.

    2006-12-01

    The estimation of regional evapotranspiration (ET) over Amazonia remains uncertain since there are very few in situ observational with a limited footprint (~1km). The present work uses an empirical method to estimate ET over the Brazilian Legal Amazon (BLA) based on satellite measurements. Satellite data include the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imagining Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the surface radiation budget from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for the period (2000-2004). The empirical model was calibrated (2 sites) and validated (6 sites) using observational measurements in the BLA. Results from F-test and t-student test have shown that observed and calculated ET have the same variance and mean values, respectively.

  10. Hydrological model uncertainty due to spatial evapotranspiration estimation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xuan; Lamačová, Anna; Duffy, Christopher; Krám, Pavel; Hruška, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) continues to be a difficult process to estimate in seasonal and long-term water balances in catchment models. Approaches to estimate ET typically use vegetation parameters (e.g., leaf area index [LAI], interception capacity) obtained from field observation, remote sensing data, national or global land cover products, and/or simulated by ecosystem models. In this study we attempt to quantify the uncertainty that spatial evapotranspiration estimation introduces into hydrological simulations when the age of the forest is not precisely known. The Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM) was implemented for the Lysina headwater catchment, located 50°03‧N, 12°40‧E in the western part of the Czech Republic. The spatial forest patterns were digitized from forest age maps made available by the Czech Forest Administration. Two ET methods were implemented in the catchment model: the Biome-BGC forest growth sub-model (1-way coupled to PIHM) and with the fixed-seasonal LAI method. From these two approaches simulation scenarios were developed. We combined the estimated spatial forest age maps and two ET estimation methods to drive PIHM. A set of spatial hydrologic regime and streamflow regime indices were calculated from the modeling results for each method. Intercomparison of the hydrological responses to the spatial vegetation patterns suggested considerable variation in soil moisture and recharge and a small uncertainty in the groundwater table elevation and streamflow. The hydrologic modeling with ET estimated by Biome-BGC generated less uncertainty due to the plant physiology-based method. The implication of this research is that overall hydrologic variability induced by uncertain management practices was reduced by implementing vegetation models in the catchment models.

  11. Satellite-derived potential evapotranspiration for distributed hydrologic runoff modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spies, R. R.; Franz, K. J.; Bowman, A.; Hogue, T. S.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    Distributed models have the ability of incorporating spatially variable data, especially high resolution forcing inputs such as precipitation, temperature and evapotranspiration in hydrologic modeling. Use of distributed hydrologic models for operational streamflow prediction has been partially hindered by a lack of readily available, spatially explicit input observations. Potential evapotranspiration (PET), for example, is currently accounted for through PET input grids that are based on monthly climatological values. The goal of this study is to assess the use of satellite-based PET estimates that represent the temporal and spatial variability, as input to the National Weather Service (NWS) Hydrology Laboratory Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HL-RDHM). Daily PET grids are generated for six watersheds in the upper Mississippi River basin using a method that applies only MODIS satellite-based observations and the Priestly Taylor formula (MODIS-PET). The use of MODIS-PET grids will be tested against the use of the current climatological PET grids for simulating basin discharge. Gridded surface temperature forcing data are derived by applying the inverse distance weighting spatial prediction method to point-based station observations from the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) and Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS). Precipitation data are obtained from the Climate Prediction Center's (CPC) Climatology-Calibrated Precipitation Analysis (CCPA). A-priori gridded parameters for the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting Model (SAC-SMA), Snow-17 model, and routing model are initially obtained from the Office of Hydrologic Development and further calibrated using an automated approach. The potential of the MODIS-PET to be used in an operational distributed modeling system will be assessed with the long-term goal of promoting research to operations transfers and advancing the science of hydrologic forecasting.

  12. Arid site water balance: evapotranspiration modeling and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    In order to evaluate the magnitude of radionuclide transport at an aird site, a field and modeling study was conducted to measure and predict water movement under vegetated and bare soil conditions. Significant quantities of water were found to move below the roo of a shallow-rooted grass-covered area during wet years at the Hanford site. The unsaturated water flow model, UNSAT-1D, was resonably successful in simulating the transient behavior of the water balance at this site. The effects of layered soils on water balance were demonstrated using the model. Models used to evaluate water balance in arid regions should not rely on annual averages and assume that all precipitation is removed by evapotranspiration. The potential for drainage at arid sites exists under conditions where shallow rooted plants grow on coarse textured soils. This condition was observed at our study site at Hanford. Neutron probe data collected on a cheatgrass community at the Hanford site during a wet year indicated that over 5 cm of water drained below the 3.5-m depth. The unsaturated water flow model, UNSAT-1D, predicted water drainage of about 5 cm (single layer, 10 months) and 3.5 cm (two layers, 12 months) for the same time period. Additional field measurements of hydraulic conductivity will likely improve the drainage estimate made by UNSAT-1D. Additional information describing cheatgrass growth and water use at the grass site could improve model predictions of sink terms and subsequent calculations of water storage within the rooting zone. In arid areas where the major part of the annual precipitation occurs during months with low average potential evapotranspiration and where soils are vegetated but are coarse textured and well drained, significant drainage can occur. 31 references, 18 figures, 1 table.

  13. Estimating evapotranspiration of reference crops using the remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payero, Jose Oscar

    For this study, seasonal meteorological and multispectral measurements were made over grass and alfalfa fields at Kimberly, Idaho, with the purpose of assessing the validity of the remote sensing method for the determination of evapotranspiration (ET) of reference crops and to establish relationships to derive ET calculation parameters from remotely sensed data. Meteorological data were obtained with the Bowen ratio method, and a new procedure was first developed to validate these data. Empirical equations were derived to estimate diurnal variation of soil heat flux. Relationships were also developed to estimate plant height from remotely sensed information. Also, a methodology to obtain surface albedo, using a variable (P/T) ratio, was described and applied. The (P/T) ratio is the fraction of the total reflected short wave radiation sensed by discrete radiometer bands. The effects of using remotely sensed aerodynamic temperature and wind-speed-corrected roughness length were evaluated. Also, different methods to correct for atmospheric stability, and to extrapolate daily ET values from instantaneous measurements were compared. It was found that the performance of the remote sensing method for estimating evapotranspiration was a function of the evaporative ratio (ER), which is the ratio of the latent heat flux to available energy. For ER ≤ 1.2, the instantaneous noon sensible and latent heat fluxes obtained with the remote sensing method compared very well with those obtained using the Bowen ratio method. On the other hand, for ER > 1.2 the method was not useful. Aerodynamic temperature corrections and the use of wind- corrected roughness lengths did not improve the results. Stability correction was only necessary when the aerodynamic resistance values were above 100 seconds per meter. None of several methods to extrapolate daily ET values from instantaneous measurements performed acceptably under the advective conditions of Kimberly.

  14. The effect of different evapotranspiration methods on portraying soil water dynamics and ET partitioning in a semi-arid environment in Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lianyu; Zeng, Yijian; Su, Zhongbo; Cai, Huanjie; Zheng, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Different methods for assessing evapotranspiration (ET) can significantly affect the performance of land surface models in portraying soil water dynamics and ET partitioning. An accurate understanding of the impact a method has is crucial to determining the effectiveness of an irrigation scheme. Two ET methods are discussed: one is based on reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) theory, uses leaf area index (LAI) for partitioning into soil evaporation and transpiration, and is denoted as the ETind method; the other is a one-step calculation of actual soil evaporation and potential transpiration by incorporating canopy minimum resistance and actual soil resistance into the Penman-Monteith model, and is denoted as the ETdir method. In this study, a soil water model, considering the coupled transfer of water, vapor, and heat in the soil, was used to investigate how different ET methods could affect the calculation of the soil water dynamics and ET partitioning in a crop field. Results indicate that for two different ET methods this model varied concerning the simulation of soil water content and crop evapotranspiration components, but the simulation of soil temperature agreed well with lysimeter observations, considering aerodynamic and surface resistance terms improved the ETdir method regarding simulating soil evaporation, especially after irrigation. Furthermore, the results of different crop growth scenarios indicate that the uncertainty in LAI played an important role in estimating the relative transpiration and evaporation fraction. The impact of maximum rooting depth and root growth rate on calculating ET components might increase in drying soil. The influence of maximum rooting depth was larger late in the growing season, while the influence of root growth rate dominated early in the growing season.

  15. Retrospective forecast of ETAS model with daily parameters estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, Giuseppe; Murru, Maura; Console, Rodolfo; Marzocchi, Warner; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2016-04-01

    We present a retrospective ETAS (Epidemic Type of Aftershock Sequence) model based on the daily updating of free parameters during the background, the learning and the test phase of a seismic sequence. The idea was born after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability) Center in Japan provided an appropriate testing benchmark for the five 1-day submitted models. Of all the models, only one was able to successfully predict the number of events that really happened. This result was verified using both the real time and the revised catalogs. The main cause of the failure was in the underestimation of the forecasted events, due to model parameters maintained fixed during the test. Moreover, the absence in the learning catalog of an event similar to the magnitude of the mainshock (M9.0), which drastically changed the seismicity in the area, made the learning parameters not suitable to describe the real seismicity. As an example of this methodological development we show the evolution of the model parameters during the last two strong seismic sequences in Italy: the 2009 L'Aquila and the 2012 Reggio Emilia episodes. The achievement of the model with daily updated parameters is compared with that of same model where the parameters remain fixed during the test time.

  16. Eta Carinae: At the Crossroads of becoming a Supernova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1840's, when Eta Carinae's visual magnitude rivaled Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, astronomers have wondered what major event took place. Today with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, with CHANDRA X-ray spectroscopy and the Very Large Telescope spectrographs and interferometers, we have learned that over 12 solar masses of material was ejected at 500 to 700 km/s into interstellar space. This ejecta is quite different from the normal interstellar medium. It is rich in nitrogen, poor in oxygen and carbon. The dust properties are quite peculiar and many metals such as vanadium, strontium, cadmium are seen in both absorption against the central source, plus a number of molecules. The chemical and dust formation is likely dominated by nitrogen as we see H_2, CH, CH+, OH, NH, HCl and NH-3, but no CO. Other metals and molecules are being searched out in the FUSE, HST/STIS, VLT/UVES and VLT/CRIRES spectra. I will describe what we know about the massive binary stellar system, how it changes every 5.54 year in UV and X-ray output and how the massive ejecta responds in this astrophysical laboratory.

  17. The Three-dimensional Structure of the Eta Carinae Homunculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, W.; Teodoro, M.; Madura, T.I.; Groh, J.H.; Gull, T.R.; Mehner, A.; Corcoran, M.F.; Damineli, A.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate, using the modeling code SHAPE, the three-dimensional structure of the bipolar Homunculus nebula surrounding Eta Carinae as mapped by new ESO VLT/X-Shooter observations of the H2 (lambda) = 2.12125 micrometers emission line. Our results reveal for the first time important deviations from the axisymmetric bipolar morphology: 1) circumpolar trenches in each lobe positioned point-symmetrically from the center and 2) offplanar protrusions in the equatorial region from each lobe at longitudinal (approximately 55 degrees) and latitudinal (10 degrees to 20 degrees) distances from the projected apastron direction of the binary orbit. The angular distance between the protrusions (approximately 110 degrees) is similar to the angular extent of each polar trench (approximately 130 degrees) and nearly equal to the opening angle of the wind-wind collision cavity (approximately 110 degrees). As in previous studies, we confirm a hole near the centre of each polar lobe and no detectable near-IR H2 emission from the thin optical skirt seen prominently in visible imagery. We conclude that the interaction between the outflows and/or radiation from the central binary stars and their orientation in space has had, and possibly still has, a strong influence on the Homunculus. This implies that prevailing theoretical models of the Homunculus are incomplete as most assume a single star origin that produces an axisymmetric nebula.We discuss how the newly found features might be related to the Homunculus ejection, the central binary and the interacting stellar winds.

  18. CRITICAL DIFFERENCES AND CLUES IN ETA CAR'S 2009 EVENT ,

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Martin, John C.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ferland, Gary J.

    2011-10-20

    We monitored Eta Carinae with the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and Gemini GMOS throughout the 2009 spectroscopic event, which was expected to differ from its predecessor in 2003. Here we report major observed differences between events and their implications. Some of these results were quite unexpected. (1) The UV brightness minimum was much deeper in 2009. This suggests that physical conditions in the early stages of an event depend on different parameters than the 'normal' inter-event wind. Extra mass ejection from the primary star is one possible cause. (2) The expected He II {lambda}4687 brightness maximum was followed several weeks later by another. We explain why this fact and the timing of the {lambda}4687 maxima strongly support a 'shock breakup' hypothesis for X-ray and {lambda}4687 behavior as proposed 5-10 years ago. (3) We observed a polar view of the star via light reflected by dust in the Homunculus nebula. Surprisingly, at that location, the variations of emission-line brightness and Doppler velocities closely resembled a direct view of the star, which should not have been true for any phenomena related to the orbit. This result casts very serious doubt on all the proposed velocity interpretations that depend on the secondary star's orbital motion. (4) Latitude-dependent variations of H I, He I, and Fe II features reveal aspects of wind behavior during the event. In addition, we discuss implications of the observations for several crucial unsolved problems.

  19. Estimating actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation using standard meteorological data: a pragmatic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, T. A.; Peel, M. C.; Lowe, L.; Srikanthan, R.; McVicar, T. R.

    2013-04-01

    This guide to estimating daily and monthly actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation covers topics that are of interest to researchers, consulting hydrologists and practicing engineers. Topics include estimating actual evaporation from deep lakes and from farm dams and for catchment water balance studies, estimating potential evaporation as input to rainfall-runoff models, and reference crop evapotranspiration for small irrigation areas, and for irrigation within large irrigation districts. Inspiration for this guide arose in response to the authors' experiences in reviewing research papers and consulting reports where estimation of the actual evaporation component in catchment and water balance studies was often inadequately handled. Practical guides using consistent terminology that cover both theory and practice are not readily available. Here we provide such a guide, which is divided into three parts. The first part provides background theory and an outline of the conceptual models of potential evaporation of Penman, Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor, as well as discussions of reference crop evapotranspiration and Class-A pan evaporation. The last two sub-sections in this first part include techniques to estimate actual evaporation from (i) open-surface water and (ii) landscapes and catchments (Morton and the advection-aridity models). The second part addresses topics confronting a practicing hydrologist, e.g. estimating actual evaporation for deep lakes, shallow lakes and farm dams, lakes covered with vegetation, catchments, irrigation areas and bare soil. The third part addresses six related issues: (i) automatic (hard wired) calculation of evaporation estimates in commercial weather stations, (ii) evaporation estimates without wind data, (iii) at-site meteorological data, (iv) dealing with evaporation in a climate change environment, (v) 24 h versus day-light hour estimation of meteorological variables, and (vi) uncertainty in evaporation

  20. Estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration using the water balance model WAVE and fine spatial resolution airborne remote sensing images from the DAIS-sensor: Experimental set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Veroustraete, F.; Feyen, J.

    2003-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ET) of agricultural land and forestland surfaces play an important role in the redistribution of water on the Earth's surface. Any change in evapotranspiration, either through change in vegetation or climate change, directly effects the available water resources. For quantifying these effects physical models need to be constructed. Most hydrological models have to deal with a lack of good spatial resolution, despite their good temporal information. Remote sensing techniques on the contrary determine the spatial pattern of landscape features and hence are very useful on large scales. The main objective of this research is the combination of the spatial pattern of remote sensing (using visible and thermal infrared spectrum) with the temporal pattern of the water balance model WAVE (Vanclooster et al., 1994 and 1996). To realise this, the following objectives are formulated: (i) relate soil and vegetation surface temperatures to actual evapotranspiration of forest and crops simulated with the water balance model WAVE using remote sensing derived parameters. Three methods will be used and mutually compared. Both airborne and satellite imagery will be implemented; (1) compare the spatial pattern of evapotranspiration, as a result of the three methods, with the energy balance model SEBAL (Bastiaanssen et al., 1998) and finally; (2) subject the up-scaled WAVE and SEBAL models to an uncertainty analysis using the GLUE-approach (Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimate) (Beven en Binley, 1992). To study the behaviour of the model beyond the field-scale (micro-scale), a meso-scale study was conducted at the test-site of DURAS (50°50'38"N, 5°08'50"W, Sint-Truiden). Airborne imagery from the DAIS/ROSIS sensor are available. For the determination of the spatial pattern of actual evapotranspiration the next two methods are considered: (1) relations between surface temperature, surface albedo and vegetation indices are linked with field

  1. Characterization of thymus-derived lymphocytes expressing Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta- eta antigen receptor isoforms: analysis by gene transfection

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the function of the CD3 eta subunit of the T cell receptor (TCR), we have used cDNAs encoding CD3 zeta, CD3 eta, or both to reconstitute a variant of a cytochrome c-specific, I-Ek-restricted murine T cell hybridoma, termed MA5.8, which lacks CD3 zeta and CD3 eta proteins. We provide direct evidence that assembly and surface expression of TCRs can be mediated by either of these subunits separately or together. However, the level of TCR expression on zeta transfectants is up to one order of magnitude greater than that on eta transfectants, implying that CD3 eta is weakly associated with the pentameric Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon complex and/or inefficient at salvaging the incomplete TCR from lysosomal degradation. As a component of the TCR, the CD3 eta subunit preferentially forms a heterodimer with CD3 zeta, but is also able to form a CD3 eta-eta homodimer. Crosslinking of Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta- zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta, or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta-eta TCR isotypes with anti-CD3 epsilon monoclonal antibody or a cytochrome c peptide epitope on I-Ek antigen-presenting cells mediates signal transduction resulting in reversible cell-cycle arrest of transfected clones. Given the potential for diversity of signals generated by these functional TCR isotypes and the expression of the CD3 eta gene product in the thymus, CD3 eta is likely to play a role in selection and/or activation of thymocytes during development. PMID:2145389

  2. Realization of daily evapotranspiration in arid ecosystems based on remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhag, Mohamed; Bahrawi, Jarbou A.

    2017-03-01

    Daily evapotranspiration is a major component of water resources management plans. In arid ecosystems, the quest for an efficient water budget is always hard to achieve due to insufficient irrigational water and high evapotranspiration rates. Therefore, monitoring of daily evapotranspiration is a key practice for sustainable water resources management, especially in arid environments. Remote sensing techniques offered a great help to estimate the daily evapotranspiration on a regional scale. Existing open-source algorithms proved to estimate daily evapotranspiration comprehensively in arid environments. The only deficiency of these algorithms is the course scale of the used remote sensing data. Consequently, the adequate downscaling algorithm is a compulsory step to rationalize an effective water resources management plan. Daily evapotranspiration was estimated fairly well using an Advance Along-Track Scanner Radiometer (AATSR) in conjunction with (MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) MERIS data acquired in July 2013 with 1 km spatial resolution and 3 days of temporal resolution under a surface energy balance system (SEBS) model. Results were validated against reference evapotranspiration ground truth values using standardized Penman-Monteith method with R2 of 0.879. The findings of the current research successfully monitor turbulent heat fluxes values estimated from AATSR and MERIS data with a temporal resolution of 3 days only in conjunction with reliable meteorological data. Research verdicts are necessary inputs for a well-informed decision-making processes regarding sustainable water resource management.

  3. Comparison of two simple tools (TSEB and FAO-56) to retrieve evapotranspiration of irrigated agriculture in semi-arid areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diarra, Alhousseine; Jarlan, Lionel; Er-Raki, Salah; Le Page, Michel; Khabba, Said; Boulet, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Probe sensors (Delta-T). The obtained results showed a linear relationship between both parameters with a correlation coefficient of 0.86 for low values LAI (<1.5 m² / m²). Finally, both approaches are used to evaluate their potentiality to predict a water stress index based on the ratio between actual and potential evapotranspiration. Although the FAO-56 is better suitable to detect high water stresses, the TSEB model is able to detect moderate stresses without a need to prescribe water inputs. This in-depth comparison of two simple tools to monitor evapotranspiration leads us to the conclusion that the TSEB model can reasonably be used to map evapotranspiration on large scale. This constitutes our work in progress based on MODIS products in the objective of monitoring plant water use at the catchment scale.

  4. Recent decline in the global land evapotranspiration trend due to limited moisture supply.

    PubMed

    Jung, Martin; Reichstein, Markus; Ciais, Philippe; Seneviratne, Sonia I; Sheffield, Justin; Goulden, Michael L; Bonan, Gordon; Cescatti, Alessandro; Chen, Jiquan; de Jeu, Richard; Dolman, A Johannes; Eugster, Werner; Gerten, Dieter; Gianelle, Damiano; Gobron, Nadine; Heinke, Jens; Kimball, John; Law, Beverly E; Montagnani, Leonardo; Mu, Qiaozhen; Mueller, Brigitte; Oleson, Keith; Papale, Dario; Richardson, Andrew D; Roupsard, Olivier; Running, Steve; Tomelleri, Enrico; Viovy, Nicolas; Weber, Ulrich; Williams, Christopher; Wood, Eric; Zaehle, Sönke; Zhang, Ke

    2010-10-21

    More than half of the solar energy absorbed by land surfaces is currently used to evaporate water. Climate change is expected to intensify the hydrological cycle and to alter evapotranspiration, with implications for ecosystem services and feedback to regional and global climate. Evapotranspiration changes may already be under way, but direct observational constraints are lacking at the global scale. Until such evidence is available, changes in the water cycle on land−a key diagnostic criterion of the effects of climate change and variability−remain uncertain. Here we provide a data-driven estimate of global land evapotranspiration from 1982 to 2008, compiled using a global monitoring network, meteorological and remote-sensing observations, and a machine-learning algorithm. In addition, we have assessed evapotranspiration variations over the same time period using an ensemble of process-based land-surface models. Our results suggest that global annual evapotranspiration increased on average by 7.1 ± 1.0 millimetres per year per decade from 1982 to 1997. After that, coincident with the last major El Niño event in 1998, the global evapotranspiration increase seems to have ceased until 2008. This change was driven primarily by moisture limitation in the Southern Hemisphere, particularly Africa and Australia. In these regions, microwave satellite observations indicate that soil moisture decreased from 1998 to 2008. Hence, increasing soil-moisture limitations on evapotranspiration largely explain the recent decline of the global land-evapotranspiration trend. Whether the changing behaviour of evapotranspiration is representative of natural climate variability or reflects a more permanent reorganization of the land water cycle is a key question for earth system science.

  5. Environmental controls on seasonal ecosystem evapotranspiration/potential evapotranspiration ratio as determined by the global eddy flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunwei; Sun, Ge; McNulty, Steven G.; Noormets, Asko; Fang, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The evapotranspiration / potential evapotranspiration (AET / PET) ratio is traditionally termed as the crop coefficient (Kc) and has been generally used as ecosystem evaporative stress index. In the current hydrology literature, Kc has been widely used as a parameter to estimate crop water demand by water managers but has not been well examined for other types of ecosystems such as forests and other perennial vegetation. Understanding the seasonal dynamics of this variable for all ecosystems is important for projecting the ecohydrological responses to climate change and accurately quantifying water use at watershed to global scales. This study aimed at deriving monthly Kc for multiple vegetation cover types and understanding its environmental controls by analyzing the accumulated global eddy flux (FLUXNET) data. We examined monthly Kc data for seven vegetation covers, including open shrubland (OS), cropland (CRO), grassland (GRA), deciduous broad leaf forest (DBF), evergreen needle leaf forest (ENF), evergreen broad leaf forest (EBF), and mixed forest (MF), across 81 sites. We found that, except for evergreen forests (EBF and ENF), Kc values had large seasonal variation across all land covers. The spatial variability of Kc was well explained by latitude, suggesting site factors are a major control on Kc. Seasonally, Kc increased significantly with precipitation in the summer months, except in EBF. Moreover, leaf area index (LAI) significantly influenced monthly Kc in all land covers, except in EBF. During the peak growing season, forests had the highest Kc values, while croplands (CRO) had the lowest. We developed a series of multivariate linear monthly regression models for Kc by land cover type and season using LAI, site latitude, and monthly precipitation as independent variables. The Kc models are useful for understanding water stress in different ecosystems under climate change and variability as well as for estimating seasonal ET for large areas with mixed

  6. QSTR with extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices. 15. Development of predictive models for toxicity of organic chemicals against fathead minnow using second-generation ETA indices.

    PubMed

    Roy, K; Das, R Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Modern industrialisation has led to the production of millions of toxic chemicals having hazardous effects on the ecosystem. It is impracticable to determine the toxic potential of a large number of chemicals in animal models, making the use of quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models an alternative strategy for toxicity prediction. Recently we introduced a set of second-generation extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices for predictive modelling. Here we have developed predictive toxicity models on a large dataset of 459 diverse chemicals against fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) using the second-generation ETA indices. These descriptors can be easily calculated from two-dimensional molecular representation without the need of time-consuming conformational analysis and alignment, making the developed models easily reproducible. Considering the importance of hydrophobicity for toxicity prediction, AlogP98 was used as an additional predictor in all the models, which were validated rigorously using multiple strategies. The ETA models were comparable in predictability to those involving various non-ETA topological parameters and those previously reported using various descriptors including computationally demanding quantum-chemical ones.

  7. A scaling approach to Budyko's framework and the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration in humid environments: case study of the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Vallejo-Bernal, S. M.; Bustamante, E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies a 3-D state space representation of Budyko's framework designed to capture the mutual interdependence among long-term mean actual evapotranspiration (E), potential evapotranspiration (Ep) and precipitation (P). For this purpose we use three dimensionless and dependent quantities: Ψ = E ⁄ P, Φ = Ep ⁄ P and Ω = E ⁄ Ep. This 3-D space and its 2-D projections provide an interesting setting to test the physical soundness of Budyko's hypothesis. We demonstrate analytically that Budyko-type equations are unable to capture the physical limit of the relation between Ω and Φ in humid environments, owing to the unfeasibility of Ep ⁄ P = 0 when E ⁄ Ep → 1. Using data from 146 sub-catchments in the Amazon River basin we overcome this inconsistency by proposing a physically consistent power law: Ψ = kΦe, with k = 0.66, and e = 0.83 (R2 = 0.93). This power law is compared with two other Budyko-type equations. Taking into account the goodness of fits and the ability to comply with the physical limits of the 3-D space, our results show that the power law is better suited to model the coupled water and energy balances within the Amazon River basin. Moreover, k is found to be related to the partitioning of energy via evapotranspiration in terms of Ω. This suggests that our power law implicitly incorporates the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration into the Budyko curve, which is a consequence of the dependent nature of the studied variables within our 3-D space. This scaling approach is also consistent with the asymmetrical nature of the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration. Looking for a physical explanation for the parameters k and e, the inter-annual variability of individual catchments is studied. Evidence of space-time symmetry in Amazonia emerges, since both between-catchment and between-year variability follow the same Budyko curves. Finally, signs of co-evolution of catchments are explored by

  8. Distinct ETA Receptor Binding Mode of Macitentan As Determined by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ETA receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ETA receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ETA receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ETA receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ETA receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ETA receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that – in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan - macitentan-ETA receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable antagonism. PMID

  9. Effect of Enzyme-Treated Asparagus Extract (ETAS) on Psychological Stress in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Jun; Nakahigashi, Jun; Sato, Atsuya; Waki, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Shogo; Uebaba, Kazuo; Hisajima, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Enzyme-Treated Asparagus Extract (ETAS) on improving stress response. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial was undertaken in healthy volunteers. ETAS (150 mg/d) or a placebo was consumed for 28 d, with a washout period. Psychological parameters were examined using a self-report scale questionnaire and psychological stress was applied using the Uchida-Kraepelin (U-K) test. During the stress load, autonomic nervous function was analyzed. After the stress load, a profile of mood states (POMS) psychological rating was performed, and serum cortisol, plasma catecholamine, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), and salivary cortisol were analyzed. ETAS intake improved the self-reported rating for the items "Feel tired," "Hard to get up," and "Feel heavy" in the psychological questionnaire; ameliorated the self-reported rating for the items "Depression-Dejection" and "Fatigue" in the POMS questionnaire; and increased salivary sIgA levels after the U-K test. In contrast, serum and salivary cortisol levels, and plasma catecholamine did not change. During the U-K test, ETAS significantly upregulated the sympathetic nerve activity. Furthermore, ETAS intake significantly increased the number of answers and the number of correct answers in the U-K test, suggesting that it might improve office work performance with swiftness and accuracy under stressful conditions. In conclusion, ETAS supplementation reduced feelings of dysphoria and fatigue, ameliorated quality of sleep, and enhanced stress-load performance as well as promoted stress response by increasing salivary sIgA levels. These data suggest ETAS intake may exert beneficial effects, resulting from well-controlled stress management, in healthy individuals.

  10. Latitude-Dependent Effects in the Stellar Wind of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nathan; Davidson, Kris; Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Hillier, D. John

    2002-01-01

    The Homunculus reflection nebula around eta Carinae provides the rare opportunity to observe the spectrum of a star from more than one direction. In the case of eta Car, the nebula's geometry is known well enough to infer how wind profiles vary with latitude. We present STIS spectra of several positions in the Homunculus, showing directly that eta Car has an aspherical and axisymmetric stellar wind. P Cygni absorption in Balmer lines depends on latitude, with relatively high velocities and strong absorption near the polar axis. Stronger absorption at high latitudes is surprising, and it suggests higher mass flux toward the poles, perhaps resulting from equatorial gravity darkening on a rotating star. Reflected profiles of He I lines are more puzzling, and offer clues to eta Car's wind geometry and ionization structure. During eta Car's high-excitation state in March 2000, the wind had a fast, dense polar wind, with higher ionization at low latitudes. Older STIS data obtained since 1998 reveal that this global stellar-wind geometry changes during eta Car's 5.5 year cycle, and may suggest that this star s spectroscopic events are shell ejections. Whether or not a companion star triggers these outbursts remains ambiguous. The most dramatic changes in the wind occur at low latitudes, while the dense polar wind remains relatively undisturbed during an event. The apparent stability of the polar wind also supports the inferred bipolar geometry. The wind geometry and its variability have critical implications for understanding the 5.5 year cycle and long-term variability, but do not provide a clear alternative to the binary hypothesis for generating eta Car s X-rays.

  11. Estimating Spatially Variable Parameters of the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, Shyam; Ouillon, Guy; Sornette, Didier; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The ETAS model is widely employed to model the spatio-temporal distribution of earthquakes, generally using spatially invariant parameters, which is most likely a gross simplification considering the extremely heterogeneous structure of the Earth's crust. We propose an efficient method for the estimation of spatially varying parameters, using an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and spatial Voronoi tessellations. We assume that each Voronoi cell is characterized by a set of eight constant ETAS parameters. For a given number of randomly distributed cells, Vi=1 to N, we jointly invert the ETAS parameters within each cell using an EM algorithm. This process is progressively repeated several times for a given N (which controls the complexity), which is itself increased incrementally. We use the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to rank all the inverted models given their likelihood and complexity and select the top 1% models to compute the average model at any location. Using a synthetic catalog, we also check that the proposed method correctly inverts the known parameters. We apply the proposed method to earthquakes (M>=3) included in the ANSS catalog that occurred within the time period 1981-2016 in the spatial polygon defined by RELM/CSEP around California. The results indicate significant spatial variation of the ETAS parameters. Using these spatially variable estimates of ETAS parameters, we are better equipped to answer some important questions: (1) What is the seismic hazard (both long- and short-term) in a given region? (2) What kind of earthquakes dominate triggering? (3) are there regions where earthquakes are most likely preceded by foreshocks? Last but not the least, a possible correlation of the spatially varying ETAS parameters with spatially variable geophysical properties can lead to an improved understanding of the physics of earthquake triggering beside providing physical meaning to the parameters of the purely statistical ETAS model.

  12. Gluon and charm content of the {eta}{sup {prime}} meson and instantons

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.V. |; Zhitnitsky, A.R. |

    1998-02-01

    Motivated by recent CLEO measurements of the B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}K decay, we evaluate the gluon and charm content of the {eta}{sup {prime}} meson using the interacting instanton liquid model of the QCD vacuum. Our main result is {l_angle}0{vert_bar}g{sup 3}f{sup abc}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{tilde G}{sub {nu}{alpha}}{sup b}G{sub {alpha}{mu}}{sup c}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_angle}={minus}(2.3{endash}3.3) GeV{sup 2}{times}{l_angle}0{vert_bar}g{sup 2}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{tilde G}{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_angle}. It is very large due to the strong field of small-size instantons. We show that it provides quantitative explanations of the CLEO data on the B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}K decay rate (as well as the inclusive process B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}+X), via a virtual Cabibbo-unsuppressed decay into a {bar c}c pair which then becomes {eta}{sup {prime}}. If so, a significant charm component may be present in other hadrons also: We briefly discuss the contribution of the charmed quark to the {ital polarized} deep-inelastic scattering on a proton. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Observation of eta_c(1S) and eta_c(2S) decays to K K-pi pi-pi0 in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, P.del Amo

    2011-05-20

    We study the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample of 519.2 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at center-of-mass energies near the {Upsilon}(nS) (n = 2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe the {eta}{sub c}(1S), {chi}{sub c0}(1P), {chi}{sub c2}(1P), and {eta}{sub c}(2S) resonances produced in two-photon interactions and decaying to K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, with significances of 18.1, 5.7, 5.2, and 5.3 standard deviations (including systematic errors), respectively. We measure the {eta}{sub c}(2S) mass and width in K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays, m({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 3638.5 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.8 MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 13.4 {+-} 4.6 {+-} 3.2 MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We search for the Z(3930) resonance and find no significant signal. We also provide the two-photon width times branching fraction values for the observed resonances.

  14. Backward-angle {eta} photoproduction from protons at E{sub {gamma}}=1.6-2.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sumihama, M.; Ejiri, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Hotta, T.; Kato, Y.; Kohri, H.; Miyabe, M.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, T.; Shimizu, A.; Yorita, T.; Yosoi, M.; Ahn, D. S.; Ahn, J. K.; Akimune, H.; Asano, Y.; Date, S.; Ohashi, Y.; Ohkuma, H.; Toyokawa, H.

    2009-11-15

    Differential cross sections for {eta} photoproduction from protons have been measured at E{sub {gamma}}=1.6-2.4 GeV in the backward direction. A bump structure has been observed above 2.0 GeV in the total energy. No such bump is observed in {eta}{sup '},{omega}, and {pi}{sup 0} photoproductions. It is inferred that this unique structure in {eta} photoproduction is due to a baryon resonance with a large ss component that is strongly coupled to the {eta}N channel.

  15. Protein kinase C{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Protein kinase C-eta (PKC{eta}) is an upstream regulator of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway. {yields} PKC{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. {yields} PKC{eta} regulates NF-{kappa}B by activating I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and inducing I{kappa}B degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-{kappa}B in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-{kappa}B regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKC{eta}) regulates NF-{kappa}B upstream signaling by activating the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and the degradation of I{kappa}B. Furthermore, PKC{eta} enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-{kappa}B under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKC{eta} confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKC{eta} is involved in NF-{kappa}B signaling leading to drug resistance.

  16. Eta Carinae and the Homunculus: An Astrophysical Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2006-01-01

    High spatial resolution spectroscopy with HST/STIS between 1998.0 and 2004.2 has provided much exciting information about the central binary system and the physics of its N-rich, C,O-poor ejecta. Stellar He I profiles, noticeably blue-shifted relative to P Cygni H and Fe II line profiles, originate from the ionized wind region between two massive companions. Changes in profiles of He I singlet and triplet lines provide clues to the excitation mechanisms involved as the hot, UV companion moves in its highly eccentric orbit. For 90% of the 5.54-year period, the spectra of nearby Weigelt blobs and the Little Homunculus include highly excited emission lines of Ar, Ne, and Fe. During the few month-long spectroscopic minimum, these systems are deprived of Lyman continuum. Recombination, plus cooling, occurs. In the skirt region between the bipolar Homunculus, a neutral emission region, devoid of hydrogen emission, glows in Ti II, Fe I, Sr II, Sc II, etc. We find the ejecta to have Ti/Ni abundances nearly 100 times solar, not due to nuclear processing, but due to lack of oxygen. Many metals normally tied up in interstellar dust remain in gaseous phase. Much information is being obtained on the physical processes in these warm N-rich gases, whose excitation varies with time in a predictable pattern. Indeed recent GRB high dispersion spectra include signatures of circumGRB warm gases. This indicates that the early, primordial massive stars have warm massive ejecta reminiscent to that around Eta Carinae.

  17. The three-dimensional structure of the Eta Carinae Homunculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, W.; Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Groh, J. H.; Gull, T. R.; Mehner, A.; Corcoran, M. F.; Damineli, A.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate, using the modelling code SHAPE, the three-dimensional structure of the bipolar Homunculus nebula surrounding Eta Carinae as mapped by new ESO Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter observations of the H2 λ = 2.121 25 μm emission line. Our results reveal for the first time important deviations from the axisymmetric bipolar morphology: (1) circumpolar trenches in each lobe positioned point symmetrically from the centre and (2) off-planar protrusions in the equatorial region from each lobe at longitudinal (˜55°) and latitudinal (10°-20°) distances from the projected apastron direction of the binary orbit. The angular distance between the protrusions (˜110°) is similar to the angular extent of each polar trench (˜130°) and nearly equal to the opening angle of the wind-wind collision cavity (˜110°). As in previous studies, we confirm a hole near the centre of each polar lobe and no detectable near-IR H2 emission from the thin optical skirt seen prominently in visible imagery. We conclude that the interaction between the outflows and/or radiation from the central binary stars and their orientation in space has had, and possibly still has, a strong influence on the Homunculus. This implies that prevailing theoretical models of the Homunculus are incomplete as most assume a single-star origin that produces an axisymmetric nebula. We discuss how the newly found features might be related to the Homunculus ejection, the central binary, and the interacting stellar winds.

  18. The Strontium Filament within the Homunculus of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Hartman, H.; Zethson, T.; Johansson, S.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a series of HST/STIS observations of Eta Carinae and associated ejecta, we noticed a peculiar emission filament located a few arcseconds north of the central source. While bright in nebular standards, it is submerged in a sea of scattered starlight until moderately high dispersion, long-slit spectroscopy with the STIS (R- 8000) brings the emission lines out. The initial spectrum, centered on 6768A with the STIS G750M grating, led to identification of twenty lines from singly-Ionized species including [Sr II], [Fe II], [Ti II], [Ni II], [Mn II], and [Co II] (Zethson, etal., 2001, AJ 122,322). No Balmer emission is detected from this filament and the Fe II 2507,9 lines, known to be pumped by Lyman alpha radiation in other regions near the central source, are not detected. Followup observations have led to detection of hundreds more emission lines from iron group elements in neutral and singly-ionized states. Thus far all are excited by less than 10 eV. This peculiar nebular emission is thought to be due to very intense stellar radiation, stripped of uv flux shortward of Lyman alpha, bathing a neutral structure. We are systematically identifying the many lines (over 90% identified) and measuring line intensities that will then be modeled to determine excitation mechanisms, temperature and density. Two [Sr II] and two Sr II lines have now been measured. Bautista, etal. (in preparation) have modeled the strontium flux ratios and find that large radiation fluxes and/or high strontium abundances may account for the detected emission. These observations were supported by STIS GTO funding and GO funding through the STScI

  19. The sub-arcsecond dusty environment of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, O.; Min, M.; Herbst, T.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Hillier, D. J.; Leinert, Ch.; de Koter, A.; Pascucci, I.; Jaffe, W.; Köhler, R.; Alvarez, C.; van Boekel, R.; Brandner, W.; Graser, U.; Lagrange, A. M.; Lenzen, R.; Morel, S.; Schöller, M.

    2005-06-01

    The core of the nebula surrounding Eta Carinae has been observed with the VLT Adaptive Optics system NACO and with the interferometer VLTI/MIDI to constrain spatially and spectrally the warm dusty environment and the central object. In particular, narrow-band images at 3.74 μm and 4.05 μm reveal the butterfly shaped dusty environment close to the central star with unprecedented spatial resolution. A void whose radius corresponds to the expected sublimation radius has been discovered around the central source. Fringes have been obtained in the Mid-IR which reveal a correlated flux of about 100 Jy situated 0.3 arcsec south-east of the photocenter of the nebula at 8.7 μm, which corresponds with the location of the star as seen in other wavelengths. This correlated flux is partly attributed to the central object, and these observations provide an upper limit for the SED of the central source from 2.2 μm to 13.5 μm. Moreover, we have been able to spectrally disperse the signal from the nebula itself at PA = 318 degree, i.e. in the direction of the bipolar nebula (~310°) within the MIDI field of view of 3 arcsec. A large amount of corundum (Al2O3) is discovered, peaking at 0.6 arcsec-1.2 arcsec south-east from the star, whereas the dust content of the Weigelt blobs is dominated by silicates. We discuss the mechanisms of dust formation which are closely related to the geometry of this Butterfly nebulae.

  20. Estimation of evapotranspiration across the conterminous United States using a regression with climate and land-cover data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Selnick, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important quantity for water resource managers to know because it often represents the largest sink for precipitation (P) arriving at the land surface. In order to estimate actual ET across the conterminous United States (U.S.) in this study, a water-balance method was combined with a climate and land-cover regression equation. Precipitation and streamflow records were compiled for 838 watersheds for 1971-2000 across the U.S. to obtain long-term estimates of actual ET. A regression equation was developed that related the ratio ET/P to climate and land-cover variables within those watersheds. Precipitation and temperatures were used from the PRISM climate dataset, and land-cover data were used from the USGS National Land Cover Dataset. Results indicate that ET can be predicted relatively well at a watershed or county scale with readily available climate variables alone, and that land-cover data can also improve those predictions. Using the climate and land-cover data at an 800-m scale and then averaging to the county scale, maps were produced showing estimates of ET and ET/P for the entire conterminous U.S. Using the regression equation, such maps could also be made for more detailed state coverages, or for other areas of the world where climate and land-cover data are plentiful.

  1. A Simple method for reference crop evapotranspiration under non-advective conditions suitable for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruin, Henk A. R.; Trigo, Isabel F.; Bosveld, Fred C.; Fokke Meirink, Jan

    2015-04-01

    A method is presented to estimate daily reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo) under non-advective conditions from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) imagery. For this purpose observations of Cabauw in the Netherlands have been analyzed. Due to the climatic conditions and the local water management at this site water stress is very rare, which makes this dataset ideal to assess ETo without advection. The findings of older studies are combined to arrive at a simple formula for ETo, requiring daily global radiation and air temperature as input only. The formula is validated against independent eddy-covariance measurements of actual evapotranspiration. The bias is 3 W m-2 and the root mean square error (RMSE) 7.6 W m-2. The applied Slob-de Bruin estimate of net radiation is tested separately, yielding a bias of 1.4 W m-2 and a RMSE of 9.6 W m-2. In a next step the measured global radiation has been replaced with MSG estimates. For ETo this resulted in a bias of 1.6 W m-2 and a RMSE of 11.7 W m-2. Based on arguments used by Schmidt (1915) a reasonably sound physical justification for the proposed ETo formula is presented. This justifies application of the results outside Cabauw. However, this applies to conditions where advection can be ignored. It is pointed out that in semi-arid regions local advection cannot be ignored. Finally, the ambiguousness of the formal definition of ETo given in the FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper No. 56 is discussed.

  2. An investigation of spectral change as influenced by irrigation and evapotranspiration volume estimation in western Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seevers, P.M.; Sadowski, F.C.; Lauer, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective satellite image data were evaluated for their ability to demonstrate the influence of center-pivot irrigation development in western Nebraska on spectral change and climate-related factors for the region. Periodic images of an albedo index and a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were generated from calibrated Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data and used to monitor spectral changes associated with irrigation development from 1972 through 1986. The albedo index was not useful for monitoring irrigation development. For the NDVI, it was found that proportions of counties in irrigated agriculture, as discriminated by a threshold, were more highly correlated with reported ground estimates of irrigated agriculture than were county mean greenness values. A similar result was achieved when using coarse resolution Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) image data for estimating irrigated agriculture. The NDVI images were used to evaluate a procedure for making areal estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) volumes. Estimates of ET volumes for test counties, using reported ground acreages and corresponding standard crop coefficients, were correlated with the estimates of ET volume using crop coefficients scaled to NDVI values and pixel counts of crop areas. These county estimates were made under the assumption that soil water availability was unlimited. For nonirrigated vegetation, this may result in over-estimation of ET volumes. Ground information regarding crop types and acreages are required to derive the NDVI scaling factor. Potential ET, estimated with the Jensen-Haise model, is common to both methods. These results, achieved with both MSS and AVHRR data, show promise for providing climatologically important land surface information for regional and global climate models. ?? 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  3. Disassembling "evapotranspiration" in-situ with a complex measurement tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Kleniewska, Malgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Sporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatylowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2014-05-01

    In this work we present a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them from the total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its components transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project will be the estimation of energy and

  4. Multiyear riparian evapotranspiration and groundwater use for a semiarid watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, R.L.; Cable, W.L.; Huxman, T. E.; Nagler, P.L.; Hernandez, M.; Goodrich, D.C.

    2008-01-01

    Riparian evapotranspiration (ET) is a major component of the surface and subsurface water balance for many semiarid watersheds. Measurement or model-based estimates of ET are often made on a local scale, but spatially distributed estimates are needed to determine ET over catchments. In this paper, we document the ET that was quantified over 3 years using eddy covariance for three riparian ecosystems along the Upper San Pedro River of southeastern Arizona, USA, and we use a water balance equation to determine annual groundwater use. Riparian evapotranspiration and groundwater use for the watershed were then determined by using a calibrated, empirical model that uses 16-day, 250-1000 m remote-sensing products for the years of 2001-2005. The inputs for the model were derived entirely from the NASA MODIS sensor and consisted of the Enhanced Vegetation Index and land surface temperature. The scaling model was validated using subsets of the entire dataset (omitting different sites or years) and its capable performance for well-watered sites (MAD=0.32 mm day-1, R2=0.93) gave us confidence in using it to determine ET over the watershed. Three years of eddy covariance data for the riparian sites reveal that ET and groundwater use increased as woody plant density increased. Groundwater use was less variable at the woodland site, which had the greatest density of phreatophytes. Annual riparian groundwater use within the watershed was nearly constant over the study period despite an on-going drought. For the San Pedro alone, the amounts determined in this paper are within the range of most recently reported values that were derived using an entirely different approach. However, because of our larger estimates for groundwater use for the main tributary of the San Pedro, the watershed totals were higher. The approach presented here can provide riparian ET and groundwater use amounts that reflect real natural variability in phreatophyte withdrawals and improve the accuracy of a

  5. Simulation of crop evapotranspiration and crop coefficient with data in weighing lysimeters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate quantification of crop evapotranspiration (ET) is critical in optimizing irrigation water productivity, especially, in the semiarid regions of the world where limited rainfall is supplemented by irrigation for profitable crop production. In this context, cropping system models are potential...

  6. Analytical solutions of travel time to a pumping well with variable evapotranspiration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian-Fei; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Wan, Li; Li, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Analytical solutions of groundwater travel time to a pumping well in an unconfined aquifer have been developed in previous studies, however, the change in evapotranspiration was not considered. Here, we develop a mathematical model of unconfined flow toward a discharge well with redistribution of groundwater evapotranspiration for travel time analysis. Dependency of groundwater evapotranspiration on the depth to water table is described using a linear formula with an extinction depth. Analytical solutions of groundwater level and travel time are obtained. For a typical hypothetical example, these solutions perfectly agree with the numerical simulation results based on MODFLOW and MODPATH. As indicated in a dimensionless framework, a lumped parameter which is proportional to the pumping rate controls the distributions of groundwater evapotranspiration rate and the travel time along the radial direction.

  7. Effects of the Temporal Variability of Evapotranspiration on Hydrologic Simulation in Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    The transient response of a hydrologic system can be of concern to water-resource managers, because it is often extreme relatively short-lived events, such as floods or droughts, that profoundly influence the management of the resource. The water available to a hydrologic system for stream flow and aquifer recharge is determined by the difference of precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET). As such, temporal variations in precipitation and ET determine the degree of influence each has on the transient response of the hydrologic system. Meteorological, ET, and hydrologic data collected from 1993 to 2003 and spanning 1- to 3 2/3 -year periods were used to develop a hydrologic model for each of five sites in central Florida. The sensitivities of simulated water levels and flows to simple approximations of ET were quantified and the adequacy of each ET approximation was assessed. ET was approximated by computing potential ET, using the Hargreaves and Priestley-Taylor equations, and applying vegetation coefficients to adjust the potential ET values to actual ET. The Hargreaves and Priestley-Taylor ET approximations were used in the calibrated hydrologic models while leaving all other model characteristics and parameter values unchanged. Two primary factors that influence how the temporal variability of ET affects hydrologic simulation in central Florida were identified: (1) stochastic character of precipitation and ET and (2) the ability of the local hydrologic system to attenuate variability in input stresses. Differences in the stochastic character of precipitation and ET, both the central location and spread of the data, result in substantial influence of precipitation on the quantity and timing of water available to the hydrologic system and a relatively small influence of ET. The temporal variability of ET was considerably less than that of precipitation at each site over a wide range of time scales (from daily to annual). However, when precipitation and ET are of

  8. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel phospholipase C, PLC-eta.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jong-Ik; Oh, Yong-Seok; Shin, Kum-Joo; Kim, Hyun; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2005-07-01

    PLC (phospholipase C) plays an important role in intracellular signal transduction by hydrolysing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, a membrane phospholipid. To date, 12 members of the mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into five isotypes beta, gamma, delta, epsilon and zeta, which are regulated by distinct mechanisms. In the present study, we describe the identification of a novel PLC isoform in the brains of human and mouse, named PLC-eta, which contains the conserved pleckstrin homology domain, X and Y domains for catalytic activity and the C2 domain. The first identified gene encoded 1002 (human) or 1003 (mouse) amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 115 kDa. The purified recombinant PLC-eta exhibited Ca2+-dependent catalytic activity on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Furthermore, molecular biological analysis revealed that the PLC-eta gene was transcribed to several splicing variants. Although some transcripts were detected in most of the tissues we examined, the transcript encoding 115 kDa was restricted to the brain and lung. In addition, the expression of the 115 kDa protein was defined in only nerve tissues such as the brain and spinal cord. In situ hybridization analysis with brain revealed that PLC-eta was abundantly expressed in various regions including cerebral cortex, hippocampus, zona incerta and cerebellar Purkinje cell layer, which are neuronal cell-enriched regions. These results suggest that PLC-eta may perform fundamental roles in the brain.

  10. An Improved Statistical Solution for Global Seismicity by the HIST-ETAS Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, A.; Ogata, Y.; Katsura, K.

    2010-12-01

    For long-term global seismic model fitting, recent work by Chu et al. (2010) applied the spatial-temporal ETAS model (Ogata 1998) and analyzed global data partitioned into tectonic zones based on geophysical characteristics (Bird 2003), and it has shown tremendous improvements of model fitting compared with one overall global model. While the ordinary ETAS model assumes constant parameter values across the complete region analyzed, the hierarchical space-time ETAS model (HIST-ETAS, Ogata 2004) is a newly introduced approach by proposing regional distinctions of the parameters for more accurate seismic prediction. As the HIST-ETAS model has been fit to regional data of Japan (Ogata 2010), our work applies the model to describe global seismicity. Employing the Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) as an assessment method, we compare the MLE results with zone divisions considered to results obtained by an overall global model. Location dependent parameters of the model and Gutenberg-Richter b-values are optimized, and seismological interpretations are discussed.

  11. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; ...

    2015-06-25

    Themore » $$\\eta N$$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $$\\Delta$$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $$E\\sim 2.3$$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $$\\pi N\\to \\pi N$$, $$\\eta N$$, $$K\\Lambda$$ and $$K\\Sigma$$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. Furthermore, the influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.« less

  12. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2015-06-25

    The $\\eta N$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $\\Delta$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $E\\sim 2.3$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. The resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $\\pi N\\to \\pi N$, $\\eta N$, $K\\Lambda$ and $K\\Sigma$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. Furthermore, the influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.

  13. Eta Car: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Nebular and Stellar Confusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.R.; Sonneborn, G.; Jensen, A.G.; Nielsen, K.E.; Vieira Kover, G.; Hillier, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Observations in the far-UV provide a unique opportunity to investigate the very massive star Eta Car and its hot binary companion, Eta Car B. Eta Car was observed with FUSE over a large portion of the 5.54 year spectroscopic period before and after the 2003.5 minimum. The observed spectrum is defined by strong stellar wind signatures, primarily from Eta Car A, complicated by the strong absorptions of the ejecta surrounding Eta Car plus interstellar absorption. The Homunculus and Little Homunculus are massive bipolar ejecta historically associable with LBV outbursts in the 1840s and the 1890s and are linked to absorptions at -513 and -146 km/s, respectively. The FUSE spectra are confused by the extended nebulosity and thermal drifting of the FUSE co-pointed instruments. Interpretation is further complicated by two B-stars sufficiently close to h Car to be included most of the time in the large FUSE aperture. Followup observations partially succeeded in obtaining spectra of at least one of these B-stars through the smaller apertures, allowing potential separation of the B-star contributions and h Car. A complete analysis of all available spectra is currently underway. Our ultimate goals