Science.gov

Sample records for actual exit velocity

  1. Relationship between cattle temperament as determined by exit velocity carcass merit in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this trial was to use cattle temperament, as determined by exit velocity only, as a means to evaluate the impact of temperament on carcass merit and the possible utilization of exit velocity alone as a sorting tool within the feedlot. At the time of processing, exit velocity and bod...

  2. Effect of cattle temperament as determined by exit velocity on lung respiratory lesions and liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this trial was to use exit velocity as a means of determining temperament of cattle to evaluate the impact of temperament on animal health. At the time of processing, exit velocity and body weight were recorded on 20 pens of cattle (2,877 head) at a commercial feedlot. Infrared sens...

  3. Investigation of exit-velocity stratification effects on jets in a crossflow (STRJET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Program determines flow field about jets with velocity stratification exhausting into crossflow. Jets with three different types of exit-velocity stratification have been considered: (a) jets with relatively high-velocity core, (b) jets with relatively low-velocity core, and (c) jets originating from vaned nozzle.

  4. Motion fading is driven by perceived, not actual angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P J; Caplovitz, G P; Hsieh, P-J; Sun, J; Tse, P U

    2010-06-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here we examine the relationship between such 'motion fading' and perceived angular velocity. Using several different dot patterns that generate emergent virtual contours, we demonstrate that whenever there is a difference in the perceived angular velocity of two patterns of dots that are in fact rotating at the same angular velocity, there is also a difference in the time to undergo motion fading for those two patterns. Conversely, whenever two patterns show no difference in perceived angular velocity, even if in fact rotating at different angular velocities, we find no difference in the time to undergo motion fading. Thus, motion fading is driven by the perceived rather than actual angular velocity of a rotating stimulus.

  5. Observations of Velocity Conditions near a Hydroelectric Turbine Draft Tube Exit using ADCP Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Measurement of flow characteristics near hydraulic structures is an ongoing challenge because of the need to obtain rapid measurements of time-varying velocity over a relatively large spatial domain. This paper discusses use of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to measure the rapidly diverging flow exiting from an operating hydroelectric turbine draft tube exit. The resolved three-dimensional velocity vectors show a highly complex and helical flow pattern developed near to and downstream of the exit. Velocity vectors were integrated across the exit and we computed an uneven percentage of flow (67%/33%) passing through the two draft tube barrels at a mid-range turbine discharge, consistent with physical model results. In addition to the three-dimensional velocity vectors, the individual one-dimensional velocities measured by each of the four ADCP beams can be separately used as calibration and validation datasets for numerical and physical models. This technique is demonstrated by comparing along-beam ADCP velocity measurements to data collected in a scaled physical model.

  6. Breed group effects for chute exit velocity as an indicator trait for temperament in weaner cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine breed group differences in chute exit velocity (CEV) in weaner cattle (n=3176). Data were collected in 2004 through 2008 under procedures of objective 3, Southern Regional Research project S1013 with the following states contributing data: FL, LA, and MS...

  7. Effect of Velocity and Temperature Distribution at the Hole Exit on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, V. K.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    An existing three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code (Arnone et al, 1991), modified Turbine Branch, to include film cooling considerations (Garg and Gaugler, 1994), has been used to study the effect of coolant velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on the heat transfer coefficient on three film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the C3X vane, the VKI rotor, and the ACE rotor. Results are also compared with the experimental data for all the blades. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (1991), Forest's model for augmentation of leading edge heat transfer due to free-stream turbulence (1977), and Crawford's model for augmentation of eddy viscosity due to film cooling (Crawford et al, 1980) are used. Use of Mayle's and Forest's models is relevant only for the ACE rotor due to the absence of showerhead cooling on this rotor. It is found that, in some cases, the effect of distribution of coolant velocity and temperature at the hole exit can be as much as 60 percent on the heat transfer coefficient at the blade suction surface, and 50 percent at the pressure surface. Also, different effects are observed on the pressure and suction surface depending upon the blade as well as upon the hole shape, conical or cylindrical.

  8. Effect of velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on film cooling of turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of coolant velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on the heat transfer coefficient on three-film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the C3X vane, the VKI rotor, and the ACE rotor. Results are also compared with the experimental data for all the blades. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion, Forest's model for augmentation of leading edge heat transfer due to freestream turbulence, and Crawford's model for augmentation of eddy viscosity due to film cooling are used. Use of Mayle's and Forest's models is relevant only for the ACE rotor due to the absence of showerhead cooling on this rotor. It is found that, in some cases, the effect of distribution of coolant velocity and temperature at the hole exit can be as much as 60% on the heat transfer coefficient at the blade suction surface, and 50% at the pressure surface. Also, different effects are observed on the pressure and suction surface depending upon the blade as well as upon the hole shape, conical or cylindrical.

  9. High Velocity Linear Induction Launcher with Exit-Edge Compensation for Testing of Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Stephen; Marriott, Darin

    2008-01-01

    Advances in ultra high speed linear induction electromagnetic launchers over the past decade have focused on magnetic compensation of the exit and entry-edge transient flux wave to produce efficient and compact linear electric machinery. The paper discusses two approaches to edge compensation in long-stator induction catapults with typical end speeds of 150 to 1,500 m/s. In classical linear induction machines, the exit-edge effect is manifest as two auxiliary traveling waves that produce a magnetic drag on the projectile and a loss of magnetic flux over the main surface of the machine. In the new design for the Stator Compensated Induction Machine (SCIM) high velocity launcher, the exit-edge effect is nulled by a dual wavelength machine or alternately the airgap flux is peaked at a location prior to the exit edge. A four (4) stage LIM catapult is presently being constructed for 180 m/s end speed operation using double-sided longitudinal flux machines. Advanced exit and entry edge compensation is being used to maximize system efficiency, and minimize stray heating of the reaction armature. Each stage will output approximately 60 kN of force and produce over 500 G s of acceleration on the armature. The advantage of this design is there is no ablation to the projectile and no sliding contacts, allowing repeated firing of the launcher without maintenance of any sort. The paper shows results of a parametric study for 500 m/s and 1,500 m/s linear induction launchers incorporating two of the latest compensation techniques for an air-core stator primary and an iron-core primary winding. Typical thrust densities for these machines are in the range of 150 kN/sq.m. to 225 kN/sq.m. and these compete favorably with permanent magnet linear synchronous machines. The operational advantages of the high speed SCIM launcher are shown by eliminating the need for pole-angle position sensors as would be required by synchronous systems. The stator power factor is also improved.

  10. Effect of Diffuser Design, Diffuser-exit Velocity Profile and Fuel Distribution on Altitude Performance of Several Afterburner Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, E William; Schultz, Frederick W; Usow, Karl H

    1953-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NACA Lewis altitude wind tunnel to improve the altitude performance and operational characteristics of an afterburner primarily by modifying the diffuser-exit velocity profile by changes in diffuser design and by changing the fuel distribution and the flame holder. Twenty configurations, consisting of combinations of six diffuser geometries, six flame-holder types, and twelve fuel systems, were investigated. Data were obtained over a range of afterburner fuel-air ratios at diffuser-inlet total pressures from 2750 to 620 pounds per square foot. Changes in fuel distribution affected the fuel-air ratio at which peak combustion efficiency occurred as well as the efficiency level. Screeching combustion, which was most prevalent at low altitudes and medium-to-high fuel-air ratios, imposed a restriction on the operable range of a number of configurations.

  11. Experimental measurement of breath exit velocity and expirated bloodstain patterns produced under different exhalation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, P H; Laffra, A M; Hoogendorp, N K; Taylor, M C; Jermy, M C

    2017-02-02

    In an attempt to obtain a deeper understanding of the factors which determine the characteristics of expirated bloodstain patterns, the mechanism of formation of airborne droplets was studied. Hot wire anemometry measured air velocity, 25 mm from the lips, for 31 individuals spitting, coughing and blowing. Expirated stains were produced by the same mechanisms performed by one individual with different volumes of a synthetic blood substitute in their mouth. The atomization of the liquid at the lips was captured with high-speed video, and the resulting stain patterns were captured on paper targets. Peak air velocities varied for blowing (6 to 64 m/s), spitting (1 to 64 m/s) and coughing (1 to 47 m/s), with mean values of 12 m/s (blowing), 7 m/s (spitting) and 4 m/s (coughing). There was a large (55-65%) variation between individuals in air velocity produced, as well as variation between trials for a single individual (25-35%). Spitting and blowing involved similar lip shapes. Blowing had a longer duration of airflow, though it is not the duration but the peak velocity at the beginning of the air motion which appears to control the atomization of blood in the mouth and thus stain formation. Spitting could project quantities of drops at least 1600 mm. Coughing had a shorter range of near 500 mm, with a few droplets travelling further. All mechanisms could spread drops over an angle >45°. Spitting was the most effective for projecting drops of blood from the mouth, due to its combination of chest motion and mouth shape producing strong air velocities. No unique method was found of inferring the physical action (spitting, coughing or blowing) from characteristics of the pattern, except possibly distance travelled. Diameter range in expirated bloodstains varied from very small (<1 mm) in a dense formation to several millimetres. No unique method was found of discriminating expirated patterns from gunshot or impact patterns on stain shape alone. Only 20% of the

  12. Entrance and exit wounds of high velocity bullet: An autopsy analysis in the event of dispersing the mass rally in Bangkok Thailand, May 2010.

    PubMed

    Peonim, Vichan; Srisont, Smith; Udnoon, Jitta; Wongwichai, Sompong; Thapon, Arisa; Worasuwannarak, Wisarn

    2016-11-01

    Fatal mass casualties by high velocity bullets (HVBs) are rare events in peaceful countries. This study presents 27 forensic autopsy cases with 32 shots fired by 5.56×45mm. HVB (M-16 rifle bullets) during the dispersing the mass rally in Bangkok Thailand, May 2010. It was found that twenty-three (71.88%) typical entrance HVB wounds had round sizes less than the bullet diameters. Most entrance wounds had microtears but no collar abrasion since a HVB has a small streamlined spitzer tip and full metal jacket. For exit wounds, there were various sizes and shapes depending on which section of wound ballistics presented when the bullet exited the body. If a bullet exited in the section of temporally cavity formation, there would be a large size exit wound in accordance with the degree of bullet yaw. This is different from civilian bullets whereby the shape looks like a cylindrical round nose and at low velocity that causes entrance wounds with a similar size to the bullet diameter and is usually round or oval shape with collar abrasion. The temporary cavity is not as large as in a HVB so exit wounds are not quite as large and present a ragged border compared to a HVB. We also reported 9 out of 32 shots (28.13%) of atypical entrance wounds that had various characteristics depending on site of injury and destabilization of bullets. These findings may be helpful to forensic pathologists and to give physicians, who need to diagnose HVB wounds, more confidence.

  13. Investigation of the tip-clearance flow inside and at the exit of a compressor rotor passage. I - Mean velocity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1982-01-01

    A stationary two-sensor hot-wire probe has been used in combination with an ensemble averaging technique to measure the flow in the tip clearance region of a compressor rotor with emphasis on the leakage flow development inside the tip-clearance region and at the exit of the rotor. It is found that the presence and interaction of leakage flow, annulus boundary layer, and the scraping vortex is the dominant feature at mid-chord position. The rotation of the blade augments the leakage flow, resulting in the movement of the leakage jet toward the mid-passage. The blade-to-blade distribution of properties is shown to be highly nonuniform, except in the downstream and upstream regions.

  14. Rotor with Flattened Exit Pressure Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltas, Constantine (Inventor); Prasad, Dilip (Inventor); Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A rotor blade comprises an airfoil extending radially from a root section to a tip section and axially from a leading edge to a trailing edge, the leading and trailing edges defining a curvature therebetween. The curvature determines a relative exit angle at a relative span height between the root section and the tip section, based on an incident flow velocity at the leading edge of the airfoil and a rotational velocity at the relative span height. In operation of the rotor blade, the relative exit angle determines a substantially flat exit pressure ratio profile for relative span heights from 75% to 95%, wherein the exit pressure ratio profile is constant within a tolerance of 10% of a maximum value of the exit pressure ratio profile.

  15. [The EXIT procedure].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, S; Blödow, A; Flügel, W; Renner-Lützkendorf, H; Isbruch, A; Siegling, F; Untch, M; Strauß, J; Bloching, M B

    2013-08-01

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure is used for unborn fetuses in cases of predictable complications of postpartum airway obstruction. Indications for the EXIT procedure are fetal neck tumors, obstruction of the trachea, hiatus hernia of the diaphragm and congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS). Large cervical tumors prevent normal delivery of a fetus due to reclination of the head with airway obstruction. Therefore, a primary caesarean section or the EXIT procedure has to be considered. The EXIT procedure has time limitations as the blood supply by the placenta only lasts for 30-60 min. Airway protection has to be ensured during parturition.This article reports the case of an unborn fetus with a large cervical teratoma where an obstruction of the cervical airway was detected and monitored by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during pregnancy. The EXIT procedure was therefore used and successfully accomplished. The features of the interdisciplinary aspects of the EXIT procedure are described with the special aspects of each medical discipline.

  16. Entry/Exit Port testing, test report

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, R.H.

    1993-05-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module I (WRAP-1) facility must have the ability to allow 55-gallon drums to enter and exit glovebox enclosures. An Entry/Exit Port (Appendix 1, Figure 1), designed by United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C), is one method chosen for drum transfer. The Entry/Exit Port is to be used for entry of 55-gallon drums into both process entry gloveboxes, exit of 55-gallon drum waste pucks from the low-level waste (LLW) glovebox, and loadout of waste from the restricted waste management glovebox. The Entry/Exit Port relies on capture velocity air flow and a neoprene seal to provide alpha confinement when the Port is in the open and closed positions, respectively. Since the glovebox is in a slight vacuum, air flow is directed into the glovebox through the space between the overpack drum and glovebox floor. The air flow is to direct any airborne contamination into the glovebox. A neoprene seal is used to seal the Port door to the glovebox floor, thus maintaining confinement in the closed position. Entry/Exit Port testing took place February 17, 1993, through April 14, 1993, in the 305 building of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Testing was performed in accordance with the Entry/Exit Port Testing Test Plan, document number WHC-SD-WO26-TP-005. A prototype Entry/Exit Port built at the Hanford Site was tested using fluorescent paint pigment and smoke candles as simulant contaminants. This test report is an interim test report. Further developmental testing is required to test modifications made to the Port as the original design of the Port did not provide complete confinement during all stages of operation.

  17. Effect of exit locations on ants escaping a two-exit room stressed with repellent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shujie; Cao, Shuchao; Wang, Qiao; Lian, Liping; Song, Weiguo

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of the distance between two exits on ant evacuation efficiency and the behavior of ants escaping from a two-exit room, we conducted ant egress experiments using Camponotus japonicus in multiple situations. We found that the ants demonstrated the phenomenon of ;symmetry breaking; in this stress situation. It was also shown that different locations for the exits obviously affected the ants' egress efficiency by measuring the time intervals between individual egress and flow rate in eight repeated experiments, each of which contained five different distance between the two exits. In addition, it is demonstrated that there are differences between the predictions of Social Force Model of pedestrians and the behaviors of ants in stress conditions through comparing some important behavioral features, including position, trajectory, velocity, and density map.

  18. Employee Exit Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulk, Larry J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an exit interview procedure for employees leaving the school system designed to identify potential personnel problems, maintain good employee relations, provide statistics on reasons for turnover, and provide assessment data for inservice education programs. Reports statistical data based on interview implementation, 1981-83. (TE)

  19. Think Exit at Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Tom; Satterfield, Coy E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the "Think Exit at Entry" program that has become the guiding principle for the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). The Georgia DJJ believes that the transition process begins the day the youth enters the system and continues well after release from the institution. Literature points the need for transition…

  20. Bed exit alarms.

    PubMed

    2004-09-01

    Bed-exit alarms alert caregivers that a patient who should not get out of bed unassisted is doing so. These alarms can help reduce the likelihood of falls and can promote speedy assistance to patients who have already fallen. But as we described in our May 2004 Guidance Article on bed-exit alarms, they don't themselves prevent falls. They are only effective if used as part of an overall fall-prevention program and with a clear understanding of their limitations. This Evaluation examines the effectiveness of 16 bed-exit alarms from seven suppliers. Our ratings focus primarily on each product's reliability in detecting bed-exit events and alerting caregivers, its ability to minimize nuisance alarms (alarms that sound even though the patient isn't leaving the bed or that sound while a caregiver is helping the patient to leave the bed), and its resistance to deliberate or inadvertent tampering. Twelve of the products use pressure-sensor-activated alarms (mainly sensor pads placed on or under the mattress); three use a cord that can attach to the patient's garment, alarming if the cord is pulled loose from the control unit; and one is a position-sensitive alarm attached to a leg cuff. All the products reliably detect attempted or successful bed exits. But they vary greatly in how effectively they alert staff, minimize nuisance alarms, and resist tampering. Ease of use and battery performance also vary for many units. Of the pressure-sensor units, three are rated Preferred. Those units meet most of our criteria and have no significant disadvantages. Five of the other pressure-sensor products are Acceptable, and the remaining four are Not Recommended. All three cord-activated alarms are rated Acceptable, as is the patient-worn alarm.

  1. Exit from Synchrony in Joint Improvised Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Assi; Noy, Lior; Hart, Yuval; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Motion synchrony correlates with effective and well-rated human interaction. However, people do not remain locked in synchrony; Instead, they repeatedly enter and exit synchrony. In many important interactions, such as therapy, marriage and parent-infant communication, it is the ability to exit and then re-enter synchrony that is thought to build strong relationship. The phenomenon of entry into zero-phase synchrony is well-studied experimentally and in terms of mathematical modeling. In contrast, exit-from-synchrony is under-studied. Here, we focus on human motion coordination, and examine the exit-from-synchrony phenomenon using experimental data from the mirror game paradigm, in which people perform joint improvised motion, and from human tracking of computer-generated stimuli. We present a mathematical mechanism that captures aspects of exit-from-synchrony in human motion. The mechanism adds a random motion component when the accumulated velocity error between the players is small. We introduce this mechanism to several models for human coordinated motion, including the widely studied HKB model, and the predictor-corrector model of Noy, Dekel and Alon. In all models, the new mechanism produces realistic simulated behavior when compared to experimental data from the mirror game and from tracking of computer generated stimuli, including repeated entry and exit from zero-phase synchrony that generates a complexity of motion similar to that of human players. We hope that these results can inform future research on exit-from-synchrony, to better understand the dynamics of coordinated action of people and to enhance human-computer and human-robot interaction. PMID:27711185

  2. Solids flow pattern in the exit region of a CFB -- Furnace influence of exit geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, F.; Leckner, B.; Vrager, A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of the exit geometry on the flow pattern in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser was studied in a cold 1/9 scale model of the Chalmers 12 MW CFB boiler. The model, which is made of transparent perspex, was operated according to the simplified scaling laws proposed by Glicksman et al. (1993). 12 different exit configurations were compared at different fluidization velocities. Two bed materials were used: iron and steel. In order to verify the scaling laws, vertical pressure and density profiles, net solids flux and pressure fluctuations measured in the model were compared with corresponding results from the 12 MW boiler. The exit configurations were evaluated by comparing the net solids fluxes and the vertical pressure and density profiles of the riser. The overall flow behavior of the scale-model was found to be similar to that of the boiler: A dense bottom bed, a splash zone and a transport zone could be identified. The dynamics (in-bed pressure fluctuations) of the bottom bed were in agreement with those of the boiler. Differences between net solids fluxes during operation with different exits were in some cases of an order of magnitude. However, there were almost no difference in solids flux between an abrupt exit, an extended exit (such as that of the boiler) and an enhanced extension. A decrease in the net solids flux (increase in the internal back-mixing) could be obtained by inserting obstacles in the upper part of the riser, and an increase in the net solids flux was achieved by narrowing the duct from the riser to the cyclone inlet (increasing the average velocity in the duct). The original configuration of the duct with an inclined bottom results in back-mixing from the duct to the furnace, thereby reducing the net (external) solids flux.

  3. Evolution of Vortex Rings Exiting Inclined Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Webster, D. R.; Reetz, M.; Gefroh, D.

    1996-11-01

    Vortex rings initiated in cylinders with exit incline lengths of 0, D/4, and D/2 were investigated for Reynolds numbers up to 30,000. The fluid exiting each cylinder was visualized with an ionized bromothymol blue solution, and velocity fields were obtained with PIV. In each inclined case, vortex rings form at angles smaller than the cylinder incline angle. Entrainment of ambient fluid on the short side of the cylinder is much stronger than that on the long side. This results in a larger circulation about the short side of the ring and a greater propagation velocity on that side. The incline angle of the ring thus decreases as it moves downstream. Behind the ring core, an impulsive wave of entrained ambient fluid flows parallel to the cylinder exit plane. Some of this fluid is wrapped into the core, while the rest is ejected outward past the long cylinder edge. The vortex ring dynamics differ significantly from those observed in jets from inclined nozzles where neighboring rings are connected by straining zones, and ring incline angles increase with downstream distance.

  4. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... with canopies, at least one emergency exit on the opposite side of the cabin from the main door... persons using that exit. (b) Type and operation. Emergency exits must be movable windows, panels,...

  5. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... with canopies, at least one emergency exit on the opposite side of the cabin from the main door... persons using that exit. (b) Type and operation. Emergency exits must be movable windows, panels,...

  6. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... with canopies, at least one emergency exit on the opposite side of the cabin from the main door... persons using that exit. (b) Type and operation. Emergency exits must be movable windows, panels,...

  7. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... with canopies, at least one emergency exit on the opposite side of the cabin from the main door... persons using that exit. (b) Type and operation. Emergency exits must be movable windows, panels,...

  8. Exit Times from Equilateral Triangles

    SciTech Connect

    Alabert, Aureli Farre, Merce Roy, Rahul

    2003-12-15

    In this paper we obtain a closed form expression of the expected exit time of a Brownian motion from equilateral triangles. We consider first the analogous problem for a symmetric random walk on the triangular lattice and show that it is equivalent to the ruin problem of an appropriate three player game. A suitable scaling of this random walk allows us to exhibit explicitly the relation between the respective exit times. This gives us the solution of the related Poisson equation.

  9. 14 CFR 25.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Type II exits must be floor-level exits unless located over the wing, in which case they must not have... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... exits. (a) Type. For the purpose of this part, the types of exits are defined as follows: (1) Type...

  10. Video measurement of the muzzle velocity of a potato gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasperson, Christopher; Pollman, Anthony

    2011-09-01

    Using first principles, a theoretical equation for the maximum and actual muzzle velocities for a pneumatic cannon was recently derived. For a fixed barrel length, this equation suggests that the muzzle velocity can be enhanced by maximizing the product of the initial pressure and the volume of the propellant gas and decreasing the projectile mass. The present paper describes the results of experiments conducted to verify the validity of this theoretical equation. A high-speed video camera was used to quantify muzzle velocity for potatoes of varying mass exiting a pneumatic cannon for gauge pressures ranging from 310 to 830 kPa. The experiments verified that a friction modified version of the theoretical equation is qualitatively and quantitatively accurate for potato masses above 100 g.

  11. The Exit Interview for Graduating Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, Paddy A.; Jacobs, Keith W.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the practice of holding exit interviews with graduating psychology students at Loyola University (Louisiana). Discusses the benefits and limitations of exit interviews, stating that they provide unique data unavailable from other sources. (GEA)

  12. Investigation of the feasibility of optical diagnostic measurements at the exit of the SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, John A.; Boedeker, Laurence R.

    1993-01-01

    Under Contract NAS8-36861 sponsored by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the United Technologies Research Center is conducting an investigation of the feasibility of remote optical diagnostics to measure temperature, species concentration and velocity at the exit of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). This is a two phase study consisting of a conceptual design phase followed by a laboratory experimental investigation. The first task of the conceptual design studies is to screen and evaluate the techniques which can be used for the measurements. The second task is to select the most promising technique or techniques, if as expected, more than one type of measurement must be used to measure all the flow variables of interest. The third task is to examine in detail analytically the capabilities and limitations of the selected technique(s). The results of this study are described in the section of this report entitled Conceptual Design Investigations. The conceptual design studies identified spontaneous Raman scattering and photodissociative flow-tagging for measurements respectively of gas temperature and major species concentration and for velocity. These techniques and others that were considered are described in the section describing the conceptual design. The objective of the second phase of investigations was to investigate experimentally the techniques identified in the first phase. The first task of the experimental feasibility study is to design and assemble laboratory scale experimental apparatus to evaluate the best approaches for SSME exit optical diagnostics for temperature, species concentrations and velocity, as selected in the Phase I conceptual design study. The second task is to evaluate performance, investigate limitations, and establish actual diagnostic capabilities, accuracies and precision for the selected optical systems. The third task is to evaluate design requirements and system trade-offs of conceptual instruments. Spontaneous Raman

  13. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operations, written procedures established for making determinations in regard to exit row seating. (g) No... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exit seating. 121.585 Section 121.585..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.585 Exit seating. (a)(1) Each...

  14. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... operations, written procedures established for making determinations in regard to exit row seating. (g) No... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exit seating. 121.585 Section 121.585..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.585 Exit seating. (a)(1) Each...

  15. Exit Exam as Academic Performance Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud; Al Marzouqi, Ali H.; Hussien, Mousa

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of exit exams on different elements of the educational process, namely: curriculum development, students and instructors. A 50-question multiple-choice Exit Exam was prepared by Electrical Engineering (EE) faculty members covering a poll of questions from EE core courses. A copy of the Exit Exam applied during each…

  16. 14 CFR 25.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.807 Emergency.... Type II exits must be floor-level exits unless located over the wing, in which case they must not have... not more than 20 inches. If the exit is located over the wing, the step-down outside the airplane...

  17. 14 CFR 25.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.807 Emergency.... Type II exits must be floor-level exits unless located over the wing, in which case they must not have... not more than 20 inches. If the exit is located over the wing, the step-down outside the airplane...

  18. 14 CFR 25.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.807 Emergency.... Type II exits must be floor-level exits unless located over the wing, in which case they must not have... not more than 20 inches. If the exit is located over the wing, the step-down outside the airplane...

  19. Effect of slotted exit orifice on performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Haohua; Kotsonis, Marios

    2017-03-01

    This study experimentally investigates the influence of exit orifice shape on the performance characteristics of a three-electrode plasma synthetic jet actuator. High-speed Schlieren imaging system and phase-locked two-component PIV measurements are used for flowfield characterisation in quiescent conditions. Two actuator configurations with the same exit area but different exit orifice shape (round orifice and slot orifice) are studied. Results indicate a close correspondence between the shapes of the starting vortex ring with the shapes of the respective exit orifices. For the slot orifice, the elongated starting vortex ring gradually expands during propagation, while its ends become warped. A distinct K-H instability structure is observed, inducing continuous oscillation of the high-speed jet. Compared with the jet from the round orifice, the slot jet has a higher entrainment rate of surrounding air, thus resulting in a lower propagation velocity of the jet front. The exit velocity of PSJA within one period initially shows a rapid increase, then persists at a relatively high level (100-130 m/s), and finally drops with some small-scale oscillations. The oscillation amplitude is less than 10 m/s, and the oscillation period is approximately 600 µs. Under conditions of same exit area, orifice shape has little influence on the variation of the exit velocity.

  20. Discrete element crowd model for pedestrian evacuation through an exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Jian, Ma; Siuming, Lo

    2016-03-01

    A series of accidents caused by crowds within the last decades evoked a lot of scientific interest in modeling the movement of pedestrian crowds. Based on the discrete element method, a granular dynamic model, in which the human body is simplified as a self-driven sphere, is proposed to simulate the characteristics of crowd flow through an exit. In this model, the repulsive force among people is considered to have an anisotropic feature, and the physical contact force due to body deformation is quantified by the Hertz contact model. The movement of the human body is simulated by applying the second Newton’s law. The crowd flow through an exit at different desired velocities is studied and simulation results indicated that crowd flow exhibits three distinct states, i.e., smooth state, transition state and phase separation state. In the simulation, the clogging phenomenon occurs more easily when the desired velocity is high and the exit may as a result be totally blocked at a desired velocity of 1.6 m/s or above, leading to faster-to-frozen effect. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 71473207, 51178445, and 71103148), the Research Grant Council, Government of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU119011), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2682014CX103 and 2682014RC05).

  1. Signal transit velocities in a turbulent plane jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiffler, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    A turbulent jet is perturbed transverse to the flow direction by periodic pressure gradients near the nozzle exit. Transit velocities are defined in terms of the measured signal time delay for stations 8, 12, 16 nozzle widths downstream of the nozzle exit. Excitation frequencies to 800 cps are considered. Transit velocities are found to be much less than the jet centerline velocity. The results are related to the convection velocity of turbulence.

  2. The EXIT procedure: principles, pitfalls, and progress.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Ahmad; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2006-05-01

    Although performing procedures on a fetus before severing the umbilical cord has previously been reported, the principles of the ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure were first fully developed for reversing tracheal occlusion in fetuses with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The EXIT procedure offers the advantage of insuring uteroplacental gas exchange while on placental support. The lessons learned in the development of the principles that underlie the EXIT procedure have improved outcomes when applied in other conditions, most notably in cases of airway obstruction. The range of indications for the EXIT procedure has expanded and currently includes giant fetal neck masses, lung or mediastinal tumors, congenital high airway obstruction syndrome, and EXIT to ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), among others. This review summarizes the underlying principles of the EXIT procedure, the expanding indications for its use, the pitfalls of management, and the progress that has been made in its successful application.

  3. Exit-site care in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Nand K; Reddy, Gampala H

    2007-01-01

    Exit-site infection (ESI), tunnel infection and associated peritonitis are major causes of morbidity and catheter loss in chronic peritoneal dialysis patients. Meticulous exit-site care is vital in preventing ESI. Avoiding trauma to the exit-site and daily cleaning of the exit-site with a dedicated antimicrobial soap is essential for the longevity of the peritoneal dialysis catheter. Antibiotics cream and disinfectant agents including povidone-iodine, chlorhexidine, electrolytic chloroxidizing solutions (Amuchina 10% - ExSept Plus, Amuchina 5% - ExSept) are useful to keep the resident micro-organisms inhibited. ESI rates in peritoneal dialysis patients treated with Amuchina 10% (ExSept Plus) and Amuchina 5% (ExSept) for the exit-site care are similar or lower compared to povidone-iodine or chlorhexidine. Electrolytic chloroxidizing (Amuchina 10% - ExSept Plus and Amuchina 5% - ExSept) solutions for exit-site care are effective for prevention and treatment of ESI.

  4. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exit seating. 121.585 Section 121.585 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., or otherwise open emergency exits; (iv) To lift out, hold, deposit on nearby seats, or maneuver...

  5. 24 CFR 257.118 - Exit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Underwriting Procedures § 257.118 Exit fee. (a) Initial Equity. For... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exit fee. 257.118 Section 257.118 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE...

  6. 24 CFR 257.118 - Exit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Underwriting Procedures § 257.118 Exit fee. (a) Initial Equity. For... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exit fee. 257.118 Section 257.118 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE...

  7. 24 CFR 257.118 - Exit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Underwriting Procedures § 257.118 Exit fee. (a) Initial Equity. For... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exit fee. 257.118 Section 257.118 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE...

  8. 24 CFR 257.118 - Exit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Underwriting Procedures § 257.118 Exit fee. (a) Initial Equity. For... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exit fee. 257.118 Section 257.118 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE...

  9. Regulation of Mitotic Exit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Baro, Bàrbara; Queralt, Ethel; Monje-Casas, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) is an essential signaling pathway, closely related to the Hippo pathway in mammals, which promotes mitotic exit and initiates cytokinesis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the MEN components and their regulation.

  10. 29 CFR 1917.122 - Employee exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Employee exits. 1917.122 Section 1917.122 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... marked. (b) If an employee exit is not visible from employees' work stations, directional...

  11. 29 CFR 1917.122 - Employee exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employee exits. 1917.122 Section 1917.122 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... marked. (b) If an employee exit is not visible from employees' work stations, directional...

  12. Topological inflation with graceful exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marunović, Anja; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a class of models of topological inflation in which a super-Hubble-sized global monopole seeds inflation. These models are attractive since inflation starts from rather generic initial conditions, but their not so attractive feature is that, unless symmetry is again restored, inflation never ends. In this work we show that, in presence of another nonminimally coupled scalar field, that is both quadratically and quartically coupled to the Ricci scalar, inflation naturally ends, representing an elegant solution to the graceful exit problem of topological inflation. While the monopole core grows during inflation, the growth stops after inflation, such that the monopole eventually enters the Hubble radius, and shrinks to its Minkowski space size, rendering it immaterial for the subsequent Universe's dynamics. Furthermore, we find that our model can produce cosmological perturbations that source CMB temperature fluctuations and seed large scale structure statistically consistent (within one standard deviation) with all available data. In particular, for small and (in our convention) negative nonminimal couplings, the scalar spectral index can be as large as ns simeq 0.955, which is about one standard deviation lower than the central value quoted by the most recent Planck Collaboration.

  13. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency exit arrangement. 25.809 Section... Emergency exit arrangement. (a) Each emergency exit, including each flightcrew emergency exit, must be a... outside. In addition, each emergency exit must have means to permit viewing of the conditions outside...

  14. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency exit arrangement. 25.809 Section... Emergency exit arrangement. (a) Each emergency exit, including each flightcrew emergency exit, must be a... outside. In addition, each emergency exit must have means to permit viewing of the conditions outside...

  15. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency exit arrangement. 25.809 Section... Emergency exit arrangement. (a) Each emergency exit, including each flightcrew emergency exit, must be a... outside. In addition, each emergency exit must have means to permit viewing of the conditions outside...

  16. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... straight (parallel to the undisturbed exit surface) motions to operate the exit, no more than 89 Newtons (20 pounds) of force shall be required to release the exit. For exits which require a straight motion... operating instructions describing each motion necessary to unlatch or open the exit located within 152 mm...

  17. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... straight (parallel to the undisturbed exit surface) motions to operate the exit, no more than 89 Newtons (20 pounds) of force shall be required to release the exit. For exits which require a straight motion... operating instructions describing each motion necessary to unlatch or open the exit located within 152 mm...

  18. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... straight (parallel to the undisturbed exit surface) motions to operate the exit, no more than 89 Newtons (20 pounds) of force shall be required to release the exit. For exits which require a straight motion... operating instructions describing each motion necessary to unlatch or open the exit located within 152 mm...

  19. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  20. Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology high velocity ratio diffusing crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-12-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  1. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... straight (parallel to the undisturbed exit surface) motions to operate the exit, no more than 89 Newtons... perpendicular to the undisturbed exit surface, no more than 267 Newtons (60 pounds) shall be required to...

  2. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... straight (parallel to the undisturbed exit surface) motions to operate the exit, no more than 89 Newtons... perpendicular to the undisturbed exit surface, no more than 267 Newtons (60 pounds) shall be required to...

  3. A Rare Case of an Intact Bone Plug Associated with a Gunshot Exit Wound.

    PubMed

    Bird, Cate E; Fleischman, Julie M

    2015-07-01

    This case study presents an unusual manifestation of gunshot trauma in skeletal tissue from a post-World War II human rights abuse sample uncovered in Vilnius, Lithuania. After briefly reviewing the typical wound appearance of projectile trauma in the cranium, we discuss the presence of an intact bone plug associated with a gunshot exit wound in an individual from the Tuskulenai Case. While this individual demonstrated typical gunshot entry and exit wounds to the cranium consistent with high-velocity trauma, the bone plug indicates that the projectile likely lost much of its kinetic energy while traveling through the cranium resulting in a low-velocity impact at the exit site. This study reviews a similar instance of a bone plug recovered from a bioarcheological sample in Peru and emphasizes the importance of thorough archeological excavations of mass graves.

  4. The Exit Interview--A Lasting Impression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworak, Linda L.

    1983-01-01

    Personnel administrators should insist on a well-managed exit interview process to monitor departmental turnover and to acquire feedback about the working environment. Some procedures to develop an effective process are discussed. (MLW)

  5. Tug of war at the exit door

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2009-01-01

    The lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate has been identified as a key exit signal for lymph nodes. Pham et al show that its action can only be understood in the context of retention signals transduced by CCR7. PMID:18199414

  6. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airplanes with a seating capacity of two or more, excluding airplanes with canopies, at least one emergency... and operation. Emergency exits must be movable windows, panels, canopies, or external doors,...

  7. Rocket rendezvous at preassigned destinations with optimum exit trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, T. N.; Nangia, A. K.

    1982-10-01

    A numerical model for the optimum trajectory for a commuter rocket to follow in order to rendezvous with a destination rocket vehicle is presented. The interceptor is launched from a launch orbit, then receives a specific velocity impulse at some point along the course to achieve the meeting. An optimum exit path from the launch orbit is characterized by minimum fuel expenditure, as is the intermediate-point velocity injection. Calculations are made of the flight durations and the launch angle, and elements of an optimum transfer trajectory for a rendezvous are defined. Sample calculations are presented for a rendezvous between a circular and an elliptical orbit, and for a meeting somewhere between earth and Mars.

  8. New approach of a traditional analysis for predicting near-exit jet liquid instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Guillermo; Collicott, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Traditional linear instability theory for round liquid jets requires an exit-plane velocity profile be assumed so as to derive the characteristic growth rates and wavelengths of instabilities. This requires solving an eigenvalue problem for the Rayleigh Equation. In this new approach, a hyperbolic tangent velocity profile is assumed at the exit-plane of a round jet and a comparison is made with a hyperbolic secant profile. Temporal and Spatial Stability Analysis (TSA and SSA respectively) are the employed analytical tools to compare results of predicted most-unstable wavelengths from the given analytical velocity profiles and from previous experimental work. The local relevance of the velocity profile in the near-exit region of a liquid jet and the validity of an inviscid formulation through the Rayleigh equation are discussed as well. A comparison of numerical accuracy is made between two different mathematical approaches for the hyperbolic tangent profile with and without the Ricatti transformation. Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of the boundary layer at the exit plane non-dimensionalizes the problem and, the Re range, based on measurements by Portillo in 2011, is 185 to 600. Wavelength measurements are taken from Portillo's experiment. School of Mechanical Engineering at Universidad del Valle, supported by a grant from Fulbright and Colciencias. Ph.D. student at the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Purdue University.

  9. The effect of the exit condition on the performance of intube condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.; Arman, B.

    1995-07-01

    Data collected from the open literature plus some new, unpublished data will be used to show that the exit condition can change the flow regimes, introduce certain types of instabilities, and alter flooding velocities with intube condensation. The major orientations will be considered: horizontal, vertical with vapor downflow, and vertical with vapor upflow (refluxing).

  10. Flow Regime Study in a High Density Circulating Fluidized Bed Riser with an Abrupt Exit

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Shadle, L.J.; Yue, P.C.; Monazam, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    Flow regime study was conducted in a 0.3 m diameter, 15.5 m height circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser with an abrupt exit at the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. Local particle velocities were measured at various radial positions and riser heights using an optical fiber probe. On-line measurement of solid circulating rate was continuously recorded by the Spiral. Glass beads of mean diameter 61 μm and particle density of 2,500 kg/m3 were used as bed material. The CFB riser was operated at various superficial gas velocities ranging from 3 to 7.6 m/s and solid mass flux from 20 to 550 kg/m2-s. At a constant riser gas velocity, transition from fast fluidization to dense suspension upflow (DSU) regime started at the bottom of the riser with increasing solid flux. Except at comparatively low riser gas velocity and solid flux, the apparent solid holdup at the top exit region was higher than the middle section of the riser. The solid fraction at this top region could be much higher than 7% under high riser gas velocity and solid mass flux. The local particle velocity showed downward flow near the wall at the top of the riser due to its abrupt exit. This abrupt geometry reflected the solids and, therefore, caused solid particles traveling downward along the wall. However, at location below, but near, the top of the riser the local particle velocities were observed flowing upward at the wall. Therefore, DSU was identified in the upper region of the riser with an abrupt exit while the fully developed region, lower in the riser, was still exhibiting core-annular flow structure. Our data were compared with the flow regime boundaries proposed by Kim et al. [1] for distinguishing the dilute pneumatic transport, fast fluidization, and DSU.

  11. Exit Strategies: How Low-Performing High Schools Respond to High School Exit Examination Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Jennifer Jellison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Over the past several decades, a significant number of states have either adopted or increased high school exit examination requirements. Although these policies are intended to generate improvement in schools, little is known about how high schools are responding to exit testing pressures. Purpose: This study examined how five…

  12. An Entrance to Exit Polling: Strategies for Using Exit Polls as Experiential Learning Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Michael J.; Robinson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Engaging students in the design, administration, and postelection analysis of an exit poll can be an excellent experiential learning activity. Lelieveldt and Rossen (2009) argue that exit polls are a "perfect teaching tool" because they provide students with a cooperative (rather than competitive) learning experience; help students…

  13. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Illuminated Exit Signs § 431.202 Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. Basic model means, with respect to illuminated exit signs, all units of a given type...

  14. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Illuminated Exit Signs § 431.202 Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. Basic model means, with respect to illuminated exit signs, all units of a given type...

  15. 49 CFR 238.113 - Emergency window exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency window exits. 238.113 Section 238.113... § 238.113 Emergency window exits. (a) Number and location. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(3) of... window exits. At least one emergency window exit shall be located in each side of each end (half) of...

  16. 49 CFR 238.113 - Emergency window exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency window exits. 238.113 Section 238.113... § 238.113 Emergency window exits. (a) Number and location. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(3) of... window exits. At least one emergency window exit shall be located in each side of each end (half) of...

  17. 14 CFR 27.805 - Flight crew emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight crew emergency exits. 27.805 Section... § 27.805 Flight crew emergency exits. (a) For rotorcraft with passenger emergency exits that are not convenient to the flight crew, there must be flight crew emergency exits, on both sides of the rotorcraft...

  18. 14 CFR 29.805 - Flight crew emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight crew emergency exits. 29.805 Section... Accommodations § 29.805 Flight crew emergency exits. (a) For rotorcraft with passenger emergency exits that are not convenient to the flight crew, there must be flight crew emergency exits, on both sides of...

  19. Exit: a salvage procedure for intraoral teratoma.

    PubMed

    Masaany, B M; Ida Sadja'ah, S; Norleza, A N; Norzi, B G; Siti Sabzah, M H

    2012-10-01

    Teratomas arising from the palate or pharynx may cause immediate life-threatening airway obstruction to the newborn. Early diagnosis via antenatal ultrasound enables the treating team to perform an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure to secure an airway and perform subsequent tumour resection. We present the first EXIT procedure done in Malaysia. A 34 year old , gravida 4, para 3, her unborn child diagnosed at 24 weeks of gestation to have a large oropharyngeal mass. Upper airway obstruction was anticipated. Orchestration of multiple specialities was executed to properly plan and perform the EXIT procedure. The fetus was delivered at 33 weeks of gestation and managed to be intubated. The extraoral portion of the multilobular mass originating from the palate was resected. Complete resection of the intraoral teratoma was successfully done at day 22 of life.

  20. Jet Exit Rig Six Component Force Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Wolter, John; Woike, Mark; Booth, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    A new six axis air balance was delivered to the NASA Glenn Research Center. This air balance has an axial force capability of 800 pounds, primary airflow of 10 pounds per second, and a secondary airflow of 3 pounds per second. Its primary use was for the NASA Glenn Jet Exit Rig, a wind tunnel model used to test both low-speed, and high-speed nozzle concepts in a wind tunnel. This report outlines the installation of the balance in the Jet Exit Rig, and the results from an ASME calibration nozzle with an exit area of 8 square-inches. The results demonstrated the stability of the force balance for axial measurements and the repeatability of measurements better than 0.20 percent.

  1. Room evacuation through two contiguous exits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sticco, I. M.; Frank, G. A.; Cerrotta, S.; Dorso, C. O.

    2017-05-01

    Current regulations demand that at least two exits should be available for a safe evacuation during a panic situation. The second exit is expected to reduce the overall clogging, and consequently, improve the evacuation time. However, rooms having contiguous doors not always reduce the leaving time as expected. We investigated the relation between the door's separation and the evacuation performance. We found that there exists a separation distance range that does not really improve the evacuation time, or it can even worsen the process performance. To our knowledge, no attention has been given to this issue in the literature. This work reports how the pedestrian's dynamics differ when the separation distance between two exit doors changes and how this affects the overall performance.

  2. The Course of Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smet, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Actualization is traditionally seen as the process following syntactic reanalysis whereby an item's new syntactic status manifests itself in new syntactic behavior. The process is gradual in that some new uses of the reanalyzed item appear earlier or more readily than others. This article accounts for the order in which new uses appear during…

  3. Visual control of walking velocity.

    PubMed

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  4. Epigenetics as a First Exit Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, E.; Sneppen, K.

    2002-01-01

    We develop a framework to discuss the stability of epigenetic states as first exit problems in dynamical systems with noise. We consider in particular the stability of the lysogenic state of the λ prophage. The formalism defines a quantitative measure of robustness of inherited states.

  5. USEPA EXAMPLE EXIT LEVEL ANALYSIS RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developed by NERL/ERD for the Office of Solid Waste, the enclosed product provides an example uncertainty analysis (UA) and initial process-based sensitivity analysis (SA) of hazardous waste "exit" concentrations for 7 chemicals and metals using the 3MRA Version 1.0 Modeling Syst...

  6. Exit from exit: resetting the cell cycle through Amn1 inhibition of G protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchang; Shirogane, Takahiro; Liu, Dou; Harper, J Wade; Elledge, Stephen J

    2003-03-07

    In S. cerevisiae cells undergoing anaphase, a ras-related GTPase, Tem1, is located on the spindle pole body that enters the daughter cell and activates a signal transduction pathway, MEN, to allow mitotic exit. MEN activation must be reversed after mitotic exit to reset the cell cycle in G1. We find that daughter cells activate an Antagonist of MEN pathway (AMEN) in part through induction of the Amn1 protein that binds directly to Tem1 and prevents its association with its target kinase Cdc15. Failure of Amn1 function results in defects of both the spindle assembly and nuclear orientation checkpoints and delays turning off Cdc14 in G1. Thus, Amn1 is part of a daughter-specific switch that helps cells exit from mitotic exit and reset the cell cycle.

  7. An alternative way of understanding exit, voice and loyalty: the case of informal payments for health care in Israel.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nissim; Filc, Dani

    2017-01-01

    This study examines Hirschman's model of exit, voice and loyalty with regard to informal payments in the Israeli healthcare system. Based on a national survey, we investigate the extent of "black" payments, its characteristics and its correlated factors. We find that informal payments do exist in Israel-although it seems that there has been a decline in the phenomenon. Contrary to the literature, we find no relationship between the option of voice or dissatisfaction with healthcare services and informal payments. However, we do find a negative correlation between trust and the use of such payments. This finding is consistent with Hirschman's insight that a lack of loyalty may lead people to strategies of exit. We suggest that given the fact that health care in Israel is a public service, the exit option may actually be a quasi-exit behavior. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The EXIT (ex utero intrapartum treatment) procedure.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsin-Hui; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Shih, Jin-Chung; Tsao, Po-Nien; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Chou, Hung-Chieh

    2008-09-01

    Fetuses with upper airway obstruction have a high mortality rate if proper airway management is not immediately administered after delivery. The EXIT (ex utero intrapartum treatment) procedure is a new technique that establishes the fetal airway while uteroplacental circulation is still maintained. The prognosis of such neonates has much improved after the introduction of this procedure. We report two neonates with prenatal diagnosis of upper airway obstruction; they were born smoothly via the EXIT procedure. The first was a case of epignathus, a rare type of nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal teratoma derived from all three germ cell layers with variable maturity. The second was a case of giant lymphangioma that resulted from localized malformations in the development of the lymphatic system. Furthermore, compared with routine cesarean section, the short-term maternal outcomes were not different with regard to infection rate, estimated blood loss, wound complication, and postpartum hospital stay.

  9. Low-noise fan exit guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Heidelberg, Laurence J. (Inventor); Envia, Edmane (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Low-noise fan exit guide vanes are disclosed. According to the present invention a fan exit guide vane has an outer shell substantially shaped as an airfoil and defining an interior cavity. A porous portion of the outer shell allows communication between the fluctuations in the air passing over the guide vane and the interior cavity. At least one acoustically resonant chamber is located within the interior cavity. The resonant chamber is in communication with the porous portion of the outer perimeter. The resonant chamber is configured to reduce the noise generated at a predetermined frequency. In various preferred embodiments, there is a plurality of acoustically resonant chambers located within the interior cavity. The resonant chambers can be separated by one or more partitions within the interior cavity. In these embodiments, the resonant chambers can be configured to reduce the noise generated over a range of predetermined frequencies.

  10. Dynamic exit pupil trackers for autostereoscopic displays.

    PubMed

    Akşit, Kaan; Baghsiahi, Hadi; Surman, Phil; Ölçer, Selim; Willman, Eero; Selviah, David R; Day, Sally; Urey, Hakan

    2013-06-17

    This paper describes the first demonstrations of two dynamic exit pupil (DEP) tracker techniques for autostereoscopic displays. The first DEP tracker forms an exit pupil pair for a single viewer in a defined space with low intraocular crosstalk using a pair of moving shutter glasses located within the optical system. A display prototype using the first DEP tracker is constructed from a pair of laser projectors, pupil-forming optics, moving shutter glasses at an intermediate pupil plane, an image relay lens, and a Gabor superlens based viewing screen. The left and right eye images are presented time-sequentially to a single viewer and seen as a 3D image without wearing glasses and allows the viewer to move within a region of 40 cm × 20 cm in the lateral plane, and 30 cm along the axial axis. The second DEP optics can move the exit pupil location dynamically in a much larger 3D space by using a custom spatial light modulator (SLM) forming an array of shutters. Simultaneous control of multiple exit pupils in both lateral and axial axes is demonstrated for the first time and provides a viewing volume with an axial extent of 0.6-3 m from the screen and within a lateral viewing angle of ± 20° for multiple viewers. This system has acceptable crosstalk (< 5%) between the stereo image pairs. In this novel version of the display the optical system is used as an advanced dynamic backlight for a liquid crystal display (LCD). This has advantages in terms of overall display size as there is no requirement for an intermediate image, and in image quality. This system has acceptable crosstalk (< 5%) between the stereo image pairs.

  11. Exit slit mirrors for the ebert spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fastie, W G

    1972-09-01

    The use of a very long straight entrance slit in an Ebert grating spectrometer with two plane mirrors at the shorter exit slit to increase the energy density is described. This system has been employed in a far uv rocket spectrometer to provide higher sensitivity than has been achieved previously. The imaging properties and required slit and mirror adjustments are presented. Experimental results are included.

  12. 14 CFR 25.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... must be conspicuously marked. (b) The identity and location of each passenger emergency exit must be..., Type C or Type I passenger emergency exit operating handle must— (i) Be self-illuminated with...

  13. 14 CFR 25.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... must be conspicuously marked. (b) The identity and location of each passenger emergency exit must be..., Type C or Type I passenger emergency exit operating handle must— (i) Be self-illuminated with...

  14. 14 CFR 25.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... must be conspicuously marked. (b) The identity and location of each passenger emergency exit must be..., Type C or Type I passenger emergency exit operating handle must— (i) Be self-illuminated with...

  15. The effect of exit conditions on the development of an axisymmetric turbulent free jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, S. J.; Foss, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The mean flow in the near field of a submerged axisymmetric jet emitting from a plane wall is presented. An experimental configuration to provide a nearly uniform mean velocity profile with a core of homogeneous turbulence of variable intensity and scale was developed. Eight cases with intensity values of 0.004 less than or equal to U prime less than or equal to 0.035 and integral scales up to l sub x/R = 0.28 were investigated using conditional sampling techniques. It was found that the jet exhibits an increasing momentum flux in the near field. Contrary to expectation and the accepted assumption of ambient static pressure in a turbulent jet, results seem to be conclusive and borne out by comparison with published data. Both integral measures, mass and momentum flux ratios, are insensitive to exit turbulence variations, but, the detailed structure (including centerline velocity) variations with exit conditions are systematic and explainable.

  16. Undulated Nozzle for Enhanced Exit Area Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M. (Inventor); Gilinsky, Mikhail M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A nozzle having an undulating surface for enhancing the mixing of a primary flow with a secondary flow or ambient air, without requiring an ejector. The nozzle includes a nozzle structure and design for introducing counter-rotating vorticity into the primary flow either through (i) internal surface corrugations where an axisymmetric line through each corrugation is coincident with an axisymmetric line through the center of the flow passageway or (ii) through one or more sets of alternating convexities and cavities in the internal surface of the nozzle where an axisymmetric line through each convexity and cavity is coincident with an axisymmetric line through the center of the flow passageway, and where the convexities contract from the entrance end towards the exit end. Exit area mixing is also enhanced by one or more chevrons attached to the exit edge of the nozzle. The nozzle is ideally suited for application as a jet engine nozzle. When used as a jet engine nozzle, noise suppression with simultaneous thrust augmentation/minimal thrust loss is achieved.

  17. 46 CFR 78.47-40 - Exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exit signs. 78.47-40 Section 78.47-40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-40 Exit signs. (a) Illuminated exit signs are required and must...

  18. 46 CFR 78.47-40 - Exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exit signs. 78.47-40 Section 78.47-40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-40 Exit signs. (a) Illuminated exit signs are required and must...

  19. 14 CFR 29.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... head twice the width of the shaft, extending along at least 70 degrees of arc at a radius approximately... Accommodations § 29.811 Emergency exit marking. (a) Each passenger emergency exit, its means of access, and its... each passenger emergency exit must be recognizable from a distance equal to the width of the cabin....

  20. 14 CFR 23.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 23.813 Section 23... Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 23.813 Emergency exit access. (a) For commuter category airplanes, access to window-type emergency exits may not be obstructed by seats or seat backs. (b) In addition,...

  1. 14 CFR 25.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 25.813 Section 25... Emergency exit access. Each required emergency exit must be accessible to the passengers and located where... following must be provided for each Type III or Type IV exit—(1) There must be access from the nearest...

  2. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Florida's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  3. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Connecticut's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  4. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Oklahoma's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  5. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Massachusetts' high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  6. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Louisiana's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  7. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Minnesota's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  8. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Virginia's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  9. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alaska's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  10. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New York's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  11. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Ohio's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  12. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Nevada's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  13. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alabama's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  14. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on North Carolina's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  15. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Washington's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  16. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Arizona's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  17. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Tennessee's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  18. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on South Carolina's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  19. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Mississippi's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  20. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Jersey's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  1. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Delaware's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  2. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Mexico's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  3. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Indiana's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  4. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Idaho's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  5. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Arkansas' high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  6. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Missouri's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  7. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Rhode Island's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  8. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Maryland's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  9. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Georgia's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  10. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on California's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  11. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Texas' high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  12. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Oregon's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  13. EOS Terra Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantziaras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This EOS Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update presentation will discuss brief history of Terra EOM work; lifetime fuel estimates; baseline vs. proposed plan origin; resultant exit orbit; baseline vs. proposed exit plan; long term orbit altitude; revised lifetime proposal and fallback options.

  14. Exit Cards: Creating a Dialogue for Continuous Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patka, Mazna; Wallin-Ruschman, Jennifer; Wallace, Tenille; Robbins, Candice

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the use of Exit Cards, which are formative evaluations of student knowledge and instruction undertaken at every class meeting. Its results are based on Exit Card data from two undergraduate research methods courses. Thematic analysis indicated that students used Exit Cards to communicate (1) what they learned, (2) challenges…

  15. Evaluation of two methods of prompting drivers to use specific exits on conflicts between vehicles at the critical exit.

    PubMed

    Van Houten, Ron; Malenfant, J E Louis; Zhao, Nan; Ko, Byungkon; Van Houten, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The Florida Department of Transportation used a series of changeable-message signs that functioned as freeway guide signs to divert traffic to Universal Theme Park via one of two eastbound exits based on traffic congestion at the first of the two exits. An examination of crashes along the entire route indicated a statistically significant increase in crashes at the first eastbound exit following the actuation of the system. Furthermore, all of the crashes occurred in close proximity to the exit gore (the crosshatched area at exits that drivers are not supposed to enter or traverse) at the first exit. In Experiment 1, behavioral data were collected using an alternating treatments design. These data revealed that reassigning the exit signs was effective in producing a change in the percentage of drivers using each of the two exits. These data also showed that the reassignment of the theme park exit was associated with an increase in the percentage of motor vehicle conflicts that consisted of vehicles cutting across the exit gore. An analysis revealed that the method used for switching the designated or active theme park exit on the series of changeable-message signs led to the presentation of conflicting messages to some motorists, thus resulting in erratic driving behavior (cutting across the exit gore). In Experiment 2, the treatment evaluated the use of a phased method of switching the designated theme park exit to eliminate the delivery of conflicting messages. The new method for switching the designated theme park exit was not associated with an increase in motorists cutting across the exit gore.

  16. High-Flow Jet Exit Rig Designed and Fabricated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Robert J.; Trimarchi, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    conditions. This wide operating envelope is required to support the testing of both single- and dual-flow nozzles. Key research goals include providing simultaneous, highly accurate acoustic, flow, and thrust measurements on jet nozzle models in realistic flight conditions, as well as providing scaleable acoustic results. The High-Flow Jet Exit Rig is a second-generation high-flow test rig. Improvements include cleaner flow with reduced levels of particulate, soot, and odor. Choked-flow metering is required with plus or minus 0.25-percent accuracy. Thrust measurements from 0 to 2000 lbf are required with plus or minus 0.25-percent accuracy. Improved acoustics will be achieved by minimizing noise through large pipe bend radii, lower internal flow velocities, and microdrilled choke plates with thousands of 0.040-in.- diameter holes.

  17. Exit plane H2O concentration measurements correlated with OH PLIF near-injector mixing measurements for scramjet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Allen, Mark G.; Foutter, R. R.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Rawlins, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    Mixing and combusting high enthalpy flows, similar to those encountered in scramjet engines, were investigated using a shock tunnel to produce the flow in conjunction with non-intrusive optical diagnostics which monitored the performance of two injector configurations. The shock tunnel is configured to produce Mach 3 flow and stagnation enthalpies corresponding to flight equivalent Mach numbers between 7 and 11. A pulsed hydrogen injection capability and interchangeable injector blocks provide a means of examining high speed, high enthalpy reacting flows. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH molecules in the near injector region produced images which show the combusting and mixing zones for the reacting flow. Line-of-sight exit plane measurement of water concentration and temperature were used to provide a unique method of monitoring exit plane products. These results demonstrated that a velocity matched axial injection system produced a fuel jet that lifted off the floor of the duct. Mixing was observed to increase for this system as a velocity mismatch was introduced. Comparison of exit plane water concentrations for a wall jet injection system and a velocity matched injection system indicated similar mixing performance but an accurate pressure measurement is necessary to further validate the result. In addition, exit plane measurements indicated an approximate steady-state condition was achieved during the 1 to 2 ms test times.

  18. Tertiary interactions within the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kosolapov, Andrey; Deutsch, Carol

    2009-04-01

    Although tertiary folding of whole protein domains is prohibited by the cramped dimensions of the ribosomal tunnel, dynamic tertiary interactions may permit folding of small elementary units within the tunnel. To probe this possibility, we used a beta-hairpin and an alpha-helical hairpin from the cytosolic N terminus of a voltage-gated potassium channel and determined a probability of folding for each at defined locations inside and outside the tunnel. Minimalist tertiary structures can form near the exit port of the tunnel, a region that provides an entropic window for initial exploration of local peptide conformations. Tertiary subdomains of the nascent peptide fold sequentially, but not independently, during translation. These studies offer an approach for diagnosing the molecular basis for folding defects that lead to protein malfunction and provide insight into the role of the ribosome during early potassium channel biogenesis.

  19. 19 CFR 18.22 - Procedure at port of exit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedure at port of exit. 18.22 Section 18.22... to Foreign Countries § 18.22 Procedure at port of exit. (a) If transfer is necessary, the procedure shall be as prescribed in § 18.3(d). (b) Upon the arrival at the port of exit of express shipments...

  20. 19 CFR 18.22 - Procedure at port of exit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure at port of exit. 18.22 Section 18.22... to Foreign Countries § 18.22 Procedure at port of exit. (a) If transfer is necessary, the procedure shall be as prescribed in § 18.3(d). (b) Upon the arrival at the port of exit of express shipments...

  1. 19 CFR 18.22 - Procedure at port of exit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure at port of exit. 18.22 Section 18.22... to Foreign Countries § 18.22 Procedure at port of exit. (a) If transfer is necessary, the procedure shall be as prescribed in § 18.3(d). (b) Upon the arrival at the port of exit of express shipments...

  2. 19 CFR 18.22 - Procedure at port of exit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedure at port of exit. 18.22 Section 18.22... to Foreign Countries § 18.22 Procedure at port of exit. (a) If transfer is necessary, the procedure shall be as prescribed in § 18.3(d). (b) Upon the arrival at the port of exit of express shipments...

  3. 19 CFR 18.22 - Procedure at port of exit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure at port of exit. 18.22 Section 18.22... to Foreign Countries § 18.22 Procedure at port of exit. (a) If transfer is necessary, the procedure shall be as prescribed in § 18.3(d). (b) Upon the arrival at the port of exit of express shipments...

  4. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  5. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  6. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  7. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  8. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  9. Evaluation of catalytic combustion of actual coal-derived gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanton, J. C.; Shisler, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of a Pt-Pl catalytic reactor burning coal-derived, low-Btu gas were investigated. A large matrix of test conditions was explored involving variations in fuel/air inlet temperature and velocity, reactor pressure, and combustor exit temperature. Other data recorded included fuel gas composition, reactor temperatures, and exhaust emissions. Operating experience with the reactor was satisfactory. Combustion efficiencies were quite high (over 95 percent) over most of the operating range. Emissions of NOx were quite high (up to 500 ppm V and greater), owing to the high ammonia content of the fuel gas.

  10. Assessing Undergraduate Curriculum Through Student Exit Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, C. M.; Gonzales, L.; Martinez, C.

    2008-12-01

    One aspect of assessing the undergraduate curriculum is recognizing that the exit vector of the student is a metric in the absence of a structured assessment program. Detailed knowledge across all geosciences departments regarding the disposition of their recent baccalaureate recipients has been at best inconsistent, and in the case of about half of geoscience programs, non-existent. However, through examining of multiple datasets, a pattern of disposition of geosciences BS recipients emerges, providing a snapshot of the system- wide response to the system-wide "average" program. This pattern can also be juxtaposed against several frameworks of desired skill sets for recent graduates and the employment sectors likely to hire them. The question remains is can one deduce the effectiveness of the undergraduate program in placing graduates in their next step, whether in graduate school or the workplace. Likewise, with an increasing scrutiny on the "value" of an education, is the resulting economic gain sufficient for the student, such that programs will be viewed as sustainable. A factor in answering this question is the importance of the undergraduate program in the ultimate destination of the professional. Clear pathways exist for "optimal" schools for the production of new faculty and new industry professionals, but is it possible to identify those trends further up the educational pipeline? One major mechanism to examine the undergraduate program effectiveness related to exit vectors is to look at hiring trends witnessed related to markedly different program structures, such as those at universities outside of the United States. Rectifying academic programs between the United States and other national systems is often a challenge, but even given the substantial differences between depth of technical knowledge and breadth of education across these programs, in the end, the sum product is often viewed as roughly comparable. This paper will look at end

  11. Jet Nozzle Having Centerbody for Enhanced Exit Area Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M. (Inventor); Gilinsky, Mikhail M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A nozzle arrangement includes a nozzle and a centerbody. The longitudinal axis of the centerbody is coaxially aligned with the nozzle. The centerbody has a free end portion shaped to create vortices in exhaust exiting the exit area. The vortices enhance mixing action in the exhaust and reduce exhaust noise while augmenting thrust.

  12. Exit Surveying of Interns: Demonstrating Impact on Young Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscio, Cara

    2011-01-01

    Documenting impact is becoming increasingly important as funding becomes tighter for Extension programs. An exit survey for interns conducted via an online survey tool is an opportunity to collect information on knowledge and skill gains, as well as document changes in intentions and attitudes about future career paths. An exit survey conducted…

  13. Open Entry/Open Exit Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Marvin

    Open entry/open exit refers to formats and procedures which allow learners to enter a program whenever they are ready and available, and allows them to leave or complete programs when competencies for job entry are attained. This study sought to provide base data on the concept of open entry/open exit by surveying involved individuals and to…

  14. The GED Exit Option Model. Procedure Manual. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Bureau of Instructional Support and Community Services.

    The purpose of this document is to assist Florida school districts in implementing the General Educational Development (GED) Exit Option Model for students at risk of not completing high school. Students must be at least 16 years of age and currently enrolled in high school to take the GED tests through the GED Exit Option Model. In addition, the…

  15. Towards an Orderly Exit Regime in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In a competitive market, the exit of those suppliers who cannot offer an attractive product at an attractive price is seen as desirable. However, the consequences for consumers when their own supplier leaves the market in an unplanned or disorderly way may be undesirable. Exit regimes exist in regulated markets to ensure that consumers are not…

  16. Exit Exams Face Pinch in Common-Core Push

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujifusa, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    With many states crafting assessments based on the common-core standards--and an increasing emphasis on college and career readiness--some are rethinking the kind of tests high school students must pass to graduate, or whether to use such exit exams at all. Twenty-five states, enrolling a total of 34.1 million students, make exit exams a…

  17. 14 CFR 25.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... wide and a head twice the width of the shaft, extending along at least 70 degrees of arc at a radius... Emergency exit marking. (a) Each passenger emergency exit, its means of access, and its means of opening... recognizable from a distance equal to the width of the cabin. (c) Means must be provided to assist...

  18. ETR WASTE GAS EXITED THE ETR COMPLEX FROM THE NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR WASTE GAS EXITED THE ETR COMPLEX FROM THE NORTH SIDE THROUGH A TUNNEL AND THEN TO A FILTER PIT. TUNNEL EXIT IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION WHILE CONTROL BUILDING IS BEING FORMED BEYOND. CAMERA FACING WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-1238. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 4/17/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. 45 CFR 670.34 - Entry and exit ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Entry and exit ports. 670.34 Section 670.34 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Import Into and Export From the United States § 670.34 Entry and exit ports....

  20. 45 CFR 670.34 - Entry and exit ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Entry and exit ports. 670.34 Section 670.34 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Import Into and Export From the United States § 670.34 Entry and exit ports....

  1. 45 CFR 670.34 - Entry and exit ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Entry and exit ports. 670.34 Section 670.34 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Import Into and Export From the United States § 670.34 Entry and exit ports....

  2. Exit and Voice: Organizational Loyalty and Dispute Resolution Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    This study compares workplace dispute resolution strategies (exit, voice and toleration) in matched pairs of conventional and worker-owned cooperative organizations operating in three industries--coal mining, taxicab driving and organic food distribution. Building on Hirschman's classic exit, voice and loyalty thesis, this research demonstrates…

  3. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9 Section 215.9 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROLS OF ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted...

  4. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9 Section 215.9 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROLS OF ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted...

  5. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9 Section 215.9 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROLS OF ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted...

  6. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9 Section 215.9 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROLS OF ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted...

  7. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9 Section 215.9 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROLS OF ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted...

  8. 14 CFR 29.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo... aisle to each Type III and Type IV exit, and (1) For rotorcraft that have a passenger seating... that exit of not less than the width of the narrowest passenger seat installed on the rotorcraft;...

  9. Exiting and Returning to the Parental Home for Boomerang Kids

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg-Thoma, Sara E.; Snyder, Anastasia R.; Jang, Bohyun Joy

    2015-01-01

    Young adults commonly exit from and return to the parental home, yet few studies have examined the motivation behind these exits and returns using a life course framework. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, the authors examined associations between mental health problems and economic characteristics and exits from (n = 8,162), and returns to (n = 6,530), the parental home during the transition to adulthood. The average age of the respondents was 24 years. The authors found evidence that mental health and economic characteristics were related to home leaving and returning. Emotional distress was associated with earlier exits from, and returns to, the parental home; alcohol problems were associated with earlier returns to the parental home. The findings regarding economic resources were unexpectedly mixed. Greater economic resources were linked to delayed exits from, and earlier returns to, the parental home. The implications of these findings for young adults are discussed. PMID:26023244

  10. Mean-field theory for pedestrian outflow through an exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2007-12-01

    The average pedestrian flow through an exit is one of the most important indices in evaluating pedestrian dynamics. In order to study the flow in detail, the floor field model, which is a crowd model using cellular automata, is extended by taking into account realistic behavior of pedestrians around the exit. The model is studied by both numerical simulations and cluster analysis to obtain a theoretical expression for the average pedestrian flow through the exit. It is found quantitatively that the effects of exit door width, the wall, and the pedestrian mood of competition or cooperation significantly influence the average flow. The results show that there is a suitable width and position of the exit according to the pedestrians’ mood.

  11. Turbulent fluid-structure interaction of water-entry/exit of a rotating circular cylinder using SPH method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Saghatchi, Roozbeh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the two-dimensional (2D) water-entry and exit of a rotating circular cylinder using the Sub-Particle Scale (SPS) turbulence model of a Lagrangian particle-based Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations along with the continuity have been solved as the governing equations of the problem. The accuracy of the numerical code is verified using the case of water-entry and exit of a nonrotating circular cylinder. The numerical simulations of water-entry and exit of the rotating circular cylinder are performed at Froude numbers of 2, 5, 8, and specific gravities of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.75, rotating at the dimensionless rates of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75. The effect of governing parameters and vortex shedding behind the cylinder on the trajectory curves, velocity components in the flow field, and the deformation of free surface for both cases have been investigated in detail. It is seen that the rotation has a great effect on the curvature of the trajectory path and velocity components in water-entry and exit cases due to the interaction of imposed lift and drag forces with the inertia force.

  12. Differences in Student Achievement between Early-Exit and Late-Exit Bilingual Programs: A Multiyear, Statewide Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Rosa Maria

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the difference between two bilingual program types: traditional early-exit and late-exit bilingual programs and academic achievement using archival data from the Texas Education Agency Public Education Information Management System. An examination of academic achievement rates across a 3-year period…

  13. Evaluation of Two Methods of Prompting Drivers to Use Specific Exits on Conflicts between Vehicles at the Critical Exit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houten, Ron; Malenfant, J. E. Louis; Zhao, Nan; Ko, Byungkon; Van Houten, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The Florida Department of Transportation used a series of changeable-message signs that functioned as freeway guide signs to divert traffic to Universal Theme Park via one of two eastbound exits based on traffic congestion at the first of the two exits. An examination of crashes along the entire route indicated a statistically significant increase…

  14. Drivers’ Visual Characteristics when Merging onto or Exiting an Urban Expressway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying; Gao, Li; Zhao, Yanan; Du, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine drivers’ visual and driving behavior while merging onto or exiting an urban expressway with low and high traffic densities. The analysis was conducted according to three periods (approaching, merging or exiting, and accelerating or decelerating). A total of 10 subjects (8 males and 2 females) with ages ranging from 25 to 52 years old (M = 30.0 years old) participated in the study. The research was conducted in a natural driving situation, and the drivers’ eye movements were monitored and recorded using an eye tracking system. The results show that the influence of traffic density on the glance duration and scan duration is more significant when merging than when exiting. The results also demonstrate that the number of glances and the mean glance duration are mainly related to the driving task (e.g., the merging period). Therefore, drivers’ visual search strategies mainly depend on the current driving task. With regard to driving behavior, the variation tendencies of the duration and the velocity of each period are similar. These results support building an automated driving assistant system that can automatically identify gaps and accelerate or decelerate the car accordingly or provide suggestions to the driver to do so. PMID:27657888

  15. A method for calculating strut and splitter plate noise in exit ducts: Theory and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portions of a four-year analytical and experimental investigation relative to noise radiation from engine internal components in turbulent flow are summarized. Spectra measured for such airfoils over a range of chord, thickness ratio, flow velocity, and turbulence level were compared with predictions made by an available rigorous thin-airfoil analytical method. This analysis included the effects of flow compressibility and source noncompactness. Generally good agreement was obtained. This noise calculation method for isolated airfoils in turbulent flow was combined with a method for calculating transmission of sound through a subsonic exit duct and with an empirical far-field directivity shape. These three elements were checked separately and were individually shown to give close agreement with data. This combination provides a method for predicting engine internally generated aft-radiated noise from radial struts and stators, and annular splitter rings. Calculated sound power spectra, directivity, and acoustic pressure spectra were compared with the best available data. These data were for noise caused by a fan exit duct annular splitter ring, larger-chord stator blades, and turbine exit struts.

  16. Velocity and turbulence measurements in combustion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. J.; Lau, K. Y.; Leung, C. C.

    1983-06-01

    A laser-Doppler velocimeter is used in the measurement of high-temperature gas flows. A two-stage fluidization particle generator provides magnesium oxide particles to serve as optical scattering centers. The one-dimensional dual-beam system is frequency shifted to permit measurements of velocities up to 300 meters per second and turbulence intensities greater than 100 percent. Exiting flows from can-type gas turbine combustors and burners with pre-mixed oxy-acetylene flames are described in terms of the velocity, turbulence intensity, and temperature profiles. The results indicate the influence of the combustion process on turbulence.

  17. Hydroburst test of a carbon-carbon involute exit cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    A hydroburst test of the aft portion of the PAM-D exit cone and the test procedure are described in detail. The hydrostatic pressure required to buckle the cone was 9.75 psi. Meanwhile, the PAM-D exit cone was modeled using the finite element method and a theoretical bucking pressure (8.76 psi) was predicted using the SPAR finite element code. The modeling technique employed is discussed. By comparing the theoretical to predicted critical pressures, this report verifies the modeling technique and calculates a material knockdown factor for the carbon-carbon exit cone.

  18. Jet engine nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter.

  19. Jet Engine Nozzle Exit Configurations and Associated Systems and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter.

  20. CANAL EXITING FLUME AND BEGINNING EARTHLINED MAIN SECTION AT MOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CANAL EXITING FLUME AND BEGINNING EARTH-LINED MAIN SECTION AT MOUTH OF PLATTE RIVER CANYON. VIEW TO WEST - High Line Canal, Mouth of South Platte River to confluence with Second Creek, Denver, Denver County, CO

  1. Exit, Punishment and Rewards in Commons Dilemmas: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Giangiacomo; Squazzoni, Flaminio

    2013-01-01

    Commons dilemmas are interaction situations where a common good is provided or exploited by a group of individuals so that optimal collective outcomes clash with private interests. Although in these situations, social norms and institutions exist that might help individuals to cooperate, little is known about the interaction effects between positive and negative incentives and exit options by individuals. We performed a modified public good game experiment to examine the effect of exit, rewards and punishment, as well as the interplay between exit and rewards and punishment. We found that punishment had a stronger effect than rewards on cooperation if considered by itself, whereas rewards had a stronger effect when combined with voluntary participation. This can be explained in terms of the ‘framing effect’, i.e., as the combination of exit and rewards might induce people to attach higher expected payoffs to cooperative strategies and expect better behaviour from others. PMID:23936356

  2. Interior detail of exit door on second floor at north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of exit door on second floor at north end; camera facing north. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, WAVES Officers Quarters, Cedar Avenue, west side between Tisdale Avenue & Eighth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  3. BASEMENT, A view looking east into Room 24. An exit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking east into Room 24. An exit door is at the far end - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  4. North wall, near east end, showing exhaust fan and exit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North wall, near east end, showing exhaust fan and exit (series 3 of 4) - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  5. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. LOOKING 278°W - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Exit, punishment and rewards in commons dilemmas: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Giangiacomo; Squazzoni, Flaminio

    2013-01-01

    Commons dilemmas are interaction situations where a common good is provided or exploited by a group of individuals so that optimal collective outcomes clash with private interests. Although in these situations, social norms and institutions exist that might help individuals to cooperate, little is known about the interaction effects between positive and negative incentives and exit options by individuals. We performed a modified public good game experiment to examine the effect of exit, rewards and punishment, as well as the interplay between exit and rewards and punishment. We found that punishment had a stronger effect than rewards on cooperation if considered by itself, whereas rewards had a stronger effect when combined with voluntary participation. This can be explained in terms of the 'framing effect', i.e., as the combination of exit and rewards might induce people to attach higher expected payoffs to cooperative strategies and expect better behaviour from others.

  7. Severe micrognathia: indications for EXIT-to-Airway.

    PubMed

    Morris, Lee M; Lim, Foong-Yen; Elluru, Ravindhra G; Hopkin, Robert J; Jaekle, Ronald K; Polzin, William J; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure has become an important management option in cases of fetal airway obstruction. Select cases of severe micrognathia may be candidates for EXIT-to-Airway due to high-risk of airway obstruction at birth. Here we present three successful EXIT-to-Airway procedures for the management of congenital micrognathia in its most severe manifestations. CASE 1: A 23-year-old G3P1011 with a pregnancy complicated by severe micorgnathia, jaw index <5th percentile, as well as polyhydramnios. At 36 weeks EXIT-to-Airway was performed utilizing a bronchoscopically positioned laryngeal mask airway (LMA) during 23 min of uteroplacental support followed by tracheostomy. CASE 2: A 26-year-old G4P0120 with a pregnancy complicated by severe micrognathia, jaw index <5th percentile, and an obstructed oropharynx associated with polyhydramnios. At 37 weeks EXIT-to-Airway was performed with placement of tracheostomy. CASE 3: A 36-year-old G6P3023 with fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealing esophageal atresia, polyhydramnios, and severe micrognathia with a jaw index <5th percentile. At 35 weeks the patient underwent EXIT-to-Airway with formal tracheostomy during 35 min of uteroplacental bypass. In the most severe cases of fetal micrognathia, EXIT-to-Airway provides time to evaluate and secure the fetal airway prior to delivery. We propose indications for EXIT-to-Airway in micrognathia to include a jaw index <5%, with indirect evidence of aerodigestive tract obstruction such as polyhydramnios, glossoptosis or an absent stomach bubble.

  8. The effects of initial jet exit conditions on plume resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Seiner, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The acoustic emission and boundary layer of a cold jet issuing from an underexpanded sonic nozzle have been measured for lip thicknesses of the nozzle exit varying from 0.015-0.625 nozzle diameters. Near-field acoustic data demonstrate that the amplitude and frequency of certain modes of screech and the dominant mode of instability which exists in the shear layer are dependent on nozzle lip thickness. Changes in momentum thickness due to variations in the nozzle exit were also quantified.

  9. Understanding human queuing behaviour at exits: an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    Wagoum, A. U. Kemloh; Liao, W.

    2017-01-01

    The choice of the exit to egress from a facility plays a fundamental role in pedestrian modelling and simulation. Yet, empirical evidence for backing up simulation is scarce. In this contribution, we present three new groups of experiments that we conducted in different geometries. We varied parameters such as the width of the doors, the initial location and number of pedestrians which in turn affected their perception of the environment. We extracted and analysed relevant indicators such as distance to the exits and density levels. The results put in evidence the fact that pedestrians use time-dependent information to optimize their exit choice, and that, in congested states, a load balancing over the exits occurs. We propose a minimal modelling approach that covers those situations, especially the cases where the geometry does not show a symmetrical configuration. Most of the models try to achieve the load balancing by simulating the system and solving optimization problems. We show statistically and by simulation that a linear model based on the distance to the exits and the density levels around the exit can be an efficient dynamical alternative. PMID:28280588

  10. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT– bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14036.001 PMID:27166637

  11. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central…

  12. A Modified EXIT-to-ECMO with Optional Reservoir Circuit for Use during an EXIT Procedure Requiring Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Matte, Gregory S; Connor, Kevin R; Toutenel, Nathalia A; Gottlieb, Danielle; Fynn-Thompson, Francis

    2016-03-01

    A 34 year old mother with a history of polyhydraminos and premature rupture of membranes presented for an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure to deliver her 34 week gestation fetus. The fetus had been diagnosed with a large cervical mass which significantly extended into the right chest. The mass compressed and deviated the airway and major neck vessels posteriorly. Imaging also revealed possible tumor involvement with the superior vena cava and right atrium. The plan was for potential extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) during the EXIT procedure (EXIT-to-ECMO) and the potential for traditional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for mediastinal tumor resection. A Modified EXIT-To-ECMO with Optional Reservoir (METEOR) circuit was devised to satisfy both therapies. A fetal airway could not be established during the EXIT procedure and so the EXIT-to-ECMO strategy was utilized. The fetus was then delivered and transferred to an adjoining operating room (OR). Traditional cardiopulmonary bypass with a cardiotomy venous reservoir (CVR) was utilized during the establishment of an airway, tumor biopsy and partial resection. The patient was eventually transitioned to our institution's standard ECMO circuit and then transferred to the intensive care unit. The patient was weaned from ECMO on day of life (DOL) eight and had a successful tumor resection on DOL 11. The patient required hospitalization for numerous interventions including cardiac surgery at 4 months of age. She was discharged to home at 5 months of age.

  13. Mitotic Exit Control as an Evolved Complex System

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W; Li, R

    2005-04-25

    The exit from mitosis is the last critical decision a cell has to make during a division cycle. A complex regulatory system has evolved to evaluate the success of mitotic events and control this decision. Whereas outstanding genetic work in yeast has led to rapid discovery of a large number of interacting genes involved in the control of mitotic exit, it has also become increasingly difficult to comprehend the logic and mechanistic features embedded in the complex molecular network. Our view is that this difficulty stems in part from the attempt to explain mitotic exit control using concepts from traditional top-down engineering design, and that exciting new results from evolutionary engineering design applied to networks and electronic circuits may lend better insights. We focus on four particularly intriguing features of the mitotic exit control system: the two-stepped release of Cdc14; the self-activating nature of Tem1 GTPase; the spatial sensor associated with the spindle pole body; and the extensive redundancy in the mitotic exit network. We attempt to examine these design features from the perspective of evolutionary design and complex system engineering.

  14. The influence of the stagnation zone on the fluid dynamics at the nozzle exit of a confined and submerged impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Nicholas; Stafford, Jason; Conway, Ciaran; Punch, Jeff; Walsh, Edmond

    2016-02-01

    Low profile impinging jets provide a means to achieve high heat transfer coefficients while occupying a small quantity of space. Consequently, they are found in many engineering applications such as electronics cooling, annealing of metals, food processing, and others. This paper investigates the influence of the stagnation zone fluid dynamics on the nozzle exit flow condition of a low profile, submerged, and confined impinging water jet. The jet was geometrically constrained to a round, 16-mm diameter, square-edged nozzle at a jet exit to target surface spacing ( H/ D) that varied between 0.25 < {{ H}{/}{ D}} < 8.75. The influence of turbulent flow regimes is the main focus of this paper; however, laminar flow data are also presented between 1350 < Re < 17{,}300. A custom measurement facility was designed and commissioned to utilise particle image velocimetry in order to quantitatively measure the fluid dynamics both before and after the jet exits its nozzle. The velocity profiles are normalised with the mean velocity across the nozzle exit, and turbulence statistics are also presented. The primary objective of this paper is to present accurate flow profiles across the nozzle exit of an impinging jet confined to a low H/ D, with a view to guide the boundary conditions chosen for numerical simulations confined to similar constraints. The results revealed in this paper suggest that the fluid dynamics in the stagnation zone strongly influences the nozzle exit velocity profile at confinement heights between 0 < {{ H}{/}{ D}} < 1. This is of particular relevance with regard to the choice of inlet boundary conditions in numerical models, and it was found that it is necessary to model a jet tube length {{ L}{/}{ D}} > 0.5—where D is the inner diameter of the jet—in order to minimise modelling uncertainty.

  15. 29 CFR 1910.36 - Design and construction requirements for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... your workplace, consult NFPA 101-2000, Life Safety Code. (c) Exit discharge. (1) Each exit discharge... open an exit route door from the inside at all times without keys, tools, or special knowledge. A... 101-2000, Life Safety Code. (g) An exit route must meet minimum height and width requirements. (1)...

  16. Theoretical and Experimental Particle Velocity in Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Victor K.; Helfritch, Dennis J.; Dinavahi, Surya P. G.; Leyman, Phillip F.

    2011-03-01

    In an effort to corroborate theoretical and experimental techniques used for cold spray particle velocity analysis, two theoretical and one experimental methods were used to analyze the operation of a nozzle accelerating aluminum particles in nitrogen gas. Two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric computations of the flow through the nozzle were performed using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code in a computational fluid dynamics platform. 1D, isentropic, gas-dynamic equations were solved for the same nozzle geometry and initial conditions. Finally, the velocities of particles exiting a nozzle of the same geometry and operated at the same initial conditions were measured by a dual-slit velocimeter. Exit plume particle velocities as determined by the three methods compared reasonably well, and differences could be attributed to frictional and particle distribution effects.

  17. Gas turbine combustor exit piece with hinged connections

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Richard C.; Pankey, William W.

    2016-04-26

    An exit piece (66) with an inlet throat (67) that conducts a combustion gas flow (36A) in a path (82) from a combustor (63) to an annular chamber (68) that feeds the first blade section (37) of a gas turbine (26). The exit piece further includes an outlet portion (69) that forms a circumferential segment of the annular chamber. The outlet portion interconnects with adjacent outlet portions by hinges (78A, 78B, 80A, 80B). Each hinge may have a hinge axis (82A, 82B) parallel to a centerline (21) of the turbine. Respective gas flows (36A) are configured by an assembly (60) of the exit pieces to converge on the feed chamber (68) into a uniform helical flow that drives the first blade section with minimal circumferential variations in force.

  18. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Hedman, Rickard; Marino, Jacopo; Wickles, Stephan; Bischoff, Lukas; Johansson, Magnus; Müller-Lucks, Annika; Trovato, Fabio; Puglisi, Joseph D.; O’Brien, Edward P.; Beckmann, Roland; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Summary At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins. PMID:26321634

  19. A review of the EXIT (Ex utero Intrapartum Treatment) procedure.

    PubMed

    Abraham, R J; Sau, A; Maxwell, D

    2010-01-01

    The EXIT (Ex utero Intrapartum Treatment) procedure is done in cases where difficulty is anticipated in neonatal airway establishment at delivery and is done at the time of caesarean section. The partially delivered fetus is maintained on placental circulation while airway is established and this is carried out by a multidisciplinary team. In this paper, we review the indications, the maternal and fetal considerations of the procedure and the results and outcomes. The review highlights the fact that the benefits far outweigh the risks and that the risk of postpartum haemorrhage is more theoretical than real. As technology improves and more anomalies are diagnosed during the antenatal period, the EXIT procedure can be performed with good results after carefully considering the ethical issues. We have performed a MEDLINE search by using the keywords EXIT, CHAOS, fetal surgery, fetal neck masses and ex utero intrapartum treatment. As there are not many large studies, we have also reviewed smaller case series and case reports.

  20. Criticality safety analysis of a calciner exit chute

    SciTech Connect

    Haught, C.F.; Basoglu, B.; Brewer, R.W.; Hollenback, D.F.; Wilkinson, A.D.; Dodds, H.L. . Nuclear Engineering Dept.); Oxenham, R.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Calcination of uranyl nitrate into uranium oxide is part of normal operations of some enrichment plants. Typically, a calciner discharges uranium oxide powder (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) into an exit chute that directs the powder into a receiving can located in a glove box. One possible scenario for a criticality accident is the exit chute becoming blocked with powder near its discharge. The blockage restricts the flow of powder causing the exit chute to become filled with the powder. If blockage does occur, the height of the powder could reach a level that would not be safe from a criticality point of view. In this analysis, the subcritical height limit is examined for 98% enriched U[sub 3]O[sub 8] in the exit chute with full water reflection and optimal water moderation. The height limit for ensuring criticality safety during such an accumulation is 28.2 cm above the top of the discharge pipe at the bottom of the chute. Chute design variations are also evaluated with full water reflection and optimal water moderation. Subcritical configurations for the exit chute variation are developed, but the configurations are not safe when combined with the calciner. To ensure criticality safety, modifications must be made to the calciner tube or safety measures must be implemented if these designs are to be utilized with 98% enriched material. A geometrically safe configuration for the exit chute is developed for a blockage of 20% enriched powder with full water reflection and optimal water moderation, and this configuration is safe when combined with the existing calciner.

  1. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  2. Cooling Air Inlet and Exit Geometries on Aircraft Engine Installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Barlow, Philip R.

    1982-01-01

    A semispan wing and nacelle of a typical general aviation twin-engine aircraft was tested to evaluate the cooling capability and drag or several nacelle shapes; the nacelle shapes included cooling air inlet and exit variations. The tests were conducted in the Ames Research Center 40 x 80-ft Wind Tunnel. It was found that the cooling air inlet geometry of opposed piston engine installations has a major effect on inlet pressure recovery, but only a minor effect on drag. Exit location showed large effect on drag, especially for those locations on the sides of the nacelle where the suction characteristics were based on interaction with the wing surface pressures.

  3. Exit point in the strong field ionization process

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, I. A.; Nam, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyung Taec

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the process of strong field ionization using the Bohmian approach. This allows retention of the concept of electron trajectories. We consider the tunnelling regime of ionization. We show that, in this regime, the coordinate distribution for the ionized electron has peaks near the points in space that can be interpreted as exit points. The interval of time during which ionization occurs is marked by a quick broadening of the coordinate distribution. The concept of the exit point in the tunneling regime, which has long been assumed for the description of strong field ionization, is justified by our analysis. PMID:28057938

  4. Exit point in the strong field ionization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Nam, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyung Taec

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the process of strong field ionization using the Bohmian approach. This allows retention of the concept of electron trajectories. We consider the tunnelling regime of ionization. We show that, in this regime, the coordinate distribution for the ionized electron has peaks near the points in space that can be interpreted as exit points. The interval of time during which ionization occurs is marked by a quick broadening of the coordinate distribution. The concept of the exit point in the tunneling regime, which has long been assumed for the description of strong field ionization, is justified by our analysis.

  5. Measurement of Initial Conditions at Nozzle Exit of High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    The time averaged and unsteady density fields close to the nozzle exit (0.1 less than or = x/D less than or = 2, x: downstream distance, D: jet diameter) of unheated free jets at Mach numbers of 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8 were measured using a molecular Rayleigh scattering based technique. The initial thickness of shear layer and its linear growth rate were determined from time-averaged density survey and a modeling process, which utilized the Crocco-Busemann equation to relate density profiles to velocity profiles. The model also corrected for the smearing effect caused by a relatively long probe length in the measured density data. The calculated shear layer thickness was further verified from a limited hot-wire measurement. Density fluctuations spectra, measured using a two-Photomultiplier-tube technique, were used to determine evolution of turbulent fluctuations in various Strouhal frequency bands. For this purpose spectra were obtained from a large number of points inside the flow; and at every axial station spectral data from all radial positions were integrated. The radially-integrated fluctuation data show an exponential growth with downstream distance and an eventual saturation in all Strouhal frequency bands. The initial level of density fluctuations was calculated by extrapolation to nozzle exit.

  6. Teachers' Interpretations of Exit Exam Scores and College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' interpretations of Virginia's high school exit exam policy through the teachers' responses to a survey. The survey was administered to teachers from one school district in Northern Virginia. The teachers selected for the survey taught a subject in which students must pass a Standards of Learning (SOL) test in order to…

  7. State High School Exit Examinations and Postsecondary Labor Market Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, John Robert; Grodsky, Eric; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2008-01-01

    Since the late 1970s, an increasing number of states have required students to pass statewide high school exit examinations (HSEEs) in order to graduate. States have usually adopted HSEEs in response to the perception that a substantial number of graduates lack skills that are required for success in the modern economy. What do these educational…

  8. 34 CFR 682.604 - Required exit counseling for borrowers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Required exit counseling for borrowers. 682.604 Section 682.604 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL)...

  9. Outcomes of Primary Teacher Education in Finland: An Exit Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saloviita, Timo; Tolvanen, Asko

    2017-01-01

    Seven final year cohorts of Finnish pre-service primary teachers (N = 384) were given an exit survey, which measured their estimated attainment of knowledge and experience in the 10 domains of professional activity considered critical for new teachers in the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards. The results…

  10. 14 CFR 29.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... self-supporting slide or equivalent, and must be designed to meet the following requirements: (1) It... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo... rotorcraft emergency exit must have an approved slide as stated in paragraph (g) of this section, or...

  11. Control of the mitotic exit network during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Attner, Michelle A; Amon, Angelika

    2012-08-01

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is an essential GTPase signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis in budding yeast. We show here that during meiosis, the MEN is dispensable for exit from meiosis I but contributes to the timely exit from meiosis II. Consistent with a role for the MEN during meiosis II, we find that the signaling pathway is active only during meiosis II. Our analysis further shows that MEN signaling is modulated during meiosis in several key ways. Whereas binding of MEN components to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) is necessary for MEN signaling during mitosis, during meiosis MEN signaling occurs off SPBs and does not require the SPB recruitment factor Nud1. Furthermore, unlike during mitosis, MEN signaling is controlled through the regulated interaction between the MEN kinase Dbf20 and its activating subunit Mob1. Our data lead to the conclusion that a pathway essential for vegetative growth is largely dispensable for the specialized meiotic divisions and provide insights into how cell cycle regulatory pathways are modulated to accommodate different modes of cell division.

  12. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... during all lighting conditions with the landing gear extended as well as in all conditions of landing gear collapse. (b) Each emergency exit must be openable from the inside and the outside except that... attitude and in each of the attitudes corresponding to collapse of one or more legs of the landing...

  13. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... during all lighting conditions with the landing gear extended as well as in all conditions of landing gear collapse. (b) Each emergency exit must be openable from the inside and the outside except that... attitude and in each of the attitudes corresponding to collapse of one or more legs of the landing...

  14. INTERIOR DETAIL OF THE ARENA EXIT GATE AND VERTICAL LOUVERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL OF THE ARENA EXIT GATE AND VERTICAL LOUVERS AT THE TOP OF THE BLEACHER SEATING. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. 3. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING BARGE AFTER EXITING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING BARGE AFTER EXITING FROM DOWNSTREAM END OF NAVIGATION LOCK #1; SWING BRIDGE IS IN PROCESS OF CLOSING. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  16. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. NOTE IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE FEATURES AT RIGHT. LOOKING 248°WSW - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202 Section 431.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... one manufacturer, having the same primary energy source, and which have essentially...

  18. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202 Section 431.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... one manufacturer, having the same primary energy source, and which have essentially...

  19. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202 Section 431.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... one manufacturer, having the same primary energy source, and which have essentially...

  20. View looking out of the Irving Powerhouse showing the exiting ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking out of the Irving Powerhouse showing the exiting water flowing south into the inlet of the Childs System. Looking south - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Irving System, Irving Powerhouse, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  1. 14 CFR 23.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... inches high, be self-illuminated or independently, internally electrically illuminated, and have a... means of opening, must be conspicuously marked; (2) The identity and location of each emergency exit...— (i) Be self-illuminated with an initial brightness of at least 160 microlamberts; or (ii)...

  2. 14 CFR 23.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... inches high, be self-illuminated or independently, internally electrically illuminated, and have a... means of opening, must be conspicuously marked; (2) The identity and location of each emergency exit...— (i) Be self-illuminated with an initial brightness of at least 160 microlamberts; or (ii)...

  3. 14 CFR 23.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... inches high, be self-illuminated or independently, internally electrically illuminated, and have a... means of opening, must be conspicuously marked; (2) The identity and location of each emergency exit...— (i) Be self-illuminated with an initial brightness of at least 160 microlamberts; or (ii)...

  4. Modeling States' Enactment of High School Exit Examination Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, John Robert; Kulick, Rachael B.

    2007-01-01

    We present five frameworks for explaining which U.S. states adopted high school exit examination policies at particular points in time. The frameworks correspond to issues of academic achievement, education spending, economic conditions, racial/ethnic heterogeneity and policy diffusion. Using event history techniques we find that states with…

  5. CA State Profile. California: California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about California High School Exit Examination, a comprehensive standards-based exam. The purpose of the exam is to: (1) Determine prospective high school graduates' knowledge and skill levels relative to those needed for entry-level employment; (2) Determine prospective high school graduates' mastery of the state…

  6. LA State Profile. Louisiana: Graduation Exit Examination (GEE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Louisiana's Graduation Exit Examination, a comprehensive standards-based exam. The purpose of the exam is to: (1) Provide schools with student academic diagnostic information; (2) Determine prospective high school graduates' mastery of the state curriculum; (3) Encourage districts and schools to identify and…

  7. Local wavefield velocity imaging for damage evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Chen Ciang; Gan, Chia Sheng; Mustapha, F.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Propagation Imaging or Acoustic Wavefield Imaging has been widely used to evaluate structural damages and internal features. Inspecting complete wavefield time history for damage identification is tedious and error-prone. A more effective way is by extracting damage-related information into a single image. A wavefield velocity imaging method that maps the local estimates of group or phase velocity is proposed. Actual velocity values rather than arbitrarily-scaled intensities are mapped, enabling damage sizing without the need of supervised training or inspecting wavefield propagation video. Performance of the proposed method was tested by inspecting a 100 mm by 100 mm area of a 2 mm thick stainless steel specimen. Local phase velocity maps of A0 mode showed a half-thickness hole of 2 mm diameter as significant change in local phase velocity from the nominal 2 m/ms. Full width at half maximum of relevant velocity profiles proved the accuracy and consistency of the damage sizing.

  8. Proton exit channels in bovine cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Popović, Dragan M; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2005-02-10

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is the terminal transmembrane enzyme of the respiratory electron transport chain in aerobic cells. It catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and utilizes the free energy of the reduction reaction for proton pumping, a process which results in a membrane electrochemical proton gradient. Although the structure of the enzyme has been solved for several organisms, the molecular mechanism of proton pumping and proton exit pathways remain unknown. In our previous work, the continuum electrostatic calculations were employed to evaluate the electrostatic potential, energies, and protonation state of bovine cytochrome c oxidase for different redox states of the enzyme. A possible mechanism of oxygen reduction and proton pumping via His291 was proposed. In this paper, using electrostatic calculations, we examine the proton exit pathways in the enzyme. By monitoring the changes of the protonation states, proton affinities, and energies of electrostatic interactions between the titratable groups in different redox states of CcO, we identified the clusters of strongly interacting residues. Using these data, we detected four possible proton exit points on the periplasmic side of the membrane (Lys171B/Asp173B, His24B/Asp25B, Asp51, and Asp300). We then were able to trace the proton exit pathways and to evaluate the energy profiles along the paths. On the basis of energetic considerations and the conservation of the residues in a protein sequence, the most likely exit pathway is one via the Lys171B/Asp173B site. The obtained results are fully consistent with our His291 model of proton pumping, and provide a rationale for the absence of proton leaking in CcO between the pumping strokes.

  9. Comparability of Semester and Exit Exam Grades: Long-Term Effect of the Implementation of State-Wide Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maag Merki, Katharina; Holmeier, Monika

    2015-01-01

    A goal in many countries is to institute state-wide exams to base student assessment more firmly on norms for all classes. This raises the question as to the extent to which greater standardization of grading practice can be reached by implementing state-wide exit exams. Since there is a lack of longitudinal studies, we analyzed the effect of the…

  10. Simultaneous measurement of smoothened entry into and exit from the primary cilium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jynho; Hsia, Elaine Y C; Kim, James; Sever, Navdar; Beachy, Philip A; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary accumulation of signaling proteins must result from a rate of ciliary entry that exceeds ciliary exit, but approaches for distinguishing ciliary entry vs. exit are lacking. Using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein tag, we establish an assay that allows a separate but simultaneous examination of ciliary entry and exit of the Hedgehog signaling protein Smoothened in individual cells. We show that KAAD-cyclopamine selectively blocks entry, whereas ciliobrevin interferes initially with exit and eventually with both entry and exit of ciliary Smoothened. Our study provides an approach to understanding regulation of ciliary entry vs. exit of Hedgehog signaling components as well as other ciliary proteins.

  11. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  12. Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance in sunflower canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tha Paw u, Kyaw; Ustin, Susan L.; Zhang, Chang-An

    1989-01-01

    Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance above and within a relatively closed fully irrigated sunflower canopy is detailed. Azimuthal variation in thermal infrared exitance above canopies was weakly (statistically) related to solar position and was comparable to or larger than errors in satellite-based canopy estimates. Anisotropy within canopies was significantly lower and decreased with canopy closure and depth into the canopy. Measured azimuthal isotropy within canopies supports the use of this assumption in radiative transfer models. Significant differences in canopy temperature measurements were found depending upon whether the instruments were within or above the canopy. These differences could produce errors of 20-35 percent in latent energy estimates during periods of high evapotranspiration (ET) and greater errors in periods of restricted ET.

  13. EXIT procedure: a report of the first three Mississippi cases.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Justin; Liechty, Kenneth W; Bofill, James A

    2012-04-01

    The University of Mississippi Medical Center has initiated a state-of-the-art fetal center. This project involves collaboration between multiple disciplines including anesthesiology, pediatric surgery, maternal-fetal medicine, radiology, neonatology, genetics, pediatric cardiology and other pediatric subspecialties, nursing, and social work. Complicated fetal patients from throughout the southeastern U.S.A. may be referred to this center and benefit from new and innovative interventions that have not been available to this region in the past. The first three EXIT (ex-utero intrapartum treatment) procedures were recently performed at Batson Children's Hospital at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Our objective is to share our recent experiences with this novel procedure and to detail some of the basics of an EXIT delivery.

  14. The exit-time problem for a Markov jump process

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, N.; D'Elia, Marta; Lehoucq, Richard B.

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of our paper is to consider the exit-time problem for a finite-range Markov jump process, i.e, the distance the particle can jump is bounded independent of its location. Such jump diffusions are expedient models for anomalous transport exhibiting super-diffusion or nonstandard normal diffusion. We refer to the associated deterministic equation as a volume-constrained nonlocal diffusion equation. The volume constraint is the nonlocal analogue of a boundary condition necessary to demonstrate that the nonlocal diffusion equation is well-posed and is consistent with the jump process. A critical aspect of the analysis is a variational formulation and a recently developed nonlocal vector calculus. Furthermore, this calculus allows us to pose nonlocal backward and forward Kolmogorov equations, the former equation granting the various moments of the exit-time distribution.

  15. Simulation of stochastic diffusion via first exit times

    SciTech Connect

    Lötstedt, Per Meinecke, Lina

    2015-11-01

    In molecular biology it is of interest to simulate diffusion stochastically. In the mesoscopic model we partition a biological cell into unstructured subvolumes. In each subvolume the number of molecules is recorded at each time step and molecules can jump between neighboring subvolumes to model diffusion. The jump rates can be computed by discretizing the diffusion equation on that unstructured mesh. If the mesh is of poor quality, due to a complicated cell geometry, standard discretization methods can generate negative jump coefficients, which no longer allows the interpretation as the probability to jump between the subvolumes. We propose a method based on the mean first exit time of a molecule from a subvolume, which guarantees positive jump coefficients. Two approaches to exit times, a global and a local one, are presented and tested in simulations on meshes of different quality in two and three dimensions.

  16. Simulation of stochastic diffusion via first exit times

    PubMed Central

    Lötstedt, Per; Meinecke, Lina

    2015-01-01

    In molecular biology it is of interest to simulate diffusion stochastically. In the mesoscopic model we partition a biological cell into unstructured subvolumes. In each subvolume the number of molecules is recorded at each time step and molecules can jump between neighboring subvolumes to model diffusion. The jump rates can be computed by discretizing the diffusion equation on that unstructured mesh. If the mesh is of poor quality, due to a complicated cell geometry, standard discretization methods can generate negative jump coefficients, which no longer allows the interpretation as the probability to jump between the subvolumes. We propose a method based on the mean first exit time of a molecule from a subvolume, which guarantees positive jump coefficients. Two approaches to exit times, a global and a local one, are presented and tested in simulations on meshes of different quality in two and three dimensions. PMID:26600600

  17. Limit of small exits in open Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Jacobo; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2003-05-01

    The nature of open Hamiltonian systems is analyzed, when the size of the exits decreases and tends to zero. Fractal basins appear typically in open Hamiltonian systems, but we claim that in the limit of small exits, the invariant sets tend to fill up the whole phase space with the strong consequence that a new kind of basin appears, where the unpredictability grows indefinitely. This means that for finite, arbitrarily small accuracy, we can find uncertain basins, where any information about the future of the system is lost. This total indeterminism had only been reported in dissipative systems, in particular in the so-called intermingled riddled basins, as well as in the riddledlike basins. We show that this peculiar, behavior is a general feature of open Hamiltonian systems.

  18. Exit probability of the one-dimensional q-voter model: Analytical results and simulations for large networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpanaro, André M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the exit probability of the one-dimensional q-voter model and present tools to obtain estimates about this probability, both through simulations in large networks (around 107 sites) and analytically in the limit where the network is infinitely large. We argue that the result E(ρ )=ρq/ρq+(1-ρ)q, that was found in three previous works [F. Slanina, K. Sznajd-Weron, and P. Przybyła, Europhys. Lett. 82, 18006 (2008), 10.1209/0295-5075/82/18006; R. Lambiotte and S. Redner, Europhys. Lett. 82, 18007 (2008), 10.1209/0295-5075/82/18007, for the case q =2; and P. Przybyła, K. Sznajd-Weron, and M. Tabiszewski, Phys. Rev. E 84, 031117 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.031117, for q >2] using small networks (around 103 sites), is a good approximation, but there are noticeable deviations that appear even for small systems and that do not disappear when the system size is increased (with the notable exception of the case q =2). We also show that, under some simple and intuitive hypotheses, the exit probability must obey the inequality ρq/ρq+(1-ρ)≤E(ρ)≤ρ/ρ +(1-ρ)q in the infinite size limit. We believe this settles in the negative the suggestion made [S. Galam and A. C. R. Martins, Europhys. Lett. 95, 48005 (2001), 10.1209/0295-5075/95/48005] that this result would be a finite size effect, with the exit probability actually being a step function. We also show how the result that the exit probability cannot be a step function can be reconciled with the Galam unified frame, which was also a source of controversy.

  19. Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Large-Scale, Supersonic, Heated Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Magnotti, G.; Bivolaru, D.; Tedder, S.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    Two laser-based measurement techniques have been used to characterize an axisymmetric, combustion-heated supersonic jet issuing into static room air. The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurement technique measured temperature and concentration while the interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) method simultaneously measured two components of velocity. This paper reports a preliminary analysis of CARS-IRS temperature and velocity measurements from selected measurement locations. The temperature measurements show that the temperature along the jet axis remains constant while dropping off radially. The velocity measurements show that the nozzle exit velocity fluctuations are about 3% of the maximum velocity in the flow.

  20. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-08-29

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55's dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis.

  1. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55’s dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis. PMID:27551057

  2. Crew of STS 41-D mission exit orbiter after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The crew of the STS 41-D mission exit the orbiter after landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Starting at the top of the ladder is Astronaut Charles D. Walker, payload specialist; Judith A. Resnik, mission specialist; Steven A. Hawley, mission specialist; and Richard M. Mike Mullane, mission specialist. Waiting at the bottom of the ramp are Astronaut Mike Coats (left), pilot and Henry W. Hartsfield, Jr. (center), crew commander.

  3. 30. VIEW OF ROOM 212 LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARDS EXIT DOORS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF ROOM 212 LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARDS EXIT DOORS. EXPOSED MASONRY WALL WITH BRICK DETAILING OVER ARCHED DOORWAY IS UNPAINTED. ORIGINAL USE OF ROOM 212 WAS AS A HAYLOFT; EXTERIOR DOOR WAS USED FOR LOADING HAY. TRUSSWORK AND BEAMS ARE EXPOSED AND UNPAINTED. WALLS HAVE PAINTED WOOD PANELING, CEILING MATERIAL IS EXPOSED WOOD ROOF SHEATHING. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Graceful exit via polymerization of pre-big-bang cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    De Risi, Giuseppe; Maartens, Roy; Singh, Parampreet

    2007-11-15

    We consider a phenomenological modification of the pre-big-bang scenario using ideas from the resolution of curvature singularities in loop quantum cosmology. We show that nonperturbative loop modifications to the dynamics, arising from the underlying polymer representation, can resolve the graceful exit problem. The curvature and the dilaton energy stay finite at all times, in both the string and Einstein frames. In the string frame, the dilaton tends to a constant value at late times after the bounce.

  5. The EXIT for Prenatally Diagnosed Cervical Cystic Teratoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cansaran, Sabri; Cerrah Celayir, Ayşenur; Moralıoğlu, Serdar; Ayvacı, Habibe; Tuğrul, Semih; Ovalı, Fahri; Çetiner, Handan

    2015-01-01

    The Ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) is a procedure performed during caesarean section while on fetal-placental circulation. We present a prenatally diagnosed cervical cystic mass causing tracheal compression which was managed successfully with the EXIT procedure.

  6. 29 CFR 1910.35 - Compliance with alternate exit-route codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit Routes and Emergency Planning § 1910.35...-route provisions of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, 2009 edition, or the exit-route provisions of...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.35 - Compliance with alternate exit-route codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit Routes and Emergency Planning § 1910.35...-route provisions of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, 2009 edition, or the exit-route provisions of...

  8. PKCɛ switches Aurora B specificity to exit the abscission checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Tanya; Brownlow, Nicola; Kjaer, Svend; Carlton, Jeremy; Parker, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The ‘NoCut', or Aurora B abscission checkpoint can be activated if DNA is retained in the cleavage furrow after completion of anaphase. Checkpoint failure leads to incomplete abscission and a binucleate outcome. These phenotypes are also observed after loss of PKCɛ in transformed cell models. Here we show that PKCɛ directly modulates the Aurora B-dependent abscission checkpoint by phosphorylating Aurora B at S227. This phosphorylation invokes a switch in Aurora B specificity, with increased phosphorylation of a subset of target substrates, including the CPC subunit Borealin. This switch is essential for abscission checkpoint exit. Preventing the phosphorylation of Borealin leads to abscission failure, as does expression of a non-phosphorylatable Aurora B S227A mutant. Further, depletion of the ESCRT-III component and Aurora B substrate CHMP4C enables abscission, bypassing the PKCɛ–Aurora B exit pathway. Thus, we demonstrate that PKCɛ signals through Aurora B to exit the abscission checkpoint and complete cell division. PMID:28004745

  9. Modeling of Fixed-Exit Porous Bleed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, John D.

    2008-01-01

    A model has been developed to simulate a fixed-exit porous bleed system for supersonic inlets. The fixed-exit model allows the amount of bleed flow to vary according to local flow conditions and fixed-exit characteristics of the bleed system. This variation is important for the control of shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions within the inlet. The model computes the bleed plenum static pressure rather than requiring its specification. The model was implemented in the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics code. The model was then verified and validated against experimental data for bleed on a flat plate with and without an impinging oblique shock and for bleed in a Mach 3.0 axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet. The model was able to accurately correlate the plenum pressures with bleed rates and simulate the effect of the bleed on the downstream boundary layer. Further, the model provided a realistic simulation of the initiation of inlet unstart. The results provide the most in-depth examination to date of bleed models for use in the simulation of supersonic inlets. The results also highlight the limitations of the models and aspects that require further research.

  10. PKCɛ switches Aurora B specificity to exit the abscission checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Pike, Tanya; Brownlow, Nicola; Kjaer, Svend; Carlton, Jeremy; Parker, Peter J

    2016-12-22

    The 'NoCut', or Aurora B abscission checkpoint can be activated if DNA is retained in the cleavage furrow after completion of anaphase. Checkpoint failure leads to incomplete abscission and a binucleate outcome. These phenotypes are also observed after loss of PKCɛ in transformed cell models. Here we show that PKCɛ directly modulates the Aurora B-dependent abscission checkpoint by phosphorylating Aurora B at S227. This phosphorylation invokes a switch in Aurora B specificity, with increased phosphorylation of a subset of target substrates, including the CPC subunit Borealin. This switch is essential for abscission checkpoint exit. Preventing the phosphorylation of Borealin leads to abscission failure, as does expression of a non-phosphorylatable Aurora B S227A mutant. Further, depletion of the ESCRT-III component and Aurora B substrate CHMP4C enables abscission, bypassing the PKCɛ-Aurora B exit pathway. Thus, we demonstrate that PKCɛ signals through Aurora B to exit the abscission checkpoint and complete cell division.

  11. The Three Dimensional Flow Field at the Exit of an Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Ristic, D.; Chu, S.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic and comprehensive investigation was performed to provide detailed data on the three dimensional viscous flow phenomena downstream of a modem turbine rotor and to understand the flow physics such as origin, nature, development of wakes, secondary flow, and leakage flow. The experiment was carried out in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) at Penn State, with velocity measurements taken with a 3-D LDV System. Two radial traverses at 1% and 10% of chord downstream of the rotor have been performed to identify the three-dimensional flow features at the exit of the rotor blade row. Sufficient spatial resolution was maintained to resolve blade wake, secondary flow, and tip leakage flow. The wake deficit is found to be substantial, especially at 1% of chord downstream of the rotor. At this location, negative axial velocity occurs near the tip, suggesting flow separation in the tip clearance region. Turbulence intensities peak in the wake region, and cross- correlations are mainly associated with the velocity gradient of the wake deficit. The radial velocities, both in the wake and in the endwall region, are found to be substantial. Two counter-rotating secondary flows are identified in the blade passage, with one occupying the half span close to the casino and the other occupying the half span close to the hub. The tip leakage flow is well restricted to 10% immersion from the blade tip. There are strong vorticity distributions associated with these secondary flows and tip leakage flow. The passage averaged data are in good agreement with design values.

  12. The Effect of Family on the Job Exits of Young Adults: A Competing Risk Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenigsberg, Judy; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Event history analysis and a competing risk model of occupational attainment indicate that, for men, marriage and children at job entry have negative effects on job exits; for women, they negatively affect exits to attend school but positively affect exits for other reasons, suggesting that young women with children may consider parenting their…

  13. The Effects of Visual Barriers on Exiting Behavior in a Dementia Care Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Joan Ivers; And Others

    1995-01-01

    To control wanderers' exiting, the view and light through a window were manipulated using visual barriers: window blind, cloth barrier, and a combination of the two. The closed blind decreased exiting by 44% while the cloth barrier was 96% effective. Combining the blind and cloth barrier lessened exiting by 88%. (RJM)

  14. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the initial motion to open the exit by not less than 90° and no more than 180°. (a) Low-force...-force access regions shown in Figures 2 and 3 for an emergency exit window. (2) Type of motion: Straight... degrees and not more than 180 degrees from the direction of the initial motion to open the exit. The...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.106 - Exit facilities; egress windows and devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exit facilities; egress windows and... § 3280.106 Exit facilities; egress windows and devices. (a) Every room designed expressly for sleeping purposes, unless it has an exit door (see § 3280.105), shall have at least one outside window or...

  16. 24 CFR 3280.106 - Exit facilities; egress windows and devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exit facilities; egress windows and... § 3280.106 Exit facilities; egress windows and devices. (a) Every room designed expressly for sleeping purposes, unless it has an exit door (see § 3280.105), shall have at least one outside window or...

  17. 24 CFR 3280.106 - Exit facilities; egress windows and devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exit facilities; egress windows and... § 3280.106 Exit facilities; egress windows and devices. (a) Every room designed expressly for sleeping purposes, unless it has an exit door (see § 3280.105), shall have at least one outside window or...

  18. 24 CFR 3280.106 - Exit facilities; egress windows and devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exit facilities; egress windows and... § 3280.106 Exit facilities; egress windows and devices. (a) Every room designed expressly for sleeping purposes, unless it has an exit door (see § 3280.105), shall have at least one outside window or...

  19. State High School Exit Exams: Trends in Test Programs, Alternate Pathways, and Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-01-01

    The report draws from Center on Education Policy's eight-year study of high school exit exams to identify long-term trends in state policies and student performance. It highlights a growing trend among states to establish alternate pathways to graduation for students who are struggling to pass exit exams. The report also analyzes exit exam pass…

  20. Mean Velocity, Turbulence Intensity and Turbulence Convection Velocity Measurements for a Convergent Nozzle in a Free Jet Wind Tunnel. Comprehensive Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccolgan, C. J.; Larson, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of flight on the mean flow and turbulence properties of a 0.056m circular jet were determined in a free jet wind tunnel. The nozzle exit velocity was 122 m/sec, and the wind tunnel velocity was set at 0, 12, 37, and 61 m/sec. Measurements of flow properties including mean velocity, turbulence intensity and spectra, and eddy convection velocity were carried out using two linearized hot wire anemometers. This report contains the raw data and graphical presentations. The final technical report includes a description of the test facilities, test hardware, along with significant test results and conclusions.

  1. Velocity Distribution in the Boundary Layer of a Submerged Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, M

    1930-01-01

    This report deals with the measurement of the velocity distribution of the air in the velocity of a plate placed parallel to the air flow. The measurements took place in a small wind tunnel where the diameter of the entrance cone is 30 cm and the length of the free jet between the entrance and exit cones is about 2.5 m. The measurements were made in the free jet where the static pressure was constant, which was essential for the method of measurement used.

  2. Measurements of temperature profiles at the exit of small rockets.

    PubMed

    Griggs, M; Harshbarger, F C

    1966-02-01

    The sodium line reversal technique was used to determine the reversal temperature profile across the exit of small rockets. Measurements were made on one 73-kg thrust rocket, and two 23-kg thrust rockets with different injectors. The large rocket showed little variation of reversal temperature across the plume. However, the 23-kg rockets both showed a large decrease of reversal temperature from the axis to the edge of the plume. In addition, the sodium line reversal technique of temperature measurement was compared with an infrared technique developed in these laboratories.

  3. STS-110 crew members during emergency exit exercise during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-110 crew members practice emergency exit from the Fixed Service Structure during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. From left are Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, Lee M.E. Morin and Steven L. Smith. TCDT also includes a simulated launch countdown and is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  4. Expedition 4 crew practice emergency exit on PAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Expedition 4 crew practice emergency exit from Space Shuttle Endeavour on the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure. Leading the way is astronaut Carl E. Walz, followed by Commander Yuri Onufrienko and astronaut Daniel W. Bursch. Expedition 4, which is the replacement resident crew for the International Space Station, is traveling to the Space Station as part of mission STS-108. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a simulated launch countdown.. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-108 is scheduled for Nov. 29 at 7:44 p.m. EST.

  5. Lessons learned in dealing with self luminous exit signs.

    PubMed

    Linsley, Mark E

    2005-02-01

    Self-luminous signs are generally licensed consumer products used to identifying exits, handicap accessibility areas, parking lots, no smoking areas, life boat locations, and emergency stair locations. While purchasers of these signs are exempt from the requirement of applying for a specific license, they are not exempt from all other requirements concerning radioactive material. And they might not be exempt from the liability that can result from lost or damaged signs and improper disposal. A review of the potential for contamination from these signs is presented along with suggestions for handling a contaminating event involving a damaged sign.

  6. Video Measurement of the Muzzle Velocity of a Potato Gun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasperson, Christopher; Pollman, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Using first principles, a theoretical equation for the maximum and actual muzzle velocities for a pneumatic cannon was recently derived. For a fixed barrel length, this equation suggests that the muzzle velocity can be enhanced by maximizing the product of the initial pressure and the volume of the propellant gas and decreasing the projectile…

  7. Optimisation of the mean boat velocity in rowing.

    PubMed

    Rauter, G; Baumgartner, L; Denoth, J; Riener, R; Wolf, P

    2012-01-01

    In rowing, motor learning may be facilitated by augmented feedback that displays the ratio between actual mean boat velocity and maximal achievable mean boat velocity. To provide this ratio, the aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm calculating an individual maximal mean boat velocity. The algorithm optimised the horizontal oar movement under constraints such as the individual range of the horizontal oar displacement, individual timing of catch and release and an individual power-angle relation. Immersion and turning of the oar were simplified, and the seat movement of a professional rower was implemented. The feasibility of the algorithm, and of the associated ratio between actual boat velocity and optimised boat velocity, was confirmed by a study on four subjects: as expected, advanced rowing skills resulted in higher ratios, and the maximal mean boat velocity depended on the range of the horizontal oar displacement.

  8. Conservation of extrusion as an exit mechanism for Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Zuck, Meghan; Sherrid, Ashley; Suchland, Robert; Ellis, Tisha; Hybiske, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Chlamydiae exit via membrane-encased extrusion or through lysis of the host cell. Extrusions are novel, pathogen-containing structures that confer infectious advantages to Chlamydia, and are hypothesized to promote cell-to-cell spread, dissemination to distant tissues and facilitate immune evasion. The extrusion phenomenon has been characterized for several Chlamydia trachomatis serovars, but a thorough investigation of extrusion for additional clinically relevant C. trachomatis strains and Chlamydia species has yet to be performed. The key parameters investigated in this study were: (i) the conservation of extrusion across the Chlamydia genus, (ii) the functional requirement for candidate Chlamydia genes in extrusion formation i.e. IncA and CT228 and (iii) extrusion-mediated uptake, and consequent survival of Chlamydia inside macrophages. Inclusion morphology was characterized by live fluorescence microscopy, using an inverted GFP strategy, at early and mid-stages of infection. Enriched extrusions were used to infect bone marrow-derived macrophages, and bacterial viability was measured following macrophage engulfment. Our results demonstrate that extrusion is highly conserved across chlamydiae, including ocular, STD and LGV biovars and divergent Chlamydia species. Consequently, this exit mechanism for Chlamydia may fulfill common advantages important for pathogenesis.

  9. Steam exit flow design for aft cavities of an airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, James Michael; Tesh, Stephen William

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. A skirt or flange structure is provided for shielding the steam cooling impingement holes adjacent the inner wall aerofoil fillet region of the nozzle from the steam flow exiting the aft nozzle cavities. Moreover, the gap between the flash rib boss and the cavity insert is controlled to minimize the flow of post impingement cooling media therebetween. This substantially confines outflow to that exiting via the return channels, thus furthermore minimizing flow in the vicinity of the aerofoil fillet region that may adversely affect impingement cooling thereof.

  10. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  11. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-11-20

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ∼270 yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (∼100 km s{sup –1}) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (≲ 10 km s{sup –1}) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation.

  12. No Exit: An Evaluation of Measures of Physician Attrition

    PubMed Central

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Mertz, Elizabeth; Keane, Dennis; Grumbach, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To validate physicians' self-reported intentions to leave clinical practice and the American Medical Association (AMA) Masterfile practice status variable as measures of physician attrition, and to determine predictors of intention to leave, and actual departure from, clinical practice. Data Sources Survey of specialist physicians in urban California (1998); the AMA Physician Masterfile (2001); and direct ascertainment of physician practice status (2001). Study Design Physicians' intention to leave clinical practice by 2001 (self-reported in 1998) was tested as a measure of each physician's actual practice status in 2001 (directly ascertained). Physician practice status according to the 2001 AMA Masterfile was also tested as a measure of physicians' actual practice status in 2001. Multivariate regression was used to predict both physicians' intentions to leave clinical practice and their actual departure. Data Collection/Extraction Methods AMA Masterfile data on 2001 practice status were obtained for 967 of 968 physician respondents to the 1998 survey. Actual practice status for 2001 was directly ascertained for 957. Principal Findings The sensitivity of Masterfile practice status as a measure of actual departure from clinical practice was 9.0 percent, and the positive predictive value was 52.9 percent. Allowing for a two-year reporting lag did not change this substantially. Self-reported intention to leave clinical practice had a sensitivity of 73.3 percent and a positive predictive value of 35.4 percent as a measure of actual departure from practice. The strongest predictor of both intention to leave clinical practice and actual departure from practice was older age. Physician dissatisfaction had a strong association (OR=5.6) with intention to leave clinical practice, but was not associated with actual departure from practice. Conclusions Our findings call into question the accuracy of both AMA Masterfile data and physicians' self-reported intentions to

  13. Maximum forces sustained during various methods of exiting commercial tractors, trailers and trucks.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, F A; Cotnam, J P

    2000-02-01

    Many commercial vehicles have steps and grab-rails to assist the driver in safely entering/exiting the vehicle. However, many drivers do not use these aids. The purpose of this study was to compare impact forces experienced during various exit methods from commercial equipment. The study investigated impact forces of ten male subjects while exiting two tractors, a step-van, a box-trailer, and a cube-van. The results showed that exiting from cab-level or trailer-level resulted in impact forces as high as 12 times the subject's body weight; whereas, fully utilizing the steps and grab-rails resulted in impact forces less than two times body weight. An approach that emphasizes optimal design of entry/exit aids coupled with driver training and education is expected to minimize exit-related injuries.

  14. High-voltage suicidal electrocution with multiple exit wounds.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Patra, Ambika Prasad; Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Jena, Manoj Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Poisoning, hanging, and burning are the usual methods adopted by people to commit suicide. Suicide by electrocution and that too high voltage is one of the rarest methods adopted for the purpose. We report the case of a young man who committed suicide by climbing up a 25-ft-high electric pole. The deceased was a regular alcoholic and was under severe depression for a long time because of his personal problems. He survived for more than 2 days after the incident. His serum urea and creatinine levels were elevated, so were the creatine kinase total and creatine kinase-MB level. The method adopted and the findings make this case a rare scientific report. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in an English scientific literature of a high-voltage suicidal electrocution with multiple exit wounds. The circumstances surrounding the manner of electrocution and the features of electric injuries are presented and discussed.

  15. Focal para-hisian atrial tachycardia with dual exits

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance Jesuraj, M.; Sharada, K.; Sridevi, C.; Narasimhan, C.

    2013-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardias (AT) in the right atrium (RA) tend to cluster around the crista terminalis, coronary sinus (CS) region, tricuspid annulus, and para-hisian region. In most cases, the AT focus can be identified by careful activation mapping, and completely eliminated by radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation. However, RF ablation near the His bundle (HB) carries a risk of inadvertent damage to the atrioventricular (AV) conduction system. Here we describe a patient with an AT originating in the vicinity of the AV node, which was successfully ablated earlier from non-coronary aortic cusp (NCC), and recurred with an exit from para-hisian location. Respiratory excursions of the catheter were associated with migration to the area of HIs. This was successfully ablated during controlled apnoea, using 3D electroanatomic mapping. PMID:23993015

  16. Trajectories of Depression Symptoms among Older Youths Exiting Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Munson, Michelle R; McMillen, Curtis

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the trajectories of depressive symptoms as older youths from the foster care system mature while also examining the correlates of these trajectories. Data came from a longitudinal study of 404 youths from the foster care system in Missouri, who were interviewed nine times between their 17th and 19th birthdays. Depression was assessed with the Depression Outcomes Module and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for DSM-IV. Data best fit a model of three trajectory classes, describing young people (1) maintaining low levels of depressive symptoms (never depressed class, 78%), (2) with increasing symptoms (increasing class, 6%), and (3) with decreasing symptoms (decreasing class, 15%). The increasing depression group was mostly male youths who were working or in school; the decreasing class was mostly highly maltreated female youths exiting the foster care system from residential care, with low levels of employment, and in school. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  17. Thermal IR exitance model of a plant canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Smith, J. A.; Link, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A thermal IR exitance model of a plant canopy based on a mathematical abstraction of three horizontal layers of vegetation was developed. Canopy geometry within each layer is quantitatively described by the foliage and branch orientation distributions and number density. Given this geometric information for each layer and the driving meteorological variables, a system of energy budget equations was determined and solved for average layer temperatures. These estimated layer temperatures, together with the angular distributions of radiating elements, were used to calculate the emitted thermal IR radiation as a function of view angle above the canopy. The model was applied to a lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) canopy over a diurnal cycle. Simulated vs measured radiometric average temperatures of the midcanopy layer corresponded with 2 C. Simulation results suggested that canopy geometry can significantly influence the effective radiant temperature recorded at varying sensor view angles.

  18. The geometry of the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Voss, N R; Gerstein, M; Steitz, T A; Moore, P B

    2006-07-21

    The geometry of the polypeptide exit tunnel has been determined using the crystal structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Haloarcula marismortui. The tunnel is a component of a much larger, interconnected system of channels accessible to solvent that permeates the subunit and is connected to the exterior at many points. Since water and other small molecules can diffuse into and out of the tunnel along many different trajectories, the large subunit cannot be part of the seal that keeps ions from passing through the ribosome-translocon complex. The structure referred to as the tunnel is the only passage in the solvent channel system that is both large enough to accommodate nascent peptides, and that traverses the particle. For objects of that size, it is effectively an unbranched tube connecting the peptidyl transferase center of the large subunit and the site where nascent peptides emerge. At no point is the tunnel big enough to accommodate folded polypeptides larger than alpha-helices.

  19. Predicting NCLEX-PN success with the HESI Exit Exam.

    PubMed

    Young, Anne; Willson, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Surveys were mailed to directors of 72 randomly selected practical nursing (PN) schools that administered Elsevier's HESI Exit Exam for Practical Nurses (E2-PN) during the 2006-2007 academic year. Data were collected regarding students' NCLEX-PN outcomes and the schools' benchmarking and remediation policies. The first version of the E2-PN was 99.48% accurate in predicting NCLEX-PN success. Versions two and three of the E2-PN, which were administered to students who were remediated because they did not achieve the faculty-designated benchmark, were also highly accurate in predicting NCLEX-PN success. Most faculties set 850 as their school's E2-PN benchmark, and 73% of the respondents required remediation for students who did not achieve the benchmark score. The most frequently cited remediation strategy was tutoring.

  20. Management of the critical airway when an EXIT procedure is not an option: A case report.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Gillian R; Hartnick, Christopher J; Bates, Sara V

    2015-12-01

    Perinatal imaging facilitates detection of congenital head and neck masses to plan fetal procedures which secure the airway. Ex utero intrapartum therapy (EXIT) procedures are preferred to protect the neonatal airway. Herein we present a case in which a neonate with a large oropharyngeal lymphovascular malformation was delivered and the airway successfully managed without an EXIT procedure using a multidisciplinary approach. Preparations for the non-EXIT delivery and critical airway management are described.

  1. Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neyer, Barry T.

    1988-04-01

    This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

  2. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  3. Solute Transport in Soils Under Conditions of Variable Flow Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liwang; Selim, H. M.

    1996-11-01

    Temporal and spatial variabilities of flow distribution significantly influence solute transport in soils. This laboratory study was designed to investigate the effects of temporal variation in flow velocity on pesticide transport in soils. Two pesticides, metribuzin (weakly adsorbed) and atrazine (moderately adsorbed), were chosen along with the following two soils: Cecil (<2 mm) and Sharkey (2-4 mm). Several tritium pulses were introduced into packed soil columns (15 or 30 cm in length) under different flow velocities to obtain velocity-dependent dispersion coefficients (D). Subsequently, several atrazine and metribuzin pulses were introduced under conditions of constant and variable velocities. For each experiment, changes in flow velocity were stepwise using a piston flow pump and were carried out during pulse application and leaching. For constant and variable flow velocity experiments, approximately similar pulse volumes and average flow velocities were maintained. Values of D versus pore water velocity (ν) from tritium breakthrough curves (BTCs) were well described using a linear equation for both soils. Identical BTCs for metribuzin were observed under conditions of constant or variable flow velocities in the Cecil soil column. However, metribuzin transport in the Sharkey soil was significantly influenced by velocity variations. Atrazine transport in the Sharkey soil was also significantly affected by variations in flow velocity. We further examined the error when an average rather than actual velocity distribution was used in BTC representation. The resulting experimental BTCs (concentration versus velocity-averaged pore volume) exhibited early arrival and the appearance of multiple peaks. Moreover, predictions of such BTCs based on the convective-dispersive equation were not successful. We concluded that actual water velocity distributions should be used in BTC representation, and, whenever possible, the use of an average velocity should be avoided.

  4. Imaging the radical channel in acetaldehyde photodissociation: Competing mechanisms at energies close to the triplet exit barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, G. A.; Arregui, A.; Rodriguez, J. D.; Banares, L.; Rubio-Lago, L.

    2010-08-14

    The photodissociation of acetaldehyde in the radical channel has been studied at wavelengths between 315 and 325 nm using the velocity-map imaging technique. Upon one-photon absorption at 315 nm, the molecule is excited to the first singlet excited state S{sub 1}, which, in turn, undergoes intersystem crossing to the first excited triplet state T{sub 1}. On the triplet surface, the molecule dissociates into CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals with large kinetic energy release (KER), in accordance with the well characterized exit barrier on T{sub 1}. However, at longer wavelengths (>320 nm), which correspond to excitation energies just below the triplet barrier, a sudden change in KER is observed. At these photolysis wavelengths, there is not enough energy to surpass the exit barrier on the triplet state, which leaves the possibility of unimolecular dissociation on S{sub 0} after internal conversion from S{sub 1}. We have characterized the fragments' KER at these wavelengths, as well as determined the energy partitioning for the radical fragments. A new accurate estimate of the barrier height on T{sub 1} is presented.

  5. Effects of forward velocity on turbulent jet mixing noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    Flight simulation experiments were conducted in an anechoic free jet facility over a broad range of model and free jet velocities. The resulting scaling laws were in close agreement with scaling laws derived from theoretical and semiempirical considerations. Additionally, measurements of the flow structure of jets were made in a wind tunnel by using a laser velocimeter. These tests were conducted to describe the effects of velocity ratio and jet exit Mach number on the development of a jet in a coflowing stream. These turbulence measurements and a simplified Lighthill radiation model were used in predicting the variation in radiated noise at 90 deg to the jet axis with velocity ratio. Finally, the influence of forward motion on flow-acoustic interactions was examined through a reinterpretation of the 'static' numerical solutions to the Lilley equation.

  6. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  7. Radio Frequency Oscillator Technique for Monitoring Velocity and Structural Integrity of Projectiles during Their Exit from the Muzzle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    microwave interferometer/ Doppler radar Most of these methods are based on recording the time required for the projectile to pass through two or more points...passage of the Shockwave and the compressed gases behind it. We have also observed this baseline modulation in the data sets for the other two gun

  8. Velocity reversals and sediment sorting in pools and riffles controlled by channel constrictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, D.M.; Wohl, E.E.; Jarrett, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Keller [Keller, E.A., 1971. Areal sorting of bed-load material; the hypothesis of velocity reversal. Geological Society of America Bulletin 82, 753-756] hypothesized that at high flow, near-bed velocities in pools exceed velocities in riffles and create pool scour. Pools, however, typically have larger cross-sectional areas of flow at bankfull discharge. This condition raises an inconsistency with Keller's velocity reversal hypothesis and the one-dimensional continuity of mass equation. To address this problem, a model of pool maintenance and sediment sorting is proposed that relies on constriction of flow by recirculating eddies and flow divergence over the exit-slopes of pools. According to the model, a narrow zone of high velocity occurs in the center of pools, creating scour. Along the downstream end of pools, an uphill climb of particles up the pool exit-slope promotes sediment deposition. The model is tested with field and flume measurements of velocity, water-surface elevation, and size of bed sediments in recirculating-eddy influenced pools. Local reversals of the water-surface gradient were measured in the field and a velocity reversal was created in the flume. The reversals that were measured indicate higher gradients of the water surface over the upstream portions of pools and higher velocities in pools at high flow. The distribution of bed sediments collected in the field also support the proposed model of pool maintenance.

  9. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... General Provisions § 13.1312 Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. Except for areas designated by the Superintendent, climbing or walking on, in, or under Exit Glacier is prohibited within 1/2 mile of the...

  10. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... General Provisions § 13.1312 Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. Except for areas designated by the Superintendent, climbing or walking on, in, or under Exit Glacier is prohibited within 1/2 mile of the...

  11. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... General Provisions § 13.1312 Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. Except for areas designated by the Superintendent, climbing or walking on, in, or under Exit Glacier is prohibited within 1/2 mile of the...

  12. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... General Provisions § 13.1312 Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. Except for areas designated by the Superintendent, climbing or walking on, in, or under Exit Glacier is prohibited within 1/2 mile of the...

  13. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... General Provisions § 13.1312 Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. Except for areas designated by the Superintendent, climbing or walking on, in, or under Exit Glacier is prohibited within 1/2 mile of the...

  14. 14 CFR 91.607 - Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency exits for airplanes carrying... Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, no person may operate a large airplane (type certificated under the Civil Air...

  15. Early Childhood Special Education Exit Decisions: How Are They Made? How Are They Evaluated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlow, Martha L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Policy issues for early childhood special education programs in the areas of exit decision-making and follow-up procedures were generated through extensive naturalistic case studies of four early childhood education programs. Guidelines for exit decision-making and follow-up procedures conclude the report. (Author/DB)

  16. EXIT procedure in a neonate with a prenatally diagnosed granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Steffi; Till, Holger; Stepan, Holger

    2010-09-01

    Congenital oral tumor masses might cause ventilation problems in the neonate. We report the first case of an EXIT procedure performed in a fetal granular cell tumor arising from the maxilla that was diagnosed prenatally followed by surgical correction on the 4th day of life. The EXIT procedure is an elegant approach to optimize perinatal airway management in such tumors.

  17. Ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT), a resuscitation option for intra-thoracic foetal pathologies.

    PubMed

    Kern, C; Ange, M; Morales; Peiry, B; Pfister, R E

    2007-05-19

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure is designed to guarantee sufficient oxygenation for a foetus at risk of airway obstruction. This is achieved by improving lung ventilation, usually by establishing an airway during caesarean delivery whilst preserving the foetal-placental circulation temporarily. Indications for the EXIT procedure have extended from its original use in reversing iatrogenic tracheal obstruction in congenital diaphragmatic hernia to naturally occurring upper airway obstructions. We report our experience with a new and rarely mentioned indication for the EXIT procedure, intra-thoracic volume expansions. The elaboration of lowest risk scenarios through balancing risks with alternative options, foetal or neonatal intervention and coordination between professionals from various disciplines are the most important conditions for a successful EXIT procedure. The EXIT procedure requires a caesarean section that specifically differs from the traditional caesarean section during which uterine tone is maintained to minimize maternal bleeding. To guarantee foetal oxygenation during the EXIT procedure, profound uterine relaxation is desired. To gain time with optimal placental oxygenation in order to safely perform an airway intervention in a baby at risk of hypoxia may require deep inhalation anaesthesia and/or tocolytic agents. We review the EXIT procedure and present a case series from the University Hospital of Geneva that contrasts with the common indication for the EXIT procedure usually based on upper airway obstruction by its exclusive indication for intra-thoracic malformations/diseases.

  18. Exit pupil expander: image quality performance enhancements and environmental testing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Karlton D.; Lopez, Peggy A.; Malik, Amjad

    2003-09-01

    The numerical aperture of the light emanating from display pixels in a given display system determines the exit pupil size. In retinal scanning displays, the exit pupil is defined by the scanner optics, creating a rastered, projected image at an intermediate plane, typically resulting in an exit pupil approximately the size of an eye's pupil. Positional freedom of the eye and relative display placement define the required expansion of the limited input NA for producing the desired exit pupil size for the display system. Currently Microvision utilizes an optical element comprised of two Microlens Arrays (MLAs) in tandem to expand the NA. The dual-MLA system has demonstrated exit pupil size that is independent of color; and uniformity of the beamlet structure is quite Top-Hat like. To further improve the perceived image quality, Microvision has now refined the optical system to minimize interference effects in the Exit Pupil plane that were caused by the coherent nature of the light source. We describe here a single refractive double-sided aspheric element that diminishes this interference effect by converting an input Gaussian beam profile to a Top-Hat profile. We also discuss the theory behind the use of a Gaussian-to-Top-Hat Converter, the tradeoffs associated with its use, as well as experimental results showing the uniformity improvements when using a Top-Hat converter element in conjunction with the MLA-based Exit Pupil Expander. In addition, we report the progress of environmental testing of the Exit Pupil Expander (EPE).

  19. Non-lytic, actin-based exit of intracellular parasites from C. elegans intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Estes, Kathleen A; Szumowski, Suzannah C; Troemel, Emily R

    2011-09-01

    The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes rearrangements of host actin inside intestinal cells as part of a novel parasite exit strategy. First, we show that N. parisii infection causes ectopic localization of the normally apical-restricted actin to the basolateral side of intestinal cells, where it often forms network-like structures. Soon after this actin relocalization, we find that gaps appear in the terminal web, a conserved cytoskeletal structure that could present a barrier to exit. Reducing actin expression creates terminal web gaps in the absence of infection, suggesting that infection-induced actin relocalization triggers gap formation. We show that terminal web gaps form at a distinct stage of infection, precisely timed to precede spore exit, and that all contagious animals exhibit gaps. Interestingly, we find that while perturbations in actin can create these gaps, actin is not required for infection progression or spore formation, but actin is required for spore exit. Finally, we show that despite large numbers of spores exiting intestinal cells, this exit does not cause cell lysis. These results provide insight into parasite manipulation of the host cytoskeleton and non-lytic escape from intestinal cells in vivo.

  20. 14 CFR 91.607 - Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... additional occupants. (2) For each additional window exit located over a wing that meets the requirements of... not located over a wing but that otherwise complies with paragraph (b)(2) of this section, five... with the following priority schedule: First, non-over-wing window exits; second, over-wing window...

  1. Wives' Relative Wages, Husbands' Paid Work Hours, and Wives' Labor-Force Exit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Emily Fitzgibbons

    2011-01-01

    Economic theories predict that women are more likely to exit the labor force if their partners' earnings are higher and if their own wage rate is lower. In this article, I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,254) and discrete-time event-history analysis to show that wives' relative wages are more predictive of their exit than are…

  2. Visual Barriers to Prevent Ambulatory ALzheimer's Patients from Exiting through an Emergency Door.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namazi, Kevan H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conducted study on Alzheimer's unit to test seven different visual barrier conditions for reducing patient exits. Findings indicated that exiting was eliminated under two conditions. Results suggest visual agnosia, the inability to interpret what the eye sees, may be used as tool in managing wandering behavior of Alzheimer's patients. (Author/NB)

  3. State Welfare Rules, TANF Exits, and Geographic Context: Does Place Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Shelley K.

    2008-01-01

    This research compares the likelihood of exiting TANF with and without employment and the effects of important state TANF rules on welfare exits in more disadvantaged (large Rustbelt cities and poor southern nonmetro) and less disadvantaged (other metro and other nonmetro) areas during the 1996-2003 post-welfare reform period. Hierarchical…

  4. Scholars Probe Diverse Effects of Exit Exams: State Graduation Tests Found to Hit Certain Groups Harder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    A study released last week suggesting that California's high school exit exams are affecting some student demographic groups more than others is the latest in a small spate of studies pointing to trade-offs from policies that require high school students to pass state tests to graduate. Twenty-six states have exit exams in place or will by 2012,…

  5. Identification and Comprehension of Symbolic Exit Signs for Small Transport-Category Airplanes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    8 Phase Two: Self -illuminated Exit Signs...11 Self -illuminated Exit Sign Comprehension ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 12 Automatic...other sign parameters such as stroke width to height, contrast ratios, and self -illumination, fall within those recommended by 14 CFR 25.812(b)(2

  6. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., sprinkler systems, alarm systems, fire doors, exit lighting) must be in proper working order at all times... impede exiting the workplace. (e) An employee alarm system must be operable. Employers must install and maintain an operable employee alarm system that has a distinctive signal to warn employees of fire or...

  7. 76 FR 14901 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Participant Application, Program Exit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ..., Program Exit Questionnaire, SABIT Alumni Success Story Report (Feedback Form) AGENCY: International Trade... applications and feedback (exit) surveys are needed to enable SABIT to find the most qualified people for the... feedback forms are used by SABIT staff to record success information but on occasion are sent to alumni...

  8. Assessment Drives Learning: The Effect of Central Exit Exams on Curricular Knowledge and Mathematical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurges, Hendrik; Schneider, Kerstin; Senkbeil, Martin; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from the German PISA 2003 sample to study the effects of central exit examinations on student performance and student attitudes. Unlike earlier studies we use (i) a value-added measure to pin down the effect of central exit exams on learning in the last year before the exam and (ii) separate test scores for mathematical…

  9. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exits for surface buildings and structures. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface buildings and structures. Surface buildings or structures in which persons work shall have a sufficient...

  10. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exits for surface buildings and structures. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface buildings and structures. Surface buildings or structures in which persons work shall have a sufficient...

  11. Drink Specials and the Intoxication Levels of Patrons Exiting College Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thombs, Dennis L.; Dodd, Virginia; Porkorny, Steven B.; Omli, Morrow R.; O'Mara, Ryan; Webb, Monica C.; Lacaci, Diana M.; Werch, Chad

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether drink specials independently increase patrons' risk of achieving a high level of intoxication upon exiting drinking establishments. Methods: In a campus community, data were collected from exiting patrons (N=291) via sidewalk interviews and breath tests on 6 nights of 2 consecutive semesters. Results: A…

  12. Bias and uncertainty in the absorption emission measurement of atomic sodium density in the SSME exit plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of atomic sodium concentration in the TTB 019 firing of April 1990 is significant in that it represents the first measurement of density at the exit plane of the space shuttle main engine. The knowledge of the sodium density, combined with the certainty that the exit plane of the plume is optically thin at the sodium D-line wavelengths, provides essential information for evaluation of diagnostic techniques using sodium atoms, such as resonant Doppler velocimetry for temperature, pressure, and velocity through high resolution fluorescent lineshape analysis. The technique used for the sodium atom line transmission (SALT) measurements is that of resonant absorption emission using a hollow cathode lamp as the reference source. Through the use of two-dimensional kinetic (TDK) predictions of temperature and density for the flight engine case and radiative transfer calculations, this line-of-sight spectrally integrated transmission indicates a sodium atom concentration, i.e., mole fraction, of 0.91e-10. The subject of this paper is the assumptions and measurement uncertainties tied into the calculation. Because of the narrow shape of the source emission, the uncertainties in the absorption profile could introduce considerable bias in the measurement. The following were investigated: (1) the inclusion of hyperfine splitting of the D-lines in the calculation; (2) the use of the flight engine predictions of plume temperature and density versus those for the large throat engine; (3) the assumption of a Gaussian, i.e., Doppler, distribution for the source radiance with a temperature of 400 K; (4) the use of atomic collisional shift and width values for the work by Jongerius; and (5) a Doppler shift for a 7 degree outward velocity vector at the plume edge. Also included in the study was the bias introduced by an uncertainty in the measurement of the D1/D2 line ratio in the source.

  13. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  14. [EXIT procedure in the management of severe foetal airway obstruction. the paediatric otolaryngologist's perspective].

    PubMed

    Pellicer, Marc; Pumarola, Félix; Peiró, José Luis; Martínez Ibáñez, Vicente; García Vaquero, Juan Antono; Carreras, Elena; Manrique, Susana; Vinzo, Joan; Perelló, Enrique

    2007-12-01

    The ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure is a technique designed to allow partial foetal delivery via caesarean section with establishment of a safe foetal airway by either intubation, bronchoscopy, or tracheostomy while foetal oxygenation is maintained through utero-placental circulation. The most common indication for the EXIT procedure is the presence of foetal airway obstruction, which is usually caused by a prenatal diagnosed neck mass. We report three cases of head and neck tumours with airway obstruction treated by means of EXIT and with different solutions in the management of the airway. With the involvement of Paediatric Otolaryngologists in EXIT, new indications and select variations from the standard EXIT protocol should be considered.

  15. Dropped out or pushed out? Insurance market exit and provider market power in Medicare Advantage.

    PubMed

    Pelech, Daria

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores how provider and insurer market power affect which markets an insurer chooses to operate in. A 2011 policy change required that certain private insurance plans in Medicare form provider networks de novo; in response, insurers cancelled two-thirds of the affected plans. Using detailed data on pre-policy provider and insurer market structure, I compare markets where insurers built networks to those they exited. Overall, insurers in the most concentrated hospital and physician markets were 9 and 13 percentage points more likely to exit, respectively, than those in the least concentrated markets. Conversely, insurers with more market power were less likely to exit than those with less, and an insurer's market power had the largest effect on exit in concentrated hospital markets. These findings suggest that concentrated provider markets contribute to insurer exit and that insurers with less market power have more difficulty surviving in concentrated provider markets.

  16. Aggregating job exit statuses of a plurality of compute nodes executing a parallel application

    DOEpatents

    Aho, Michael E.; Attinella, John E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Mundy, Michael B.

    2015-07-21

    Aggregating job exit statuses of a plurality of compute nodes executing a parallel application, including: identifying a subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer to execute the parallel application; selecting one compute node in the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer as a job leader compute node; initiating execution of the parallel application on the subset of compute nodes; receiving an exit status from each compute node in the subset of compute nodes, where the exit status for each compute node includes information describing execution of some portion of the parallel application by the compute node; aggregating each exit status from each compute node in the subset of compute nodes; and sending an aggregated exit status for the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer.

  17. Thermal radiant exitance model performance: Soils and forests

    SciTech Connect

    Balick, L.K.; Smith, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Models of surface temperatures of two land surface types based on their energy budgets were developed to simulate the effects of environmental factors on thermal radiant exitance. The performance of these models is examined in detail. One model solves the non-linear differential equation for heat diffusion in solids using a set of submodels for surface energy budget components. The model performance is examined under three desert conditions thought to be a strong test of the submodels. The accuracy of the temperature predictions and submodels is described. The accuracy of the model is generally good but some discrepancies between some of the submodels and measurements are noted. The sensitivity of the submodels is examined and is seen to be strongly controlled by interaction and feedback among energy components that are a function of surface temperature. The second model simulates vegetation canopies with detailed effects of surface geometry on radiant transfer in the canopy. Foliage solar absorption coefficients are calculated using a radiosity approach for a three layer canopy and long wave fluxes are modeled using a view factor matrix. Sensible and latent heat transfer through the canopy are also simulated using, nearby meteorological data but heat storage in the canopy is not included. Simulations for a coniferous forest canopy are presented and the sensitivity of the model to environmental inputs is discussed.

  18. STS-112 Crew exit O&C building before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew eagerly exit the Operations and Checkout Building for their ride to Launch Pad 39B and the launch scheduled 3:46 p.m. EDT. Leading the way are Pilot Pamela Melroy and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. In the second row are Mission Specialists David Wolf (left) and Sandra Magnus. Behind them are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin and Piers Sellers. Sellers, Magnus and Yurchikhin are making their first Shuttle flights. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. [Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews

  19. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  20. Phenotypic Diversity as a Mechanism to Exit Cellular Dormancy.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Alexander; Dworkin, Jonathan

    2015-08-31

    Microorganisms can facilitate their survival in stressful environments by entering a state of metabolic inactivity or dormancy. However, this state impairs the function of the very sensory systems necessary to detect favorable growth conditions. Thus, how can a metabolically quiescent cell accurately monitor environmental conditions in order to best decide when to exit dormancy? One strategy employed by microbes to deal with changing environments is the generation of phenotypes that may be less well adapted to a current condition but might confer an advantage in the future. This bet-hedging depends on phenotypic diversity in the population, which itself can derive from naturally occurring stochastic differences in gene expression. In the case of metabolic dormancy, a bet-hedging strategy that has been proposed is the "scout model" where cells comprising a fraction of the dormant population reinitiate growth stochastically, independent of environmental cues. Here, we provide experimental evidence that such a mechanism exists in dormant spores produced by the ubiquitous soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We observe that these spores reinitiate growth at a low but measureable frequency even in the absence of an inducing signal. This phenomenon is the result of phenotypic variation in the propensity of individual spores to reinitiate growth spontaneously. Since this bet-hedging mechanism produces individuals that will either grow under favorable conditions or die under unfavorable conditions, a population can properly respond to environmental changes despite the impaired sensory ability of individual cells.

  1. Hearing loss and disability exit: Measurement issues and coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Vibeke Tornhøj; Datta Gupta, Nabanita

    2017-02-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common conditions related to aging, and previous descriptive evidence links it to early exit from the labor market. These studies are usually based on self-reported hearing difficulties, which are potentially endogenous to labor supply. We use unique representative data collected in the spring of 2005 through in-home interviews. The data contains self-reported functional and clinically-measured hearing ability for a representative sample of the Danish population aged 50-64. We estimate the causal effect of hearing loss on early retirement via disability benefits, taking into account the endogeneity of functional hearing. Our identification strategy involves the simultaneous estimation of labor supply, functional hearing, and coping strategies (i.e. accessing assistive devices at work or informing one's employer about the problem). We use hearing aids as an instrument for functional hearing. Our main empirical findings are that endogeneity bias is more severe for men than women and that functional hearing problems significantly increase the likelihood of receiving disability benefits for both men and women. However, relative to the baseline the effect is larger for men (47% vs. 20%, respectively). Availability of assistive devices in the workplace decreases the likelihood of receiving disability benefits, whereas informing an employer about hearing problems increases this likelihood.

  2. LTE1 promotes exit from mitosis by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Jill E.; Campbell, Ian W.; Joyce, Kelsey; Whalen, Jenna; Seshan, Anupama; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, alignment of the anaphase spindle along the mother–bud axis is crucial for maintaining genome integrity. If the anaphase spindle becomes misaligned in the mother cell compartment, cells arrest in anaphase because the mitotic exit network (MEN), an essential Ras-like GTPase signaling cascade, is inhibited by the spindle position checkpoint (SPoC). Distinct localization patterns of MEN and SPoC components mediate MEN inhibition. Most components of the MEN localize to spindle pole bodies. If the spindle becomes mispositioned in the mother cell compartment, cells arrest in anaphase due to inhibition of the MEN by the mother cell–restricted SPoC kinase Kin4. Here we show that a bud-localized activating signal is necessary for full MEN activation. We identify Lte1 as this signal and show that Lte1 activates the MEN in at least two ways. It inhibits small amounts of Kin4 that are present in the bud via its central domain. An additional MEN-activating function of Lte1 is mediated by its N- and C-terminal GEF domains, which, we propose, directly activate the MEN GTPase Tem1. We conclude that control of the MEN by spindle position is exerted by both negative and positive regulatory elements that control the pathway’s GTPase activity. PMID:27798238

  3. LTE1 promotes exit from mitosis by multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Falk, Jill E; Campbell, Ian W; Joyce, Kelsey; Whalen, Jenna; Seshan, Anupama; Amon, Angelika

    2016-12-15

    In budding yeast, alignment of the anaphase spindle along the mother-bud axis is crucial for maintaining genome integrity. If the anaphase spindle becomes misaligned in the mother cell compartment, cells arrest in anaphase because the mitotic exit network (MEN), an essential Ras-like GTPase signaling cascade, is inhibited by the spindle position checkpoint (SPoC). Distinct localization patterns of MEN and SPoC components mediate MEN inhibition. Most components of the MEN localize to spindle pole bodies. If the spindle becomes mispositioned in the mother cell compartment, cells arrest in anaphase due to inhibition of the MEN by the mother cell-restricted SPoC kinase Kin4. Here we show that a bud-localized activating signal is necessary for full MEN activation. We identify Lte1 as this signal and show that Lte1 activates the MEN in at least two ways. It inhibits small amounts of Kin4 that are present in the bud via its central domain. An additional MEN-activating function of Lte1 is mediated by its N- and C-terminal GEF domains, which, we propose, directly activate the MEN GTPase Tem1. We conclude that control of the MEN by spindle position is exerted by both negative and positive regulatory elements that control the pathway's GTPase activity.

  4. POD- Mapping and analysis of hydroturbine exit flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Morten; Finstad, Pal Henrik

    2012-11-01

    Pairwise radial dynamic measurements of the swirling draft tube flow have been made at the 25 MW Svorka power plant in Surnadal operating at 48% load at 6 radial and 7 angular positions. The data is analyzed with traditional methods as well as with POD. The measurements were made in the turbine draft tube/exit flow in an axial measurement plane about 1200mm downstream the turbine runner. The draft tube diameter in the measurement plane is about 1300mm. The flow rate during measurements was close to 5.8m3/s. Two probes were used; both of length Le=700 mm and made of stainless steel with an outer diameter of Do=20 mm and inner diameter Di=4mm. At the end of each probe a full bridge cylindrical KULITE xcl152, 0-3.5, was mounted. 90 seconds samples at 10 kS/s were taken. The POD analysis largely follows that of Tutkun et al. (see e.g. AIAA J., 45,5,2008). The analysis shows that 26% of the pressure pulsation energy can be addressed to azimuthal mode 1. The work has been supported by Energy Norway.

  5. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.

  6. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  7. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  8. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  9. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  10. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  11. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  12. Determination of plasma velocity from light fluctuations in a cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of plasma velocities in a 30 A high energy density cutting torch are reported. The velocity diagnostic is based on the analysis of the light fluctuations emitted by the arc which are assumed to propagate with the flow velocity. These light fluctuations originate from plasma temperature and plasma density fluctuations mainly due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Fast photodiodes are employed as the light sensors. The arc core velocity was obtained from spectrally filtered light fluctuations measurements using a band-pass filter to detect light emission fluctuations emitted only from the arc axis. Maximum plasma jet velocities of 5000 m s{sup -1} close to the nozzle exit and about 2000 m s{sup -1} close to the anode were found. The obtained velocity values are in good agreement with those values predicted by a numerical code for a similar torch to that employed in this work.

  13. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  14. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  15. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  16. Mean exit time and survival probability within the CTRW formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, M.; Masoliver, J.

    2007-05-01

    An intense research on financial market microstructure is presently in progress. Continuous time random walks (CTRWs) are general models capable to capture the small-scale properties that high frequency data series show. The use of CTRW models in the analysis of financial problems is quite recent and their potentials have not been fully developed. Here we present two (closely related) applications of great interest in risk control. In the first place, we will review the problem of modelling the behaviour of the mean exit time (MET) of a process out of a given region of fixed size. The surveyed stochastic processes are the cumulative returns of asset prices. The link between the value of the MET and the timescale of the market fluctuations of a certain degree is crystal clear. In this sense, MET value may help, for instance, in deciding the optimal time horizon for the investment. The MET is, however, one among the statistics of a distribution of bigger interest: the survival probability (SP), the likelihood that after some lapse of time a process remains inside the given region without having crossed its boundaries. The final part of the manuscript is devoted to the study of this quantity. Note that the use of SPs may outperform the standard “Value at Risk" (VaR) method for two reasons: we can consider other market dynamics than the limited Wiener process and, even in this case, a risk level derived from the SP will ensure (within the desired quintile) that the quoted value of the portfolio will not leave the safety zone. We present some preliminary theoretical and applied results concerning this topic.

  17. Measurement of Velocity and Power Balance in a Two-Dimensional MPD Arcjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinefuchi, Kiyoshi; Funaki, Ikkoh; Toki, Kyoichiro; Shimizu, Yukio

    Velocity and temperature measurements were conducted for a two-dimensional magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet with hydrogen propellant. To obtain the velocities of both atoms and ions, laser absorption spectroscopy was employed for atom, and time-of-flight technique was used for ions. In a quasi-steady operation at 13kA/0.65g/s, larger ions velocity (33km/s) than that of the atoms (13km/s) was found in the case of flared anode configuration, which implies that large mean free path between the ions and atoms prohibited momentum transfer from the ions to the neutral particles. This velocity difference was not observed in the case of converging-diverging anode, where the high-density plasma inside the discharge chamber enhances momentum transfer from ions to atoms. In addition to the velocity difference, diagnostics by probe methods revealed high ion temperature in comparison with that of electrons at the thruster exit. Using the velocities and temperatures together with the densities of each particle, energy flux of the magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet was discussed. The large energy deposition into thermal and internal energy modes near the thruster exit indicated a large amount of pressure energy that should be converted to velocity energy by an appropriate nozzle design to further improve the thrust performance.

  18. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  19. Exit, voice, governance and user-responsiveness: the case of English primary care trusts.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Susan; Sheaff, Rod; Dowling, Bernard

    2006-07-01

    Hirschman contrasts exit and voice as 'recuperation' mechanisms for making organisations responsive to users. However, the emergence of health-care quasi-markets and of network governance structures since Hirschman necessitate revising his theory, for they complicate the relationships between governance structures and recuperation mechanisms. Using a case study of nine primary care trusts (PCTs), this paper analyses the recuperation mechanisms, governance structures and relations between them in primary care in England. User voice can be exercised through dedicated networks besides hierarchies. As well as the 'user exit' described by Hirschman, two new 'exit' mechanisms now exist in quasi-markets. Commissioner exit occurs when a third-party payer stops using a given provider. Professional proxy exit occurs when a general practitioner (GP) fund-holder (or analogous budget-holder) behaves similarly. Neither exit mechanism requires the existence of mechanisms for user exit from healthcare purchasers, provided strong voice mechanisms exist instead to make commissioners responsive to users' demands. Establishing such voice mechanisms is not straightforward, however, as the experience of English PCTs illustrates.

  20. Evacuation dynamic and exit optimization of a supermarket based on particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Yu, Zhonghai; Chen, Yang

    2014-12-01

    A modified particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed in this paper to investigate the dynamic of pedestrian evacuation from a fire in a public building-a supermarket with multiple exits and configurations of counters. Two distinctive evacuation behaviours featured by the shortest-path strategy and the following-up strategy are simulated in the model, accounting for different categories of age and sex of the pedestrians along with the impact of the fire, including gases, heat and smoke. To examine the relationship among the progress of the overall evacuation and the layout and configuration of the site, a series of simulations are conducted in various settings: without a fire and with a fire at different locations. Those experiments reveal a general pattern of two-phase evacuation, i.e., a steep section and a flat section, in addition to the impact of the presence of multiple exits on the evacuation along with the geographic locations of the exits. For the study site, our simulations indicated the deficiency of the configuration and the current layout of this site in the process of evacuation and verified the availability of proposed solutions to resolve the deficiency. More specifically, for improvement of the effectiveness of the evacuation from the site, adding an exit between Exit 6 and Exit 7 and expanding the corridor at the right side of Exit 7 would significantly reduce the evacuation time.

  1. Transgenic C. elegans dauer larvae expressing hookworm phospho null DAF-16/FoxO exit dauer.

    PubMed

    Gelmedin, Verena; Brodigan, Thomas; Gao, Xin; Krause, Michael; Wang, Zhu; Hawdon, John M

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic hookworms and the free-living model nematode Caenorhabtidis elegans share a developmental arrested stage, called the dauer stage in C. elegans and the infective third-stage larva (L3) in hookworms. One of the key transcription factors that regulate entrance to and exit from developmental arrest is the forkhead transcription factor DAF-16/FoxO. During the dauer stage, DAF-16 is activated and localized in the nucleus. DAF-16 is negatively regulated by phosphorylation by the upstream kinase AKT, which causes DAF-16 to localize out of the nucleus and the worm to exit from dauer. DAF-16 is conserved in hookworms, and hypothesized to control recovery from L3 arrest during infection. Lacking reverse genetic techniques for use in hookworms, we used C. elegans complementation assays to investigate the function of Ancylostoma caninum DAF-16 during entrance and exit from L3 developmental arrest. We performed dauer switching assays and observed the restoration of the dauer phenotype when Ac-DAF-16 was expressed in temperature-sensitive dauer defective C. elegans daf-2(e1370);daf-16(mu86) mutants. AKT phosphorylation site mutants of Ac-DAF-16 were also able to restore the dauer phenotype, but surprisingly allowed dauer exit when temperatures were lowered. We used fluorescence microscopy to localize DAF-16 during dauer and exit from dauer in C. elegans DAF-16 mutant worms expressing Ac-DAF-16, and found that Ac-DAF-16 exited the nucleus during dauer exit. Surprisingly, Ac-DAF-16 with mutated AKT phosphorylation sites also exited the nucleus during dauer exit. Our results suggest that another mechanism may be involved in the regulation DAF-16 nuclear localization during recovery from developmental arrest.

  2. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  3. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  4. Jet engine nozzle exit configurations, including projections oriented relative to pylons, and associated systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter. Projections near a support pylon and/or associated heat shield can have particular configurations, including greater flow immersion than other projections.

  5. Improving performance of CFB boiler by adopting end effect of bed exit of CFB combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Q.Y.; Jin, Y.

    1997-12-31

    Experiments indicate that the end effect of the bed exit of a CFB strongly influences the bulk density profile and internal circulation of bed materials in a CFB combustor. A well designed geometry of the bed exit of CFBC can create abundant internal circulation of bed materials in furnace and reduce external circulation in circulating loop of CFBC, then consequently improves the comprehensive performance of CFB boiler. This paper is devoted to analyzing the mechanism of the end effect of the bed exit on the hydrodynamics in a CFB by presenting test results. Design criteria and a suggestion for getting the end effect will also be presented.

  6. Development of an Energetic X-Ray Imaging Telescope Experiment (EXITE) and Associated Balloon Gondola System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is the Final Report for grant NAGW-624, which was our original grant to develop the Energetic X- ray Imaging Telescope Experiment (EXITE) and Associated Balloon Gondola. The EXITE grant was changed over to a new grant (from GSFC), NAG5-5103, beginning in FY97 and is currently very much continuing under that grant. The Final Report presented here then covers the EXITE development under the original grant, which in fact continued (with a 1 year no-cost extension) through December 31, 1997.

  7. Interferometric phase velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Labelle, J.; Kelley, M. C.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Moore, T.; Arnoldy, R.

    1984-01-01

    Phase velocities of plasma waves near the lower hybrid frequency were measured with an interferometer composed of two spatially separated electron-density probes. The plasma waves were produced in the F-region ionosphere by an argon ion beam. By calculating the normalized cross spectrum of the plasma waves a coherency of .98 was estimated along with a maximum phase difference of pi/3 radians between the two probes. This implies that the wavelength was 6 meters compared to an O(+) gyroradius of 3.8 meters, and that the phase velocity was 45 km/sec compared to an ion-beam velocity of 12.4 km/sec. These numbers compare favorably with recent predictions of a nonresonant mode produced by a dense ion beam.

  8. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  9. 10 CFR 431.204 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consumption of illuminated exit signs. 431.204 Section 431.204 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Illuminated Exit Signs Test Procedures § 431.204 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of illuminated exit...

  10. 10 CFR 431.204 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... consumption of illuminated exit signs. 431.204 Section 431.204 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Illuminated Exit Signs Test Procedures § 431.204 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of illuminated exit...

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  13. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  14. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1984-02-07

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  15. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an interrotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal application

  16. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  17. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  18. Intraglottal geometry and velocity measurements in canine larynges

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Liran; Khosla, Sid; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2014-01-01

    Previous flow velocity measurements during phonation in canine larynges were done above the glottal exit. These studies found that vortical structures are present in the flow above the glottis at different phases of the glottal cycle. Some vortices were observed to leave the glottis during the closing phase and assumptions were proposed regarding their formation mechanism. In the current study, intraglottal velocity measurements are performed using PIV, and the intraglottal flow characteristics are determined. Results from five canine larynges show that at low subglottal pressure the glottis assumes a minimal divergence angle during closing and the flow separates at the glottal exit. Vortical structures are observed above the glottis but not inside. As the subglottal pressure is increased, the divergence angle between the folds during closing increases and the location of the flow separation moves upstream into the glottis. Entrainment flow enters the glottis to fill the void that is formed between the glottal jet and the fold. Vortical structures develop near the superior edge at medium and high subglottal pressures from the flow separation. The magnitude of their swirling strength changes as a function of the wall dynamics. PMID:24437778

  19. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 2; Normal Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Morris, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as noise generators in supersonic jets. Recent analysis of these slowly diverging jets has shown that these instability waves radiate noise to the far field when the waves have components with phase velocities that are supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This instability wave noise generation model has been applied to supersonic jets with a single shear layer and is now applied to supersonic coaxial jets with two initial shear layers. In this paper the case of coaxial jets with normal velocity profiles is considered, where the inner jet stream velocity is higher than the outer jet stream velocity. To provide mean flow profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is used to calculate the mean flow properties. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. The effects of changes in the velocity ratio, the density ratio and the area ratio are each considered independently.

  20. Exit, Voice, and Loyalty in the Italian Public Health Service: Macroeconomic and Corporate Implications

    PubMed Central

    Impagliazzo, Cira; Zoccoli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyses how customers of public health organizations can express their dissatisfaction for the services offered to them. The main aim is to evaluate the effects that possible dissatisfaction of Italian public health service customers can have on public health organizations. We adopted the methodological scheme developed by Hirschman with exit, voice, and loyalty, considering the macroeconomic and corporate implications that it causes for Italian public health organizations. The study investigated the effects developed by exit of the patients on the system of financing of local health authorities considering both the corporate level of analysis and the macroeconomic level. As a result, local health authority management is encouraged to pay greater attention to the exit phenomena through the adoption of tools that promote loyalty, such as the promotion of voice, even if exit is not promoting, at a macroeconomic level, considerable attention to this phenomenon. PMID:24348148

  1. Anesthetic management of the ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heeseung; Ryu, Jung Wan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Lee, Guie Yong

    2010-12-01

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure is a very rare technique performed in cases of fetal congenital malformations. The EXIT procedure increases the rate of survival at delivery by maintaining the uteroplacental circulation until the airway of the fetus is secured. To maintain the uteroplacental circulation, a higher dose of inhalational anesthetics and/or intravenous nitroglycerin can be used as compared to conventional Cesarean section. The aim of this report is to share our anesthetic experience during the EXIT procedure with members of the Korean society of anesthesiology for the first time, and to highlight the maternal implications of the use of inhalational anesthetics and nitroglycerin during Cesarean section for the EXIT procedure.

  2. NAD+ Is a Food Component That Promotes Exit from Dauer Diapause in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mylenko, Mykola; Boland, Sebastian; Penkov, Sider; Sampaio, Julio L.; Lombardot, Benoit; Vorkel, Daniela; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V.

    2016-01-01

    The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans adapts its development to the availability of food. When food is scarce and population density is high, worms enter a developmentally arrested non-feeding diapause stage specialized for long-term survival called the dauer larva. When food becomes available, they exit from the dauer stage, resume growth and reproduction. It has been postulated that compound(s) present in food, referred to as the “food signal”, promote exit from the dauer stage. In this study, we have identified NAD+ as a component of bacterial extract that promotes dauer exit. NAD+, when dissolved in alkaline medium, causes opening of the mouth and ingestion of food. We also show that to initiate exit from the dauer stage in response to NAD+ worms require production of serotonin. Thus, C. elegans can use redox cofactors produced by dietary organisms to sense food. PMID:27907064

  3. Criticality safety analysis and design modifications of a calciner exit chute

    SciTech Connect

    Haught, C.F.; Basoglu, B.; Brewer, R.W.; Hollenbach, D.F.; Wilkinson, A.D.; Dodds, H.L. Jr. ); D'Aquila, D. )

    1992-01-01

    Calcination of uranium solutions into uranium oxide is part of the normal operations of many plants in the uranium fuel cycle. A calciner discharges uranium oxide powder into an exit chute, which directs the flow of powder into a receiving container. An illustration of an existing exit chute is provided. One possible scenario for a criticality accident begins with a discharge pipe that is blocked with powder. If this scenario does occur, the powder in the chute can reach a height that would make the system critical. This work analyzes the effect of the accumulation of powder on the safety of the exit chute and calciner with a full water reflector present. The powder is also assumed to be optimally moderated to account for possible water ingress into the exit chute. The chemical form of the uranium oxide during this hypothetical accident is assumed to be U{sub 3}O{sub 8}.

  4. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-01

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment. PMID:28117323

  5. 24 CFR 3280.106 - Exit facilities; egress windows and devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... purposes, unless it has an exit door (see § 3280.105), shall have at least one outside window or approved... above the floor. (c) Locks, latches, operating handles, tabs, and any other window screen or...

  6. MEN, destruction and separation: mechanistic links between mitotic exit and cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Foong May; Lim, Hong Hwa; Surana, Uttam

    2002-07-01

    Cellular events must be executed in a certain sequence during the cell division in order to maintain genome integrity and hence ensure a cell's survival. In M phase, for instance, chromosome segregation always precedes mitotic exit (characterized by mitotic kinase inactivation via cyclin destruction); this is then followed by cytokinesis. How do cells impose this strict order? Recent findings in budding yeast have suggested a mechanism whereby partitioning of chromosomes into the daughter cell is a prerequisite for the activation of mitotic exit network (MEN). So far, however, a regulatory scheme that would temporally link the initiation of cytokinesis to the execution of mitotic exit has not been determined. We propose that the requirement of MEN components for cytokinesis, their translocation to the mother-daughter neck and triggering of this translocation by inactivation of the mitotic kinase may be the three crucial elements that render initiation of cytokinesis dependent on mitotic exit.

  7. Single-molecule tracking of mRNA exiting from RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Andrecka, Joanna; Lewis, Robert; Brückner, Florian; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Cramer, Patrick; Michaelis, Jens

    2008-01-08

    Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to track RNA exiting from RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in elongation complexes. Measuring the distance between the RNA 5' end and three known locations within the elongation complex allows us determine its position by means of triangulation. RNA leaves the polymerase active center cleft via the previously proposed exit tunnel and then disengages from the enzyme surface. When the RNA reaches lengths of 26 and 29 nt, its 5' end associates with Pol II at the base of the dock domain. Because the initiation factor TFIIB binds to the dock domain and exit tunnel, exiting RNA may prevent TFIIB reassociation during elongation. RNA further extends toward the linker connecting to the polymerase C-terminal repeat domain (CTD), which binds the 5'-capping enzyme and other RNA processing factors.

  8. Exit, voice, and loyalty in the Italian public health service: macroeconomic and corporate implications.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Adelaide; Impagliazzo, Cira; Zoccoli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyses how customers of public health organizations can express their dissatisfaction for the services offered to them. The main aim is to evaluate the effects that possible dissatisfaction of Italian public health service customers can have on public health organizations. We adopted the methodological scheme developed by Hirschman with exit, voice, and loyalty, considering the macroeconomic and corporate implications that it causes for Italian public health organizations. The study investigated the effects developed by exit of the patients on the system of financing of local health authorities considering both the corporate level of analysis and the macroeconomic level. As a result, local health authority management is encouraged to pay greater attention to the exit phenomena through the adoption of tools that promote loyalty, such as the promotion of voice, even if exit is not promoting, at a macroeconomic level, considerable attention to this phenomenon.

  9. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-24

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment.

  10. Reduction of military high-altitude parachute entanglement using the controlled alternating parachute exit system.

    PubMed

    Hadley, A T; Hibst, J D

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of high-altitude parachute entanglement (HAE) results when two paratroopers have both a simultaneous and weak exit from the jump doors. They are then caught in the aircraft's slipstream and collision and entanglement follow. To avoid this phenomenon, the Controlled Alternating Parachute Exit System (CAPES) was introduced. CAPES focused upon manipulation of the exit technique to eliminate simultaneous paratrooper exit. Data from 90,894 consecutive parachute jumps revealed that the CAPES is highly successful in reducing te rate of high-altitude entanglement and the associated injury rate. CAPES seems to reduce the mid-altitude entanglement (MAE) and its injury rate but the results did not reach statistical significance as measured by chi square technique. The rate of landing or ground injuries, was essentially unchanged by the CAPES.

  11. Development of EXITE3, Imaging Detectors and a Long Duration Balloon Gondola

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this Report we summarize the work conducted for the EXITE program under grant NAG5-5103. This grant supported the ongoing EXITE program at Harvard for the development of imaging hard x-ray detectors and telescopes over the 3 year period 1997-2000 with a one year extension to 2001 to transition to the next SR&T grant in this program. Work was conducted in three major parts: analysis of the EXITE2 balloon flight data (from our May 1997 flight); development of pixellated imaging Cd-Zn-Te detector arrays and readout systems for the proposed EXITE3 detector and telescope; and development of systems for a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) gondola. Progress on all three major aspects of this research is summarized for each of the years of this grant.

  12. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  13. Response of polymer composites to high and low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, C. Y.; Mount, A.; Jang, B. Z.; Zee, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites' impact characteristics employed a drop tower for the low-velocity impact case and a novel, projectile instantaneous velocity-measuring sensor for high-velocity impact. Attention was given to the energy loss of projectiles in composites reinforced with polyethylene, kevlar, and graphite. Two distinct energy-loss mechanisms are noted, the first of which is due to the actual fracture process while the other is due to the generation of friction heat. The drop-tower impact-test results furnish the strain-rate dependence of the energy loss.

  14. Explosive Percolation Transition is Actually Continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recently a discontinuous percolation transition was reported in a new “explosive percolation” problem for irreversible systems [D. Achlioptas, R. M. D’Souza, and J. Spencer, Science 323, 1453 (2009)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1167782] in striking contrast to ordinary percolation. We consider a representative model which shows that the explosive percolation transition is actually a continuous, second order phase transition though with a uniquely small critical exponent of the percolation cluster size. We describe the unusual scaling properties of this transition and find its critical exponents and dimensions.

  15. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  16. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for temperature and velocity measurements in a hydrogen arcjet plume.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, J G; Hanson, R K; Cappelli, M A

    1993-10-20

    A diagnostic has been developed to measure velocity and translational temperature in the plume of a 1-kW-class arcjet thruster operating on hydrogen. Laser-induced fluorescence with a narrow-band cw laser is used to probe the Balmer α transition of excited atomic hydrogen. The velocity is determined from the Doppler shift of the fluorescence excitation spectrum, whereas the temperature is inferred from the lineshape. Analysis shows that although Doppler broadening is the only significant broadening mechanism, the fine structure of the transition must be taken into account. Near the exit plane, axial velocities vary from 4 to 14 km/s, radial velocities vary from 0 to 4 km/s, and swirl velocities are shown to be relatively small. Temperatures from 1000 to 5000 K indicate high dissociation fractions.

  18. Targeting mitotic exit with hyperthermia or APC/C inhibition to increase paclitaxel efficacy.

    PubMed

    Giovinazzi, Serena; Bellapu, Dhruv; Morozov, Viacheslav M; Ishov, Alexander M

    2013-08-15

    Microtubule-poisoning drugs, such as Paclitaxel (or Taxol, PTX), are powerful and commonly used anti-neoplastic agents for the treatment of several malignancies. PTX triggers cell death, mainly through a mitotic arrest following the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Cells treated with PTX slowly slip from this mitotic block and die by mitotic catastrophe. However, cancer cells can acquire or are intrinsically resistant to this drug, posing one of the main obstacles for PTX clinical effectiveness. In order to override PTX resistance and increase its efficacy, we investigated both the enhancement of mitotic slippage and the block of mitotic exit. To test these opposing strategies, we used physiological hyperthermia (HT) to force exit from PTX-induced mitotic block and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) inhibitor, proTAME, to block mitotic exit. We observed that application of HT on PTX-treated cells forced mitotic slippage, as shown by the rapid decline of cyclin B levels and by microscopy analysis. Similarly, HT induced mitotic exit in cells blocked in mitosis by other antimitotic drugs, such as Nocodazole and the Aurora A inhibitor MLN8054, indicating a common effect of HT on mitotic cells. On the other hand, proTAME prevented mitotic exit of PTX and MLN8054 arrested cells, prolonged mitosis, and induced apoptosis. In addition, we showed that proTAME prevented HT-mediated mitotic exit, indicating that stress-induced APC/C activation is necessary for HT-induced mitotic slippage. Finally, HT significantly increased PTX cytotoxicity, regardless of cancer cells' sensitivity to PTX, and this activity was superior to the combination of PTX with pro-TAME. Our data suggested that forced mitotic exit of cells arrested in mitosis by anti-mitotic drugs, such as PTX, can be a more successful anticancer strategy than blocking mitotic exit by inactivation of the APC/C.

  19. Near Field Pressure Fluctuations in the Exit Plane of a Choked Axisymmetric Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Seiner, John M.; Brown, Martha C.

    1997-01-01

    Nearfield pressure data are presented for an unheated jet issuing from an underexpanded sonic nozzle for two exit lip thicknesses of 0.200 and 0.625 nozzle diameters. Fluctuating measurements were obtained on the nozzle exit surface as well as in the acoustic nearfield. Narrowband spectra are presented for numerous operating conditions expressed in terms of the fully expanded Mach number based on nozzle pressure ratio.

  20. Performance Characteristics of Flush and Shielded Auxiliary Exits at Mach Numbers of 1.5 to 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalla, Kaleel L.

    1959-01-01

    The performance characteristics of several flush and shielded auxiliary exits were investigated at Mach numbers of 1.5 to 2.0, and jet pressure ratios from jet off to 10. The results indicate that the shielded configurations produced better overall performance than the corresponding flush exits over the Mach-number and pressure-ratio ranges investigated. Furthermore, the full-length shielded exit was highest in performance of all the configurations. The flat-exit nozzle block provided considerably improved performance compared with the curved-exit nozzle block.

  1. Anesthetic management of a patient undergoing an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Choleva, Abbie J

    2011-12-01

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure involves partial delivery of the fetus with the fetal-placental circulation maintained. This allows for management of the obstructed fetal airway via direct laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, tracheostomy, or surgical intervention. These complex and often challenging procedures have been performed about 100 times in the United States to date. Recent advances in prenatal diagnosis of fetal congenital malformations, in particular, abnormalities involving the fetal airway, have allowed for the development of the EXIT strategy to convert potentially catastrophic situations during fetal delivery to a controlled environment. Indications for the EXIT procedure have expanded to a variety of congenital abnormalities, including fetal neck masses, lung or mediastinal tumors, congenital high airway obstruction syndrome, conjoined twin separation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring transitioning from EXIT to extracorporeal membrane oxygen transitioning. Various considerations must be managed by the anesthesia provider during the EXIT procedure to ensure positive maternal and fetal outcomes. Careful attention to achieving adequate uterine relaxation, maintaining maternal blood pressure, avoiding placental abruption, prioritizing fetal airway establishment, and providing return of uterine tone when indicated are examples of these considerations. In this case report, a parturient presented for an EXIT procedure secondary to fetal cystic hygroma.

  2. FEAR but not MEN genes are required for exit from meiosis I.

    PubMed

    Kamieniecki, Rebecca J; Liu, Li; Dawson, Dean S

    2005-08-01

    Exit from mitosis is regulated by Cdc14, which plays an essential role in triggering cyclin-dependent kinase inactivation. Throughout most of the cell cycle, Cdc14 is sequestered in the nucleolus where it remains inactive. After the completion of anaphase, an essential signaling cascade, named the Mitotic Exit Network, or MEN, promotes Cdc14 release. Cdc14 is also released from the nucleolus in early anaphase by another, nonessential, pathway called FEAR (CdcFourteen Early Anaphase Release). Separase (Esp1), polo kinase (Cdc5), the kinetochore protein Slk19, and Spo12, whose molecular function remains unknown, have been identified as members of the FEAR pathway. In meiosis, mutations in CDC14 and its FEAR pathway regulators, CDC5, SLK19, and SPO12, all result it asci that contain only two diploid spores because of a defect in the ability to exit meiosis I. Thus although the FEAR pathway is dispensible for mitotic exit, it is essential for meiosis I exit. The way that the genes of the Mitotic Exit Network contribute to coordinating meiotic progression is less clear. Here, we explore this issue. Our results demonstrate that the orderly transition from meiosis I to meiosis II is accomplished by eliminating MEN function and using the FEAR pathway to modulate cyclin dependent kinase activity, in part through the actions of SIC1.

  3. IR signature study of aircraft engine for variation in nozzle exit area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranwal, Nidhi; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2016-01-01

    In general, jet engines operate with choked nozzle during take-off, climb and cruise, whereas unchoking occurs while landing and taxiing (when engine is not running at full power). Appropriate thrust in an aircraft in all stages of the flight, i.e., take-off, climb, cruise, descent and landing is achieved through variation in the nozzle exit area. This paper describes the effect on thrust and IR radiance of a turbojet engine due to variation in the exit area of a just choked converging nozzle (Me = 1). The variations in the nozzle exit area result in either choking or unchoking of a just choked converging nozzle. Results for the change in nozzle exit area are analyzed in terms of thrust, mass flow rate and specific fuel consumption. The solid angle subtended (Ω) by the exhaust system is estimated analytically, for the variation in nozzle exit area (Ane), as it affects the visibility of the hot engine parts from the rear aspect. For constant design point thrust, IR radiance is studied from the boresight (ϕ = 0°, directly from the rear side) for various percentage changes in nozzle exit area (%ΔAne), in the 1.9-2.9 μm and 3-5 μm bands.

  4. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  5. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  6. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  7. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  8. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  9. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  10. Parameter-free determination of actual temperature at chemical freeze-out in nuclear interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, A. D.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Tzoulis, J.

    1995-07-01

    We propose a method to determine the actual temperature at chemical freeze-out in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions, using the experimental μq/T and μs/T values, obtained from strange particle ratios. We employ the Hadron Gas formalism, assuming only local thermal equilibration, to relate the quarkchemical potential and temperature. This relation constrains the allowed values of μq/T, μs/T and T, enabling the determination of the actual temperature. Comparison of the inverse slope parameter of the mT-distributions with the actual temperature determines the transverse flow velocity of the fireball matter. Knowledge of these quantities is essential in determining the EoS of nuclear matter and in evaluating interactions with regard to a possible phase transition to QGP.

  11. Internal wave generation from tidal flow exiting a constricted opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Caixia; Pawlowicz, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The southern Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, often contains packets of large, near-surface internal waves. Wave crests at the leading edge of the packet, spaced a few hundred meters apart, can have a longitudinal extent of more than 10 km. It has long been assumed that these waves are generated by tidal flow through narrow passages and channels at the Strait's southern boundaries, but no actual link has ever been made between these waves and a specific passage or generation mechanism. Here we identify the location and extent of a number of these large packets at specific times using mosaics of photogrammetrically rectified oblique air photos. Wave speeds are determined by analyzing a time sequence of images, with water column measurements used to subtract effects of tidal advection. The location and extent of these internal waves are then compared with the predicted location and extent of hypothetical waves generated in different passages, at different stages of the tide, which are then propagated through a predicted time-varying barotropic flow field. It is found that the observed waves are most likely generated near or after the time of the peak flood tide, or peak inflow into the Strait. They are therefore inconsistent with generation mechanisms involving the release and upstream propagation of waves by the relaxation of an ebb tide. Instead they are probably associated with the nonlinear adjustment of conditions at the edge of an inflowing injection of relatively weakly stratified water.

  12. Global Phosphoproteomic Mapping of Early Mitotic Exit in Human Cells Identifies Novel Substrate Dephosphorylation Motifs

    PubMed Central

    McCloy, Rachael A.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Rogers, Samuel; Chaudhuri, Rima; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Hoffman, Nolan J.; Ali, Naveid; Watkins, D. Neil; Daly, Roger J.; James, David E.; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna; Burgess, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Entry into mitosis is driven by the coordinated phosphorylation of thousands of proteins. For the cell to complete mitosis and divide into two identical daughter cells it must regulate dephosphorylation of these proteins in a highly ordered, temporal manner. There is currently a lack of a complete understanding of the phosphorylation changes that occur during the initial stages of mitotic exit in human cells. Therefore, we performed a large unbiased, global analysis to map the very first dephosphorylation events that occur as cells exit mitosis. We identified and quantified the modification of >16,000 phosphosites on >3300 unique proteins during early mitotic exit, providing up to eightfold greater resolution than previous studies. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001559. Only a small fraction (∼10%) of phosphorylation sites were dephosphorylated during early mitotic exit and these occurred on proteins involved in critical early exit events, including organization of the mitotic spindle, the spindle assembly checkpoint, and reformation of the nuclear envelope. Surprisingly this enrichment was observed across all kinase consensus motifs, indicating that it is independent of the upstream phosphorylating kinase. Therefore, dephosphorylation of these sites is likely determined by the specificity of phosphatase/s rather than the activity of kinase/s. Dephosphorylation was significantly affected by the amino acids at and surrounding the phosphorylation site, with several unique evolutionarily conserved amino acids correlating strongly with phosphorylation status. These data provide a potential mechanism for the specificity of phosphatases, and how they co-ordinate the ordered events of mitotic exit. In summary, our results provide a global overview of the phosphorylation changes that occur during the very first stages of mitotic exit, providing novel mechanistic insight into how phosphatase/s specifically regulate this critical

  13. Global Phosphoproteomic Mapping of Early Mitotic Exit in Human Cells Identifies Novel Substrate Dephosphorylation Motifs.

    PubMed

    McCloy, Rachael A; Parker, Benjamin L; Rogers, Samuel; Chaudhuri, Rima; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Hoffman, Nolan J; Ali, Naveid; Watkins, D Neil; Daly, Roger J; James, David E; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna; Burgess, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Entry into mitosis is driven by the coordinated phosphorylation of thousands of proteins. For the cell to complete mitosis and divide into two identical daughter cells it must regulate dephosphorylation of these proteins in a highly ordered, temporal manner. There is currently a lack of a complete understanding of the phosphorylation changes that occur during the initial stages of mitotic exit in human cells. Therefore, we performed a large unbiased, global analysis to map the very first dephosphorylation events that occur as cells exit mitosis. We identified and quantified the modification of >16,000 phosphosites on >3300 unique proteins during early mitotic exit, providing up to eightfold greater resolution than previous studies. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001559. Only a small fraction (∼ 10%) of phosphorylation sites were dephosphorylated during early mitotic exit and these occurred on proteins involved in critical early exit events, including organization of the mitotic spindle, the spindle assembly checkpoint, and reformation of the nuclear envelope. Surprisingly this enrichment was observed across all kinase consensus motifs, indicating that it is independent of the upstream phosphorylating kinase. Therefore, dephosphorylation of these sites is likely determined by the specificity of phosphatase/s rather than the activity of kinase/s. Dephosphorylation was significantly affected by the amino acids at and surrounding the phosphorylation site, with several unique evolutionarily conserved amino acids correlating strongly with phosphorylation status. These data provide a potential mechanism for the specificity of phosphatases, and how they co-ordinate the ordered events of mitotic exit. In summary, our results provide a global overview of the phosphorylation changes that occur during the very first stages of mitotic exit, providing novel mechanistic insight into how phosphatase/s specifically regulate this critical

  14. Evaluation of six TPS algorithms in computing entrance and exit doses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yun I; Metwaly, Mohamed; Glegg, Martin; Baggarley, Shaun; Elliott, Alex

    2014-05-08

    Entrance and exit doses are commonly measured in in vivo dosimetry for comparison with expected values, usually generated by the treatment planning system (TPS), to verify accuracy of treatment delivery. This report aims to evaluate the accuracy of six TPS algorithms in computing entrance and exit doses for a 6 MV beam. The algorithms tested were: pencil beam convolution (Eclipse PBC), analytical anisotropic algorithm (Eclipse AAA), AcurosXB (Eclipse AXB), FFT convolution (XiO Convolution), multigrid superposition (XiO Superposition), and Monte Carlo photon (Monaco MC). Measurements with ionization chamber (IC) and diode detector in water phantoms were used as a reference. Comparisons were done in terms of central axis point dose, 1D relative profiles, and 2D absolute gamma analysis. Entrance doses computed by all TPS algorithms agreed to within 2% of the measured values. Exit doses computed by XiO Convolution, XiO Superposition, Eclipse AXB, and Monaco MC agreed with the IC measured doses to within 2%-3%. Meanwhile, Eclipse PBC and Eclipse AAA computed exit doses were higher than the IC measured doses by up to 5.3% and 4.8%, respectively. Both algorithms assume that full backscatter exists even at the exit level, leading to an overestimation of exit doses. Despite good agreements at the central axis for Eclipse AXB and Monaco MC, 1D relative comparisons showed profiles mismatched at depths beyond 11.5 cm. Overall, the 2D absolute gamma (3%/3 mm) pass rates were better for Monaco MC, while Eclipse AXB failed mostly at the outer 20% of the field area. The findings of this study serve as a useful baseline for the implementation of entrance and exit in vivo dosimetry in clinical departments utilizing any of these six common TPS algorithms for reference comparison.

  15. On the Exit Boundary Condition for One-Dimensional Calculations of Pulsed Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2002-01-01

    In one-dimensional calculations of pulsed detonation engine (PDE) performance, the exit boundary condition is frequently taken to be a constant static pressure. In reality, for an isolated detonation tube, after the detonation wave arrives at the exit plane, there will be a region of high pressure, which will gradually return to ambient pressure as an almost spherical shock wave expands away from the exit, and weakens. Initially, the flow is supersonic, unaffected by external pressure, but later becomes subsonic. Previous authors have accounted for this situation either by assuming the subsonic pressure decay to be a relaxation phenomenon, or by running a two-dimensional calculation first, including a domain external to the detonation tube, and using the resulting exit pressure temporal distribution as the boundary condition for one-dimensional calculations. These calculations show that the increased pressure does affect the PDE performance. In the present work, a simple model of the exit process is used to estimate the pressure decay time. The planar shock wave emerging from the tube is assumed to transform into a spherical shock wave. The initial strength of the spherical shock wave is determined from comparison with experimental results. Its subsequent propagation, and resulting pressure at the tube exit, is given by a numerical blast wave calculation. The model agrees reasonably well with other, limited, results. Finally, the model was used as the exit boundary condition for a one-dimensional calculation of PDE performance to obtain the thrust wall pressure for a hydrogen-air detonation in tubes of length to diameter ratio (L/D) of 4, and 10, as well as for the original, constant pressure boundary condition. The modified boundary condition had no performance impact for values of L/D > 10, and moderate impact for L/D = 4.

  16. The measurement of abrasive particles velocities in the process of abrasive water jet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Říha, Zdeněk

    2014-08-01

    An optimization of the design of the abrasive cutting head using the numerical simulation requires gathering as much information about processes occurring in the cutting head as possible. Detailed knowledge of velocities of abrasive particles in the process of abrasive water jet generation is vital for the verification of the numerical model. A method of measurement of abrasive particles at the exit of focusing tube using the FPIV technique was proposed and preliminary tests are described in the paper. Results of analysis of measured velocity fields are presented in the paper.

  17. Energy Velocity Defined by Brillouin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hiroyuki; Hosono, Toshio

    The physical meaning of the energy velocity in lossy Lorentz media is clarified. First, two expressions for the energy velocity, one by Brillouin and another by Diener, are examined. We show that, while Diener's is disqualified, Brillouin's is acceptable as energy velocity. Secondly, we show that the signal velocity defined by Brillouin and Baerwald is exactly identical with the Brillouin's energy velocity. Thirdly, by using triangle-modulated harmonic wave, we show that the superluminal group velocity plays its role as a revelator only after the arrival of the signal traveling at the subluminal energy velocity. In short, nothing moves at the group velocity, and every frequency component of a signal propagates at its own energy velocity.

  18. Do Disk Galaxies Have Different Central Velocity Dispersions At A Given Rotation Velocity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, Taissa; Jones, H.; Mould, J.; Taylor, E.; Tonini, C.; Webster, R.

    2011-05-01

    Hubble's classification of spiral galaxies was one dimensional. Actually it was 1.5 dimensional, as he distinguished barred spirals. Van den Bergh's was two dimensional: spirals had luminosity classes too. Other schemes are summarized at http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/G/galaxyclassification.html A more quantitative approach is to classify spiral galaxies by rotation velocity. Their central velocity dispersion (bulge) tends to be roughly one half of their rotation velocity (disk). There is a trend from σ/W = 0.8 to σ/W = 0.2 as one goes from W = 100 to 500 km/s, where W is twice the rotation velocity. But some fraction of spirals have a velocity dispersion up to a factor of two larger than that. In hierarchical galaxy formation models, the relative contributions of σ and W depend on the mass accretion history of the galaxy, which determines the mass distribution of the dynamical components such as disk, bulge and dark matter halo. The wide variety of histories that originate in the hierarchical mass assembly produce at any value of W a wide range of σ/W, that reaches high values in more bulge- dominated systems. In a sense the two classifiers were both right: spirals are mostly one dimensional, but σ/W (bulge to disk ratio) is often larger than average. Is this a signature of merger history?

  19. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 3; Inverted Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    The instability wave noise generation model is used to study the instability waves in the two shear layers of an inverted velocity profile, supersonic, coaxial jet and the noise radiated from the dominant wave. The inverted velocity profile jet has a high speed outer stream surrounding a low speed inner stream and the outer shear layer is always larger than the inner shear layer. The jet mean flows are calculated numerically. The operating conditions are chosen to exemplify the effect of the coaxial jet outer shear layer initial spreading rates. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. Results for inverted velocity profile jets indicate that relative maximum instability wave amplitudes and far field peak noise levels can be reduced from that of the reference jet by having higher spreading rates for the outer shear layer, low velocity ratios, and outer streams hotter than the inner stream.

  20. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  1. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  2. Thermal regime, predation danger and the early marine exit of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka.

    PubMed

    Katinic, P J; Patterson, D A; Ydenberg, R C

    2015-01-01

    Marine exit timing of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka populations on the Haida Gwaii Archipelago, British Columbia, Canada, is described, with specific focus on Copper Creek. Marine exit in Copper Creek occurs > 130 days prior to spawning, one of the longest adult freshwater residence periods recorded for any O. nerka population. Copper Creek presents an easy upstream migration, with mild water temperatures (7 to 14°  C), short distance (13·1 km) and low elevation gain (41 m) to the lake where fish hold prior to spawning. An energetic model estimates that <1% of the initial energy reserve is required for upstream migration, compared with 62% for lake holding and 38% for reproductive development. Historical records suggest that it is unlikely that water temperature in any of the O.nerka streams in Haida Gwaii has ever exceeded the presumed temperature threshold (19° C) for early marine exit. Although it is not impossible that the thermal tolerance of Copper Creek O.nerka is very low, the data presented here appear inconsistent with thermal avoidance as an explanation for the early marine exit timing in Copper Creek and in three other populations on the archipelago with early marine exit.

  3. Runway Exit Designs for Capacity Improvement Demonstrations. Phase 1: Algorithm Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trani, A. A.; Hobeika, A. G.; Sherali, H.; Kim, B. J.; Sadam, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    A description and results are presented of a study to locate and design rapid runway exits under realistic airport conditions. The study developed a PC-based computer simulation-optimization program called REDIM (runway exit design interactive model) to help future airport designers and planners to locate optimal exits under various airport conditions. The model addresses three sets of problems typically arising during runway exit design evaluations. These are the evaluations of existing runway configurations, addition of new rapid runway turnoffs, and the design of new runway facilities. The model is highly interactive and allows a quick estimation of the expected value of runway occupancy time. Aircraft populations and airport environmental conditions are among the multiple inputs to the model to execute a viable runway location and geometric design solution. The results presented suggest that possible reductions on runway occupancy time (ROT) can be achieved with the use of optimally tailored rapid runway designs for a given aircraft population. Reductions of up to 9 to 6 seconds are possible with the implementation of 30 m/sec variable geometry exits.

  4. Bed-exit alarms. A component (but only a component) of fall prevention.

    PubMed

    2004-05-01

    Patient falls are a common cause of morbidity, nonfatal injuries, and trauma-related hospitalizations in the United States. Sometimes, they're even fatal. Falls typically occur either while the patient is getting into or out of bed or shortly after the patient has exited the bed. One means of helping to reduce the number of patient falls is the bed-exit alarm. Such alarms can be either built-in devices incorporated into the beds themselves or stand-alone units consisting of a portable control unit and a pressure- or position-sensitive sensor. They can serve as an "early warning system" alerting nursing staff when patients attempt to leave their beds unassisted. However, bed-exit alarms do not themselves prevent falls--a fact that is not always clearly understood. To be effective, they need to be implemented with care and with a clear understanding of their limitations. In this article, we describe the types of stand-alone bed-exit alarms currently available on the market and provide guidance to facilities on how to implement them effectively. We also review the elements of an effective fall-prevention program and recount one hospital's success in reducing patient falls. We are in the process of conducting a comparative evaluation of a number of bed-exit alarms, which will be published in an upcoming issue of Health Devices.

  5. Exit from sliding in piecewise-smooth flows: Deterministic vs. determinacy-breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Mike R.

    2016-03-01

    The collapse of flows onto hypersurfaces where their vector fields are discontinuous creates highly robust states called sliding modes. The way flows exit from such sliding modes can lead to complex and interesting behaviour about which little is currently known. Here, we examine the basic mechanisms by which a flow exits from sliding, either along a switching surface or along the intersection of two switching surfaces, with a view to understanding sliding and exit when many switches are involved. On a single switching surface, exit occurs via tangency of the flow to the switching surface. Along an intersection of switches, exit can occur at a tangency with a lower codimension sliding flow, or by a spiralling of the flow that exhibits geometric divergence (infinite steps in finite time). Determinacy-breaking can occur where a singularity creates a set-valued flow in an otherwise deterministic system, and we resolve such dynamics as far as possible by blowing up the switching surface into a switching layer. We show preliminary simulations exploring the role of determinacy-breaking events as organizing centres of local and global dynamics.

  6. Pressure and velocity measurements in a three dimensional wall jet. [high lift V/STOL wing-flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalano, G. D.; Morton, J. B.; Humphris, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    In three recent papers, some results of an experimental investigation of a freely expanding coflowing jet as well as a three dimensional wall jet have been presented. A flat plate as well as a curved wall surface intended to model a wing-flap combination in a high lift V/STOL configuration have been investigated. In these papers, the ratio of the jet exit plane velocity to the free stream velocity, was 5.1. This paper explores the effects of increasing the velocity ratio. The quantities measured include the width of the mixing region, the mean velocity field, turbulent intensities and time scales. In addition, wall and static pressure-velocity correlations and coherences are presented. The velocity measurements are made using a laser Doppler velocimeter with a phase-locked loop processor. The fluctuating pressures are monitored using condenser-type microphones.

  7. Neutron Velocity Selector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, Enrico

    This Patent presents a detailed description of the construction and operation of a velocity selector for neutrons with velocities up to 6000÷7000 m/s. This apparatus employs a rotating shutter designed in such a way that neutrons are passed during a portion of each rotation of the shutter, the shutter blocking all neutron radiation at other times. The selector is built up with alternate laminations of a material with high neutron capture cross section (such as, for example, cadmium, boron or gadolinium), and parallel laminations of a material with low capture probability (such as, for example, aluminium, magnesium or beryllium). This is required in order to provide a path through the shutter to the neutrons, which then pass into a ionization chamber. The timing mechanism, adopted to activate or deactivate the neutron detection, and measuring means at given times following each opening or closing of the shutter, is electronic (not mechanic), controlled by a photocell unit. The reference published article for the main topic of the present Patent is [Fermi (1947)].

  8. Diversity Exiting the Academy: Influential Factors for the Career Choice of Well-Represented and Underrepresented Minority Scientists.

    PubMed

    Layton, Rebekah L; Brandt, Patrick D; Freeman, Ashalla M; Harrell, Jessica R; Hall, Joshua D; Sinche, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    A national sample of PhD-trained scientists completed training, accepted subsequent employment in academic and nonacademic positions, and were queried about their previous graduate training and current employment. Respondents indicated factors contributing to their employment decision (e.g., working conditions, salary, job security). The data indicate the relative importance of deciding factors influencing career choice, controlling for gender, initial interest in faculty careers, and number of postgraduate publications. Among both well-represented (WR; n = 3444) and underrepresented minority (URM; n = 225) respondents, faculty career choice was positively associated with desire for autonomy and partner opportunity and negatively associated with desire for leadership opportunity. Differences between groups in reasons endorsed included: variety, prestige, salary, family influence, and faculty advisor influence. Furthermore, endorsement of faculty advisor or other mentor influence and family or peer influence were surprisingly rare across groups, suggesting that formal and informal support networks could provide a missed opportunity to provide support for trainees who want to stay in faculty career paths. Reasons requiring alteration of misperceptions (e.g., limited leadership opportunity for faculty) must be distinguished from reasons requiring removal of actual barriers. Further investigation into factors that affect PhDs' career decisions can help elucidate why URM candidates are disproportionately exiting the academy.

  9. Diversity Exiting the Academy: Influential Factors for the Career Choice of Well-Represented and Underrepresented Minority Scientists

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Rebekah L.; Brandt, Patrick D.; Freeman, Ashalla M.; Harrell, Jessica R.; Hall, Joshua D.; Sinche, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    A national sample of PhD-trained scientists completed training, accepted subsequent employment in academic and nonacademic positions, and were queried about their previous graduate training and current employment. Respondents indicated factors contributing to their employment decision (e.g., working conditions, salary, job security). The data indicate the relative importance of deciding factors influencing career choice, controlling for gender, initial interest in faculty careers, and number of postgraduate publications. Among both well-represented (WR; n = 3444) and underrepresented minority (URM; n = 225) respondents, faculty career choice was positively associated with desire for autonomy and partner opportunity and negatively associated with desire for leadership opportunity. Differences between groups in reasons endorsed included: variety, prestige, salary, family influence, and faculty advisor influence. Furthermore, endorsement of faculty advisor or other mentor influence and family or peer influence were surprisingly rare across groups, suggesting that formal and informal support networks could provide a missed opportunity to provide support for trainees who want to stay in faculty career paths. Reasons requiring alteration of misperceptions (e.g., limited leadership opportunity for faculty) must be distinguished from reasons requiring removal of actual barriers. Further investigation into factors that affect PhDs’ career decisions can help elucidate why URM candidates are disproportionately exiting the academy. PMID:27587854

  10. Preliminary Analysis of the Effect of Flow Separation Due to Rocket Jet Pluming on Aircraft Dynamic Stability During Atmospheric Exit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Murray; North, Warren J.

    1959-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the effects of body boundary-layer separation resulting from a highly underexpanded jet on the dynamic stability of a typical rocket aircraft during an atmospheric exit trajectory. The particular flight condition studied on a digital computer for five degrees of freedom was at Mach 6.0 and 150,000 feet. In view of the unknown character of the separated flow field, two estimates of the pressures in the separated region were made to calculate the unbalanced forces and moments. These estimates, based on limited fundamental zero-angle-of-attack studies and observations, are believed to cover what may be the actual case. In addition to a fixed control case, two simulated pilot control inputs were studied: rate-limited and instantaneous responses. The resulting-motions with and without boundary-layer separation were compared for various initial conditions. The lower of the assumed misalinement forces and moments led to a situation whereby a slowly damped motion could be satisfactorily controlled with rate-limited control input. The higher assumption led to larger amplitude, divergent motions when the same control rates were used. These motions were damped only when the instantaneous control responses were assumed.

  11. Velocity mapping in the plume of a 30-kW ammonia arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Deininger, William D.

    1990-01-01

    The flow velocity of atomic hydrogen in the plume of an ammonia-propelled arcjet was measured using LIF. The velocity was obtained by the Doppler shift of the absorption peak of the Balmer alpha spectral line. Measurements were made at the nozzle exit, varying the distance from the plume centerline. Results are presented for arcjet operating conditions 13, 20 and 27 kW with a mass flow of 0.31 g/s. The on-axis H flow velocity varies from 14 km/s to 28 km/s over this range of input power. The axial velocity as a function of the distance from the axis is sharply peaked, dropping to almost zero at a radius of less than 5 mm.

  12. The interaction between duration, velocity and repetitive auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Makin, Alexis D J; Poliakoff, Ellen; Dillon, Joe; Perrin, Aimee; Mullet, Thomas; Jones, Luke A

    2012-03-01

    Repetitive auditory stimulation (with click trains) and visual velocity signals both have intriguing effects on the subjective passage of time. Previous studies have established that prior presentation of auditory clicks increases the subjective duration of subsequent sensory input, and that faster moving stimuli are also judged to have been presented for longer (the time dilation effect). However, the effect of clicks on velocity estimation is unknown, and the nature of the time dilation effect remains ambiguous. Here were present a series of five experiments to explore these phenomena in more detail. Participants viewed a rightward moving grating which traveled at velocities ranging from 5 to 15°/s and which lasted for durations of 500 to 1500 ms. Gratings were preceded by clicks, silence or white noise. It was found that both clicks and higher velocities increased subjective duration. It was also found that the time dilation effect was a constant proportion of stimulus duration. This implies that faster velocity increases the rate of the pacemaker component of the internal clock. Conversely, clicks increased subjective velocity, but the magnitude of this effect was not proportional to actual velocity. Through considerations of these results, we conclude that clicks independently affect velocity and duration representations.

  13. Ionization Time and Exit Momentum in Strong-Field Tunnel Ionization.

    PubMed

    Teeny, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H

    2016-02-12

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. The so-called two-step model, which describes the ionization as instantaneous tunneling at the electric field maximum and classical motion afterwards with zero exit momentum, is commonly employed to describe tunnel ionization in adiabatic regimes. In this contribution, we show by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in one dimension and employing a virtual detector at the tunnel exit that there is a nonvanishing positive time delay between the electric field maximum and the instant of ionization. Moreover, we find a nonzero exit momentum in the direction of the electric field. To extract proper tunneling times from asymptotic momentum distributions of ionized electrons, it is essential to incorporate the electron's initial momentum in the direction of the external electric field.

  14. Peritonitis and catheter exit-site infection in patients on peritoneal dialysis at home1

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Ana Cristina Freire; Kusumota, Luciana; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Rodrigues, Flávia Fernanda Luchetti; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the complications related to peritonitis and catheter exit-site infections, in patients on peritoneal dialysis at home. Method: quantitative and cross-sectional study, carried out with 90 patients on peritoneal dialysis at home, in a municipality in the Northeast region of Brazil. For data collection, it was used two structured scripts and consultation on medical records. Descriptive analysis and comparison tests among independent groups were used, considering p<0.05 as level of statistical significance. Results: by comparing the frequency of peritonitis and the length of treatment, it was found that patients over two years of peritoneal dialysis were more likely to develop peritonitis (X²=6.39; p=0.01). The number of episodes of peritoneal catheter exit-site infection showed association with the length of treatment (U=224,000; p=0.015). Conclusion: peritonitis and catheter exit-site infection are associated with the length of treatment. PMID:26487141

  15. Asymmetric Localization of Components and Regulators of the Mitotic Exit Network at Spindle Pole Bodies.

    PubMed

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2017-01-01

    Most proteins of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) and their upstream regulators localize at spindle pole bodies (SPBs) at least in some stages of the cell cycle. Studying the SPB localization of MEN factors has been extremely useful to elucidate their biological roles, organize them in a hierarchical pathway, and define their dynamics under different conditions.Recruitment to SPBs of the small GTPase Tem1 and the downstream kinases Cdc15 and Mob1/Dbf2 is thought to be essential for Cdc14 activation and mitotic exit, while that of the upstream Tem1 regulators (the Kin4 kinase and the GTPase activating protein Bub2-Bfa1) is important for MEN inhibition upon spindle mispositioning. Here, we describe the detailed fluorescence microscopy procedures that we use in our lab to analyze the localization at SPBs of Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) components tagged with GFP or HA epitopes.

  16. Impact of a standardized test package on exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN outcomes.

    PubMed

    Homard, Catherine M

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this ex post facto correlational study was to compare exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN(®) pass rates of baccalaureate nursing students who differed in level of participation in a standardized test package. Three cohort groups emerged as a standardized test package was introduced: (a) students who did not participate in a standardized test package; (b) students with two semesters of a standardized test package; and (c) students with four semesters of a standardized test package. Benner's novice-to-expert theory framed the study in the belief that students best acquire knowledge and skills through practice and reflection. Students participating in four semesters of a standardized test package demonstrated higher exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN pass rates compared with students who did not participate in this package. This study's results could inform nurse educators about strategies to facilitate nursing student success on exit examinations and the NCLEX-RN.

  17. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  18. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is required for cell cycle exit in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Jiang, Huaqi; Nickerson, Derek W; Edgar, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for proper development. In particular, robust mechanisms exist to ensure that cells permanently exit the cell cycle upon terminal differentiation, and these include restraining the activities of both the E2F/DP transcription factor and Cyclin/Cdk kinases. However, the full complement of mechanisms necessary to restrain E2F/DP and Cyclin/Cdk activities in differentiating cells are not known. Here, we have performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster, designed to identify genes required for cell cycle exit. This screen utilized a PCNA-miniwhite(+) reporter that is highly E2F-responsive and results in a darker red eye color when crossed into genetic backgrounds that delay cell cycle exit. Mutation of Hsp83, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Hsp90, results in increased E2F-dependent transcription and ectopic cell proliferation in pupal tissues at a time when neighboring wild-type cells are postmitotic. Further, these Hsp83 mutant cells have increased Cyclin/Cdk activity and accumulate proteins normally targeted for proteolysis by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), suggesting that APC/C function is inhibited. Indeed, reducing the gene dosage of an inhibitor of Cdh1/Fzr, an activating subunit of the APC/C that is required for timely cell cycle exit, can genetically suppress the Hsp83 cell cycle exit phenotype. Based on these data, we propose that Cdh1/Fzr is a client protein of Hsp83. Our results reveal that Hsp83 plays a heretofore unappreciated role in promoting APC/C function during cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibition could promote genomic instability and carcinogenesis.

  19. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  20. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  1. STS-102 crew gets emergency exit training at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- During emergency exit training on the Fixed Service Structure of Launch Pad 39B, STS-102 Mission Specialist Paul Richards takes a closer look at the lever that releases a slidewire basket, used for emergency exits from the launch pad, to the landing below. He and the rest of the crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  2. The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure for fetal head and neck masses.

    PubMed

    Filipchuck, Debora; Avdimiretz, Lourdes

    2009-11-01

    A congential head or neck mass increase the risk of airway obstruction and imminent respiratory failure at birth. The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure is an option to secure the infant's airway in some clinical situations when an antenatal diagnosis of a head or neck mass or potentials airway obstruction has been established. This article discusses an EXIT procedure performed on a maternal patient whose 38-week gestation age fetus was diagnosed with a lymphatic malformation. Planning and coordination between surgical teams to achieve a safe, successful outcome for the mother and child.

  3. Evolving indications for the EXIT procedure: the usefulness of combining ultrasound and fetal MRI.

    PubMed

    Mota, Raquel; Ramalho, Carla; Monteiro, Joaquim; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Rodrigues, Manuela; Guimarães, Hercília; Spratley, Jorge; Macedo, Filipe; Matias, Alexandra; Montenegro, Nuno

    2007-01-01

    The EXIT procedure (EX utero Intrapartum Treatment) encompasses a multidisciplinary approach to situations in which airway obstruction is anticipated. Uteroplacental circulation is maintained to avoid neonatal hypoxemia while intubation is attempted. Not only is it useful in congenital diaphragmatic hernia with intrauterine tracheal occlusion, but new indications have been proposed. We present two cases in which EXIT procedure was adopted (huge cervical mass with tracheal compression and a highly vascularized cephalocervical mass) for the same purpose on different grounds. Our two cases stress once more the importance of combining fetal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of cervical masses and its usefulness in programming the procedure with a multidisciplinary team.

  4. Passage Times, Exit Times and Dirichlet Problems for Open Quantum Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardet, Ivan; Bernard, Denis; Pautrat, Yan

    2017-03-01

    We consider an open quantum walk on a graph, and the random variables defined as the passage time and number of visits at a given point of the graph. We study in particular the probability that the passage time is finite, the expectation of that passage time, the expectation of the number of visits, and discuss the notion of recurrence for open quantum walks. We also study exit times and exit probabilities from a finite domain, and use them to solve Dirichlet problems and to determine harmonic measures. We consider in particular the case of irreducible open quantum walks. The results we obtain extend those for classical Markov chains.

  5. Entry and exit facet laser damage of optical windows with random antireflective surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Gopal; Case, Jason R.; Potter, Matthew G.; Busse, Lynda E.; Shaw, L. Brandon; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.; Poutous, Menelaos K.

    2016-12-01

    Nanosecond duration, high intensity and high average power laser pulses induce damage on uncoated optics, due to localized field enhancement at the exit surface of the components. Anti-reflection (AR) coated optics, due to their (multiple) thin film boundaries, have similar field enhancement regions, which lead to laser damage on both entry and exit sides. Nano-scale structured optical interfaces with AR performance (ARSS) have been widely demonstrated, and found to have higher laser damage resistance than conventional AR coatings. Comprehensive tests of optical entry and exit structured-surface laser damage using nanosecond pulses for ARSS are not widely available. We measured the laser damage of random anti-reflective surface structures (rARSS), on planar, optical quality, fused silica substrates, using single 6-8ns duration pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. The single-sided rARSS substrates were optimized for Fresnel reflectance suppression at 1064 nm, and the measured transmittance at normal incidence was increased by 3.2%, with a possible theoretical maximum of 3.5%. The high energy laser beam was focused to increase the incident intensity, in order to probe values above and below the damage thresholds reported in the literature. The source laser Q-switch durations were used to directly control incident fluence. Multiple locations were tested for each Q-switch setting, to build a statistical relationship between the fluence and damaging events. Single-sided, AR random surface structured substrates were tested, using entry and exit side orientations, to determine any effects the random structures may have in the damage induced by the field enhancement on the exit side. We found that the AR randomly structured surfaces have a higher resistance, to the onset of laser damage, when they are located at the entry (structured) side of the substrates. In comparison, when the same AR random structures are in the beam exit side of the substrates, the onset of laser damage

  6. Study of bottleneck effect at an emergency evacuation exit using cellular automata model, mean field approximation analysis, and game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Hagishima, Aya; Tanaka, Yasukaka

    2010-12-01

    An improved cellular automaton model for pedestrian dynamics was established, where both static floor field and collision effect derived from game theory were considered. Several model parameters were carefully determined by previous studies. Results obtained through model-based simulation and analytical approach (derived from mean field approximation) proved that outflow rate from an evacuation exit, which is usually estimated using outflow coefficient in building codes in Japan, can be improved by placing an appropriate obstacle in front of the exit. This can reduce collision probability at the exit by increasing collisions around the obstacles ahead of the exit.

  7. External Validity of Contingent Valuation: Comparing Hypothetical and Actual Payments.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mandy; Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Jareinpituk, Suthi; Cairns, John

    2016-10-09

    Whilst contingent valuation is increasingly used in economics to value benefits, questions remain concerning its external validity that is do hypothetical responses match actual responses? We present results from the first within sample field test. Whilst Hypothetical No is always an Actual No, Hypothetical Yes exceed Actual Yes responses. A constant rate of response reversals across bids/prices could suggest theoretically consistent option value responses. Certainty calibrations (verbal and numerical response scales) minimise hypothetical-actual discrepancies offering a useful solution. Helping respondents resolve uncertainty may reduce the discrepancy between hypothetical and actual payments and thus lead to more accurate policy recommendations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Asymmetric Hermite method for the velocity dependence of the Vlasov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Vlasov-Maxwell equations provide one of the basic kinetic theory descriptions of a plasma; in one dimension and for a single negatively charged species of unit charge and unit mass, and with a neutralizing background of immobile positive charge, where the integrals-{integral}f{alpha} du and - {integral}uf{alpha} du over all velocities u give the charge and current densities. Because of the self-consistent coupling, these equations are nonlinear, and very few exact solutions can be constructed. One challenge in the development of numerical methods for these equations is to produce methods that simultaneously and exactly conserve particles, momentum, and energy in a fully discrete model. I have previously described a pseudospectral method based on Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto collocation which was conservative in the sense that particles, energy, and momentum did not appear or disappear into the grid but could enter and leave the region of phase space being modeled; this is satisfactory for spatial boundaries, where particles can physically enter and exit, but the method had a maximum velocity boundary in phase space that allowed high-energy particles to enter and exit the system, carrying their energy and momentum with them, simply by accelerating or decelerating beyond the maximum speed. In this paper, a method is briefly described based on a nonstandard Hermite expansion in velocity that has no such maximum velocity and that does not suffer the same nonphysical loss of particles.

  9. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  10. On the Symmetry of Ionospheric Polar Cap Patch Exits Around Magnetic Midnight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, J. I.; Hosokawa, K.; Gulbrandsen, N.; Clausen, L.

    2014-12-01

    We present continuous observations of polar cap patches exiting the polar cap ionosphere into the night time auoral oval. Satellite images of the auroral oval and all-sky camera observations of 630.0 nm airglow patches superimposed onto SuperDARN convection maps, reveals a detailed picture on how patches exiting the polar cap and return to the dayside at night, on both the dusk convection cell and the dawn convection cell. We also present eight years of statistics demonstrating that the MLT distribution of patch exits are marginally affected by the IMF BY polarity 3-4 hours around midnight. Synthesizing our observations with previous results there are two, possibly related, explanations to why patches populate both convection cells almost symmetrically. i) Intake of patch material occur on both convection cells for both IMF BY polarities. ii) According to the patch formation model by Lockwood and Carlson et al. [1992] the excitation of flow associated with transient dayside reconnection produces cigar-shaped patches stretching across both the morning and the evening convection cells. Applying the dynamic polar cap flow model by Cowley and Lockwood [1992], we suggest that dawn-dusk elongated patches may be torn apart at night when they are grabbed by transient tail reconnection. The associated twin cell flow disturbance expanding from the reconnection region will divert plasma towards dawn and dusk. This may explain the observed exits on both convection cells.

  11. Children's Reading Profiles on Exiting the Reading Recovery Programme: Do They Predict Sustained Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliman, Andrew J.; Hurry, Jane; Bodman, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify reading profiles, which predict the literacy progress of Reading Recovery graduates. Reading Recovery is an intensive remediation for children after the first year of school. Children were assessed at exit from the programme and at 3-month, 6-month and 12-month follow-up points. Text Reading Level made unique…

  12. Causal Factors Attributed to Student Success on the California High School Exit Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Nikita A.

    2011-01-01

    American students are failing to demonstrate expected competency on basic skills taught in schools. The educational system needs a major overhaul to address declines in scholarly engagement. The State Board of Education (SBE) designed the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to give some merit to the high school diploma. Minorities and…

  13. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...” not less than three-fourths of an inch (1.9 cm) wide. (c) The fire retardant properties of paints or solutions must be maintained. Fire retardant paints or solutions must be renewed as often as necessary to maintain their fire retardant properties. (d) Exit routes must be maintained during construction,...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...” not less than three-fourths of an inch (1.9 cm) wide. (c) The fire retardant properties of paints or solutions must be maintained. Fire retardant paints or solutions must be renewed as often as necessary to maintain their fire retardant properties. (d) Exit routes must be maintained during construction,...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...” not less than three-fourths of an inch (1.9 cm) wide. (c) The fire retardant properties of paints or solutions must be maintained. Fire retardant paints or solutions must be renewed as often as necessary to maintain their fire retardant properties. (d) Exit routes must be maintained during construction,...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...” not less than three-fourths of an inch (1.9 cm) wide. (c) The fire retardant properties of paints or solutions must be maintained. Fire retardant paints or solutions must be renewed as often as necessary to maintain their fire retardant properties. (d) Exit routes must be maintained during construction,...

  17. School Exits in the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program: Evidence of a Marketplace?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article examines whether the large number of school exits from the Milwaukee school voucher program is evidence of a marketplace. Two logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression models tested the relation between the inability to draw large numbers of voucher students and the ability for a private school to remain viable. Data on…

  18. "Now My Old Self Is Thin": Stigma Exits after Weight Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granberg, Ellen M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I employ a structural symbolic interaction framework to examine the processes by which persons can exit a stigmatized identity. Using the empirical example of weight loss, I analyze how individuals evolve from an identity as "fat" and stigmatized to one that is "normal" with respect to weight and free from identification with…

  19. Compulsory Literacy and Numeracy Exit Standards for Senior Secondary Students: The Right Direction for Australia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Suzanne; Care, Esther; Griffin, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    An overview of positive and negative potential effects of the setting of compulsory exit-level standards in literacy and numeracy for students completing their final years of schooling is presented. The overview rests on studies completed primarily outside Australia, reflecting the reality of such practices not having been implemented widely in…

  20. PP1 initiates the dephosphorylation of MASTL, triggering mitotic exit and bistability in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Samuel; Fey, Dirk; McCloy, Rachael A.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.; Payne, Richard J.; Daly, Roger J.; James, David E.; Caldon, C. Elizabeth; Watkins, D. Neil; Croucher, David R.; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entry into mitosis is driven by the phosphorylation of thousands of substrates, under the master control of Cdk1. During entry into mitosis, Cdk1, in collaboration with MASTL kinase, represses the activity of the major mitotic protein phosphatases, PP1 and PP2A, thereby ensuring mitotic substrates remain phosphorylated. For cells to complete and exit mitosis, these phosphorylation events must be removed, and hence, phosphatase activity must be reactivated. This reactivation of phosphatase activity presumably requires the inhibition of MASTL; however, it is not currently understood what deactivates MASTL and how this is achieved. In this study, we identified that PP1 is associated with, and capable of partially dephosphorylating and deactivating, MASTL during mitotic exit. Using mathematical modelling, we were able to confirm that deactivation of MASTL is essential for mitotic exit. Furthermore, small decreases in Cdk1 activity during metaphase are sufficient to initiate the reactivation of PP1, which in turn partially deactivates MASTL to release inhibition of PP2A and, hence, create a feedback loop. This feedback loop drives complete deactivation of MASTL, ensuring a strong switch-like activation of phosphatase activity during mitotic exit. PMID:26872783

  1. PP1 initiates the dephosphorylation of MASTL, triggering mitotic exit and bistability in human cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samuel; Fey, Dirk; McCloy, Rachael A; Parker, Benjamin L; Mitchell, Nicholas J; Payne, Richard J; Daly, Roger J; James, David E; Caldon, C Elizabeth; Watkins, D Neil; Croucher, David R; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Entry into mitosis is driven by the phosphorylation of thousands of substrates, under the master control of Cdk1. During entry into mitosis, Cdk1, in collaboration with MASTL kinase, represses the activity of the major mitotic protein phosphatases, PP1 and PP2A, thereby ensuring mitotic substrates remain phosphorylated. For cells to complete and exit mitosis, these phosphorylation events must be removed, and hence, phosphatase activity must be reactivated. This reactivation of phosphatase activity presumably requires the inhibition of MASTL; however, it is not currently understood what deactivates MASTL and how this is achieved. In this study, we identified that PP1 is associated with, and capable of partially dephosphorylating and deactivating, MASTL during mitotic exit. Using mathematical modelling, we were able to confirm that deactivation of MASTL is essential for mitotic exit. Furthermore, small decreases in Cdk1 activity during metaphase are sufficient to initiate the reactivation of PP1, which in turn partially deactivates MASTL to release inhibition of PP2A and, hence, create a feedback loop. This feedback loop drives complete deactivation of MASTL, ensuring a strong switch-like activation of phosphatase activity during mitotic exit.

  2. Exit Documents and Students with Disabilities: Legal Issues. EPRRI Issue Brief Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karger, Joanne; Pullin, Diana

    This report describes court challenges to high school exit exams for students with disabilities, explores the legal and public policy issues, and discusses implications for educators. Legal challenges include claims brought under the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, and under disability statutes, including the…

  3. Ethnic variations in immigrant poverty exit and female employment: the missing link.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    Despite widespread interest in poverty among recent immigrants and female immigrant employment, research on the link between the two is limited. This study evaluates the effect of recently arrived immigrant women's employment on the exit from family poverty and considers the implications for ethnic differences in poverty exit. It uses the bivariate probit model and the Fairlie decomposition technique to analyze data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), a nationally representative survey of immigrants arriving in Canada, 2000-2001. Results show that the employment of recently arrived immigrant women makes a notable contribution to lifting families out of poverty. Moreover, the wide ethnic variations in the probability of exit from poverty between European and non-European groups are partially explained by the lower employment rates among non-European women. The results suggest that the equal earner/female breadwinner model applies to low-income recent immigrant families in general, but the male breadwinner model explains the low probability of poverty exit among select non-European groups whose female employment rates are notably low.

  4. Comparing Virtual Reference Exit Survey Results and Transcript Analysis: A Model for Service Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Joanne B.; MacKenzie, James C.

    2006-01-01

    This study uses virtual reference transcripts for which patrons completed exit surveys to seek any correlations between user and librarian satisfaction within virtual reference transactions. By analyzing transcripts with a focus on three elements-technology performance, preferred reference practices, and the demonstrated communication levels of…

  5. Student Nurse Attrition: Use of an Exit-Interview Procedure To Determine Students' Leaving Reasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glossop, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Attrition from a nursing program in Wales was studied through exit interviews with 105 students who left from 1996-1999. Academic difficulties, wrong career choice, and family, health, and financial problems were key reasons. Almost half had at least two reasons for leaving, suggesting a complex interplay of factors. (Contains 39 references.) (SK)

  6. Using an Entrance and Exit Interview Process To Assess the Effectiveness of an IEP Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garr, Madeline B.

    An entrance and exit interview procedure designed to evaluate student progress in an intensive English program (IEP) is discussed. The program offers six terms of 7 weeks each per year. Students are interviewed within the first 10 days after classes have started, always by the same individual. Both personal and placement information are gathered,…

  7. Exit Interviews Reveal Why Students Leave a BA-MD Degree Program Prematurely.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Louise; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The executive committee of a combined sixth-year Baccalaureate-M.S. degree program instituted the administration of exit interviews to gain systematic information about why students leave the program prematurely. The committee hoped to assess the school's admissions procedures, its educational policies, and its student support services. (MLW)

  8. The Impact of Alternate High School Exit Certificates on Access to Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Amy S. Gaumer; Morningstar, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of high school students plan to attend college, but little is known about the postsecondary enrollment of students who exit high school with certificates of completion or individualized diplomas. With as many as 10% of all high school completers in some states earning documentation other than the high school diploma, it is…

  9. The Exit Distribution for Smart Kinetic Walk with Symmetric and Asymmetric Transition Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yan

    2017-03-01

    It has been proved that the distribution of the point where the smart kinetic walk (SKW) exits a domain converges in distribution to harmonic measure on the hexagonal lattice. For other lattices, it is believed that this result still holds, and there is good numerical evidence to support this conjecture. Here we examine the effect of the symmetry and asymmetry of the transition probability on each step of the SKW on the square lattice and test if the exit distribution converges in distribution to harmonic measure as well. From our simulations, the limiting exit distribution of the SKW with a non-uniform but symmetric transition probability as the lattice spacing goes to zero is the harmonic measure. This result does not hold for asymmetric transition probability. We are also interested in the difference between the SKW with symmetric transition probability exit distribution and harmonic measure. Our simulations provide strong support for a explicit conjecture about this first order difference. The explicit formula for the conjecture will be given below.

  10. Youth Corps Case Studies: The New York City Volunteer Corps Exit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Natalie; Freedman, Marc

    This exit report chronicles the last 20 months of the 3-year demonstration phase of the New York City Volunteer Corps (CVC), whose members worked in teams at various sites to either provide human services or do physical work. These final months were characterized by the following factors: (1) a change in Corps leadership; (2) concern about…

  11. Impact of Repeatedly Failing a High School Exit Exam: Voices of English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Louis J.; Li, Chieh; Kimble, Edward; Ruah, Rachel; Stoianov, Diana; Krishnan, Kalyani

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the perceived psychological impact of repeated failures on a high school exit examination (HSEE). We interviewed eight self-identified English language learners (ELLs), whose ages ranged from 20 to 29. All participants were attending tutoring HSEE programs at urban community colleges in New England. Using a modified…

  12. Exploring Work and Development Options to Reduce Early Labour Force Exit of Mature Aged Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Hitendra; Kelly, Kathy; Tones, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Early labour force exit is a significant challenge associated with the ageing workforce in Australia and many other developed countries. A reduction and increased flexibility of work hours has been suggested to improve labour force participation of the mature aged cohort. However, little is known about mature aged workers' aspirations for…

  13. Why Do Some Employees Fall into and Fail to Exit a Job-Lock Situation?

    PubMed Central

    Groot, Wim; Pavlova, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have paid little attention to the employees' ability to exit a job-lock situation and factors that determine this ability. It remains unclear why some employees who experience job lock are able to exit this state while others remain in job lock. We use longitudinal data to identify employees who have fallen in the state of job lock and their subsequent behavior—exiting or remaining in job lock. By use of a first-order Markov transition models, we analyze the relevance of sociodemographic features, employment, occupational, sectoral, and contextual factors, as well as personality characteristics in explaining the transition or its absence. Overall the results show that both demographic factors and work-related aspects increase the likelihood that an employee enters the long-term job lock state (especially for older, married, full-time employed, those in a craft occupation and governmental sector, and in a region with high unemployment). Mental health problems and personality characteristics (low peak-end self-esteem and decisional procrastination) have a significant effect on the probability to stay in long-term job lock. On the contrary, having a managerial, service, or associate occupation, working in the private sector, and having promotion opportunities increase the chance of an exit from the state of job lock. PMID:23737809

  14. 29 CFR Appendix to Subpart E of... - Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit...) can be supplemented by the following to more effectively achieve employee safety and health in an... sparks, cigarettes and similar low level energy ignition sources. 5. Maintenance of equipment under...

  15. 29 CFR Appendix to Subpart E of... - Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit...) can be supplemented by the following to more effectively achieve employee safety and health in an... sparks, cigarettes and similar low level energy ignition sources. 5. Maintenance of equipment under...

  16. 29 CFR Appendix to Subpart E of... - Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit...) can be supplemented by the following to more effectively achieve employee safety and health in an... sparks, cigarettes and similar low level energy ignition sources. 5. Maintenance of equipment under...

  17. High School Exit Exams and Dropout in an Era of Increased Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelt, Steven W.; Marcotte, Dave E.

    2013-01-01

    A key form of student-level accountability is the requirement for students to pass high school exit exams (HSEEs) in order to receive a diploma. In this paper, we examine the impact of HSEEs on dropout during a period when these exams became more common and rigorous. Further, we study whether offering alternate pathways to graduation for students…

  18. Why do some employees fall into and fail to exit a job-lock situation?

    PubMed

    Huysse-Gaytandjieva, Anna; Groot, Wim; Pavlova, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have paid little attention to the employees' ability to exit a job-lock situation and factors that determine this ability. It remains unclear why some employees who experience job lock are able to exit this state while others remain in job lock. We use longitudinal data to identify employees who have fallen in the state of job lock and their subsequent behavior-exiting or remaining in job lock. By use of a first-order Markov transition models, we analyze the relevance of sociodemographic features, employment, occupational, sectoral, and contextual factors, as well as personality characteristics in explaining the transition or its absence. Overall the results show that both demographic factors and work-related aspects increase the likelihood that an employee enters the long-term job lock state (especially for older, married, full-time employed, those in a craft occupation and governmental sector, and in a region with high unemployment). Mental health problems and personality characteristics (low peak-end self-esteem and decisional procrastination) have a significant effect on the probability to stay in long-term job lock. On the contrary, having a managerial, service, or associate occupation, working in the private sector, and having promotion opportunities increase the chance of an exit from the state of job lock.

  19. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Figure 3D(1) and Figure 3D(2) for an interior release mechanism for a rear emergency exit door, and within the high force access region shown in Figure 3D(1) for an exterior release mechanism for a rear... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume...

  20. Door locking and exit security measures on acute psychiatric admission wards.

    PubMed

    Nijman, H; Bowers, L; Haglund, K; Muir-Cochrane, E; Simpson, A; Van Der Merwe, M

    2011-09-01

    Locking the exit doors of psychiatric wards is believed to reduce the risk of patients absconding. The aims of the study were to investigate both the prevalence of door locking and other exit security measures on UK admission wards, as well as whether door locking appears to be effective in keeping inpatients in. A cross-sectional survey on 136 acute psychiatric wards in the UK was conducted, in which a range of data on patients, staff, and conflict and containment events, including door locking and absconding, were collected from shift to shift during a period of 6 months. About one-third of the participating wards (30%) operated with their ward exit door permanently locked, whereas another third (34%) never locked the ward door. Univariate analyses suggested little association between exit security measures and absconding. A more robust multilevel statistical analysis, however, did indicate a reduction of about 30% of absconding rates when the ward door was locked the entire shift. Although locking the ward door does seem to reduce absconding to a certain extent, it far from completely prevents it. As it may be unrealistic to strive for a 100% absconding-proof ward, alternative measures for door locking to prevent absconding are discussed.

  1. Is the Resolution Style "Exiting Statements" Related to Adolescent Problem Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijsbroek, Saskia A. M.; Hale, William W., III; Van Doorn, Muriel D.; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the association between the adolescents' conflict resolution style "exiting statements" (i.e., the expression of the adolescent' desire to minimize or end the contact with his or her parents) in parent-adolescent conflicts with self-rated adolescent GAD symptoms and delinquency symptoms of 1313 adolescents. A multi-group,…

  2. [Ca2+ exit from intracellular stores of growing and fully grown native and devitrified porcine oocytes].

    PubMed

    Denisenko, V Iu; Kuz'mina, T I

    2012-07-01

    The exit of Ca2+ from intracellular stores in growing and fully grown native and devitrified porcine oocytes stimulated by somatotropin and GTP was investigated using fluorescent dye chlortetracycline. In native as well as in the devitrified porcines oocytes, in their fully grown phase, joint action of somatotropin and GTP stimulated additional freeing of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, but during subsequent processing of the cell with nocodazole (a polymerization inhibitor of microtubules), additional exit of calcium did not occur. In the growing phase of native oocytes during the joint acting of somatotropin and GTP additional exit for Ca2+ from the intracellular stores did not occur. Join action of somatotropin and GTP on growing devitrified oocytes lead to the additional freeing of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Injection of nocodazole inhibited the exit for calcium in growing devitrified oocytes treated with somatotropin and GTP. The data obtained points to the absence of difference of signal transduction mechanisms in growing and fully grown oocytes after devitrification.

  3. Inhibition of the mitotic exit network in response to damaged telomeres.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Santiago, Mauricio; de Los Santos-Velázquez, Ana Isabel; Monje-Casas, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    When chromosomal DNA is damaged, progression through the cell cycle is halted to provide the cells with time to repair the genetic material before it is distributed between the mother and daughter cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this cell cycle arrest occurs at the G2/M transition. However, it is also necessary to restrain exit from mitosis by maintaining Bfa1-Bub2, the inhibitor of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), in an active state. While the role of Bfa1 and Bub2 in the inhibition of mitotic exit when the spindle is not properly aligned and the spindle position checkpoint is activated has been extensively studied, the mechanism by which these proteins prevent MEN function after DNA damage is still unclear. Here, we propose that the inhibition of the MEN is specifically required when telomeres are damaged but it is not necessary to face all types of chromosomal DNA damage, which is in agreement with previous data in mammals suggesting the existence of a putative telomere-specific DNA damage response that inhibits mitotic exit. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism of MEN inhibition when telomeres are damaged relies on the Rad53-dependent inhibition of Bfa1 phosphorylation by the Polo-like kinase Cdc5, establishing a new key role of this kinase in regulating cell cycle progression.

  4. Exploring Students' Experiences with the California High School Exit Examination February 2006 to May 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vang, Mao Justice

    2009-01-01

    The California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) is a graduation requirement that includes passing a two part exam: English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics. Students take the exam for the first time in 10th grade. In 2005-06, the passing rates were about 77% for ELA and 75% for math. This study uses student level data to focus on the…

  5. The Entrance and Exit Effects in Small Electrochemical Filter-Press Reactors Used in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frias-Ferrer, Angel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Jose; Saez, Veronica; Exposito, Eduardo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Carlos M.; Mantiel, Vicente; Walsh, Frank C.; Aldaz, Antonio; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed to examine the entrance and exit effects in small electrochemical filter-press reactors used in the laboratory is presented. The single compartment of the filter-press reactor is filled with different turbulence promoters to study their influence as compared to the empty configuration.

  6. MTR, TRA603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION C THROUGH COOLANT WATER EXIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION C THROUGH COOLANT WATER EXIT TUNNEL ALONG NORTH SIDE AS IT RETURNS TO MAIN COOLANT TUNNEL LEAVING BUILDING TO THE NORTH. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-35, 5/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100591, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. The effect of nozzle-exit-channel shape on resultant fiber diameter in melt-electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilirad, Ahmad; Ko, Junghyuk; Rukosuyev, Maxym V.; Lee, Jason K.; Lee, Patrick C.; Jun, Martin B. G.

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, electrospinning using a molten poly (ε-caprolactone) resin has gained attention for creating fibrous tissue scaffolds. The topography and diameter control of such electrospun microfibers is an important issue for their different applications in tissue engineering. Charge density, initial nozzle-exit-channel cross-sectional area, nozzle to collector distance, viscosity, and processing temperature are the most important input parameters that affect the final electrospun fiber diameters. In this paper we will show that the effect of nozzle-exit-channel shape is as important as the other effective parameters in a resultant fiber diameter. However, to the best of our knowledge, the effect of nozzle-exit-channel shapes on a resultant fiber diameter have not been studied before. Comparing rectangular and circular nozzles with almost the same exit-channel cross-sectional areas in a similar processing condition showed that using a rectangular nozzle resulted in decreasing final fiber diameter up to 50%. Furthermore, the effect of processing temperature on the final fiber topography was investigated.

  8. Kin4 kinase delays mitotic exit in response to spindle alignment defects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2005-07-22

    For many polarized cells, it is critical that the mitotic spindle becomes positioned relative to the polarity axis. This is especially important in yeast, where the site of cytokinesis is predetermined. The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) therefore delays mitotic exit of cells with a mispositioned spindle. One component of the SPOC is the Bub2-Bfa1 complex, an inhibitor of the mitotic exit network (MEN). Here, we show that the Kin4 kinase is a component of the SPOC and as such is essential to delay cell cycle progression of cells with a misaligned spindle. When spindles are correctly oriented, Kin4 and Bub2-Bfa1 are asymmetrically localized to opposite spindle pole bodies (SPBs). Bub2-Bfa1 then becomes inhibited by Cdc5 polo kinase with anaphase onset, a prerequisite for mitotic exit. In response to spindle misalignment, Kin4 and Bub2-Bfa1 are brought together at both SPBs. Kin4 now maintains Bub2-Bfa1 activity by counteracting Cdc5, thereby inhibiting mitotic exit.

  9. Quantifying groundwater dependency of riparian surface hydrologic features using the exit gradient

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines groundwater exit gradients as a way to quantify groundwater interactions with surface water. We calibrated high resolution groundwater models for the basin fill sediments in the lower Calapooia watershed, Oregon, using data collected between 1928--2000. The e...

  10. Income Mobility and Exits from Poverty of American Children, 1970-1992. JCPR Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Peter; Danziger, Sheldon

    This longitudinal study investigated two issues regarding child poverty dynamics: whether long-run transitions out of poverty have changed and whether the events associated with exits from poverty have changed over time. The study contrasted mobility patterns of young children over the 1970s with patterns over the 1980s, examining which poor…

  11. High precision measurements of atom column positions using model-based exit wave reconstruction.

    PubMed

    De Backer, A; Van Aert, S; Van Dyck, D

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, it has been investigated how to measure atom column positions as accurately and precisely as possible using a focal series of images. In theory, it is expected that the precision would considerably improve using a maximum likelihood estimator based on the full series of focal images. As such, the theoretical lower bound on the variances of the unknown atom column positions can be attained. However, this approach is numerically demanding. Therefore, maximum likelihood estimation has been compared with the results obtained by fitting a model to a reconstructed exit wave rather than to the full series of focal images. Hence, a real space model-based exit wave reconstruction technique based on the channelling theory is introduced. Simulations show that the reconstructed complex exit wave contains the same amount of information concerning the atom column positions as the full series of focal images. Only for thin samples, which act as weak phase objects, this information can be retrieved from the phase of the reconstructed complex exit wave.

  12. Envisioning life "on the outs": exit narratives of incarcerated male youth.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Laura S

    2012-09-01

    In this article, the author explores the significance of "exits" for juvenile male offenders who are preparing to leave correctional institutions. The analysis focuses on practical and cognitive exit strategies, anticipated challenges, and future visions based on qualitative interviews with 20 juvenile males (ages 15-17 years) from two correctional facilities in the upper Midwest region of the United States. At the juncture of exit, all of the youth were involved in practical preparation for reentry and shared an emphasis on the theme of "individual responsibility" for their futures. However, the cognitive strategies they used to prepare for exit were strongly differentiated by level of motivation or expressed "openness" to change. Youth who had little motivation to change tended to deny the potential challenges associated with their return to the community, whereas those who expressed a greater openness to change were contemplating how to achieve an alternative, law-abiding future while realistically considering the potential pitfalls of crime temptations. Ambivalence about change was the most common pattern, expressed as a desire to move toward desistance but lacking the internal confidence or sense of social support to achieve such change. From these findings, implications for theory and practice are proposed.

  13. Youth Voter Turnout 1992 to 2004: Estimates from Exit Polls. CIRCLE Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, 2005

    2005-01-01

    CIRCLE has issued two releases estimating youth turnout in the 2004 presidential election. The first release was issued on November 3rd and provided the earliest turnout estimates based on National Election Pool (NEP) state and national exit polls and a preliminary vote count. The second was a Fact Sheet released on November 8th which provided…

  14. Exit Counseling Guide for Counselors. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended to help school financial aid administrators meet the requirement that they provide in-person exit counseling to borrowers of Federal Direct Stafford/Ford Loans (direct subsidized) and Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford/Ford Loans (direct unsubsidized). The guide is intended to be used with a companion video and a guide for…

  15. Aircraft and avionic related research required to develop an effective high-speed runway exit system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoen, M. L.; Hosford, J. E.; Graham, J. M., Jr.; Preston, O. W.; Frankel, R. S.; Erickson, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Research was conducted to increase airport capacity by studying the feasibility of the longitudinal separation between aircraft sequences on final approach. The multidisciplinary factors which include the utility of high speed exits for efficient runway operations were described along with recommendations and highlights of these studies.

  16. 29 CFR Appendix to Subpart E of... - Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention..., and Fire Prevention Plans This appendix serves as a nonmandatory guideline to assist employers in.... Fire prevention housekeeping. The standard calls for the control of accumulations of flammable...

  17. Ceramic filters and their use for cleaning dust-laden hot exit gases

    SciTech Connect

    B.L. Krasnyi; V.P. Tarasovskii; A.Yu. Val'dberg

    2005-03-01

    The performance characteristics of ceramic filter cells for cleaning dust-laden hot exit gases (400 - 1000{sup o}C) are reported. Major process parameters of a newly designed module-type FKI-45 filtering unit fitted with ceramic filter cells are given.

  18. Teaching Better, Teaching Together: A Coordinated Student Exit Poll across the States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Jennifer Kelkres; Howard, Alison; Evans, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Student exit polling has demonstrated value in the classroom (Berry and Robinson 2012; Evans and Lagergren 2007; Lelieveldt and Rossen 2009), but faculty typically operate these polls in isolation. When faculty collaborate, however, students gain additional benefits from the experience. Collaboration provides a geographically diverse "student…

  19. Marking emergency exits and evacuation routes with sound beacons utilizing the precedence effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijngaarden, Sander J.; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.; Boer, Louis C.

    2004-05-01

    Sound beacons can be extremely useful during emergency evacuations, especially when vision is obscured by smoke. When exits are marked with suitable sound sources, people can find these using only their capacity for directional hearing. Unfortunately, unless very explicit instructions were given, sound beacons currently commercially available (based on modulated noise) led to disappointing results during an evacuation experiment in a traffic tunnel. Only 19% out of 65 subjects were able to find an exit by ear. A signal designed to be more self-explanatory and less hostile-sounding (alternating chime signal and spoken message ``exit here'') increased the success rate to 86%. In a more complex environment-a mock-up of a ship's interior-routes to the exit were marked using multiple beacons. By applying carefully designed time delays between successive beacons, the direction of the route was marked, utilizing the precedence effect. Out of 34 subjects, 71% correctly followed the evacuation route by ear (compared to 24% for a noise signal as used in commercially available beacons). Even when subjects were forced to make a worst-case left-right decision at a T-junction, between two beacons differing only in arrival of the first wave front, 77% made the right decision.

  20. Changes in Student Attributions Due to the Implementation of Central Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerke, Britta; Maag Merki, Katharina; Holmeier, Monika; Jager, Daniela J.

    2011-01-01

    The central aim of standardized exit exams is to motivate students and teachers to work harder on critical subject matters and thus increase student achievement. However, the effects of the implementation of central exams on student motivation have not been analyzed in a longitudinal section until now. In the present study, the consequences of…

  1. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  2. Velocity dependant splash behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlett, C. A. E.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.; Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Bryant, R.; Newton, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme soil water repellency can occur in nature via condensation of volatile organic compounds released during wildfires and can lead to increased erosion rate. Such extreme water repellent soil can be classified as superhydrophobic and shares similar chemical and topographical features to specifically designed superhydrophobic surfaces. Previous studies using high speed videography to investigate single droplet impact behaviour on artificial superhydrophobic have revealed three distinct modes of splash behaviour (rebound, pinned and fragmentation) which are dependent on the impact velocity of the droplet. In our studies, using high-speed videography, we show that such splash behaviour can be replicated on fixed 'model' water repellent soils (hydrophobic glass beads/particles). We show that the type of splash behaviour is dependent on both the size and chemical nature of the fixed particles. The particle shape also influences the splash behaviour as shown by drop impact experiments on fixed sand samples. We have also studied soil samples, as collected from the field, which shows that the type of droplet splash behaviour can lead to enhanced soil particle transport.

  3. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.

  4. Peculiar cosmological velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    In the first section a gauge-invariant, variations formalism for investigating vector perturbations is set up, suitable for showing that there is no natural way that the usual scalar inflation field could give rise to vorticities. In the last two sections, a vector field A{sub {mu}} is coupled to the Einstein equations with a linearly perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric, constructed to generate first order vector perturbations. A working classical chaotic vector inflation is demonstrated and then quantum fluctuations of the field are used to constrain the cosmological perturbations. In particular, the vector momentum flux, T{sub 0i}, is tracked to the epoch where a radiation-dominated matter exists. Matching conditions using observational constraints of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) gives rise to a peculiar cosmological velocity of the order of 10{sup {minus}100}c. Amplification of this number, e.g., by breaking the conformal invariance of the field, could be used to generate cosmic magnetic fields using a dynamo mechanism.

  5. Numerical identification of blade exit angle effect on the performance for a multistage centrifugal pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, Osman; Kocaaslan, Osman; Hilmi Aksoy, Muharrem; Melih Guleren, Kursad; Ozgoren, Muammer

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, single and multistage centrifugal pumps are widely used in industrial and mining enterprises. One of the most important components of a centrifugal pump is the impeller. The performance characteristics are related to the pump comprising the head and the overall efficiency rely a great deal on the impeller geometry. In this work, effects of blade exit angle change on hydraulic efficiency of a multi stage pump impeller are investigated via Ansys-Fluent computational fluid dynamics software for constant width impeller entrance and exit gates, blade numbers and blade thickness. Firstly, the flow volume of a centrifugal pump impeller is generated and then mesh structure is formed for the full impeller flow volume. Secondly, rotational periodic flow model are adopted in order to examine the effect of periodic flow assumption on the performance predictions. Corresponding to the available experimental data, inlet mass flow rate, outlet static pressure and rotation of impeller are taken as 0.02m3s-1, 450 kPa and 2950 rpm, respectively for the water fluid. No slip boundary condition is exposed to all solid of surface in the flow volume. The continuity and Navier-Stokes equations with the k-ɛ turbulence model and the standard wall functions are used. During the study, numerical analyses are conducted for the blade exit angle values of 18°, 20°, 25°, 30° and 35°. In consequence of the performed analyses, it is determined that hydraulic efficiency of the pump impeller value is changed between 81.0-84.6%. The most convenient blade exit angle that yields 84.6% hydraulic efficiency at is 18°. The obtained results show that the blade exit angle range has an impact on the centrifugal pump performance describing the pump head and the hydraulic efficiency.

  6. A new function of Skp1 in the mitotic exit of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namil; Yoon, Hayoung; Lee, Eunhwa; Song, Kiwon

    2006-12-01

    We previously reported that Skp1, a component of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box protein (SCF) complex essential for the timely degradation of cell cycle proteins by ubiquitination, physically interacts with Bfa1, which is a key negative regulator of the mitotic exit network (MEN) in response to diverse checkpoint-activating stresses in budding yeast. In this study, we initially investigated whether the interaction of Skp1 and Bfa1 is involved in the regulation of the Bfa1 protein level during the cell cycle, especially by mediating its degradation. However, the profile of the Bfa1 protein did not change during the cell cycle in skp1-11, which is a SKP1 mutant allele in which the function of Skp1 as a part of SCF is completely impaired, thus indicating that Skp1 does not affect the degradation of Bfa1. On the other hand, we found that the skp1-12 mutant allele, previously reported to block G2-M transition, showed defects in mitotic exit and cytokinesis. The skp1-12 mutant allele also revealed a specific genetic interaction with Deltabfa1. Bfa1 interacted with Skp1 via its 184 C-terminal residues (Bfa1-D8) that are responsible for its function in mitotic exit. In addition, the interaction between Bfa1 and the Skp1-12 mutant protein was stronger than that of Bfa1 and the wild type Skp1. We suggest a novel function of Skp1 in mitotic exit and cytokinesis, independent of its function as a part of the SCF complex. The interaction of Skp1 and Bfa1 may contribute to the function of Skp1 in the mitotic exit.

  7. Rogue events in the group velocity horizon

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Ayhan; Amiranashvili, Shalva; Brée, Carsten; Mahnke, Christoph; Mitschke, Fedor; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of rogue waves arises from a mysterious and potentially calamitous phenomenon of oceanic surfaces. There is mounting evidence that they are actually commonplace in a variety of different physical settings. A set of defining criteria has been advanced; this set is of great generality and therefore applicable to a wide class of systems. The question arises naturally whether there are generic mechanisms responsible for extreme events in different systems. Here we argue that under suitable circumstances nonlinear interaction between weak and strong waves results in intermittent giant waves with all the signatures of rogue waves. To obtain these circumstances only a few basic conditions must be met. Then reflection of waves at the so-called group-velocity horizon occurs. The connection between rogue waves and event horizons, seemingly unrelated physical phenomena, is identified as a feature common in many different physical systems. PMID:23152941

  8. Rogue events in the group velocity horizon.

    PubMed

    Demircan, Ayhan; Amiranashvili, Shalva; Brée, Carsten; Mahnke, Christoph; Mitschke, Fedor; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of rogue waves arises from a mysterious and potentially calamitous phenomenon of oceanic surfaces. There is mounting evidence that they are actually commonplace in a variety of different physical settings. A set of defining criteria has been advanced; this set is of great generality and therefore applicable to a wide class of systems. The question arises naturally whether there are generic mechanisms responsible for extreme events in different systems. Here we argue that under suitable circumstances nonlinear interaction between weak and strong waves results in intermittent giant waves with all the signatures of rogue waves. To obtain these circumstances only a few basic conditions must be met. Then reflection of waves at the so-called group-velocity horizon occurs. The connection between rogue waves and event horizons, seemingly unrelated physical phenomena, is identified as a feature common in many different physical systems.

  9. Similarity of the Velocity Profile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    su x (with 0 constantb = ) is the empirically derived velocity scale developed by Zagarola and Smits [5] for turbulent boundary layer flow...Zagarola and Smits and others have shown that the velocity scaling factor given by Eq. 5 with sδ as the boundary layer thickness can collapse certain...and Smits , it is important to point out that the fact that the similarity length scale factor and the similarity velocity scale factor must follow

  10. 75 FR 48412 - Proposed Information Collection (Six-Month Post-Exit Focus Interview of Former VHA Employees...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Six-Month Post-Exit Focus Interview of Former VHA Employees.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0487).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Six-Month Post-Exit Focus Interview...

  11. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  12. High Velocity Implanting of Anchors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    pi’ech us~inq cold high pressure gas to s’jppl y -the, energy, instead of propllant gs. This turned .ne. "* "UNCLASSIFIED *SECJQ" : SSI FICA’ION O.TH.IS... pressure gun propulsor now used. These alternate ýropulsion systems all have the capability to propel the PEA’s and to eliminate the recoil problems that...EXIT AND AT GAS-WATER INTERFACE AS A FUNCTION OF TIME ..... ......... 34 11 REQUIRED INSIDE DIAMETER OF LAUNCH, TUBE AS A FUNCTION OF DRIVE PRESSURE

  13. Velocity ratio and its application to predicting velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2003-01-01

    The velocity ratio of water-saturated sediment derived from the Biot-Gassmann theory depends mainly on the Biot coefficient?a property of dry rock?for consolidated sediments with porosity less than the critical porosity. With this theory, the shear moduli of dry sediments are the same as the shear moduli of water-saturated sediments. Because the velocity ratio depends on the Biot coefficient explicitly, Biot-Gassmann theory accurately predicts velocity ratios with respect to differential pressure for a given porosity. However, because the velocity ratio is weakly related to porosity, it is not appropriate to investigate the velocity ratio with respect to porosity (f). A new formulation based on the assumption that the velocity ratio is a function of (1?f)n yields a velocity ratio that depends on porosity, but not on the Biot coefficient explicitly. Unlike the Biot-Gassmann theory, the shear moduli of water-saturated sediments depend not only on the Biot coefficient but also on the pore fluid. This nonclassical behavior of the shear modulus of water-saturated sediment is speculated to be an effect of interaction between fluid and the solid matrix, resulting in softening or hardening of the rock frame and an effect of velocity dispersion owing to local fluid flow. The exponent n controls the degree of softening/hardening of the formation. Based on laboratory data measured near 1 MHz, this theory is extended to include the effect of differential pressure on the velocity ratio by making n a function of differential pressure and consolidation. However, the velocity dispersion and anisotropy are not included in the formulation.

  14. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  15. High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; McKee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of high velocity clouds (HVCs) in the Galactic Halo. Our method accounts for the photoelectric heating from small grains and PAHs, and includes a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus gas density n) are presented for gas with a range of dust/gas ratios (D/G) and a range of metallicities (Z). Variations in D/G affect mainly the photoelectric heating rate, while variations in Z affect both the photoelectric heating and gas cooling. Curves are shown for D/G = 1 (local value) to D/G less than approx. equal to 0.005 and for Z=1 (local value) to Z= 0.005. We find that a two phase medium (CNM + WNM) can be in pressure equilibrium with a hot (T approximately 1-2 x 10(exp 6) K) halo within a range of permitted pressures, P(sup min) to P(sup max). We take halo parameters consistent with observed properties of the soft X-ray background. In general, both P(sup min) and P(sup max) decrease with lower D/G due to a drop in photoelectric heating from grains, while. P(sup min) and P(sup max) increase with lower Z due to a drop in gas coolants. We demonstrate that successful two phase models can be constructed with pressure in the range 10(exp 3) less than approximately equal to P/k less than approximately equal to 10(exp 4) K cm(exp -3) consistent with the thermal pressure in the Galactic disk. In addition, using the observed relation between CNM density and distance in HVCs, (n = 75/fDkpc cm(exp -3); Wakker & Schwarz 1991, AA, 250, 484) we show that our pressure curves constrain the allowed range of HVC heights to be between 0.3 - 16 kpc.

  16. Velocity Field Measurements of Human Coughing Using Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, T.; Marr, D. R.; Higuchi, H.; Glauser, M. N.

    2003-11-01

    Quantitative fluid mechanics analysis of human coughing has been carried out using new Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TRPIV). The study involves measurement of velocity vector time-histories and velocity profiles. It is focused on the average normal human coughing. Some work in the past on cough mechanics has involved measurement of flow rates, tidal volumes and sub-glottis pressure. However, data of unsteady velocity vector field of the exiting highly time-dependent jets is not available. In this study, human cough waveform data are first acquired in vivo using conventional respiratory instrumentation for various volunteers of different gender/age groups. The representative waveform is then reproduced with a coughing/breathing simulator (with or without a manikin) for TRPIV measurements and analysis. The results of this study would be useful not only for designing of indoor air quality and heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, but also for devising means of protection against infectious diseases.

  17. Factors associated with biosafety level-2 research workers' laboratory exit handwashing behaviors and glove removal compliance.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Merrill, Ray M; Zimmerman, Grant C; Collingwood, Scott C; Reading, James C

    2016-01-01

    Biosafety level-2 laboratories are designated for work with human-derived samples or moderate-risk microorganisms that transmit primarily by direct contact exposures. Many laboratory procedures generate unseen droplets that contaminate workers' hands, equipment, and work surfaces. Workers' strict adherence to glove removal and handwashing is required prior to laboratory exit to prevent inadvertent transmission of pathogens to self or others. However, little is known about biosafety level-2 workers' compliance with these behaviors. In this article, glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were measured by direct observation of 93 biosafety level-2 research workers from 21 university laboratories. Participants completed a 41-item survey measuring social cognitive theory-based variables related to handwashing, self-reported compliance, and demographic factors. Survey items, observed exit frequency, and laboratory characteristics were evaluated for associations with handwashing compliance. Overall, observed glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were 43.0% (Standard Error [SE] = 2.3%), and 8.2% (SE = 1.2%), respectively, while workers' self-reported glove removal and handwashing compliance were 73.7% (SE = 3.6%) and 35.5% (SE = 4.1%), respectively. The average number of observed laboratory exits per hour was 2.8 for workers with any handwashing compliance vs. 5.4 for workers with no handwashing compliance (p = 0.0013). Among the cognitive variables, behavioral modeling by supervisors and coworkers had the strongest association with workers' compliance (slope = 3.5, SE = 1.3, p = 0.0113). Workers in laboratories with a written handwashing policy had higher compliance (Mean = 14.1%, SE = 5.9%) than workers in laboratories with no written policy (Mean = 1.1%, SE = 1.0%; p = 0.0488). Multi-faceted interventions that encourage modeling of the behavior by supervisors and coworkers, implementation of written handwashing policies

  18. Multi-Velocity Component LDV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A laser doppler velocimeter uses frequency shifting of a laser beam to provide signal information for each velocity component. A composite electrical signal generated by a light detector is digitized and a processor produces a discrete Fourier transform based on the digitized electrical signal. The transform includes two peak frequencies corresponding to the two velocity components.

  19. Instantaneous Velocity Using Photogate Timers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolbeck, John

    2010-01-01

    Photogate timers are commonly used in physics laboratories to determine the velocity of a passing object. In this application a card attached to a moving object breaks the beam of the photogate timer providing the time for the card to pass. The length L of the passing card can then be divided by this time to yield the average velocity (or speed)…

  20. Transverse Velocity Shifts in Protostellar Jets: Rotation or Velocity Asymmetries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Cerqueira, Adriano H.; Riera, Angels

    2016-12-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction that have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could originate from rotation in the flow, or from side-to-side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (˜100-200 km s-1), an asymmetry ≳10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three-dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing, and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts (TVSs). Our analysis indicates that side-to-side velocitiy asymmetries could represent an important contribution to TVSs, being the most important contributor for large jet inclination angles (with respect the the plane of the sky), and cannot be neglected when interpreting the observations.