Science.gov

Sample records for actual exit velocity

  1. Volumetric velocity measurements of vortex rings from inclined exits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Daniel R.; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2010-03-01

    Vortex rings were generated by driving pistons within circular cylinders of inner diameter D = 72.8 mm at a constant velocity U 0 over a distance L = D. The Reynolds number, U 0 L/(2ν), was 2500. The flow downstream of circular and inclined exits was examined using volumetric 3-component velocimetry (V3V). The circular exit yields a standard primary vortex ring that propagates downstream at a constant velocity and a lingering trailing ring of opposite sign associated with the stopping of the piston. By contrast, the inclined nozzle yields a much more complicated structure. The data suggest that a tilted primary vortex ring interacts with two trailing rings; one associated with the stopping of the piston, and the other associated with the asymmetry of the cylinder exit. The two trailing ring structures, which initially have circulation of opposite sign, intertwine and are distorted and drawn through the center of the primary ring. This behavior was observed for two inclination angles. Increased inclination was associated with stronger interactions between the primary and trailing vortices as well as earlier breakdown.

  2. Relationship between cattle temperament as determined by exit velocity carcass merit in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this trial was to use cattle temperament, as determined by exit velocity only, as a means to evaluate the impact of temperament on carcass merit and the possible utilization of exit velocity alone as a sorting tool within the feedlot. At the time of processing, exit velocity and bod...

  3. Modeling the exit velocity of a compressed air cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Z. J.; Buresh, T. R.; Madsen, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of compressed air cannons in an undergraduate laboratory provides a way to illustrate the connection between diverse physics concepts, such as conservation of momentum, the work-kinetic energy theorem, gas expansion, air drag, and elementary Newtonian mechanics. However, it is not clear whether the expansion of the gas in the cannon is an adiabatic or an isothermal process. We built an air cannon that utilizes a diaphragm valve to release the pressurized gas and found that neither process accurately predicts the exit velocity of our projectile. We discuss a model based on the flow of air through the valve, which is in much better agreement with our data.

  4. Effect of cattle temperament as determined by exit velocity on lung respiratory lesions and liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this trial was to use exit velocity as a means of determining temperament of cattle to evaluate the impact of temperament on animal health. At the time of processing, exit velocity and body weight were recorded on 20 pens of cattle (2,877 head) at a commercial feedlot. Infrared sens...

  5. Motion fading is driven by perceived, not actual angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P J; Caplovitz, G P; Hsieh, P-J; Sun, J; Tse, P U

    2010-06-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here we examine the relationship between such 'motion fading' and perceived angular velocity. Using several different dot patterns that generate emergent virtual contours, we demonstrate that whenever there is a difference in the perceived angular velocity of two patterns of dots that are in fact rotating at the same angular velocity, there is also a difference in the time to undergo motion fading for those two patterns. Conversely, whenever two patterns show no difference in perceived angular velocity, even if in fact rotating at different angular velocities, we find no difference in the time to undergo motion fading. Thus, motion fading is driven by the perceived rather than actual angular velocity of a rotating stimulus. PMID:20371254

  6. Effect of relative velocity distribution on efficiency and exit flow of centrifugal impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishina, H.; Nishida, H.

    1983-03-01

    A quasi-three-dimensional flow analysis proposed by Senoo and Nakase (1972) is applied in order to estimate the relative velocity distribution within a centrifugal impeller, assuming that the flow is both isentropic and inviscid. The relationship between relative velocity distribution, impeller efficiency, and meridional exit flow is experimentally investigated for the case of shrouded impellers having various relative velocity distributions. Analytical results are used to establish design criteria for the relative velocity distribution of centrifugal impellers.

  7. Control of exit velocity profile of an asymmetric annular diffuser using wall suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    An asymmetric annular diffuser equipped with wall bleed (suction) capability was tested for controllability of exit velocity profile. The diffuser area ratio was 3.2, and the length to inlet height ratio was 1.6. Results show that the diffuser radial exit velocity profile could be controlled from a hub peaked to a tip peaked form by selective use of bleed on the outer wall or on both diffuser walls. Based on these results, application of the diffuser bleed technique to gas turbine combustors may be possible. Diffuser bleed could be used to tailor the airflow distribution for optimizing combustor performance at a variety of operating conditions.

  8. Breed group effects for chute exit velocity as an indicator trait for temperament in weaner cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine breed group differences in chute exit velocity (CEV) in weaner cattle (n=3176). Data were collected in 2004 through 2008 under procedures of objective 3, Southern Regional Research project S1013 with the following states contributing data: FL, LA, and MS...

  9. Two-dimensional Cascade Investigation of the Maximum Exit Tangential Velocity Component and Other Flow Conditions at the Exit of Several Turbine Blade Designs at Supercritical Pressure Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Cavour H; Plohr, Henry W

    1951-01-01

    The nature of the flow at the exit of a row of turbine blades for the range of conditions represented by four different blade configurations was evaluated by the conservation-of-momentum principle using static-pressure surveys and by analysis of Schlieren photographs of the flow. It was found that for blades of the type investigated, the maximum exit tangential-velocity component is a function of the blade geometry only and can be accurately predicted by the method of characteristics. A maximum value of exit velocity coefficient is obtained at a pressure ratio immediately below that required for maximum blade loading followed by a sharp drop after maximum blade loading occurs.

  10. Effect of Velocity and Temperature Distribution at the Hole Exit on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, V. K.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    An existing three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code (Arnone et al, 1991), modified Turbine Branch, to include film cooling considerations (Garg and Gaugler, 1994), has been used to study the effect of coolant velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on the heat transfer coefficient on three film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the C3X vane, the VKI rotor, and the ACE rotor. Results are also compared with the experimental data for all the blades. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (1991), Forest's model for augmentation of leading edge heat transfer due to free-stream turbulence (1977), and Crawford's model for augmentation of eddy viscosity due to film cooling (Crawford et al, 1980) are used. Use of Mayle's and Forest's models is relevant only for the ACE rotor due to the absence of showerhead cooling on this rotor. It is found that, in some cases, the effect of distribution of coolant velocity and temperature at the hole exit can be as much as 60 percent on the heat transfer coefficient at the blade suction surface, and 50 percent at the pressure surface. Also, different effects are observed on the pressure and suction surface depending upon the blade as well as upon the hole shape, conical or cylindrical.

  11. Effect of velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on film cooling of turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of coolant velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on the heat transfer coefficient on three-film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the C3X vane, the VKI rotor, and the ACE rotor. Results are also compared with the experimental data for all the blades. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion, Forest's model for augmentation of leading edge heat transfer due to freestream turbulence, and Crawford's model for augmentation of eddy viscosity due to film cooling are used. Use of Mayle's and Forest's models is relevant only for the ACE rotor due to the absence of showerhead cooling on this rotor. It is found that, in some cases, the effect of distribution of coolant velocity and temperature at the hole exit can be as much as 60% on the heat transfer coefficient at the blade suction surface, and 50% at the pressure surface. Also, different effects are observed on the pressure and suction surface depending upon the blade as well as upon the hole shape, conical or cylindrical.

  12. High Velocity Linear Induction Launcher with Exit-Edge Compensation for Testing of Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Stephen; Marriott, Darin

    2008-01-01

    Advances in ultra high speed linear induction electromagnetic launchers over the past decade have focused on magnetic compensation of the exit and entry-edge transient flux wave to produce efficient and compact linear electric machinery. The paper discusses two approaches to edge compensation in long-stator induction catapults with typical end speeds of 150 to 1,500 m/s. In classical linear induction machines, the exit-edge effect is manifest as two auxiliary traveling waves that produce a magnetic drag on the projectile and a loss of magnetic flux over the main surface of the machine. In the new design for the Stator Compensated Induction Machine (SCIM) high velocity launcher, the exit-edge effect is nulled by a dual wavelength machine or alternately the airgap flux is peaked at a location prior to the exit edge. A four (4) stage LIM catapult is presently being constructed for 180 m/s end speed operation using double-sided longitudinal flux machines. Advanced exit and entry edge compensation is being used to maximize system efficiency, and minimize stray heating of the reaction armature. Each stage will output approximately 60 kN of force and produce over 500 G s of acceleration on the armature. The advantage of this design is there is no ablation to the projectile and no sliding contacts, allowing repeated firing of the launcher without maintenance of any sort. The paper shows results of a parametric study for 500 m/s and 1,500 m/s linear induction launchers incorporating two of the latest compensation techniques for an air-core stator primary and an iron-core primary winding. Typical thrust densities for these machines are in the range of 150 kN/sq.m. to 225 kN/sq.m. and these compete favorably with permanent magnet linear synchronous machines. The operational advantages of the high speed SCIM launcher are shown by eliminating the need for pole-angle position sensors as would be required by synchronous systems. The stator power factor is also improved.

  13. Calculation of the velocity of a plasma flow in the nozzle exit section of a coaxial-electrode Hall accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoshko, I. A.; Ermachenko, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    The velocity of a plasma jet in the nozzle exit section and the pressure in the discharge zone of a coaxial-electrode Hall accelerator have been calculated on the basis of the experimentally measured enthalpy, temperature, and electron concentration near the indicated section within the framework of a model of the magnetic hydrodynamics of a plasma flow.

  14. Unexpected transverse velocity component of Xe{sup +} ions near the exit plane of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, G.; Mazouffre, S.; Sadeghi, N.

    2010-11-15

    The velocity component of singly charged xenon ions in a plane perpendicular to the thrust axis of the 1 kW-class PPS100-ML Hall effect thruster is deduced from laser induced fluorescence measurements on the 5d {sup 2}F{sub 7/2}{yields}6p {sup 2}D{sub 5/2}{sup 0} electronic transition at 834.72 nm. Measurements are carried out at several locations in the near field of the channel exhaust. Thruster operating parameters, such as magnetic field strength, discharge voltage, and xenon mass flow rate, are varied over a wide range. The initial aim of this work was to measure the azimuthal velocity of the ions due to their weak magnetic deflection. Surprisingly, experimental results cannot be explained by the one and only Lorentz force acting on Xe{sup +} ions. A realistic picture of the ion trajectory in the ExB drift plane is obtained when adding a velocity component directed toward the external cathode.

  15. Performance of an asymmetric short annular diffuser with a nondiverging inner wall using suction. [control of radial profiles of diffuser exit velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of a short highly asymmetric annular diffuser equipped with wall bleed (suction) capability was evaluated at nominal inlet Mach numbers of 0.188, 0.264, and 0.324 with the inlet pressure and temperature at near ambient values. The diffuser had an area ratio of 2.75 and a length- to inlet-height ratio of 1.6. Results show that the radial profiles of diffuser exit velocity could be controlled from a severely hub peaked to a slightly tip biased form by selective use of bleed. At the same time, other performance parameters were also improved. These results indicate the possible application of the diffuser bleed technique to control flow profiles to gas turbine combustors.

  16. Measurement of XeI and XeII velocity in the near exit plane of a low-power Hall effect thruster by light induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dancheva, Y.; Biancalana, V.; Pagano, D.; Scortecci, F.

    2013-06-15

    Near exit plane non-resonant light induced fluorescence spectroscopy is performed in a Hall effect low-power Xenon thruster at discharge voltage of 250 V and anode flow rate of 0.7 mg/s. Measurements of the axial and radial velocity components are performed, exciting the 6s{sup 2}[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o}{yields}6p{sup 2}[3/2]{sub 2} transition at 823.16 nm in XeI and the 5d[4]{sub 7/2}{yields}6p[3]{sub 5/2}{sup o} transition at 834.724 nm in XeII. No significant deviation from the thermal velocity is observed for XeI. Two most probable ion velocities are registered at a given position with respect to the thruster axis, which are mainly attributed to different areas of creation of ions inside the acceleration channel. The spatial resolution of the set-up is limited by the laser beam size (radius of the order of 0.5 mm) and the fluorescence collection optics, which have a view spot diameter of 8 mm.

  17. Measurement of XeI and XeII velocity in the near exit plane of a low-power Hall effect thruster by light induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dancheva, Y; Biancalana, V; Pagano, D; Scortecci, F

    2013-06-01

    Near exit plane non-resonant light induced fluorescence spectroscopy is performed in a Hall effect low-power Xenon thruster at discharge voltage of 250 V and anode flow rate of 0.7 mg/s. Measurements of the axial and radial velocity components are performed, exciting the 6s(2)[3/2]2(o)→6p(2)[3/2]2 transition at 823.16 nm in XeI and the 5d[4]7/2→6p[3]5/2(o) transition at 834.724 nm in XeII. No significant deviation from the thermal velocity is observed for XeI. Two most probable ion velocities are registered at a given position with respect to the thruster axis, which are mainly attributed to different areas of creation of ions inside the acceleration channel. The spatial resolution of the set-up is limited by the laser beam size (radius of the order of 0.5 mm) and the fluorescence collection optics, which have a view spot diameter of 8 mm. PMID:23822384

  18. Measurement of XeI and XeII velocity in the near exit plane of a low-power Hall effect thruster by light induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancheva, Y.; Biancalana, V.; Pagano, D.; Scortecci, F.

    2013-06-01

    Near exit plane non-resonant light induced fluorescence spectroscopy is performed in a Hall effect low-power Xenon thruster at discharge voltage of 250 V and anode flow rate of 0.7 mg/s. Measurements of the axial and radial velocity components are performed, exciting the 6s ^2[3/2]^o_2rArr 6p ^2[3/2]_2 transition at 823.16 nm in XeI and the 5d [4]_{7/2}rArr 6p [3]^o_{5/2} transition at 834.724 nm in XeII. No significant deviation from the thermal velocity is observed for XeI. Two most probable ion velocities are registered at a given position with respect to the thruster axis, which are mainly attributed to different areas of creation of ions inside the acceleration channel. The spatial resolution of the set-up is limited by the laser beam size (radius of the order of 0.5 mm) and the fluorescence collection optics, which have a view spot diameter of 8 mm.

  19. Investigation of the tip-clearance flow inside and at the exit of a compressor rotor passage. I - Mean velocity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1982-01-01

    A stationary two-sensor hot-wire probe has been used in combination with an ensemble averaging technique to measure the flow in the tip clearance region of a compressor rotor with emphasis on the leakage flow development inside the tip-clearance region and at the exit of the rotor. It is found that the presence and interaction of leakage flow, annulus boundary layer, and the scraping vortex is the dominant feature at mid-chord position. The rotation of the blade augments the leakage flow, resulting in the movement of the leakage jet toward the mid-passage. The blade-to-blade distribution of properties is shown to be highly nonuniform, except in the downstream and upstream regions.

  20. Rotor with Flattened Exit Pressure Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltas, Constantine (Inventor); Prasad, Dilip (Inventor); Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A rotor blade comprises an airfoil extending radially from a root section to a tip section and axially from a leading edge to a trailing edge, the leading and trailing edges defining a curvature therebetween. The curvature determines a relative exit angle at a relative span height between the root section and the tip section, based on an incident flow velocity at the leading edge of the airfoil and a rotational velocity at the relative span height. In operation of the rotor blade, the relative exit angle determines a substantially flat exit pressure ratio profile for relative span heights from 75% to 95%, wherein the exit pressure ratio profile is constant within a tolerance of 10% of a maximum value of the exit pressure ratio profile.

  1. Performance of high-velocity oxy-fuel-sprayed chromium carbide-nickel chromium coating in an actual boiler environment of a thermal power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D.

    2007-09-15

    The present study aims to evaluate the performance of a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr (chromium carbide-nickel chromium) coating on a nickel-based super-alloy in an actual industrial environment of a coal-fired boiler, with the objective to protect the boiler super-heater and reheater tubes from hot corrosion. The tests were performed in the platen super heater zone of a coal-fired boiler for 1,000 h at 900 degrees C under cyclic conditions. The Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating imparted the necessary protection to the nickel-based super alloy in the given environment. The dense and flat splat structure of the coating, and the formation of oxides of chromium and nickel and their spinels, might have protected the substrate super alloy from the inward permeation of corrosive species.

  2. Entry/Exit Port testing, test report

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, R.H.

    1993-05-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module I (WRAP-1) facility must have the ability to allow 55-gallon drums to enter and exit glovebox enclosures. An Entry/Exit Port (Appendix 1, Figure 1), designed by United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C), is one method chosen for drum transfer. The Entry/Exit Port is to be used for entry of 55-gallon drums into both process entry gloveboxes, exit of 55-gallon drum waste pucks from the low-level waste (LLW) glovebox, and loadout of waste from the restricted waste management glovebox. The Entry/Exit Port relies on capture velocity air flow and a neoprene seal to provide alpha confinement when the Port is in the open and closed positions, respectively. Since the glovebox is in a slight vacuum, air flow is directed into the glovebox through the space between the overpack drum and glovebox floor. The air flow is to direct any airborne contamination into the glovebox. A neoprene seal is used to seal the Port door to the glovebox floor, thus maintaining confinement in the closed position. Entry/Exit Port testing took place February 17, 1993, through April 14, 1993, in the 305 building of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Testing was performed in accordance with the Entry/Exit Port Testing Test Plan, document number WHC-SD-WO26-TP-005. A prototype Entry/Exit Port built at the Hanford Site was tested using fluorescent paint pigment and smoke candles as simulant contaminants. This test report is an interim test report. Further developmental testing is required to test modifications made to the Port as the original design of the Port did not provide complete confinement during all stages of operation.

  3. Effect of exit locations on ants escaping a two-exit room stressed with repellent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shujie; Cao, Shuchao; Wang, Qiao; Lian, Liping; Song, Weiguo

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of the distance between two exits on ant evacuation efficiency and the behavior of ants escaping from a two-exit room, we conducted ant egress experiments using Camponotus japonicus in multiple situations. We found that the ants demonstrated the phenomenon of "symmetry breaking" in this stress situation. It was also shown that different locations for the exits obviously affected the ants' egress efficiency by measuring the time intervals between individual egress and flow rate in eight repeated experiments, each of which contained five different distance between the two exits. In addition, it is demonstrated that there are differences between the predictions of Social Force Model of pedestrians and the behaviors of ants in stress conditions through comparing some important behavioral features, including position, trajectory, velocity, and density map.

  4. Think Exit at Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Tom; Satterfield, Coy E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the "Think Exit at Entry" program that has become the guiding principle for the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). The Georgia DJJ believes that the transition process begins the day the youth enters the system and continues well after release from the institution. Literature points the need for transition planning…

  5. Large Eddy Simulation in a Channel with Exit Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cziesla, T.; Braun, H.; Biswas, G.; Mitra, N. K.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the exit boundary conditions (vanishing first derivative of the velocity components and constant pressure) on the large eddy simulation of the fully developed turbulent channel flow has been investigated for equidistant and stretched grids at the channel exit. Results show that the chosen exit boundary conditions introduce some small disturbance which is mostly damped by the grid stretching. The difference between the fully developed turbulent channel flow obtained with LES with periodicity condition and the inlet and exit and the LES with fully developed flow at the inlet and the exit boundary condition is less than 10% for equidistant grids and less than 5% for the case grid stretching. The chosen boundary condition is of interest because it may be used in complex flows with backflow at exit.

  6. Experiment and modeling of exit-selecting behaviors during a building evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhiming; Song, Weiguo; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Hao

    2010-02-01

    The evacuation process in a teaching building with two neighboring exits is investigated by means of experiment and modeling. The basic parameters such as flow, density and velocity of pedestrians in the exit area are measured. The exit-selecting phenomenon in the experiment is analyzed, and it is found that pedestrians prefer selecting the closer exit even though the other exit is only a little far. In order to understand the phenomenon, we reproduce the experiment process with a modified biased random walk model, in which the preference of closer exit is achieved using the drift direction and the drift force. Our simulation results afford a calibrated value of the drift force, especially when it is 0.56, there is good agreement between the simulation results and the experimental results on the number of pedestrians selecting the closer exit, the average velocity through the exits, the cumulative distribution of the instantaneous velocity and the fundamental diagram of the flow through exits. According to the further simulation results, it is found that pedestrians tend to select the exit with shorter distance to them, especially when the people density is small or medium. But if the density is large enough, the flow rates of the two exits will become comparable because of the detour behaviors. It reflects the fact that a crowd of people may not be rational to optimize the usage of multi-exits, especially in an emergency.

  7. Solids flow pattern in the exit region of a CFB -- Furnace influence of exit geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, F.; Leckner, B.; Vrager, A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of the exit geometry on the flow pattern in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser was studied in a cold 1/9 scale model of the Chalmers 12 MW CFB boiler. The model, which is made of transparent perspex, was operated according to the simplified scaling laws proposed by Glicksman et al. (1993). 12 different exit configurations were compared at different fluidization velocities. Two bed materials were used: iron and steel. In order to verify the scaling laws, vertical pressure and density profiles, net solids flux and pressure fluctuations measured in the model were compared with corresponding results from the 12 MW boiler. The exit configurations were evaluated by comparing the net solids fluxes and the vertical pressure and density profiles of the riser. The overall flow behavior of the scale-model was found to be similar to that of the boiler: A dense bottom bed, a splash zone and a transport zone could be identified. The dynamics (in-bed pressure fluctuations) of the bottom bed were in agreement with those of the boiler. Differences between net solids fluxes during operation with different exits were in some cases of an order of magnitude. However, there were almost no difference in solids flux between an abrupt exit, an extended exit (such as that of the boiler) and an enhanced extension. A decrease in the net solids flux (increase in the internal back-mixing) could be obtained by inserting obstacles in the upper part of the riser, and an increase in the net solids flux was achieved by narrowing the duct from the riser to the cyclone inlet (increasing the average velocity in the duct). The original configuration of the duct with an inclined bottom results in back-mixing from the duct to the furnace, thereby reducing the net (external) solids flux.

  8. Exit flows from highly porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. J.; Hiatt, J. P.

    1994-02-01

    This paper presents laser velocimetry measurements of the streamwise component of mean velocities and turbulence intensities measured downstream from the exit plane of porous ceramic foams through which air is flowed. The recent development and commercial availability of porous ceramic foams has lead to their application in many fields. Their uses have extended to combustion, high-temperature fluid filtering, biotechnology, and as support matrix for catalysts. These applications have created an interest in their pore scale fluid mechanics, both within the porous matrix and along surfaces open to flow. One emerging application is porous ceramic burners which combust liquid or gaseous fuels within the pore matrix or along the surface of the ceramic. The ceramic foams have pore sizes ranging from 4 to 12 pores per cm (ppcm) and porosities of 85%. Mean velocities between 0.3 and 1.5 m/s were examined. Radial distributions of mean velocities show a jet-like structure through the pores, with local mean velocities reaching maximum values over two times the area mean velocity. Negative mean velocities were often observed between pores, suggesting that recirculation zones are present above the web-like struts surrounding the pores. Levels of turbulence intensities normalized by the area mean velocity ranged from 0.05 to 0.6 for the various flow rates and pore sizes. Turbulence intensities were found to increase with increasing pore size for a given flow rate.

  9. Comprehensive schoolteachers at risk of early exit from work.

    PubMed

    Mykletun, R J; Mykletun, A

    1999-01-01

    Risk of early exit from work for teachers was operationalized as high burnout scores, working part-time due to heavy burden and illness or working part-time while also receiving partial disability pension. Data were collected by mailed questionnaires in a cross-sectional study to a random sample of Norwegian comprehensive schoolteachers, response rate = 86% (N = 1860 valid cases). High age increased the risk of early exit from work, but for cynicism the age effect disappeared when sense of competence and stress were introduced in the regression model. Age had no effect for low professional efficacy. Sense of competence effected burnout, but actual competence level and the gap between actual competence and teaching obligations did not. Stress effected all measures of risk of early exit, especially exhaustion. Change as stress factor increased the exhaustion scores, and were also relevant to risk of having a part-time position, and/or partial disability pension. PMID:10553518

  10. Early exit: Estimating and explaining early exit from drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Alex; Radcliffe, Polly; Sanders, Melony; Hunt, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Background Early exit (drop-out) from drug treatment can mean that drug users do not derive the full benefits that treatment potentially offers. Additionally, it may mean that scarce treatment resources are used inefficiently. Understanding the factors that lead to early exit from treatment should enable services to operate more effectively and better reduce drug related harm. To date, few studies have focused on drop-out during the initial, engagement phase of treatment. This paper describes a mixed method study of early exit from English drug treatment services. Methods Quantitative data (n = 2,624) was derived from three English drug action team areas; two metropolitan and one provincial. Hierarchical linear modelling (HLM) was used to investigate predictors of early-exit while controlling for differences between agencies. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 53 ex-clients and 16 members of staff from 10 agencies in these areas to explore their perspectives on early exit, its determinants and, how services could be improved. Results Almost a quarter of the quantitative sample (24.5%) dropped out between assessment and 30 days in treatment. Predictors of early exit were: being younger; being homeless; and not being a current injector. Age and injection status were both consistently associated with exit between assessment and treatment entry. Those who were not in substitution treatment were significantly more likely to leave treatment at this stage. There were substantial variations between agencies, which point to the importance of system factors. Qualitative analysis identified several potential ways to improve services. Perceived problems included: opening hours; the service setting; under-utilisation of motivational enhancement techniques; lack of clarity about expectations; lengthy, repetitive assessment procedures; constrained treatment choices; low initial dosing of opioid substitution treatment; and the routine requirement of supervised consumption

  11. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency exits. 23.807 Section 23.807... Cargo Accommodations § 23.807 Emergency exits. (a) Number and location. Emergency exits must be located... following emergency exits: (1) For all airplanes with a seating capacity of two or more, excluding...

  12. Investigation of the feasibility of optical diagnostic measurements at the exit of the SSME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, John A.; Boedeker, Laurence R.

    1993-07-01

    Under Contract NAS8-36861 sponsored by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the United Technologies Research Center is conducting an investigation of the feasibility of remote optical diagnostics to measure temperature, species concentration and velocity at the exit of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). This is a two phase study consisting of a conceptual design phase followed by a laboratory experimental investigation. The first task of the conceptual design studies is to screen and evaluate the techniques which can be used for the measurements. The second task is to select the most promising technique or techniques, if as expected, more than one type of measurement must be used to measure all the flow variables of interest. The third task is to examine in detail analytically the capabilities and limitations of the selected technique(s). The results of this study are described in the section of this report entitled Conceptual Design Investigations. The conceptual design studies identified spontaneous Raman scattering and photodissociative flow-tagging for measurements respectively of gas temperature and major species concentration and for velocity. These techniques and others that were considered are described in the section describing the conceptual design. The objective of the second phase of investigations was to investigate experimentally the techniques identified in the first phase. The first task of the experimental feasibility study is to design and assemble laboratory scale experimental apparatus to evaluate the best approaches for SSME exit optical diagnostics for temperature, species concentrations and velocity, as selected in the Phase I conceptual design study. The second task is to evaluate performance, investigate limitations, and establish actual diagnostic capabilities, accuracies and precision for the selected optical systems. The third task is to evaluate design requirements and system trade-offs of conceptual instruments. Spontaneous Raman

  13. Investigation of the feasibility of optical diagnostic measurements at the exit of the SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, John A.; Boedeker, Laurence R.

    1993-01-01

    Under Contract NAS8-36861 sponsored by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the United Technologies Research Center is conducting an investigation of the feasibility of remote optical diagnostics to measure temperature, species concentration and velocity at the exit of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). This is a two phase study consisting of a conceptual design phase followed by a laboratory experimental investigation. The first task of the conceptual design studies is to screen and evaluate the techniques which can be used for the measurements. The second task is to select the most promising technique or techniques, if as expected, more than one type of measurement must be used to measure all the flow variables of interest. The third task is to examine in detail analytically the capabilities and limitations of the selected technique(s). The results of this study are described in the section of this report entitled Conceptual Design Investigations. The conceptual design studies identified spontaneous Raman scattering and photodissociative flow-tagging for measurements respectively of gas temperature and major species concentration and for velocity. These techniques and others that were considered are described in the section describing the conceptual design. The objective of the second phase of investigations was to investigate experimentally the techniques identified in the first phase. The first task of the experimental feasibility study is to design and assemble laboratory scale experimental apparatus to evaluate the best approaches for SSME exit optical diagnostics for temperature, species concentrations and velocity, as selected in the Phase I conceptual design study. The second task is to evaluate performance, investigate limitations, and establish actual diagnostic capabilities, accuracies and precision for the selected optical systems. The third task is to evaluate design requirements and system trade-offs of conceptual instruments. Spontaneous Raman

  14. Exit Exam as Academic Performance Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud; Al Marzouqi, Ali H.; Hussien, Mousa

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of exit exams on different elements of the educational process, namely: curriculum development, students and instructors. A 50-question multiple-choice Exit Exam was prepared by Electrical Engineering (EE) faculty members covering a poll of questions from EE core courses. A copy of the Exit Exam applied during each…

  15. 14 CFR 27.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... that may result from a crash; (2) Doors intended for normal use may also serve as emergency exits... shown by test, demonstration, or analysis to; (i) Be above the waterline; and (ii) Open without... emergency exit must be shown by test. (d) Ditching emergency exits for passengers. If certification...

  16. 14 CFR 27.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... that may result from a crash; (2) Doors intended for normal use may also serve as emergency exits... shown by test, demonstration, or analysis to; (i) Be above the waterline; and (ii) Open without... emergency exit must be shown by test. (d) Ditching emergency exits for passengers. If certification...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.122 - Employee exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee exits. 1917.122 Section 1917.122 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.122 Employee exits. (a) Employee exits shall be...

  18. 14 CFR 135.129 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exit seating. 135.129 Section 135.129....129 Exit seating. (a)(1) Applicability. This section applies to all certificate holders operating... certificate holder shall make the passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a...

  19. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exit seating. 121.585 Section 121.585..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.585 Exit seating. (a)(1) Each certificate... passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a non-discriminatory manner...

  20. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exit seating. 121.585 Section 121.585..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.585 Exit seating. (a)(1) Each certificate... passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a non-discriminatory manner...

  1. 14 CFR 135.129 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exit seating. 135.129 Section 135.129....129 Exit seating. (a)(1) Applicability. This section applies to all certificate holders operating... certificate holder shall make the passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a...

  2. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exit seating. 121.585 Section 121.585..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.585 Exit seating. (a)(1) Each certificate... passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a non-discriminatory manner...

  3. 14 CFR 135.129 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exit seating. 135.129 Section 135.129....129 Exit seating. (a)(1) Applicability. This section applies to all certificate holders operating... certificate holder shall make the passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a...

  4. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exit seating. 121.585 Section 121.585..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.585 Exit seating. (a)(1) Each certificate... passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a non-discriminatory manner...

  5. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exit seating. 121.585 Section 121.585..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.585 Exit seating. (a)(1) Each certificate... passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a non-discriminatory manner...

  6. 14 CFR 135.129 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exit seating. 135.129 Section 135.129....129 Exit seating. (a)(1) Applicability. This section applies to all certificate holders operating... certificate holder shall make the passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a...

  7. 14 CFR 135.129 - Exit seating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exit seating. 135.129 Section 135.129....129 Exit seating. (a)(1) Applicability. This section applies to all certificate holders operating... certificate holder shall make the passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a...

  8. The Exit Interview: A Generic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Anthony; Hill, Jonathan

    By providing more accurate and complete data, a personal exit interview is superior to an exit questionnaire; however, separation interviews in the field of education are not common. To optimize the benefits of an exit interview for both the district and the departing employee, a formal, oral interview should be scheduled within the last 4 weeks…

  9. 49 CFR 239.107 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency exits. 239.107 Section 239.107..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER TRAIN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Specific Requirements § 239.107 Emergency exits. For additional requirements related to emergency window exits, see part 223 of this chapter....

  10. 29 CFR 1917.122 - Employee exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employee exits. 1917.122 Section 1917.122 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.122 Employee exits. (a) Employee exits shall be...

  11. Discrete element crowd model for pedestrian evacuation through an exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Jian, Ma; Siuming, Lo

    2016-03-01

    A series of accidents caused by crowds within the last decades evoked a lot of scientific interest in modeling the movement of pedestrian crowds. Based on the discrete element method, a granular dynamic model, in which the human body is simplified as a self-driven sphere, is proposed to simulate the characteristics of crowd flow through an exit. In this model, the repulsive force among people is considered to have an anisotropic feature, and the physical contact force due to body deformation is quantified by the Hertz contact model. The movement of the human body is simulated by applying the second Newton’s law. The crowd flow through an exit at different desired velocities is studied and simulation results indicated that crowd flow exhibits three distinct states, i.e., smooth state, transition state and phase separation state. In the simulation, the clogging phenomenon occurs more easily when the desired velocity is high and the exit may as a result be totally blocked at a desired velocity of 1.6 m/s or above, leading to faster-to-frozen effect. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 71473207, 51178445, and 71103148), the Research Grant Council, Government of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU119011), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2682014CX103 and 2682014RC05).

  12. 14 CFR 23.805 - Flightcrew emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... emergency exit on each side of the airplane, or a top hatch emergency exit, in the flightcrew area; (b) Each... above the top of the emergency exit opening or, for a device at a pilot's emergency exit window,...

  13. 14 CFR 27.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exits. 27.807 Section 27.807 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.807 Emergency exits. (a) Number and...

  14. 14 CFR 27.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency exits. 27.807 Section 27.807 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.807 Emergency exits. (a) Number and...

  15. 14 CFR 25.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency exits. 25.807 Section 25.807... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.807 Emergency... required passenger emergency exit must be accessible to the passengers and located where it will afford...

  16. 14 CFR 25.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exits. 25.807 Section 25.807... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.807 Emergency..., with landing gear extended. (6) Tailcone. This type is an aft exit from the passenger...

  17. Topological inflation with graceful exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marunović, Anja; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a class of models of topological inflation in which a super-Hubble-sized global monopole seeds inflation. These models are attractive since inflation starts from rather generic initial conditions, but their not so attractive feature is that, unless symmetry is again restored, inflation never ends. In this work we show that, in presence of another nonminimally coupled scalar field, that is both quadratically and quartically coupled to the Ricci scalar, inflation naturally ends, representing an elegant solution to the graceful exit problem of topological inflation. While the monopole core grows during inflation, the growth stops after inflation, such that the monopole eventually enters the Hubble radius, and shrinks to its Minkowski space size, rendering it immaterial for the subsequent Universe's dynamics. Furthermore, we find that our model can produce cosmological perturbations that source CMB temperature fluctuations and seed large scale structure statistically consistent (within one standard deviation) with all available data. In particular, for small and (in our convention) negative nonminimal couplings, the scalar spectral index can be as large as ns simeq 0.955, which is about one standard deviation lower than the central value quoted by the most recent Planck Collaboration.

  18. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  19. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (20 pounds) of force shall be required to release the exit. For exits which require a straight motion... operating instructions describing each motion necessary to unlatch or open the exit located within 152 mm...

  20. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to allow escape without crowding in any probable crash attitude. The airplane must have at least the... that is likely to block the pilot's escape in a minor crash, there must be an exit in the...

  1. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to allow escape without crowding in any probable crash attitude. The airplane must have at least the... that is likely to block the pilot's escape in a minor crash, there must be an exit in the...

  2. A Rare Case of an Intact Bone Plug Associated with a Gunshot Exit Wound.

    PubMed

    Bird, Cate E; Fleischman, Julie M

    2015-07-01

    This case study presents an unusual manifestation of gunshot trauma in skeletal tissue from a post-World War II human rights abuse sample uncovered in Vilnius, Lithuania. After briefly reviewing the typical wound appearance of projectile trauma in the cranium, we discuss the presence of an intact bone plug associated with a gunshot exit wound in an individual from the Tuskulenai Case. While this individual demonstrated typical gunshot entry and exit wounds to the cranium consistent with high-velocity trauma, the bone plug indicates that the projectile likely lost much of its kinetic energy while traveling through the cranium resulting in a low-velocity impact at the exit site. This study reviews a similar instance of a bone plug recovered from a bioarcheological sample in Peru and emphasizes the importance of thorough archeological excavations of mass graves. PMID:25832722

  3. Exit-site care in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Nand K; Reddy, Gampala H

    2007-01-01

    Exit-site infection (ESI), tunnel infection and associated peritonitis are major causes of morbidity and catheter loss in chronic peritoneal dialysis patients. Meticulous exit-site care is vital in preventing ESI. Avoiding trauma to the exit-site and daily cleaning of the exit-site with a dedicated antimicrobial soap is essential for the longevity of the peritoneal dialysis catheter. Antibiotics cream and disinfectant agents including povidone-iodine, chlorhexidine, electrolytic chloroxidizing solutions (Amuchina 10% - ExSept Plus, Amuchina 5% - ExSept) are useful to keep the resident micro-organisms inhibited. ESI rates in peritoneal dialysis patients treated with Amuchina 10% (ExSept Plus) and Amuchina 5% (ExSept) for the exit-site care are similar or lower compared to povidone-iodine or chlorhexidine. Electrolytic chloroxidizing (Amuchina 10% - ExSept Plus and Amuchina 5% - ExSept) solutions for exit-site care are effective for prevention and treatment of ESI. PMID:17099306

  4. New approach of a traditional analysis for predicting near-exit jet liquid instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Guillermo; Collicott, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Traditional linear instability theory for round liquid jets requires an exit-plane velocity profile be assumed so as to derive the characteristic growth rates and wavelengths of instabilities. This requires solving an eigenvalue problem for the Rayleigh Equation. In this new approach, a hyperbolic tangent velocity profile is assumed at the exit-plane of a round jet and a comparison is made with a hyperbolic secant profile. Temporal and Spatial Stability Analysis (TSA and SSA respectively) are the employed analytical tools to compare results of predicted most-unstable wavelengths from the given analytical velocity profiles and from previous experimental work. The local relevance of the velocity profile in the near-exit region of a liquid jet and the validity of an inviscid formulation through the Rayleigh equation are discussed as well. A comparison of numerical accuracy is made between two different mathematical approaches for the hyperbolic tangent profile with and without the Ricatti transformation. Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of the boundary layer at the exit plane non-dimensionalizes the problem and, the Re range, based on measurements by Portillo in 2011, is 185 to 600. Wavelength measurements are taken from Portillo's experiment. School of Mechanical Engineering at Universidad del Valle, supported by a grant from Fulbright and Colciencias. Ph.D. student at the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Purdue University.

  5. The effect of the exit condition on the performance of intube condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.; Arman, B.

    1995-07-01

    Data collected from the open literature plus some new, unpublished data will be used to show that the exit condition can change the flow regimes, introduce certain types of instabilities, and alter flooding velocities with intube condensation. The major orientations will be considered: horizontal, vertical with vapor downflow, and vertical with vapor upflow (refluxing).

  6. Coupling Between Velocities in a Radial Supercharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlechko, V. N.; Petrov, O. A.

    2014-03-01

    We have analyzed the velocities of the medium and impeller in a radial supercharger with consideration of the Coriolis acceleration. We have derived an expression for determining the angular velocity of the medium that differs from the angular velocity of the impeller. Dependences have been obtained to determine the velocity of the medium at the exit from the impeller on the inclination angle of the supercharger blades and their coupling with the circumferential velocity of the impeller in the absence of energy losses. Graphical dependences of velocities on the inclination angle of the blades at different ratios of inside radius to outside radius have been constructed.

  7. Bevelling in exit gunshot wounds in bones.

    PubMed

    Quatrehomme, G; Işcan, M Y

    1997-09-19

    The analysis of trauma to the skeleton is an important aspect of forensic case work, but most major pathology references devote limited attention to this topic. The aim of this paper is to analyze bevelling in exit gunshot wounds from a series of 14 cases with 17 exit wounds. Assessment of bevelling was made by measuring the endocranial and ectrocranial size of the wound, locating the most pronounced bevelling, and determining if there is a correlation between the direction of bevelling and the direction of shooting. The results indicate outward bevelling of exit wounds in nearly two thirds of cases. No bevelling was observed in the orbits, sphenoid, and in some cases, the occipital and parietal bones. Internal bevelling of exit wounds was not found in this series. Bevelling may be partly understood using a glass model. The inconsistent correlation of the direction of bevelling in exit wounds with the direction of shooting leads to the conclusion that this characteristic cannot be relied upon to determine the direction of fire. PMID:9306668

  8. Flow Regime Study in a High Density Circulating Fluidized Bed Riser with an Abrupt Exit

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Shadle, L.J.; Yue, P.C.; Monazam, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    Flow regime study was conducted in a 0.3 m diameter, 15.5 m height circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser with an abrupt exit at the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. Local particle velocities were measured at various radial positions and riser heights using an optical fiber probe. On-line measurement of solid circulating rate was continuously recorded by the Spiral. Glass beads of mean diameter 61 μm and particle density of 2,500 kg/m3 were used as bed material. The CFB riser was operated at various superficial gas velocities ranging from 3 to 7.6 m/s and solid mass flux from 20 to 550 kg/m2-s. At a constant riser gas velocity, transition from fast fluidization to dense suspension upflow (DSU) regime started at the bottom of the riser with increasing solid flux. Except at comparatively low riser gas velocity and solid flux, the apparent solid holdup at the top exit region was higher than the middle section of the riser. The solid fraction at this top region could be much higher than 7% under high riser gas velocity and solid mass flux. The local particle velocity showed downward flow near the wall at the top of the riser due to its abrupt exit. This abrupt geometry reflected the solids and, therefore, caused solid particles traveling downward along the wall. However, at location below, but near, the top of the riser the local particle velocities were observed flowing upward at the wall. Therefore, DSU was identified in the upper region of the riser with an abrupt exit while the fully developed region, lower in the riser, was still exhibiting core-annular flow structure. Our data were compared with the flow regime boundaries proposed by Kim et al. [1] for distinguishing the dilute pneumatic transport, fast fluidization, and DSU.

  9. Exit Strategies: How Low-Performing High Schools Respond to High School Exit Examination Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Jennifer Jellison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Over the past several decades, a significant number of states have either adopted or increased high school exit examination requirements. Although these policies are intended to generate improvement in schools, little is known about how high schools are responding to exit testing pressures. Purpose: This study examined how five…

  10. An Entrance to Exit Polling: Strategies for Using Exit Polls as Experiential Learning Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Michael J.; Robinson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Engaging students in the design, administration, and postelection analysis of an exit poll can be an excellent experiential learning activity. Lelieveldt and Rossen (2009) argue that exit polls are a "perfect teaching tool" because they provide students with a cooperative (rather than competitive) learning experience; help students better connect…

  11. The Self Actualized Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael; Moylan, Mary Elizabeth

    A study examined the commonalities that "voracious" readers share, and how their experiences can guide parents, teachers, and librarians in assisting children to become self-actualized readers. Subjects, 25 adults ranging in age from 20 to 67 years, completed a questionnaire concerning their reading histories and habits. Respondents varied in…

  12. Comparison of flight speed and exit score as measurements of temperament in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Vetters, M D D; Engle, T E; Ahola, J K; Grandin, T

    2013-01-01

    Observations were collected for the purpose of comparing exit velocity measurements in the form of exit score (ES; walk, trot, canter, or run) and flight speed (FS) as assessments of cattle temperament. Squeeze chute exit velocity was obtained for 1,181 crossbred yearling steers using ES and FS temperament systems. Flight speed used infrared sensors to determine the time taken for an animal to traverse a fixed distance of 1.83 m after exiting the squeeze chute. Exit score (1=walk, 2=trot, 3=canter, and 4=run) was assigned by 2 different observers when each steer crossed a fixed point between the infrared sensors. All animals were scored with each system (ES and FS) simultaneously on exiting the squeeze chute on d -21 and d -1 of the experiment. Of the 1,181 cattle, 357 were moved to a nearby research feedyard for use in a 140 d feedlot trial. These cattle were scored using both measurement systems and BW was recorded at 35 d intervals throughout the trial. Exit score was assessed for observer reliability, ES and FS were compared for measurement repeatability, and both were assessed on ability to predict ADG. Exit score between observers on a single day showed considerable agreement (weighted Kappa=0.66), indicating the system was reliable between different observers. However, the agreement for a single observer between day was only moderate (weighted Kappa=0.40), indicating a day effect for ES. In addition, although mean velocities for day were not different (P>0.18; FS=2.98±.87 and 3.02±0.87 m/s for day, respectively), the persistence of FS for each animal was low (Spearman rank correlation coefficient=0.25). The frequency that an animal would be placed into the same third of FS or receive the same ES on consecutive weigh days was 50% and 60.0%, respectively, and both were moderate predictors of ADG (R2=0.14 and R2=0.17). These data indicate that ES and FS are reliable instruments for assessment of temperament on a given day, and show moderate repeatability

  13. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sliding window emergency exits in the flight crew area need not be openable from the outside if other approved exits are convenient and readily accessible to the flight crew area. Each emergency exit must be.... Internal exit-opening means involving sequence operations (such as operation of two handles or latches,...

  14. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... sliding window emergency exits in the flight crew area need not be openable from the outside if other approved exits are convenient and readily accessible to the flight crew area. Each emergency exit must be.... Internal exit-opening means involving sequence operations (such as operation of two handles or latches,...

  15. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sliding window emergency exits in the flight crew area need not be openable from the outside if other approved exits are convenient and readily accessible to the flight crew area. Each emergency exit must be.... Internal exit-opening means involving sequence operations (such as operation of two handles or latches,...

  16. 12 CFR 611.1250 - Preliminary exit fee estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preliminary exit fee estimate. 611.1250 Section... System Institution Status § 611.1250 Preliminary exit fee estimate. (a) Preliminary exit fee estimate—terminating association. You must provide a preliminary exit fee estimate to us when you submit the plan...

  17. 14 CFR 29.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... emergency exit in a minor crash landing as a result of fuselage deformation under the ultimate inertial... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency exit arrangement. 29.809 Section... Accommodations § 29.809 Emergency exit arrangement. (a) Each emergency exit must consist of a movable door...

  18. Jet Exit Rig Six Component Force Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Wolter, John; Woike, Mark; Booth, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    A new six axis air balance was delivered to the NASA Glenn Research Center. This air balance has an axial force capability of 800 pounds, primary airflow of 10 pounds per second, and a secondary airflow of 3 pounds per second. Its primary use was for the NASA Glenn Jet Exit Rig, a wind tunnel model used to test both low-speed, and high-speed nozzle concepts in a wind tunnel. This report outlines the installation of the balance in the Jet Exit Rig, and the results from an ASME calibration nozzle with an exit area of 8 square-inches. The results demonstrated the stability of the force balance for axial measurements and the repeatability of measurements better than 0.20 percent.

  19. Relationship of core exit-temperature noise to thermal-hydraulic conditions in PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Core exit thermocouple temperature noise and neutron detector noise measurements were performed at the Loss of Fluid Test Facility (LOFT) reactor and a Westinghouse, 1148 MW(e) PWR to relate temperature noise to core thermal-hydraulic conditions. The noise analysis results show that the RMS of the temperature noise increases linearly with increasing core ..delta..T at LOFT and the commercial PWR. Out-of-core test loop temperature noise has shown similar behavior. The phase angle between core exit temperature noise and in-core or ex-core neutron noise is directly related to the core coolant flow velocity. However, if the thermocouple response time is slow, compared to the coolant transit time between the sensors, velocities inferred from the phase angle are lower than measured coolant flow velocities.

  20. 49 CFR 239.107 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... retained in its database system and identifies those individuals who have such access; (2) The railroad has a terminal at the system headquarters and at each division headquarters; (3) Each such terminal has... its inspection, maintenance, and repair of emergency window and door exits at its system...

  1. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exits. 23.807 Section 23.807 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations §...

  2. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency exits. 23.807 Section 23.807 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations §...

  3. USEPA EXAMPLE EXIT LEVEL ANALYSIS RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developed by NERL/ERD for the Office of Solid Waste, the enclosed product provides an example uncertainty analysis (UA) and initial process-based sensitivity analysis (SA) of hazardous waste "exit" concentrations for 7 chemicals and metals using the 3MRA Version 1.0 Modeling Syst...

  4. Scholars Probe Diverse Effects of Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on a study released in April 2009 that suggests that California's high school exit exams are affecting some student demographic groups more than others. The California study, which was released by the Institute for Research on Education Policy and Practice at Stanford University, is the latest in a small spate of studies…

  5. High School Exit Exams and Hispanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the report, entitled "State High School Exit Exams: A Maturing Reform", that addressed the achievement gaps that exist for minority and English language learner (ELL) populations. In this article, the author shows how Hispanics and ELLs lag behind Caucasians in terms of passing percentage in different subject areas. The…

  6. Epigenetics as a First Exit Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, E.; Sneppen, K.

    2002-01-01

    We develop a framework to discuss the stability of epigenetic states as first exit problems in dynamical systems with noise. We consider in particular the stability of the lysogenic state of the λ prophage. The formalism defines a quantitative measure of robustness of inherited states.

  7. Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz

    2010-09-15

    A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

  8. Mathematical design of a highway exit curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdemirli, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    A highway exit curve is designed under the assumption that the tangential and normal components of the acceleration of the vehicle remain constant throughout the path. Using fundamental principles of physics and calculus, the differential equation determining the curve function is derived. The equation and initial conditions are cast into a dimensionless form first for universality of the results. It is found that the curves are effected by only one dimensionless parameter which is the ratio of the tangential acceleration to the normal acceleration. For no tangential acceleration, the equation can be solved analytically yielding a circular arc solution as expected. For nonzero tangential acceleration, the function is complicated and no closed-form solutions exist for the differential equation. The equation is solved numerically for various acceleration ratios. Discussions for applications to highway exits are given.

  9. Low-noise fan exit guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Heidelberg, Laurence J. (Inventor); Envia, Edmane (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Low-noise fan exit guide vanes are disclosed. According to the present invention a fan exit guide vane has an outer shell substantially shaped as an airfoil and defining an interior cavity. A porous portion of the outer shell allows communication between the fluctuations in the air passing over the guide vane and the interior cavity. At least one acoustically resonant chamber is located within the interior cavity. The resonant chamber is in communication with the porous portion of the outer perimeter. The resonant chamber is configured to reduce the noise generated at a predetermined frequency. In various preferred embodiments, there is a plurality of acoustically resonant chambers located within the interior cavity. The resonant chambers can be separated by one or more partitions within the interior cavity. In these embodiments, the resonant chambers can be configured to reduce the noise generated over a range of predetermined frequencies.

  10. Preventing 'exit block' in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Kevin; Clancy, Elaine

    2014-11-01

    Overcrowding due to poor patient flow increases risk for more than 500,000 patients a year ( College of Emergency Medicine (CEM) 2014 ) and is linked to increased mortality ( Geelhoed and de Klerk 2012 ). CEM ( 2014 ) has called for urgent action to address 'exit block' in UK emergency departments (EDs). In October last year, Croydon Health Services NHS Trust designed and implemented a site practitioner early warning system (SPEWS) to alert staff to capacity and flow pressures in the ED, and to initiate escalation to a nurse-led, protocol-driven response. Under pressurised and time-critical conditions, SPEWS ensures rigour and conformity in exchanges between clinical emergency care staff and managers. The result is closer collaboration between clinicians and managers, optimised patient flow and mitigated risk from exit block. PMID:25369968

  11. The effect of exit conditions on the development of an axisymmetric turbulent free jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, S. J.; Foss, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The mean flow in the near field of a submerged axisymmetric jet emitting from a plane wall is presented. An experimental configuration to provide a nearly uniform mean velocity profile with a core of homogeneous turbulence of variable intensity and scale was developed. Eight cases with intensity values of 0.004 less than or equal to U prime less than or equal to 0.035 and integral scales up to l sub x/R = 0.28 were investigated using conditional sampling techniques. It was found that the jet exhibits an increasing momentum flux in the near field. Contrary to expectation and the accepted assumption of ambient static pressure in a turbulent jet, results seem to be conclusive and borne out by comparison with published data. Both integral measures, mass and momentum flux ratios, are insensitive to exit turbulence variations, but, the detailed structure (including centerline velocity) variations with exit conditions are systematic and explainable.

  12. Exit Exams: Decreases or Increases the Dropout Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the impact of exit exams on the dropout rate. Data was gathered from several research articles. The most impressionable research revealed exit exams have a negative effect on minorities, especially black males. Results indicate by 2012, that exit exams in 25 states will affect 81 percent of minority high…

  13. 14 CFR 25.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 25.813 Section 25... Emergency exit access. Each required emergency exit must be accessible to the passengers and located where... following must be provided for each Type III or Type IV exit—(1) There must be access from the nearest...

  14. 14 CFR 25.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 25.813 Section 25... Emergency exit access. Each required emergency exit must be accessible to the passengers and located where... following must be provided for each Type III or Type IV exit—(1) There must be access from the nearest...

  15. 14 CFR 25.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 25.813 Section 25... Emergency exit access. Each required emergency exit must be accessible to the passengers and located where... following must be provided for each Type III or Type IV exit—(1) There must be access from the nearest...

  16. 14 CFR 25.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 25.813 Section 25... Emergency exit access. Each required emergency exit must be accessible to the passengers and located where... following must be provided for each Type III or Type IV exit—(1) There must be access from the nearest...

  17. 14 CFR 25.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 25.813 Section 25... Emergency exit access. Each required emergency exit must be accessible to the passengers and located where... following must be provided for each Type III or Type IV exit—(1) There must be access from the nearest...

  18. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on South Carolina's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  19. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Tennessee's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  20. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Oregon's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  1. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Nevada's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  2. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Rhode Island's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  3. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9... ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted on certain temporary worker visas at a port of entry participating in the Temporary Worker Visa Exit...

  4. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9... ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted on certain temporary worker visas at a port of entry participating in the Temporary Worker Visa Exit...

  5. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9... ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted on certain temporary worker visas at a port of entry participating in the Temporary Worker Visa Exit...

  6. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9... ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted on certain temporary worker visas at a port of entry participating in the Temporary Worker Visa Exit...

  7. 8 CFR 215.9 - Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. 215.9... ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.9 Temporary Worker Visa Exit Program. An alien admitted on certain temporary worker visas at a port of entry participating in the Temporary Worker Visa Exit...

  8. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Jersey's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  9. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New York's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  10. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Ohio's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  11. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Oklahoma's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  12. A Legal Overview and History of High School Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Lenford

    2006-01-01

    State exit exams, also known as graduation tests, are tests that student must pass to graduate from high school. These tests are more influential than ever. Accordingly, in 2004, 20 states required students to pass an exit exam to graduate from high school, and six additional states will implement an exit exam by 2009. This affects more than half…

  13. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Georgia's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  14. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Mexico's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  15. 10 CFR 429.48 - Illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Illuminated exit signs. 429.48 Section 429.48 Energy... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.48 Illuminated exit signs. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to illuminated exit...

  16. 10 CFR 429.48 - Illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Illuminated exit signs. 429.48 Section 429.48 Energy... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.48 Illuminated exit signs. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to illuminated exit...

  17. 46 CFR 78.47-40 - Exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exit signs. 78.47-40 Section 78.47-40 Shipping COAST... Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-40 Exit signs. (a) Illuminated exit signs are required and must be... sign in red letters “EMERGENCY EXIT” directing attention to such escape. Cross Reference:...

  18. 46 CFR 78.47-40 - Exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exit signs. 78.47-40 Section 78.47-40 Shipping COAST... Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-40 Exit signs. (a) Illuminated exit signs are required and must be... sign in red letters “EMERGENCY EXIT” directing attention to such escape. Cross Reference:...

  19. 10 CFR 429.48 - Illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Illuminated exit signs. 429.48 Section 429.48 Energy... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.48 Illuminated exit signs. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to illuminated exit...

  20. 46 CFR 78.47-40 - Exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exit signs. 78.47-40 Section 78.47-40 Shipping COAST... Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-40 Exit signs. (a) Illuminated exit signs are required and must be... sign in red letters “EMERGENCY EXIT” directing attention to such escape. Cross Reference:...

  1. 46 CFR 78.47-40 - Exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exit signs. 78.47-40 Section 78.47-40 Shipping COAST... Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-40 Exit signs. (a) Illuminated exit signs are required and must be... sign in red letters “EMERGENCY EXIT” directing attention to such escape. Cross Reference:...

  2. 46 CFR 78.47-40 - Exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exit signs. 78.47-40 Section 78.47-40 Shipping COAST... Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-40 Exit signs. (a) Illuminated exit signs are required and must be... sign in red letters “EMERGENCY EXIT” directing attention to such escape. Cross Reference:...

  3. 14 CFR 27.805 - Flight crew emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... emergency landing on water. This must be shown by test, demonstration, or analysis. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight crew emergency exits. 27.805 Section... § 27.805 Flight crew emergency exits. (a) For rotorcraft with passenger emergency exits that are...

  4. 14 CFR 29.807 - Passenger emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... a crash landing must be extremely remote. (d) Ditching emergency exits for passengers. If... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Passenger emergency exits. 29.807 Section... Accommodations § 29.807 Passenger emergency exits. (a) Type. For the purpose of this part, the types of...

  5. 14 CFR 27.805 - Flight crew emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... emergency landing on water. This must be shown by test, demonstration, or analysis. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight crew emergency exits. 27.805 Section... § 27.805 Flight crew emergency exits. (a) For rotorcraft with passenger emergency exits that are...

  6. TomoTherapy MLC verification using exit detector data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Quan; Westerly, David; Fang Zhenyu; Sheng, Ke; Chen Yu

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Treatment delivery verification (DV) is important in the field of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). While IMRT and image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), allow us to create more conformal plans and enables the use of tighter margins, an erroneously executed plan can have detrimental effects on the treatment outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a DV technique to verify TomoTherapy's multileaf collimator (MLC) using the onboard mega-voltage CT detectors. Methods: The proposed DV method uses temporal changes in the MVCT detector signal to predict actual leaf open times delivered on the treatment machine. Penumbra and scattered radiation effects may produce confounding results when determining leaf open times from the raw detector data. To reduce the impact of the effects, an iterative, Richardson-Lucy (R-L) deconvolution algorithm is applied. Optical sensors installed on each MLC leaf are used to verify the accuracy of the DV technique. The robustness of the DV technique is examined by introducing different attenuation materials in the beam. Additionally, the DV technique has been used to investigate several clinical plans which failed to pass delivery quality assurance (DQA) and was successful in identifying MLC timing discrepancies as the root cause. Results: The leaf open time extracted from the exit detector showed good agreement with the optical sensors under a variety of conditions. Detector-measured leaf open times agreed with optical sensor data to within 0.2 ms, and 99% of the results agreed within 8.5 ms. These results changed little when attenuation was added in the beam. For the clinical plans failing DQA, the dose calculated from reconstructed leaf open times played an instrumental role in discovering the root-cause of the problem. Throughout the retrospective study, it is found that the reconstructed dose always agrees with measured doses to within 1%. Conclusions: The exit detectors in the TomoTherapy treatment systems

  7. Thermoacoustic limit cycles in a premixed laboratory combustor with open and choked exits

    SciTech Connect

    Hield, Peter A.; Brear, Michael J.; Jin, Seong Ho

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of the response of a turbulent premixed flame during thermoacoustic limit cycle in a simple, laboratory combustor. The flame dynamics are examined using high-speed pressure transducers and CH* chemiluminescence. The so-called 'interaction index' and time delay between the acoustic velocity fluctuations at the flame holder and the flame's overall heat release fluctuations are then determined. A wide range of operating conditions, traversing the combustor's flammability limits in Mach number and equivalence ratio, are studied for four different combustor exits, including one where the exit is choked. In all cases the time delay correlates very well with the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations. There is also some correlation between the interaction index and these velocity fluctuations, but this is less clear. These results suggest a novel, nonlinear flame model, derived entirely empirically. An existing low-order thermoacoustic model is then extended to include convection and dispersion of entropy fluctuations downstream of the flame, enabling the effect of the choked nozzle to be examined. The novel nonlinear flame model is integrated into the low-order thermoacoustic model, and used to investigate the experimentally observed thermoacoustic limit cycles. The model correctly simulates the observed switch to a low-frequency, entropically driven instability observed when the combustor exit is choked. (author)

  8. Evaluation of two methods of prompting drivers to use specific exits on conflicts between vehicles at the critical exit.

    PubMed

    Van Houten, Ron; Malenfant, J E Louis; Zhao, Nan; Ko, Byungkon; Van Houten, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The Florida Department of Transportation used a series of changeable-message signs that functioned as freeway guide signs to divert traffic to Universal Theme Park via one of two eastbound exits based on traffic congestion at the first of the two exits. An examination of crashes along the entire route indicated a statistically significant increase in crashes at the first eastbound exit following the actuation of the system. Furthermore, all of the crashes occurred in close proximity to the exit gore (the crosshatched area at exits that drivers are not supposed to enter or traverse) at the first exit. In Experiment 1, behavioral data were collected using an alternating treatments design. These data revealed that reassigning the exit signs was effective in producing a change in the percentage of drivers using each of the two exits. These data also showed that the reassignment of the theme park exit was associated with an increase in the percentage of motor vehicle conflicts that consisted of vehicles cutting across the exit gore. An analysis revealed that the method used for switching the designated or active theme park exit on the series of changeable-message signs led to the presentation of conflicting messages to some motorists, thus resulting in erratic driving behavior (cutting across the exit gore). In Experiment 2, the treatment evaluated the use of a phased method of switching the designated theme park exit to eliminate the delivery of conflicting messages. The new method for switching the designated theme park exit was not associated with an increase in motorists cutting across the exit gore. PMID:16270840

  9. Blade-to-Blade Flow at Centrifugal Impeller Exit Under Rotating Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, You Hwan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    This study presents the unsteady fluctuation measurements of impeller discharge flow for a centrifugal compressor in unstable operating region. The characteristics of the blade-to-blade flow under rotating stall were investigated by measuring unsteady velocity fluctuations at several different diffuser axial distances using a hot wire anemometer and high frequency pressure transducers mounted on the shroud wall. The flow characteristics in terms of the radial and tangential velocity components and turbulence intensity at the impeller exit were analyzed by using double phase-locked ensemble averaging techniques. During one stall period, a deep wake core was observed on the suction surface near the hub for the maximum radial velocity instant. On the other hand, large wake region existed in the middle of the passage near the shroud side. For the radial velocity increasing instant a quite strong core flow was generated at the pressure side, however, for the decreasing instant comparatively strong core flow was developed near the suction side.

  10. High-Flow Jet Exit Rig Designed and Fabricated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Robert J.; Trimarchi, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    conditions. This wide operating envelope is required to support the testing of both single- and dual-flow nozzles. Key research goals include providing simultaneous, highly accurate acoustic, flow, and thrust measurements on jet nozzle models in realistic flight conditions, as well as providing scaleable acoustic results. The High-Flow Jet Exit Rig is a second-generation high-flow test rig. Improvements include cleaner flow with reduced levels of particulate, soot, and odor. Choked-flow metering is required with plus or minus 0.25-percent accuracy. Thrust measurements from 0 to 2000 lbf are required with plus or minus 0.25-percent accuracy. Improved acoustics will be achieved by minimizing noise through large pipe bend radii, lower internal flow velocities, and microdrilled choke plates with thousands of 0.040-in.- diameter holes.

  11. Use of exit examinations: a criterion for graduation?

    PubMed

    Cullen, P D

    1997-01-01

    This study sought to measure the use of exit examinations in nursing schools at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). Fifteen participants from HBCU nursing schools throughout the United States were surveyed to determine current practices related to exit exams. Overall, fourteen schools (93.33%) used an exit exam at the end of their nursing program. However, 73.33% of the participants (11 schools) reported it was mandatory for students to pass the exam as a requirement for graduation. Almost 47% of the participants (7 schools) reported the use of the exit exam was related to NCLEX-RN pass rates, while others reported identification of student needs as the primary reason for using an exit exam. Most participants were very helpful by sharing their innovations. While this small study provided some information on the use of exit examinations, more research is needed to substantiate both the appropriateness and usefulness of their use in baccalaureate degree nursing programs. PMID:9460307

  12. Exit plane H2O concentration measurements correlated with OH PLIF near-injector mixing measurements for scramjet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Allen, Mark G.; Foutter, R. R.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Rawlins, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    Mixing and combusting high enthalpy flows, similar to those encountered in scramjet engines, were investigated using a shock tunnel to produce the flow in conjunction with non-intrusive optical diagnostics which monitored the performance of two injector configurations. The shock tunnel is configured to produce Mach 3 flow and stagnation enthalpies corresponding to flight equivalent Mach numbers between 7 and 11. A pulsed hydrogen injection capability and interchangeable injector blocks provide a means of examining high speed, high enthalpy reacting flows. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH molecules in the near injector region produced images which show the combusting and mixing zones for the reacting flow. Line-of-sight exit plane measurement of water concentration and temperature were used to provide a unique method of monitoring exit plane products. These results demonstrated that a velocity matched axial injection system produced a fuel jet that lifted off the floor of the duct. Mixing was observed to increase for this system as a velocity mismatch was introduced. Comparison of exit plane water concentrations for a wall jet injection system and a velocity matched injection system indicated similar mixing performance but an accurate pressure measurement is necessary to further validate the result. In addition, exit plane measurements indicated an approximate steady-state condition was achieved during the 1 to 2 ms test times.

  13. 19 CFR 18.22 - Procedure at port of exit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure at port of exit. 18.22 Section 18.22... to Foreign Countries § 18.22 Procedure at port of exit. (a) If transfer is necessary, the procedure shall be as prescribed in § 18.3(d). (b) Upon the arrival at the port of exit of express shipments...

  14. Reserve capacity and exit choosing in pedestrian evacuation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Gao, Ziyou

    2010-03-01

    A modified cellular automata model is proposed to simulate the pedestrian evacuation behavior in a room with multiple exits by considering the reserve capacity of the exit. The main idea is motivated by the original concept of minority game, which means less congested exits may be preferentially chosen together with the floor fields. The model outperforms previous ones under the condition in which pedestrians are distributed heterogeneously. Simulation results show that wise exit choosing with the consideration of reserve capacity may reduce the evacuation time apparently, which is more realistic. Furthermore, the impacts of the room geometry and parameter settings are investigated extensively.

  15. Observation of strong reflection of electron waves exiting a ballistic channel at low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Canute I.; Liu, Changze; Campbell, Jason P.; Ryan, Jason T.; Southwick, Richard G., III; Gundlach, David; Oates, Anthony S.; Huang, Ru; Cheung, Kin. P.

    2016-06-01

    Wave scattering by a potential step is a ubiquitous concept. Thus, it is surprising that theoretical treatments of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices, from quantum point contacts to ballistic transistors, assume no reflection even when the potential step is encountered upon exiting the device. Experiments so far seem to support this even if it is not clear why. Here we report clear evidence of coherent reflection when electron wave exits the channel of a nanoscale transistor and when the electron energy is low. The observed behavior is well described by a simple rectangular potential barrier model which the Schrodinger's equation can be solved exactly. We can explain why reflection is not observed in most situations but cannot be ignored in some important situations. Our experiment also represents a direct measurement of electron injection velocity - a critical quantity in nanoscale transistors that is widely considered not measurable.

  16. Evaluation of catalytic combustion of actual coal-derived gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanton, J. C.; Shisler, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of a Pt-Pl catalytic reactor burning coal-derived, low-Btu gas were investigated. A large matrix of test conditions was explored involving variations in fuel/air inlet temperature and velocity, reactor pressure, and combustor exit temperature. Other data recorded included fuel gas composition, reactor temperatures, and exhaust emissions. Operating experience with the reactor was satisfactory. Combustion efficiencies were quite high (over 95 percent) over most of the operating range. Emissions of NOx were quite high (up to 500 ppm V and greater), owing to the high ammonia content of the fuel gas.

  17. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  18. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  19. Assessing Undergraduate Curriculum Through Student Exit Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, C. M.; Gonzales, L.; Martinez, C.

    2008-12-01

    One aspect of assessing the undergraduate curriculum is recognizing that the exit vector of the student is a metric in the absence of a structured assessment program. Detailed knowledge across all geosciences departments regarding the disposition of their recent baccalaureate recipients has been at best inconsistent, and in the case of about half of geoscience programs, non-existent. However, through examining of multiple datasets, a pattern of disposition of geosciences BS recipients emerges, providing a snapshot of the system- wide response to the system-wide "average" program. This pattern can also be juxtaposed against several frameworks of desired skill sets for recent graduates and the employment sectors likely to hire them. The question remains is can one deduce the effectiveness of the undergraduate program in placing graduates in their next step, whether in graduate school or the workplace. Likewise, with an increasing scrutiny on the "value" of an education, is the resulting economic gain sufficient for the student, such that programs will be viewed as sustainable. A factor in answering this question is the importance of the undergraduate program in the ultimate destination of the professional. Clear pathways exist for "optimal" schools for the production of new faculty and new industry professionals, but is it possible to identify those trends further up the educational pipeline? One major mechanism to examine the undergraduate program effectiveness related to exit vectors is to look at hiring trends witnessed related to markedly different program structures, such as those at universities outside of the United States. Rectifying academic programs between the United States and other national systems is often a challenge, but even given the substantial differences between depth of technical knowledge and breadth of education across these programs, in the end, the sum product is often viewed as roughly comparable. This paper will look at end

  20. The Exit Interview: A Potential Management Tool for University Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, Susan A.

    1981-01-01

    The educational sector should be concerned about the reasons for and consequences of employee turnover. One of the ways in which an institution can assess the reasons for the departure of its employees is the exit interview. An exit interview is designed to gain information about voluntary employee turnover. (MLW)

  1. 14 CFR 29.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency exit arrangement. 29.809 Section 29.809 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 29.809 Emergency exit...

  2. 14 CFR 29.807 - Passenger emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Passenger emergency exits. 29.807 Section 29.807 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 29.807 Passenger emergency exits....

  3. 49 CFR 238.113 - Emergency window exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency window exits. 238.113 Section 238.113 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Planning and General Requirements § 238.113 Emergency window exits....

  4. High School Exit Exams and "Mis"measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Test score validity takes center stage in the debate over the use of high school exit exams. Scant literature addresses the amount of conditional standard error of measurement (CSEM) present in individual student results on high school exit exams. The purpose of this study is to fill a void in the literature and add a national review of the CSEM,…

  5. Exit Examinations, Peer Academic Climate, and Adolescents' Developmental Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Aprile D.

    2013-01-01

    Implications of high school exit examination performance were examined with a sample of 672 racial/ethnic minority students. Exit examination failure in the 10th grade was negatively linked to subsequent grade point average, school engagement, and school belonging one year later, controlling for outcomes prior to taking the examination.…

  6. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency exit arrangement. 25.809 Section 25.809 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.809 Emergency exit arrangement. (a)...

  7. 14 CFR 29.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 29.813 Section 29.813 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 29.813 Emergency exit access. (a)...

  8. State High School Exit Exams: A Policy in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Shelby

    2012-01-01

    Since 2002, the Center on Education Policy (CEP) at The George Washington University, a national advocate for public education and improving public schools, has been studying state high school exit examinations--tests students must pass to receive a high school diploma. This year marks the 11th year CEP has reported on exit exams in order to help…

  9. Towards an Orderly Exit Regime in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In a competitive market, the exit of those suppliers who cannot offer an attractive product at an attractive price is seen as desirable. However, the consequences for consumers when their own supplier leaves the market in an unplanned or disorderly way may be undesirable. Exit regimes exist in regulated markets to ensure that consumers are not…

  10. 49 CFR 238.113 - Emergency window exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency window exits. 238.113 Section 238.113..., electrical locker, or kitchen); and (B) There are no more than eight seats in the seating area. (4) Cars with... have at least one emergency window exit in each such compartment. For purposes of this paragraph...

  11. 49 CFR 238.113 - Emergency window exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency window exits. 238.113 Section 238.113..., electrical locker, or kitchen); and (B) There are no more than eight seats in the seating area. (4) Cars with... have at least one emergency window exit in each such compartment. For purposes of this paragraph...

  12. Achievement Tests and Elementary ESOL Exit Criteria: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abella, Rodolfo

    1992-01-01

    Examines Dade County (Florida) Public Schools' process for exiting limited English-proficient students (LEPSs) from the English-for-Speakers-of-Other-Languages (ESOL) Program. Results with 500 LEPSs show that exiters perform successfully in regular classrooms. The Stanford Achievement Test discriminated between LEPS and non-LEPS performance on…

  13. Jet Nozzle Having Centerbody for Enhanced Exit Area Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M. (Inventor); Gilinsky, Mikhail M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A nozzle arrangement includes a nozzle and a centerbody. The longitudinal axis of the centerbody is coaxially aligned with the nozzle. The centerbody has a free end portion shaped to create vortices in exhaust exiting the exit area. The vortices enhance mixing action in the exhaust and reduce exhaust noise while augmenting thrust.

  14. State High School Tests: Exit Exams and Other Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Shelby

    2010-01-01

    Since 2002, the Center on Education Policy (CEP), an independent nonprofit organization, has been studying state high school exit examinations--tests students must pass to receive a high school diploma. This is CEP's ninth annual report on exit exams. The information in this report comes from several sources: CEP's survey of states that have…

  15. 14 CFR 25.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Internal exit-opening means involving sequence operations (such as operation of two handles or latches, or... established that these means are simple and obvious to crewmembers trained in their use. (d) If a single power-boost or single power-operated system is the primary system for operating more than one exit in...

  16. 94. VIEW OF LSB (BLDG. 770) EAST EXIT FROM SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. VIEW OF LSB (BLDG. 770) EAST EXIT FROM SOUTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106). SOUTHWEST CORNER OF UNINTERRUPTABLE POWER SUPPLY (UPS) VISIBLE ON EAST WALL OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106). ROOM 101 ENTRANCE OFF HALLWAY TO LEFT OF EXIT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. Exit and Voice: Organizational Loyalty and Dispute Resolution Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    This study compares workplace dispute resolution strategies (exit, voice and toleration) in matched pairs of conventional and worker-owned cooperative organizations operating in three industries--coal mining, taxicab driving and organic food distribution. Building on Hirschman's classic exit, voice and loyalty thesis, this research demonstrates…

  18. Exit Surveying of Interns: Demonstrating Impact on Young Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscio, Cara

    2011-01-01

    Documenting impact is becoming increasingly important as funding becomes tighter for Extension programs. An exit survey for interns conducted via an online survey tool is an opportunity to collect information on knowledge and skill gains, as well as document changes in intentions and attitudes about future career paths. An exit survey conducted…

  19. 24 CFR 3280.105 - Exit facilities; exterior doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exit facilities; exterior doors... § 3280.105 Exit facilities; exterior doors. (a) Number and location of exterior doors. Manufactured homes shall have a minimum of two exterior doors located remote from each other. (1) Required egress...

  20. 24 CFR 3280.105 - Exit facilities; exterior doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exit facilities; exterior doors... § 3280.105 Exit facilities; exterior doors. (a) Number and location of exterior doors. Manufactured homes shall have a minimum of two exterior doors located remote from each other. (1) Required egress...

  1. 24 CFR 3280.105 - Exit facilities; exterior doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exit facilities; exterior doors... § 3280.105 Exit facilities; exterior doors. (a) Number and location of exterior doors. Manufactured homes shall have a minimum of two exterior doors located remote from each other. (1) Required egress...

  2. 24 CFR 3280.105 - Exit facilities; exterior doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exit facilities; exterior doors... § 3280.105 Exit facilities; exterior doors. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73981, Dec. 9, 2013. (a) Number and location of exterior doors. Manufactured homes shall have a minimum of two...

  3. Multiple program participation and exits from food stamps among elders.

    PubMed

    Issar, Sukriti

    2010-01-01

    This article uses population-level administrative data from Rhode Island's Food Stamp Program to examine exits from the Food Stamp Program by elders. Multivariate event history models estimate the relations of multiple program participation and the timing of eligibility reviews to the probability of exiting food stamps. Results suggest that elders who are age 65 or older and who receive both Supplemental Security Income and food stamps have a higher probability of exiting the Food Stamp Program than do elders who receive only food stamps. The timing of eligibility reviews is also found to be positively associated with the probability of exit from food stamps. This article is argued to extend conceptual models of the determinants of food stamp exits. PMID:20873021

  4. Suicide, Canadian law, and Exit International's "peaceful pill".

    PubMed

    Ogden, Russel D

    2010-11-01

    Australia's Exit International ("Exit") is probably the most visible and controversial right-to-die organization in the world. Founded by Dr. Philip Nitschke, Exit is known for do-it-yourself ("DIY") suicide workshops and a book banned in Australia: The Peaceful Pill Handbook. In 2009, Exit held its first workshop in Canada. Due to legal concerns, the Vancouver Public Library reneged on a commitment to give Exit a venue, so the workshop proceeded in the sanctuary of a church hall. This article summarizes the history of suicide law in Canada and gives an overview of the emerging DIY movement. A case report describes how a Canadian woman studied Exit's literature and learned how to import veterinary pentobarbital. In accordance with Exit's information, she ended her life. Ethical and legal implications for researching DIY suicide are discussed and it is argued that prohibition contributes to an undesirable situation of uncontrolled and unregulated suicide. Whether they are prohibited, permitted, or tolerated, suicide and assisted suicide are controversial. Their legal treatment in Canada is conflicting because suicide is not a crime but it is a serious offense to assist, encourage, or counsel someone to suicide. Individuals can lawfully take their lives, but they must act independently. This legal situation has given rise to a do-it-yourself ("DIY") right-to-die movement dedicated to technologies and information to enhance the possibilities for planned and humane suicide, while limiting the legal exposure of sympathetic third parties (Martin, 2010; Ogden 2001). My aim is to summarize the legal history of suicide in Canada and discuss the emerging social movement for DIY suicide and assistance in suicide. Exit International ("Exit"), based in Australia, is a leading organization in this movement. I present a case report that describes how a Canadian woman ended her life using DIY techniques learned from Exit. Some ethical and legal implications for researching DIY

  5. Evaluation of Two Methods of Prompting Drivers to Use Specific Exits on Conflicts between Vehicles at the Critical Exit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houten, Ron; Malenfant, J. E. Louis; Zhao, Nan; Ko, Byungkon; Van Houten, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The Florida Department of Transportation used a series of changeable-message signs that functioned as freeway guide signs to divert traffic to Universal Theme Park via one of two eastbound exits based on traffic congestion at the first of the two exits. An examination of crashes along the entire route indicated a statistically significant increase…

  6. Differences in Student Achievement between Early-Exit and Late-Exit Bilingual Programs: A Multiyear, Statewide Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Rosa Maria

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the difference between two bilingual program types: traditional early-exit and late-exit bilingual programs and academic achievement using archival data from the Texas Education Agency Public Education Information Management System. An examination of academic achievement rates across a 3-year period…

  7. Turbulent fluid-structure interaction of water-entry/exit of a rotating circular cylinder using SPH method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Saghatchi, Roozbeh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the two-dimensional (2D) water-entry and exit of a rotating circular cylinder using the Sub-Particle Scale (SPS) turbulence model of a Lagrangian particle-based Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations along with the continuity have been solved as the governing equations of the problem. The accuracy of the numerical code is verified using the case of water-entry and exit of a nonrotating circular cylinder. The numerical simulations of water-entry and exit of the rotating circular cylinder are performed at Froude numbers of 2, 5, 8, and specific gravities of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.75, rotating at the dimensionless rates of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75. The effect of governing parameters and vortex shedding behind the cylinder on the trajectory curves, velocity components in the flow field, and the deformation of free surface for both cases have been investigated in detail. It is seen that the rotation has a great effect on the curvature of the trajectory path and velocity components in water-entry and exit cases due to the interaction of imposed lift and drag forces with the inertia force.

  8. A method for calculating strut and splitter plate noise in exit ducts: Theory and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portions of a four-year analytical and experimental investigation relative to noise radiation from engine internal components in turbulent flow are summarized. Spectra measured for such airfoils over a range of chord, thickness ratio, flow velocity, and turbulence level were compared with predictions made by an available rigorous thin-airfoil analytical method. This analysis included the effects of flow compressibility and source noncompactness. Generally good agreement was obtained. This noise calculation method for isolated airfoils in turbulent flow was combined with a method for calculating transmission of sound through a subsonic exit duct and with an empirical far-field directivity shape. These three elements were checked separately and were individually shown to give close agreement with data. This combination provides a method for predicting engine internally generated aft-radiated noise from radial struts and stators, and annular splitter rings. Calculated sound power spectra, directivity, and acoustic pressure spectra were compared with the best available data. These data were for noise caused by a fan exit duct annular splitter ring, larger-chord stator blades, and turbine exit struts.

  9. Surgical management of Novacor drive-line exit site infections.

    PubMed

    Pasque, Michael K; Hanselman, Tina; Shelton, Kim; Kehoe-Huck, Beth A; Hedges, Robyn; Cassivi, Stephen D; Ewald, Gregory A; Rogers, Joseph G

    2002-10-01

    Implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD) drive-line exit site infection, an expected consequence of currently available device use, continues to be a significant limiting factor in long-term support. We theorize that the mechanism behind the establishment of the most chronic exit site infections involves a shearing torsion injury that disrupts the tissue adherence interface with the drive-line. The resulting neo-epithelialized drainage tract prevents permanent clearance of the infection with antibiotics alone. The proposed treatment strategy of established infections involves aggressive surgical excision of the involved exit site. PMID:12400795

  10. Jet Engine Nozzle Exit Configurations and Associated Systems and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter.

  11. Jet engine nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter.

  12. Hydroburst test of a carbon-carbon involute exit cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    A hydroburst test of the aft portion of the PAM-D exit cone and the test procedure are described in detail. The hydrostatic pressure required to buckle the cone was 9.75 psi. Meanwhile, the PAM-D exit cone was modeled using the finite element method and a theoretical bucking pressure (8.76 psi) was predicted using the SPAR finite element code. The modeling technique employed is discussed. By comparing the theoretical to predicted critical pressures, this report verifies the modeling technique and calculates a material knockdown factor for the carbon-carbon exit cone.

  13. Exploring the Use of Statewide Exit Exams to Spread Innovation--The Example of "Context" in Science Tasks from an International Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Svenja Mareike

    2011-01-01

    Many innovation-oriented concepts have recently been discussed as means to improve science education and instruction as well as the corresponding tests and exit exams. So far, empirical evidence of whether these new concepts for exam tasks actually find their way into the exam practice is still pending. This contribution takes up this desideratum…

  14. Relationships among exit velocity, cortisol, and carcass characteristics of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One hundred ninety-nine crossbred beef heifer calves (205 ± 7.9 kg initial BW) were used in a 44-d receiving trial with 2 dietary treatments (9 pens/treatment) in a completely randomized design. Heifers were weighed and bled on d 0, 16, 30, and 44 after arrival. Blood was collected by jugular venipu...

  15. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  16. 108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground flue that leads to stack. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. 14 CFR 29.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... emergency exit in a minor crash landing as a result of fuselage deformation under the ultimate inertial..., and at least three tests of each such five-test series must be conducted using a single...

  18. BASEMENT, A view looking east into Room 24. An exit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking east into Room 24. An exit door is at the far end - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  19. Exit, Punishment and Rewards in Commons Dilemmas: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Giangiacomo; Squazzoni, Flaminio

    2013-01-01

    Commons dilemmas are interaction situations where a common good is provided or exploited by a group of individuals so that optimal collective outcomes clash with private interests. Although in these situations, social norms and institutions exist that might help individuals to cooperate, little is known about the interaction effects between positive and negative incentives and exit options by individuals. We performed a modified public good game experiment to examine the effect of exit, rewards and punishment, as well as the interplay between exit and rewards and punishment. We found that punishment had a stronger effect than rewards on cooperation if considered by itself, whereas rewards had a stronger effect when combined with voluntary participation. This can be explained in terms of the ‘framing effect’, i.e., as the combination of exit and rewards might induce people to attach higher expected payoffs to cooperative strategies and expect better behaviour from others. PMID:23936356

  20. 31. THE SLUICE EXIT AND OPERATING HOUSE AT THE SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. THE SLUICE EXIT AND OPERATING HOUSE AT THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE DIVERSION DAM Photographer: Mark Durben, 1984 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  1. 24 CFR 3280.105 - Exit facilities; exterior doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in any straight line direction regardless of the length of path of travel between doors. (iii) Double... direction regardless of the length of path of travel between doors. (iv) One of the required exit doors...

  2. DETAIL OF TWO PENSTOCKS EXITING SURGE TANK TOWARD THE TURBINES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF TWO PENSTOCKS EXITING SURGE TANK TOWARD THE TURBINES FOR GENERATORS #3 AND #4. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Elwha Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  3. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. LOOKING 278°W - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. CANAL EXITING FLUME AND BEGINNING EARTHLINED MAIN SECTION AT MOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CANAL EXITING FLUME AND BEGINNING EARTH-LINED MAIN SECTION AT MOUTH OF PLATTE RIVER CANYON. VIEW TO WEST - High Line Canal, Mouth of South Platte River to confluence with Second Creek, Denver, Denver County, CO

  5. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND STEEL SLAB EXITING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND STEEL SLAB EXITING (LEFT) AND EDGING MACHINE/PRESS (RIGHT). - Central Iron Foundry, Hot Strip Mill Building, 1700 Holt Road, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  6. North wall, near east end, showing exhaust fan and exit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North wall, near east end, showing exhaust fan and exit (series 3 of 4) - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  7. Behavior of Ants Escaping from a Single-Exit Room

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujie; Lv, Wei; Song, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    To study the rules of ant behavior and group-formation phenomena, we examined the behaviors of Camponotus japonicus, a species of large ant, in a range of situations. For these experiments, ants were placed inside a rectangular chamber with a single exit that also contained a filter paper soaked in citronella oil, a powerful repellent. The ants formed several groups as they moved toward the exit to escape. We measured the time intervals between individual escapes in six versions of the experiment, each containing an exit of a different width, to quantify the movement of the groups. As the ants exited the chamber, the time intervals between individual escapes changed and the frequency distribution of the time intervals exhibited exponential decay. We also investigated the relationship between the number of ants in a group and the group flow rate. PMID:26125191

  8. The effects of initial jet exit conditions on plume resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Seiner, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The acoustic emission and boundary layer of a cold jet issuing from an underexpanded sonic nozzle have been measured for lip thicknesses of the nozzle exit varying from 0.015-0.625 nozzle diameters. Near-field acoustic data demonstrate that the amplitude and frequency of certain modes of screech and the dominant mode of instability which exists in the shear layer are dependent on nozzle lip thickness. Changes in momentum thickness due to variations in the nozzle exit were also quantified.

  9. Influence of Flow Swirling and Exit Shape of Barrel Nozzle on Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2011-06-01

    Traditionally, in cold spray two-phase supersonic jet formed with the help of converging-diverging nozzle are used. In this study an alternative design of cold spray nozzle is proposed in which a high velocity two-phase flow is created using an intense flow swirling in a constant section barrel (cylinder) with double-edged bevel exit. As a result, a high velocity gas-powder mixture jet is produced presenting a fan-shaped jet spreading at a large angle in one plane and approximately of equal size along the normal to this plane. This results in greater angles of particle deposition and, hence, in larger deposition widths, with the maximum width of deposition spot reaching 25 barrel diameters. The performed experimental study proves the new nozzle design to be appropriate for deposition of cold-sprayed coatings.

  10. Intelligent Exit-Selection Behaviors during a Room Evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarita, Zainuddin; Lim Eng, Aik

    2012-01-01

    A modified version of the existing cellular automata (CA) model is proposed to simulate an evacuation procedure in a classroom with and without obstacles. Based on the numerous literature on the implementation of CA in modeling evacuation motions, it is notable that most of the published studies do not take into account the pedestrian's ability to select the exit route in their models. To resolve these issues, we develop a CA model incorporating a probabilistic neural network for determining the decision-making ability of the pedestrians, and simulate an exit-selection phenomenon in the simulation. Intelligent exit-selection behavior is observed in our model. From the simulation results, it is observed that occupants tend to select the exit closest to them when the density is low, but if the density is high they will go to an alternative exit so as to avoid a long wait. This reflects the fact that occupants may not fully utilize multiple exits during evacuation. The improvement in our proposed model is valuable for further study and for upgrading the safety aspects of building designs.

  11. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT– bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14036.001 PMID:27166637

  12. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position.

    PubMed

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT- bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. PMID:27166637

  13. A Modified EXIT-to-ECMO with Optional Reservoir Circuit for Use during an EXIT Procedure Requiring Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Matte, Gregory S; Connor, Kevin R; Toutenel, Nathalia A; Gottlieb, Danielle; Fynn-Thompson, Francis

    2016-03-01

    A 34 year old mother with a history of polyhydraminos and premature rupture of membranes presented for an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure to deliver her 34 week gestation fetus. The fetus had been diagnosed with a large cervical mass which significantly extended into the right chest. The mass compressed and deviated the airway and major neck vessels posteriorly. Imaging also revealed possible tumor involvement with the superior vena cava and right atrium. The plan was for potential extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) during the EXIT procedure (EXIT-to-ECMO) and the potential for traditional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for mediastinal tumor resection. A Modified EXIT-To-ECMO with Optional Reservoir (METEOR) circuit was devised to satisfy both therapies. A fetal airway could not be established during the EXIT procedure and so the EXIT-to-ECMO strategy was utilized. The fetus was then delivered and transferred to an adjoining operating room (OR). Traditional cardiopulmonary bypass with a cardiotomy venous reservoir (CVR) was utilized during the establishment of an airway, tumor biopsy and partial resection. The patient was eventually transitioned to our institution's standard ECMO circuit and then transferred to the intensive care unit. The patient was weaned from ECMO on day of life (DOL) eight and had a successful tumor resection on DOL 11. The patient required hospitalization for numerous interventions including cardiac surgery at 4 months of age. She was discharged to home at 5 months of age. PMID:27134307

  14. A Modified EXIT-to-ECMO with Optional Reservoir Circuit for Use during an EXIT Procedure Requiring Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Gregory S.; Connor, Kevin R.; Toutenel, Nathalia A.; Gottlieb, Danielle; Fynn-Thompson, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: A 34 year old mother with a history of polyhydraminos and premature rupture of membranes presented for an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure to deliver her 34 week gestation fetus. The fetus had been diagnosed with a large cervical mass which significantly extended into the right chest. The mass compressed and deviated the airway and major neck vessels posteriorly. Imaging also revealed possible tumor involvement with the superior vena cava and right atrium. The plan was for potential extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) during the EXIT procedure (EXIT-to-ECMO) and the potential for traditional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for mediastinal tumor resection. A Modified EXIT-To-ECMO with Optional Reservoir (METEOR) circuit was devised to satisfy both therapies. A fetal airway could not be established during the EXIT procedure and so the EXIT-to-ECMO strategy was utilized. The fetus was then delivered and transferred to an adjoining operating room (OR). Traditional cardiopulmonary bypass with a cardiotomy venous reservoir (CVR) was utilized during the establishment of an airway, tumor biopsy and partial resection. The patient was eventually transitioned to our institution's standard ECMO circuit and then transferred to the intensive care unit. The patient was weaned from ECMO on day of life (DOL) eight and had a successful tumor resection on DOL 11. The patient required hospitalization for numerous interventions including cardiac surgery at 4 months of age. She was discharged to home at 5 months of age. PMID:27134307

  15. Mitotic Exit Control as an Evolved Complex System

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W; Li, R

    2005-04-25

    The exit from mitosis is the last critical decision a cell has to make during a division cycle. A complex regulatory system has evolved to evaluate the success of mitotic events and control this decision. Whereas outstanding genetic work in yeast has led to rapid discovery of a large number of interacting genes involved in the control of mitotic exit, it has also become increasingly difficult to comprehend the logic and mechanistic features embedded in the complex molecular network. Our view is that this difficulty stems in part from the attempt to explain mitotic exit control using concepts from traditional top-down engineering design, and that exciting new results from evolutionary engineering design applied to networks and electronic circuits may lend better insights. We focus on four particularly intriguing features of the mitotic exit control system: the two-stepped release of Cdc14; the self-activating nature of Tem1 GTPase; the spatial sensor associated with the spindle pole body; and the extensive redundancy in the mitotic exit network. We attempt to examine these design features from the perspective of evolutionary design and complex system engineering.

  16. Cell entry and exit by periodontal pathogen via recycling pathway.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroki; Furuta, Nobumichi; Amano, Atsuo

    2011-09-01

    In the oral cavity, gingival epithelial cell (GEC) layers function as an innate host defense system to prevent intrusion by periodontal bacteria. Nevertheless, Porphyromonas gingivalis, the most well-known periodontal pathogen, can enter GECs and pass through the epithelial barrier into deeper tissues. An intracellular location is considered advantageous for bacteria to escape from immune surveillance by the host as well as antibiotic pressure, leading to intracellular persistence, multiplication and dissemination to adjacent tissues. P. gingivalis are invaginated by gingival epithelial cells via the endocytic pathway, and some intracellular bacteria are sorted to lytic compartments, including autolysosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, while a considerable number of the remaining organisms are sorted to Rab11- and RalA-positive recycling endosomes, followed by bacterial exit from the cells. Exited bacteria can re-enter fresh cells. However, dominant negative forms and RNAi-knockdown of Rab11, RalA and exocyst complex subunits (Sec5, Sec6 and Exo84) significantly disturb the exit of P. gingivalis. These are the first known results to show that the endocytic recycling pathway mediates bacterial exit from infected cells to neighboring cells and may provide important information regarding the exit mechanisms of various invasive pathogens. PMID:22046471

  17. The influence of the stagnation zone on the fluid dynamics at the nozzle exit of a confined and submerged impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Nicholas; Stafford, Jason; Conway, Ciaran; Punch, Jeff; Walsh, Edmond

    2016-02-01

    Low profile impinging jets provide a means to achieve high heat transfer coefficients while occupying a small quantity of space. Consequently, they are found in many engineering applications such as electronics cooling, annealing of metals, food processing, and others. This paper investigates the influence of the stagnation zone fluid dynamics on the nozzle exit flow condition of a low profile, submerged, and confined impinging water jet. The jet was geometrically constrained to a round, 16-mm diameter, square-edged nozzle at a jet exit to target surface spacing ( H/ D) that varied between 0.25 < {{ H}{/}{ D}} < 8.75. The influence of turbulent flow regimes is the main focus of this paper; however, laminar flow data are also presented between 1350 < Re < 17{,}300. A custom measurement facility was designed and commissioned to utilise particle image velocimetry in order to quantitatively measure the fluid dynamics both before and after the jet exits its nozzle. The velocity profiles are normalised with the mean velocity across the nozzle exit, and turbulence statistics are also presented. The primary objective of this paper is to present accurate flow profiles across the nozzle exit of an impinging jet confined to a low H/ D, with a view to guide the boundary conditions chosen for numerical simulations confined to similar constraints. The results revealed in this paper suggest that the fluid dynamics in the stagnation zone strongly influences the nozzle exit velocity profile at confinement heights between 0 < {{ H}{/}{ D}} < 1. This is of particular relevance with regard to the choice of inlet boundary conditions in numerical models, and it was found that it is necessary to model a jet tube length {{ L}{/}{ D}} > 0.5—where D is the inner diameter of the jet—in order to minimise modelling uncertainty.

  18. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  19. [I am old and sick, therefore I "exit"?].

    PubMed

    Coutaz, M; Morisod, J

    2012-10-01

    One hundred seventy patients (average age 79.9 years) with preserved cognitive faculties agreed to complete a questionnaire on the costs caused by their health conditions, the guilt they feel due to these costs, and their eventual resort to the Exit association. 48% answered that health care cost too much to the community, 10% reported feeling guilty about the potential costs generated by a consultation with their physician. 98 patients knew about the Exit association: 26% considered that resorting to Exit was a way to reduce health costs, 30% a way to avoid being an economic burden to their family and 34% a way to die with dignity. Our results indicate that economic pressure on medical costs is a source of guilt for older citizens, so much so that one in 10 patients considers resorting to assisted sucide for fear of costing too much to the community. PMID:23133892

  20. Near field and exit wave computations for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Howie, A

    2013-11-01

    The partial wave phase shift formalism of atomic scattering is applied to compute exit wave functions for isolated Au and Si atoms under both plane wave and focused probe illumination. Connections between the far field and near field (exit) waves are clarified. This approach treats the Coulomb singularity properly though at 100 keV large numbers of phase shifts are required. In principle any form of incident wave can be handled so it may provide a means for testing traditional scattering theories used in electron microscopy. By applying the analysis to an atom embedded in a constant potential rather than free space, exit spheres of radius half the interatomic spacing can be used. PMID:23726769

  1. Experimental study of three exit pressure distortions on turbine performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.; Boynton, James L.

    1993-06-01

    A cold flow air test of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) turbine was conducted with a circumferential pressure distortion at the turbine exit. The effects of three circumferential exit pressure distortions on turbine efficiency and pressure ratio, are presented. Circumferential and radial total pressure, total temperature, static pressure, and flow angle distributions at the turbine exit are also presented. Efficiency and total-to-total pressure ratio are shown to have a circumferential variation as high as 13.7 percent (or points of efficiency) and 7.1 percent, respectively. A slight pressure distortion was measured downstream of the first stage nozzle and the distortion increased across subsequent blade rows to a maximum downstream of the second stage rotor for all three plates. A brief discussion of the test facility, model, instrumentation, and test plan is given for completeness.

  2. Small protein domains fold inside the ribosome exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jacopo; von Heijne, Gunnar; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Cotranslational folding of small protein domains within the ribosome exit tunnel may be an important cellular strategy to avoid protein misfolding. However, the pathway of cotranslational folding has so far been described only for a few proteins, and therefore, it is unclear whether folding in the ribosome exit tunnel is a common feature for small protein domains. Here, we have analyzed nine small protein domains and determined at which point during translation their folding generates sufficient force on the nascent chain to release translational arrest by the SecM arrest peptide, both in vitro and in live E. coli cells. We find that all nine protein domains initiate folding while still located well within the ribosome exit tunnel. PMID:26879042

  3. Gas turbine combustor exit piece with hinged connections

    DOEpatents

    Charron, Richard C.; Pankey, William W.

    2016-04-26

    An exit piece (66) with an inlet throat (67) that conducts a combustion gas flow (36A) in a path (82) from a combustor (63) to an annular chamber (68) that feeds the first blade section (37) of a gas turbine (26). The exit piece further includes an outlet portion (69) that forms a circumferential segment of the annular chamber. The outlet portion interconnects with adjacent outlet portions by hinges (78A, 78B, 80A, 80B). Each hinge may have a hinge axis (82A, 82B) parallel to a centerline (21) of the turbine. Respective gas flows (36A) are configured by an assembly (60) of the exit pieces to converge on the feed chamber (68) into a uniform helical flow that drives the first blade section with minimal circumferential variations in force.

  4. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; Hedman, Rickard; Marino, Jacopo; Wickles, Stephan; Bischoff, Lukas; Johansson, Magnus; Müller-Lucks, Annika; Trovato, Fabio; Puglisi, Joseph D; O'Brien, Edward P; Beckmann, Roland; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-09-01

    At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins. PMID:26321634

  5. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Hedman, Rickard; Marino, Jacopo; Wickles, Stephan; Bischoff, Lukas; Johansson, Magnus; Müller-Lucks, Annika; Trovato, Fabio; Puglisi, Joseph D.; O’Brien, Edward P.; Beckmann, Roland; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Summary At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins. PMID:26321634

  6. Healthcare transition managers make market exits easier for insurers.

    PubMed

    Resnick, L R

    1999-10-01

    Insurers have been struggling to meet and maintain their profit margins on the health insurance business they underwrite. As a result, many have exited or are contemplating exiting from the health insurance market. At the same time, managed care organizations are seeking ways to augment their enrollment base and satisfy investor expectations. Insurers that wish to transfer their health insurance business to other carriers and managed care organizations that are interested in accepting this business have turned to a new type of healthcare financing company--the healthcare transition manager--to facilitate the transaction. Part broker, part matchmaker, and part administrative coordinator, these companies make it possible for commercial insurers to exit the health insurance market without undue hardship to enrollees or the managed care plans that assume risk for their care. PMID:11066665

  7. NOTE: Comparison of sources of exit fluence variation for IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Joseph K.; Clews, Luke; Gordon, J. James; Wang, Song; Greer, Peter B.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2009-10-01

    The fluence exiting a patient during beam delivery can be used as treatment delivery quality assurance, either by direct comparison with expected exit fluences or by backprojection to reconstruct the patient dose. Multiple possible sources of measured exit fluence deviations exist, including changes in the beam delivery and changes in the patient anatomy. The purpose of this work is to compare the deviations caused by these sources. Machine delivery-related variability is measured by acquiring multiple dosimetric portal images (DPIs) of several test fields without a patient/phantom in the field over a time period of 2 months. Patient anatomy-related sources of fluence variability are simulated by computing transmission DPIs for a prostate patient using the same incident fluence for 11 different computed tomography (CT) images of the patient anatomy. The standard deviation (SD) and maximum deviation of the exit fluence, averaged over 5 mm × 5 mm square areas, is calculated for each test set. Machine delivery fluence SDs as large as 1% are observed for a sample patient field and as large as 2.5% for a picket-fence dMLC test field. Simulations indicate that day-to-day patient anatomy variations induce exit fluence SDs as large as 3.5%. The largest observed machine delivery deviations are 4% for the sample patient field and 7% for the picket-fence field, while the largest difference for the patient anatomy-related source is 8.5%. Since daily changes in patient anatomy can result in substantial exit fluence deviations, care should be taken when applying fluence back-projection to ensure that such deviations are properly attributed to their source.

  8. Flow Regime Study in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Riser with an Abrupt Exit: [1] High Density Suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Lee, G.T.; Seachman, S.M.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2008-05-13

    Flow regime study was conducted in a 0.3 m diameter, 15.5 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser with an abrupt exit at the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U. S. Department of Energy. A statistical designed test series was conducted including four (4) operating set points and a duplicated center point (therefore a total of 6 operating set points). Glass beads of mean diameter 200 μm and particle density of 2,430 kg/m3 were used as bed material. The CFB riser was operated at various superficial gas velocities ranging from 5.6 to 7.6 m/s and solid mass flux from a low of 86 to a high of 303 kg/m2-s. Results of the apparent solids fraction profile as well as the radial particle velocity profile were analyzed in order to identify the presence of Dense Suspension Upflow (DSU) conditions. DSU regime was found to exist at the bottom of the riser, while the middle section of the riser was still exhibiting core-annular flow structure. Due to the abrupt geometry of the exit, the DSU regime was also found at the top of the riser. In addition the effects of the azimuthal angle, riser gas velocity, and mass solids flux on the particle velocity were investigated and are discussed in this paper.

  9. Intermittency and velocity fluctuations in hopper flows prone to clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. C.; Durian, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    We study experimentally the dynamics of granular media in a discharging hopper. In such flows, there often appears to be a critical outlet size Dc such that the flow never clogs for D >Dc . We report on the time-averaged velocity distributions, as well as temporal intermittency in the ensemble-averaged velocity of grains in a viewing window, for both D Dc , near and far from the outlet. We characterize the velocity distributions by the standard deviation and the skewness of the distribution of vertical velocities. We propose a measure for intermittency based on the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov DKS statistic for the velocity distributions as a function of time. We find that there is no discontinuity or kink in these various measures as a function of hole size. This result supports the proposition that there is no well-defined Dc and that clogging is always possible. Furthermore, the intermittency time scale of the flow is set by the speed of the grains at the hopper exit. This latter finding is consistent with a model of clogging as the independent sampling for stable configurations at the exit with a rate set by the exiting grain speed [C. C. Thomas and D. J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 178001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.178001].

  10. Measurement of Initial Conditions at Nozzle Exit of High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    The time averaged and unsteady density fields close to the nozzle exit (0.1 less than or = x/D less than or = 2, x: downstream distance, D: jet diameter) of unheated free jets at Mach numbers of 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8 were measured using a molecular Rayleigh scattering based technique. The initial thickness of shear layer and its linear growth rate were determined from time-averaged density survey and a modeling process, which utilized the Crocco-Busemann equation to relate density profiles to velocity profiles. The model also corrected for the smearing effect caused by a relatively long probe length in the measured density data. The calculated shear layer thickness was further verified from a limited hot-wire measurement. Density fluctuations spectra, measured using a two-Photomultiplier-tube technique, were used to determine evolution of turbulent fluctuations in various Strouhal frequency bands. For this purpose spectra were obtained from a large number of points inside the flow; and at every axial station spectral data from all radial positions were integrated. The radially-integrated fluctuation data show an exponential growth with downstream distance and an eventual saturation in all Strouhal frequency bands. The initial level of density fluctuations was calculated by extrapolation to nozzle exit.

  11. Senior Exit Plans Survey. State Summary Report. Class of 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State of Hawaii Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report presents statewide, complex area, and individual school summaries of students' post-secondary plans for the year following their completion of high school. The Senior Exit Plans Survey (SEPS) Coordinator at each school, usually a school counselor, was responsible for distributing, collecting, checking, and returning the completed…

  12. Embracing the Exit: Assessment, Trust, and the Teaching of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Historically, the Composition Program at Eastern Washington University (EWU), a comprehensive university in Cheney, WA, required a single essay sample from each composition student as the final exit exam; in practice, a student passed or failed the course based on an in-class argumentative essay, written in three consecutive class periods. Such a…

  13. 14 CFR 29.807 - Passenger emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... might become potential fire hazards in a crash. (2) Type II. This type is the same as Type I, except... a crash landing must be extremely remote. (d) Ditching emergency exits for passengers. If... with the following requirements and must be proven by test, demonstration, or analysis unless...

  14. 14 CFR 29.807 - Passenger emergency exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... might become potential fire hazards in a crash. (2) Type II. This type is the same as Type I, except... a crash landing must be extremely remote. (d) Ditching emergency exits for passengers. If... with the following requirements and must be proven by test, demonstration, or analysis unless...

  15. 3. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING BARGE AFTER EXITING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING BARGE AFTER EXITING FROM DOWNSTREAM END OF NAVIGATION LOCK #1; SWING BRIDGE IS IN PROCESS OF CLOSING. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  16. High School Exit Exams: The Attitudes and Perceptions of Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    In the U. S. 25 states operate from an assessment based frame of reference that includes some form of high school exit examination. Enhancements for existing assessment and accountability systems need to be explored according to the findings of Elizabeth Towles. The problem addressed in this study was that little research had been conducted to…

  17. Senior Exit Plans Survey. State Summary Report. Class of 2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State of Hawaii Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This report presents statewide, complex area, and individual school summaries of students? post-secondary plans for the year following their completion of high school. The Senior Exit Plans Survey (SEPS) Coordinator at each school, usually a school counselor, was responsible for distributing, collecting, checking, and returning the completed…

  18. Events That Trigger Poverty Entries and Exits. JCPR Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKernan, Signe-Mary; Ratcliffe, Caroline

    This paper uses a discrete-time multivariate hazard model and longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation to examine how events affect poverty entries and exits and how these events have changed over time--from the pre-welfare reform period to the post-reform period. It also uses monthly state unemployment rate data from…

  19. Exiting School: Who Cares about the Youths with Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnisch, Delwyn L.; Snauwaert, Dale

    This paper documents the gap between the supply of and demand for adult services in each state of the United States, places this situation in its political context to explain why this gap exists, and discusses policy alternatives. The paper profiles the nature of the population of individuals with disabilities exiting public education and examines…

  20. A Longitudinal Study of Welfare Exit among American Indian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Shanta; Guo, Baorong

    2007-01-01

    Data from a longitudinal survey of families from three reservations (Navajo Nation, San Carlos, and Salt River) in Arizona were used to examine their probability of welfare use. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the effects of individual, family, and structural factors on welfare exit. Results indicate that their probability of…

  1. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. NOTE IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE FEATURES AT RIGHT. LOOKING 248°WSW - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. View looking out of the Irving Powerhouse showing the exiting ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking out of the Irving Powerhouse showing the exiting water flowing south into the inlet of the Childs System. Looking south - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Irving System, Irving Powerhouse, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  3. INTERIOR DETAIL OF THE ARENA EXIT GATE AND VERTICAL LOUVERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL OF THE ARENA EXIT GATE AND VERTICAL LOUVERS AT THE TOP OF THE BLEACHER SEATING. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. 14 CFR 29.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from that sign; and (2) On each bulkhead or divider that prevents fore and aft vision along the... emergency exits which are normally used doors. (2) Each outside marking, including the band, must have color... that, if the reflectance of the darker color is 15 percent or less, the reflectance of the...

  5. 14 CFR 25.811 - Emergency exit marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... divider that prevents fore and aft vision along the passenger cabin to indicate emergency exits beyond and... color contrast to be readily distinguishable from the surrounding fuselage surface. The contrast must be such that if the reflectance of the darker color is 15 percent or less, the reflectance of the...

  6. 2. Northwest face of missile site control building. Bottom exit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Northwest face of missile site control building. Bottom exit is the emergency escape tunnel/unloading dock leading from the subterranean second floor at vestibule #266 and room #265 - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  7. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency exits for buses. 393.62 Section 393.62 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Glazing...

  8. Chlamydial Lytic Exit from Host Cells Is Plasmid Regulated

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunfu; Starr, Tregei; Song, Lihua; Carlson, John H.; Sturdevant, Gail L.; Beare, Paul A.; Whitmire, William M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that is a globally important human pathogen. The chlamydial plasmid is an attenuating virulence factor, but the molecular basis for attenuation is not understood. Chlamydiae replicate within a membrane-bound vacuole termed an inclusion, where they undergo a biphasic developmental growth cycle and differentiate from noninfectious into infectious organisms. Late in the developmental cycle, the fragile chlamydia-laden inclusion retains its integrity by surrounding itself with scaffolds of host cytoskeletal proteins. The ability of chlamydiae to developmentally free themselves from this cytoskeleton network is a fundamental virulence trait of the pathogen. Here, we show that plasmidless chlamydiae are incapable of disrupting their cytoskeletal entrapment and remain intracellular as stable mature inclusions that support high numbers of infectious organisms. By using deletion mutants of the eight plasmid-carried genes (Δpgp1 to Δpgp8), we show that Pgp4, a transcriptional regulator of multiple chromosomal genes, is required for exit. Exit of chlamydiae is dependent on protein synthesis and is inhibited by the compound C1, an inhibitor of the type III secretion system (T3S). Exit of plasmid-free and Δpgp4 organisms, which failed to lyse infected cells, was rescued by latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Our findings describe a genetic mechanism of chlamydial exit from host cells that is dependent on an unknown pgp4-regulated chromosomal T3S effector gene. PMID:26556273

  9. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202 Section 431.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Face means an illuminated side of an illuminated...

  10. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202 Section 431.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Face means an illuminated side of an illuminated...

  11. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202 Section 431.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... energy source, which have electrical characteristics that are essentially identical, and which do...

  12. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202 Section 431.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Face means an illuminated side of an illuminated...

  13. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202 Section 431.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... energy source, which have electrical characteristics that are essentially identical, and which do...

  14. Teachers' Interpretations of Exit Exam Scores and College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' interpretations of Virginia's high school exit exam policy through the teachers' responses to a survey. The survey was administered to teachers from one school district in Northern Virginia. The teachers selected for the survey taught a subject in which students must pass a Standards of Learning (SOL) test in order to…

  15. The Exit Poll: An Environmental Scanning Technique for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Jess E.

    1989-01-01

    Exit polling of school district election returns is a form of environmental scanning that can provide information needed for strategic planning and be used to increase the effectiveness of school election campaigns. This technique is recommended for all school districts dependent on voter approval to meet revenue needs. (11 references) (MLH)

  16. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Glazing and Window Construction § 393.62 Emergency exits for buses. (a) Buses... glazing if such glazing is not contained in a push-out window; or, at least 432 cm2 (67 square inches) of free opening resulting from opening of a push-out type window. No area shall be included in...

  17. 49 CFR 393.62 - Emergency exits for buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Glazing and Window Construction § 393.62 Emergency exits for buses. (a) Buses... glazing if such glazing is not contained in a push-out window; or, at least 432 cm2 (67 square inches) of free opening resulting from opening of a push-out type window. No area shall be included in...

  18. Unfertilized frog eggs die by apoptosis following meiotic exit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A characteristic feature of frog reproduction is external fertilization accomplished outside the female's body. Mature fertilization-competent frog eggs are arrested at the meiotic metaphase II with high activity of the key meiotic regulators, maturation promoting factor (MPF) and cytostatic factor (CSF), awaiting fertilization. If the eggs are not fertilized within several hours of ovulation, they deteriorate and ultimately die by as yet unknown mechanism. Results Here, we report that the vast majority of naturally laid unfertilized eggs of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis spontaneously exit metaphase arrest under various environmental conditions and degrade by a well-defined apoptotic process within 48 hours after ovulation. The main features of this process include cytochrome c release, caspase activation, ATP depletion, increase of ADP/ATP ratio, apoptotic nuclear morphology, progressive intracellular acidification, and egg swelling. Meiotic exit seems to be a prerequisite for execution of the apoptotic program, since (i) it precedes apoptosis, (ii) apoptotic events cannot be observed in the eggs maintaining high activity of MPF and CSF, and (iii) apoptosis in unfertilized frog eggs is accelerated upon early meiotic exit. The apoptotic features cannot be observed in the immature prophase-arrested oocytes, however, the maturation-inducing hormone progesterone renders oocytes susceptible to apoptosis. Conclusions The study reveals that naturally laid intact frog eggs die by apoptosis if they are not fertilized. A maternal apoptotic program is evoked in frog oocytes upon maturation and executed after meiotic exit in unfertilized eggs. The meiotic exit is required for execution of the apoptotic program in eggs. The emerging anti-apoptotic role of meiotic metaphase arrest needs further investigation. PMID:22195698

  19. Comparability of Semester and Exit Exam Grades: Long-Term Effect of the Implementation of State-Wide Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maag Merki, Katharina; Holmeier, Monika

    2015-01-01

    A goal in many countries is to institute state-wide exams to base student assessment more firmly on norms for all classes. This raises the question as to the extent to which greater standardization of grading practice can be reached by implementing state-wide exit exams. Since there is a lack of longitudinal studies, we analyzed the effect of the…

  20. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  1. Calcium Signaling and Meiotic Exit at Fertilization in Xenopus Egg

    PubMed Central

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Stefanov, Vasily E.; Iwasaki, Tetsushi; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Fukami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that mediates egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species studied. However, signaling pathways leading to calcium generation and the mechanisms of calcium-induced exit from meiotic arrest vary substantially among species. Here, we review the pathways of calcium signaling and the mechanisms of meiotic exit at fertilization in the eggs of the established developmental model, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We also discuss calcium involvement in the early fertilization-induced events in Xenopus egg, such as membrane depolarization, the increase in intracellular pH, cortical granule exocytosis, cortical contraction, contraction wave, cortical rotation, reformation of the nuclear envelope, sperm chromatin decondensation and sister chromatid segregation. PMID:25322156

  2. Simulation of stochastic diffusion via first exit times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lötstedt, Per; Meinecke, Lina

    2015-11-01

    In molecular biology it is of interest to simulate diffusion stochastically. In the mesoscopic model we partition a biological cell into unstructured subvolumes. In each subvolume the number of molecules is recorded at each time step and molecules can jump between neighboring subvolumes to model diffusion. The jump rates can be computed by discretizing the diffusion equation on that unstructured mesh. If the mesh is of poor quality, due to a complicated cell geometry, standard discretization methods can generate negative jump coefficients, which no longer allows the interpretation as the probability to jump between the subvolumes. We propose a method based on the mean first exit time of a molecule from a subvolume, which guarantees positive jump coefficients. Two approaches to exit times, a global and a local one, are presented and tested in simulations on meshes of different quality in two and three dimensions.

  3. The exit-time problem for a Markov jump process

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, N.; D'Elia, Marta; Lehoucq, Richard B.

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of our paper is to consider the exit-time problem for a finite-range Markov jump process, i.e, the distance the particle can jump is bounded independent of its location. Such jump diffusions are expedient models for anomalous transport exhibiting super-diffusion or nonstandard normal diffusion. We refer to the associated deterministic equation as a volume-constrained nonlocal diffusion equation. The volume constraint is the nonlocal analogue of a boundary condition necessary to demonstrate that the nonlocal diffusion equation is well-posed and is consistent with the jump process. A critical aspect of the analysis is a variational formulation and a recently developed nonlocal vector calculus. Furthermore, this calculus allows us to pose nonlocal backward and forward Kolmogorov equations, the former equation granting the various moments of the exit-time distribution.

  4. Limit of small exits in open Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Jacobo; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2003-05-01

    The nature of open Hamiltonian systems is analyzed, when the size of the exits decreases and tends to zero. Fractal basins appear typically in open Hamiltonian systems, but we claim that in the limit of small exits, the invariant sets tend to fill up the whole phase space with the strong consequence that a new kind of basin appears, where the unpredictability grows indefinitely. This means that for finite, arbitrarily small accuracy, we can find uncertain basins, where any information about the future of the system is lost. This total indeterminism had only been reported in dissipative systems, in particular in the so-called intermingled riddled basins, as well as in the riddledlike basins. We show that this peculiar, behavior is a general feature of open Hamiltonian systems. PMID:12786244

  5. The exit-time problem for a Markov jump process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, N.; D'Elia, M.; Lehoucq, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider the exit-time problem for a finite-range Markov jump process, i.e, the distance the particle can jump is bounded independent of its location. Such jump diffusions are expedient models for anomalous transport exhibiting super-diffusion or nonstandard normal diffusion. We refer to the associated deterministic equation as a volume-constrained nonlocal diffusion equation. The volume constraint is the nonlocal analogue of a boundary condition necessary to demonstrate that the nonlocal diffusion equation is well-posed and is consistent with the jump process. A critical aspect of the analysis is a variational formulation and a recently developed nonlocal vector calculus. This calculus allows us to pose nonlocal backward and forward Kolmogorov equations, the former equation granting the various moments of the exit-time distribution.

  6. Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance in sunflower canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tha Paw u, Kyaw; Ustin, Susan L.; Zhang, Chang-An

    1989-01-01

    Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance above and within a relatively closed fully irrigated sunflower canopy is detailed. Azimuthal variation in thermal infrared exitance above canopies was weakly (statistically) related to solar position and was comparable to or larger than errors in satellite-based canopy estimates. Anisotropy within canopies was significantly lower and decreased with canopy closure and depth into the canopy. Measured azimuthal isotropy within canopies supports the use of this assumption in radiative transfer models. Significant differences in canopy temperature measurements were found depending upon whether the instruments were within or above the canopy. These differences could produce errors of 20-35 percent in latent energy estimates during periods of high evapotranspiration (ET) and greater errors in periods of restricted ET.

  7. EXIT procedure: a report of the first three Mississippi cases.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Justin; Liechty, Kenneth W; Bofill, James A

    2012-04-01

    The University of Mississippi Medical Center has initiated a state-of-the-art fetal center. This project involves collaboration between multiple disciplines including anesthesiology, pediatric surgery, maternal-fetal medicine, radiology, neonatology, genetics, pediatric cardiology and other pediatric subspecialties, nursing, and social work. Complicated fetal patients from throughout the southeastern U.S.A. may be referred to this center and benefit from new and innovative interventions that have not been available to this region in the past. The first three EXIT (ex-utero intrapartum treatment) procedures were recently performed at Batson Children's Hospital at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Our objective is to share our recent experiences with this novel procedure and to detail some of the basics of an EXIT delivery. PMID:22803277

  8. Graceful exit via polymerization of pre-big-bang cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    De Risi, Giuseppe; Maartens, Roy; Singh, Parampreet

    2007-11-15

    We consider a phenomenological modification of the pre-big-bang scenario using ideas from the resolution of curvature singularities in loop quantum cosmology. We show that nonperturbative loop modifications to the dynamics, arising from the underlying polymer representation, can resolve the graceful exit problem. The curvature and the dilaton energy stay finite at all times, in both the string and Einstein frames. In the string frame, the dilaton tends to a constant value at late times after the bounce.

  9. 30. VIEW OF ROOM 212 LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARDS EXIT DOORS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF ROOM 212 LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARDS EXIT DOORS. EXPOSED MASONRY WALL WITH BRICK DETAILING OVER ARCHED DOORWAY IS UNPAINTED. ORIGINAL USE OF ROOM 212 WAS AS A HAYLOFT; EXTERIOR DOOR WAS USED FOR LOADING HAY. TRUSSWORK AND BEAMS ARE EXPOSED AND UNPAINTED. WALLS HAVE PAINTED WOOD PANELING, CEILING MATERIAL IS EXPOSED WOOD ROOF SHEATHING. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-08-29

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55's dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis. PMID:27551057

  11. Exit probability of the one-dimensional q-voter model: Analytical results and simulations for large networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpanaro, André M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the exit probability of the one-dimensional q-voter model and present tools to obtain estimates about this probability, both through simulations in large networks (around 107 sites) and analytically in the limit where the network is infinitely large. We argue that the result E(ρ )=ρq/ρq+(1-ρ)q, that was found in three previous works [F. Slanina, K. Sznajd-Weron, and P. Przybyła, Europhys. Lett. 82, 18006 (2008), 10.1209/0295-5075/82/18006; R. Lambiotte and S. Redner, Europhys. Lett. 82, 18007 (2008), 10.1209/0295-5075/82/18007, for the case q =2; and P. Przybyła, K. Sznajd-Weron, and M. Tabiszewski, Phys. Rev. E 84, 031117 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.031117, for q >2] using small networks (around 103 sites), is a good approximation, but there are noticeable deviations that appear even for small systems and that do not disappear when the system size is increased (with the notable exception of the case q =2). We also show that, under some simple and intuitive hypotheses, the exit probability must obey the inequality ρq/ρq+(1-ρ)≤E(ρ)≤ρ/ρ +(1-ρ)q in the infinite size limit. We believe this settles in the negative the suggestion made [S. Galam and A. C. R. Martins, Europhys. Lett. 95, 48005 (2001), 10.1209/0295-5075/95/48005] that this result would be a finite size effect, with the exit probability actually being a step function. We also show how the result that the exit probability cannot be a step function can be reconciled with the Galam unified frame, which was also a source of controversy.

  12. Modeling of Fixed-Exit Porous Bleed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, John D.

    2008-01-01

    A model has been developed to simulate a fixed-exit porous bleed system for supersonic inlets. The fixed-exit model allows the amount of bleed flow to vary according to local flow conditions and fixed-exit characteristics of the bleed system. This variation is important for the control of shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions within the inlet. The model computes the bleed plenum static pressure rather than requiring its specification. The model was implemented in the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics code. The model was then verified and validated against experimental data for bleed on a flat plate with and without an impinging oblique shock and for bleed in a Mach 3.0 axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet. The model was able to accurately correlate the plenum pressures with bleed rates and simulate the effect of the bleed on the downstream boundary layer. Further, the model provided a realistic simulation of the initiation of inlet unstart. The results provide the most in-depth examination to date of bleed models for use in the simulation of supersonic inlets. The results also highlight the limitations of the models and aspects that require further research.

  13. First exit times of harmonically trapped particles: a didactic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2015-01-01

    We revise the classical problem of characterizing first exit times of a harmonically trapped particle whose motion is described by a one- or multidimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. We start by recalling the main derivation steps of a propagator using Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations. The mean exit time, the moment-generating function and the survival probability are then expressed through confluent hypergeometric functions and thoroughly analyzed. We also present a rapidly converging series representation of confluent hypergeometric functions that is particularly well suited for numerical computation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the governing Fokker-Planck operator. We discuss several applications of first exit times, such as the detection of time intervals during which motor proteins exert a constant force onto a tracer in optical tweezers single-particle tracking experiments; adhesion bond dissociation under mechanical stress; characterization of active periods of trend-following and mean-reverting strategies in algorithmic trading on stock markets; relation to the distribution of first crossing times of a moving boundary by Brownian motion. Some extensions are described, including diffusion under quadratic double-well potential and anomalous diffusion.

  14. The Three Dimensional Flow Field at the Exit of an Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Ristic, D.; Chu, S.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic and comprehensive investigation was performed to provide detailed data on the three dimensional viscous flow phenomena downstream of a modem turbine rotor and to understand the flow physics such as origin, nature, development of wakes, secondary flow, and leakage flow. The experiment was carried out in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) at Penn State, with velocity measurements taken with a 3-D LDV System. Two radial traverses at 1% and 10% of chord downstream of the rotor have been performed to identify the three-dimensional flow features at the exit of the rotor blade row. Sufficient spatial resolution was maintained to resolve blade wake, secondary flow, and tip leakage flow. The wake deficit is found to be substantial, especially at 1% of chord downstream of the rotor. At this location, negative axial velocity occurs near the tip, suggesting flow separation in the tip clearance region. Turbulence intensities peak in the wake region, and cross- correlations are mainly associated with the velocity gradient of the wake deficit. The radial velocities, both in the wake and in the endwall region, are found to be substantial. Two counter-rotating secondary flows are identified in the blade passage, with one occupying the half span close to the casino and the other occupying the half span close to the hub. The tip leakage flow is well restricted to 10% immersion from the blade tip. There are strong vorticity distributions associated with these secondary flows and tip leakage flow. The passage averaged data are in good agreement with design values.

  15. Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Large-Scale, Supersonic, Heated Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Magnotti, G.; Bivolaru, D.; Tedder, S.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    Two laser-based measurement techniques have been used to characterize an axisymmetric, combustion-heated supersonic jet issuing into static room air. The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurement technique measured temperature and concentration while the interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) method simultaneously measured two components of velocity. This paper reports a preliminary analysis of CARS-IRS temperature and velocity measurements from selected measurement locations. The temperature measurements show that the temperature along the jet axis remains constant while dropping off radially. The velocity measurements show that the nozzle exit velocity fluctuations are about 3% of the maximum velocity in the flow.

  16. 29 CFR 1910.36 - Design and construction requirements for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... your workplace, consult NFPA 101-2000, Life Safety Code. (c) Exit discharge. (1) Each exit discharge... 101-2000, Life Safety Code. (g) An exit route must meet minimum height and width requirements. (1) The... for your workplace, consult NFPA 101-2009, Life Safety Code, or IFC-2009, International Fire...

  17. 24 CFR 3280.106 - Exit facilities; egress windows and devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exit facilities; egress windows and... § 3280.106 Exit facilities; egress windows and devices. (a) Every room designed expressly for sleeping purposes, unless it has an exit door (see § 3280.105), shall have at least one outside window or...

  18. State High School Exit Exams: Trends in Test Programs, Alternate Pathways, and Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-01-01

    The report draws from Center on Education Policy's eight-year study of high school exit exams to identify long-term trends in state policies and student performance. It highlights a growing trend among states to establish alternate pathways to graduation for students who are struggling to pass exit exams. The report also analyzes exit exam pass…

  19. Pore Velocity Estimation Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devary, J. L.; Doctor, P. G.

    1982-08-01

    Geostatistical data analysis techniques were used to stochastically model the spatial variability of groundwater pore velocity in a potential waste repository site. Kriging algorithms were applied to Hanford Reservation data to estimate hydraulic conductivities, hydraulic head gradients, and pore velocities. A first-order Taylor series expansion for pore velocity was used to statistically combine hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head gradient, and effective porosity surfaces and uncertainties to characterize the pore velocity uncertainty. Use of these techniques permits the estimation of pore velocity uncertainties when pore velocity measurements do not exist. Large pore velocity estimation uncertainties were found to be located in the region where the hydraulic head gradient relative uncertainty was maximal.

  20. Mean Velocity, Turbulence Intensity and Turbulence Convection Velocity Measurements for a Convergent Nozzle in a Free Jet Wind Tunnel. Comprehensive Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccolgan, C. J.; Larson, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of flight on the mean flow and turbulence properties of a 0.056m circular jet were determined in a free jet wind tunnel. The nozzle exit velocity was 122 m/sec, and the wind tunnel velocity was set at 0, 12, 37, and 61 m/sec. Measurements of flow properties including mean velocity, turbulence intensity and spectra, and eddy convection velocity were carried out using two linearized hot wire anemometers. This report contains the raw data and graphical presentations. The final technical report includes a description of the test facilities, test hardware, along with significant test results and conclusions.

  1. Bypassing slip velocity: rotational and translational velocities of autophoretic colloids in terms of surface flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Paul E.; Crespi, Vincent H.; Nourhani, Amir

    2016-09-01

    A standard approach to propulsion velocities of autophoretic colloids with thin interaction layers uses a reciprocity relation applied to the slip velocity. But the surface flux (chemical, electrical, thermal, etc.), which is the source of the field driving the slip is often more accessible. We show how, under conditions of low Reynolds number and a field obeying the Laplace equation in the outer region, the slip velocity can be bypassed in velocity calculations. In a sense, the actual slip velocity and a normal field proportional to the flux density are equivalent for this type of calculation. Using known results for surface traction induced by rotating or translating an inert particle in a quiescent fluid, we derive simple and explicit integral formulas for translational and rotational velocities of arbitrary spheroidal and slender-body autophoretic colloids.

  2. Lessons learned in dealing with self luminous exit signs.

    PubMed

    Linsley, Mark E

    2005-02-01

    Self-luminous signs are generally licensed consumer products used to identifying exits, handicap accessibility areas, parking lots, no smoking areas, life boat locations, and emergency stair locations. While purchasers of these signs are exempt from the requirement of applying for a specific license, they are not exempt from all other requirements concerning radioactive material. And they might not be exempt from the liability that can result from lost or damaged signs and improper disposal. A review of the potential for contamination from these signs is presented along with suggestions for handling a contaminating event involving a damaged sign. PMID:15654240

  3. High velocity impact resistance of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justo, Jo; Marquer, A. T.

    2003-09-01

    Composite materials are used in applications that require protection against high velocity impacts by fragment simulating projectiles. In this work, the ballistic performance of two commercially available materials against a fragments simulating projectile (FSP) is studied. The materials used were an aramid fiber with a phenolic matrix and a polyethylene fiber with a thermoplastic film. Impact tests have been carried out, with velocities ranging from 300 m/s to 1260m/s. The projectile used is a 1.1g NATO FSP. Impact velocity and exit velocity are measured, to determine the V{50} and the energy absorbed in cases where perforation occurs. Assessment of the impact damaged area is done using ultrasonic C-scan inspection. Types of damage and damage mechanisms have been identified. Several mechanical tests have been carried out to determine the mechanical properties, at different strain rates. Future work in numerical simulation of impact will be done using commercial code AutodyntinycircledR ftom Century Dynamics.

  4. Moral Reasoning in Hypothetical and Actual Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumprer, Gerard F.; Butter, Eliot J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of this investigation suggest that moral reasoning of college students, when assessed using the DIT format, is the same whether the dilemmas involve hypothetical or actual situations. Subjects, when presented with hypothetical situations, become deeply immersed in them and respond as if they were actual participants. (Author/BEF)

  5. Factors Related to Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, H. Wayne; McWilliams, Jettie M.

    1978-01-01

    Provides data to further support the notions that females score higher in self-actualization measures and that self-actualization scores correlate inversely to the degree of undesirability individuals assign to their heights and weights. Finds that, contrary to predictions, greater androgyny was related to lower, not higher, self-actualization…

  6. Video Measurement of the Muzzle Velocity of a Potato Gun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasperson, Christopher; Pollman, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Using first principles, a theoretical equation for the maximum and actual muzzle velocities for a pneumatic cannon was recently derived. For a fixed barrel length, this equation suggests that the muzzle velocity can be enhanced by maximizing the product of the initial pressure and the volume of the propellant gas and decreasing the projectile…

  7. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how ...

  8. The exit interview: effective tool or meaningless gesture?

    PubMed

    Garretson, P; Teel, K S

    1982-01-01

    As a management tool, the exit interviews has generated both acclaim and criticism. Some managers have maintained that it can play a major role in reducing an organization's turnover rate while others contend that it is a worthless gesture. Research conducted by Pamela Garretson, systems and procedures analyst at Hughes Aircraft Company's Ground Systems Group, and Kenneth S. Teel, professor of human resources management at California State University at Long Beach, suggests that (1) such interviews are, for the most part, conducted by personnel department staff members during the employee's last week on the job, (2) too often, organizations fail to make any use of the information obtained during the interview, and (3) little effort is made to compute turnover costs even though turnover is generally recognized as being expensive. The authors recommend that companies conducting exit interviews either use the information obtained as a basis for identifying and alleviating problems or stop conducting them, and that they should begin to compile quantitative data on turnover costs before deciding to set up a turnover-reduction program. PMID:10258855

  9. Imperforate Anus with Fistula Exiting at the Penile Skin.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaris, Dimitrios; Mouravas, Vassilios; Lambropoulos, Vassilios; Kepertis, Chrysostomos; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    2016-03-01

    We present the case of a male neonate with imperforate anus and a fistula exiting on the penile skin. Anorectal malformations in boys often present themselves with an entero-perineal or entero-urinary tract fistula, the type of which is a key feature for the classification and the treatment plan. A fistula exiting in front of the scrotum, such as described in our case, is very rare and is not incorporated in the current classification and treatment algorithms. Scarce reports on misjudgment concerning the position of the blind rectal pouch in similar cases, led us to perform a colostomy instead of a one-stage correction. A posterior sagittal anorectoplasty was performed eight months later and the rectal pouch was found inside the levator sling, justifying the cautious approach. The colostomy was closed three months later and after six months the distal part of the fistula was excised. We believe that in cases with a rare fistula presentation, the position of the rectal pouch is not predictable and the surgeon should proceed with caution. PMID:27134930

  10. Steam exit flow design for aft cavities of an airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Storey, James Michael; Tesh, Stephen William

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. A skirt or flange structure is provided for shielding the steam cooling impingement holes adjacent the inner wall aerofoil fillet region of the nozzle from the steam flow exiting the aft nozzle cavities. Moreover, the gap between the flash rib boss and the cavity insert is controlled to minimize the flow of post impingement cooling media therebetween. This substantially confines outflow to that exiting via the return channels, thus furthermore minimizing flow in the vicinity of the aerofoil fillet region that may adversely affect impingement cooling thereof.

  11. Imperforate Anus with Fistula Exiting at the Penile Skin

    PubMed Central

    Mouravas, Vassilios; Lambropoulos, Vassilios; Kepertis, Chrysostomos; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a male neonate with imperforate anus and a fistula exiting on the penile skin. Anorectal malformations in boys often present themselves with an entero-perineal or entero-urinary tract fistula, the type of which is a key feature for the classification and the treatment plan. A fistula exiting in front of the scrotum, such as described in our case, is very rare and is not incorporated in the current classification and treatment algorithms. Scarce reports on misjudgment concerning the position of the blind rectal pouch in similar cases, led us to perform a colostomy instead of a one-stage correction. A posterior sagittal anorectoplasty was performed eight months later and the rectal pouch was found inside the levator sling, justifying the cautious approach. The colostomy was closed three months later and after six months the distal part of the fistula was excised. We believe that in cases with a rare fistula presentation, the position of the rectal pouch is not predictable and the surgeon should proceed with caution. PMID:27134930

  12. Optimisation of the mean boat velocity in rowing.

    PubMed

    Rauter, G; Baumgartner, L; Denoth, J; Riener, R; Wolf, P

    2012-01-01

    In rowing, motor learning may be facilitated by augmented feedback that displays the ratio between actual mean boat velocity and maximal achievable mean boat velocity. To provide this ratio, the aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm calculating an individual maximal mean boat velocity. The algorithm optimised the horizontal oar movement under constraints such as the individual range of the horizontal oar displacement, individual timing of catch and release and an individual power-angle relation. Immersion and turning of the oar were simplified, and the seat movement of a professional rower was implemented. The feasibility of the algorithm, and of the associated ratio between actual boat velocity and optimised boat velocity, was confirmed by a study on four subjects: as expected, advanced rowing skills resulted in higher ratios, and the maximal mean boat velocity depended on the range of the horizontal oar displacement. PMID:21491254

  13. Velocity field measurement of a round jet using quantitative schlieren.

    PubMed

    Iffa, Emishaw D; Aziz, A Rashid A; Malik, Aamir S

    2011-02-10

    This paper utilizes the background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to measure the velocity field of a variable density round jet. The density field of the jet is computed based on the light deflection created during the passage of light through the understudy jet. The deflection vector estimation was carried out using phase-based optical flow algorithms. The density field is further exploited to extract the axial and radial velocity vectors with the aid of continuity and energy equations. The experiment is conducted at six different jet-exit temperature values. Additional turbulence parameters, such as velocity variance and power spectral density of the vector field, are also computed. Finally, the measured velocity parameters are compared with the hot wire anemometer measurements and their correlation is displayed. PMID:21343981

  14. Dust particle velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielman, L. O.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

  15. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  16. Flow characteristics in an expansion tunnel as inferred from velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Friesen, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    A photoionization technique was used to study flow characteristics in an expansion tunnel. Vertical surveys of the axial component of flow velocity just downstream from the nozzle exit were obtained, and estimates of freestream density were inferred from the velocity measurement technique. The pitot pressure was measured and compared to the average axial component of velocity as a function of time for the two cases when air and CO2 were used as test gases. Vertical velocity and static density profiles at the nozzle exit are presented for the case when CO2 was used as test gas. Experimental results were used to determine the diameter and uniformity of the test core at the nozzle exit and the duration of the quasi-steady flow period. These data are relevant to evaluation of the suitability of operating an expansion tube as an expansion tunnel. The expansion tunnel is an expansion tube with a conical nozzle positioned at the exit of the acceleration section, so that nozzle entrance flow conditions are hypersonic and characterized by hypervelocity.

  17. Group velocity of the light pulse in an open V-type system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingjuan; Fan, Xijun; Tian, Shufen; Liu, Chengpu; Gong, Shangqing; Xu, Zhizhan

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the group velocity of the probe light pulse in an open V-type system with spontaneously generated coherence. We find that, not only varying the relative phase between the probe and driving pulses can but varying the atomic exit rate or incoherent pumping rate also can manipulate dramatically the group velocity, even make the pulse propagation switching from subluminal to superluminal; the subliminal propagation can be companied with gain or absorption, but the superluminal propagation is always companied with absorption.

  18. Radial and circumferential flow surveys at the inlet and exit of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, S. T.; Bordelon, W. J., Jr.; Smith, A. W.; Ramachandran, N.

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this test was to obtain detailed radial and circumferential flow surveys at the inlet and exit of the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbine model using three-hole cobra probes, hot-film probes, and a laser velocimeter. The test was designed to meet several objectives. First, the techniques for making laser velocimeter, hot-film probe, and cobra probe measurements in turbine flows were developed and demonstrated. The ability to use the cobra probes to obtain static pressure and, therefore, velocity had to be verified; insertion techniques had to be established for the fragile hot-film probes; and a seeding method had to be established for the laser velocimetry. Once the measurement techniques were established, turbine inlet and exit velocity profiles, temperature profiles, pressure profiles, turbulence intensities, and boundary layer thicknesses were measured at the turbine design point. The blockage effect due to the model inlet and exit total pressure and total temperature rakes on the turbine performance was also studied. A small range of off-design points were run to obtain the profiles and to verify the rake blockage effects off-design. Finally, a range of different Reynolds numbers were run to study the effect of Reynolds number on the various measurements.

  19. Adolescents Exiting Homelessness Over Two Years: The Risk Amplification and Abatement Model.

    PubMed

    Milburn, Norweeta G; Rice, Eric; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Mallett, Shelley; Rosenthal, Doreen; Batterham, Phillip; May, Susanne J; Witkin, Andrea; Duan, Naihua

    2009-12-01

    The Risk Amplification and Abatement Model (RAAM), demonstrates that negative contact with socializing agents amplify risk, while positive contact abates risk for homeless adolescents. To test this model, the likelihood of exiting homelessness and returning to familial housing at 2 years and stably exiting over time are examined with longitudinal data collected from 183 newly homeless adolescents followed over 2 years in Los Angeles, CA. In support of RAAM, unadjusted odds of exiting at 2 years and stably exiting over2 years revealed that engagement with pro-social peers, maternal social support, and continued school attendance all promoted exiting behaviors. Simultaneously, exposure to family violence and reliance on shelter services discouraged stably exiting behaviors. Implications for family-based interventions are proposed. PMID:25067896

  20. Thermal IR exitance model of a plant canopy.

    PubMed

    Kimes, D S; Smith, J A; Link, L E

    1981-02-15

    A thermal IR exitance model of a plant canopy based on a mathematical abstraction of three horizontal layers of vegetation was developed. Canopy geometry within each layer is quantitatively described by the foliage and branch orientation distributions and number density. Given this geometric information for each layer and the driving meteorological variables, a system of energy budget equations was determined and solved for average layer temperatures. These estimated layer temperatures, together with the angular distributions of radiating elements, were used to calculate the emitted thermal IR radiation as a function of view angle above the canopy. The model was applied to a lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) canopy over a diurnal cycle. Simulated vs measured radiometric average temperatures of the midcanopy layer corresponded within 2 degrees C. Simulation results suggested that canopy geometry can significantly influence the effective radiant temperature recorded at varying sensor view angles. PMID:20309167

  1. An Epidemic Patchy Model with Entry-Exit Screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxin; Liu, Shengqiang; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Weiwei

    2015-07-01

    A multi-patch SEIQR epidemic model is formulated to investigate the long-term impact of entry-exit screening measures on the spread and control of infectious diseases. A threshold dynamics determined by the basic reproduction number R₀ is established: The disease can be eradicated if R₀ < 1, while the disease persists if R₀ > 1. As an application, six different screening strategies are explored to examine the impacts of screening on the control of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. We find that it is crucial to screen travelers from and to high-risk patches, and it is not necessary to implement screening in all connected patches, and both the dispersal rates and the successful detection rate of screening play an important role on determining an effective and practical screening strategy. PMID:25976693

  2. Moral considerations in non-EXIT airway management.

    PubMed

    Walker, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The case report "Management of the critical airway when an EXIT procedure is not an option" has important moral decision-making implications. If intubation was not quickly successful, then significant hypoxic brain injury may have resulted. A full discussion of the moral implications in cases such as this, prior to delivery, is important - both to the family and to the clinicians involved. Our contemporary era is characterised by a pronounced disparity of values and belief systems. An active process for moral decision-making based upon dialogic consensus, is seen as more appropriate than contemplation of ethical frameworks alone. This is increasingly important as the armamentarium of life-sustaining technology available to clinicians steadily increases. PMID:26706315

  3. Opinion dynamics model with weighted influence: Exit probability and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Soham; Sinha, Suman; Sen, Parongama

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a stochastic model of binary opinion dynamics in which the opinions are determined by the size of the neighboring domains. The exit probability here shows a step function behavior, indicating the existence of a separatrix distinguishing two different regions of basin of attraction. This behavior, in one dimension, is in contrast to other well known opinion dynamics models where no such behavior has been observed so far. The coarsening study of the model also yields novel exponent values. A lower value of persistence exponent is obtained in the present model, which involves stochastic dynamics, when compared to that in a similar type of model with deterministic dynamics. This apparently counterintuitive result is justified using further analysis. Based on these results, it is concluded that the proposed model belongs to a unique dynamical class.

  4. The entry-exit function and geometric singular perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Maesschalck, Peter; Schecter, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    For small ε > 0, the system x ˙ = ε, z ˙ = h (x , z , ε) z, with h (x , 0 , 0) < 0 for x < 0 and h (x , 0 , 0) > 0 for x > 0, admits solutions that approach the x-axis while x < 0 and are repelled from it when x > 0. The limiting attraction and repulsion points are given by the well-known entry-exit function. For h (x , z , ε) z replaced by h (x , z , ε)z2, we explain this phenomenon using geometric singular perturbation theory. We also show that the linear case can be reduced to the quadratic case, and we discuss the smoothness of the return map to the line z =z0, z0 > 0, in the limit ε → 0.

  5. When success breeds failure: history, hysteresis, and delayed exit decisions.

    PubMed

    Bragger, Jennifer DeNicolis; Hantula, Donald A; Bragger, Donald; Kirnan, Jean; Kutcher, Eugene

    2003-02-01

    The effects of feedback equivocality, information availability, and prior decision-making history on escalation and persistence were investigated. Replicating the findings of J.L. Bragger, D.H. Bragger, D.A. Hantula, and J.P. Kirnan (1998), this study found that participants receiving equivocal feedback on their decisions invested more money and invested across more opportunities; those who could purchase information invested fewer resources than did participants who did not have the opportunity to purchase information. There was an inverse linear relationship between the percentage of opportunities in which participants purchased information and the delay to exit decisions and total resources invested. Six weeks earlier, some participants took part in a more profitable investment scenario, and prior experience led to later increased investing when participants were faced with failure, even above that invested in a preceding, succeeding scenario. These results are consistent with an equivocality theory account of escalation. PMID:12675390

  6. Thermal IR exitance model of a plant canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Smith, J. A.; Link, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A thermal IR exitance model of a plant canopy based on a mathematical abstraction of three horizontal layers of vegetation was developed. Canopy geometry within each layer is quantitatively described by the foliage and branch orientation distributions and number density. Given this geometric information for each layer and the driving meteorological variables, a system of energy budget equations was determined and solved for average layer temperatures. These estimated layer temperatures, together with the angular distributions of radiating elements, were used to calculate the emitted thermal IR radiation as a function of view angle above the canopy. The model was applied to a lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) canopy over a diurnal cycle. Simulated vs measured radiometric average temperatures of the midcanopy layer corresponded with 2 C. Simulation results suggested that canopy geometry can significantly influence the effective radiant temperature recorded at varying sensor view angles.

  7. Bankruptcy as an exit mechanism for systems with a variable number of components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delli Gatti, Domenico; Di Guilmi, Corrado; Gaffeo, Edoardo; Gallegati, Mauro

    2004-12-01

    Dynamical systems with components whose sizes evolve according to multiplicative stochastic rules have been recently combined with entry and exit processes. We show that the assumptions usually made in modeling exits are at odds with the available evidence. We discuss a recently proposed macroeconomic model with random multiplicative shocks and a mechanism for exit based on bankruptcy, which displays several observed stylized facts for firms' dynamics, like power law distributions for firms' sizes and Laplace distributions for firms' growth rates.

  8. Effects of nozzle exit geometry and pressure ratio on plume shape for nozzles exhausting into quiescent air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, William I.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of varying the exit geometry on the plume shapes of supersonic nozzles exhausting into quiescent air at several exit-to-ambient pressure ratios are given. Four nozzles having circular throat sections and circular, elliptical and oval exit cross sections were tested and the exit plume shapes are compared at the same exit-to-ambient pressure ratios. The resulting mass flows were calculated and are also presented.

  9. [Prediction and influence factors of the ramp's noise of the entrance or exit of garages].

    PubMed

    Di, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Bang-Jun

    2005-09-01

    Some typical entrances/exits of the underground garages are chosen in urban residential areas. On the basis of the optimization of the positions of the noise sampling points and the groupings of the synchronous sampling points, by means of the acoustical analysis of the noise samples, the relation of the correlative factors, among the ramps' noise of the entrances or exits of the garages, the structure, grade, shape of the ramps, upgrade and downgrade, is studied. The prediction model of the ramp's noise influence of the entrance or exit of the garage is established through amending the noise influence of the entrance or exit of the even concrete road. PMID:16366500

  10. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  11. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  12. Imaging the radical channel in acetaldehyde photodissociation: Competing mechanisms at energies close to the triplet exit barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, G. A.; Arregui, A.; Rodriguez, J. D.; Banares, L.; Rubio-Lago, L.

    2010-08-14

    The photodissociation of acetaldehyde in the radical channel has been studied at wavelengths between 315 and 325 nm using the velocity-map imaging technique. Upon one-photon absorption at 315 nm, the molecule is excited to the first singlet excited state S{sub 1}, which, in turn, undergoes intersystem crossing to the first excited triplet state T{sub 1}. On the triplet surface, the molecule dissociates into CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals with large kinetic energy release (KER), in accordance with the well characterized exit barrier on T{sub 1}. However, at longer wavelengths (>320 nm), which correspond to excitation energies just below the triplet barrier, a sudden change in KER is observed. At these photolysis wavelengths, there is not enough energy to surpass the exit barrier on the triplet state, which leaves the possibility of unimolecular dissociation on S{sub 0} after internal conversion from S{sub 1}. We have characterized the fragments' KER at these wavelengths, as well as determined the energy partitioning for the radical fragments. A new accurate estimate of the barrier height on T{sub 1} is presented.

  13. Influence of the exits' configuration on evacuation process in a room without obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan-Huan, Tian; Li-Yun, Dong; Yu, Xue

    2015-02-01

    The floor field model is the most popular cellular automata (CA) model which is used to simulate the pedestrian's behaviors. In the floor field model, the interaction between pedestrians is expressed by the dynamical field. In this paper, we proposed an improved and simple method to calculate the floor field. In our method, the pedestrians are treated as the movable obstacles which will increase the value of the floor field. The additional value is interpreted as the blocking effect of preceding pedestrians. And then, the influence of the exits' configuration on evacuation process in a room without obstacle is simulated. The evacuation time for different widths and positions of the exits is investigated. In the case of single exit, there is a power law relationship between the evacuation time (T) and the exit width (Dw) with a negative exponent when Dw ≤ 6. Mean flow rates and the using efficiency of each exit cell obtained by our model are higher than other models. The simulation results indicate that pedestrians do not choose the shortest path but a faster path in our model. For the case of two exits, the relationships between the location of the exits and evacuation time are discussed. When the total width of two exits is small (i.e. Dw = 2), the main factor affecting the total evacuation time T is the exits' capacity. If the total width of two exits is large (i.e. Dw = 12), the moving distance of pedestrians to exits is the main factor affecting the evacuation time, and the corresponding phase diagrams are given.

  14. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  15. Effects of forward velocity on turbulent jet mixing noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    Flight simulation experiments were conducted in an anechoic free jet facility over a broad range of model and free jet velocities. The resulting scaling laws were in close agreement with scaling laws derived from theoretical and semiempirical considerations. Additionally, measurements of the flow structure of jets were made in a wind tunnel by using a laser velocimeter. These tests were conducted to describe the effects of velocity ratio and jet exit Mach number on the development of a jet in a coflowing stream. These turbulence measurements and a simplified Lighthill radiation model were used in predicting the variation in radiated noise at 90 deg to the jet axis with velocity ratio. Finally, the influence of forward motion on flow-acoustic interactions was examined through a reinterpretation of the 'static' numerical solutions to the Lilley equation.

  16. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  17. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  18. Stepwise shockwave velocity determinator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Timothy E.; Beeson, Harold

    1992-01-01

    To provide an uncomplicated and inexpensive method for measuring the far-field velocity of a surface shockwave produced by an explosion, a stepwise shockwave velocity determinator (SSVD) was developed. The velocity determinator is constructed of readily available materials and works on the principle of breaking discrete sensors composed of aluminum foil contacts. The discrete sensors have an average breaking threshold of approximately 7 kPa. An incremental output step of 250 mV is created with each foil contact breakage and is logged by analog-to-digital instrumentation. Velocity data obtained from the SSVD is within approximately 11 percent of the calculated surface shockwave velocity of a muzzle blast from a 30.06 rifle.

  19. Adolescents Exiting Homelessness over Two Years: The Risk Amplification and Abatement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rice, Eric; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Mallett, Shelley; Rosenthal, Doreen; Batterham, Phillip; May, Susanne J.; Witkin, Andrea; Duan, Naihua

    2009-01-01

    The Risk Amplification and Abatement Model (RAAM) demonstrates that negative contact with socializing agents amplify risk, while positive contact abates risk for homeless adolescents. To test this model, the likelihood of exiting homelessness and returning to familial housing at 2 years and stably exiting over time are examined with longitudinal…

  20. The Impact of High School Exit Exams on ESL Learners in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odo, Dennis Murphy

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores the validity of including ELL students in British Columbia provincial high school exit exams. Data and a sample exam from the BC Ministry of education are used to scrutinize the practice of using BC provincial exams for high school exit decisions regarding ELLs. A comparison of failure rates of ELLs and mainstream students…

  1. Visual Barriers to Prevent Ambulatory ALzheimer's Patients from Exiting through an Emergency Door.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namazi, Kevan H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conducted study on Alzheimer's unit to test seven different visual barrier conditions for reducing patient exits. Findings indicated that exiting was eliminated under two conditions. Results suggest visual agnosia, the inability to interpret what the eye sees, may be used as tool in managing wandering behavior of Alzheimer's patients. (Author/NB)

  2. Drink Specials and the Intoxication Levels of Patrons Exiting College Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thombs, Dennis L.; Dodd, Virginia; Porkorny, Steven B.; Omli, Morrow R.; O'Mara, Ryan; Webb, Monica C.; Lacaci, Diana M.; Werch, Chad

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether drink specials independently increase patrons' risk of achieving a high level of intoxication upon exiting drinking establishments. Methods: In a campus community, data were collected from exiting patrons (N=291) via sidewalk interviews and breath tests on 6 nights of 2 consecutive semesters. Results: A…

  3. Rif-Recall as Symbol and Signal: The Differential Effects of Riffing on Teacher Exit Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehrke, Nathalie; Sheffield, Rosemary

    A case study of 1100 high school teachers in a large urban district that has experienced declining enrollment for eight years illustrates several of the exit options and career mobility effects of riffing (reduction in force). The findings show that during decline, freely chosen movement out (exit), or laterally (moderate number of location…

  4. 49 CFR 238.127 - Low-location emergency exit path marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part 51. You may... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low-location emergency exit path marking. 238.127... Requirements § 238.127 Low-location emergency exit path marking. On or after January 28, 2015,...

  5. Examining the Career Paths and Transition Services of Students with Disabilities Exiting High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Robert M.; Flexer, Robert W.; Dennis, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Career paths and transition services were investigated for students with disabilities who were exiting special education for comparison with two models of transition developed by Siegel (1998) and Greene (2003). Teachers and parent-mentors from 52 local education agencies (LEAs) conducted a record review and an exit interview of 741 students with…

  6. Assessment Drives Learning: The Effect of Central Exit Exams on Curricular Knowledge and Mathematical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurges, Hendrik; Schneider, Kerstin; Senkbeil, Martin; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from the German PISA 2003 sample to study the effects of central exit examinations on student performance and student attitudes. Unlike earlier studies we use (i) a value-added measure to pin down the effect of central exit exams on learning in the last year before the exam and (ii) separate test scores for mathematical…

  7. 29 CFR 1910.36 - Design and construction requirements for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Design and construction requirements for exit routes. 1910.36 Section 1910.36 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit Routes and Emergency Planning § 1910.36 Design and...

  8. The Effects of High School Exit Exam Performance: New Evidence from Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Damon; Martorell, Paco; Yang, Muzhe

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents new evidence on the effects of exit exam performance on high school persistence and completion as well as on college attendance using data on students from Florida. Specifically, they examine whether initial exit exam performance causes students to drop out of school, changes the likelihood of graduating from high school, and…

  9. Scholars Probe Diverse Effects of Exit Exams: State Graduation Tests Found to Hit Certain Groups Harder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    A study released last week suggesting that California's high school exit exams are affecting some student demographic groups more than others is the latest in a small spate of studies pointing to trade-offs from policies that require high school students to pass state tests to graduate. Twenty-six states have exit exams in place or will by 2012,…

  10. 14 CFR 91.607 - Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency exits for airplanes carrying... Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, no person may operate a large airplane (type certificated under the Civil Air...

  11. 14 CFR 91.607 - Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency exits for airplanes carrying... Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, no person may operate a large airplane (type certificated under the Civil Air...

  12. 14 CFR 91.607 - Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency exits for airplanes carrying... Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, no person may operate a large airplane (type certificated under the Civil Air...

  13. 14 CFR 91.607 - Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency exits for airplanes carrying... Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, no person may operate a large airplane (type certificated under the Civil Air...

  14. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exits for surface buildings and structures. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface buildings and structures. Surface buildings or structures in which persons work shall have a sufficient...

  15. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exits for surface buildings and structures. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface buildings and structures. Surface buildings or structures in which persons work shall have a sufficient...

  16. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exits for surface buildings and structures. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface buildings and structures. Surface buildings or structures in which persons work shall have a sufficient...

  17. Re-Examining Exit Exams: New Findings from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuster, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Using the nationally representative, cohort-based data of the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:02), this study employs multiple regression to examine the effects of exit exams on student achievement and school completion. This study finds that exit exams as a whole do not have substantial effects on student achievement in mathematics,…

  18. 29 CFR 1910.36 - Design and construction requirements for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exit travel if the room is designed to be occupied by more than 50 people or if the room is a high..., substantially level walkways; and (4) The outdoor exit route must not have a dead-end that is longer than...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.36 - Design and construction requirements for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... exit travel if the room is designed to be occupied by more than 50 people or if the room is a high..., substantially level walkways; and (4) The outdoor exit route must not have a dead-end that is longer than...

  20. Wives' Relative Wages, Husbands' Paid Work Hours, and Wives' Labor-Force Exit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Emily Fitzgibbons

    2011-01-01

    Economic theories predict that women are more likely to exit the labor force if their partners' earnings are higher and if their own wage rate is lower. In this article, I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,254) and discrete-time event-history analysis to show that wives' relative wages are more predictive of their exit than are…

  1. Economic Well-Being Following an Exit from Aid to Families with Dependent Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Daniel R.; Cancian, Maria

    1998-01-01

    Uses data from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to trace poverty status and welfare use in five years following an exit from Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). Results show substantial diversity in economic well-being. Women who were working when they exited from AFDC do better, and, to a lesser extent so do those who were…

  2. Exiting Welfare in the 1990s: Did Public Policy Influence Recipients' Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofferth, Sandra L.; Stanhope, Stephen; Harris, Kathleen Mullan

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates the association between welfare policies implemented by states in the early to mid-1990s and the rate at which female household heads with children exit AFDC for work or for non-work reasons. Reports that waiver policies requiring work for mothers of very young children are associated with more rapid exits through employment. (Contains…

  3. Effects of Failing a High School Exit Exam on Course Taking, Achievement, Persistence, and Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Arshan, Nicole; Atteberry, Allison; Kurlaender, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The increasing use of state-mandated public high school exit exams is one manifestation of the current movement in U.S. public schooling toward more explicit standards of instruction and accountability. Exit exam requirements implicitly argue that raising the bar for graduation creates incentives both for students to work harder in school and for…

  4. Tuscaloosa County School System Placement Services for Exiting Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuscaloosa County Board of Education, Tuscaloosa, AL.

    During the school year 1974-75, a project to place exiting students in an occupational or postsecondary program was conducted by the Tuscaloosa County School System. The project was designed to assist graduating seniors of four high schools and those exiting prior to graduation. In meeting the project goal the following activities were carried…

  5. State Welfare Rules, TANF Exits, and Geographic Context: Does Place Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Shelley K.

    2008-01-01

    This research compares the likelihood of exiting TANF with and without employment and the effects of important state TANF rules on welfare exits in more disadvantaged (large Rustbelt cities and poor southern nonmetro) and less disadvantaged (other metro and other nonmetro) areas during the 1996-2003 post-welfare reform period. Hierarchical…

  6. A Structural Equation Model of Burnout and Job Exit among Child Protective Services Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Brett; Yadama, Gautam N.

    1996-01-01

    Uses a structural equation model to examine the three elements of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI)--emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment--in relation to job exit among child protective services workers over a 15-month period. The model was supported, showing the relevance of all three MBI elements of job exit.…

  7. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exits for surface buildings and structures. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface buildings and structures. Surface buildings or structures in which persons work shall have a sufficient...

  8. Non-lytic, actin-based exit of intracellular parasites from C. elegans intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Estes, Kathleen A; Szumowski, Suzannah C; Troemel, Emily R

    2011-09-01

    The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes rearrangements of host actin inside intestinal cells as part of a novel parasite exit strategy. First, we show that N. parisii infection causes ectopic localization of the normally apical-restricted actin to the basolateral side of intestinal cells, where it often forms network-like structures. Soon after this actin relocalization, we find that gaps appear in the terminal web, a conserved cytoskeletal structure that could present a barrier to exit. Reducing actin expression creates terminal web gaps in the absence of infection, suggesting that infection-induced actin relocalization triggers gap formation. We show that terminal web gaps form at a distinct stage of infection, precisely timed to precede spore exit, and that all contagious animals exhibit gaps. Interestingly, we find that while perturbations in actin can create these gaps, actin is not required for infection progression or spore formation, but actin is required for spore exit. Finally, we show that despite large numbers of spores exiting intestinal cells, this exit does not cause cell lysis. These results provide insight into parasite manipulation of the host cytoskeleton and non-lytic escape from intestinal cells in vivo. PMID:21949650

  9. Non-Lytic, Actin-Based Exit of Intracellular Parasites from C. elegans Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Estes, Kathleen A.; Szumowski, Suzannah C.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2011-01-01

    The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes rearrangements of host actin inside intestinal cells as part of a novel parasite exit strategy. First, we show that N. parisii infection causes ectopic localization of the normally apical-restricted actin to the basolateral side of intestinal cells, where it often forms network-like structures. Soon after this actin relocalization, we find that gaps appear in the terminal web, a conserved cytoskeletal structure that could present a barrier to exit. Reducing actin expression creates terminal web gaps in the absence of infection, suggesting that infection-induced actin relocalization triggers gap formation. We show that terminal web gaps form at a distinct stage of infection, precisely timed to precede spore exit, and that all contagious animals exhibit gaps. Interestingly, we find that while perturbations in actin can create these gaps, actin is not required for infection progression or spore formation, but actin is required for spore exit. Finally, we show that despite large numbers of spores exiting intestinal cells, this exit does not cause cell lysis. These results provide insight into parasite manipulation of the host cytoskeleton and non-lytic escape from intestinal cells in vivo. PMID:21949650

  10. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  11. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  12. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  13. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  14. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  15. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  16. Racial Discrimination in Occupations: Perceived and Actual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Castellano B.; Turner, Barbara F.

    The relationship between the actual representation of Blacks in certain occupations and individual perceptions of the occupational opportunity structure were examined. A scale which rated the degree of perceived discrimination against Blacks in 21 occupations was administered to 75 black male, 70 black female, 1,429 white male and 1,457 white…

  17. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  18. Experimental investigation of an axisymmetric free jet with an initially uniform velocity profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.; Symons, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the flow characteristics of a circular free helium jet having an initially uniform velocity profile. Complete velocity profiles are presented at Reynolds numbers of 1027 and 4571 at 0, 3, 6, 10, 15, and 20 nozzle diameters (where possible) from the nozzle exit. Centerline velocity decay and potential core length were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 155 to 5349 at distances up to and including 25 nozzle diameters from the nozzle exit. The angles of spread associated with the diffusion of the jet downstream of the nozzle are also given. Axial jet momentum flux and entrained mass flux, at various distances downstream of the nozzle, are presented as a function of the jet Reynolds number.

  19. STS-112 Crew exit O&C building before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew eagerly exit the Operations and Checkout Building for their ride to Launch Pad 39B and the launch scheduled 3:46 p.m. EDT. Leading the way are Pilot Pamela Melroy and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. In the second row are Mission Specialists David Wolf (left) and Sandra Magnus. Behind them are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin and Piers Sellers. Sellers, Magnus and Yurchikhin are making their first Shuttle flights. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. [Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews

  20. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Phuong Thuy; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as temperature increases. Our folding simulations as well as free energy calculation by using umbrella sampling show that, at low temperatures, folding at the tunnel follows one or two specific pathways without kinetic traps. It is shown that the escape time can be mapped to a one-dimensional diffusion model with two different regimes for temperatures above and below the folding transition temperature. Attractive interactions between amino acids and attractive sites on the tunnel wall lead to a free energy barrier along the escape route of the protein. It is suggested that this barrier slows down the escape process and consequently promotes correct folding of the released nascent protein.

  1. Phenotypic Diversity as a Mechanism to Exit Cellular Dormancy.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Alexander; Dworkin, Jonathan

    2015-08-31

    Microorganisms can facilitate their survival in stressful environments by entering a state of metabolic inactivity or dormancy. However, this state impairs the function of the very sensory systems necessary to detect favorable growth conditions. Thus, how can a metabolically quiescent cell accurately monitor environmental conditions in order to best decide when to exit dormancy? One strategy employed by microbes to deal with changing environments is the generation of phenotypes that may be less well adapted to a current condition but might confer an advantage in the future. This bet-hedging depends on phenotypic diversity in the population, which itself can derive from naturally occurring stochastic differences in gene expression. In the case of metabolic dormancy, a bet-hedging strategy that has been proposed is the "scout model" where cells comprising a fraction of the dormant population reinitiate growth stochastically, independent of environmental cues. Here, we provide experimental evidence that such a mechanism exists in dormant spores produced by the ubiquitous soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We observe that these spores reinitiate growth at a low but measureable frequency even in the absence of an inducing signal. This phenomenon is the result of phenotypic variation in the propensity of individual spores to reinitiate growth spontaneously. Since this bet-hedging mechanism produces individuals that will either grow under favorable conditions or die under unfavorable conditions, a population can properly respond to environmental changes despite the impaired sensory ability of individual cells. PMID:26279233

  2. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuong Thuy; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as temperature increases. Our folding simulations as well as free energy calculation by using umbrella sampling show that, at low temperatures, folding at the tunnel follows one or two specific pathways without kinetic traps. It is shown that the escape time can be mapped to a one-dimensional diffusion model with two different regimes for temperatures above and below the folding transition temperature. Attractive interactions between amino acids and attractive sites on the tunnel wall lead to a free energy barrier along the escape route of the protein. It is suggested that this barrier slows down the escape process and consequently promotes correct folding of the released nascent protein. PMID:26957181

  3. Loop corrections and graceful exit in string cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffa, Stefano; Maggiore, Michele; Sturani, Riccardo

    1999-07-01

    We examine the effect of perturbative string loops on the cosmological pre-big-bang evolution. We study loop corrections derived from heterotic string theory compactified on a ZN orbifold and we consider the effect of the all-order loop corrections to the Kähler potential and of the corrections to gravitational couplings, including both threshold corrections and corrections due to the mixed Kähler-gravitational anomaly. We find that string loops can drive the evolution into the region of the parameter space where a graceful exit is in principle possible, and we find solutions that, in the string frame, connect smoothly the superinflationary pre-big-bang evolution to a phase where the curvature and the derivative of the dilaton are decreasing. We also find that at a critical coupling the loop corrections to the Kähler potential induce a ghost-like instability, i.e. the kinetic term of the dilaton vanishes. This is similar to what happens in Seiberg-Witten theory and signals the transition to a new regime where the light modes in the effective action are different and are related to the original ones by S-duality. In a string context, this means that we enter a D-brane dominated phase.

  4. Thermal radiant exitance model performance: Soils and forests

    SciTech Connect

    Balick, L.K.; Smith, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Models of surface temperatures of two land surface types based on their energy budgets were developed to simulate the effects of environmental factors on thermal radiant exitance. The performance of these models is examined in detail. One model solves the non-linear differential equation for heat diffusion in solids using a set of submodels for surface energy budget components. The model performance is examined under three desert conditions thought to be a strong test of the submodels. The accuracy of the temperature predictions and submodels is described. The accuracy of the model is generally good but some discrepancies between some of the submodels and measurements are noted. The sensitivity of the submodels is examined and is seen to be strongly controlled by interaction and feedback among energy components that are a function of surface temperature. The second model simulates vegetation canopies with detailed effects of surface geometry on radiant transfer in the canopy. Foliage solar absorption coefficients are calculated using a radiosity approach for a three layer canopy and long wave fluxes are modeled using a view factor matrix. Sensible and latent heat transfer through the canopy are also simulated using, nearby meteorological data but heat storage in the canopy is not included. Simulations for a coniferous forest canopy are presented and the sensitivity of the model to environmental inputs is discussed.

  5. Exposure to violence in adolescence and precocious role exits.

    PubMed

    Haynie, Dana L; Petts, Richard J; Maimon, David; Piquero, Alex R

    2009-03-01

    Exposure to violence is a serious public health concern that compromises adolescents by affecting their behavior and psychological well-being. The current study advances knowledge about the consequences of exposure to violence in adolescence by applying a life course perspective to evaluate the developmental implications of adolescents' exposure to violence. In particular, drawing on a sample of 11,949 school-aged adolescents in the U.S., we examine whether exposure to violence in adolescence is associated with precocious role exits that some adolescents experience. Exposure to violence is conceptualized as including both direct (i.e., experiencing physical victimization) and indirect exposure (i.e., witnessing others' victimization). Three types of direct exposure to violence are examined: street, intimate partner, and family victimization, as well as four types of indirect exposure including: street, peer, and school violence as well as exposure to family/friend suicide. Using three waves of longitudinal data from the Add Health Study, we find that exposure to violence is associated with greater risks of running away from home, dropping out of high school, having a child, attempting suicide, and coming into contact with the criminal justice system in later adolescence. In addition, risks depend upon the relational context in which the exposure to violence occurred, risks increase with greater exposure to violence, and risks are, for the most part, highest for those youth exposed to both indirect and direct violence in adolescence. PMID:19636744

  6. Phenotypic Diversity as a Mechanism to Exit Cellular Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Alexander; Dworkin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Microorganisms can facilitate their survival in stressful environments by entering a state of metabolic inactivity or dormancy [1]. However, this state impairs the function of the very sensory systems necessary to detect favorable growth conditions. Thus, how can a metabolically quiescent cell accurately monitor environmental conditions in order to best decide when to exit dormancy? One strategy employed by microbes to deal with changing environments is the generation of phenotypes that may be less well adapted to a current condition but might confer an advantage in the future [2, 3]. This bet-hedging depends on phenotypic diversity in the population [4], which itself can derive from naturally occurring stochastic differences in gene expression [5, 6]. In the case of metabolic dormancy, a bet-hedging strategy that has been proposed is the “scout model” where cells comprising a fraction of the dormant population reinitiate growth stochastically, independent of environmental cues [7, 8]. Here, we provide experimental evidence that such a mechanism exists in dormant spores produced by the ubiquitous soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We observe that these spores reinitiate growth at a low but measureable frequency even in the absence of an inducing signal. This phenomenon is the result of phenotypic variation in the propensity of individual spores to reinitiate growth spontaneously. Since this bet-hedging mechanism produces individuals that will either grow under favorable conditions or die under unfavorable conditions, a population can properly respond to environmental changes despite the impaired sensory ability of individual cells. PMID:26279233

  7. Thermal radiant exitance model performance: soils and forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Lee K.; Smith, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Models of surface temperatures of two land surface types based on their energy budgets were developed to simulate the effects of environmental factors on thermal radiant exitance. The performance of these models is examined in detail. One model solves the non-linear differential equation for heat diffusion in solids using a set of submodels for surface energy budget components. The model performance is examined under three desert conditions thought to be a strong test of the submodels. The accuracy of the temperature predictions and submodels is described. The accuracy of the model is generally good but some discrepancies between some of the submodels and measurements are noted. The sensitivity of the submodels is examined and is seen to be strongly controlled by interaction and feedback among energy components that are a function of surface temperature. The second model simulates vegetation canopies with detailed effects of surface geometry on radiant transfer in the canopy. Foliage solar absorption coefficients are calculated using a radiosity approach for a three layer canopy and long wave fluxes are modeled using a view factor matrix. Sensible and latent heat transfer through the canopy are also simulated using nearby meteorological data but heat storage in the canopy is not included. Simulations for a coniferous forest canopy are presented and the sensitivity of the model to environmental inputs is discussed.

  8. Compact Fixed-exit UHV DCM for XAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Rickers, K.; Brueggmann, U.; Drube, W.; Herrmann, M.; Heuer, J.; Welter, E.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.; Schulz-Ritter, H.

    2007-01-19

    A double-crystal, UHV-compatible monochromator for XAFS applications at bending magnet beamlines has been designed. It uses two crystal sets, Si(111) and (311), on a common central rotation axis driven by an ex-vacuo goniometer. All mechanical and electrical components are mounted on a 400 mm UHV flange which is attached to a compact vacuum chamber. The first crystals are water cooled using connector- and bellowless tubing through the fluidic sealed feedthrough of the central rotation. The first crystal set is mounted off-axis and can be translated vertically to keep the fixed exit condition. The second crystal set uses small crystals of the same size as the first. In order to accept the reflected beam of the first crystal at small Bragg angles, it is tangentially translated along the beam. The angle can be varied from 5 deg. to 55.5 deg. resulting in a total energy range 2.4 - 43.4 keV for Si(111)/(311). Crystal sets are interchangeable by translating the vacuum chamber. Angle encoding is achieved by a Renishaw incremental optical encoder in vacuo.

  9. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  10. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  11. Aggregating job exit statuses of a plurality of compute nodes executing a parallel application

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, Michael E.; Attinella, John E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Mundy, Michael B.

    2015-07-21

    Aggregating job exit statuses of a plurality of compute nodes executing a parallel application, including: identifying a subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer to execute the parallel application; selecting one compute node in the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer as a job leader compute node; initiating execution of the parallel application on the subset of compute nodes; receiving an exit status from each compute node in the subset of compute nodes, where the exit status for each compute node includes information describing execution of some portion of the parallel application by the compute node; aggregating each exit status from each compute node in the subset of compute nodes; and sending an aggregated exit status for the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer.

  12. Velocity reversals and sediment sorting in pools and riffles controlled by channel constrictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, D.M.; Wohl, E.E.; Jarrett, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Keller [Keller, E.A., 1971. Areal sorting of bed-load material; the hypothesis of velocity reversal. Geological Society of America Bulletin 82, 753-756] hypothesized that at high flow, near-bed velocities in pools exceed velocities in riffles and create pool scour. Pools, however, typically have larger cross-sectional areas of flow at bankfull discharge. This condition raises an inconsistency with Keller's velocity reversal hypothesis and the one-dimensional continuity of mass equation. To address this problem, a model of pool maintenance and sediment sorting is proposed that relies on constriction of flow by recirculating eddies and flow divergence over the exit-slopes of pools. According to the model, a narrow zone of high velocity occurs in the center of pools, creating scour. Along the downstream end of pools, an uphill climb of particles up the pool exit-slope promotes sediment deposition. The model is tested with field and flume measurements of velocity, water-surface elevation, and size of bed sediments in recirculating-eddy influenced pools. Local reversals of the water-surface gradient were measured in the field and a velocity reversal was created in the flume. The reversals that were measured indicate higher gradients of the water surface over the upstream portions of pools and higher velocities in pools at high flow. The distribution of bed sediments collected in the field also support the proposed model of pool maintenance.

  13. FAME Radial Velocity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.; Gould, A.

    2000-12-01

    Full-Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) belongs to a new generation of astrometry satellites and will probe the surrounding space some 20 times deeper than its predecessor Hipparcos. As a result we will acquire precise knowledge of 5 out of 6 components of phase-space for millions of stars. The remaining coordinate, radial velocity, will remain unknown. In this study, we look at how the knowledge of radial velocity affects the determination of the structure of the Galaxy, and its gravitational potential. We therefore propose a radial velocity survey of FAME stars, and discuss its feasibility and technical requirements.

  14. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... normal body temperature. Being too cold slows nerve conduction. Tell your doctor if you have a cardiac ...

  15. Investigation of Slipstream Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W , Jr

    1925-01-01

    These experiments were made at the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, to investigate the velocity of the air in the slipstream in horizontal and climbing flight to determine the form of expression giving the slipstream velocity in terms of the airspeed of the airplane. The method used consisted in flying the airplane both on a level course and in climb at full throttle and measuring the slipstream velocity at seven points in the slipstream for the whole speed range of the airplane in both conditions. In general the results show that for both condition, horizontal and climbing flights, the slipstream velocity v subscript 3 and airspeed v can be represented by straight lines and consequently the equations are of the form: v subscript s = mv+b where m and b are constant. (author)

  16. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  17. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  18. Allelomimesis as escape strategy of pedestrians in two-exit confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Gay Jane; Saloma, Caesar

    2009-06-01

    We study the efficacy of allelomimesis as an escape strategy of mobile agents (pedestrians) that aim to leave a two-exit room within the shortest possible time. Allelomimesis is the act of copying one’s kindred neighbors. To escape, an agent employs one of the following strategies: (1) It chooses its own route independently (non-copying, α=0), (2) It imitates the actions of its neighbors at all times (blind copying, α=1), or (3) It either copies or acts independently according to a certain probability that is set by the copying parameter α (0<α<1). Not more than one agent could occupy a given room location. An agent’s knowledge of the two exit locations is set by its information content β (0≤β≤1). When left alone, an agent with complete knowledge of the exit whereabouts ( β=1) always takes the shortest possible path to an exit. We obtain plots of the (group) evacuation time T and exit throughput Q as functions of α and β for cases where the two exits are near (on same room side) and far (on opposite sides of room) from each other. For an isolated agent, T is inversely proportional to β. The chances of escape for an isolated agent with β≤0.2 are higher with adjacent exits. However, for an agent with β>0.4 the chance is better with opposite exits. In a highly occupied room (occupancy rate R=80%) with adjacent exits, agents with β>0.8 escape more quickly if they employ a mixed strategy of copying and non-copying ( 0.4<α<0.6). On the other hand, blind copying ( α≈1) gives agents with β<0.1 a better chance of escaping from the same room. For the same α and R values, opposite exits allow faster evacuation for agents with β<0.1 due to the likelihood of streaming and the lower probability of exit clogging. Streaming indicates an efficient utilization of an exit and it happens when the arcs that are formed are smaller and arch interference is less likely. Allelomimesis provides a simple yet versatile mechanism for studying the egress behavior

  19. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.

  20. Determination of plasma velocity from light fluctuations in a cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of plasma velocities in a 30 A high energy density cutting torch are reported. The velocity diagnostic is based on the analysis of the light fluctuations emitted by the arc which are assumed to propagate with the flow velocity. These light fluctuations originate from plasma temperature and plasma density fluctuations mainly due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Fast photodiodes are employed as the light sensors. The arc core velocity was obtained from spectrally filtered light fluctuations measurements using a band-pass filter to detect light emission fluctuations emitted only from the arc axis. Maximum plasma jet velocities of 5000 m s{sup -1} close to the nozzle exit and about 2000 m s{sup -1} close to the anode were found. The obtained velocity values are in good agreement with those values predicted by a numerical code for a similar torch to that employed in this work.

  1. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  2. Mean exit time and survival probability within the CTRW formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, M.; Masoliver, J.

    2007-05-01

    An intense research on financial market microstructure is presently in progress. Continuous time random walks (CTRWs) are general models capable to capture the small-scale properties that high frequency data series show. The use of CTRW models in the analysis of financial problems is quite recent and their potentials have not been fully developed. Here we present two (closely related) applications of great interest in risk control. In the first place, we will review the problem of modelling the behaviour of the mean exit time (MET) of a process out of a given region of fixed size. The surveyed stochastic processes are the cumulative returns of asset prices. The link between the value of the MET and the timescale of the market fluctuations of a certain degree is crystal clear. In this sense, MET value may help, for instance, in deciding the optimal time horizon for the investment. The MET is, however, one among the statistics of a distribution of bigger interest: the survival probability (SP), the likelihood that after some lapse of time a process remains inside the given region without having crossed its boundaries. The final part of the manuscript is devoted to the study of this quantity. Note that the use of SPs may outperform the standard “Value at Risk" (VaR) method for two reasons: we can consider other market dynamics than the limited Wiener process and, even in this case, a risk level derived from the SP will ensure (within the desired quintile) that the quoted value of the portfolio will not leave the safety zone. We present some preliminary theoretical and applied results concerning this topic.

  3. Exit Survey of Senior Residents: Cost Conscious but Uninformed.

    PubMed

    Long, Theodore; Silvestri, Mark T; Dashevsky, Meir; Halim, Andrea; Fogerty, Robert L

    2016-05-01

    Background Cost awareness, to ensure physician stewardship of limited resources, is increasingly recognized as an important skill for physicians. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has made cost awareness part of systems-based practice, a core competency of resident education. However, little is known about resident cost awareness. Objective We sought to assess senior resident self-perceived cost awareness and cost knowledge. Methods In March 2014, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of all emergency medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopaedic surgery pediatrics, and medicine-pediatrics residents in their final year at Yale-New Haven Hospital. The survey examined attitudes toward health care costs and residents' estimates of order prices. We considered resident price estimates to be accurate if they were between 50% and 200% of the Connecticut-specific Medicare price. Results We sent the survey to 84 residents and received 47 completed surveys (56% response rate). Although more than 95% (45 of 47) felt that containing costs is the responsibility of every clinician, and 49% (23 of 47) agreed that cost influenced their decision when ordering, only 4% (2 of 47) agreed that they knew the cost of tests being ordered. No residents accurately estimated the price of a complete blood count with differential, and only 2.1% (1 of 47) were accurate for a basic metabolic panel. The overall accuracy of all resident responses was 25%. Conclusions In our study, many trainees exit residency with self-identified deficiencies in knowledge about costs. The findings show the need for educational approaches to improve cost awareness among trainees. PMID:27168897

  4. Evacuation dynamic and exit optimization of a supermarket based on particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Yu, Zhonghai; Chen, Yang

    2014-12-01

    A modified particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed in this paper to investigate the dynamic of pedestrian evacuation from a fire in a public building-a supermarket with multiple exits and configurations of counters. Two distinctive evacuation behaviours featured by the shortest-path strategy and the following-up strategy are simulated in the model, accounting for different categories of age and sex of the pedestrians along with the impact of the fire, including gases, heat and smoke. To examine the relationship among the progress of the overall evacuation and the layout and configuration of the site, a series of simulations are conducted in various settings: without a fire and with a fire at different locations. Those experiments reveal a general pattern of two-phase evacuation, i.e., a steep section and a flat section, in addition to the impact of the presence of multiple exits on the evacuation along with the geographic locations of the exits. For the study site, our simulations indicated the deficiency of the configuration and the current layout of this site in the process of evacuation and verified the availability of proposed solutions to resolve the deficiency. More specifically, for improvement of the effectiveness of the evacuation from the site, adding an exit between Exit 6 and Exit 7 and expanding the corridor at the right side of Exit 7 would significantly reduce the evacuation time.

  5. Influences of exit and stair conditions on human evacuation in a dormitory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wenjun; Li, Angui; Gao, Ran; Wang, Xiaowei

    2012-12-01

    Evacuation processes of students are investigated by experiment and simulation. The experiment is performed for students evacuating from a dormitory with an exit and stairs. FDS+Evac is proposed to simulate the exit and stair dynamics of occupant evacuation. Concerning the exit and stair widths, we put forward some useful standpoints. Good agreement is achieved between the predicted results and experimental results. With the increase of exit width, a significant stratification phenomenon will be found in flow rate. Stratification phenomenon is that two different stable flow rates will emerge during the evacuation. And the flow rate curve looks like a ladder. The larger the exit width, the earlier the stratification phenomenon appears. When exit width is more than 2.0 m, the flow rate of each exit width is divided into two stable stages, and the evacuation times show almost no change. The judgment that the existence of stairs causes flow stratification is reasonable. By changing the width of the stairs, we proved that judgment. The smaller the width of BC, the earlier the stratification appears. We found that scenario 5 is the most adverse circumstance. Those results are helpful in performance-based design of buildings.

  6. Comparison of measured and calculated velocity profiles of a laminar incompressible free jet at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison of the measured and calculated velocity profiles of a laminar, incompressible, low Reynolds number jet is presented. The experimental jet was produced by a nozzle which consists of a porous metal plate covering the end of a pipe. This nozzle produces a uniform exit velocity profile at Reynolds numbers well below those at which conventional contoured nozzles are completely filled by the boundary layer. A jet mixing analysis based on the boundary-layer equations accurately predicted the velocity field for each test condition. The Reynolds number based on nozzle diameter ranged from 50 to 1000 with jet exit velocity either 30 or 61 m/s (100 or 200 ft/sec).

  7. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  8. Measurement of Velocity and Power Balance in a Two-Dimensional MPD Arcjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinefuchi, Kiyoshi; Funaki, Ikkoh; Toki, Kyoichiro; Shimizu, Yukio

    Velocity and temperature measurements were conducted for a two-dimensional magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet with hydrogen propellant. To obtain the velocities of both atoms and ions, laser absorption spectroscopy was employed for atom, and time-of-flight technique was used for ions. In a quasi-steady operation at 13kA/0.65g/s, larger ions velocity (33km/s) than that of the atoms (13km/s) was found in the case of flared anode configuration, which implies that large mean free path between the ions and atoms prohibited momentum transfer from the ions to the neutral particles. This velocity difference was not observed in the case of converging-diverging anode, where the high-density plasma inside the discharge chamber enhances momentum transfer from ions to atoms. In addition to the velocity difference, diagnostics by probe methods revealed high ion temperature in comparison with that of electrons at the thruster exit. Using the velocities and temperatures together with the densities of each particle, energy flux of the magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet was discussed. The large energy deposition into thermal and internal energy modes near the thruster exit indicated a large amount of pressure energy that should be converted to velocity energy by an appropriate nozzle design to further improve the thrust performance.

  9. 'The ones that got away': implementing an exit policy for nurses in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Cheryl-Ann; O'Connor, Louise; Potter, Sharee

    2003-08-01

    The shortage of registered nurses in Victoria led a Melbourne metropolitan hospital to analyse their recent staff attrition rate. This analysis highlighted the importance of having an exiting policy in place for all departing staff. An exit policy can provide unique opportunities for hospitals to collect information that may help reduce future employee turnover through the identification of the causes of employee dissatisfaction. This paper will discuss the literature and outline the project that aided in the analysis of the hospital's attrition rate and development of a practical exit policy. PMID:14649506

  10. Market entry and exit by biotech and device companies funded by venture capital.

    PubMed

    Burns, Lawton R; Housman, Michael G; Robinson, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    Start-up companies in the biotechnology and medical device sectors are important sources of health care innovation. This paper describes the role of venture capital in supporting these companies and charts the growth in venture capital financial support. The paper then uses longitudinal data to describe market entry and exit by these companies. Similar factors are associated with entry and exit in the two sectors. Entries and exits in one sector also appear to influence entry in the other. These findings have important implications for developing innovative technologies and ensuring competitive markets in the life sciences. PMID:19049998

  11. Development of an Energetic X-Ray Imaging Telescope Experiment (EXITE) and Associated Balloon Gondola System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is the Final Report for grant NAGW-624, which was our original grant to develop the Energetic X- ray Imaging Telescope Experiment (EXITE) and Associated Balloon Gondola. The EXITE grant was changed over to a new grant (from GSFC), NAG5-5103, beginning in FY97 and is currently very much continuing under that grant. The Final Report presented here then covers the EXITE development under the original grant, which in fact continued (with a 1 year no-cost extension) through December 31, 1997.

  12. Improving performance of CFB boiler by adopting end effect of bed exit of CFB combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Q.Y.; Jin, Y.

    1997-12-31

    Experiments indicate that the end effect of the bed exit of a CFB strongly influences the bulk density profile and internal circulation of bed materials in a CFB combustor. A well designed geometry of the bed exit of CFBC can create abundant internal circulation of bed materials in furnace and reduce external circulation in circulating loop of CFBC, then consequently improves the comprehensive performance of CFB boiler. This paper is devoted to analyzing the mechanism of the end effect of the bed exit on the hydrodynamics in a CFB by presenting test results. Design criteria and a suggestion for getting the end effect will also be presented.

  13. Jet engine nozzle exit configurations, including projections oriented relative to pylons, and associated systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter. Projections near a support pylon and/or associated heat shield can have particular configurations, including greater flow immersion than other projections.

  14. High-School Exit Examinations and the Schooling Decisions of Teenagers: Evidence from Regression-Discontinuity Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papay, John P.; Murnane, Richard J.; Willett, John B.

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether barely failing one or more state-mandated high school exit examinations in Massachusetts affects the probability that students enroll in college. We extend the exit examination literature in two ways. First, we explore longer term effects of failing these tests. We find that barely failing an exit examination, for students on…

  15. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  16. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hodges, James N; McCall, Benjamin J

    2016-05-14

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined. PMID:27179476

  17. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  18. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  19. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  20. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  1. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  2. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  3. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  4. A new instrumentation for particle velocity and velocity related measurements under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weijia

    This dissertation investigates the capability of a new instrument for small particle velocity measurement and velocity related signal analysis in an underwater environment. This research started from the laser beam quality test, which was performed in air. It was conducted mainly by means of an optical fiber sensor combined with a computer controlled stepping motor as well as two other methods, edge detection and needle-tip scattering. The stepping motor offers a constant velocity to the fiber sensor, so that the beam separation can be accurately measured by using the constant velocity value and the transit time determined by the cross correlation function of two digital signals. Meanwhile, information of the beam intensity profile, the parallelism of the two beams and the in-air beam widths can also be obtained in the test. By using the calibrated beam separation of the ribbon pair in the beam quality test, particle velocity measurements are carried out based on the relation between velocity, displacement and time in a 500-liter open water tank. The time delay for a particle crossing over the two ribbons in sequence is obtained by computing the cross correlation of the two signals. In fact, the time delay is actually a statistical mean value of many particles that cross over the ribbons in a short time. So is the measured velocity. The third part of this research is the practical study on pulse shape analysis based on the data sets of the velocity measurement. Several computer programs are developed to explore the pulse height distribution in a data set, to study the pulse degeneration, the relationship between the pulse width and the velocity, and the in-water beam width information. Some important reference materials are displayed in the appendices such as the fundamentals of the cross correlation and auto correlation, three main MATLAB programs developed for this research, the theoretical analysis of particle diffraction.

  5. Exit, voice, and loyalty in the Italian public health service: macroeconomic and corporate implications.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Adelaide; Impagliazzo, Cira; Zoccoli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyses how customers of public health organizations can express their dissatisfaction for the services offered to them. The main aim is to evaluate the effects that possible dissatisfaction of Italian public health service customers can have on public health organizations. We adopted the methodological scheme developed by Hirschman with exit, voice, and loyalty, considering the macroeconomic and corporate implications that it causes for Italian public health organizations. The study investigated the effects developed by exit of the patients on the system of financing of local health authorities considering both the corporate level of analysis and the macroeconomic level. As a result, local health authority management is encouraged to pay greater attention to the exit phenomena through the adoption of tools that promote loyalty, such as the promotion of voice, even if exit is not promoting, at a macroeconomic level, considerable attention to this phenomenon. PMID:24348148

  6. Interior of east side exit, view facing eastsoutheast U.S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of east side exit, view facing east-southeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Type "B" Casualty Dressing & Decontamination Station, Intersection of Eighth Street, Avenue E & Central Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Reduction of military high-altitude parachute entanglement using the controlled alternating parachute exit system.

    PubMed

    Hadley, A T; Hibst, J D

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of high-altitude parachute entanglement (HAE) results when two paratroopers have both a simultaneous and weak exit from the jump doors. They are then caught in the aircraft's slipstream and collision and entanglement follow. To avoid this phenomenon, the Controlled Alternating Parachute Exit System (CAPES) was introduced. CAPES focused upon manipulation of the exit technique to eliminate simultaneous paratrooper exit. Data from 90,894 consecutive parachute jumps revealed that the CAPES is highly successful in reducing te rate of high-altitude entanglement and the associated injury rate. CAPES seems to reduce the mid-altitude entanglement (MAE) and its injury rate but the results did not reach statistical significance as measured by chi square technique. The rate of landing or ground injuries, was essentially unchanged by the CAPES. PMID:6696698

  8. CHARGE MEASUREMENTS ON INDIVIDUAL PARTICLES EXITING LABORATORY PRECIPITATORS WITH POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE CORONA AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports measurements of charge values on individual particles exiting three different laboratory electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in an experimental apparatus containing a Millikan cell. Dioctylphthalate (DOP) droplets and fly ash particles were measured at temperatur...

  9. Development of EXITE3, Imaging Detectors and a Long Duration Balloon Gondola

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this Report we summarize the work conducted for the EXITE program under grant NAG5-5103. This grant supported the ongoing EXITE program at Harvard for the development of imaging hard x-ray detectors and telescopes over the 3 year period 1997-2000 with a one year extension to 2001 to transition to the next SR&T grant in this program. Work was conducted in three major parts: analysis of the EXITE2 balloon flight data (from our May 1997 flight); development of pixellated imaging Cd-Zn-Te detector arrays and readout systems for the proposed EXITE3 detector and telescope; and development of systems for a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) gondola. Progress on all three major aspects of this research is summarized for each of the years of this grant.

  10. Exit, Voice, and Loyalty in the Italian Public Health Service: Macroeconomic and Corporate Implications

    PubMed Central

    Impagliazzo, Cira; Zoccoli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyses how customers of public health organizations can express their dissatisfaction for the services offered to them. The main aim is to evaluate the effects that possible dissatisfaction of Italian public health service customers can have on public health organizations. We adopted the methodological scheme developed by Hirschman with exit, voice, and loyalty, considering the macroeconomic and corporate implications that it causes for Italian public health organizations. The study investigated the effects developed by exit of the patients on the system of financing of local health authorities considering both the corporate level of analysis and the macroeconomic level. As a result, local health authority management is encouraged to pay greater attention to the exit phenomena through the adoption of tools that promote loyalty, such as the promotion of voice, even if exit is not promoting, at a macroeconomic level, considerable attention to this phenomenon. PMID:24348148

  11. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface...

  12. 29 CFR 1910.36 - Design and construction requirements for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exit route must be covered if snow or ice is likely to accumulate along the route, unless the employer can demonstrate that any snow or ice accumulation will be removed before it presents a slipping...

  13. Near Field Pressure Fluctuations in the Exit Plane of a Choked Axisymmetric Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Seiner, John M.; Brown, Martha C.

    1997-01-01

    Nearfield pressure data are presented for an unheated jet issuing from an underexpanded sonic nozzle for two exit lip thicknesses of 0.200 and 0.625 nozzle diameters. Fluctuating measurements were obtained on the nozzle exit surface as well as in the acoustic nearfield. Narrowband spectra are presented for numerous operating conditions expressed in terms of the fully expanded Mach number based on nozzle pressure ratio.

  14. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  15. Response of polymer composites to high and low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, C. Y.; Mount, A.; Jang, B. Z.; Zee, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites' impact characteristics employed a drop tower for the low-velocity impact case and a novel, projectile instantaneous velocity-measuring sensor for high-velocity impact. Attention was given to the energy loss of projectiles in composites reinforced with polyethylene, kevlar, and graphite. Two distinct energy-loss mechanisms are noted, the first of which is due to the actual fracture process while the other is due to the generation of friction heat. The drop-tower impact-test results furnish the strain-rate dependence of the energy loss.

  16. IR signature study of aircraft engine for variation in nozzle exit area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranwal, Nidhi; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2016-01-01

    In general, jet engines operate with choked nozzle during take-off, climb and cruise, whereas unchoking occurs while landing and taxiing (when engine is not running at full power). Appropriate thrust in an aircraft in all stages of the flight, i.e., take-off, climb, cruise, descent and landing is achieved through variation in the nozzle exit area. This paper describes the effect on thrust and IR radiance of a turbojet engine due to variation in the exit area of a just choked converging nozzle (Me = 1). The variations in the nozzle exit area result in either choking or unchoking of a just choked converging nozzle. Results for the change in nozzle exit area are analyzed in terms of thrust, mass flow rate and specific fuel consumption. The solid angle subtended (Ω) by the exhaust system is estimated analytically, for the variation in nozzle exit area (Ane), as it affects the visibility of the hot engine parts from the rear aspect. For constant design point thrust, IR radiance is studied from the boresight (ϕ = 0°, directly from the rear side) for various percentage changes in nozzle exit area (%ΔAne), in the 1.9-2.9 μm and 3-5 μm bands.

  17. Performance Characteristics of Flush and Shielded Auxiliary Exits at Mach Numbers of 1.5 to 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalla, Kaleel L.

    1959-01-01

    The performance characteristics of several flush and shielded auxiliary exits were investigated at Mach numbers of 1.5 to 2.0, and jet pressure ratios from jet off to 10. The results indicate that the shielded configurations produced better overall performance than the corresponding flush exits over the Mach-number and pressure-ratio ranges investigated. Furthermore, the full-length shielded exit was highest in performance of all the configurations. The flat-exit nozzle block provided considerably improved performance compared with the curved-exit nozzle block.

  18. Comparison of measurement data at the impeller exit of a centrifugal compressor measured with both pneumatic and fast-response probes

    SciTech Connect

    Roduner, C.; Koeppel, P.; Kupferschmied, P.; Gyarmathy, G.

    1999-07-01

    The main goal of these investigations was the refined measurement of unsteady high speed flow in a centrifugal compressor using the advanced FRAP{reg_sign} fast-response aerodynamic probe system. The present contribution focuses on the impeller exit region and shows critical comparisons between fast-response (time-resolving) and conventional pneumatic probe measurement results. Three probes of identical geometry (one fast and two pneumatic) were used to perform wall-to-wall traverses close to impeller exit. The data shown refer to a single running condition near the best point of the stage. The mass flow obtained from different probe measurements and from the standard orifice measurement were compared. Stage work obtained from temperature rise measured with a FRAP{reg_sign} probe and from impeller outlet velocity vectors fields by using Euler`s turbine equation are presented. The comparison in terms of velocity magnitude and angle distribution is quite satisfactory, indicating the superior DC measurement capabilities of the fast-response probe system.

  19. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 2; Normal Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Morris, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as noise generators in supersonic jets. Recent analysis of these slowly diverging jets has shown that these instability waves radiate noise to the far field when the waves have components with phase velocities that are supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This instability wave noise generation model has been applied to supersonic jets with a single shear layer and is now applied to supersonic coaxial jets with two initial shear layers. In this paper the case of coaxial jets with normal velocity profiles is considered, where the inner jet stream velocity is higher than the outer jet stream velocity. To provide mean flow profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is used to calculate the mean flow properties. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. The effects of changes in the velocity ratio, the density ratio and the area ratio are each considered independently.

  20. Intraglottal geometry and velocity measurements in canine larynges

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Liran; Khosla, Sid; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2014-01-01

    Previous flow velocity measurements during phonation in canine larynges were done above the glottal exit. These studies found that vortical structures are present in the flow above the glottis at different phases of the glottal cycle. Some vortices were observed to leave the glottis during the closing phase and assumptions were proposed regarding their formation mechanism. In the current study, intraglottal velocity measurements are performed using PIV, and the intraglottal flow characteristics are determined. Results from five canine larynges show that at low subglottal pressure the glottis assumes a minimal divergence angle during closing and the flow separates at the glottal exit. Vortical structures are observed above the glottis but not inside. As the subglottal pressure is increased, the divergence angle between the folds during closing increases and the location of the flow separation moves upstream into the glottis. Entrainment flow enters the glottis to fill the void that is formed between the glottal jet and the fold. Vortical structures develop near the superior edge at medium and high subglottal pressures from the flow separation. The magnitude of their swirling strength changes as a function of the wall dynamics. PMID:24437778

  1. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  2. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  3. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  4. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  5. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  6. Modeling and Simulation of Interior Ballistics Based on Actual Combustion Characteristics of Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xin; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Bin; Wang, Ze-Shan

    2015-07-01

    A novel interior ballistic model was established by revising actual combustion characteristics describing the relationship between burned propellants (ψ) and pressure impulse (It). The discrepancy between theory and experiment for gas releasing of porous propellant was investigated. Furthermore, the model was tested for multiperforated propellants, with relative errors less than 1 and 3% for the maximum pressure and velocity, respectively, indicating that this is a good model to estimate the interior ballistics performance for multiperforated propellants.

  7. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  8. What Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation Actually Activates

    PubMed Central

    Curthoys, Ian S.; MacDougall, Hamish Gavin

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper in Frontiers Cohen et al. (2012) asked “What does galvanic vestibular stimulation actually activate?” and concluded that galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) causes predominantly otolithic behavioral responses. In this Perspective paper we show that such a conclusion does not follow from the evidence. The evidence from neurophysiology is very clear: galvanic stimulation activates primary otolithic neurons as well as primary semicircular canal neurons (Kim and Curthoys, 2004). Irregular neurons are activated at lower currents. The answer to what behavior is activated depends on what is measured and how it is measured, including not just technical details, such as the frame rate of video, but the exact experimental context in which the measurement took place (visual fixation vs total darkness). Both canal and otolith dependent responses are activated by GVS. PMID:22833733

  9. MODIS Solar Diffuser: Modelled and Actual Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xiong, Xiao-Xiong; Esposito, Joe; Wang, Xin-Dong; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument's solar diffuser is used in its radiometric calibration for the reflective solar bands (VIS, NTR, and SWIR) ranging from 0.41 to 2.1 micron. The sun illuminates the solar diffuser either directly or through a attenuation screen. The attenuation screen consists of a regular array of pin holes. The attenuated illumination pattern on the solar diffuser is not uniform, but consists of a multitude of pin-hole images of the sun. This non-uniform illumination produces small, but noticeable radiometric effects. A description of the computer model used to simulate the effects of the attenuation screen is given and the predictions of the model are compared with actual, on-orbit, calibration measurements.

  10. Performance Analysis of an Annular Diffuser Under the Influence of a Gas Turbine Stage Exit Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Rafael Rodriguez

    In this investigation the performance of a gas turbine exhaust diffuser subject to the outlet flow conditions of a turbine stage is evaluated. Towards that goal, a fully three-dimensional computational analysis has been performed where several turbine stage-exhaust diffuser configurations have been studied: a turbine stage with a shrouded rotor coupled to a diffuser with increasing divergence angle in the diffuser, and a turbine stage with an unshrouded rotor was also considered for the exhaust diffuser performance analysis. The large load of this investigation was evaluated using a steady state numerical analysis utilizing the "mixing plane" algorithm between the rotating rotor and stationary stator and diffuser rows. Finally, an unsteady analysis is performed on a turbine stage with an unshrouded rotor coupled to an annular exhaust diffuser with an outer wall opening angle of 18°. It has been found that the over the tip leakage flow in the unshrouded rotor emerges as a swirling wall jet at the upper wall of the diffuser. When using the turbine with the shrouded rotor no wall jet was observed, making the flow at the entrance to the diffuser "quasi-uniform". The maximum opening angle of the diffuser upper wall achieved before the diffuser stalls was 12° with a static pressure recovery coefficient of Cp = 0.293. When the wall jet was observed, diffuser opening angles of 18° were possible with a static pressure recovery of Cp = 0.365. Consequently the wall jet energizes the diffuser upper wall boundary layer flow, allows for higher static pressure recovery levels and postpones diffuser stall. By altering the speed of the rotor the effect of the swirl in the turbine exit plane on the performance of the diffuser was explored. In the case where the wall jet was absent the diffuser recovers more pressure when the inlet is swirl-free. In this case the performance of the diffuser is independent on whether the turbine exit flow has co or counter swirl. In the presence of

  11. Evaluation of six TPS algorithms in computing entrance and exit doses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yun I; Metwaly, Mohamed; Glegg, Martin; Baggarley, Shaun; Elliott, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Entrance and exit doses are commonly measured in in vivo dosimetry for comparison with expected values, usually generated by the treatment planning system (TPS), to verify accuracy of treatment delivery. This report aims to evaluate the accuracy of six TPS algorithms in computing entrance and exit doses for a 6 MV beam. The algorithms tested were: pencil beam convolution (Eclipse PBC), analytical anisotropic algorithm (Eclipse AAA), AcurosXB (Eclipse AXB), FFT convolution (XiO Convolution), multigrid superposition (XiO Superposition), and Monte Carlo photon (Monaco MC). Measurements with ionization chamber (IC) and diode detector in water phantoms were used as a reference. Comparisons were done in terms of central axis point dose, 1D relative profiles, and 2D absolute gamma analysis. Entrance doses computed by all TPS algorithms agreed to within 2% of the measured values. Exit doses computed by XiO Convolution, XiO Superposition, Eclipse AXB, and Monaco MC agreed with the IC measured doses to within 2%-3%. Meanwhile, Eclipse PBC and Eclipse AAA computed exit doses were higher than the IC measured doses by up to 5.3% and 4.8%, respectively. Both algorithms assume that full backscatter exists even at the exit level, leading to an overestimation of exit doses. Despite good agreements at the central axis for Eclipse AXB and Monaco MC, 1D relative comparisons showed profiles mismatched at depths beyond 11.5 cm. Overall, the 2D absolute gamma (3%/3 mm) pass rates were better for Monaco MC, while Eclipse AXB failed mostly at the outer 20% of the field area. The findings of this study serve as a useful baseline for the implementation of entrance and exit in vivo dosimetry in clinical departments utilizing any of these six common TPS algorithms for reference comparison. PMID:24892349

  12. On the Exit Boundary Condition for One-Dimensional Calculations of Pulsed Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2002-01-01

    In one-dimensional calculations of pulsed detonation engine (PDE) performance, the exit boundary condition is frequently taken to be a constant static pressure. In reality, for an isolated detonation tube, after the detonation wave arrives at the exit plane, there will be a region of high pressure, which will gradually return to ambient pressure as an almost spherical shock wave expands away from the exit, and weakens. Initially, the flow is supersonic, unaffected by external pressure, but later becomes subsonic. Previous authors have accounted for this situation either by assuming the subsonic pressure decay to be a relaxation phenomenon, or by running a two-dimensional calculation first, including a domain external to the detonation tube, and using the resulting exit pressure temporal distribution as the boundary condition for one-dimensional calculations. These calculations show that the increased pressure does affect the PDE performance. In the present work, a simple model of the exit process is used to estimate the pressure decay time. The planar shock wave emerging from the tube is assumed to transform into a spherical shock wave. The initial strength of the spherical shock wave is determined from comparison with experimental results. Its subsequent propagation, and resulting pressure at the tube exit, is given by a numerical blast wave calculation. The model agrees reasonably well with other, limited, results. Finally, the model was used as the exit boundary condition for a one-dimensional calculation of PDE performance to obtain the thrust wall pressure for a hydrogen-air detonation in tubes of length to diameter ratio (L/D) of 4, and 10, as well as for the original, constant pressure boundary condition. The modified boundary condition had no performance impact for values of L/D > 10, and moderate impact for L/D = 4.

  13. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  14. Identification of the effects of the nozzle-exit boundary-layer thickness and its corresponding Reynolds number in initially highly disturbed subsonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogey, Christophe; Marsden, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    The influence of the nozzle-exit boundary-layer thickness in isothermal round jets at a Mach number of 0.9 and at diameter Reynolds numbers ReD ≃ 5 × 104 is investigated using large-eddy simulations. The originality of this work is that, contrary to previous studies on the topic, the jets are initially highly disturbed, and that the effects of the boundary-layer thickness are explored jointly on the exit turbulence, the shear-layer and jet flow characteristics, and the acoustic field. The jets originate from a pipe of radius r0, and exhibit, at the exit, peak disturbance levels of 9% of the jet velocity, and mean velocity profiles similar to laminar boundary-layer profiles of thickness δ0 = 0.09r0, 0.15r0, 0.25r0, or 0.42r0, yielding 99% velocity thicknesses between 0.07r0 and 0.34r0 and momentum thicknesses δθ(0) between 0.012r0 and 0.05r0. Two sets of computations are reported to distinguish, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, between the effects of the ratio δ0/r0 and of the Reynolds number Reθ based on δθ(0). First, four jets with a fixed diameter, hence at a constant Reynolds number ReD = 5 × 104 giving Reθ = 304, 486, 782, and 1288 depending on δ0, are considered. In this case, due to the increase in Reθ, thickening the initial shear layers mainly results in a weaker mixing-layer development with lower spreading rates and turbulence intensities, and reduced sound levels at all emission angles. Second, four jets at Reynolds numbers ReD between 1.8 × 104 and 8.3 × 104, varying so as to obtain Reθ ≃ 480 in all simulations, are examined. Here, increasing δ0/r0 has a limited impact on the mixing-layer key features, but clearly leads to a shorter potential core, a more rapid velocity decay, and higher fluctuations on the jet axis, and stronger noise in the downstream direction. Similar trends can be expected for high-Reynolds-number jets in which viscosity plays a negligible role.

  15. Is velocity-specific strength training important in improving functional performance?

    PubMed

    Cronin, J B; McNair, P J; Marshall, R N

    2002-09-01

    A variable considered when designing programs to optimize athletic performance is training velocity. It has been suggested that training at a specific velocity improves strength mainly at that velocity and as velocity deviates from the trained velocity, the less effective training will be. However, the research describing velocity-specific adaptation and the transference of these adaptations to other movement velocities is by no means clear. Compounding the problem in this area is the failure of research to detail the relationship between training velocity and actual movement velocity of a given task or athletic pursuit. In most cases there is a great disparity between training velocity and actual movement velocity. Factors that may better develop and explain velocity-specific adaptation in relation to functional performance are discussed. Developing qualities such as strength, power and rate of force development would appear of greater importance than training at the actual movement velocity of a task. It may be that irrespective of load and limb velocity, the repeated intent to move an isoinertial load as rapidly as possible might be an important stimulus for functional high velocity adaptation. The ability of the nervous system to activate and coordinate agonist, synergist and antagonist activity would seem essential. It was suggested training techniques that simulate the velocity and acceleration profiles associated with the desired functional performance, such as throw or jump training, may optimize functional adaptation. Furthermore combination training that incorporates same session sport specific training with either a heavy load or a mixed training load approach might provide an optimal strategy for promoting intramuscular and intermuscular co-ordination and improving functional performance. PMID:12094114

  16. Similarity analysis of the momentum field of a subsonic, plane air jet with varying jet-exit and local Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Ravinesh C.; Nathan, Graham J.; Mi, Jianchun

    2013-01-01

    A similarity analysis is presented of the momentum field of a subsonic, plane air jet over the range of the jet-exit Reynolds number Reh (≡ Ubh/υ where Ub is the area-averaged exit velocity, h the slot height, and υ the kinematic viscosity) = 1500 - 16 500. In accordance with similarity principles, the mass flow rates, shear-layer momentum thicknesses, and integral length scales corresponding to the size of large-scale coherent eddy structures are found to increase linearly with the downstream distance from the nozzle exit (x) for all Reh. The autocorrelation measurements performed in the near jet confirmed reduced scale of the larger coherent eddies for increased Reh. The mean local Reynolds number, measured on the centerline and turbulent local Reynolds number measured in the shear-layer increases non-linearly following x1/2, and so does the Taylor microscale local Reynolds number that scales as x1/4. Consequently, the comparatively larger local Reynolds number for jets produced at higher Reh causes self-preservation of the fluctuating velocity closer to the nozzle exit plane. The near-field region characterized by over-shoots in turbulent kinetic energy spectra confirms the presence of large-scale eddy structures in the energy production zone. However, the faster rate of increase of the local Reynolds number with increasing x for jets measured at larger Reh is found to be associated with a wider inertial sub-range of the compensated energy spectra, where the -5/3 power law is noted. The downstream region corresponding to the production zone persists for longer x/h for jets measured at lower Reh. As Reh is increased, the larger width of the sub-range confirms the narrower dissipative range within the energy spectra. The variations of the dissipation rate (ɛ) of turbulent kinetic energy and the Kolmogorov (η) and Taylor (λ) microscales all obey similarity relationships, \\varepsilon h/U_b^3 ˜ Re_h^3, η/h ˜ Reh-3/4, and λ/h ˜ Reh-1/2. Finally, the

  17. Do Disk Galaxies Have Different Central Velocity Dispersions At A Given Rotation Velocity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, Taissa; Jones, H.; Mould, J.; Taylor, E.; Tonini, C.; Webster, R.

    2011-05-01

    Hubble's classification of spiral galaxies was one dimensional. Actually it was 1.5 dimensional, as he distinguished barred spirals. Van den Bergh's was two dimensional: spirals had luminosity classes too. Other schemes are summarized at http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/G/galaxyclassification.html A more quantitative approach is to classify spiral galaxies by rotation velocity. Their central velocity dispersion (bulge) tends to be roughly one half of their rotation velocity (disk). There is a trend from σ/W = 0.8 to σ/W = 0.2 as one goes from W = 100 to 500 km/s, where W is twice the rotation velocity. But some fraction of spirals have a velocity dispersion up to a factor of two larger than that. In hierarchical galaxy formation models, the relative contributions of σ and W depend on the mass accretion history of the galaxy, which determines the mass distribution of the dynamical components such as disk, bulge and dark matter halo. The wide variety of histories that originate in the hierarchical mass assembly produce at any value of W a wide range of σ/W, that reaches high values in more bulge- dominated systems. In a sense the two classifiers were both right: spirals are mostly one dimensional, but σ/W (bulge to disk ratio) is often larger than average. Is this a signature of merger history?

  18. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast.

    PubMed

    Locke, Shannon M; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static "snapshot" model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation. PMID:27291488

  19. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Shannon M.; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static “snapshot” model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation. PMID:27291488

  20. The measurement of abrasive particles velocities in the process of abrasive water jet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Říha, Zdeněk

    2014-08-01

    An optimization of the design of the abrasive cutting head using the numerical simulation requires gathering as much information about processes occurring in the cutting head as possible. Detailed knowledge of velocities of abrasive particles in the process of abrasive water jet generation is vital for the verification of the numerical model. A method of measurement of abrasive particles at the exit of focusing tube using the FPIV technique was proposed and preliminary tests are described in the paper. Results of analysis of measured velocity fields are presented in the paper.

  1. Effect of simulated forward speed on the jet noise of inverted velocity profile coannular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packman, A. B.; Ng, K. W.; Chen, C. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were conducted of inverted velocity profile coannular nozzles and a conical nozzle in an acoustic wind tunnel facility to simulate flight effects on jet noise generation. Coannular model nozzles were tested at fan to core nozzle exit area ratios of .75 and 1.2. Fan stream jet velocity ranged up to 2000 fps at a variety of fan exhaust pressure ratios and temperatures for a core stream of 1000 fps. The wind tunnel airflow was varied from static to 425 fps. The acoustic results indicated that the noise level differences seen previously under static conditions are retained in the flight environment.

  2. Histopathological detection of entry and exit holes in human skin wounds caused by firearms.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marcus Vinícius; d'Ávila, Solange C G P; d'Ávila, Antônio Miguel M P

    2014-07-01

    The judiciary needs forensic medicine to determine the difference between an entry hole and an exit hole in human skin caused by firearms for civilian use. This important information would be most useful if a practical and accurate method could be done with low-cost and minimal technological resources. Both macroscopic and microscopic analyses were performed on skin lesions caused by firearm projectiles, to establish histological features of 14 entry holes and 14 exit holes. Microscopically, in the abrasion area macroscopically observed, there were signs of burns (sub-epidermal cracks and keratinocyte necrosis) in the entrance holes in all cases. These signs were not found in three exit holes which showed an abrasion collar, nor in other exit holes. Some other microscopic features not found in every case were limited either to entry holes, such as cotton fibres, grease deposits, or tattooing in the dermis, or to exit holes, such as adipose tissue, bone or muscle tissue in the dermis. Coagulative necrosis of keratinocytes and sub-epidermal cracks are characteristic of entry holes. Despite the small sample size, it can be safely inferred that this is an important microscopic finding, among others less consistently found, to define an entry hole in questionable cases. PMID:24931861

  3. Side-chain recognition and gating in the ribosome exit tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Paula M.; Snow, Christopher D.; Lucent, Del; Pande, Vijay S.

    2008-01-01

    The ribosome is a large complex catalyst responsible for the synthesis of new proteins, an essential function for life. New proteins emerge from the ribosome through an exit tunnel as nascent polypeptide chains. Recent findings indicate that tunnel interactions with the nascent polypeptide chain might be relevant for the regulation of translation. However, the specific ribosomal structural features that mediate this process are unknown. Performing molecular dynamics simulations, we are studying the interactions between components of the ribosome exit tunnel and different chemical probes (specifically different amino acid side chains or monovalent inorganic ions). Our free-energy maps describe the physicochemical environment of the tunnel, revealing binding crevices and free-energy barriers for single amino acids and ions. Our simulations indicate that transport out of the tunnel could be different for diverse amino acid species. In addition, our results predict a notable protein–RNA interaction between a flexible 23S rRNA tetraloop (gate) and ribosomal protein L39 (latch) that could potentially obstruct the tunnel's exit. By relating our simulation data to earlier biochemical studies, we propose that ribosomal features at the exit of the tunnel can play a role in the regulation of nascent chain exit and ion flux. Moreover, our free-energy maps may provide a context for interpreting sequence-dependent nascent chain phenomenology. PMID:18946046

  4. Exit from sliding in piecewise-smooth flows: Deterministic vs. determinacy-breaking.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Mike R

    2016-03-01

    The collapse of flows onto hypersurfaces where their vector fields are discontinuous creates highly robust states called sliding modes. The way flows exit from such sliding modes can lead to complex and interesting behaviour about which little is currently known. Here, we examine the basic mechanisms by which a flow exits from sliding, either along a switching surface or along the intersection of two switching surfaces, with a view to understanding sliding and exit when many switches are involved. On a single switching surface, exit occurs via tangency of the flow to the switching surface. Along an intersection of switches, exit can occur at a tangency with a lower codimension sliding flow, or by a spiralling of the flow that exhibits geometric divergence (infinite steps in finite time). Determinacy-breaking can occur where a singularity creates a set-valued flow in an otherwise deterministic system, and we resolve such dynamics as far as possible by blowing up the switching surface into a switching layer. We show preliminary simulations exploring the role of determinacy-breaking events as organizing centres of local and global dynamics. PMID:27036186

  5. Exit of intracellular Porphyromonas gingivalis from gingival epithelial cells is mediated by endocytic recycling pathway.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroki; Furuta, Nobumichi; Morisaki, Ichijiro; Amano, Atsuo

    2011-05-01

    Gingival epithelial cells function as an innate host defence system to prevent intrusion by periodontal bacteria. Nevertheless, Porphyromonas gingivalis, the most well-known periodontal pathogen, can enter gingival epithelial cells and pass through the epithelial barrier into deeper tissues. However, it is poorly understood how this pathogen exits from infected cells for further transcellular spreading. The present study was performed to elucidate the cellular machinery exploited by P. gingivalis to exit from immortalized human gingival epithelial cells. P. gingivalis was shown to be internalized with early endosomes positive for the FYVE domain of EEA1 and transferrin receptor, and about half of the intracellular bacteria were then sorted to lytic compartments, including autolysosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, while a considerable number of the remaining organisms were sorted to Rab11- and RalA-positive recycling endosomes. Inhibition experiments revealed that bacterial exit was dependent on actin polymerization, lipid rafts and microtubule assembly. Dominant negative forms and RNAi knockdown of Rab11, RalA and exocyst complex subunits (Sec5, Sec6 and Exo84) significantly disturbed the exit of P. gingivalis. These results strongly suggest that the recycling pathway is exploited by intracellular P. gingivalis to exit from infected cells to neighbouring cells as a mechanism of cell-to-cell spreading. PMID:21155963

  6. Runway Exit Designs for Capacity Improvement Demonstrations. Phase 1: Algorithm Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trani, A. A.; Hobeika, A. G.; Sherali, H.; Kim, B. J.; Sadam, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    A description and results are presented of a study to locate and design rapid runway exits under realistic airport conditions. The study developed a PC-based computer simulation-optimization program called REDIM (runway exit design interactive model) to help future airport designers and planners to locate optimal exits under various airport conditions. The model addresses three sets of problems typically arising during runway exit design evaluations. These are the evaluations of existing runway configurations, addition of new rapid runway turnoffs, and the design of new runway facilities. The model is highly interactive and allows a quick estimation of the expected value of runway occupancy time. Aircraft populations and airport environmental conditions are among the multiple inputs to the model to execute a viable runway location and geometric design solution. The results presented suggest that possible reductions on runway occupancy time (ROT) can be achieved with the use of optimally tailored rapid runway designs for a given aircraft population. Reductions of up to 9 to 6 seconds are possible with the implementation of 30 m/sec variable geometry exits.

  7. Exit from sliding in piecewise-smooth flows: Deterministic vs. determinacy-breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Mike R.

    2016-03-01

    The collapse of flows onto hypersurfaces where their vector fields are discontinuous creates highly robust states called sliding modes. The way flows exit from such sliding modes can lead to complex and interesting behaviour about which little is currently known. Here, we examine the basic mechanisms by which a flow exits from sliding, either along a switching surface or along the intersection of two switching surfaces, with a view to understanding sliding and exit when many switches are involved. On a single switching surface, exit occurs via tangency of the flow to the switching surface. Along an intersection of switches, exit can occur at a tangency with a lower codimension sliding flow, or by a spiralling of the flow that exhibits geometric divergence (infinite steps in finite time). Determinacy-breaking can occur where a singularity creates a set-valued flow in an otherwise deterministic system, and we resolve such dynamics as far as possible by blowing up the switching surface into a switching layer. We show preliminary simulations exploring the role of determinacy-breaking events as organizing centres of local and global dynamics.

  8. Velocity statistics along the stagnation line of an axi- symmetric stagnating turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, T.; Imaizumi, H.; Mizomoto, M.; Shepherd, I. G.

    1997-04-01

    Velocity statistics along the stagnation line of an axi-symmetric wall stagnating turbulent flow are studied experimentally. A low turbulence, uniform air flow from a nozzle type air supply with an exit diameter of 50 mm stagnates at a wall located 50 mm downstream. A flow velocity is set to 3 m/s, 10 mm downstream from the exit of the air supply. Instantaneous values of streamwise and radial velocities are measured by laser-Doppler velocimetry. The turbulence level in the air flow is changed by use of turbulence generator. When the turbulence generator is not installed in the air supply, the mean velocity profile in the streamwise direction fits well with that of a laminar viscous flow with the rms value of velocity fluctuations low near the wall. With the turbulence generator installed, a significant turbulence structure appears near the wall. When the wall is approached, the rms value of velocity fluctuations in the streamwise direction decreases monotonically while the profile of the rms value in the radial direction reaches a maximum near the wall. The increase in the rms value of velocity fluctuations in the radial direction near the wall is attributed to the bi-modal histogram of the fluctuating velocity in the radial direction. Near the wall, the instantaneous stagnation streamline fluctuates and the probability of the mean location of the stagnation point reaches a maximum not at the stagnation line but on a circle around the stagnation line, resulting in the bi-modal histogram. Turbulence statistics, the rms value of velocity fluctuation and the turbulent kinetic energy, can be normalized successfully by similarity parameters based on the strain rate and the reference turbulent kinetic energy introduced by Champion and Libby.

  9. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  10. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  11. Slipher, Galaxies, and Cosmological Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J. A.

    2013-04-01

    By 1917, V. M. Slipher had singlehandedly established a general tendency for ‘spiral nebulae’ to be redshifted (21 out of 25 cases). From a modern perspective, it could seem surprising that the discovery of the expansion of the universe was not announced at this point. Examination of the data and arguments contained in Slipher's papers shows that he reached a more subtle conclusion: the identification of cosmological peculiar velocities, including the bulk motion of the Milky Way, leading to a beautiful argument in favor of spiral nebulae as distant stellar systems. Nevertheless, Slipher's data actually contain evidence at >8σ for a positive mean velocity, even after subtracting the best-fitting dipole pattern owing to motion of the observer. In 1929, Hubble provided distance estimates for a sample of no greater depth, using redshifts due almost entirely to Slipher. Hubble's distances turned out to be flawed in two distinct ways: in addition to an incorrect absolute calibration, the largest distances were systematically under-estimated. Nevertheless, he claimed the detection of a linear distance-redshift relation. Statistically, the evidence for such a correlation is less strong than the simple evidence for a positive mean velocity in Hubble's sample. Comparison with modern data shows that a sample of more than twice Hubble's depth would generally be required in order to reveal clearly the global linear expansion in the face of the ‘noise’ from peculiar velocities. When the theoretical context of the time is examined, the role of the de Sitter model and its prediction of a linear distance-redshift relation looms large. A number of searches for this relation were performed prior to Hubble over the period 1924-1928, with a similar degree of success. All were based on the velocities measured by Slipher, whose work from a Century ago stands out both for the precision of his measurements and for the subtle clarity of the arguments he employed to draw correct

  12. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 3; Inverted Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    The instability wave noise generation model is used to study the instability waves in the two shear layers of an inverted velocity profile, supersonic, coaxial jet and the noise radiated from the dominant wave. The inverted velocity profile jet has a high speed outer stream surrounding a low speed inner stream and the outer shear layer is always larger than the inner shear layer. The jet mean flows are calculated numerically. The operating conditions are chosen to exemplify the effect of the coaxial jet outer shear layer initial spreading rates. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. Results for inverted velocity profile jets indicate that relative maximum instability wave amplitudes and far field peak noise levels can be reduced from that of the reference jet by having higher spreading rates for the outer shear layer, low velocity ratios, and outer streams hotter than the inner stream.

  13. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications. PMID:26849582

  14. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speckhard, Eric G.; Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Beacom, John F.; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy—the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer—can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  15. Estimation of aerosol columnar size distribution and optical thickness from the angular distribution of radiance exiting the atmosphere: simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Gordon, H R

    1995-10-20

    We report the results of simulations in which an algorithm developed for estimation of aerosol optical properties from the angular distribution of radiance exiting the top of the atmosphere over the oceans [Appl. Opt. 33, 4042 (1994)] is combined with a technique for carrying out radiative transfer computations by synthesis of the radiance produced by individual components of the aerosol-size distribution [Appl. Opt. 33, 7088 (1994)], to estimate the aerosol-size distribution by retrieval of the total aerosol optical thickness and the mixing ratios for a set of candidate component aerosol-size distributions. The simulations suggest that in situations in which the true size-refractive-index distribution can actually be synthesized from a combination of the candidate components, excellent retrievals of the aerosol optical thickness and the component mixing ratios are possible. An exception is the presence of strongly absorbing aerosols. The angular distribution of radiance in a single spectral band does not appear to contain sufficient information to separate weakly from strongly absorbing aerosols. However, when two spectral bands are used in the algorithm, retrievals in the case of strongly absorbing aerosols are improved. When pseudodata were simulated with an aerosol-size distribution that differed in functional form from the candidate components, excellent retrievals were still obtained as long as the refractive indices of the actual aerosol model and the candidate components were similar. This underscores the importance of component candidates having realistic indices of refraction in the various size ranges for application of the method. The examples presented all focus on the multiangle imaging spectroradiometer; however, the results should be as valid for data obtained by the use of high-altitude airborne sensors. PMID:21060560

  16. Diversity Exiting the Academy: Influential Factors for the Career Choice of Well-Represented and Underrepresented Minority Scientists

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Rebekah L.; Brandt, Patrick D.; Freeman, Ashalla M.; Harrell, Jessica R.; Hall, Joshua D.; Sinche, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    A national sample of PhD-trained scientists completed training, accepted subsequent employment in academic and nonacademic positions, and were queried about their previous graduate training and current employment. Respondents indicated factors contributing to their employment decision (e.g., working conditions, salary, job security). The data indicate the relative importance of deciding factors influencing career choice, controlling for gender, initial interest in faculty careers, and number of postgraduate publications. Among both well-represented (WR; n = 3444) and underrepresented minority (URM; n = 225) respondents, faculty career choice was positively associated with desire for autonomy and partner opportunity and negatively associated with desire for leadership opportunity. Differences between groups in reasons endorsed included: variety, prestige, salary, family influence, and faculty advisor influence. Furthermore, endorsement of faculty advisor or other mentor influence and family or peer influence were surprisingly rare across groups, suggesting that formal and informal support networks could provide a missed opportunity to provide support for trainees who want to stay in faculty career paths. Reasons requiring alteration of misperceptions (e.g., limited leadership opportunity for faculty) must be distinguished from reasons requiring removal of actual barriers. Further investigation into factors that affect PhDs’ career decisions can help elucidate why URM candidates are disproportionately exiting the academy. PMID:27587854

  17. Diversity Exiting the Academy: Influential Factors for the Career Choice of Well-Represented and Underrepresented Minority Scientists.

    PubMed

    Layton, Rebekah L; Brandt, Patrick D; Freeman, Ashalla M; Harrell, Jessica R; Hall, Joshua D; Sinche, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    A national sample of PhD-trained scientists completed training, accepted subsequent employment in academic and nonacademic positions, and were queried about their previous graduate training and current employment. Respondents indicated factors contributing to their employment decision (e.g., working conditions, salary, job security). The data indicate the relative importance of deciding factors influencing career choice, controlling for gender, initial interest in faculty careers, and number of postgraduate publications. Among both well-represented (WR; n = 3444) and underrepresented minority (URM; n = 225) respondents, faculty career choice was positively associated with desire for autonomy and partner opportunity and negatively associated with desire for leadership opportunity. Differences between groups in reasons endorsed included: variety, prestige, salary, family influence, and faculty advisor influence. Furthermore, endorsement of faculty advisor or other mentor influence and family or peer influence were surprisingly rare across groups, suggesting that formal and informal support networks could provide a missed opportunity to provide support for trainees who want to stay in faculty career paths. Reasons requiring alteration of misperceptions (e.g., limited leadership opportunity for faculty) must be distinguished from reasons requiring removal of actual barriers. Further investigation into factors that affect PhDs' career decisions can help elucidate why URM candidates are disproportionately exiting the academy. PMID:27587854

  18. Preliminary Analysis of the Effect of Flow Separation Due to Rocket Jet Pluming on Aircraft Dynamic Stability During Atmospheric Exit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Murray; North, Warren J.

    1959-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the effects of body boundary-layer separation resulting from a highly underexpanded jet on the dynamic stability of a typical rocket aircraft during an atmospheric exit trajectory. The particular flight condition studied on a digital computer for five degrees of freedom was at Mach 6.0 and 150,000 feet. In view of the unknown character of the separated flow field, two estimates of the pressures in the separated region were made to calculate the unbalanced forces and moments. These estimates, based on limited fundamental zero-angle-of-attack studies and observations, are believed to cover what may be the actual case. In addition to a fixed control case, two simulated pilot control inputs were studied: rate-limited and instantaneous responses. The resulting-motions with and without boundary-layer separation were compared for various initial conditions. The lower of the assumed misalinement forces and moments led to a situation whereby a slowly damped motion could be satisfactorily controlled with rate-limited control input. The higher assumption led to larger amplitude, divergent motions when the same control rates were used. These motions were damped only when the instantaneous control responses were assumed.

  19. Mechanisms regulating phosphatase specificity and the removal of individual phosphorylation sites during mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samuel; McCloy, Rachael; Watkins, D Neil; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Entry into mitosis is driven by the activity of kinases, which phosphorylate over 7000 proteins on multiple sites. For cells to exit mitosis and segregate their genome correctly, these phosphorylations must be removed in a specific temporal order. This raises a critical and important question: how are specific phosphorylation sites on an individual protein removed? Traditionally, the temporal order of dephosphorylation was attributed to decreasing kinase activity. However, recent evidence in human cells has identified unique patterns of dephosphorylation during mammalian mitotic exit that cannot be fully explained by the loss of kinase activity. This suggests that specificity is determined in part by phosphatases. In this review, we explore how the physicochemical properties of an individual phosphosite and its surrounding amino acids can affect interactions with a phosphatase. These positive and negative interactions in turn help determine the specific pattern of dephosphorylation required for correct mitotic exit. PMID:27417119

  20. Ionization Time and Exit Momentum in Strong-Field Tunnel Ionization.

    PubMed

    Teeny, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H

    2016-02-12

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. The so-called two-step model, which describes the ionization as instantaneous tunneling at the electric field maximum and classical motion afterwards with zero exit momentum, is commonly employed to describe tunnel ionization in adiabatic regimes. In this contribution, we show by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in one dimension and employing a virtual detector at the tunnel exit that there is a nonvanishing positive time delay between the electric field maximum and the instant of ionization. Moreover, we find a nonzero exit momentum in the direction of the electric field. To extract proper tunneling times from asymptotic momentum distributions of ionized electrons, it is essential to incorporate the electron's initial momentum in the direction of the external electric field. PMID:26918986

  1. Nuclear reorganization of mammalian DNA synthesis prior to cell cycle exit.

    PubMed

    Barbie, David A; Kudlow, Brian A; Frock, Richard; Zhao, Jiyong; Johnson, Brett R; Dyson, Nicholas; Harlow, Ed; Kennedy, Brian K

    2004-01-01

    In primary mammalian cells, DNA replication initiates in a small number of perinucleolar, lamin A/C-associated foci. During S-phase progression in proliferating cells, replication foci distribute to hundreds of sites throughout the nucleus. In contrast, we find that the limited perinucleolar replication sites persist throughout S phase as cells prepare to exit the cell cycle in response to contact inhibition, serum starvation, or replicative senescence. Proteins known to be involved in DNA synthesis, such as PCNA and DNA polymerase delta, are concentrated in perinucleolar foci throughout S phase under these conditions. Moreover, chromosomal loci are redirected toward the nucleolus and overlap with the perinucleolar replication foci in cells poised to undergo cell cycle exit. These same loci remain in the periphery of the nucleus during replication under highly proliferative conditions. These results suggest that mammalian cells undergo a large-scale reorganization of chromatin during the rounds of DNA replication that precede cell cycle exit. PMID:14701733

  2. Peritonitis and catheter exit-site infection in patients on peritoneal dialysis at home1

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Ana Cristina Freire; Kusumota, Luciana; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Rodrigues, Flávia Fernanda Luchetti; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the complications related to peritonitis and catheter exit-site infections, in patients on peritoneal dialysis at home. Method: quantitative and cross-sectional study, carried out with 90 patients on peritoneal dialysis at home, in a municipality in the Northeast region of Brazil. For data collection, it was used two structured scripts and consultation on medical records. Descriptive analysis and comparison tests among independent groups were used, considering p<0.05 as level of statistical significance. Results: by comparing the frequency of peritonitis and the length of treatment, it was found that patients over two years of peritoneal dialysis were more likely to develop peritonitis (X²=6.39; p=0.01). The number of episodes of peritoneal catheter exit-site infection showed association with the length of treatment (U=224,000; p=0.015). Conclusion: peritonitis and catheter exit-site infection are associated with the length of treatment. PMID:26487141

  3. Inertia effects on strategy updating in emergency evacuation from a room with multiple exits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Li, Yuanzhen

    2014-03-01

    The inertia effects on strategy updating in emergency evacuation from a room with multiple exits is studied using the modified floor field model. Game theory is adopted to deal with conflict resolving process of evacuees and inertia effects are introduced in both exit choosing and conflict resolving process. From simulation results, the influences of inertia effects on the evacuation times and cooperation frequencies have been discussed. Interestingly, it can be found that inertia effects in exit choosing may lead more evacuation times, while inertia effects in conflict resolving may lead more evacuation times and higher cooperation frequencies. This study provides a new perspective to understand how the inertia of changing status quo acts on the strategy evolution in emergency circumstances.

  4. Organized medicine and Scandinavian professional unionism: hospital policies and exit options in Denmark and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Heidenheimer, A J; Johansen, L N

    1985-01-01

    Strikes by junior hospital doctors over the issue of on-call remuneration in Denmark and Sweden in 1981 are analyzed to clarify the impact of public-sector cost-control policies on intra- and interprofessional solidarity within the Scandinavian professional peak associations. The junior doctors' grievances could find expression either through increased "voice" within the medical negotiating machinery, or by pursuing the exit option in having the medical associations quit the peak associations. The article explains why the "exit" option was selected in Denmark, while in Sweden the granting of additional voice helped persuade the medical association to withdraw its exit threat and to remain within the peak association. The two cases are interpreted as presaging a divergence in the paths being taken by the various Scandinavian welfare states. PMID:4045171

  5. Ionization Time and Exit Momentum in Strong-Field Tunnel Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeny, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2016-02-01

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. The so-called two-step model, which describes the ionization as instantaneous tunneling at the electric field maximum and classical motion afterwards with zero exit momentum, is commonly employed to describe tunnel ionization in adiabatic regimes. In this contribution, we show by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in one dimension and employing a virtual detector at the tunnel exit that there is a nonvanishing positive time delay between the electric field maximum and the instant of ionization. Moreover, we find a nonzero exit momentum in the direction of the electric field. To extract proper tunneling times from asymptotic momentum distributions of ionized electrons, it is essential to incorporate the electron's initial momentum in the direction of the external electric field.

  6. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is required for cell cycle exit in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Jiang, Huaqi; Nickerson, Derek W; Edgar, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for proper development. In particular, robust mechanisms exist to ensure that cells permanently exit the cell cycle upon terminal differentiation, and these include restraining the activities of both the E2F/DP transcription factor and Cyclin/Cdk kinases. However, the full complement of mechanisms necessary to restrain E2F/DP and Cyclin/Cdk activities in differentiating cells are not known. Here, we have performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster, designed to identify genes required for cell cycle exit. This screen utilized a PCNA-miniwhite(+) reporter that is highly E2F-responsive and results in a darker red eye color when crossed into genetic backgrounds that delay cell cycle exit. Mutation of Hsp83, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Hsp90, results in increased E2F-dependent transcription and ectopic cell proliferation in pupal tissues at a time when neighboring wild-type cells are postmitotic. Further, these Hsp83 mutant cells have increased Cyclin/Cdk activity and accumulate proteins normally targeted for proteolysis by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), suggesting that APC/C function is inhibited. Indeed, reducing the gene dosage of an inhibitor of Cdh1/Fzr, an activating subunit of the APC/C that is required for timely cell cycle exit, can genetically suppress the Hsp83 cell cycle exit phenotype. Based on these data, we propose that Cdh1/Fzr is a client protein of Hsp83. Our results reveal that Hsp83 plays a heretofore unappreciated role in promoting APC/C function during cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibition could promote genomic instability and carcinogenesis. PMID:24086162

  7. Synthetic RR Lyrae velocity curves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tianxing Boston Univ., MA )

    1991-02-01

    An amplitude correlation between the pulsation velocity curves and visual light curves of ab-type RR Lyrae stars is derived from a large number of RR Lyrae that have high-precision radial-velocity and photometric data. Based on the determined AVp, AV ralation, a synthetic radial-velocity curve for a typical ab-type RR Lyrae star is constructed. This would be of particular use in determining the systemic velocities of RR Lyrae. 17 refs.

  8. Entrainment in High-Velocity, High Temperature Plasma Jets Part I: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Crawford, D.M.; Snyder, S.C.; Swank, W.D.; Haggard, D.C.; Williamson, R.L.

    2002-03-27

    The development of a high-velocity, high-temperature argon plasma jet issuing into air has been investigated. In particular the entrainment of the surrounding air, its effect on the temperature and velocity profiles and the subsequent mixing and dissociation of oxygen has been examined in detail. The total concentration of oxygen and the velocity and temperature profiles in the jet were obtained from an enthalpy probe. High-resolution Thomson scattering provided an independent measure of plasma velocity and temperature, validating enthalpy probe measurements and providing non-intrusive measurements near the nozzle exit. The concentration of atomic oxygen was obtained from two-photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Molecular oxygen concentration and temperature was obtained from Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS). It was found that both the incompleteness of mixing at the molecular scale and the rate of oxygen dissociation and recombination effects jet behavior.

  9. STS-102 crew gets emergency exit training at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- During emergency exit training on the Fixed Service Structure of Launch Pad 39B, STS-102 Mission Specialist Paul Richards takes a closer look at the lever that releases a slidewire basket, used for emergency exits from the launch pad, to the landing below. He and the rest of the crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  10. Plasma arc welding torch having means for vortexing plasma gas exiting the welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is described wherein a plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of the welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. The plasma gas is provided with a vortexing motion prior to exiting the body by a vortex motion imparting member which is mounted in an orifice housing member and carried in the forward portion of the torch body. The orifice housing member is provided with an orifice of an predetermined diameter through which the electric arc and the plasma gas exits.

  11. Using exit surveys to assess counterproductive work behaviors: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pecker, Gabriela; Fine, Saul

    2015-02-01

    Counterproductive work behaviors are notoriously difficult to measure in applied settings. As a result, many organizations are unable to reliably evaluate the frequency and antecedents of these behaviors. Exit surveys provide a unique opportunity for measuring potentially sensitive organizational issues but have yet to be widely adopted for measuring counterproductive work behaviors. The present paper describes a case study in which an exit survey was designed to study counterproductive work behaviors in a large telecommunications company. The results of this study suggest that a similar methodology may be beneficial for other organizations looking to better understand and manage these potentially damaging behaviors. PMID:25650640

  12. Distinction between entrance and exit wounds by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takakura, Ayaka; Jamal, Mostofa; Ito, Asuka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Kimura, Shoji; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated gunshot wounds in two autopsy cases using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Lead and copper were detected in the entrance wound of one case and lead, antimony, and copper were detected in that of the other case. In the exit wounds of both cases, lead, antimony, and copper were below detection limits. These findings indicate that the detection of metallic elements, such as lead, antimony, and copper, which are found in bullets, may be useful for differentiating entrance from exit wounds using EDX. PMID:27591531

  13. The velocity distribution of cometary hydrogen - Evidence for high velocities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael E.; Spinrad, Hyron

    1993-01-01

    The Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory was used to obtain high-velocity and spatial resolution 2D spectra of H-alpha 6563-A emission in Comets Austin and Levy. The presence of the components expected from water dissociation and collisional thermalization in the inner coma is confirmed by the hydrogen velocity distribution. In Comet Austin, the potential high-velocity hydrogen includes velocities of up to about 40 km/s and is spatially symmetric with respect to the nucleus. In Comet Levy, the high-velocity hydrogen reaches velocities of up to 50 km/s and is situated exclusively on the sunward side of the nucleus. The two distinct signatures of high-velocity hydrogen imply two distinct sources.

  14. The evolving velocity field around protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinch, Christian

    2008-10-01

    -out onto dust grains and no longer contribute to the radiation field. This may happen in regions which are kinematically important (e.g., the disk) and can mask the rotation, resulting in the circumstellar material appearing more infall dominated than it actually is. We show how this effect can be taken into account when modeling the velocity field in order to avoid misinterpretation.

  15. Velocity distributions on two-dimensional wing-duct inlets by conformal mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W; Moses, H E

    1948-01-01

    The conformal-mapping method of the Cartesian mapping function is applied to the determination of the velocity distribution on arbitrary two-dimensional duct-inlet shapes such as are used in wing installations. An idealized form of the actual wing-duct inlet is analyzed. The effects of leading edge stagger, inlet-velocity ratio, and section lift coefficients on the velocity distribution are included in the analysis. Numerical examples are given and, in part, compared with experimental data.

  16. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  17. Velocity specificity, combination training and sport specific tasks.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J; McNair, P J; Marshall, R N

    2001-06-01

    Whether velocity-specific resistance training is important for improving functional sporting performance was investigated by studying the effect of isoinertial training velocity on netball chest pass throwing velocity. Twenty-one female netball players were randomly assigned to a strength-trained group (80% 1RM - average training velocity = .308 m/s), power-trained group (60% 1RM - average training velocity = .398 m/s) and a control group. Resistance training was combined with sport specific motion training for both groups over a ten-week training duration. Pre- and post-training testing revealed that the training velocity associated with the strength-trained group produced significantly greater improvement in mean volume of weight lifted (85kg) and mean power output (13.25 W) as compared to the power and control groups (P< 0.05). The strength-trained and power-trained groups significantly improved netball throw velocity by 12.4% and 8.8% respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups. The validity of velocity-specific training and subsequent adaptations to improve functional sporting performance appears highly questionable, due to the disparity between training velocity and actual movement velocity (11.38 m x s(-1)) for a given sport specific task such as the netball throw it was proposed that the repeated intent to move an isoinertial load as rapidly as possible coupled with performance of the sport-specific movement promote efficient coordination and activation patterns. Such mechanisms might be more important determinants of sport-specific high velocity adaptation. PMID:11548916

  18. Phobos: Low Velocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Heather; Lee, Pascal; Hamilton, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    Mars’s inner moon, Phobos, is located deep in the planet’s gravity well and orbits far below the planet’s synchronous orbit. Images of the surface of Phobos, in particular from Viking Orbiter 1, MGS, MRO, and MEX, reveal a rich collisional history, including fresh-looking impact craters and subdued older ones, very large impact structures (compared to the size of Phobos), such as Stickney, and much smaller ones.Sources of impactors colliding with Phobos include a priori: A) Impactors from outside the martian system (asteroids, comets, and fragments thereof); B) Impactors from Mars itself (ejecta from large impacts on Mars); and C) Impactors from Mars orbit, including impact ejecta launched from Deimos and ejecta launched from, and reintercepted by, Phobos. In addition to individual craters on Phobos, the networks of grooves on this moon have also been attributed in part or in whole to impactors from some of these sources, particularly B. We report the preliminary results of a systematic survey of the distribution, morphology, albedo, and color characteristics of fresh impact craters and associated ejecta deposits on Phobos. Considering that the different potential impactor sources listed above are expected to display distinct dominant compositions and different characteristic impact velocity regimes, we identify specific craters on Phobos that are more likely the result of low velocity impacts by impactors derived from Mars orbit than from any alternative sources. Our finding supports the hypothesis that the spectrally “Redder Unit” on Phobos may be a superficial veneer of accreted ejecta from Deimos, and that Phobos’s bulk might be distinct in composition from Deimos.

  19. Velocity and velocity bounds in static spherically symmetric metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraut, Ivan; Batic, Davide; Nowakowski, Marek

    2011-08-01

    We find simple expressions for velocity of massless particles with dependence on the distance, r, in Schwarzschild coordinates. For massive particles these expressions give an upper bound for the velocity. Our results apply to static spherically symmetric metrics. We use these results to calculate the velocity for different cases: Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Reissner-Nordström with and without the cosmological constant. We emphasize the differences between the behavior of the velocity in the different metrics and find that in cases with naked singularity there always exists a region where the massless particle moves with a velocity greater than the velocity of light in vacuum. In the case of Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter we completely characterize the velocity and the metric in an algebraic way. We contrast the case of classical naked singularities with naked singularities emerging from metric inspired by noncommutative geometry where the radial velocity never exceeds one. Furthermore, we solve the Einstein equations for a constant and polytropic density profile and calculate the radial velocity of a photon moving in spaces with interior metric. The polytropic case of radial velocity displays an unexpected variation bounded by a local minimum and maximum.

  20. STS-44 crewmembers exit people mover after landing at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), exit people mover, a crew transport vehicle, after landing at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Commander Frederick D. Gregory follows ground crew personnel down the stairway. Gregory leads Mission Specialist (MS) Mario Runco, Jr, and Payload Specialist Thomas J. Hennen. In the background, is Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, undergoing post flight servicing.

  1. The Role Exit Process of Community College Faculty: A Study of Faculty Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Allatia; Prentice, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Between 1965 and 1975, over 500 community colleges opened across the United States. Thirty-five years later, the founding faculty has begun to retire. This study was designed to reveal the experiences of veteran community college faculty as they left their teaching role. The study examined the role exit experience of faculty, comparing the…

  2. 49 CFR 392.64 - Riding within closed commercial motor vehicles without proper exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Riding within closed commercial motor vehicles without proper exits. 392.64 Section 392.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF...

  3. "Now My Old Self Is Thin": Stigma Exits after Weight Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granberg, Ellen M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I employ a structural symbolic interaction framework to examine the processes by which persons can exit a stigmatized identity. Using the empirical example of weight loss, I analyze how individuals evolve from an identity as "fat" and stigmatized to one that is "normal" with respect to weight and free from identification with…

  4. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... tested under the conditions specified in S6.1 of Standard No. 131 (49 CFR 571.131), meets the criteria... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and... Figure 3D(1) and Figure 3D(2) for an interior release mechanism for a rear emergency exit door,...

  5. Exit Documents and Students with Disabilities: Legal Issues. EPRRI Issue Brief Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karger, Joanne; Pullin, Diana

    This report describes court challenges to high school exit exams for students with disabilities, explores the legal and public policy issues, and discusses implications for educators. Legal challenges include claims brought under the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, and under disability statutes, including the…

  6. Analysis of the mitotic exit control system using locked levels of stable mitotic cyclin.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, Benjamin J; Lu, Ying; Procko, Andrea L; Timney, Benjamin L; Cross, Frederick R

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) both promotes mitotic entry (spindle assembly and anaphase) and inhibits mitotic exit (spindle disassembly and cytokinesis), leading to an elegant quantitative hypothesis that a single cyclin oscillation can function as a ratchet to order these events. This ratchet is at the core of a published ODE model for the yeast cell cycle. However, the ratchet model requires appropriate cyclin dose-response thresholds. Here, we test the inhibition of mitotic exit in budding yeast using graded levels of stable mitotic cyclin (Clb2). In opposition to the ratchet model, stable levels of Clb2 introduced dose-dependent delays, rather than hard thresholds, that varied by mitotic exit event. The ensuing cell cycle was highly abnormal, suggesting a novel reason for cyclin degradation. Cdc14 phosphatase antagonizes Clb2-Cdk, and Cdc14 is released from inhibitory nucleolar sequestration independently of stable Clb2. Thus, Cdc14/Clb2 balance may be the appropriate variable for mitotic regulation. Although our results are inconsistent with the aforementioned ODE model, revision of the model to allow Cdc14/Clb2 balance to control mitotic exit corrects these discrepancies, providing theoretical support for our conclusions. PMID:19920813

  7. Quality Assurance in Higher Education Institutions: Exit Survey among Universiti Putra Malaysia Graduating Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konting, Mohd Majid; Kamaruddin, Norfaryanti; Man, Nor Azirawani

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the exit survey of graduating students at Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM). The results gathered from 1,823 final year students of the 2006/07 session indicate that overall, the students' satisfaction level is moderately high (3.55 ± 0.79). The students' perception on the attributes of graduates resulting from learning outcomes…

  8. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... routes. 1910.37 Section 1910.37 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit Routes and... alternate fire protection is furnished that provides an equivalent level of safety. (3) Employees must...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... routes. 1910.37 Section 1910.37 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit Routes and... alternate fire protection is furnished that provides an equivalent level of safety. (3) Employees must...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... routes. 1910.37 Section 1910.37 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Exit Routes and... alternate fire protection is furnished that provides an equivalent level of safety. (3) Employees must...

  11. 29 CFR 1910.37 - Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes. 1910.37 Section 1910.37 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Means of Egress § 1910.37 Maintenance, safeguards,...

  12. The Entrance and Exit Effects in Small Electrochemical Filter-Press Reactors Used in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frias-Ferrer, Angel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Jose; Saez, Veronica; Exposito, Eduardo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Carlos M.; Mantiel, Vicente; Walsh, Frank C.; Aldaz, Antonio; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed to examine the entrance and exit effects in small electrochemical filter-press reactors used in the laboratory is presented. The single compartment of the filter-press reactor is filled with different turbulence promoters to study their influence as compared to the empty configuration.

  13. Compulsory Literacy and Numeracy Exit Standards for Senior Secondary Students: The Right Direction for Australia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Suzanne; Care, Esther; Griffin, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    An overview of positive and negative potential effects of the setting of compulsory exit-level standards in literacy and numeracy for students completing their final years of schooling is presented. The overview rests on studies completed primarily outside Australia, reflecting the reality of such practices not having been implemented widely in…

  14. Exit and Entry: Why Parents in Utah Left Public Schools and Chose Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukhari, Patras; Randall, E. Vance

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the factors that influenced parental decisions to exit a public school and enroll their children in a private school. It also explored why parents chose the specific private school their child attends and the level of satisfaction they have with their private school choice. The key reasons for leaving public education were: (a)…

  15. Changes in Student Attributions Due to the Implementation of Central Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerke, Britta; Maag Merki, Katharina; Holmeier, Monika; Jager, Daniela J.

    2011-01-01

    The central aim of standardized exit exams is to motivate students and teachers to work harder on critical subject matters and thus increase student achievement. However, the effects of the implementation of central exams on student motivation have not been analyzed in a longitudinal section until now. In the present study, the consequences of…

  16. 49 CFR 392.64 - Riding within closed commercial motor vehicles without proper exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Riding within closed commercial motor vehicles... SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.64 Riding within closed commercial motor vehicles without proper exits. No person shall ride within the closed body of...

  17. Exploring Work and Development Options to Reduce Early Labour Force Exit of Mature Aged Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Hitendra; Kelly, Kathy; Tones, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Early labour force exit is a significant challenge associated with the ageing workforce in Australia and many other developed countries. A reduction and increased flexibility of work hours has been suggested to improve labour force participation of the mature aged cohort. However, little is known about mature aged workers' aspirations for…

  18. Pedestrian overpass at West 176th Street, over Riverside Drive exit, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pedestrian overpass at West 176th Street, over Riverside Drive exit, connecting Haven Avenue to Fort Washington Park. George Washington Bridge in background, looking north. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  19. High School Exit Examinations and High School Completion: Evidence from the Early 1990s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, John Robert; Edwards, Melanie R.

    2005-01-01

    For more than two decades, many states have required students to pass exit examinations to obtain high school diplomas. Despite these sweeping policy initiatives, we know relatively little about whether such policies are related to the chances that high school students will obtain diplomas. The authors estimate the association between high school…

  20. Use of the Exit Poll Survey To Improve Levy Campaign Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Jess E.

    Levy-election results frequently mean the difference between the curtailment or expansion of educational services. This paper presents results of a study that explored the feasibility of using exit polling as an alternative way to assess voter attitudes in an urban school-district levy election. Background information is provided on two levy…

  1. Causal Factors Attributed to Student Success on the California High School Exit Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Nikita A.

    2011-01-01

    American students are failing to demonstrate expected competency on basic skills taught in schools. The educational system needs a major overhaul to address declines in scholarly engagement. The State Board of Education (SBE) designed the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to give some merit to the high school diploma. Minorities and…

  2. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National...

  3. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National...

  4. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National...

  5. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National...

  6. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. 13.1312 Section 13.1312 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National...

  7. Exit Interviews. Examples of Forms Used at the Time of Employee Separation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Personnel Administrators, Seven Hills, OH.

    This publication consists mainly of sample forms used by public school districts throughout the U.S. at the time an employee leaves his or her position. Included are eight different questionnaires and similar forms for use in conducting exit interviews or otherwise gathering information on terminating employees. Also included are reprints of two…

  8. Predicting Success, Preventing Failure: An Investigation of the California High School Exit Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zau, Andrew C.; Betts, Julian R.

    2008-01-01

    Many educators, parents, and policymakers continue to call for reforms to the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), citing concern about the 10 percent of California students who do not graduate because of their failure to pass the test. By law, current funding for tutoring those at risk of failing the CAHSEE is targeted at those in grade 12…

  9. Why do some employees fall into and fail to exit a job-lock situation?

    PubMed

    Huysse-Gaytandjieva, Anna; Groot, Wim; Pavlova, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have paid little attention to the employees' ability to exit a job-lock situation and factors that determine this ability. It remains unclear why some employees who experience job lock are able to exit this state while others remain in job lock. We use longitudinal data to identify employees who have fallen in the state of job lock and their subsequent behavior-exiting or remaining in job lock. By use of a first-order Markov transition models, we analyze the relevance of sociodemographic features, employment, occupational, sectoral, and contextual factors, as well as personality characteristics in explaining the transition or its absence. Overall the results show that both demographic factors and work-related aspects increase the likelihood that an employee enters the long-term job lock state (especially for older, married, full-time employed, those in a craft occupation and governmental sector, and in a region with high unemployment). Mental health problems and personality characteristics (low peak-end self-esteem and decisional procrastination) have a significant effect on the probability to stay in long-term job lock. On the contrary, having a managerial, service, or associate occupation, working in the private sector, and having promotion opportunities increase the chance of an exit from the state of job lock. PMID:23737809

  10. 33 CFR 401.40 - Entering, exiting or position in lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Entering, exiting or position in lock. 401.40 Section 401.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation §...

  11. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRY/EXIT POINT OF TRAM BUCKETS ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRY/EXIT POINT OF TRAM BUCKETS ON THE LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THE CABLE CARRYING EMPTY BUCKETS AT TOP RIGHT IS THINNER IN DIAMETER THAN THE CABLE CARRYING LOADED BUCKETS ON THE TOP CENTER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  12. Children's Reading Profiles on Exiting the Reading Recovery Programme: Do They Predict Sustained Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliman, Andrew J.; Hurry, Jane; Bodman, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify reading profiles, which predict the literacy progress of Reading Recovery graduates. Reading Recovery is an intensive remediation for children after the first year of school. Children were assessed at exit from the programme and at 3-month, 6-month and 12-month follow-up points. Text Reading Level made unique…

  13. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release. 571.217 Section 571.217 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS Federal...

  14. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release. 571.217 Section 571.217 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS Federal...

  15. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release. 571.217 Section 571.217 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS Federal...

  16. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release. 571.217 Section 571.217 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS Federal...

  17. 77 FR 19132 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Bus Emergency Exits and Window Retention and Release

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... (NPRM) upon which this final rule is based was published on December 28, 2009 (74 FR 68558) (Docket No... application to release the exit.'' The language first appeared in a November 2, 1992 final rule (57 FR 49423... August 12, 2005 final rule (70 FR 47131), we amended FMVSS No. 217 by, among other things,...

  18. Ceramic filters and their use for cleaning dust-laden hot exit gases

    SciTech Connect

    B.L. Krasnyi; V.P. Tarasovskii; A.Yu. Val'dberg

    2005-03-01

    The performance characteristics of ceramic filter cells for cleaning dust-laden hot exit gases (400 - 1000{sup o}C) are reported. Major process parameters of a newly designed module-type FKI-45 filtering unit fitted with ceramic filter cells are given.

  19. The Relationship to Achievement on the California High School Exit Exam for Language Minority Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Paul A.; Gopal, Malati

    2003-01-01

    Examines first year results of the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) required for students to earn a high school diploma. Results suggest this high stakes test failed to meet legislative objectives to increase achievement and close the achievement gap. Instead, language-minority students with passing scores achieved significantly below…

  20. Is the Resolution Style "Exiting Statements" Related to Adolescent Problem Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijsbroek, Saskia A. M.; Hale, William W., III; Van Doorn, Muriel D.; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the association between the adolescents' conflict resolution style "exiting statements" (i.e., the expression of the adolescent' desire to minimize or end the contact with his or her parents) in parent-adolescent conflicts with self-rated adolescent GAD symptoms and delinquency symptoms of 1313 adolescents. A multi-group,…