Science.gov

Sample records for actual experimental materials

  1. Experimental study on the regenerator under actual operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2002-05-01

    An experimental apparatus was prepared to investigate thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of the regenerator under its actual operating conditions. The apparatus included a compressor to pressurize and depressurize regenerator with various operating frequencies. Cold end of the regenerator was maintained around 100 K by means of liquid nitrogen container and heat exchanger. Instantaneous gas temperature and mass flow rate were measured at both ends of the regenerator during the whole pressure cycle. Pulsating pressure and pressure drop across the regenerator were also measured. The operating frequency of the pressure cycle was varied between 3 and 60 Hz, which are typical operating frequencies of Gifford-McMahon, pulse tube, and Stirling cryocoolers. First, friction factor for the wire screen mesh was directly determined from room temperature experiments. When the operating frequency was less than 9 Hz, the oscillating flow friction factor was nearly same as the steady flow friction factor for Reynolds number up to 100. For 60 Hz operations, the ratio of oscillating flow friction factor to steady flow one was increased as hydraulic Reynolds number became high. When the Reynolds number was 100, this ratio was about 1.6. Second, ineffectiveness of the regenerator was obtained when the cold-end was maintained around 100 K and the warm-end at 300 K to simulate the actual operating condition of the regenerator in cryocooler. Effect of the operating frequency on ineffectiveness of regenerator was discussed at low frequency range.

  2. Finite element modelling of the actual structure of cellular materials determined by X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, S. . E-mail: souhail.youssef@insa-lyon.fr; Maire, E.; Gaertner, R.

    2005-02-01

    The initial microstructure and local deformation mechanisms of a polyurethane foam during a compression test are investigated by means of X-ray microtomography. A methodology to mesh the actual solid volume is described. The polymer material behaviour is assumed to be elastoplastic. A predictive finite element modelling of the mechanical behaviour of cellular materials is then implemented. The validation of the modelling procedure is performed in relation to the macroscopic mechanical response as well as to the local deformation mechanisms observed during the experiments.

  3. Experimental study of environmental tobacco smoke particles under actual indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Ning, Z; Cheung, C S; Fu, J; Liu, M A; Schnell, M A

    2006-08-31

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is a major source of human exposure to airborne particles. In order to provide more information necessary for human exposure investigations, the aim of the work presented here is to investigate experimentally the variation of the ETS particle concentration and size distribution under an actual indoor environment, in a room of 30 m3, using human smokers. The effect of number of cigarettes and brands of cigarettes, the effect of sampling location and the effect of ventilation rates were investigated. The results indicated little difference in the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of the ETS particles from those in background air. Under a ventilation rate of 0.03 m3/s, the concentration of the ETS particles reached a peak value at the sampling point shortly after completing the smoking process. The GMD first increased due to coagulation and diffusion deposition, and finalize decreased due to the effect of ventilation. Smoking two cigarettes at the same time would increase the initial concentration and led to an increase in GMD of the ETS particles. Two different brands of cigarette with different tar contents released ETS particles of different GMDs but similar particle concentrations. Spatial variation in particle concentration was obvious only in the first 600 s of the tests and tended to fade out subsequently. Stronger ventilation would reduce the concentration and GMD of the particles.

  4. Experimental investigation of panel radiator heat output enhancement for efficient thermal use under actual operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisir, Tamer; Baskaya, Senol; Onur Yazar, Hakan; Yucedag, Sinan

    2015-05-01

    In this study the heat output of a panel-convector-convector-panel radiator (PCCP) under controlled laboratory conditions under Turkish household and especially Ankara conditions was investigated experimentally. In this sense, investigations were performed for different heating water mass flow rates, water inlet temperatures and radiator inlet and outlet connection positions, which are most commonly used in Turkey. An experimental setup was built for this purpose in a test room where temperature was controlled and held constant during the experiments. Inlet and outlet water temperatures and mass flow rates were measured and heat output of the radiator was calculated. Infrared thermal camera visualizations of the steel panel radiator front surface were also performed.

  5. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    PubMed

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions.

  6. Experimental Fracture Measurements of Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Ray Douglas

    The primary objective of this research was to extend established fracture toughness testing methods to a new class of engineering materials known as functionally graded materials (FGMs). Secondary goals were to compare experimental results to those predicted by finite element models and to provide fracture test results as feedback toward optimizing processing parameters for the in-house synthesis of a MoSi2/SiC FGM. Preliminary experiments were performed on commercially pure (CP) Ti and uniform axial tensile tests resulted in mechanical property data including yield strength, 268 MPa, ultimate tensile strength, 470 MPa and Young's modulus, 110 GPa. Results from 3-point bending fracture experiments on CP Ti demonstrated rising R-curve behavior and experimentally determined JQ fracture toughness values ranged between 153 N/mm and 254 N/mm. Similar experimental protocols were used for fracture experiments on a 7- layered Ti/TiB FGM material obtained from Cercom in Vista, California. A novel technique for pre-cracking in reverse 4-point bending was developed for this ductile/brittle FGM material. Fracture test results exhibited rising R-curve behavior and estimated JQ fracture toughness values ranged from 0.49 N/mm to 2.63 N/mm. A 5- layered MoSi2/SiC FGM was synthesized using spark plasma sintering (SPS). Samples of this material were fracture tested and the results again exhibited a rising R-curve with KIC fracture toughness values ranging from 2.7 MPa-m1/2 to 6.0 MPa-m1/2. Finite Element Models predicted rising R-curve behavior for both of the FGM materials tested. Model results were in close agreement for the brittle MoSi2/SiC FGM. For the relatively more ductile Ti/TiB material, results were in close agreement at short crack lengths but diverged at longer crack lengths because the models accounted for fracture toughening mechanisms at the crack tip but not those acting in the crack wake.

  7. Upper level experimental physics resource materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Lee E.

    1992-04-01

    During a 1990 NSF-sponsored workshop on improving upper level experimental physics laboratories, it was agreed that a list of resources from publishers and from institutions with strong upper level labs would be useful to the physics teaching community. This compilation is by no means exhaustive, and suggestions for additions are welcome. If you have or know of materials that should be included, please contact the compiler of this list, Lee Larson, Department of Physics, Denison University, Granville, Ohio (614-587-6468; Bitnet LARSON@DENISON).

  8. Experimental use of Evazote joint materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, J. O.

    1981-09-01

    The performance of Evazote joint material is discussed. Merits and shortcomings noted in evaluations are listed. This material is designed to be used in expansion joints in roadways, bridges, sidewalks, roofs and walls, as well as other areas requiring a waterproof filler. Evazote material has been placed in joints on one bridge and in a number of highly expansive joints in prestressed concrete pavement.

  9. Experimental Verification of Material Flammability in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, A. V.; Balashov, Y. V.; Andreeva, T. V.; Melikhov, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    The flammability in microgravity of three US-furnished materials, Delrin, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and high-density polyethylene, was determined using a Russian-developed combustion tunnel on Mir. Four 4.5-mm-diameter cylindrical samples of each plastic were ignited under concurrent airflow (in the direction of flame spread) with velocities from no flow to 8.5 cm/s. The test results identify a limiting air-flow velocity V(sub lim) for each material, below which combustion ceases. Nominal values are V(sub lim) < 0.3 cm/s for Delrin, 0.5 cm/s for PMMA, and 0.3 to 0.5 cm/s for polyethylene. These values are lower than those obtained in prior ground testing. Nevertheless, they demonstrate that flow shutoff is effective for extinguishment in the microgravity environment of spacecraft. Microgravity test results also show that the plastic materials maintain a stable melt ball within the spreading flame zone. In general, as the concurrent flow velocity V decreases, the flame-spread rate V(sub F) decreases, from an average (for all three materials) of V(sub F)= 0.5-0.75 mm/s at V = 8.5 cm/s to V(sub F)= 0.05-0.01 mm/s at V = 0.3-0.5 cm/s. Also, as V decreases, the flames become less visible but expand, increasing the probability of igniting an adjacent surface.

  10. Experimental oral foreign body reactions. Commonly employed dental materials.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C M; Watson, R E

    1990-06-01

    Foreign bodies and tissue reactions to foreign materials are commonly encountered in the oral cavity. The more common lesions include apical deposition of endodontic materials, mucosal amalgam and graphite tattoos, myospherulosis, oil granulomas, and traumatically introduced dental materials and instruments. Since many foreign materials are unidentifiable histologically, commonly used dental materials were experimentally implanted subcutaneously in rats to assess local host responses and characterize the nature of these materials microscopically. The histologic characteristics of these foreign body reactions are detailed herein. The implanted materials corresponded to reactions seen in human subjects.

  11. Double-blind photo lineups using actual eyewitnesses: an experimental test of a sequential versus simultaneous lineup procedure.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gary L; Steblay, Nancy K; Dysart, Jennifer E

    2015-02-01

    Eyewitnesses (494) to actual crimes in 4 police jurisdictions were randomly assigned to view simultaneous or sequential photo lineups using laptop computers and double-blind administration. The sequential procedure used in the field experiment mimicked how it is conducted in actual practice (e.g., using a continuation rule, witness does not know how many photos are to be viewed, witnesses resolve any multiple identifications), which is not how most lab experiments have tested the sequential lineup. No significant differences emerged in rates of identifying lineup suspects (25% overall) but the sequential procedure produced a significantly lower rate (11%) of identifying known-innocent lineup fillers than did the simultaneous procedure (18%). The simultaneous/sequential pattern did not significantly interact with estimator variables and no lineup-position effects were observed for either the simultaneous or sequential procedures. Rates of nonidentification were not significantly different for simultaneous and sequential but nonidentifiers from the sequential procedure were more likely to use the "not sure" response option than were nonidentifiers from the simultaneous procedure. Among witnesses who made an identification, 36% (41% of simultaneous and 32% of sequential) identified a known-innocent filler rather than a suspect, indicating that eyewitness performance overall was very poor. The results suggest that the sequential procedure that is used in the field reduces the identification of known-innocent fillers, but the differences are relatively small.

  12. Actual principles of the simulation of state-of-the-art technologies of laser processing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Oleg B.

    2010-07-01

    Here we present the results of mathematical, numerical, and experimental simulation of the processes of interaction between the laser radiation and metals in the technologies of gas-laser cutting of thick-sheet materials and laser gas-powder cladding at the production of coatings and 3D objects by the DMD (Direct Material Deposition) method. The peculiarities of jet 3D flows of the working gases in narrow channels, geometrically identical to keyholes, are studied. It is demonstrated that during the stainless steel cutting, supersonic gas flows form local regions of separation flows which in turn result in the worse carry-away of the metal by the gas flow; these factors increase the roughness (striation) and worsen the surface quality. A vortex flow was found inside the cut at the subsonic jet flows typical for the oxygen gas-laser cutting of low-carbon steel; this flow causes slagging of the cut bottom edge. The processes running inside the laser cut at the fusible metals cutting with the low-power radiation were visualized under the laboratory conditions. Some new concepts of the processes running inside the keyhole have been gained; we also propose the explanations of the mechanisms of striation and other surface defects formation during the cutting of thick-sheet standard metals on the automate laser technological complex. A mathematical model of the volumetric laser-powder cladding is proposed. The submitted results concern the numerical simulation of multi-layer flows of shaping and carrier gases with the gas-jet transportation of powder particles into the laser spot on the substrate.

  13. Actual principles of the simulation of state-of-the-art technologies of laser processing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Oleg B.

    2011-02-01

    Here we present the results of mathematical, numerical, and experimental simulation of the processes of interaction between the laser radiation and metals in the technologies of gas-laser cutting of thick-sheet materials and laser gas-powder cladding at the production of coatings and 3D objects by the DMD (Direct Material Deposition) method. The peculiarities of jet 3D flows of the working gases in narrow channels, geometrically identical to keyholes, are studied. It is demonstrated that during the stainless steel cutting, supersonic gas flows form local regions of separation flows which in turn result in the worse carry-away of the metal by the gas flow; these factors increase the roughness (striation) and worsen the surface quality. A vortex flow was found inside the cut at the subsonic jet flows typical for the oxygen gas-laser cutting of low-carbon steel; this flow causes slagging of the cut bottom edge. The processes running inside the laser cut at the fusible metals cutting with the low-power radiation were visualized under the laboratory conditions. Some new concepts of the processes running inside the keyhole have been gained; we also propose the explanations of the mechanisms of striation and other surface defects formation during the cutting of thick-sheet standard metals on the automate laser technological complex. A mathematical model of the volumetric laser-powder cladding is proposed. The submitted results concern the numerical simulation of multi-layer flows of shaping and carrier gases with the gas-jet transportation of powder particles into the laser spot on the substrate.

  14. Exposure to alcohol commercials in movie theaters affects actual alcohol consumption in young adult high weekly drinkers: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Koordeman, Renske; Anschutz, Doeschka J; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2011-01-01

    The present pilot study examined the effects of alcohol commercials shown in movie theaters on the alcohol consumption of young adults who see these commercials. A two (alcohol commercials vs. nonalcohol commercials) by two (high weekly alcohol consumption vs. low weekly alcohol consumption) between-participant design was used, in which 184 young adults (age: 16-28 years) were exposed to a movie that was preceded by either alcohol commercials or nonalcohol commercials. Participants' actual alcohol consumption while watching the movie ("Watchmen") was examined. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to examine the effects of the commercial condition on alcohol consumption. An interaction effect was found between commercial condition and weekly alcohol consumption (p < .001). Alcohol consumption among high weekly alcohol drinkers was higher in the alcohol commercial condition than in the nonalcohol commercial condition, whereas no differences were found in alcohol consumption between commercial conditions among low weekly alcohol drinkers. No gender differences were found in the association between exposure to alcohol commercials, weekly drinking, and alcohol use. Thus, exposure to alcohol commercials prior to a movie in a movie theater can directly influence alcohol consumption among high weekly alcohol consumers.

  15. Finite element simulation of flexible roll forming with supplemented material data and the experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Wang, Haibo; Li, Qiang; Guan, Yanzhi

    2016-03-01

    Flexible roll forming is a promising manufacturing method for the production of variable cross section products. Considering the large plastic strain in this forming process which is much larger than that of uniform deformation phase of uniaxial tensile test, the widely adopted method of simulating the forming processes with non-supplemented material data from uniaxial tensile test will certainly lead to large error. To reduce this error, the material data is supplemented based on three constitutive models. Then a finite element model of a six passes flexible roll forming process is established based on the supplemented material data and the original material data from the uniaxial tensile test. The flexible roll forming experiment of a B pillar reinforcing plate is carried out to verify the proposed method. Final cross section shapes of the experimental and the simulated results are compared. It is shown that the simulation calculated with supplemented material data based on Swift model agrees well with the experimental results, while the simulation based on original material data could not predict the actual deformation accurately. The results indicate that this material supplement method is reliable and indispensible, and the simulation model can well reflect the real metal forming process. Detailed analysis of the distribution and history of plastic strain at different positions are performed. A new material data supplement method is proposed to tackle the problem which is ignored in other roll forming simulations, and thus the forming process simulation accuracy can be greatly improved.

  16. Experimental determination of material constants of a hybrid composite laminate

    SciTech Connect

    Ihekweazu, S.N.; Lari, S.B.; Unanwa, C.O.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of the experimental study that was conducted in order to determine the material properties of a hybrid composite laminate made from Fiberite material MXM-7714/120 (a fabric prepreg consisting of woven Kevlar{reg_sign} 49 reinforcement impregnated with Fiberite 250 F (121 C) curing 7714 epoxy resin) and HYE-2448AIE (a 250 F (121 C) curing epoxy resin impregnated unidirectional graphite tape). First, each of the materials that comprise the hybrid laminate was fabricated separately according to ASTM-D-3039 specification in order to determine their material properties. The materials were then hybridized and the properties were determined. Data from this experiment reveal that a new class of material that can meet desired specifications can be created through hybridization. The data also revealed that the properties of the materials bonded together as a hybrid complement the properties of the constituent members of the hybrid.

  17. Development of experimental systems for material sciences under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanii, Jun; Obi, Shinzo; Kamimiyata, Yotsuo; Ajimine, Akio

    1988-01-01

    As part of the Space Experiment Program of the Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies, three experimental systems (G452, G453, G454) have been developed for materials science studies under microgravity by the NEC Corporation. These systems are to be flown as Get Away Special payloads for studying the feasibility of producing new materials. Together with the experimental modules carrying the hardware specific to the experiment, the three systems all comprise standard subsystems consisting of a power supply, sequence controller, temperature controller, data recorder, and video recorder.

  18. Stochastic identification of composite material properties from limited experimental databases, part I: Experimental database construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrez, Loujaine; Moens, David; Vandepitte, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Composite materials exhibit variability and uncertainties in their material properties with relation to their compositions and manufacturing processes. Conventional deterministic identification of composite material properties involves numerical-experimental characterisation techniques. These techniques do not account for the associated spatial variability and uncertainties in the identified properties. The objective of this work is to characterise spatially-stochastic macroscopic material properties of heterogeneous composite fabrics from limited-size macro-scale experimental measurements. The work is organised in a sequence of two papers. The first paper, present manuscript, is concerned with the construction of an experimental database of macroscopic material properties of heterogeneous composite fabrics from limited-size macro-scale experimental measurements. The mobility frequency response functions from a number of cantilever-beam specimens of the composite material are measured at selected points along each beam. These direct measurements are introduced to a set of deterministic inverse problems in order to reconstruct a database of heterogeneous Young's modulus spatial fields. The constructed database will be used, in the second paper of the sequence, to construct a stochastic model of the material properties that account for both aleatory uncertainties, related to sample inter-variability, as well as epistemic uncertainties due to insufficiency of the available data.

  19. Occupational Orientation: Industrial Oriented Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials, for one of five clusters developed for the occupational orientation program in Illinois, contain teacher references and a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the industrial oriented occupations field. The 30…

  20. Experimental determination of material damping using vibration analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowdhury, Mostafiz R.; Chowdhury, Farida

    1990-01-01

    Structural damping is an important dynamic characteristic of engineering materials that helps to damp vibrations by reducing their amplitudes. In this investigation, an experimental method is illustrated to determine the damping characteristics of engineering materials using a dual channel Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analyzer. A portable Compaq III computer which houses the analyzer, is used to collect the dynamic responses of three metal rods. Time-domain information is analyzed to obtain the logarithmic decrement of their damping. The damping coefficients are then compared to determine the variation of damping from material to material. The variations of damping from one point to another of the same material, due to a fixed point excitation, and the variable damping at a fixed point due to excitation at different points, are also demonstrated.

  1. Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

  2. Structural Prediction and Experimental Verification of Three New Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbogast, D. J.; Foster, M. C.; Nielson, R. M.; Photinos, P. J.; Abrahams, S. C.

    1999-05-01

    Aminoguanidinium hexafluorozirconate, potassium niobyl silicate and fresnoite are typical members of a growing group of materials predicted to be new ferroelectrics by the application of structural criteria. Following prediction, undergraduate chemistry majors prepare and physics majors measure the dielectric properties of each. Experimental results will be presented for the three title materials in verification of their predicted property. In addition to the structural criteria on which the predictions depend, the circuits built locally and other instrumentation used for measuring ac and dc hysteresis, the thermal and frequency dependence of the dielectric permittivity, the thermal dependence of the spontaneous polarization and also the pyroelectric coefficient will be presented.

  3. Experimental investigation of the electrocaloric response in ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es'kov, A. V.; Belyavskii, P. Yu.; Anokhin, A. S.; Pakhomov, O. V.; Semenov, A. A.; Myl'nikov, I. L.; Nikitin, A. A.; Bui, M. T.; Cherkasskii, M. A.; Plotnikov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed the electrocaloric response in ferroelectric materials in nonequilibrium thermal conditions. The temperature dependences of the electrocaloric response during polarization and depolarization of ferroelectric samples based on solid solutions of barium-strontium titanate and lead magnoniobate-titanate are considered. The difference in the electrocaloric responses for polarization and depolarization, which can be as large as 5 mK, has been demonstrated experimentally.

  4. Taguchi method of experimental design in materials education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the advantages and disadvantages of the Taguchi Method of experimental design as applied to Materials Science will be discussed. This is a fractional factorial method that employs the minimum number of experimental trials for the information obtained. The analysis is also very simple to use and teach, which is quite advantageous in the classroom. In addition, the Taguchi loss function can be easily incorporated to emphasize that improvements in reproducibility are often at least as important as optimization of the response. The disadvantages of the Taguchi Method include the fact that factor interactions are normally not accounted for, there are zero degrees of freedom if all of the possible factors are used, and randomization is normally not used to prevent environmental biasing. In spite of these disadvantages it is felt that the Taguchi Method is extremely useful for both teaching experimental design and as a research tool, as will be shown with a number of brief examples.

  5. In situ transmission electron microscopy experimentation of nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alducin, Diego

    Due to the remarkable mechanical and electrical properties some nanostructured materials possess, it is important to be able to quantitatively characterize how these materials react under different types of stimulus. In situ transmission electron microscopy is a unique technique that allows the user to fully observe and record the crystallographic behavior of such materials undergoing a variety of tests. The crystallographic orientations silver nanowires were mapped in order to understand the structure and facets due to its geometry. Measuring the toughness and yield of the material led us to understand the anisotropic behavior of AgNWs. Depending on whether a load is applied to either a boundary between facets or on a facet will change the mechanical strength of the nanowire. By measuring the resistivity of the this material during deformation has also led us to understand that the intrinsic defects in the crystal structure of nanowires will change the way the material reacts to an electric potential. We have been also able to completely map the crystallographic orientations of very complex geometries of gold nanoparticles and characterize the weak forces involved in the manipulation if these nanoparticles. Finally, the elasticity of MoS2 was tested and found to be exponentially dependent upon the thickness of the nanosheets. However, the resistivity of this material does not seem to be affected by any type of deformation it is subjected to. The complete categorization of how materials interact with external stimulus while comparing the changes observed in its crystal structure is essential to understanding the underlying properties of nanostructured materials, which would not be possible without in situ transmisison electron microscopy experimentation.

  6. Experimental Studies of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Space Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, MIchael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Craven, Paul D.; Hyers, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Game ]changing propulsion systems are often enabled by novel designs using advanced materials. Radiator performance dictates power output for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon fiber materials have the potential to offer significant improvements in thermal conductivity and mass properties. A test apparatus was developed to test advanced radiator designs. This test apparatus uses a resistance heater inside a graphite tube. Metallic tubes can be slipped over the graphite tube to simulate a heat pipe. Several sub ]scale test articles were fabricated using CNT cloth and pitch ]based carbon fibers, which were bonded to a metallic tube using an active braze material. The test articles were heated up to 600 C and an infrared (IR) camera captured the results. The test apparatus and experimental results are presented here.

  7. Experimental characterization of materials subjected to combined loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrusca, L.; Goanta, V.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Savin, A.

    2016-08-01

    In real life experience, machine and structure elements are subjected to complex loading history. Combined loading testes facilitate the understanding of materials behavior subjected to multiaxial stress state. In this paper are presented experimental investigations used to evaluate the influence of an initial type of loading on material properties which will be subsequently tested through another load type. Initial tests are tension tests, by different elongations, and subsequent tests are torsion tests, until break. Circular cross section specimens will be used in these tests. Tension tests have been performed on a universal testing machine. Subsequently torsion tests have been conducted through an attachable device. It was found that the energy associated with plastic deformation obtained by subsequent torsional tests has the dominant influence on the material total plastic energy, although initial test was tension.

  8. Experimental Design for Combinatorial and High Throughput Materials Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawse, James N.

    2002-12-01

    In the past decade, combinatorial and high throughput experimental methods have revolutionized the pharmaceutical industry, allowing researchers to conduct more experiments in a week than was previously possible in a year. Now high throughput experimentation is rapidly spreading from its origins in the pharmaceutical world to larger industrial research establishments such as GE and DuPont, and even to smaller companies and universities. Consequently, researchers need to know the kinds of problems, desired outcomes, and appropriate patterns for these new strategies. Editor James Cawse's far-reaching study identifies and applies, with specific examples, these important new principles and techniques. Experimental Design for Combinatorial and High Throughput Materials Development progresses from methods that are now standard, such as gradient arrays, to mathematical developments that are breaking new ground. The former will be particularly useful to researchers entering the field, while the latter should inspire and challenge advanced practitioners. The book's contents are contributed by leading researchers in their respective fields. Chapters include: -High Throughput Synthetic Approaches for the Investigation of Inorganic Phase Space -Combinatorial Mapping of Polymer Blends Phase Behavior -Split-Plot Designs -Artificial Neural Networks in Catalyst Development -The Monte Carlo Approach to Library Design and Redesign This book also contains over 200 useful charts and drawings. Industrial chemists, chemical engineers, materials scientists, and physicists working in combinatorial and high throughput chemistry will find James Cawse's study to be an invaluable resource.

  9. Spin glasses: redux: an updated experimental/materials survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mydosh, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the 40+ year old spin-glass field and one of its earliest model interpretations as a spin density wave. Our description is from an experimental phenomenological point of view with emphasis on new spin glass materials and their relation to topical problems and strongly correlated materials in condensed matter physics. We first simply define a spin glass (SG), give its basic ingredients and explain how the spin glasses enter into the statistical mechanics of classical phase transitions. We then consider the four basic experimental properties to solidly characterize canonical spin glass behavior and introduce the early theories and models. Here the spin density wave (SDW) concept is used to explain the difference between a short-range SDW, i.e. a SG and, in contrast, a long-range SDW, i.e. a conventional magnetic phase transition. We continue with the present state of SG, its massive computer simulations and recent proposals of chiral glasses and quantum SG. We then collect and mention the various SG ‘spin-off’s'. A major section uncovers the fashionable unconventional materials that display SG-like freezing and glassy ground states, such as (high temperature) superconductors, heavy fermions, intermetallics and Heuslers, pyrochlor and spinels, oxides and chalogenides and exotics, e.g. quasicrystals. Some conclusions and future directions complete the review.

  10. Ultrasonically assisted turning of aviation materials: simulations and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Babitsky, V I; Mitrofanov, A V; Silberschmidt, V V

    2004-04-01

    Ultrasonically assisted turning of modern aviation materials is conducted with ultrasonic vibration (frequency f approximately 20 kHz, amplitude a approximately 15 microm) superimposed on the cutting tool movement. An autoresonant control system is used to maintain the stable nonlinear resonant mode of vibration throughout the cutting process. Experimental comparison of roughness and roundness for workpieces machined conventionally and with the superimposed ultrasonic vibration, results of high-speed filming of the turning process and nanoindentation analyses of the microstructure of the machined material are presented. The suggested finite-element model provides numerical comparison between conventional and ultrasonic turning of Inconel 718 in terms of stress/strain state, cutting forces and contact conditions at the workpiece/tool interface.

  11. Fabrication and test of experimental automotive friction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    Three classes of experimental ingredients having good high temperature stability were substituted, singly and in combination, for corresponding ingredients in a standard friction material. The effects of substitution were evaluated by physical and chemical analysis, and principally by determination of friction and wear properties as a function of temperature on a sample drag dynamometer. The major finding was the demonstration of the potential of potassium titanate fiber for the improvement of a friction material of the secondary lining type. For example, the maintenance of a mean friction coefficient of 0.35 between 232 and 343 C (450 and 650 F) was achieved in the presence of the titanate fiber, as opposed to a value of 0.30 in its absence. Wear improvement of the order of 30 to 40% also becomes possible by proper adjustment of resin content and potassium titanate fiber-to-asbestos ratio.

  12. Experimental and computing strategies in advanced material characterization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bolzon, G.

    2015-10-28

    The mechanical characterization of materials relies more and more often on sophisticated experimental methods that permit to acquire a large amount of data and, contemporarily, to reduce the invasiveness of the tests. This evolution accompanies the growing demand of non-destructive diagnostic tools that assess the safety level of components in use in structures and infrastructures, for instance in the strategic energy sector. Advanced material systems and properties that are not amenable to traditional techniques, for instance thin layered structures and their adhesion on the relevant substrates, can be also characterized by means of combined experimental-numerical tools elaborating data acquired by full-field measurement techniques. In this context, parameter identification procedures involve the repeated simulation of the laboratory or in situ tests by sophisticated and usually expensive non-linear analyses while, in some situation, reliable and accurate results would be required in real time. The effectiveness and the filtering capabilities of reduced models based on decomposition and interpolation techniques can be profitably used to meet these conflicting requirements. This communication intends to summarize some results recently achieved in this field by the author and her co-workers. The aim is to foster further interaction between engineering and mathematical communities.

  13. Experimental hypervelocity impact effects on simulated planetesimal materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedeschi, W.J.; Schulze, J.F.; Remo, J.L.; Young, R.P. Jr

    1994-08-01

    Experimental results are presented from a series of hypervelocity impact tests on simulated comet and asteroid materials for the purpose of characterizing their response to hypervelocity kinetic energy impacts. Nine tests were conducted at the Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) S1 Range Facility on ice, rock, and iron target samples using a spherical 2.39 mm diameter aluminum impactor (0.0192 gm) at impact velocities of from 7.6 to 8.4 km/sec. The test objectives were to collect target response phenomenology data on cratering, momentum deposition and enhancement, target fragmentation, and material response under hypervelocity impact loading conditions. A carefully designed ballistic pendulum was used to measure momentum deposition into the targets. Observations and measurements of the impacted samples provide important insights into the response of these materials to kinetic energy impacts, especially in regards to unexpectedly large measured values of momentum enhancement to some of the targets. Such information is required to allow us to successfully deflect or fragment comets or asteroids which might someday be detected on collision trajectories with Earth.

  14. Evaluation of advanced materials through experimental mechanics and modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yii-Ching

    1993-01-01

    Composite materials have been frequently used in aerospace vehicles. Very often defects are inherited during the manufacture and damages are inherited during the construction and services. It becomes critical to understand the mechanical behavior of such composite structure before it can be further used. One good example of these composite structures is the cylindrical bottle of solid rocket motor case with accidental impact damages. Since the replacement of this cylindrical bottle is expensive, it is valuable to know how the damages affects the material, and how it can be repaired. To reach this goal, the damage must be characterized and the stress/strain field must be carefully analyzed. First the damage area, due to impact, is surveyed and identified with a shearography technique which uses the principle of speckle shearing interferometry to measure displacement gradient. Within the damage area of a composite laminate, such as the bottle of solid rocket motor case, all layers are considered to be degraded. Once a lamina being degraded the stiffness as well as strength will be drastically decreased. It becomes a critical area of failure to the whole bottle. And hence the stress/strain field within and around a damage should be accurately evaluated for failure prediction. To investigate the stress/strain field around damages a Hybrid-Numerical method which combines experimental measurement and finite element analysis is used. It is known the stress or strain at the singular point can not be accurately measured by an experimental technique. Nevertheless, if the location is far away from the singular spot, the displacement can be found accurately. Since it reflects the true displacement field locally regardless of the boundary conditions, it is an excellent input data for a finite element analysis to replace the usually assumed boundary conditions. Therefore, the Hybrid-Numerical method is chosen to avoid the difficulty and to take advantage of both experimental

  15. Experimental Observations on Material Damping at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Chia-Yen; Levine, Marie; Shido, Lillian; Leland, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a unique experimental facility designed to measure damping of materials at cryogenic temperatures for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The test facility removes other sources of damping in the measurement by avoiding frictional interfaces, decoupling the test specimen from the support system, and by using a non-contacting measurement device. Damping data reported herein are obtained for materials (Aluminum, Aluminum/Terbium/Dysprosium, Titanium, Composites) vibrating in free-free bending modes with low strain levels (< 10(exp -6) ppm). The fundamental frequencies of material samples are ranged from 14 to 202 Hz. To provide the most beneficial data relevant to TPF-like precision optical space missions, the damping data are collected from room temperatures (around 293 K) to cryogenic temperatures (below 40 K) at unevenly-spaced intervals. More data points are collected over any region of interest. The test data shows a significant decrease in viscous damping at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic damping can be as low as 10(exp -4) %, but the amount of the damping decrease is a function of frequency and material. However, Titanium 15-3-3-3 shows a remarkable increase in damping at cryogenic temperatures. It demonstrates over one order of magnitude increase in damping in comparison to Aluminum 6061-T6. Given its other properties (e.g., good stiffness and low conductivity) this may prove itself to be a good candidate for the application on TPF. At room temperatures, the test data are correlated well with the damping predicted by the Zener theory. However, large discrepancies at cryogenic temperatures between the Zener theory and the test data are observed.

  16. Experimental determination of the emissivity coefficient of selected materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idzkowski, Adam; Walendziuk, Wojciech; Sawicki, Aleksander

    2016-09-01

    This paper concerns the experimental determination of the emissivity of selected materials (metals and alloys). In the first chapter the theoretical aspects are presented. Then ISO 18434-1:2008 norm, as the standard regulating all issues related to the emissivity and the way of its determination, is described. The aim of work was to modernize the laboratory stand for non-contact temperature measurements. The modernized laboratory stand was equipped with the modern data acquisition module (National Instruments NI 9203). It enabled to present temperature measurement data and to save it on the PC. As a result, students will be able to conduct more measurements and to make more conclusions about the emissivity of materials and its influence on a temperature result. Sample measurements and calculations were presented. The final element of study was to determine emissivity for each plate. It was made by calculations basing on the values: reference temperature (from Pt100 sensor) and non-contact temperature (from pyrometer). The emissivity values determined from these calculations were compared with the values obtained through published tables in the literature and with the values received by means of NEC Avio G100 thermographic camera. The expanded uncertainty of determined emissivity coefficient was also estimated.

  17. Experimental investigation of high velocity impacts on brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, David Isaac

    Experiments were conducted on soda lime glass and AS800 grade silicon nitride. Soda lime glass is often used in windows of military vehicles and aircraft where integrity in the event of shrapnel impacts is of vital concern. AS800 grade silicon nitride is considered one of the leading material candidates for the next generation of aircraft engine turbine blades because of its superior high temperature properties when compared with nickel based super-alloys. The suitability of these materials for their applications depends upon their response to point and planar dynamic impact loading. An experimental apparatus was constructed to fire one-sixteenth inch diameter hardened chrome steel ball bearings at 50 mm square soda lime glass blocks of thicknesses between 3 mm and 25.4 mm. Inelasticity due to the crushed zone effects the coefficients of restitution and the surface strains. The change in severity of cracking with velocity and specimen thickness is observed. Shock compression and pressure-shear experiments were conducted by means of a single stage gas gun capable of attaining impact velocities of 600 m/s. High velocity planar shock compression experiments on soda lime glass reveal a lack of spall strength, and a decrease of shear impedance and shear strength in the presence of a failure wave. The longitudinal impedance remains nearly constant. The spall strength of glass is 3.49 GPa and is sensitive to the presence of shear. Shock compression studies on silicon nitride using normal shock compression show that the material has a Hugoniot Elastic Limit of 12 GPa and that the spall strength decreases with increasing impact velocity due to damage below the HEL. The presence of inelastic deformation stops this trend, while the presence of shear increases the rate of spall strength drop by five times because of more severe microscopic damage. Experiments involving multiple shocks on silicon nitride show that material loading and unloading follows the shock Hugoniot

  18. Degradation of experimental composite materials and in vitro wear simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, Daniel Allen

    2001-12-01

    The material, mechanical, and clinical aspects of surface degradation of resin composite dental restorative materials by in vitro wear simulation continues to be an area of active research. To investigate wear mechanisms, a series of experimental resin composites with variable and controlled filler particle shape and loading were studied by in vitro wear simulation. The current investigation utilized a simulation that isolated the wear environment, entrapped high and low modulus debris, and evaluated the process including machine and fluid flow dynamics. The degradation was significantly affected by filler particle shape and less by particle loading. The spherical particle composites demonstrated wear loss profiles suggesting an optimized filler loading may exist. This was also demonstrated by the trends in the mechanical properties. Very little difference in magnitude was noted for the wear of irregular particle composites as a function of particulate size; and as a group they were more wear resistant than spherical particle composites. This was the result of different mechanisms of wear that were correlated with the three-dimensional particle shape. The abrasive effects of the aggregate particles and the polymeric stabilization of the irregular shape versus the destabilization and "plucking" of the spherical particles resulted in an unprotected matrix that accounted for significantly greater wear of spherical composite. A model and analysis was developed to explain the events associated with the progressive material wear loss. The initial phase was explained by fatigue-assisted microcracking and loss of material segments in a zone of high stress immediately beneath a point of high stress contact. The early phase was characterized by the development of a small facet primarily by fatigue-assisted microcracking. Although the translation effects were minimal, some three-body and initial two-body wear events were also present. In the late phases, the abrasive effects

  19. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  1. Thermal mapping and trends of Mars analog materials in sample acquisition operations using experimentation and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwarc, Timothy; Hubbard, Scott

    2014-09-01

    The effects of atmosphere, ambient temperature, and geologic material were studied experimentally and using a computer model to predict the heating undergone by Mars rocks during rover sampling operations. Tests were performed on five well-characterized and/or Mars analog materials: Indiana limestone, Saddleback basalt, kaolinite, travertine, and water ice. Eighteen tests were conducted to 55 mm depth using a Mars Sample Return prototype coring drill, with each sample containing six thermal sensors. A thermal simulation was written to predict the complete thermal profile within each sample during coring and this model was shown to be capable of predicting temperature increases with an average error of about 7%. This model may be used to schedule power levels and periods of rest during actual sample acquisition processes to avoid damaging samples or freezing the bit into icy formations. Maximum rock temperature increase is found to be modeled by a power law incorporating rock and operational parameters. Energy transmission efficiency in coring is found to increase linearly with rock hardness and decrease by 31% at Mars pressure.

  2. Experimental characterization of energetic material dynamics for multiphase blast simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Wright, Elton K.; Baer, Melvin R.; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2011-09-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of data for interactions of shock waves with particle fields having volume fractions residing between the dilute and granular regimes, which creates one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the simulation of energetic material detonation. To close this gap, a novel Multiphase Shock Tube has been constructed to drive a planar shock wave into a dense gas-solid field of particles. A nearly spatially isotropic field of particles is generated in the test section by a gravity-fed method that results in a spanwise curtain of spherical 100-micron particles having a volume fraction of about 19%. Interactions with incident shock Mach numbers of 1.66, 1.92, and 2.02 were achieved. High-speed schlieren imaging simultaneous with high-frequency wall pressure measurements are used to reveal the complex wave structure associated with the interaction. Following incident shock impingement, transmitted and reflected shocks are observed, which lead to differences in particle drag across the streamwise dimension of the curtain. Shortly thereafter, the particle field begins to propagate downstream and spread. For all three Mach numbers tested, the energy and momentum fluxes in the induced flow far downstream are reduced about 30-40% by the presence of the particle field. X-Ray diagnostics have been developed to penetrate the opacity of the flow, revealing the concentrations throughout the particle field as it expands and spreads downstream with time. Furthermore, an X-Ray particle tracking velocimetry diagnostic has been demonstrated to be feasible for this flow, which can be used to follow the trajectory of tracer particles seeded into the curtain. Additional experiments on single spherical particles accelerated behind an incident shock wave have shown that elevated particle drag coefficients can be attributed to increased compressibility rather than flow unsteadiness, clarifying confusing results from the historical database of shock tube

  3. Experimental Research in Advanced Concepts for Novel Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Sand casting with pre-cast heating of tungsten elements  Induction casting with applied pressure II.A.2.a Experimental Furnace Casting The...such an experiment was completed during the research period. These experiments involved the electronic spectrum in the vacuum ultraviolet of the...methods used to create the casings include the following, each of which is outlined below:  Experimental casting in a small furnace  Sand casting

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON PARTICLE IMPACTION AND BOUNCE: EFFECTS OF SUBSTRATE DESIGN AND MATERIAL. (R825270)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the effects of impaction substrate designs and material in reducing particle bounce and reentrainment. Particle collection without coating by using combinations of different impaction substrate designs and surface materials was...

  5. Experimental data for new fire-retardant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supkis, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Report contains evaluations of flammability and physical properties of twenty-four upholstery and furnishing materials, such as those used in commercial aircraft. Data presented include degradation upon heating, limited oxygen indices, smoke generation, flammability afterglow, and char length.

  6. Experimental study of optical storage characteristics of photochromic material: pyrrylfulgide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Chen, Yi; Han, Yong; Wang, Congmin; Wang, Yingli; Menke, Neimule; Chen, Guofu; Fan, Meigong

    2003-04-01

    Optical data storage is a frontier in the information science. Currently, there are mainly two kinds of storage materials, i.e., thermal-optic and photonic materials. The storage methods are divided into serial and parallel modes. In the market, the mature technique is CD-RW, which uses the thermal-optic material and serial method. The storage density of the CD-RW is restricted by the size of material particles, the conduction of heat, etc. Besides, the recording speed is seriously limited by the process of heating. Photonic materials and parallel method will be the trend in the optical data storage. Because it is based on the photon reaction on the molecule scale, the storage density and speed will be greatly increased. In this paper, a new kind of organic photochromic material -- pyrrylfulgide was studied. A parallel optical data storage system was established. Using the pyrrylfulgide/PMMA film as a recording medium, micro-images and binary digital information could be recorded, readout and erased in this parallel system. The recorded information on the film can be kept for at least 8 months in dark at room temperature. So far, the storage density is 3 x 107 bit/cm2.

  7. Experimental analysis of electrical properties of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, L.; Rovnaník, P.; Černý, R.

    2017-02-01

    Dry cement-based composites are electrically non-conductive materials that behave in electric field like dielectrics. However, a relatively low amount of electrically conductive admixture significantly increases the electrical conductivity which extends applicability of such materials in practice. Therefore, they can be used as self-monitoring sensors controlling development of cracks; as sensors monitoring moisture content or when treated by an external electrical voltage as heat sources used for deicing of material's surface layer. Alkali-activated aluminosilicates (AAA), as competing materials to cement-based materials, are intensively investigated in the present due to their superior durability and environmental impact. Whereas the electrical properties of AAA are similar to those cement-based, they can be enhanced in the same way. In both cases, it is crucial to find a reasonable amount of electrically conductive phase to design composites with a sufficient electrical conductivity at an affordable price. In this paper, electrical properties of composites based on AAA binder and electrically conductive admixture represented by carbon nanotubes (CNT) are investigated. Measurements of electrical properties are carried out by means of 2-probes DC technique on nine types of samples; reference sample without the conductive phase and samples with CNT admixture in amount of 0.1 % - 2.5 % by vol. A significant increase of the electrical conductivity starts from the amount of 0.5 % CNT admixture and in case of 2.5 % CNT is about three orders of magnitude higher compared to the reference sample.

  8. Amorphous material in high strain experimental fault gouges

    SciTech Connect

    Yund, R.A.; Blanpied, M.L.; Tullis, T.E.; Weeks, J.D. )

    1990-09-10

    The microstructures of gouges produced in room temperature, rotary shear sliding experiments were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Gouges were produced by sliding on ground surfaces of granite, quartzite, or marble except for one experiment in which a 1-mm-thick simulated gouge layer was used. Water was added to the sliding surfaces of all but one sample. Crystal plastic processes play no role in the granite and quartzite gouges and a minor role in the marbles. All of the gouges consist of mostly submicron crystalline fragments; in addition, the granite gouges contain 5-60% amorphous material, and the quartzite gouge contains {approximately}50% amorphous material. In the granite samples the composition of the amorphous material commonly lies between K-rich and Na, Ca-rich feldspars, although portions may be silica-rich. The microstructural relations suggest that the amorphous material forms by comminution of fragments rather than by melting. The amount of amorphous material increases, and the size of the largest crystalline fragments decreases, with an increase in average shear strain, although the microstructure is nearly uniform throughout each granite gouge layer. These observations suggest that after slip becomes localized on Y shear surfaces and/or R{sub 1} Riedel shears the entire gouge layer must continue to undergo deformation. It is suggested that cyclic deformation in the gouge must occur to accommodate the passage of geometric irregularities on the active slip surfaces.

  9. The behavior of delaminations in composite materials - experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chermoshentseva, A. S.; Pokrovskiy, A. M.; Bokhoeva, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Delamination is one of the most common failure modes of composite materials. It may occur as a consequence of imperfections in the production process or the effects of external factors during the operational life of the composite laminates, such as the impact by foreign objects. This paper presents the results of mechanical tests and the optimum degrees of filling the composite materials (CM) with hydrophobic powder (Tarkosil T-20) depending on the latter mass concentration. The results present test samples of the CM with the underlying interlayer defects. The samples were fabricated of twenty-ply pre-preg (fiberglass or carbon fiber). The industrial grade glass is T-25 (VM) specification 6-11-380-76. The composite materials have nanosized additives in structure. The volume concentration of nanopowders is varying from 0.1% to 0.5%. This kind of research has been done for the first time.

  10. Experimental and Analytical Studies for a Computational Materials Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1999-01-01

    The studies supported by Grant NAG1-1780 were directed at providing physical data on polymer behavior that would form the basis for computationally modeling these types of materials. Because of ongoing work in polymer characterization this grant supported part of a larger picture in this regard. Efforts went into two combined areas of their time dependent mechanical response characteristics: Creep properties on the one hand, subject to different volumetric changes (nonlinearly viscoelastic behavior) and time or frequency dependence of dilatational material behavior. The details of these endeavors are outlined sufficiently in the two appended publications, so that no further description of the effort is necessary.

  11. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program. 98.3 Section 98.3 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STUDENT RIGHTS IN RESEARCH, EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS, AND TESTING § 98.3 Access to instructional material used in...

  12. Experimental modelling of material interfaces with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcovilos, Theodore A.; Brooke, Robert W. A.; Gillis, Julie; Ruggiero, Anthony C.; Tiber, Gage D.; Zaccagnini, Christopher A.

    2014-05-01

    We present a design for a new experimental apparatus for studying the physics of junctions using ultracold potassium atoms (K-39 and K-40). Junctions will be modeled using holographically projected 2D optical potentials. These potentials can be engineered to contain arbitrary features such as junctions between dissimilar lattices or the intentional insertion of defects. Long-term investigation goals include edge states, scattering at defects, and quantum depletion at junctions. In this poster we show our overall apparatus design and our progress in building experimental subsystems including the vacuum system, extended cavity diode lasers, digital temperature and current control circuits for the lasers, and the saturated absorption spectroscopy system. Funding provided by the Bayer School of Natural and Environmental.

  13. Stuff- The Materials that Shape our World - Experimental Learning Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenstein, Pam

    2012-04-30

    Making Stuff is a four-part series that explores how materials changed history and are shaping the future. To further enhance public engagement in and understanding of materials science, the project convened an extensive network of community coalitions across the country that hosted Making Stuff outreach activities and events, science cafes, and educator workshops in their local areas. Department Of Energy funding enabled us to increase the number of communities formally involved in the project, from 10 to 20 community hubs. Department of Energy funding also made it possible to develop a collection of materials science resources, activities and hands-on demonstrations for use in a variety of formal and informal settings, and Making Stuff activities were presented at science conferences and festivals around the country. The design, printing and national dissemination of the Making Stuff afterschool activity guide were also developed with DOE funding, as well as professional webinar trainings for scientists and educators to help facilitate many of the community activities and other online and print materials. Thanks to additional funding from the Department of Energy, we were able to expand the reach and scope of the project's outreach plan, specifically in the areas of: 1) content development, 2) training/professional development, 3) educational activities and 4) community partnerships. This report documents how the following DOE project goals were met: (1) Train scientists and provide teachers and informal educators with resources to engage youth with age appropriate information about materials science; (2) Provide activities and resources to five selected communities with ties to DOE researchers; (3) Increase interest in STEM.

  14. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

  15. Effect of composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshihito; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Akiba, Norihisa; Hibino, Yasushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Sumi, Yasunori; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin. Vinylidene fluoride/hexafluoro propylene copolymer (2-6F), tridecafluorooctyl methacrylate (13FMA), methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate (MDGMA), and silica (as filler) were used for fabrication of the experimental soft lining materials. Nine experimental soft lining materials having various compositions of 2-6F, 13FMA, and MDGMA were prepared. Shear and tensile bond strength tests were performed before and after immersion in water. The water sorption for the materials was also measured. An increase in the content of acrylic monomer, MDGMA, in the experimental materials increased the bond strength before immersion in water but reduced the bond strength after immersion in water as compared to that before immersion in water. The inclusion of fluorinated monomer (13FMA) in the materials appeared to affect water sorption.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Textile Composite Materials Using Moire Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    The viability as an efficient aircraft material of advanced textile composites is currently being addressed in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. One of the expected milestones of the program is to develop standard test methods for these complex material systems. Current test methods for laminated composites may not be optimum for textile composites, since the architecture of the textile induces nonuniform deformation characteristics on the scale of the smallest repeating unit of the architecture. The smallest repeating unit, also called the unit cell, is often larger than the strain gages used for testing of tape composites. As a result, extending laminated composite test practices to textiles can often lead to pronounced scatter in material property measurements. It has been speculated that the fiber architectures produce significant surface strain nonuniformities, however, the magnitudes were not well understood. Moire interferometry, characterized by full-field information, high displacement sensitivity, and high spatial resolution, is well suited to document the surface strain on textile composites. Studies at the NASA Langley Research Center on a variety of textile architectures including 2-D braids and 3-D weaves, has evidenced the merits of using moire interferometry to guide in test method development for textile composites. Moire was used to support tensile testing by validating instrumentation practices and documenting damage mechanisms. It was used to validate shear test methods by mapping the full-field deformation of shear specimens. Moire was used to validate open hole tension experiments to determine the strain concentration and compare then to numeric predictions. It was used for through-the-thickness tensile strength test method development, to verify capabilities for testing of both 2-D and 3-D material systems. For all of these examples, moire interferometry provided vision so that test methods could be developed with less

  17. Experimental Determination of Shock Structures in Hetrogeneous Layered Material Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-19

    2004). The failure and ultimate strength of the composites were both reported to increase with strain rate. Haque et al. (2003) used SHPB technique...Sierakowski and Chaturvedi, 1997). These material systems can be engineered to have the same strength and stiffness as high- strength steels , yet they...Hugoniot curve of GRP were determined. The spall strength of GRP was also studied by conducting a series of both normal-impact and combined pressure

  18. Experimental studies on a new bioactive material: HAIonomer cements.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U J; Pek, Y S; Kumar, R A; Cheang, P; Khor, K A

    2002-02-01

    The lack of exotherm during setting, absence of monomer and improved release of incorporated therapeutic agents has resulted in the development of glass ionomer cements (GICs) for biomedical applications. In order to improve biocompatibility and biomechanically match GICs to bone, hydroxyapatite-ionomer (HAIonomer) hybrid cements were developed. Ultra-fine hydroxyapatite (HA) powders were produced using a new induction spraying technique that utilizes a radio-frequency source to spheriodize an atomized suspension containing HA crystallites. The spheriodized particulates were then held at 800 degrees C for 4 h in a carbolite furnace using a heating and cooling rate of 25 degrees C/min to obtain almost fully crystalline HA powders. The heat-treated particles were characterized and introduced into a commercial glass ionomer cement. 4 (H4), 12 (H12) and 28 (H28) vol% of fluoroalumino silicate were substituted by crystalline HA particles that were dispersed using a high-speed dispersion technique. The HAIonomer cements were subjected to hardness, compressive and diametral tensile strength testing based upon BS6039:1981. The storage time were extended to one week to investigate the effects of cement maturation on mechanical properties. Commercially available capsulated GIC (GC) and GIC at maximum powder:liquid ratio (GM) served as comparisons. Results were analyzed using factorial ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc tests and independent samples t-test at significance level 0.05. The effect of time on hardness was material dependent. With the exception of H12, a significant increase in hardness was observed for all materials at one week. A significant increase in compressive strength was, however, observed for H12 over time. At 1 day and 1 week, the hardness of H28 was significantly lower than for GM, H4, and H12. No significant difference in compression and diametral tensile strengths were observed between materials at both time intervals. Results show that HAIonomers is a

  19. New suture materials for midline laparotomy closure: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Midline laparotomy closure carries a significant risk of incisional hernia. This study examines the behavior of two new suture materials, an elastic material, polyurethane (PUe), and a barbed polydioxanone (PDXb) suture thread in a rabbit model of midline incision closure. Methods Three 2-cm midline incisions were made in 68 New Zealand White rabbits. The incisions were closed by running suture using four 3/0 threads: polypropylene (PP) (Surgipro®, Covidien), PUe (Assuplus®, Assut Europe), PDX (Assufil®, Assut Europe) or PDXb (Filbloc®, Assut Europe). Animals in each suture group were euthanized 3 weeks and 6 months after surgery. Histological sections of the tissue-embedded sutures were subjected to morphological, collagen expression, macrophage response and uniaxial tensiometry studies. Results No signs of wound dehiscence or complications were observed. At 3 weeks, all sutures were surrounded by connective tissue composed mainly of collagen III. PUe showed greater collagen I expression than the other sutures. All sutures elicited a macrophage response that diminished from 3 weeks to 6 months (p < 0.001). This response was similar for the non-reabsorbable sutures (PP and PUe) yet PDXb showed a significantly greater response than the other reabsorbable suture (PDX) at 3 weeks (p < 0.01). At this early time point, the tensile strength of PUe was similar to that of control intact tissue (p > 0.05). Conclusion Three weeks after surgery, PUe revealed more collagen I deposition than the remaining materials and this translated to a similar biomechanical behavior to linea alba, that could avoid the appearance of short term dehiscences and thus reduce the incidence of incisional hernia. PDXb provides no additional advantages in their behavior regarding PDX suture. PMID:25231161

  20. Structures and Materials Experimental Facilities and Capabilities Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G. (Compiler); Kurtz-Husch, Jeanette D. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Center of Excellent for Structures and Materials at Langley Research Center is responsible for conducting research and developing useable technology in the areas of advanced materials and processing technologies, durability, damage tolerance, structural concepts, advanced sensors, intelligent systems, aircraft ground operations, reliability, prediction tools, performance validation, aeroelastic response, and structural dynamics behavior for aerospace vehicles. Supporting the research activities is a complementary set of facilities and capabilities documented in this report. Because of the volume of information, the information collected was restricted in most cases to one page. Specific questions from potential customers or partners should be directed to the points of contacts provided with the various capabilities. Grouping of the equipment is by location as opposed to function. Geographical information of the various buildings housing the equipment is also provided. Since this is the first time that such an inventory is ever collected at Langley it is by no means complete. It is estimated that over 90 percent of the equipment capabilities at hand are included but equipment is continuously being updated and will be reported in the future.

  1. Experimental Study of High-Energy Processing of Protoplanetary Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petaev, M. I.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Remo, J. L.; Adams, R. G.; Sasselov, D. D.

    2006-12-01

    The metal-silicate fractionation in celestial bodies effectively separates siderophile 182W from lithophile 182Hf into the core and mantle, respectively, making the Hf-W chronometer ideal for dating core-formation in differentiated planetary bodies. It is generally believed that there was equilibration of the Hf-W system during primary metal-silicate fractionation of small, initially chondritic, parent bodies. However, the accretion of larger objects like Moon and terrestrial planets generally involves giant impacts, with both the target and projectile probably being differentiated. Then, use of the Hf-W system assumes metal-silicate re-equilibration at high T and P while metal droplets rain through the magma ocean of a growing planet. Currently no experimental data at such conditions exist. Here we report the first results of experiments aimed at studying partitioning of Fe and Ni (proxy for W) between metal and silicate melt formed at high P and T by laser shocks of powered mixtures of pure Fe metal and Ni-bearing ALM-2 dunite. The initial targets with variable metal/dunite ratios were lightly pressed into 6.3 mm pellets (1-3 mm thick) and subjected to single laser pulses (~120-600 J, ~1 nsec). The details of experiments are described in the accompanying abstract by Remo et al. Some shots produced ~ 1 mm round craters in partially preserved targets which have been studied by optical microscopy, SEM and EPMA. The craters have rather rough surfaces and blackened appearance. The SEM images show thin (1-3 microns) films or pockets (3-8 microns) of silicate melt with or without tiny metal blebs which weld together angular grains of olivine and metal. The olivine contains no Al2O3 and ~0.4 wt% NiO; the metal is pure Fe. The melt, besides being lighter in the BSE images, shows distinct compositional differences (higher Al2O3 and FeO, lower MgO and SiO2) from olivine. The NiO content in metal-free melt films and pockets is similar to that in the host olivine. Metal in

  2. An elastomeric material for facial prostheses: synthesis, experimental and numerical testing aspects.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Kathryn; Limbert, G; Waters, Mark G; Middleton, J

    2003-12-01

    Current materials used for maxillofacial prostheses are far from ideal and there is a need for new improved materials which better simulate the tissues they are replacing. This study was based on a mixed experimental/analytical/numerical approach. A new polymeric material was developed to provide a better alternative to the materials currently used in maxillofacial prosthetics. A series of experimental tensile tests were performed in order to characterise the tensile properties of the material. A Mooney-Rivlin type hyperelastic formulation was chosen to describe the constitutive behaviour of the polymer which operates at the finite strain regime. The material parameters (two) of the constitutive law were identified with the experimental data. The Mooney-Rivlin material was found to be suitable to represent accurately the mechanical behaviour of the polymer up to 50% strain as shown by the excellent agreement between analytical and experimental results. An FE model reproducing all the characteristics of the experimental tensile tests was built and a series of three FE analyses were conducted and has proven the proper finite element implementation of the material model. This preliminary study will serve as a basis to introduce more complex features such as viscoelasticity and wrinkling of the soft polymeric structure in order to optimise the performances of the final prosthetic material.

  3. Experimental Characterization of the Jamming Transition in a Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Behringer, Robert

    2007-03-01

    We describe experiments to test recent predictions for the jamming transition in disordered solids. Here, our system is a 2D granular material consisting of photoelastic disks. By observing these particles through crossed circular polarizers, it is possible to a) accurately determine particle contacts, b) via an appropriate computational procedure, calculate the vector contact forces between particles, and c) from the contact forces compute the Cauchy stress. Simulations (e.g. by O'Hern et al., Donev et al.) for frictionless particles predict a discontinuous increase in the contact number, Z at the jamming transition, given by a critical packing fraction, φc. Above jamming, Z should then increase as a power law in φ-φc with an exponent of 0.5 to 0.6. The pressure, P is also predicted to grow as a power law. Additionally, Senkes and Chakraborty have predicted the behavior of P and Z using a meanfield entropy-based description. Our experiments support all of these predictions. There is a rapid increase in Z at φc, and power law increase of Z and P above the transition. There is also reasonable agreement between the data and the predictions of Senkens and Chakraborty.

  4. Experimental space weathering of regolith material. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, D. S.; Allen, C. C.

    1994-01-01

    Significant advances in the understanding of space weathering processes were recently reported. Submicroscopic iron blebs were produced in lunar simulant glass and natural terrestrial minerals by high-temperature reduction in controlled atmosphere furnaces. These experiments altered the samples' optical properties and microtextures so that they resembled those of extremely mature lunar soil. The results contributed to a revised model for natural reduction in the regolith. Subsequently, supporting results were obtained by reduction of lunar samples. Research to date has focused on reduction of three lunar surface components: basalt, pyroclastic glass, and mare soil. An extensive set of H reduction experiments with simulants has led to a detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and kinetics. Reduction experiments using lunar basalt were recently conducted by Carbotek. Reduced samples from these test were analyzed. Reduction experiments on lunar glass 74220 were run at temperatures of 900-1100 C. Reduction efficiency of volcanic glass proved to be a function of the sample's FeO abundance and reaction temperature. We also reduced mare soil 75061 at temperatures of 900-1050 C. Partial reduction of FeO in olivine and pyroxene occurred, but was slower and less complete than reduction of ilmenite. Our experiments on simulants and lunar samples have indicated that the most readily reduced phases in the regolith are ilmenite and glass. Based on initial tests with simulants we proposed refinements to the accepted model for space weathering of the regolith. The impact of a micrometeoroid flash heats and melts and ejects from the impact point a small volume of soil that contains trapped solar wind H and C. Reduction occurs rapidly, while the melt volume is still in motion. When a droplet encounters unmelted soil, it envelopes cold mineral grains. The melt is chilled rapidly. Our analyses of experimentally reduced lunar basalt, glass, and mare soil support the proposed

  5. Experimental study of dynamic properties of porous materials under shock-wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubareva, A. N.; Efremov, V. P.; Mochalova, V. M.; Utkin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents new experimental data on properties of porous media under shock-wave loading. We considered materials with different nature of porosity. The porosity in the silicone rubber and the epoxy resin was produced by glass microspheres filler. Open porosity was realized in a fibrous material made from glass fibers with corundum. It was shown that two-wave configuration was formed in materials with closed porosity. Such structure of the pulse with a precursor was not observed in samples with open porosity. As a result of analysis of experimental data, Hugoniots for the investigated materials were obtained.

  6. Experimental investigations and numerical simulations of notch effect in cellular plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsavina, L.; Linul, E.; Voiconi, T.; Negru, R.

    2016-04-01

    Cellular plastics are light weight structures with many applications in civil, aeronautical, automotive and mechanical engineering. Properties of cellular materials depend on the properties of the solid material, on the shape and dimensions of the cellular structure and on the relative density of the cellular material. Most of cellular plastic materials are crushing in compression and have a brittle behavior in tension. The effect of notches represents an important issue in such materials, taking into account that for packing applications for example, notches/holes should be introduced in the cellular material. This paper investigates the effect of notches in compression for three different densities 100, 145 and 300 kg/m3 polyurethane (PUR) foams. Experimental investigations were performed on rectangular blocks of 100×100×25 mm with 16, 28 and 40 mm central holes. The mechanism of damage was monitored with an IR camera FLIR A40M. Purpose of the numerical simulations was to calibrate a material model, based on compression test for un-notched specimens using the CRUSHABLE FOAM models implemented in ABAQUS SIMULIA. Then the material models were used to simulate the experimental tests on notched blocks. Good agreement was obtained for the load - displacement curves obtained experimentally and from simulation. Also the plastic deformation patterns observed experimentally by IR thermograpghy were obtained numerically using the CRUSHABLE FOAM material model.

  7. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designed to explore or develop new or unproven teaching methods or techniques. (c) For the purpose of the... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to instructional material used in a research or... RIGHTS IN RESEARCH, EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS, AND TESTING § 98.3 Access to instructional material used in...

  8. A Cross-Over Experimental Design for Testing Audiovisual Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolovitch, Harold D.; Bordeleau, Pierre

    This paper contains a description of the cross-over type of experimental design as well as a case study of its use in field testing audiovisual materials related to teaching handicapped children. Increased efficiency is an advantage of the cross-over design, while difficulty in selecting similar format audiovisual materials for field testing is a…

  9. Experimental study of the thermal stability of materials in high temperature oxygen-containing media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abaltusov, Y. Y.; Bagramyan, A. R.; Grishin, A. M.; Yukhvid, V. I.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study is made of the interaction of several materials with a high temperature medium containing oxygen. The temperature of the surface was measured as a function of time. It is found that the higher the velocity of mass removal from the surface, the more effective is the material from the viewpoint of heat resistance.

  10. Toward the Ultra-incompressible Carbon Materials. Computational Simulation and Experimental Observation.

    PubMed

    Kvashnina, Yu A; Kvashnin, A G; Popov, M Yu; Kulnitskiy, B A; Perezhogin, I A; Tyukalova, E V; Chernozatonskii, L A; Sorokin, P B; Blank, V D

    2015-06-04

    The common opinion that diamond is the stiffest material is disproved by a number of experimental studies where the fabrication of carbon materials based on polymerized fullerenes with outstanding mechanical stiffness was reported. Here we investigated the nature of this unusual effect. We present a model constituted of compressed polymerized fullerite clusters implemented in a diamond matrix with bulk modulus B0 much higher than that of diamond. The calculated B0 value depends on the sizes of both fullerite grain and diamond environment and shows close correspondence with measured data. Additionally, we provide results of experimental study of atomic structure and mechanical properties of ultrahard carbon material supported the presented model.

  11. The Course of Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smet, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Actualization is traditionally seen as the process following syntactic reanalysis whereby an item's new syntactic status manifests itself in new syntactic behavior. The process is gradual in that some new uses of the reanalyzed item appear earlier or more readily than others. This article accounts for the order in which new uses appear during…

  12. Low-cost phase change material as an energy storage medium in building envelopes: Experimental and numerical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Abhari, Ramin

    2014-10-03

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of a phase change material (PCM) in the building envelope. Numerous studies over the last two decades have reported the energy saving potential of PCMs in building envelopes, but their wide application has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel PCM made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application. The PCM-HDPE pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation and then added to an exterior wall of a test building in a hot and humid climate, and tested over a period of several months, To demonstrate the efficacy of the PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation in reducing the building envelope heat gains and losses, side-by-side comparison was performed with another wall section filled with cellulose-only insulation. Further, numerical modeling of the test wall was performed to determine the actual impact of the PCM-HDPE pellets on wall-generated heating and cooling loads and the associated electricity consumption. The model was first validated using experimental data and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. Furthermore, this article presents the experimental data and numerical analyses showing the energy-saving potential of the new PCM.

  13. Low-cost phase change material as an energy storage medium in building envelopes: Experimental and numerical analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Kaushik; Abhari, Ramin

    2014-10-03

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of a phase change material (PCM) in the building envelope. Numerous studies over the last two decades have reported the energy saving potential of PCMs in building envelopes, but their wide application has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel PCM made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application. The PCM-HDPE pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation and then added to an exterior wall of a test buildingmore » in a hot and humid climate, and tested over a period of several months, To demonstrate the efficacy of the PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation in reducing the building envelope heat gains and losses, side-by-side comparison was performed with another wall section filled with cellulose-only insulation. Further, numerical modeling of the test wall was performed to determine the actual impact of the PCM-HDPE pellets on wall-generated heating and cooling loads and the associated electricity consumption. The model was first validated using experimental data and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. Furthermore, this article presents the experimental data and numerical analyses showing the energy-saving potential of the new PCM.« less

  14. Cohesive fracture of elastically heterogeneous materials: An integrative modeling and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Neng; Xia, Shuman

    2017-01-01

    A combined modeling and experimental effort is made in this work to examine the cohesive fracture mechanisms of heterogeneous elastic solids. A two-phase laminated composite, which mimics the key microstructural features of many tough engineering and biological materials, is selected as a model material system. Theoretical and finite element analyses with cohesive zone modeling are performed to study the effective fracture resistance of the heterogeneous material associated with unstable crack propagation and arrest. A crack-tip-position controlled algorithm is implemented in the finite element analysis to overcome the inherent instability issues resulting from crack pinning and depinning at local heterogeneities. Systematic parametric studies are carried out to investigate the effects of various material and geometrical parameters, including the modulus mismatch ratio, phase volume fraction, cohesive zone size, and cohesive law shape. Concurrently, a novel stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printing system is developed and used for fabricating heterogeneous test specimens with well-controlled structural and material properties. Fracture testing of the specimens is performed using the tapered double-cantilever beam (TDCB) test method. With optimal material and geometrical parameters, heterogeneous TDCB specimens are shown to exhibit enhanced effective fracture energy and effective fracture toughness than their homogeneous counterparts, which is in good agreement with the modeling predictions. The integrative computational and experimental study presented here provides a fundamental mechanistic understanding of the fracture mechanisms in brittle heterogeneous materials and sheds light on the rational design of tough materials through patterned heterogeneities.

  15. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

    DOE PAGES

    Dingreville, Rémi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; ...

    2015-11-16

    With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends in which predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure–property relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanicsmore » community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to “simply” support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. In conclusion this manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.« less

  16. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Dingreville, Rémi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; Schmitt, Jean -Hubert

    2015-11-16

    With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends in which predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure–property relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanics community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to “simply” support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. In conclusion this manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.

  17. An Experimental Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Certain Structured Teaching Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehresman, Norman Donald

    A random sample of 20 Illinois schools offering vocational agriculture participated in a study to ascertain the relative effectiveness of structured and unstructured printed instructional materials. Half were randomly designated as experimental and the others were control groups. A unit on agricultural cooperatives was taught, and pre and post…

  18. Perspiration Poisoning of Protective Clothing Materials. Part I. Experimental Results and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    coconut shell activated carbon having an average particle diameter of 0.038 cm. Comparisons between calculated and experimental data were quite good... active charcoal . There was . no obvious change in the appearance of carbon impregnated foam material upon irradiation, however, after the 72 hours...ION ISOTHERMS ADSORPTION BREAKTHROUJGH- TIME UNDERGARMENT POISONING ACTIVATED CARBON UNDERGARMENT MODIFICATION SWEAT POISONING FOAM The objectives of

  19. Charging characteristics of materials: Comparison of experimental results with simple analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.; Stevens, N. J.; Oglebay, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A one-dimensional model for charging of samples is used in conjunction with experimental data taken to develop material charging characteristics for silvered Teflon. These characteristics are then used in a one dimensional model for charging in space to examine expected response. Relative charging rates as well as relative charging levels for silvered Teflon and metal are discussed.

  20. Material response mechanisms are needed to obtain highly accurate experimental shock wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jerry W.

    2017-01-01

    The field of shock wave compression of matter has provided a simple set of equations relating thermodynamic and kinematic parameters that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and energy across a steady plane shock wave with one-dimensional flow. Well-known condensed matter shock wave experimental results will be reviewed to see whether the assumptions required for deriving these simple R-H equations are satisfied. Note that the material compression model is not required for deriving the 1-D conservation flow equations across a steady plane shock front. However, this statement is misleading from a practical experimental viewpoint since obtaining small systematic errors in shock wave measured parameters requires the material compression and release mechanisms to be known. A review will be presented on errors in shock wave data from common experimental techniques for elastic-plastic solids. Issues related to time scales of experiments, steady waves with long rise times and detonations will also be discussed

  1. Experimental investigation of micromechanical behavior of advanced materials by moiré interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xinlin; Qin, Yuwen; Dai, Fulong

    1996-09-01

    Several typical instances show that moiré interferometry is an effective experimental method for micromechanics study of advanced materials. By using moiré interferometry, stress-induced martensitic transformation plastic zone in ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramics (Ce-TZP) is studied. The experimental results show that the stress-induced transformation at room temperature is not uniform within the transformation zone and the phenomenon of microscopic plastic flow localization for transformation is revealed. Meanwhile, the experimental investigation of the pseudoelasticity behavior of Cu-Zn-Al polycrystalline shape memory alloy and bending behavior of carbon-fiber aluminium laminates (CALL) are reported. The experiments reveal some important features of the deformation processes of the materials. Finally, the measuring ability of moiré interferometry for micromechanics study is discussed.

  2. Experimental validation of simulations of radiation shielding effectiveness of materials by MULASSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, A.; Raghavan, J.

    2016-12-01

    MULASSIS (Multilayered Shielding Simulation Software) is a GEANT4 based radiation analysis software for simulating the transport of radiating particles through a target material and has been used in predicting the radiation shielding effectiveness of homogenous and composite material shielding for satellites in Highly Elliptical Orbits (Emmanuel et al., 2014; Emmanuel and Raghavan, 2015). In order to validate the simulations of radiation shielding effectiveness by MULASSIS and latter's applicability to shield design, the radiation shielding effectiveness of three materials, Aluminum (Al), Polyethylene (PE) and Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC), was studied experimentally in proton and electron environments and compared with predictions using MULASSIS. A 70 MeV proton beam from a cyclotron source was used to measure the water equivalent thickness (tWET), a measure of thickness for complete absorption of the radiation (also known as stopping range), for the three material targets. A 10 MeV electron accelerator was used to determine the dose deposited (transmitted TID) on a detector behind the three material targets. The experimental conditions were used in MULASSIS to predict the stopping range and the transmitted TID. The simulated results compared very well with the experimental result within 7% for protons and 2-74% (lower values for shield thicknesses less than 10 mm) for electrons, validating the software and its applicability to the design of radiation shields.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Turning Parameters on AA 6061-T6 Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthiban, A.; Pugazhenthi, R.; Ravikumar, R.; Vivek, P.

    2017-03-01

    Turning is a broadly used material removal process to manufacture cylindrical products. The effects of various process parameters on turning like spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut have been investigated to Impact on Material Removal Rate (MRR) and surface roughness (Ra) by using Response Surface Methodology. Experimental plan is performed by a Box-behenken design. The main purpose of this work is to study the effect of process parameters on Aluminium alloy AA6061-T6 surface, and to develop the mathematical model for Material removal rate and surface roughness on milling process. The quadratic model is best agreement with experimental data; finally the numerical optimization technique has been used to find out best optimum milling parameters. The optimal set of process parameters has also been predicted to maximize the MRR and minimize the surface roughness.

  4. Advanced Experimental Methods for Low-temperature Magnetotransport Measurement of Novel Materials.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Joseph A; Le, Son T; Richter, Curt A; Seiler, David G

    2016-01-21

    Novel electronic materials are often produced for the first time by synthesis processes that yield bulk crystals (in contrast to single crystal thin film synthesis) for the purpose of exploratory materials research. Certain materials pose a challenge wherein the traditional bulk Hall bar device fabrication method is insufficient to produce a measureable device for sample transport measurement, principally because the single crystal size is too small to attach wire leads to the sample in a Hall bar configuration. This can be, for example, because the first batch of a new material synthesized yields very small single crystals or because flakes of samples of one to very few monolayers are desired. In order to enable rapid characterization of materials that may be carried out in parallel with improvements to their growth methodology, a method of device fabrication for very small samples has been devised to permit the characterization of novel materials as soon as a preliminary batch has been produced. A slight variation of this methodology is applicable to producing devices using exfoliated samples of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), as well as multilayer heterostructures of such materials. Here we present detailed protocols for the experimental device fabrication of fragments and flakes of novel materials with micron-sized dimensions onto substrate and subsequent measurement in a commercial superconducting magnet, dry helium close-cycle cryostat magnetotransport system at temperatures down to 0.300 K and magnetic fields up to 12 T.

  5. Closed source experimental system for soft x-ray spectroscopy of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Modin, A.; Butorin, S. M.; Vegelius, J.; Olsson, A.; Englund, C.-J.; Andersson, J.; Werme, L.; Nordgren, J.; Kaeaembre, T.; Skarnemark, G.; Burakov, B. E.

    2008-09-15

    An instrumental and experimental setup for soft x-ray spectroscopy meeting the requirements of a closed source for radioactivity is described. The system consists of a vacuum sealed cell containing the sample, mounted on a tubing system to ensure compatibility with most standard manipulators. The soft x rays penetrate a thin x-ray window separating the interior of the cell from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Our first results for single crystal PuO{sub 2} confirm the feasibility of experiments using the setup. The results are consistent with results of first principles calculations and previously recorded spectra obtained using a standard open source setup. The results show that the closed source experimental system can be used to collect valuable experimental data from radioactive materials.

  6. The Influence of Root-End Filling Materials on Bone Healing – An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    KUI, ANDREEA GULIE; BERAR, ANTONELA; LASCU, LIANA; BOLFA, POMPEI; BOSCA, BIANCA; MIHU, CARMEN; BACIUT, MIHAELA; AVRAM, RAMONA; BADEA, MÂNDRA

    2014-01-01

    Aims. The aim of this experimental study is to assess the bone healing phenomenon produced in the presence of several dental materials: a polycarboxylate cement, a glass-ionomer cement, a composite resin and MTA (mineral trioxide aggregate) based cement. Methods. The biocompatibility of four root-end fillings materials, used in periapical surgery was investigated after intra-osseous implantation of the materials in rats’ calvaria. Tissue reaction was studied at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks after implantation. We took into consideration the presence of inflammatory cells (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, plasma cells, lymphocytes and giant cells) and classified the aspects of the histological samples according to the following scale: 0 - no inflammation, 1 – mild, isolated inflammation, 2 - moderate, localized inflammatory reaction, 3 - severe, diffuse and intense inflammatory reaction. Results. The inflammatory reaction was present at the six intervals for all the tested materials, but at 12 week interval, the reaction was minimal in all cases. Also, a dissolution reaction was observed for all the materials, less intense for glass-ionomer cement and polycarboxilate cement. Conclusions. At the end of the experimental period, glass-ionomer cement and polycarboxilate cement suffered a lesser dissolution reaction as compared to the second group of tested materials. PMID:26528034

  7. Basic evaluation on physical properties of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Yuta; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Akiba, Norihisa; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Matsushita, Nariko; Hishimoto, Munemitsu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the properties required for the clinical application of soft lining materials containing a fluorinated monomer versus that of conventional materials in an effort to develop a new soft lining material with long-term stable viscoelastic properties. Four soft lining materials were examined. Two experimental materials containing dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (SR12F) or tridecafluorooctyl methacrylate (SR13F) were prepared. Two commercial soft lining materials, one acrylic-based and one silicone rubber-based, were selected as reference materials. Shore A hardness, viscoelastic properties, water sorption, solubility, and staining resistance were evaluated. The Shore A hardness and the displacements were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD test. The water sorption, the solubility and the color change were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. The significance level was set at 0.05. SR12F and SR13F showed greater viscous flow, low water sorption, low solubility, and good staining resistance compared to the commercial products. The results indicate that the soft lining materials containing fluorinated monomers might have a potentially long-term stable viscoelastic behavior.

  8. Experimental study of relationship between interfacial electroadhesive force and applied voltage for different substrate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Bamber, T.; Petzing, J.; Justham, L.; Jackson, M.

    2017-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the relationship between the interfacial electroadhesive force and applied voltage up to 20 kV has been presented. Normal electroadhesive forces have been obtained between a double-electrode electroadhesive pad and three optically flat and different substrate materials: glass, acrylic, and polycarbonate. The results have shown that not all substrate materials are good for the generation of electroadhesive forces. Only 15.7 Pa has been obtained between the pad and the polycarbonate substrate under 20 kV, whereas 46.3 Pa and 123.4 Pa have been obtained on the acrylic and glass substrate, respectively. Based on the experimental data, empirical models, with an adjusted R-square value above 0.995 in all cases, have been obtained for the three substrates. However, it has not been possible to develop a general empirical model which is suitable for all substrates. This further indicates the need for a large quantity of experimental data to obtain robust empirical models for different substrate materials in order to reliably use electroadhesive technologies for material handling applications.

  9. Experimental study of low amplitude, long-duration mechanical loading of reactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2000-10-03

    Studies of the low amplitude, long-duration mechanical loading of reactive materials rely very heavily on the experimental data in general and in particular on the data obtained from gauges placed within the experimental test sample to measure accurately the local changes of parameters of the investigated material. For a complete description of these changes taking place in a dynamically loaded material one would like to know both the spatial and the temporal resolution of pressure, temperature, volume, wave and mass velocity. However, temperature and volume are not easily attainable. Therefore, most of the in-situ work is limited to measurements of pressure and both wave and mass velocities. Various types of these gauges will be discussed and their records will be illustrated. Some of these gauges have limitations but are better suited for particular applications than others. These aspects will also be discussed. Main limitation of most in-situ gauges is that they are built for one-dimensional application. However, some work is being done to develop two-dimensional gauges. This work will also be briefly discussed. While these experiments are necessary to validate theoretical models of the phenomenon, they can also provide sufficient amount of data to yield complete information on material characteristics such as its equation of state (EOS), its phase change under certain loads and its sensitivity to shock loading. Processing of these data to get important information on the behavior of both reactive and non-reactive materials will also be demonstrated.

  10. Charging characteristics of materials: Comparison of experimental results with simple analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.; Stevens, N. J.; Oglebay, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    An understanding of the behavior of materials, of dielectrics in particular, under charged particle bombardment is essential to the prediction and prevention of the adverse effects of spacecraft charging. A one-dimensional model for charging of samples in a test facility was used in conjunction with experimental data taken to develop "material charging characteristics" for silvered Teflon. These characteristics were then used in a one-dimensional model for charging in space to examine expected response. Relative charging rates as well as relative charging levels for silvered Teflon and metal are discussed.

  11. Experimental study on structural health monitoring of RC columns using self-diagnosis materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Hiroshi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Kumagai, Hitoshi

    2004-07-01

    The authors have been continuously conducting a series of research works on the development of the fiber reinforced composites as self-diagnosis materials. The function to detect damage is based on the property of carbon materials as a conductor of electricity. The conductive fiber reinforced composite, which is the glass fiber reinforced plastics added carbon particles for electrical conductivity, has been confirmed to possess excellent sensitivity as a self-diagnosis materials. In this study, a self-diagnosis material with the ability to memorize damage history has been applied. Irreversible resistance changes dependent on the strain histories of the composites were utilized to achieve this ability. The authors have also developed an electrically conductive film sensor bonded on the concrete surface to detect cracks and measure crack width. The specimens of the reinforced concrete bridge pier columns were tested under quasi-static cyclic lateral loading. The performance of the proposed self-diagnosis materials to detect damage to concrete structures is evaluated through confirmation of the relationship between the extent of damage and the variation of electrical conductivity of self-diagnosis materials. On the basis of the obtained experimental results, the applicability of self-diagnosis materials to structural health monitoring for concrete structures are discussed in detail, and the practical monitoring techniques for structures are proposed.

  12. Experimental data showing the thermal behavior of a flat roof with phase change material.

    PubMed

    Tokuç, Ayça; Başaran, Tahsin; Yesügey, S Cengiz

    2015-12-01

    The selection and configuration of building materials for optimal energy efficiency in a building require some assumptions and models for the thermal behavior of the utilized materials. Although the models for many materials can be considered acceptable for simulation and calculation purposes, the work for modeling the real time behavior of phase change materials is still under development. The data given in this article shows the thermal behavior of a flat roof element with a phase change material (PCM) layer. The temperature and energy given to and taken from the building element are reported. In addition the solid-liquid behavior of the PCM is tracked through images. The resulting thermal behavior of the phase change material is discussed and simulated in [1] A. Tokuç, T. Başaran, S.C. Yesügey, An experimental and numerical investigation on the use of phase change materials in building elements: the case of a flat roof in Istanbul, Build. Energy, vol. 102, 2015, pp. 91-104.

  13. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. We illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound \\text{FeSi} over a wide range of temperature. Results agree well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.

  14. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; ...

    2016-07-20

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. In this study, we illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound FeSi over a wide range of temperature. Our results agreemore » well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.« less

  15. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier A.

    2016-07-20

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. In this study, we illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound FeSi over a wide range of temperature. Our results agree well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.

  16. Synthesis of designed materials by laser-based direct metal deposition technique: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huan

    Direct metal deposition (DMD), a laser-cladding based solid freeform fabrication technique, is capable of depositing multiple materials at desired composition which makes this technique a flexible method to fabricate heterogeneous components or functionally-graded structures. The inherently rapid cooling rate associated with the laser cladding process enables extended solid solubility in nonequilibrium phases, offering the possibility of tailoring new materials with advanced properties. This technical advantage opens the area of synthesizing a new class of materials designed by topology optimization method which have performance-based material properties. For better understanding of the fundamental phenomena occurring in multi-material laser cladding with coaxial powder injection, a self-consistent 3-D transient model was developed. Physical phenomena including laser-powder interaction, heat transfer, melting, solidification, mass addition, liquid metal flow, and species transportation were modeled and solved with a controlled-volume finite difference method. Level-set method was used to track the evolution of liquid free surface. The distribution of species concentration in cladding layer was obtained using a nonequilibrium partition coefficient model. Simulation results were compared with experimental observations and found to be reasonably matched. Multi-phase material microstructures which have negative coefficients of thermal expansion were studied for their DMD manufacturability. The pixel-based topology-optimal designs are boundary-smoothed by Bezier functions to facilitate toolpath design. It is found that the inevitable diffusion interface between different material-phases degrades the negative thermal expansion property of the whole microstructure. A new design method is proposed for DMD manufacturing. Experimental approaches include identification of laser beam characteristics during different laser-powder-substrate interaction conditions, an

  17. Positron range in tissue-equivalent materials: experimental microPET studies.

    PubMed

    Alva-Sánchez, H; Quintana-Bautista, C; Martínez-Dávalos, A; Ávila-Rodríguez, M A; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M

    2016-09-07

    In this work an experimental investigation was carried out to study the effect that positron range has over positron emission tomography (PET) scans through measurements of the line spread function (LSF) in tissue-equivalent materials. Line-sources consisted of thin capillary tubes filled with (18)F, (13)N or (68)Ga water-solution inserted along the axis of symmetry of cylindrical phantoms constructed with the tissue-equivalent materials: lung (inhale and exhale), adipose tissue, solid water, trabecular and cortical bone. PET scans were performed with a commercial small-animal PET scanner and image reconstruction was carried out with filtered-backprojection. Line-source distributions were analyzed using radial profiles taken on axial slices from which the spatial resolution was determined through the full-width at half-maximum, tenth-maximum, twentieth-maximum and fiftieth-maximum. A double-Gaussian model of the LSFs was used to fit experimental data which can be incorporated into iterative reconstruction methods. In addition, the maximum activity concentration in the line-sources was determined from reconstructed images and compared to the known values for each case. The experimental data indicates that positron range in different materials has a strong effect on both spatial resolution and activity concentration quantification in PET scans. Consequently, extra care should be taken when computing standard-uptake values in PET scans, in particular when the radiopharmaceutical is taken up by different tissues in the body, and more even so with high-energy positron emitters.

  18. Optimal experimental designs for the estimation of thermal properties of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.; Moncman, Deborah A.

    1994-01-01

    Reliable estimation of thermal properties is extremely important in the utilization of new advanced materials, such as composite materials. The accuracy of these estimates can be increased if the experiments are designed carefully. The objectives of this study are to design optimal experiments to be used in the prediction of these thermal properties and to then utilize these designs in the development of an estimation procedure to determine the effective thermal properties (thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity). The experiments were optimized by choosing experimental parameters that maximize the temperature derivatives with respect to all of the unknown thermal properties. This procedure has the effect of minimizing the confidence intervals of the resulting thermal property estimates. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional experimental designs were optimized. A heat flux boundary condition is required in both analyses for the simultaneous estimation of the thermal properties. For the one-dimensional experiment, the parameters optimized were the heating time of the applied heat flux, the temperature sensor location, and the experimental time. In addition to these parameters, the optimal location of the heat flux was also determined for the two-dimensional experiments. Utilizing the optimal one-dimensional experiment, the effective thermal conductivity perpendicular to the fibers and the effective volumetric heat capacity were then estimated for an IM7-Bismaleimide composite material. The estimation procedure used is based on the minimization of a least squares function which incorporates both calculated and measured temperatures and allows for the parameters to be estimated simultaneously.

  19. Positron range in tissue-equivalent materials: experimental microPET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, H.; Quintana-Bautista, C.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work an experimental investigation was carried out to study the effect that positron range has over positron emission tomography (PET) scans through measurements of the line spread function (LSF) in tissue-equivalent materials. Line-sources consisted of thin capillary tubes filled with 18F, 13N or 68Ga water-solution inserted along the axis of symmetry of cylindrical phantoms constructed with the tissue-equivalent materials: lung (inhale and exhale), adipose tissue, solid water, trabecular and cortical bone. PET scans were performed with a commercial small-animal PET scanner and image reconstruction was carried out with filtered-backprojection. Line-source distributions were analyzed using radial profiles taken on axial slices from which the spatial resolution was determined through the full-width at half-maximum, tenth-maximum, twentieth-maximum and fiftieth-maximum. A double-Gaussian model of the LSFs was used to fit experimental data which can be incorporated into iterative reconstruction methods. In addition, the maximum activity concentration in the line-sources was determined from reconstructed images and compared to the known values for each case. The experimental data indicates that positron range in different materials has a strong effect on both spatial resolution and activity concentration quantification in PET scans. Consequently, extra care should be taken when computing standard-uptake values in PET scans, in particular when the radiopharmaceutical is taken up by different tissues in the body, and more even so with high-energy positron emitters.

  20. Theoretical-Experimental Method for Evaluating the Elastic and Damping Characteristics of Soft Materials Based on Studying the Resonance Flexural Vibrations of Test Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Firsov, V. A.; Gyunal, I.; Shishkin, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    A hardware and software system for studying the damping and elastic properties of soft materials in a low-frequency range of deformation up to 100 Hz, which most fully corresponds to the range of dynamic actions in actual service conditions of structures, is proposed. A novel identification method for evaluating the elastic and damping properties of soft materials in shear is developed. It employs the frequency and amplitude characteristics of the resonance flexural vibrations of three-layer test specimens with a soft inner layer. Identification of the elastic shear properties is based on a comparison of calculated and experimental frequencies of resonance vibrations of test specimens. To evaluate the shear damping properties of soft materials, the condition of minimum of an objective function containing experimental and calculated amplitudes of vibrations of the free end of a test specimen is used. The possibility of evaluating the properties mentioned from the experimental and calculated internal damping parameters of test specimens, which significantly reduces the laboriousness of the problem considered, is shown. Numerical calculations are carried out for identifying the elastic and damping characteristics of a technical rubber in shear based on an analysis of resonance flexural vibrations of seven test specimens with outer layers made of a D16AT aluminum alloy.

  1. Experimental study of nonlinear ultrasonic behavior of soil materials during the compaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Hao; Yao, Yangping

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear ultrasonic behavior of unconsolidated granular medium - soil during the compaction is experimentally studied. The second harmonic generation technique is adopted to investigate the change of microstructural void in materials during the compaction process of loose soils. The nonlinear parameter is measured with the change of two important environmental factors i.e. moisture content and impact energy of compaction. It is found the nonlinear parameter of soil material presents a similar variation pattern with the void ratio of soil samples, corresponding to the increased moisture content and impact energy. A same optimum moisture content is found by observing the variation of nonlinear parameter and void ratio with respect to moisture content. The results indicate that the unconsolidated soil is manipulated by a strong material nonlinearity during the compaction procedure. The developed experimental technique based on the second harmonic generation could be a fast and convenient testing method for the determination of optimum moisture content of soil materials, which is very useful for the better compaction effect of filled embankment for civil infrastructures in-situ.

  2. A hybrid numerical-experimental method for determination of dynamic fracture properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihradi, S.; Putra, I. S.; Dirgantara, T.; Widagdo, D.; Truong, L. X.

    2010-03-01

    A novel hybrid numerical-experimental method to obtain dynamic fracture properties of materials has been developed in the present work. Specimens were tested with one-point bending configuration in the Hopkinson's bar apparatus, from which the impact loading profiles were measured. In this dynamic fracture experiment, the crack tip position was measured by two strips of special strain gage having five gages arranged in one strip. Since the strain gage record only gave strain signal of each gage as a function of time, a novel method is proposed to determine the time at which the crack tip passed each strain gage and the time when the crack finally stopped. From the data of crack tip position as a function of time, the crack speed then can be calculated. These data, i.e. the loading profile and the crack speed, were then used as the input of the Node-Based FEM program developed for dynamic fractures problems. With the proposed method, three dynamic fracture properties of materials i.e dynamic fracture toughness for crack initiation (KIcd), fracture toughness for crack propagation (KID), and crack arrest toughness (KIa) can simultaneously be obtained. The results obtained from the investigation of dynamic fracture properties of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) material by the present method are well compared with the ones in the literature and from the direct experimental measurement. The good agreement suggests that the hybrid method developed in the present work can be used reliably to determine the dynamic fracture properties of materials.

  3. A hybrid numerical-experimental method for determination of dynamic fracture properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihradi, S.; Putra, I. S.; Dirgantara, T.; Widagdo, D.; Truong, L. X.

    2009-12-01

    A novel hybrid numerical-experimental method to obtain dynamic fracture properties of materials has been developed in the present work. Specimens were tested with one-point bending configuration in the Hopkinson's bar apparatus, from which the impact loading profiles were measured. In this dynamic fracture experiment, the crack tip position was measured by two strips of special strain gage having five gages arranged in one strip. Since the strain gage record only gave strain signal of each gage as a function of time, a novel method is proposed to determine the time at which the crack tip passed each strain gage and the time when the crack finally stopped. From the data of crack tip position as a function of time, the crack speed then can be calculated. These data, i.e. the loading profile and the crack speed, were then used as the input of the Node-Based FEM program developed for dynamic fractures problems. With the proposed method, three dynamic fracture properties of materials i.e dynamic fracture toughness for crack initiation (KIcd), fracture toughness for crack propagation (KID), and crack arrest toughness (KIa) can simultaneously be obtained. The results obtained from the investigation of dynamic fracture properties of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) material by the present method are well compared with the ones in the literature and from the direct experimental measurement. The good agreement suggests that the hybrid method developed in the present work can be used reliably to determine the dynamic fracture properties of materials.

  4. Experimental study of damping of graphite epoxy composite material of the Space Telescope truss system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. D.; Crocker, M. J.; Guest, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The truss system of the Hubble Space Telescope is made of graphite epoxy tubes and beams that have very low material damping. This paper describes a systematic experimental evaluation of the damping capacity of the graphite epoxy material used in the telescope truss system. The damping capacity of the composite material was measured both under normal and elevated temperatures in atmospheric conditions and in vacuum. Both free decay and steady state methods were used to measure the damping ratio of different specimens under different boundary conditions. A method that involves an iterative least-squares curve-fitting technique for the measured frequency response data has been developed to improve the accuracy of the damping ratio estimation. A unique experimental setup was developed to measure the damping of the material in a vacuum chamber. It was found that outgassing (moisture desorption) has little effect on the damping of the specimen. On the other hand, it was observed that temperature has a significant effect on both the damping and resonance frequencies of the specimen.

  5. Experimental study on impact-initiated characters of multifunctional energetic structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. F.; Shi, A. S.; Qiao, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y. G.; Guan, Z. W.

    2013-02-01

    Multifunctional energetic structural materials (MESMs) are a new class of energetic materials, which release energy due to exothermic chemical reactions initiated under shock loading conditions. In order to analyze the impact-initiated process of MESMs, a quasi-sealed test chamber, which was originally developed by Ames ["Vented chamber calorimetry for impact-initiated energetic materials," in AIAA (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2005), p. 279], is used to study on shock-induced chemical reaction characters at various impact velocities. The impact initiated experiments are involving two typical MESMs, Al/PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), W/Zr and inert 2024 Al fragment. The video frames recorded from reactive and inert material impact events have shown the process of late-time after burn phenomena. The total pressure and shock wave reflection at the wall of the test chamber are measured using high frequency gauges. The quasi-pressures inside the test chamber, which is fitting from the total pressure curves, are used to determine the impact initiated reaction efficiencies of MESMs at different impact velocities. A thermochemical model for shock-induced reactions, in which the reaction efficiency is considered, is validated against the experimental data from impact initiation. The results show that the impact velocity plays a significant role in chemical reaction and the energy release characteristics of MESMs. The theoretical calculations correlate reasonably well to the corresponding experimental results, which can be used to predict the reaction results of MESMs over a wide range of pressure satisfactorily.

  6. Standardization of the carbon-phenolic materials and processes. Vol. 1: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, William B.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon-phenolic composite materials are used as ablative material in the solid rocket motor nozzle of the Space Shuttle. The nozzle is lined with carbon cloth-phenolic resin composites. The nominal effects of the completely consumed solid propellant on the carbon-phenolic material are given. The extreme heat and erosion of the burning propellant are controlled by the carbon-phenolic composite by ablation, the heat and mass transfer process in which a large amount of heat is absorbed by sacrificially removing material from the nozzle surface. Phenolic materials ablate with the initial formation of a char. The depth of the char is a function of the heat conduction coefficient of the composite. The char layer is a very poor heat conductor so it protects the underlying phenolic composite from the high heat of the burning propellant. The nozzle component ablative liners (carbon cloth-phenolic composites) are tape wrapped, hydroclave and/or autoclave cured, machined, and assembled. The tape consists of a prepreg broadcloth. The materials flow sheet for the nozzle ablative liners is shown. The prepreg is a three component system: phenolic resin, carbon cloth, and carbon filler. This is Volume 1 of two, Experimental Studies.

  7. Experimental study on the initiation and energy release behavior of polymer bonded explosive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Cai, Xuanming; Ye, Nan; Gao, Yubo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an initially sealed vented test chamber and a test projectile with polymer bonded explosive materials were designed to complete the experiments. As the initiation takes place on the interior, great amounts of thermo-chemical energy gases were vented through a hole formed by the penetration process. The gas pressure inside the chamber was used to evaluate the energy release behavior of polymer bonded explosive materials. The experimental results reveal that the impact velocity is significant to the energy release behavior, and in some extent the gas pressure improves with the velocity of the projectile. And the critical initiation velocity and the velocity as the polymer bonded explosive materials reached the maximum reactive efficiency were obtained.

  8. Negative refraction and energy funneling by hyperbolic materials: an experimental demonstration in acoustics.

    PubMed

    García-Chocano, Victor M; Christensen, Johan; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-04-11

    This Letter reports the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of hyperbolic materials showing negative refraction and energy funneling of airborne sound. Negative refraction is demonstrated using a stack of five holey Plexiglas plates where their thicknesses, layer separation, hole diameters, and lattice periodicity have been determined to show hyperbolic dispersion around 40 kHz. The resulting hyperbolic material shows a flat band profile in the equifrequency contour allowing the gathering of acoustic energy in a broad range of incident angles and its funneling through the material. Our demonstrations foresee interesting developments based on both phenomena. Acoustic imaging with subwavelength resolution and spot-size converters that harvest and squeeze sound waves irradiating from many directions into a collimated beam are just two possible applications among many.

  9. New method of the polymeric material properties experimental investigation under powerful energy flux impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, B. A.; Efremov, V. P.; Kalinin, Yu G.; Kazakov, E. D.; Metelkin, S. Yu; Petrov, V. A.; Potapenko, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    Investigation of the polymeric material properties under powerfull energy flux impact is relevant as for basic research (mathematical modeling of polymeric materials behavior in extreme conditions, testing the state equations), as for practical applications (for testing of protective coatings for space research and laboratory facilities). This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the interaction of polymeric materials with a relativistic electron beam produced by a high-current electron accelerator Calamary. Calamary facility provides a wide range of electron beam parameters: diameter 10-15 mm, the voltage on the diode up to 300 kV, the current through the diode up to 30 kA. New method of beam-target interaction area measurement was developed. The original method for the mechanical kick impulse measuring based on piezoelectric vibration sensor was presented. The dependence of the kick impulse from the power flux was obtained.

  10. Mechanical Behaviour of Conventional Materials at Experimental Conditions of Deep Drawing Technological Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, N.; Pashkouleva, D.; Kavardzhikov, V.

    2012-09-01

    The paper deals with experimental investigations on the mechanical behaviour of body-centred-cubic (BCC) and face-centred-cubic (FCC)-conventionally structured sheet metalic-metalic materials under stress-strain conditions of a deep drawing process determined by a coefficient close to the limiting one for Steel 08 and punch diameter of 50 mm. The mechanical characteristics of the investigated materials are identified by one-dimensional tension tests. The materials' responses, as results of identical loading conditions, are described by the change of blank sizes and characteristics of the forming processes. The chosen deformation path ensures obtaining a qualitative steel piece and leads to failures of aluminium and brass blanks. The reported results could be useful for investigations and predictions of the mechanical responses of such type metallic structures applying microscopic instrumented observations and numerical simulations.

  11. An experimental study on stress-strain behavior and constitutive model of hardfill material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Du, Bin; Yao, Yuancheng; He, Xianfeng

    2011-11-01

    Hardfill is a new type of artificially cemented material for dam construction works, with a wide application prospect. Its mechanical behavior lies between concrete and rockfill materials. A series of large-scale triaxial tests are performed on hardfill specimens at different ages, and the stress-strain behavior of hardfill is further discussed. The strength and stress-strain relationship of hardfill materials show both frictional mechanism and cohesive mechanism. An age-related constitutive model of hardfill is developed, which is a parallel model consisting of two components, rockfill component and cementation component. Moreover, a comparison is made between the simulated and the experimental results, which shows that the parallel model can reflect the mechanical characteristics of both rockfill-like nonlinearity and concrete-like age relativity. In addition, a simplified method for the determination of parameters is proposed.

  12. A new experimental material for modeling relief dynamics and interactions between tectonics and surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graveleau, F.; Hurtrez, J.-E.; Dominguez, S.; Malavieille, J.

    2011-12-01

    We developed a new granular material (MatIV) to study experimentally landscape evolution in active mountain belt piedmonts. Its composition and related physical properties have been determined using empirical criteria derived from the scaling of deformation, erosion-transport and sedimentation natural processes. MatIV is a water-saturated composite material made up with 4 granular components (silica powder, glass microbeads, plastic powder and graphite) whose physical, mechanical and erosion-related properties were measured with different laboratory tests. Mechanical measurements were made on a modified Hubbert-type direct shear apparatus. Erosion-related properties were determined using an experimental set-up that allows quantifying the erosion/sedimentation budget from tilted relaxation topographies. For MatIV, we also investigated the evolution of mean erosion rates and stream power erosion law exponents in 1D as a function of slope. Our results indicate that MatIV satisfies most of the defined criteria. It deforms brittlely according to the linear Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion and localizes deformation along discrete faults. Its erosion pattern is characterized by realistic hillslope and channelized processes (slope diffusion, mass wasting, channel incision). During transport, eroded particles are sorted depending on their density and shape, which results in stratified alluvial deposits displaying lateral facies variations. To evaluate the degree of similitude between model and nature, we used a new experimental device that combines accretionary wedge deformation mechanisms and surface runoff erosion processes. Results indicate that MatIV succeeded in producing detailed morphological and sedimentological features (drainage basin, channel network, terrace, syntectonic alluvial fan). Geometric, kinematic and dynamic similarity criteria have been investigated to compare precisely model to nature. Although scaling is incomplete, it yields particularly informative

  13. Combined experimental and numerical approach for identification of dynamic material model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirs, J.; Verleysen, P.; van Paepegem, W.; Degrieck, J.

    2010-06-01

    Extraction of the material stress-strain curve from a dynamic tensile or shear experiment is not straightforward. Indeed, stress and strain are not homogeneously distributed in the specimen, and consequently no one-one relation exists between the measured elongation and strain on one hand, and the measured force and stress on the other hand. This work aims at improving the accuracy of the stress-strain curves calculated from high strain rate experiments and the modelling of the material behaviour. Therefore numerical simulations are used to determine the relationship between the average stress-strain and local effective stress-strain. The material model parameters used in these simulations are improved during an iterative procedure which combines the experimental results and the simulated stress and strain distribution. Stress triaxiality, local temperature and strain rate are taken into account. The method is applied to dynamic tensile and shear experiments on a Ti6Al4V alloy carried out on a split Hopkinson bar set up. The Johnson-Cook model is used to describe the strain rate and temperature dependent material behaviour. The two types of tests are used separately or simultaneously to extract and model the material behaviour. It is found that using tensile and shear experiments simultaneously has clear advantages. The same approach is used to identify parameters for the Johnson-Cook damage initiation criteria.

  14. Plant growth response in experimental soilless mixes prepared from coal combustion products and organic waste materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardhan, S.; Watson, M.; Dick, W.A.

    2008-07-15

    Large quantities of organic materials such as animal manures, yard trimmings, and biosolids are produced each year. Beneficial use options for them are often limited, and composting has been proposed as a way to better manage these organic materials. Similarly, burning of coal created 125 million tons of coal combustion products (CCP) in the United States in 2006. An estimated 53 million tons of CCP were reused, whereas the remainder was deposited in landfills. By combining CCP and composted organic materials (COM), we were able to create soilless plant growth mixes with physicochemical conditions that can support excellent plant growth. An additional benefit is the conservation of natural raw materials, such as peat, which is generally used for making soilless mixes. Experimental mixes were formulated by combining CCP and COM at ratios ranging from 2:8 to 8:2 (vol/vol), respectively. Water content at saturation for the created mixes was 63% to 72%, whereas for the commercial control, it was 77%. pH values for the best performing mixes ranged between 5.9 and 6.8. Electrical conductivity and concentrations of required plant nutrient were also within plant growth recommendations for container media. Significantly (P < 0.0001) higher plant biomass growth (7%-130%) was observed in the experimental mixes compared with a commercial mix. No additional fertilizers were provided during the experiment, and reduced fertilization costs can thus accrue as an added benefit to the grower. In summary, combining CCP and COM, derived from source materials often viewed as wastes, can create highly productive plant growth mixes.

  15. Hybrid hierarchical bio-based materials: Development and characterization through experimentation and computational simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Mahmoodul

    Environmentally friendly bio-based composites with improved properties can be obtained by harnessing the synergy offered by hybrid constituents such as multiscale (nano- and micro-scale) reinforcement in bio-based resins composed of blends of synthetic and natural resins. Bio-based composites have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental appeal and their potential to compete with synthetic composites. The advantage of multiscale reinforcement is that it offers synergy at various length scales, and when combined with bio-based resins provide stiffness-toughness balance, improved thermal and barrier properties, and increased environmental appeal to the resulting composites. Moreover, these hybrid materials are tailorable in performance and in environmental impact. While the use of different concepts of multiscale reinforcement has been studied for synthetic composites, the study of mukiphase/multiscale reinforcements for developing new types of sustainable materials is limited. The research summarized in this dissertation focused on development of multiscale reinforced bio-based composites and the effort to understand and exploit the synergy of its constituents through experimental characterization and computational simulations. Bio-based composites consisting of petroleum-based resin (unsaturated polyester), natural or bio-resin (epoxidized soybean and linseed oils), natural fibers (industrial hemp), and nanosilicate (nanoclay) inclusions were developed. The work followed the "materials by Mahmoodul Haq design" philosophy by incorporating an integrated experimental and computational approach to strategically explore the design possibilities and limits. Experiments demonstrated that the drawbacks of bio-resin addition, which lowers stiffness, strength and increases permeability, can be counter-balanced through nanoclay reinforcement. Bio-resin addition yields benefits in impact strength and ductility. Conversely, nanoclay enhances stiffness

  16. Experimental validation of systematically designed acoustic hyperbolic meta material slab exhibiting negative refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Rasmus E.; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-09-01

    This Letter reports on the experimental validation of a two-dimensional acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial slab optimized to exhibit negative refractive behavior. The slab was designed using a topology optimization based systematic design method allowing for tailoring the refractive behavior. The experimental results confirm the predicted refractive capability as well as the predicted transmission at an interface. The study simultaneously provides an estimate of the attenuation inside the slab stemming from the boundary layer effects—insight which can be utilized in the further design of the metamaterial slabs. The capability of tailoring the refractive behavior opens possibilities for different applications. For instance, a slab exhibiting zero refraction across a wide angular range is capable of funneling acoustic energy through it, while a material exhibiting the negative refractive behavior across a wide angular range provides lensing and collimating capabilities.

  17. Experimental Artifacts for Morphological Tweaking of Chemical Sensor Materials: Studies on ZnO

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Ikram Ul; Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    2012-01-01

    Sensing mechanisms of gases on solid structures are predominantly surface-dominated. Benign surface features in terms of small grain size, high aspect ratio, large surface area and open and connected porosity, are required to realize a successful sensor material. Such morphological artifacts are a function of the fabrication and processing techniques employed. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of monoshaped and monosized zinc oxide (ZnO) particles by a homogeneous precipitation method, using urea and/or hexmethyltetraamine as the reductant. The effect of operating conditions and experimental variables, such as the relative concentration of the precursors, temperature, and the aging time on the morphology of the resulting particles was studied systematically. These experimental parameters were optimized in order to achieve particles of uniform morphology and of narrow size distribution. Some of these particles were employed for the detection of ammonia gas at room temperature. PMID:22969399

  18. Experimental observations of root growth in a controlled photoelastic granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Serge; Bares, Jonathan; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Fourcaud, Thierry

    The mechanism of root growth in soil is a key issue to understand both how to improve plant development and how to stabilize grounds. However, no experimental studies have been carried out to directly observe root development and surrounding stress while imposing specific grain configurations or mechanical loading. We present a novel set-up which permits to observe the development of chickpea root networks in a 2D granular material made of bidisperse photoelastic discs while imposing the position of the grains, the intergranular spacing and the nature of the system confinement: (i) open cell, (ii) confined cell (iii) sheared cell. In the experimental apparatus several root development cells are treated in parallel to increase the statistical meaning of the observations. Evolution of the root network is followed as well as position and pressure inside each disc by mean of a camera and classical photoelastic techniques. Preliminary results will be presented.

  19. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study. Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibeault, Sheila A.; Fay, Catharine C.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Earle, Kevin D.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kang, Jin Ho; Park, Cheol; McMullen, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    The key objectives of this study are to investigate, both computationally and experimentally, which forms, compositions, and layerings of hydrogen, boron, and nitrogen containing materials will offer the greatest shielding in the most structurally robust combination against galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), secondary neutrons, and solar energetic particles (SEP). The objectives and expected significance of this research are to develop a space radiation shielding materials system that has high efficacy for shielding radiation and that also has high strength for load bearing primary structures. Such a materials system does not yet exist. The boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) can theoretically be processed into structural BNNT and used for load bearing structures. Furthermore, the BNNT can be incorporated into high hydrogen polymers and the combination used as matrix reinforcement for structural composites. BNNT's molecular structure is attractive for hydrogen storage and hydrogenation. There are two methods or techniques for introducing hydrogen into BNNT: (1) hydrogen storage in BNNT, and (2) hydrogenation of BNNT (hydrogenated BNNT). In the hydrogen storage method, nanotubes are favored to store hydrogen over particles and sheets because they have much larger surface areas and higher hydrogen binding energy. The carbon nanotube (CNT) and BNNT have been studied as potentially outstanding hydrogen storage materials since 1997. Our study of hydrogen storage in BNNT - as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrogen gas concentration - will be performed with a hydrogen storage chamber equipped with a hydrogen generator. The second method of introducing hydrogen into BNNT is hydrogenation of BNNT, where hydrogen is covalently bonded onto boron, nitrogen, or both. Hydrogenation of BN and BNNT has been studied theoretically. Hyper-hydrogenated BNNT has been theoretically predicted with hydrogen coverage up to 100% of the individual atoms. This is a higher hydrogen content

  20. Experimental observation of a hydrodynamic mode in a flow duct with a porous material.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, Yves; Singh, Deepesh Kumar

    2014-08-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of a homogeneous porous material with a rigid frame (metallic foam) under grazing flow. The transmission coefficient shows an unusual oscillation over a particular range of frequencies which reports the presence of an unstable hydrodynamic wave that can exchange energy with the acoustic waves. This coupling of acoustic and hydrodynamic waves becomes larger when the Mach number increases. A rise of the static pressure drop in the lined region is induced by an acoustic excitation when the hydrodynamic wave is present.

  1. Highly porous thermal protection materials: Modelling and prediction of the methodical experimental errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, Valery V.; Alifanov, Oleg M.; Morzhukhina, Alena V.; Budnik, Sergey A.

    2016-11-01

    The formation mechanisms and the main factors affecting the systematic error of thermocouples were investigated. According to the results of experimental studies and mathematical modelling it was established that in highly porous heat resistant materials for aerospace application the thermocouple errors are determined by two competing mechanisms provided correlation between the errors and the difference between radiation and conduction heat fluxes. The comparative analysis was carried out and some features of the methodical error formation related to the distances from the heated surface were established.

  2. Experimental study of two material decomposition methods using multi-bin photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Kevin C.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Gilat Schmidt, Taly

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors with multi-bin pulse height analysis (PHA) are capable of extracting energy dependent information which can be exploited for material decomposition. Iterative decomposition algorithms have been previously implemented which require prior knowledge of the source spectrum, detector spectral response, and energy threshold settings. We experimentally investigated two material decomposition methods that do not require explicit knowledge of the source spectrum and spectral response. In the first method, the effective spectrum for each energy bin is estimated from calibration transmission measurements, followed by an iterative maximum likelihood decomposition algorithm. The second investigated method, first proposed and tested through simulations by Alvarez, uses a linearized maximum likelihood estimator which requires calibration transmission measurements. The Alvarez method has the advantage of being non-iterative. This study experimentally quantified and compared the material decomposition bias, as a percentage of material thickness, and standard deviation resulting from these two material decomposition estimators. Multi-energy x-ray transmission measurements were acquired through varying thicknesses of Teon, Delrin, and neoprene at two different flux settings and decomposed into PMMA and aluminum thicknesses using the investigated methods. In addition, a series of 200 equally spaced projections of a rod phantom were acquired over 360°. The multi-energy sinograms were decomposed using both empirical methods and then reconstructed using filtered backprojection producing two images representing each basis material. The Alvarez method decomposed Delrin into PMMA with a bias of 0.5-19% and decomposed neoprene into aluminum with a bias of less than 3%. The spectral estimation method decomposed Delrin into PMMA with a bias of 0.6-16% and decomposed neoprene into aluminum with a bias of 0.1-58%. In general, the spectral estimation method resulted in

  3. Using experimental design modules for process characterization in manufacturing/materials processes laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ankenman, Bruce; Ermer, Donald; Clum, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Modules dealing with statistical experimental design (SED), process modeling and improvement, and response surface methods have been developed and tested in two laboratory courses. One course was a manufacturing processes course in Mechanical Engineering and the other course was a materials processing course in Materials Science and Engineering. Each module is used as an 'experiment' in the course with the intent that subsequent course experiments will use SED methods for analysis and interpretation of data. Evaluation of the modules' effectiveness has been done by both survey questionnaires and inclusion of the module methodology in course examination questions. Results of the evaluation have been very positive. Those evaluation results and details of the modules' content and implementation are presented. The modules represent an important component for updating laboratory instruction and to provide training in quality for improved engineering practice.

  4. Experimental studies in fluid mechanics and materials science using acoustic levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Robey, J.; Arce, A.; Gaspar, M.

    1987-01-01

    Ground-based and short-duration low gravity experiments have been carried out with the use of ultrasonic levitators to study the dynamics of freely suspended liquid drops under the influence of predominantly capillary and acoustic radiation forces. Some of the effects of the levitating field on the shape as well as the fluid flow fields within the drop have been determined. The development and refinement of measurement techniques using levitated drops with size on the order of 2 mm in diameter have yielded methods having direct application to experiments in microgravity. In addition, containerless melting, undercooling, and freezing of organic materials as well as low melting metals have provided experimental data and observations on the application of acoustic positioning techniques to materials studies.

  5. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  6. Novel nano-particles as fillers for an experimental resin-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Rüttermann, S; Wandrey, C; Raab, W H-M; Janda, R

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the properties of two experimental materials, nano-material (Nano) and Microhybrid, and two trade products, Clearfil AP-X and Filtek Supreme XT. The flexural strength and modulus after 24h water storage and 5000 thermocycles, water sorption, solubility and X-ray opacity were determined according to ISO 4049. The volumetric behavior (DeltaV) after curing and after water storage was investigated with the Archimedes principle. ANOVA was calculated with p<0.05. Clearfil AP-X showed the highest flexural strength (154+/-14 MPa) and flexural modulus (11,600+/-550 MPa) prior to and after thermocycling (117+/-14 MPa and 13,000+/-300 MPa). The flexural strength of all materials decreased after thermocycling, but the flexural modulus decreased only for Filtek Supreme XT. After thermocycling, there were no significant differences in flexural strength and modulus between Filtek Supreme XT, Microhybrid and Nano. Clearfil AP-X had the lowest water sorption (22+/-1.1 microg mm(-3)) and Nano had the highest water sorption (82+/-2.6 microg mm(-3)) and solubility (27+/-2.9 microg mm(-3)) of all the materials. No significant differences occurred between the solubility of Clearfil AP-X, Filtek Supreme XT and Microhybrid. Microhybrid and Nano provided the highest X-ray opacity. Owing to the lower filler content, Nano showed higher shrinkage than the commercial materials. Nano had the highest expansion after water storage. After thermocycling, Nano performed as well as Filtek Supreme XT for flexural strength, even better for X-ray opacity but significantly worse for flexural modulus, water sorption and solubility. The performances of microhybrids were superior to those of the nano-materials.

  7. Experimental study of bentonite-soil mixtures as anti-seepage materials of constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Zifu; Zhao, Xin; Li, Haihan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, mixtures of different kinds of bentonite and soil were used and tested in order to find a cheap alternative to current anti-seepage materials for constructed wetlands. The anti-seepage layer of constructed wetlands was simulated in the experimental study and the permeability coefficient of the mixed materials was determined in order to evaluate the anti-seepage effect of mixtures. The main results are as follows: (i) The minimum mass ratio of bentonite to soil is 10%; (ii) Within a certain range, the more compact and higher the wet density is, then the better anti-seepage effect is (under the condition of certain moisture content). The permeability coefficient of the mixed materials exponentially increased with the increase of wet density; (iii) At the wet density of 1.83 g/cm(3), corresponding with the optimum compactness, the mixture of natural sodium bentonite produced in Wyoming, USA and soil from Cangzhou, Hebei province showed the best anti-seepage performance; (iv) The impermeability of the mixture with smaller particle sizes of bentonite was far better than that with the bigger particle sizes; (v) The hydration effect of bentonite changed the structure of the mixture materials into a special structure that is similar to that of pure bentonite. The particles of the mixture became expanded under SEM investigation and the mixture became more compact, which could have the same or similar effect as pure bentonite for anti-seepage.

  8. Experimental study of ice lens formation using fine granular materials under terrestrial and martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saruya, T.; Rempel, A. W.; Kurita, K.

    2012-12-01

    Detailed exploration of Mars has yielded a range of direct and indirect evidence for the distribution of ice. Significantly, direct observations of segregated ice (i.e. sediment free) were obtained by Phoenix lander. This segregated ice most likely originated as an ice lens, which formed by the migration and solidification of unfrozen water. Unfrozen water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state below the normal melting temperature. This water is known to migrate in frozen materials and form ice lenses. Zent et al. (2012) developed a numerical model for ice lens formation (Rempel et al. 2004) and demonstrated that the nucleation of ice lenses at the Phoenix landing site was possible in the recent past. However, many questions remain regarding the detailed conditions of ice lens nucleation and growth, even in the terrestrial environment. Further experimental checks of numerical models are especially needed. Here, we describe laboratory investigations of ice lens behavior under both terrestrial conditions and with experimental conditions approaching those in the martian environment. We have performed a series of step-freezing experiments in fine, granular materials to observe the initiation and growth of ice lenses. Our experiments reveal clear and systematic relationships between ice-lens behavior and the imposed cooling temperature and host particle size. We compared our experimental results to numerical predictions from a model of ice lens formation (Rempel et al. 2004) that was applied to our experimental conditions. We find that the trend is consistent between the experiment and model, however, there are important quantitative differences. Most notably, modeled ice-lens nucleation occurred more quickly and enabled ice lenses to grow larger than occurred during our experiments. We infer that some additional mechanisms must be responsible for restricting the formation and growth of ice lenses. Further

  9. Study on clogging mechanism of fibrous materials in a pump by experimental and computational approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, H.; Kawahara, T.; Kanai, H.; Miyagawa, K.; Saito, S.; Isono, M.; Nohmi, M.; Uchida, H.; Kawai, M.

    2014-03-01

    Clogging trouble in a sewage pump is a serious problem caused by foreign substances like strings, towels, and cloths. However, mechanism of pump clogging is significantly complicated and it is difficult to clarify factors affecting pump clogging. In this paper, the simplified air duct test and axial fan test are introduced and some parameter studies based on design of experiments (DOE) were conducted. From the DOE results, the sensitivity of each parameter to the clogging was predicted. As the parameters related to the clogging, length and rigidity of the strings, leading shape and lean angle of obstacles, flow velocity in a measuring section were selected. Behavior of string in the pump was also observed in the actual pump apparatus and was compared to that in the air duct. Computational simulation with simplified flow fields and MBD (Multi Body Dynamics) was developed and applied to predict behavior of a string in the pump. These experiments and computation are effective to detect and classify the clogging mechanism. These approaches aided to establish one of the evaluation methods on anti-clogging performance against fibrous materials.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Material Flows Within FSWs Using 3D Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Tolle; Timothy A. White; Karen S. Miller; Denis E. Clark; Herschel B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    There exists significant prior work using tracers or pre-placed hardened markers within friction stir welding (FSWing) to experimentally explore material flow within the FSW process. Our experiments replaced markers with a thin sheet of copper foil placed between the 6061 aluminum lap and butt joints that were then welded. The absorption characteristics of x-rays for copper and aluminum are significantly different allowing for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods such as x-ray computed tomography (CT) to be used to demonstrate the material movement within the weldment on a much larger scale than previously shown. 3D CT reconstruction of the copper components of the weldment allows for a unique view into the final turbulent state of the welding process as process parameters are varied. The x-ray CT data of a section of the weld region was collected using a cone-beam x-ray imaging system developed at the INL. Six-hundred projections were collected over 360-degrees using a 160-kVp Bremsstrahlung x-ray generator (25-micrometer focal spot) and amorphoussilicon x-ray detector. The region of the object that was imaged was about 3cm tall and 1.5cm x 1cm in cross section, and was imaged at a magnification of about 3.6x. The data were reconstructed on a 0.5x0.5x0.5 mm3 voxel grid. After reconstruction, the aluminum and copper could be easily discriminated using a gray level threshold allowing visualization of the copper components. Fractal analysis of the tomographic reconstructed material topology is investigated as a means to quantify macro level material flow based on process parameters. The results of multi-pass FSWs show increased refinement of the copper trace material. Implications of these techniques for quantifying process flow are discussed.

  11. Optimum iodine concentration of contrast material through microcatheters: hydrodynamic analysis of experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Teiyu; Furui, Shigeru; Harasawa, Arimi; Ishimura, Makoto; Imai, Tatsuhiko; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2002-07-01

    It is important to increase the iodine delivery rate (I), that is the iodine concentration of the contrast material (C) × the flow rate of the contrast material (Q), through a catheter to obtain high quality arteriograms. The iodine delivery rate varies depending on the iodine concentration of the contrast material. The purpose of this study is to estimate the optimum iodine concentration (Copt) of contrast material (i.e. the iodine concentration at which I becomes maximum) through a microcatheter of a given length (L), inner diameter (D) and injection pressure (P). Iohexol, ioversol and iopamidol of 11-12 iodine concentrations (140-350, 160-350 or 160-370 mg cm-3) at 37 °C are used. I and Reynolds number (Re) of the flow of each contrast material through four microcatheters (0.49-0.68 mm in inner diameter, 1000-1500 mm in length) at injection pressures of 1.38, 2.76, 4.14 and 5.52 × 106 Pa (200, 400, 600 and 800 pounds per square inch) are obtained experimentally. The relationships between I and C and between I and Re are examined for each catheter and injection pressure. Copt is 160-280 mg cm-3 for iohexol, 180-280 mg cm-3 for ioversol and 200-300 mg cm-3 for iopamidol. I becomes maximum when Re approximates the critical Reynolds number (Re ≃ 2300). Utilizing this principle, we can estimate Copt and its flow rate through a microcatheter of a given L, D and P.

  12. Modeling, simulation and experimental verification of constitutive models for energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberman, K. S.; Bennett, J. G.; Asay, B. W.; Henson, B. F.; Funk, D. J.

    1998-07-01

    Simulation of the complete response of components and systems composed of energetic materials, such as PBX-9501 (1) is important in the determination of the safety of various explosive systems. For example, predicting the correct state of stress, rate of deformation and temperature during penetration is essential in the prediction of ignition. Such simulation requires accurate constitutive models. These models must also be computationally efficient to enable analysis of large scale three dimensional problems using explicit lagrangian finite element codes such as DYNA3D (2). However, to be of maximum utility, these predictions must be validated against robust dynamic experiments. In this paper, we report comparisons between experimental and predicted displacement fields in PBX-9501 during dynamic deformation, and describe the modeling approach. The predictions used Visco-SCRAM and the Generalized Method of Cells which have been implemented into DYNA3D. The experimental data were obtained using laser-induced fluorescence speckle photography. Results from this study have lead to more accurate models and have also guided further experimental work.

  13. Modeling, simulation and experimental verification of constitutive models for energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Haberman, K.S.; Bennett, J.G.; Assay, B.W.

    1997-09-01

    Simulation of the complete response of components and systems composed of energetic materials, such as PBX-9501 is important in the determination of the safety of various explosive systems. For example, predicting the correct state of stress, rate of deformation and temperature during penetration is essential in the prediction of ignition. Such simulation requires accurate constitutive models. These models must also be computationally efficient to enable analysis of large scale three dimensional problems using explicit lagrangian finite element codes such as DYNA3D. However, to be of maximum utility, these predictions must be validated against robust dynamic experiments. In this paper, the authors report comparisons between experimental and predicted displacement fields in PBX-9501 during dynamic deformation, and describe the modeling approach. The predictions used Visco-SCRAM and the Generalized Method of Cells which have been implemented into DYNA3D. The experimental data were obtained using laser-induced fluorescence speckle photography. Results from this study have lead to more accurate models and have also guided further experimental work.

  14. Experimental Characterization and Material-Model Development for Microphase-Segregated Polyurea: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; He, T.; Pandurangan, B.; Svingala, F. R.; Settles, G. S.; Hargather, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous experimental investigations reported in the open literature over the past decade have clearly demonstrated that the use of polyurea external coatings and/or inner layers can substantially enhance both the blast resistance (the ability to withstand shock loading) and the ballistic performance (the ability to defeat various high-velocity projectiles such as bullets, fragments, shrapnel, etc. without penetration, excessive deflection or spalling) of buildings, vehicles, combat-helmets, etc. It is also well established that the observed high-performance of polyurea is closely related to its highly complex submicron scale phase-segregated microstructure and the associated microscale phenomena and processes (e.g., viscous energy dissipation at the internal phase boundaries). As higher and higher demands are placed on blast/ballistic survivability of the foregoing structures, a need for the use of the appropriate transient nonlinear dynamics computational analyses and the corresponding design-optimization methods has become ever apparent. A critical aspect of the tools used in these analyses and methods is the availability of an appropriate physically based, high-fidelity material model for polyurea. There are presently several public domain and highly diverse material models for polyurea. In the present work, an attempt is made to critically assess these models as well as the experimental methods and results used in the process of their formulation. Since these models are developed for use in the high-rate loading regime, they are employed in the present work, to generate the appropriate shock-Hugoniot relations. These relations are subsequently compared with their experimental counterparts in order to assess the fidelity of these models.

  15. Experimental and numerical studies on laser-based powder deposition of slurry erosion resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu

    cracking issue, and 3) the effect of composition and composition gradient of Ni and WC on the slurry erosion resistance over a wide range of erosion conditions. This thesis presents a set of numerical and experimental methods in order to address the challenges mentioned above. A three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based powder flow model and three vision based techniques were developed in order to visualize the process of feeding the Ni-WC powder in the LBPD process. The results provide the guidelines for efficiently feeding the Ni-WC composite powder into the laser-formed molten pool. The finite element (FE) based experimentally verified 3-D thermal and thermo-mechanical models are developed in order to understand the thermal and stress evolutions in Ni-WC composite material during the LBPD process. The models address the effect of the process variables, preheating temperature, and different mass fractions of WC in Ni on thermal cycles and stress distributions within the deposited material. The slurry erosion behavior of the single and multilayered deposits of Ni-WC composite material produced by the LBPD process is investigated using an accelerated slurry erosion testing machine and a 3-D FE dynamic model. The verified model is used to identify the appropriate composition and composition gradient of Ni-WC composite material required to achieve erosion resistance over a wide range of erosion conditions.

  16. Experimental investigation of Rayleigh Taylor instability in elastic-plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Aaron Alan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2010-11-01

    The interface of an elastic-plastic plate accelerated by a fluid of lower density is Rayleigh Taylor (RT) unstable, the growth being mitigated by the mechanical strength of the plate. The instability is observed when metal plates are accelerated by high explosives, in explosive welding, and in volcanic island formation due to the strength of the inner crust. In contrast to the classical case involving Newtonian fluids, RT instability in accelerated solids is not well understood. The difficulties for constructing a theory for the linear growth phase in solids is essentially due to the character of elastic-plastic constitutive properties which has a nonlinear dependence on the magnitude of the rate of deformation. Experimental investigation of the phenomena is difficult due to the exceedingly small time scales (in high energy density experiments) and large measurement uncertainties of material properties. We performed experiments on our Two-Wheel facility to study the linear stage of the incompressible RT instability in elastic-plastic materials (yogurt) whose properties were well characterized. Rotation of the wheels imparted a constant centrifugal acceleration on the material interface that was cut with a small sinusoidal ripple. The controlled initial conditions and precise acceleration amplitudes are levied to investigate transition from elastic to plastic deformation and allow accurate and detailed measurements of flow properties.

  17. Experimental Study on Creep Characterization and Lifetime Estimation of RPV Material at 723-1023 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lin-Jun; Ning, Dong; Yang, Yi-zhong

    2017-01-01

    During the plant operation, nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is the most critical pressure boundary component for integrity and safety in a light-water reactor. In this paper, the creep behavior and properties for RPV metallic material are studied by conducting constant-temperature and constant-load creep tests at 723, 823, 923 and 1023 K. The θ projection constitutive model was established based on a creep method to describe the high-temperature creep behavior of RPV material. The material parameter θ would be obtained based on experimental data by depending on numerical optimization techniques. The relationship between and among θ, T and σ was evaluated, and the coefficients a i , b i , c i and d i were obtained. Based on the short-term tests at a high temperature, the values for long-term creep data could be predicted in accordance with parameter θ. Moreover, rupture life, the minimum creep rate and the time reaching to an arbitrary strain can be calculated and may be used to evaluate the damage behavior and properties, so as to be used as a reference for design and safety assessment.

  18. Experimental study of porosity reduction in high deposition-rate Laser Material Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chongliang; Gasser, Andres; Schopphoven, Thomas; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the interest in Additive Manufacturing (AM) is continuously expanding, owing to the paradigm shift that new production processes, such as Laser Material Deposition (LMD), provide over conventional manufacturing technologies. With LMD, three-dimensional, complex components out of a wide range of materials can be manufactured consecutively layer-by-layer. Despite the technological advantages of the LMD process, currently achieved deposition-rates of approx. 0.5 kg/h for Inconel 718 (IN 718) remain a major concern in regards to processing times and economic feasibility. Moreover, processing conditions need to be chosen carefully or else material defects can be systematically formed either at the interface separating two adjacent clad layers, at the bonding zone or within the bulk of the layer. In this respect, the effects of powder humidity, laser power, nominal powder particle size, powder morphology and shielding gas flow rate on the porosity in laser deposited single tracks at an increased deposition-rate of approx. 2 kg/h was investigated through experiments. Based on experimental results, several approaches of reducing porosity in high deposition-rate LMD are proposed in this paper.

  19. Experimental investigation on materials and lubricants for sliding-vane air compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, Stefano; Valenti, Gianluca; Contaldi, Giulio; Valenti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    Positive-displacement compressors and, among them, sliding-vane rotary machines are widely used in the compressed air sector. As in many other industrial fields, the efficient utilization of energy has become a major goal also in this sector. The aim of the present activity is the experimental investigation on the influence of two vanes materials (cast iron and aluminium with anodized surface) and of four commercial lubricants (characterized by different formulations and additives concentrations) on the performance of a mid-capacity sliding-vane rotary compressor in a number of operating pressures. The performance is identified by both the volume flow rate and the absorbed mechanical power, evaluated according to the international standard ISO 5167 and ISO 1217. The campaign indicates that the considered lubricants do not affect appreciably the volumetric flow rate. On the other hand, the specific lubricants determine a variation of about 1% of the mechanical power for both materials, while the specific material a variation between 0.9% and 2.6%. The best performance is achieved by aluminium vanes and a synthetic poly-α-olefin lubricant.

  20. Experimental Study on Creep Characterization and Lifetime Estimation of RPV Material at 723-1023 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lin-Jun; Ning, Dong; Yang, Yi-zhong

    2017-02-01

    During the plant operation, nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is the most critical pressure boundary component for integrity and safety in a light-water reactor. In this paper, the creep behavior and properties for RPV metallic material are studied by conducting constant-temperature and constant-load creep tests at 723, 823, 923 and 1023 K. The θ projection constitutive model was established based on a creep method to describe the high-temperature creep behavior of RPV material. The material parameter θ would be obtained based on experimental data by depending on numerical optimization techniques. The relationship between and among θ, T and σ was evaluated, and the coefficients a i , b i , c i and d i were obtained. Based on the short-term tests at a high temperature, the values for long-term creep data could be predicted in accordance with parameter θ. Moreover, rupture life, the minimum creep rate and the time reaching to an arbitrary strain can be calculated and may be used to evaluate the damage behavior and properties, so as to be used as a reference for design and safety assessment.

  1. Experimental verification of the inverse Doppler effect in negative-index material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lie; Chen, Jiabi; Wang, Yan; Geng, Tao; Zhuang, Songlin

    2010-10-01

    μResearch of negative-index material (NIM) is a very hot developing research field in recent years. NIM is also called left-handed material (LHM), in which the electric field [see manuscript], the magnetic field [see manuscript] and the wave vector [see manuscript] are not composed of a set of right-handed coordinates but a set of left-handed coordinates. Thus the action of electromagnetic waves in both left-handed material and right-handed material is just the opposite, for instance, the negative refraction phenomenon, the inverse Doppler effect and so on. Here we report the explicit result of the inverse Doppler effect through a photonic crystal (PC) prism at 10.6m wavelength for the first time, and the result we get from the experiment is much similar to the theoretical analysis we have deduced before. During the experiment, the CO2 laser is used as a light source, and the PC prism is used as a sample, which can move a tiny distance (1mm) uniformly with a translating stage. Based on the method of optical heterodyne, we let the emergent light from the output surface of PC prism and the reference light from light source interfere at the surface of the detector. When the translating stage moves towards the detector, the optical paths in the PC prism will be changed, and then the Doppler frequency shift will be generated. Though several different samples have been tested repeatedly, the results we get are extraordinarily similar. So we can be sure that the inverse Doppler effect really exists in the NIM at optical frequencies. To our best knowledge, this is the only experimental verification of the inverse Doppler effect in the NIM at optical frequencies at home and aboard.

  2. A dynamic experimental study on the evaporative cooling performance of porous building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Meng, Qinglin; Feng, Yanshan; Chen, Yuanrui

    2017-03-01

    Conventional outdoor dynamic and indoor steady-state experiments have certain limitations in regard to investigating the evaporative cooling performance of porous building materials. The present study investigated the evaporative cooling performance of a porous building material using a special wind tunnel apparatus. First, the composition and control principles of the wind tunnel environment control system were elucidated. Then, the meteorological environment on a typical summer day in Guangzhou was reproduced in the wind tunnel and the evaporation process and thermal parameters of specimens composed of a porous building material were continuously measured. Finally, the experimental results were analysed to evaluate the accuracy of the wind tunnel environment control system, the heat budget of the external surface of the specimens and the total thermal resistance of the specimens and its uncertainty. The analysis results indicated that the normalized root-mean-square error between the measured value of each environmental parameter in the wind tunnel test section and the corresponding value input into the environment control system was <4%, indicating that the wind tunnel apparatus had relatively high accuracy in reproducing outdoor meteorological environments. In addition, the wet specimen could cumulatively consume approximately 80% of the shortwave radiation heat during the day, thereby reducing the temperature of the external surface and the heat flow on the internal surface of the specimen. Compared to the dry specimen, the total thermal resistance of the wet specimen was approximately doubled, indicating that the evaporation process of the porous building material could significantly improve the thermal insulation performance of the specimen.

  3. An Experimental Comparison of Case Histories with Conventional Materials in Teaching a College General Education Course in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Ronald G.

    Experimentally evaluated were the merits of a case history and a current reading materials approach to a college general education science course with regard to facts and generalizations, methods of science, and scientific attitudes examination scores. In the experimental treatment, the nature of science and scientific research and other course…

  4. A novel experimental setup for simultaneous adsorption and induced deformation measurements in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, L.; Plantier, F.; Grégoire, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental setup is presented allowing the simultaneous measurement of adsorption isotherms and adsorption-induced deformations. It is composed of a manometric technique coupled with a digital image correlation setup for full-field displacement measurements. The manometric part is validated by comparing adsorption isotherms with those obtained by a gravimetric method. The principles and methods of both adsorption isotherm and induced deformation measurements are presented in detail. As a first application of this new apparatus, the coupling between adsorption and induced deformation is characterised for a microporous media (activated carbon) saturated by pure CO2 (318.15 K, [0-60] bars) and pure CH4 (303.15 K, [0-130] bars). For this very homogeneous porous material, the induced deformation is characteristic of a pure volumetric swelling but the full-field setup may allow the characterisation of the localised pattern of deformation for heterogenous or cracked microporous media.

  5. [Modeling and experimental study on frequency-domain electricity properties of biological materials].

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Luo, Shiqiang; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Gang; Huang, Hua

    2009-12-01

    Frequency-domain electricity properties of four objects, including bullfrog skin, bullfrog muscle, triply distilled water and 0.9% NaCl, were tested in the range of 100Hz-10MHz using home-made electrode and measuring system. The experimental results showed that the resistance of 0.9% NaCl decreased dramatically, that the amplitude frequency characteristics of bullfrog's muscle and skin were similar, but that of triply distilled water did not change significantly. The frequency dependence of 0.9% NaCl showed that the electrode had great influence on the measuring system, so a new equivalent circuit model based on the electrode system was needed. These findings suggest that the new five-parameter equivalent circuit model, which embodies considerations on the interaction between electrodes and tissues, is a reasonable equivalent circuit for studying the electrical characteristics of biological materials.

  6. Experimental measurements of surface damage and residual stresses in micro-engineered plasma facing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, David; Wirz, Richard E.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2017-04-01

    The thermomechanical damage and residual stresses in plasma-facing materials operating at high heat flux are experimentally investigated. Materials with micro-surfaces are found to be more resilient, when exposed to cyclic high heat flux generated by an arc-jet plasma. An experimental facility, dedicated to High Energy Flux Testing (HEFTY), is developed for testing cyclic heat flux in excess of 10 MW/m2. We show that plastic deformation and subsequent fracture of the surface can be controlled by sample cooling. We demonstrate that W surfaces with micro-pillar type surface architecture have significantly reduced residual thermal stresses after plasma exposure, as compared to those with flat surfaces. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of the W-(110) peak reveal that broadening of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) for micro-engineered samples is substantially smaller than corresponding flat surfaces. Spectral shifts of XRD signals indicate that residual stresses due to plasma exposure of micro-engineered surfaces build up in the first few cycles of exposure. Subsequent cyclic plasma heat loading is shown to anneal out most of the built-up residual stresses in micro-engineered surfaces. These findings are consistent with relaxation of residual thermal stresses in surfaces with micro-engineered features. The initial residual stress state of highly polished flat W samples is compressive (≈ -1.3 GPa). After exposure to 50 plasma cycles, the surface stress relaxes to -1.0 GPa. Micro-engineered samples exposed to the same thermal cycling show that the initial residual stress state is compressive at (- 250 MPa), and remains largely unchanged after plasma exposure.

  7. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of organometallic radiation-protective materials adapted to radiation sources with a complex isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Russkikh, I. M.; Seleznev, E. N.; Tashlykov, O. L. Shcheklein, S. E.

    2015-12-15

    The significance of optimizing the content of components of a radiation-protective material, which is determined by the isotopic composition of radioactive contamination, depending on the reactor type, operating time, and other factors is demonstrated. The results of computational and experimental investigation of the gamma-radiation attenuation capacity of homogenous radiation-protective materials with different fillers are reported.

  9. An experimental study of low-velocity impacts into granular material in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, Naomi; Avila Martinez, Iris; Sunday, Cecily; Zenou, Emmanuel; Cherrier, Olivier; Cadu, Alexandre; Gourinat, Yves

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of landing on small bodies and of asteroid evolution, we use our novel drop tower facility (Sunday et al. 2016) to perform low-velocity (2 - 40 cm/s), shallow impact experiments of a 10 cm diameter aluminum sphere into quartz sand in low effective gravities (˜0.2 - 1 m/s2). Using in-situ accelerometers we measure the acceleration profile during the impacts and determine the peak accelerations, collision durations and maximum penetration depth. We find that the penetration depth scales linearly with the collision velocity but is independent of the effective gravity for the experimental range tested, and that the collision duration is independent of both the effective gravity and the collision velocity. No rebounds are observed in any of the experiments. Our low-gravity experimental results indicate that the transition from the quasi-static regime to the inertial regime occurs for impact energies two orders of magnitude smaller than in similar impact experiments under terrestrial gravity. The lower energy regime change may be due to the increased hydrodynamic drag of the surface material in our experiments, but may also support the notion that the quasi-static regime reduces as the effective gravity becomes lower.

  10. Numerical and Experimental Analysis on Inorganic Phase Change Material Usage in Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuvel, S.; Saravanasankar, S.; Sudhakarapandian, R.; Muthukannan, M.

    2014-12-01

    This work demonstrates the significance of Phase Change Material (PCM) in the construction of working sheds and product storage magazines in fireworks industries to maintain less temperature variation by passive cooling. The inorganic PCM, namely Calcium Chloride Hexahydrate (CCH) is selected in this study. First, the performance of two models with inbuilt CCH was analysed, using computational fluid dynamics. A significant change in the variation of inner wall temperature was observed, particularly during the working hours. This is mainly due to passive cooling, where the heat transfer from the surroundings to the room is partially used for the phase change from solid to liquid. The experiment was carried out by constructing two models, one with PCM packed in hollow brick walls and roof, and the other one as a conventional construction. The experimental results show that the temperature of the room got significantly reduced up to 7 °C. The experimental analysis results had good agreement with the numerical analysis results, and this reveals the advantage of the PCM in the fireworks industry construction.

  11. A comprehensive experimental study on material properties of human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Zhu, Feng; Mao, Haojie; Shen, Ming; Yang, King H

    2013-11-15

    A comprehensive study on the biomechanical response of human brain tissue is necessary to investigate traumatic brain injury mechanisms. Published brain material property studies have been mostly performed under a specific type of loading, which is insufficient to develop accurate brain tissue constitutive equations. In addition, inconsistent or contradictory data in the literature made it impossible for computational model developers to create a single brain material model that can fit most, if not all, experimental results. In the current study, a total of 240 brain tissue specimens were tested under tension (n=72), compression (n=72), and shear (n=96) loading modes at varying strain rates. Gray-white matter difference, regional difference, and directional difference within white matter were also investigated. Stress-strain relationships of human brain tissue were obtained up to 50% of engineering strain. Strain rate dependency was observed under all three loading modes. White matter was stiffer than gray matter in compression and shear. Corona radiata was found to be stiffer than cortex, thalamus, and corpus callosum in tension and compression. Directional dependency of white matter was observed under shear loading.

  12. An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Biaxial Test for Determining Shear Properties of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Barnett, Terry R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical investigation of a biaxial tension/compression test for determining shear properties of composite materials are reported. Using finite element models of isotropic and orthotropic laminates, a specimen geometry was optimized. A kinematic fixture was designed to introduce an equal and opposite pair of forces into a specimen with a one inch square test section. Aluminum and several composite laminates with the optimized geometry and a configuration with large stress gradients were tested in the fixture. The specimens were instrumented with strain gages in the center of the test section for shear stiffness measurements. Pure shear strain was measured. The results from the experiments correlated well with finite element results. Failure of the specimens occurred through the center of the test section and appeared to have initiated at the high stress points. The results lead to the conclusion that the optimized specimen is suitable for determining shear modulus for composite materials. Further revisions to the specimen geometry are necessary if the method is to give shear strength data.

  13. Experimental Evidence of Classical Conditioning and Microscopic Engrams in an Electroconductive Material

    PubMed Central

    Karbowski, Lukasz M.; Persinger, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic experimental substrates are indispensable tools which can allow researchers to model biological processes non-invasively in three-dimensional space. In this study, we investigated the capacities of an electroconductive material whose properties converge upon those of the brain. An electrically conductive material composed of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, ions, water, and trace amounts of other organic compounds and minerals was classically conditioned as inferred by electrophysiological measurements. Spectral densities evoked during the display of a conditioned stimulus (CS) probe were strongly congruent with those displayed during the conditioned-unconditioned stimulus pairing (CS-UCS). The neutral stimulus consisted of the pulsed light from a LED. The unconditioned stimulus was an alternating current. Interstimulus intervals >130 ms did not result in conditioned responses. Microscopic analysis of the chemically-fixed substratum revealed 10–200 μm wide ‘vessel structures’ within samples exposed to a stimulus. Greater complexity (increased fractal dimensions) was clearly discernable by light microscopy for stained sections of fixed samples that had been conditioned compared to various controls. The denser pixels indicated greater concentration of stain and increased canalization. Implications for learning and memory formation are discussed. PMID:27764215

  14. Experimental investigation of plastic finned-tube heat exchangers, with emphasis on material thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lin; Li, Zhen; Guo, Zeng-Yuan

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, two modified types of polypropylene (PP) with high thermal conductivity up to 2.3 W/m K and 16.5 W/m K are used to manufacture the finned-tube heat exchangers, which are prospected to be used in liquid desiccant air conditioning, heat recovery, water source heat pump, sea water desalination, etc. A third plastic heat exchanger is also manufactured with ordinary PP for validation and comparison. Experiments are carried out to determine the thermal performance of the plastic heat exchangers. It is found that the plastic finned-tube heat exchanger with thermal conductivity of 16.5 W/m K can achieve overall heat transfer coefficient of 34 W/m{sup 2} K. The experimental results are compared with calculation and they agree well with each other. Finally, the effect of material thermal conductivity on heat exchanger thermal performance is studied in detail. The results show that there is a threshold value of material thermal conductivity. Below this value improving thermal conductivity can considerably improve the heat exchanger performance while over this value improving thermal conductivity contributes very little to performance enhancement. For the finned-tube heat exchanger designed in this paper, when the plastic thermal conductivity can reach over 15 W/m K, it can achieve more than 95% of the titanium heat exchanger performance and 84% of the aluminum or copper heat exchanger performance with the same dimension. (author)

  15. The effects of energetic proton bombardment on polymeric materials: Experimental studies and degradation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.; Smith, M. V.; Fornes, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes 3 MeV proton bombardment experiments on several polymeric materials of interest to NASA carried out on the Tandem Van De Graff Accelerator at the California Institute of Technology's Kellogg Radiation Laboratory. Model aromatic and aliphatic polymers such as poly(1-vinyl naphthalene) and poly(methyl methacrylate), as well as polymers for near term space applications such as Kapton, Epoxy and Polysulfone, have been included in this study. Chemical and physical characterization of the damage products have been carried out in order to develop a model of the interaction of these polymers with the incident proton beam. The proton bombardment methodology developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and reported here is part of an ongoing study on the effects of space radiation on polymeric materials. The report is intended to provide an overview of the mechanistic, as well as the technical and experimental, issues involved in such work rather than to serve as an exhaustive description of all the results.

  16. Thermal control for space microelectronic equipment via pyroelectric material: Design, characterisation and experimental campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Riccardo; Gasbarri, Paolo; Lecci, Umberto

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades the development of new satellite platforms from a smaller to a bigger size goes in parallel with the development of the microelectronics equipment boarded on. Avionics, control systems and payloads equipment exploit the microelectronics in order to reduce the overall dimensions and masses and to increase the performances of each unit for the improvement of goals in each mission. A larger use of electronic elements with the relevant components increases the importance of a carefully equipment designed under different points of view. One of them is the thermal management. It is well known that the Joule Effect causes the heat overstocking which in turn reduces the efficiency of the electronic devices and increases the difficulties to manage the thermal power budget on board. A new design philosophy sees a possibility for a simpler and a more efficient thermal control on the use of the pyroelectric materials. Pyroelectrics are a "special" class of materials that demonstrates a spontaneous capacity to convert thermal fluxes in electrical charge and if applied on a "passive" structure they can "actively" reduce the heat overstocking. The electrical charge could be eventually stored for different purposes such as for instance the auto-feeding, or better the energy harvesting. With the reduction of the temperature of each component, and consequently with the reduction of the heat flux that flows through microelectronics, better efficiency and better performances are ensured. In this way the reliability is increased and the goals of the mission could be achieved easier and easier. In this paper the design of a thermal rig made up of pyroelectric devices and dummy electronics components in order to verify the thermo-electric conversion is presented. Furthermore an experimental campaign has been performed to validate the technology here introduced and the relevant results presented. In particular the characterisation of a typical aerospace pyroelectric

  17. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Hydroformed Tubular Materials for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Sung

    condition on deformation behavior. The second model was a multi-scale model using both macroscopic continuum model and microscopic crystal plasticity (CP) model: First, the constitutive equation was obtained from the other microscopic simulation model (CP-FEM) using the microstructural information (i.e., orientation) of materials from the OIM and simple tensile test data. Continuum FE analysis based on the obtained constitutive equation using CP model were then fulfilled. Several conclusions can be drawn on the basis of the experimental and numerical analysis as follows: 1) The stress-strain relationship from the bulge test represents a more accurate description of the deformation behavior for a hydroforming than that from tensile tests made on segments cut from the tubular materials. 2) For anisotropic material, the incorporation of anisotropic effects using anisotropy coefficient from the tensile test led to even more accurate results. 3) A multi-scale simulation strategy using combination of continuum and CP models can give high quality predictions of the deformation under hydroforming of Cu and Nb tubes.

  18. Experimental determination of Grunieisen gamma for two dissimilar materials (PEEK and Al 5083) via the shock-reverberation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Andrew; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Hazell, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Following multiple loading events the resultant shock state of a material will lie away from the principle Hugoniot. Prediction of such states requires knowledge of a materials equation-of-state. The material-specific variable Grunieisen gamma (Γ) defines the shape of ``off-Hugoniot'' points in energy-volume-pressure space. Experimentally the shock-reverberation technique (based on the principle of impedance-matching) has previously allowed estimation of the first-order Grunieisen gamma term (Γ1) for a silicone elastomer. Here, this approach was employed to calculate Γ1 for two dissimilar materials, Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and the armour-grade aluminium alloy 5083 (H32); thereby allowing discussion of limitations of this technique in the context of plate-impact experiments employing Manganin stress gauges. Finally, the experimentally determined values for Γ1 were further refined by comparison between experimental records and numerical simulations carried out using the commercial code ANYSYS Autodyn®.

  19. Influence of phantom material and dimensions on experimental {sup 192}Ir dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tedgren, Aasa Carlsson; Carlsson, Gudrun Alm

    2009-06-15

    In treatment planning of brachytherapy, absorbed dose is calculated by superposing predetermined distributions of absorbed dose to water in water for the single source according to the irradiation pattern [i.e., placement of the source(s) or dwelling position(s)]. Single-source reference water data are derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and/or experiments. For reasons of positional accuracy, experimental brachytherapy dosimetry is most often performed in plastic phantoms. This work investigates the water equivalence of phantoms made from polystyrene, PMMA, and solid water for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry. The EGSnrc MC code is used to simulate radial absorbed dose distributions in cylindrical phantoms of dimensions ranging in size from diameter and height of 20 cm to diameter and height of 40 cm. Water equivalence prevails if the absorbed dose to water in the plastic phantom is the same as the absorbed dose to water in a water phantom at equal distances from the source. It is shown that water equivalence at a specified distance from the source depends not only on the size of the plastic phantom but also on the size of the water phantom used for comparison. Compared to equally sized water phantoms, phantoms of polystyrene are less water equivalent than phantoms of PMMA and solid water but compared to larger water phantoms they are the most water equivalent. Although phantom dimension is the most important single factor influencing the dose distributions around {sup 192}Ir sources, the effect of material properties is non-negligible and becomes increasingly important as phantom dimensions increase. The importance of knowing the size of the water phantom whose data underlies treatment planning systems, when using such data as a reference in, e.g., detector evaluation studies, is discussed. To achieve the highest possible accuracy in experimental dosimetry, phantom-specific correction factors should be used.

  20. Experimentally determined attenuation and modulus in Earth analogue materials over a wide range of frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, C.; Fujisawa, K.; Takei, Y.; Hiraga, T.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic observations, particularly in areas of active tectonics, show large variations and can be affected by many variables, including temperature, composition, grain size, volatile content and the presence of small quantities of melt or other fluids. The understanding and interpretation of seismic wave dispersion and attenuation data can be significantly enhanced through improved knowledge of material dynamic response at the grain scale (and smaller). The organic binary system borneol-diphenylamine is a suitable analogue of melting in the Earth’s mantle. Not only does the solid phase deform through the same deformation mechanisms (diffusion creep, dislocation creep) observed in geologic materials, but the moderate and controllable dihedral angle (40° at 316 K) exhibited by this system provides an equilibrium melt-geometry very similar to that of the olivine + basalt system [Takei, 2000]. With a eutectic melting temperature (TE = 316 K at ambient pressure) just above room temperature, borneol-diphenylamine provides an attractive chemical analogue to study the properties of solid-melt interaction, obviating the difficulties associated with high-temperature, high-pressure experimentation. We have initiated compression-compression cyclic loading experiments on single phase (borneol; TM = 477 K) and multiphase (borneol-diphenylamine) aggregates. Our newly developed apparatus is able to apply and measure very small stress and strain amplitudes with high accuracy using a piezoelectric actuator and optical displacement meters, respectively. The planned experimental conditions are P = 1 atm, T = 298 - 333 K, strain amplitude <10-5, f = 10-4 - 102 Hz, and melt fraction φ = 0 - 0.1. The combination of low (sub seismic) frequency data obtained from these forced oscillation experiments and high-frequency data (f = 102 - 106) from ultrasonic wave transmission measurements allows us to explore the dissipation and Young’s modulus over a frequency range of some ten decades

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a mesoporous KxWO3 material having superior mechanical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sonal; Anderson, Sean T.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Sakidja, Ridwan; Landskron, Kai; Kokoszka, Berenika; Mandal, Manik; Wang, Zhongwu

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous materials with tailored properties hold great promise for energy harvesting and industrial applications. We have synthesized a novel tungsten bronze mesoporous material (KxWO3; x ~ 0.07) having inverse FDU-12 type pore symmetry and a crystalline framework. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of the mesoporous K0.07WO3 show persistence of a highly ordered meso-scale pore structure to high pressure conditions (~18.5 GPa) and a material with remarkable mechanical strength despite having ~35% porosity. Pressure dependent in situ SAXS measurements reveal a bulk modulus κ = 44 +/- 4 GPa for the mesoporous KxWO3 which is comparable to the corresponding value for the bulk monoclinic WO3 (γ-WO3). Evidence from middle angle (MAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy shows that the presence of potassium leads to the formation of a K-bearing orthorhombic tungsten bronze (OTB) phase within a monoclinic WO3 host structure. Our ab initio molecular dynamics calculations show that the formation of the OTB phase provides superior strength to the mesoporous K0.07WO3.Mesoporous materials with tailored properties hold great promise for energy harvesting and industrial applications. We have synthesized a novel tungsten bronze mesoporous material (KxWO3; x ~ 0.07) having inverse FDU-12 type pore symmetry and a crystalline framework. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of the mesoporous K0.07WO3 show persistence of a highly ordered meso-scale pore structure to high pressure conditions (~18.5 GPa) and a material with remarkable mechanical strength despite having ~35% porosity. Pressure dependent in situ SAXS measurements reveal a bulk modulus κ = 44 +/- 4 GPa for the mesoporous KxWO3 which is comparable to the corresponding value for the bulk monoclinic WO3 (γ-WO3). Evidence from middle angle (MAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), high

  2. Experimental Investigation of Material Removal Characteristics in Silicon Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Boumyoung; Jeong, Sukhoon; Lee, Hyunseop; Kim, Hyoungjae; Jeong, Haedo; Dornfeld, David A.

    2009-11-01

    The material removal characteristics of a silicon wafer were experimentally investigated with respect to the chemical dissolution and mechanical abrasion of the wafer during silicon chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) using an alkali-based slurry. The silicon surface without native oxide is rapidly dissolved by the slurry containing an amine agent, which effectively leads to the reduced hardness of the loaded silicon wafer due to Si-Si bond breaking during polishing. The abrasive particles in the slurry easily remove the reacted silicon surface, and the removal rate and wafer non-uniformity for abrasive concentrations of 1.5-3 wt % are better than those for other concentrations because of the low and steady coefficient of friction (COF) owing to the evenness of abrasive particles between the wafer and pad. Also, it was found that a high slurry flow rate of 700-1000 cm3/min improves wafer non-uniformity owing to the reduced temporal variation of temperature, because the slurry acts as a good cooling source during polishing. However, the removal rate remains almost constant upon varying the slurry flow rate because of the effective dissolution characteristic of the slurry with abundant amine as an accelerator, regardless of the reduction of average temperature with increasing slurry flow rate. In the break-in process used to stabilize the material removal, the viscoelastic behaviors of the pad and the ground wafer surface with native oxide and wheel marks cause a temporal change of the friction force during polishing, which is related to the removal rate and wafer non-uniformity. As a result, the stabilization of removal rate and wafer non-uniformity is achieved through a steady-state process with elevated temperature and reduced COF after a total polishing time of 60 min, based on the removal process of the wafer surface and the permanent deformation in the viscoelastic behavior of the pad.

  3. A robust nanoscale experimental quantification of fracture energy in a bilayer material system

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Denvid; Broderick, Kurt; Buehler, Markus J.; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2014-01-01

    Accurate measurement of interfacial properties is critical any time two materials are bonded—in composites, tooth crowns, or when biomaterials are attached to the human body. Yet, in spite of this importance, reliable methods to measure interfacial properties between dissimilar materials remain elusive. Here we present an experimental approach to quantify the interfacial fracture energy Γi that also provides unique mechanistic insight into the interfacial debonding mechanism at the nanoscale. This approach involves deposition of an additional chromium layer (superlayer) onto a bonded system, where interface debonding is initiated by the residual tensile stress in the superlayer, and where the interface can be separated in a controlled manner and captured in situ. Contrary to earlier methods, our approach allows the entire bonded system to remain in an elastic range during the debonding process, such that Γi can be measured accurately. We validate the method by showing that moisture has a degrading effect on the bonding between epoxy and silica, a technologically important interface. Combining in situ through scanning electron microscope images with molecular simulation, we find that the interfacial debonding mechanism is hierarchical in nature, which is initiated by the detachment of polymer chains, and that the three-dimensional covalent network of the epoxy-based polymer may directly influence water accumulation, leading to the reduction of Γi under presence of moisture. The results may enable us to design more durable concrete composites that could be used to innovate transportation systems, create more durable buildings and bridges, and build resilient infrastructure. PMID:25097263

  4. A robust nanoscale experimental quantification of fracture energy in a bilayer material system.

    PubMed

    Lau, Denvid; Broderick, Kurt; Buehler, Markus J; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2014-08-19

    Accurate measurement of interfacial properties is critical any time two materials are bonded--in composites, tooth crowns, or when biomaterials are attached to the human body. Yet, in spite of this importance, reliable methods to measure interfacial properties between dissimilar materials remain elusive. Here we present an experimental approach to quantify the interfacial fracture energy Γi that also provides unique mechanistic insight into the interfacial debonding mechanism at the nanoscale. This approach involves deposition of an additional chromium layer (superlayer) onto a bonded system, where interface debonding is initiated by the residual tensile stress in the superlayer, and where the interface can be separated in a controlled manner and captured in situ. Contrary to earlier methods, our approach allows the entire bonded system to remain in an elastic range during the debonding process, such that Γi can be measured accurately. We validate the method by showing that moisture has a degrading effect on the bonding between epoxy and silica, a technologically important interface. Combining in situ through scanning electron microscope images with molecular simulation, we find that the interfacial debonding mechanism is hierarchical in nature, which is initiated by the detachment of polymer chains, and that the three-dimensional covalent network of the epoxy-based polymer may directly influence water accumulation, leading to the reduction of Γi under presence of moisture. The results may enable us to design more durable concrete composites that could be used to innovate transportation systems, create more durable buildings and bridges, and build resilient infrastructure.

  5. Experimental measurement of a shipboard fire environment with simulated radioactive materials packages

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.; Beene, D.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Results from a series of eight test fires ranging in size from 2.2 to 18.8 MW conducted aboard the Coast Guard fire test ship Mayo Lykes at Mobile, Alabama are presented and discussed. Tests aboard the break-bulk type cargo ship consisted of heptane spray fires simulating engine room and galley fires, wood crib fires simulating cargo hold fires, and pool fires staged for comparison to land-based regulatory fire results. Primary instrumentation for the tests consisted of two pipe calorimeters that simulated a typical package shape for radioactive materials packages. The calorimeters were both located adjacent to the fires and on the opposite side of the cargo hold bulkhead nearest the fire. The calorimeters were constructed from 1.5 m length sections of nominal 2 foot diameter schedule 60 steel pipe. Type K thermocouples were attached at 12 locations on the circumference and ends of the calorimeter. Fire heat fluxes to the calorimeter surfaces were estimated with the use of the Sandia SODDIT inverse heat conduction code. Experimental results from all types of tests are discussed, and some comparisons are made between the environments found on the ship and those found in land-based pool fire tests.

  6. Experimental Study on Melting and Solidification of Phase Change Material Thermal Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambarita, H.; Abdullah, I.; Siregar, C. A.; Siregar, R. E. T.; Ronowikarto, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    Melting and solidification process of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are investigated experimentally. The tested PCMs are Paraffin wax and Steric acid which typically used for solar water heater. The objective is to explore the characteristics of the PCM when it is being melted and solidified. The experiments are performed in a glass box. One side of the box wall is heated while the opposite wall is kept constant and other walls are insulated. Temperature of the heated wall are kept constant at 80°C, 85°C, and 90°C, respectively. Every experiment is carried out for 600 minutes. Temperatures are recorded and the melting and solidification processes are pictured by using camera. The results show that the melting process starts from the upper part of the thermal storage. In the solidification process, it starts from the lower part of the thermal storage. As a thermal energy storage, Paraffin wax is better than Steric acid. This is because Paraffin wax can store more energy. At heat source temperature of 90°C, thermal energy stored by Paraffin wax and Stearic acid is 61.84 kJ and 57.39 kJ, respectively. Thus it is better to used Paraffin wax in the solar water heater as thermal energy storage.

  7. Thermal conductivity model for powdered materials under vacuum based on experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakatani, N.; Ogawa, K.; Iijima, Y.; Arakawa, M.; Honda, R.; Tanaka, S.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of powdered media is characteristically very low in vacuum, and is effectively dependent on many parameters of their constituent particles and packing structure. Understanding of the heat transfer mechanism within powder layers in vacuum and theoretical modeling of their thermal conductivity are of great importance for several scientific and engineering problems. In this paper, we report the results of systematic thermal conductivity measurements of powdered media of varied particle size, porosity, and temperature under vacuum using glass beads as a model material. Based on the obtained experimental data, we investigated the heat transfer mechanism in powdered media in detail, and constructed a new theoretical thermal conductivity model for the vacuum condition. This model enables an absolute thermal conductivity to be calculated for a powder with the input of a set of powder parameters including particle size, porosity, temperature, and compressional stress or gravity, and vice versa. Our model is expected to be a competent tool for several scientific and engineering fields of study related to powders, such as the thermal infrared observation of air-less planetary bodies, thermal evolution of planetesimals, and performance of thermal insulators and heat storage powders.

  8. Design and Development of a Composite Dome for Experimental Characterization of Material Permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, Hector; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a carbon fiber reinforced plastic dome, including a description of the dome fabrication, method for sealing penetrations in the dome, and a summary of the planned test series. This dome will be used for the experimental permeability characterization and leakage validation of composite vessels pressurized using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen at the Cryostat Test Facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The preliminary design of the dome was completed using membrane shell analysis. Due to the configuration of the test setup, the dome will experience some flexural stresses and stress concentrations in addition to membrane stresses. Also, a potential buckling condition exists for the dome due to external pressure during the leak testing of the cryostat facility lines. Thus, a finite element analysis was conducted to assess the overall strength and stability of the dome for each required test condition. Based on these results, additional plies of composite reinforcement material were applied to local regions on the dome to alleviate stress concentrations and limit deflections. The dome design includes a circular opening in the center for the installation of a polar boss, which introduces a geometric discontinuity that causes high stresses in the region near the hole. To attenuate these high stresses, a reinforcement system was designed using analytical and finite element analyses. The development of a low leakage polar boss system is also investigated.

  9. Shear bond strengths of tooth coating materials including the experimental materials contained various amounts of multi-ion releasing fillers and their effects for preventing dentin demineralization.

    PubMed

    Arita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masaya; Kazama-Koide, Miku; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-01-24

    We examined shear bond strengths (SBSs) of various tooth-coating-materials including the experimental materials to dentin and demineralization resistance of a fractured adhesive surface after the SBS testing. Three resin-type tooth-coating-materials (BC, PRG Barrier Coat; HC, Hybrid Coat II; and SF, Shield force plus) and two glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials (CV, Clinpro XT Varnish; and FJ, Fuji VII) were selected. The experimental PRG Barrier Coat containing 0, 17, and 33 wt% S-PRG filler (BC0, BC17, and BC33, respectively) were developed. Each tooth-coating-material was applied to flattened dentin surfaces of extracted human teeth for SBS testing. After storing in water for 32 days with 4000 thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the SBS test. Specimens after SBS testing were subjected to a pH cycling test, and then, demineralization depths were measured using a polarized-light microscope. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test were used for statistical analysis. The SBS value of FJ and CV was significantly lower than those of other materials except for BC (p < 0.01). The lesion depth of FJ was significantly shallower than those of other materials (p < 0.01); that of CV was significantly shallower than those of BC, HC, SF, and the control; and those of BC0 and BC17 were significantly shallower than that of the control (p < 0.05). The resin-type tooth-coating-materials demonstrated significantly higher SBS for dentin than the glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials; however, they were inferior to the glass ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials in regards to the acid resistance of the fractured adhesion surface.

  10. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central…

  11. 27 CFR 24.249 - Experimentation with new treating material or process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., under the provisions of this section, conduct on bonded wine premises such experimentation with a... proprietor who wants to conduct experimentation must file an application with the appropriate TTB officer... that the conduct of such experimentation must not jeopardize the revenue, conflict with wine...

  12. 27 CFR 24.249 - Experimentation with new treating material or process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., under the provisions of this section, conduct on bonded wine premises such experimentation with a... proprietor who wants to conduct experimentation must file an application with the appropriate TTB officer... that the conduct of such experimentation must not jeopardize the revenue, conflict with wine...

  13. Effect of varying experimental conditions on the viscosity of α-pinene derived secondary organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Mutzel, A.; Renbaum-Wolff, L.; Böge, O.; Kamal, S.; Herrmann, H.; Martin, S. T.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    To predict the role of secondary organic material (SOM) particles in climate, visibility, and health, information on the viscosity of particles containing SOM is required. In this study we investigate the viscosity of SOM particles as a function of relative humidity and SOM particle mass concentration during SOM synthesis. The SOM was generated via the ozonolysis of α-pinene at < 5 % relative humidity (RH). Experiments were carried out using the poke-and-flow technique, which measures the experimental flow time (τexp, flow) of SOM after poking the material with a needle. In the first set of experiments, we show that τexp, flow increased by a factor of 3600 as the RH increased from < 0.5 to 50 % RH, for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. Based on simulations, the viscosities of the particles were between 6 × 105 and 5 × 107 Pa s at < 0.5 % RH and between 3 × 102 and 9 × 103 Pa s at 50 % RH. In the second set of experiments we show that under dry conditions τexp, flow decreased by a factor of 45 as the production mass concentration increased from 121 to 14 000 μg m-3. From simulations of the poke-and-flow experiments, the viscosity of SOM with a production mass concentration of 14 000 μg m-3 was determined to be between 4 × 104 and 1.5 × 106 Pa s compared to between 6 × 105 and 5 × 107 Pa s for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. The results can be rationalised by a dependence of the chemical composition of SOM on production conditions. These results emphasise the shifting characteristics of SOM, not just with RH and precursor type, but also with the production conditions, and suggest that production mass concentration and the RH at which the viscosity was determined should be considered both when comparing laboratory results and when extrapolating these results to the atmosphere.

  14. Effect of varying experimental conditions on the viscosity of α-pinene derived secondary organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, James W.; Zhang, Yue; Mutzel, Anke; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Boge, Olaf; Kamal, Saeid; Herrmann, Hartmut; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the viscosity of particles containing secondary organic material (SOM) is useful for predicting reaction rates and diffusion in SOM particles. In this study we investigate the viscosity of SOM particles as a function of relative humidity and SOM particle mass concentration, during SOM synthesis. The SOM was generated via the ozonolysis of α-pinene at < 5 % relative humidity (RH). Experiments were carried out using the poke-and-flow technique, which measures the experimental flow time (τexp, flow) of SOM after poking the material with a needle. In the first set of experiments, we show that τexp, flow increased by a factor of 3600 as the RH increased from < 0.5 RH to 50 % RH, for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. Based on simulations, the viscosities of the particles were between 6 x 105 and 5 x 107 Pa s at < 0.5 % RH and between 3 x 102 and 9 x 103 Pa s at 50 % RH. In the second set of experiments we show that under dry conditions τexp, flow decreased by a factor of 45 as the production mass concentration increased from 121 to 14 000 μg m-3. From simulations of the poke-and-flow experiments, the viscosity of SOM with a production mass concentration of 14 000 μg m-3 was determined to be between 4 x 104 and 1.5 x 106 Pa s compared to between 6 x 105 and 5 x 107 Pa s for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. The results can be rationalized by a dependence of the chemical composition of SOM on production conditions. These results emphasize the shifting characteristics of SOM, not just with RH and precursor type, but also with the production conditions, and suggest that production mass concentration and the RH at which the viscosity was determined should be considered both when comparing laboratory results and when extrapolating these results to the atmosphere.

  15. Material unaccounted for at the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor: The SEFOR MUF

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, W.A.

    1994-11-07

    The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission contracted with the General Electric Company to design, construct, and operate the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor (SEFOR) to measure the Doppler effect for fast neutron breeder reactors. It contracted with Nuclear Fuel Services to fabricate the fuel rods for the reactor. When the reactor went critical in May, 1969, it appeared that some of the mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel rods did not contain the specified quantity of plutonium. The SEFOR operators soon found several fuel rods which appeared to be low in plutonium. The safeguards group at Brookhaven was asked to look into the problem and, if possible, determine how much plutonium was missing from the unirradiated rods and from the larger number which had been slightly irradiated in the reactor. It was decided that the plutonium content of the unirradiated and irradiated rods could be measured relative to a reference rod using a high resolution gamma-ray detector and also by neutron measurements using an auto-correlation circuit recently developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). During the next two years, Brookhaven personnel and C.V. Strain of NRL made several trips to the SEFOR reactor. About 250 of the 775 rods were measured by two or more methods, using a sodium-iodide detector, a high-resolution germanium detector, a neutron detector, or the reactor (to measure reactivity). The research team concluded that 4.6 {+-} 0.46 kg of plutonium was missing out of the 433 kg that the rods should have contained. This report describes the SEFOR experiment and the procedures used to determine the material unaccounted for, or MUF.

  16. Experimental Investigation of the Mechanical Behavior of Cord-Rubber Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    gages was carried out with a tensometer (Hounsfield, Serial No. W6771). Separate calibration curves were obtained for each gage. The gages were...gripped over the teflon end tubes in wedge grips of the tensometer as shown in Fig. 2. The actual applied strain was calculated by knowing the gage length...of the strain gage and the cross-head speed of the tensometer . The strain indicated by the gage was measured by a conventional strain indicator. The

  17. Environmental Effect on Evolutionary Cyclic Plasticity Material Parameters of 316 Stainless Steel: An Experimental & Material Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2014-09-20

    This report provides an update on an earlier assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor (LWR) materials under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. The overall objective of this LWRS project is to assess the degradation by environmentally assisted cracking/fatigue of LWR materials such as various alloy base metals and their welds used in reactor coolant system piping. This effort is to support the Department of Energy LWRS program for developing tools to understand the aging/failure mechanism and to predict the remaining life of LWR components for anticipated 60-80 year operation.

  18. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  19. Experimental investigation of pressure responsive 'smart' materials found in the natural world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, George W.

    The unique ability to sense environmental stimuli and respond appropriately in a controlled and reversible fashion is a distinguishing characteristic of a novel class of materials collectively known as 'smart,' 'adaptive,' or 'responsive' materials. This seemingly 'smart' behavior is, thus, controlled by internal 'feedback loops' generated by the interconnectivity of various system elements which enables them to operate cooperatively and exhibit more complex behaviors as a collective. This thesis investigates, experimentally, three natural systems found in both the biological and non-biological domains which exhibit responsive or adaptive behaviors in the presence of external mechanical pressures by exploiting uniquely different chemical and physical principles. The first system focuses on articular cartilage, an example of an adaptive material which utilizes its distinctive hierachical, multi-scale structure in order to adjust and change its physical and lubricating properties to suit the specific needs under a broad range of normal and shear stresses. A compression cell designed to fit inside an NMR spectrometer was used to investigate the in situ mechanical strain response, structural changes to the internal pore structure, and the diffusion and flow of interstitial water in full thickness cartilage samples as it was deforming dynamically under a constant compressive load (pressure). We distinguish between the hydrostatic pressure acting on the interstitial fluid and the pore pressure acting on the cartilage fibril network. Our results show that properties related to the pore matrix microstructure such as diffusion and hydraulic conductivity are strongly influenced by the hydrostatic pressure in the interstitial fluid of the dynamically deforming cartilage which differ significantly from the properties measured under static i.e. equilibrium loading conditions (when the hydrostatic pressure has relaxed back to zero). The magnitude of the hydrostatic fluid

  20. CFD analysis and experimental investigation associated with the design of the Los Alamos nuclear materials storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Hopkins, S.; Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is being renovated for long-term storage of canisters designed to hold heat-generating nuclear materials, such as powders, ingots, and other components. The continual heat generation within the canisters necessitates a reliable cooling scheme of sufficient magnitude which maintains the stored material temperatures within acceptable limits. The primary goal of this study was to develop both an experimental facility and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a subsection of the NMSF which could be used to observe general performance trends of a proposed passive cooling scheme and serve as a design tool for canister holding fixtures. Comparisons of numerical temperature and velocity predictions with empirical data indicate that the CFD model provides an accurate representation of the NMSF experimental facility. Minor modifications in the model geometry and boundary conditions are needed to enhance its accuracy, however, the various fluid and thermal models correctly capture the basic physics.

  1. Modeling defect cluster evolution in irradiated structural materials: Focus on comparing to high-resolution experimental characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Brian D.; Hu, Xunxiang; Kohnert, Aaron; Xu, Donghua

    2015-03-02

    Exposure of metallic structural materials to irradiation environments results in significant microstructural evolution, property changes, and performance degradation, which limits the extended operation of current generation light water reactors and restricts the design of advanced fission and fusion reactors. Further, it is well recognized that these irradiation effects are a classic example of inherently multiscale phenomena and that the mix of radiation-induced features formed and the corresponding property degradation depend on a wide range of material and irradiation variables. This inherently multiscale evolution emphasizes the importance of closely integrating models with high-resolution experimental characterization of the evolving radiation-damaged microstructure. Lastly, this article provides a review of recent models of the defect microstructure evolution in irradiated body-centered cubic materials, which provide good agreement with experimental measurements, and presents some outstanding challenges, which will require coordinated high-resolution characterization and modeling to resolve.

  2. Modeling defect cluster evolution in irradiated structural materials: Focus on comparing to high-resolution experimental characterization studies

    DOE PAGES

    Wirth, Brian D.; Hu, Xunxiang; Kohnert, Aaron; ...

    2015-03-02

    Exposure of metallic structural materials to irradiation environments results in significant microstructural evolution, property changes, and performance degradation, which limits the extended operation of current generation light water reactors and restricts the design of advanced fission and fusion reactors. Further, it is well recognized that these irradiation effects are a classic example of inherently multiscale phenomena and that the mix of radiation-induced features formed and the corresponding property degradation depend on a wide range of material and irradiation variables. This inherently multiscale evolution emphasizes the importance of closely integrating models with high-resolution experimental characterization of the evolving radiation-damaged microstructure. Lastly,more » this article provides a review of recent models of the defect microstructure evolution in irradiated body-centered cubic materials, which provide good agreement with experimental measurements, and presents some outstanding challenges, which will require coordinated high-resolution characterization and modeling to resolve.« less

  3. Computational and Experimental Study of Energetic Materials in a Counterflow Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki (Technical Monitor); Urban, David (Technical Monitor); Smooke, M. D.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Yetter, R. A.; Risha, G.

    2004-01-01

    Counterflow diffusion flames are studied for various fuels flowing against decomposition products from solid ammonium perchlorate (AP) pellets in order to obtain fundamental understanding of composite propellant flame structure and chemistry. We illustrate this approach through a combined experimental and numerical study of a fuel mixture consisting of C2H4 CO + H2, and C2H2 + C2H4 flowing against solid AP. For these particular AP-fuel systems, the resulting flame zone simulates the various flame structures that are ex+ to exist between reaction products from Ap crystals and a hydrocarbon binder. As in all our experimental studies, quantitative species and temperature profiles have been measured between the fuel exit and AP surface. Species measured included CN, NH, NO, OH, N2, CO2, CO, H2, CO, HCl, and H2O. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple at the exit, spontaneous Raman scattering measurements throughout the flame, OH rotational population distributions, and NO vibrational population distributions. The burning rate of AP was also measured as a function of strain rate, given by the separation distance between the AP surface and the gaseous hydrocarbon fuel tube exit plane. This distance was nominally set at 5 mm, although studies have been performed for variations in separation distance. The measured 12 scalars are compared with predictions from a detailed gas-phase kinetics model consisting of 86 species and 531 reactions. Model predictions are found to be in good agreement with experiment and illustrate the type of kinetic features that may be expected to occur in propellants when AP particle size distributions are varied. Furthermore, the results constitute the continued development of a necessary database and validation of a comprehensive model for studying more complex AP-solid fuel systems in microgravity. Exploratory studies have also been performed with liquid and solid fuels at normal gravity. Because of melting (and hence dripping) and deep

  4. Studies on the dissolution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated materials using a novel dialysis tubing experimental method

    SciTech Connect

    Woolgar, P.J. Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Stirling ); Jones, K.C. )

    1999-06-15

    Assessment of risk and remediation strategies at contaminated sites requires that both the amounts of contaminants present and their potential for release from materials and soils be evaluated. The release, or dissolution, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated materials to water was therefore investigated. To facilitate investigations of PAH dissolution from physically disparate materials such as solid coal tars, creosote, oil, and spent oxide, an experimental method for measuring dissolved PAHs was developed employing dialysis tubing in batch-type system. This was validated and compared to aqueous-phase PAH concentrations measured using more traditional techniques and also predicted using Raoult's law. The experimental procedure was successfully used to determine near equilibrium aqueous concentrations of PAHs, but it could only be used to determine relative rates of approach to equilibrium as the dialysis tubing effected the rate constants. It was found that the contaminant materials influenced dissolution, in particular the close to equilibrium concentrations. For materials chemically similar to PAHs, such as nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs), the concentrations could be predicted using Raoult's law. For materials that were chemically dissimilar to PAHs, such as spent oxide, release was more thermodynamically favorable than for NAPLs.

  5. Experimental measurements of composite materials from the bearing structure of railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebeşans, I.; Babici, L. M.; Floroiu, D.

    2016-11-01

    Composite materials belong to the category of "new materials", artificially created to meet the demands of science and technology.On the one hand, these are a perfect replacement of ferrous and nonferrous materials, and a perfect solution for a whole series of technical problems in various industrial branches, on the other hand.The composite materials represent fiber arrangements - continuous or not - from a resistant material (reinforcing elements), which are coated with a matrix, the mechanical strength of which is much lower.The Matrix maintains the desired geometrical arrangement of fibers and transmits stresses that the piece is subjected to.The present paper proposes to analyze behavioral patterns during the tests of specimens made of composite materials.

  6. Etching of low-k materials for microelectronics applications by means of a N2/H2 plasma: modeling and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Laer, K.; Tinck, S.; Samara, V.; de Marneffe, J. F.; Bogaerts, A.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the etch process of so-called low-k organic material by means of a N2/H2 capacitively coupled plasma, as applied in the micro-electronics industry for the manufacturing of computer chips. In recent years, such an organic material has emerged as a possible alternative for replacing bulk SiO2 as a dielectric material in the back-end-of-line, because of the smaller parasitic capacity between adjacent conducting lines, and thus a faster propagation of the electrical signals throughout the chip. Numerical simulations with a hybrid plasma model, using an extensive plasma and surface chemistry set, as well as experiments are performed, focusing on the plasma properties as well as the actual etching process, to obtain a better insight into the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the effects of gas pressure, applied power and gas composition are investigated to try to optimize the etch process. In general, the plasma density reaches a maximum near the wafer edge due to the so-called ‘edge effect’. As a result, the etch rate is not uniform but will also reach its maximum near the wafer edge. The pressure seems not to have a big effect. A higher power increases the etch rate, but the uniformity becomes (slightly) worse. The gas mixing ratio has no significant effect on the etch process, except when a pure H2 or N2 plasma is used, illustrating the synergistic effects of a N2/H2 plasma. In fact, our calculations reveal that the N2/H2 plasma entails an ion-enhanced etch process. The simulation results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. The microscopic etch profile shows the desired anisotropic shape under all conditions under study.

  7. Experimental determination of the viscous flow permeability of porous materials by measuring reflected low frequency acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbiche, A.; Sadouki, M.; Fellah, Z. E. A.; Ogam, E.; Fellah, M.; Mitri, F. G.; Depollier, C.

    2016-01-01

    An acoustic reflectivity method is proposed for measuring the permeability or flow resistivity of air-saturated porous materials. In this method, a simplified expression of the reflection coefficient is derived in the Darcy's regime (low frequency range), which does not depend on frequency and porosity. Numerical simulations show that the reflection coefficient of a porous material can be approximated by its simplified expression obtained from its Taylor development to the first order. This approximation is good especially for resistive materials (of low permeability) and for the lower frequencies. The permeability is reconstructed by solving the inverse problem using waves reflected by plastic foam samples, at different frequency bandwidths in the Darcy regime. The proposed method has the advantage of being simple compared to the conventional methods that use experimental reflected data, and is complementary to the transmissivity method, which is more adapted to low resistive materials (high permeability).

  8. Pad Characterization and Experimental Analysis of Pad Wear Effect on Material Removal Uniformity in Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kihyun; Oh, Jiheon; Jeong, Haedo

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of pad wear on the nonuniformity of material removal in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). In order to verify the mechanical aspect of the material removal mechanism, pad characterization was conducted. Pad conditioning plays a key role in obtaining stable material removal during polishing. However, the polishing pad is gradually worn as conditioning proceeds during CMP. The pad profile was measured using the contact profile measuring system to analyze pad wear after each polishing run. From experimental results, the within wafer nonuniformity (WIWNU) was unstable at the initial polishing run because of the first wafer effect. In addition, the WIWNU deteriorated as determined from a polishing pad worn by conditioning. Therefore, pad wear has a significant effect on the nonuniformity of material removal in CMP.

  9. Experimental study of compatibility of reduced metal oxides with thermal energy storage lining materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Danish, Syed Noman; Al-Ansary, Hany; Jeter, Sheldon; Al-Suhaibani, Zeyad

    2016-05-01

    Solid particles have been shown to be able to operate at temperatures higher than 1000 °C in concentrated solar power (CSP) systems with thermal energy storage (TES). Thermochemical energy storage (TCES) using metal oxides have also found to be advantageous over sensible and latent heat storage concepts. This paper investigates the compatibility of the inner lining material of a TES tank with the reduced metal oxide. Two candidate metal oxides are investigated against six candidate lining materials. XRD results for both the materials are investigated and compared before and after the reduction of metal oxide at 1000°C in the presence of lining material. It is found that the lining material rich in zirconia is suitable for such application. Silicon Carbide is also found non-reacting with one of the metal oxides so it needs to be further investigated with other candidate metal oxides.

  10. Limit analysis assessment of experimental behavior of arches reinforced with GFRP materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilio, Ismael; Fedele, Roberto; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Milani, Gabriele

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a comparison between results furnished by a 3D FE upper bound limit analysis and experimental results for some reinforced masonry arches tested at the University of Minho (Portugal) is provided. While the delamination from arches support can be modelled only in an approximate way within limit analysis, the aim of the paper is to accurately reproduce the change in the failure mechanism observed in experimentation, due to the introduction of strengthening elements. Both experimental and numerical results showa clear change in the failure mechanism and in the corresponding ultimate peak load. A set of simulations is also performed on reinforced arches previously damaged, to investigate the role played by the reinforcement within a proper repairing procedure. Good correlation with experimental work and numerical simulations is achieved.

  11. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  12. Three-Dimensional Thermomechanical Simulation and Experimental Validation on Failure of Dissimilar Material Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2016-07-01

    Dissimilar material weld joints, consisting of low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel (SS), have critical application in boiling water reactors in the nuclear industry. It was predicted that phase transformation adjacent to the fusion boundary and stress distribution across the transition joint play a key role in the structural degeneration of these welds. Quantitatively, to evaluate their contribution, two different joints were considered. One was fabricated with buttering material 309L SS (M/S Mishra Dhatu Nigam Limited, Hyderabad, India), and the other was produced with buttering material IN182 (M/S Mishra Dhatu Nigam Limited, Hyderabad, India). Base materials remained the same for both. Thermomechanical simulation on dissimilar material welds was performed using finite-element modeling to predict the thermal effect and stress prone area. Temperature-dependent thermal and structural properties were considered for simulation. Simulation results were compared with microstructural characteristics, and data were obtained from the in-situ tensile test. Simulation results exhibited that stress was at maximum in the buttering material and made the zone weaker with respect to adjacent areas. During the validation of results, it was observed that failure occurred through buttering material and endorsed the inference. The variation in mechanical properties of the two welds was explained considering the effect of thermal state and stress distribution.

  13. Effect of suture materials on bacterial survival in infected wounds. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, B; Blomstedt, B

    1979-01-01

    A non-capilllary and a capillary suture material were compared as regards the course of Staphylococcus areus infection at the site of implantation. The materials were implanted in the muscle of the rat, and bacterial counts were made at intervals over 41 days. The number of bacteria recovered at the implantation site during the test period decreased steadily and was significantly lower for the non-capillary than for the capillary materials. In the latter case the bacterial counts did not fall far below the initial value at inoculation. The number of bacteria isolated from the suture thread in relation to the total number from the thread and the surrounding muscle was significantly greater for the capillary material. The difference in the results for the two types of suture materials might be ascribed to differences in the extent to which the bacteria are exposed to the body's defence mechanism; in the case of the capillary suture material the bacteria would tend to be protected through their enclosure in the interstices of the material.

  14. The MIRTE Experimental Program: An Opportunity to Test Structural Materials in Various Configurations in Thermal Energy Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Leclaire, Nicolas; Le Dauphin, Francois-Xavier; Duhamel, Isabelle; Briggs, Blair; Piot, Jerome; Rennesson, Malvina; Laville, Arnaud

    2014-11-04

    The MIRTE (Materials in Interacting and Reflecting configurations, all Thicknesses) program was established to answer the needs of criticality safety practitioners in terms of experimental validation of structural materials and to possibly contribute to nuclear data improvement, which ultimately supports reactor safety analysis as well. MIRTE took the shape of a collaboration between the AREVA and ANDRA French industrialists and a noncommercial international funding partner such as the U.S. Department of Energy. The aim of this paper is to present the configurations of the MIRTE 1 and MIRTE 2 programs and to highlight the results of the titanium experiments recently published in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.

  15. Experimental study on the rheologic behavior of debris flow material in the Campania region, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotto di Santolo, A.; Evangelista, A.; Pellegrino, A.

    2009-04-01

    The rheologic behavior of the natural material collected in the source area of debris flows occurred in the Campania region has been investigated. Several studies have been carried out on the conditions leading to the triggering of landslides. Less information is available on the transition between soil behavior and fluid behavior. In this work the rheologic flow behavior of the suspension of these materials in distilled water has been investigated with a standard viscosimeter (AR 2000ex TA Instruments) at different solid volumetric concentrations Cv (20, 30 and 40%). The materials tested were taken from the source area of three debris flows occurred in the mountainsides of the Northwestern Campania region (Southern Italy): Nocera, Salerno (March 2005) material A in the following; Monteforte Irpino, Avellino (May 1998) material B; Astroni, Naples (December 2005) material C. The soil type regards the most recent pyroclastic deposits deriving from the volcanic activity of mount Somma/Vesuvius (comprising the Sorrento Penisula and the mountains of Sarno-Quindici) for materials A and B. For material C, the soil type regards the most recent pyroclastic deposits deriving from the volcanic activity of the Phlegrean Fields (part of the city of Naples). For each solid volumetric concentration Cv, two kinds of tests have been performed: test on fine particle suspension (maximum diameter of 0.1 mm); test on large particle suspension (maximum diameter of 0.5 mm). The principal result is that the flow behavior is almost the same for all pyroclastic deposits: the materials behave like a Non-Newtonian fluid with a threshold shear stress (yield stress). The shear stress increases with increase of shear strain in the range analyzed (1< γ י

  16. The Experimental Analysis on the Thermal and Electrical Characteristics of Impregnating Materials for Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong Eun; Kweon Bae, Duck; Kang, Hyoungku; Ahn, Min Cheol; Park, Dong Keun; Seok, Bok-Yeol; Myoung Jang, Ho; Kuk Ko, Tae

    2006-06-01

    In recent years, a development of Coated Conductor (CC) that is a called the second generation superconductor tape is opened out. Therefore a commercialization of superconducting power equipments will be realized presently. To realize a commercialization, it is necessary to develop a stable superconducting magnet. A superconducting magnet has to keep thermal stability as well as electrical stability. In this paper, thermal conductivity of impregnating materials, epoxy compounds, was measured at 65K, 77K, 100K and 200K. Dielectric Strength of superconducting magnet modeled electrode system with impregnating materials was also analyzed. Stycast blue/catalyst 23LV is good materials to apply to the superconducting magnets.

  17. Experimental characterization of magnetic materials for the magnetic shielding of cryomodules in particle accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sah, Sanjay; Myneni, Ganapati; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2015-10-26

    The magnetic properties of two important passive magnetic shielding materials (A4K and Amumetal) for accelerator applications, subjected to various processing and heat treatment conditions are studied comprehensively over a wide range of temperatures: from cryogenic to room temperature. Furthermore, we analyze the effect of processing on the extent of degradation of the magnetic properties of both materials and investigate the possibility of restoring these properties by re-annealing.

  18. Experimental validation of bidirectional reflection and transmission distribution measurements of specular and scattering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobe, Lars O.; Wittkopf, Stephen; Apian-Bennewitz, Peter; Jonsson, Jacob C.; Rubin, Mike

    2010-05-01

    The development of advanced materials for facades aims to achieve higher energy efficiency of buildings. Successful application of these materials depends on the availability of reliable characterization data. While data derived from integrated measurements of transmission and reflection is widely available, it does not allow to characterize the angular dependence of the performance of such materials. The Bidirectional Reflection-Transmission Distribution (BRTD) can be measured by commercially available Gonio-Photometers and, complimenting integrated transmittance and reflectance, allows the assessment of facade materials and thus supports both their development and application. Validation of the obtained data is crucial to back these measurements. Integration of validation procedures into the operation of a characterization laboratory allowing a well-defined approach to quality control is presented for a range of typical material and sample types: * consistency checks of measurement data * cross-checking of integrated material properties derived from BRTD data with integrating sphere measurements * round-robin comparison between laboratories using comparable devices The results of of these first measurements are discussed. Potential to further improve the availability of reliable angular resolved characterization data for the building sector is identified.

  19. Through-the-wall high-resolution imaging of a human and experimental characterization of the transmission of wall materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, S.; Jänis, A.; Gustafsson, M.; Kjellgren, J.; Sume, Ain

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the research efforts made at the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) concerning through-the-wall imaging radar, as well as fundamental characterization of various wall materials. These activities are a part of two FOI-projects concerning security sensors in the aspects of Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) and Homeland Defence. Through-the-wall high resolution imaging of a human between 28-40 GHz has been performed at FOI. The UWB radar that was used is normally a member of the instrumentation of the FOI outdoor RCS test range Lilla Gåra. The armed test person was standing behind different kinds of walls. The radar images were generated by stepping the turntable in azimuth and elevation. The angular resolution in the near-field was improved by refocusing the parabolic antennas, which in combination with the large bandwidth (12 GHz) gave extremely high resolution radar images. A 3D visualization of the person even exposed the handgun tucked into one hip pocket. A qualitative comparison between the experimental results and simulation results (physical optics-based method) will also be presented. The second part of this paper describes results from activities at FOI concerning material characterization in the 2-110 GHz region. The transmission of building, packing and clothing materials has been experimentally determined. The wide-band measurements in free space were carried out with a scalar network analyzer. In this paper results from these characterizations will be presented. Furthermore, an experimental investigation will be reported of how the transmission properties for some moisted materials change as a function of water content and frequency. We will also show experimental results of how the transmission properties of a pine panel are affected when the surface is coated with a thin surface layer of water.

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of ferromagnetic materials by a magnetometer like experimental arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, B.Z.; Rabinovici, R.

    1987-06-01

    The paper presents experimental results regarding the influence of mechanical stresses and thermal treatments on the Barkhausen noise and magnetization characteristic of MolyPermalloy and MuMetal ferromagnetic samples. The samples are different in stress magnitude and localization and in their thermal history. The level of Barkhausen noise and the changes in magnetization characteristic are estimated by measuring the sensitivity and transduction gain of magnetometer like coils configurations which employ the studied ferromagnetic samples as their nonlinear ferromagnetic cores. The present method is unique in the sense that the two factors (one factor is related to the internal magnetic noise, and the other one is related to the form of the magnetic characteristic) are obtained by employing a single relatively simple experimental arrangement. Various types of stresses, which are different in magnitude and localization, become distinguishable one from the other, when considering their differential effects on the two factors. Several possible experimental arrangements are shown.

  1. Biomechanical behaviour of oesophageal tissues: material and structural configuration, experimental data and constitutive analysis.

    PubMed

    Natali, Arturo N; Carniel, Emanuele L; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to propose an approach to the biomechanical analysis of oesophagus by defining an appropriate constitutive model and the associated constitutive parameters. The configuration of the different tissues and layers that compose the oesophagus shows very complicated internal anatomy, geometry and mechanical properties. The coupling of these tissues adds to the complexity. The constitutive models must be capable of interpreting the highly non-linear mechanical response. This is done adopting a specific hyperelastic anisotropic formulation. Experimental data are essential for the investigation of the tissues' biomechanical behaviour and also represent the basis for the definition of constitutive parameters to be adopted within the constitutive formulation developed. This action is provided by using a specific stochastic optimization procedure, addressed to the minimization of a cost function that interprets the discrepancy between experimental data and results from the analytical models developed. Unfortunately, experimental data at disposal do not satisfy all requested information and a particular solution must be provided with regard to definition of the lateral contraction of soft tissues. The anisotropic properties of the tissues are investigated considering the configuration of embedded fibres, according to their mechanical characteristics, quantity and distribution. Collagen and muscular fibres must be considered. The formulation provided on the basis of axiomatic theory of constitutive relationships and the procedure for constitutive parameters identification are described. The evaluation of constitutive parameters requires the analysis of data from experimental tests, that are extracted from the literature. Result validation is performed by comparing the experimental data and model results. In this way a valid basis is provided for the investigation of biomechanical behaviour of oesophagus, looking at deeper information from the

  2. Bioactivity, cytocompatibility and thermal properties of experimental Bioglass-reinforced composites as potential root-canal filling materials.

    PubMed

    Alhashimi, Raghad Abdulrazzaq; Mannocci, Francesco; Sauro, Salvatore

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the bioactivity and the cytocompatibility of experimental Bioglass-reinforced polyethylene-based root-canal filling materials. The thermal properties of the experimental materials were also evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry, while their radiopacity was assessed using a grey-scale value (GSV) aluminium step wedge and a phosphor plate digital system. Bioglass 45S5 (BAG), polyethylene and Strontium oxide (SrO) were used to create tailored composite fibres. The filler distribution within the composites was assessed using SEM, while their bioactivity was evaluated through infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) after storage in simulated body fluid (SBF). The radiopacity of the composite fibres and their thermal properties were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The cytocompatibility of the experimental composites used in this study was assessed using human osteoblasts and statistically analysed using the Pairwise t-test (p<0.05). Bioglass and SrO fillers were well distributed within the resin matrix and increased both the thermal properties and the radiopacity of the polyethylene matrix. The FTIR showed a clear formation of calcium-phosphates, while, MTT and AlamrBlue tests demonstrated no deleterious effects on the metabolic activity of the osteoblast-like cells. BAG-reinforced polyethylene composites may be suitable as obturation materials for endodontic treatment. Since their low melting temperature, such innovative composites may be easily removed in case of root canal retreatment. Moreover, their biocompatibility and bioactivity may benefit proliferation of human osteoblast cells at the periapical area of the root.

  3. Experimental analysis of viscous and material damping in microstructures through the interferometric microscopy technique with climatic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pasquale, Giorgio

    2013-09-01

    This study describes an experimental analysis of energy dissipation due to damping sources in microstructures and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) components using interferometric microscopy techniques. Viscous damping caused by the surrounding air (squeeze film damping) and material damping are measured using variable geometrical parameters of samples and under different environmental conditions. The equipment included a self-made climatic chamber which was used to modify the surrounding air pressure. Results show the relationship between damping coefficients and sample geometry caused by variation in airflow resistance and the relationship between quality factor and air pressure. The experimental results will provide a useful data source for validating analytic models and calibrating simulations. A thorough discussion about interferometry applied to experimental mechanics of MEMS will also contribute to the reduction of the knowledge gap between specialists in optical methods and microsystem designers.

  4. [Is it necessary to assess experimentally and clinically restorative materials already on the market?].

    PubMed

    Merte, Ilka; Schneider, Hartmut; Merte, Knut

    2004-01-01

    The precondition for introducing medical products, e.g. new filling materials, in the European Union is their safety, not their clinical reliability. The latter arises from longitudinal studies and is assessed on the basis of available standards or, if not existant, on formulated quality guidelines. In the case of the specific products Ariston Liner and Ariston pHc (Vivadent, Schaan, FL), designed as an amalgam substitute, the material combination did not correspond to the Swiss standard 2 of restorative dentistry. Although after a short-term application testing on caries free premolars the pulp and dentin were free from inflammation and bacteria, the material combination clinically failed within the 18 months control period with a cumulative failure rate of 16.1% due to marginal caries. After six months of function the subjectively assessed sensitivity tended to increase. Gap formations and porous zones were detected in the composite-tooth-interface in vitro as well as in vivo. Neither the lining, designed to ensure the passage of cations and anions out of the filling material, nor the concept of an adequate caries protective effect proved successful. Marginal caries and hypersensitivity of teeth were the main reasons for the replacement of this amalgam substitute. The specific material combination was withdrawn from the market. As long as laboratory methods cannot substitute clinical evaluations, the introduction of new materials or systems into the market should be supported by short-term clinical studies and the further quality assessment should result from intermediate to long-term longitudinal studies. In this respect guidelines are valuable, such as the Swiss guidelines concerning materials as amalgam substitute.

  5. Experimental Observations of Nuclear Activity in Deuterated Materials Subjected to a Low-Energy Photon Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Benyo, Theresa L.; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Westmeyer, Paul A.; Chait, Arnon; Becks, Michael D.; Martin, Richard E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Penney, Nicholas; Marsolais, Annette M.; Kamm, Tracy R.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of highly deuterated materials to a low-energy (nom. 2 MeV) photon beam resulted in nuclear activity of both the parent metals of hafnium and erbium and a witness material (molybdenum) mixed with the reactants. Gamma spectral analysis of all deuterated materials, ErD2.8+C36D74+Mo and HfD2+C36D74+Mo, showed that nuclear processes had occurred as shown by unique gamma signatures. For the deuterated erbium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of erbium ((163)Er and (171)Er) and of molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo) and by beta decay, technetium (99mTc and 101Tc). For the deuterated hafnium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of hafnium (180mHf and 181Hf) and molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo), and by beta decay, technetium ((99m)Tc and (101)Tc). In contrast, when either the hydrogenated or non-gas-loaded erbium or hafnium materials were exposed to the gamma flux, the gamma spectra revealed no new isotopes. Neutron activation materials showed evidence of thermal and epithermal neutrons. CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors showed evidence of fast neutrons with energies between 1.4 and 2.5 MeV and several instances of triple tracks, indicating (is) greater than 10 MeV neutrons. Further study is required to determine the mechanism causing the nuclear activity.

  6. Aspects of experimental design for plant metabolomics experiments and guidelines for growth of plant material.

    PubMed

    Gibon, Yves; Rolin, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Experiments involve the deliberate variation of one or more factors in order to provoke responses, the identification of which then provides the first step towards functional knowledge. Because environmental, biological, and/or technical noise is unavoidable, biological experiments usually need to be designed. Thus, once the major sources of experimental noise have been identified, individual samples can be grouped, randomised, and/or pooled. Like other 'omics approaches, metabolomics is characterised by the numbers of analytes largely exceeding sample number. While this unprecedented singularity in biology dramatically increases false discovery, experimental error can nevertheless be decreased in plant metabolomics experiments. For this, each step from plant cultivation to data acquisition needs to be evaluated in order to identify the major sources of error and then an appropriate design can be produced, as with any other experimental approach. The choice of technology, the time at which tissues are harvested, and the way metabolism is quenched also need to be taken into consideration, as they decide which metabolites can be studied. A further recommendation is to document data and metadata in a machine readable way. The latter should also describe every aspect of the experiment. This should provide valuable hints for future experimental design and ultimately give metabolomic data a second life. To facilitate the identification of critical steps, a list of items to be considered before embarking on time-consuming and costly metabolomic experiments is proposed.

  7. Experimental determination of forces in a rigidly constrained rod of composite material heated on one side

    SciTech Connect

    Pervushin, Yu.S.; Valiev, R.S.

    1987-03-01

    An installation and a method for investigating thermal forces and strains in structural elements type rods, plates and panels of composite polymer materials subjected to one-sided heating are presented. A diagram of the installation for investigating the thermal forces in structural elements of heat-insulating materials subjected to one-sided heating is shown. The dependences of the support membrane forces and bending moments in the rod on the temperature in one-sided heating were established. The nature of the change of the thermal forces depends on the speed and depth of penetration of the front of temperatures exceeding the temperature of onset of destruction into the section of the material. During cooling, the tensile forces and bending moments continue to increase.

  8. Ultrasonic Vibration Assisted Grinding of Bio-ceramic Materials: Modeling, Simulation, and Experimental Investigations on Edge Chipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfay, Hayelom D.

    Bio-ceramics are those engineered materials that find their applications in the field of biomedical engineering or medicine. They have been widely used in dental restorations, repairing bones, joint replacements, pacemakers, kidney dialysis machines, and respirators. etc. due to their physico-chemical properties, such as excellent corrosion resistance, good biocompatibility, high strength and high wear resistance. Because of their inherent brittleness and hardness nature they are difficult to machine to exact sizes and dimensions. Abrasive machining processes such as grinding is one of the most widely used manufacturing processes for bioceramics. However, the principal technical challenge resulted from these machining is edge chipping. Edge chipping is a common edge failure commonly observed during the machining of bio-ceramic materials. The presence of edge chipping on bio-ceramic products affects dimensional accuracy, increases manufacturing cost, hider their industrial applications and causes potential failure during service. To overcome these technological challenges, a new ultrasonic vibration-assisted grinding (UVAG) manufacturing method has been developed and employed in this research. The ultimate aim of this study is to develop a new cost-effective manufacturing process relevant to eliminate edge chippings in grinding of bio-ceramic materials. In this dissertation, comprehensive investigations will be carried out using experimental, theoretical, and numerical approaches to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic vibrations on edge chipping of bioceramics. Moreover, effects of nine input variables (static load, vibration frequency, grinding depth, spindle speed, grinding distance, tool speed, grain size, grain number, and vibration amplitude) on edge chipping will be studied based on the developed models. Following a description of previous research and existing approaches, a series of experimental tests on three bio-ceramic materials (Lava, partially fired Lava

  9. Experimental and Analytical Characterization of the Macromechanical Response for Triaxial Braided Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, carbon composite structures are being used in aerospace applications. Their highstrength, high-stiffness, and low-weight properties make them good candidates for replacing many aerospace structures currently made of aluminum or steel. Recently, many of the aircraft engine manufacturers have developed new commercial jet engines that will use composite fan cases. Instead of using traditional composite layup techniques, these new fan cases will use a triaxially braided pattern, which improves case performance. The impact characteristics of composite materials for jet engine fan case applications have been an important research topic because Federal regulations require that an engine case be able to contain a blade and blade fragments during an engine blade-out event. Once the impact characteristics of these triaxial braided materials become known, computer models can be developed to simulate a jet engine blade-out event, thus reducing cost and time in the development of these composite jet engine cases. The two main problems that have arisen in this area of research are that the properties for these materials have not been fully determined and computationally efficient computer models, which incorporate much of the microscale deformation and failure mechanisms, are not available. The research reported herein addresses some of the deficiencies present in previous research regarding these triaxial braided composite materials. The current research develops new techniques to accurately quantify the material properties of the triaxial braided composite materials. New test methods are developed for the polymer resin composite constituent and representative composite coupons. These methods expand previous research by using novel specimen designs along with using a noncontact measuring system that is also capable of identifying and quantifying many of the microscale failure mechanisms present in the materials. Finally, using the data gathered, a new hybrid

  10. The utilization of Habrobracon and artemia as experimental materials in bioastronautic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    In the reproductive performance of female braconids striking contrasts were revealed between the results from the actual biosatellite flight and those from experiments when the recovered vehicle was subjected to the forces of simulated launching and recovery. Second week decreases in egg production due to the radiation damage of cells in mitosis were minimized for the females irradiated during space flight. It was demonstrated that females irradiated for two days during orbital flight laid as many eggs during the second week as the unirradiated ground-based controls. After the 10th day their oviposition records exceeded control values. The hatchability of eggs deposited by Biosatellite II females was excellent. Explanations were sought for the space flight's cancellation of the characteristic radiation-induced decrease in egg production, and for the exceptionally good hatchability of eggs derived from most of the cell types in the irradiated ovarioles. Eggs from only two classes of cells showed enhanced embryonic lethality: those poised in meiotic metaphase during their mother's orbital flight, and those from oocytes beginning vitellogenesis.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of the weld joints formation in welding foam materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bezginov, Roman O. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Krektuleva, Raisa A. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Mishin, Mikhail A. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Cherepanov, Oleg I. Cherepanov, Roman O.

    2014-11-14

    A numerical analysis of fusion welding of steel- and aluminum-based foam materials is carried out. The schemes of the structured and stochastic pore distribution are considered. The research results were used to conduct the experiments which confirmed the reliability of the numerical calculations.

  12. A Multi-Experimental Study on the Use of Multimedia Instructional Materials to Teach Technical Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbarika, Victor; Bagarukayo, Emily; Hingorani, Vineeta; Stokes, Sandra; Kourouma, Mathieu; Sankar, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    A review of "social experiments" with adoption of multimedia-based technologies in Europe has been reported. But, there has been limited discussion on the value of multimedia instructional materials in technical disciplines. This study combines results from experiments carried out over a period of three years with multiple audiences--IT…

  13. Experimental studies on the effect of chymopapain on nerve root compression caused by intervertebral disk material.

    PubMed

    Krempen, J F; Minnig, D I; Smith, B S

    1975-01-01

    Chymopapain degrades the nucleus pulposus portion of the intervertebral disk of rabbits. The degradation is not grossly visible until 15 days post-injection. Depolymerization of the chondromucoprotein and decreases in the ability of a disk to imbibe fluid, is, in effect, a "chemical decompression" of the nucleur pulposus. The enzyme must come into direct contact with the chondromucoprotein complex of the disk material, and to a significant extent also must reach the area of disk material adjacent to the herniated annulus. Rapid depolymerization of the chondromucoprotein complex on a biomechanical level, and "decompression" of disk material on a biomechanical level can be correlated with relief of pain in all types of disk herniation in human beings. A primary biochemical change in the disk material would lead to a secondary decrease in inflammation if the change led to a "decompression" of the chondromucoprotein. Since the primary effect of chymopapain is on the chondromucoprotein of the disk, beneficial results would not be expected if nerve root compression is due to bony impingement or scar tissue following previous surgery. Chymopapain did not seem to possess any anti-inflammatory properties when bone was used as an irritant under a nerve root. However, this was technically difficult to evaluate and the possibility that chymopapain may also interfere with a chemical mediator of pain or interfere directly with an inflammatory reaction secondary to root compression can not be excluded.

  14. Experimental petrology of lunar material: the nature of mascons, seas, and the lunar interior.

    PubMed

    O'hara, M J; Biggar, G M; Richardson, S W

    1970-01-30

    One-atmosphere melting data show that Apollo 11 samples are near cotectic. Melting relations at pressures up to 35 kilobars show that clinopyroxenite or amphibole peridotite are possible lunar interiors. Mascons cannot be eclogite; they may be ilmenite accumulate. Hot lunar surface material will boil off alkalis.

  15. Preparation of Problem Oriented Learning Materials: Experimental Project: Farmers Functional Literacy Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deleon, Asher, Ed.

    Using practical problems faced by farmers developing new agricultural methods, a problem-oriented approach to adult functional literacy was developed and tested in the Jaipur district. The booklet explains the first two of the project's five phases: exploration, syllabus and curriculum construction, materials preparation, action, and evaluation.…

  16. Full-scale experimentations on alternative materials in roads: analysis of study practices.

    PubMed

    François, D; Jullien, A; Kerzreho, J P; Chateau, L

    2009-03-01

    In France beginning in the 1990s, the topic of road construction using various alternative materials has given rise to several studies aimed at clarifying the technical and environmental feasibility of such an option. Although crucial to understanding and forecasting their behaviour in the field, an analysis of feedback from onsite experiences (back analysis) of roads built with alternative materials has not yet been carried out. The aim of the CAREX project (2003-2005) has been to fill this gap at the national scale. Based on a stress-response approach applied to both the alternative material and the road structure and including the description of external factors, a dedicated standardised framework for field data classification and analysis was adopted. To carry out this analysis, a set of 17 documented field experiments was identified through a specific national survey. It appears that a great heterogeneity exists in data processing procedures among studies. The description of material is acceptable while it is generally poor regarding external factors and structure responses. Structure monitoring is usually brief and mechanical loads too weak, which limits the significance of field testing. For future full-scale experiments, strengthening the realism within the testing conditions would be appropriate.

  17. Modeling of ultrasonic nonlinearities for dislocation evolution in plastically deformed materials: Simulation and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wujun; Deng, Mingxi; Xiang, Yanxun; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Liu, Changjun; Wang, Yi-Ning

    2016-05-01

    A nonlinear constitutive relationship was established to investigate nonlinear behaviors of ultrasonic wave propagation in plastically damaged media based on analyses of mixed dislocation evolution. Finite element simulations of longitudinal wave propagation in plastically deformed martensite stainless steel were performed based on the proposed nonlinear constitutive relationship, in which the contribution of mixed dislocation to acoustic nonlinearity was considered. The simulated results were validated by experimental measurements of plastically deformed 30Cr2Ni4MoV martensite stainless steels. Simulated and experimental results both reveal a monotonically increasing tendency of the normalized acoustic nonlinearity parameter as a function of plastic strain. Microscopic studies revealed that the changes of the acoustic nonlinearity are mainly attributed to dislocation evolutions, such as dislocation density, dislocation length, and the type and fraction of dislocations during plastic loading.

  18. [Experimental studies on the effect of ceramic materials on cellular and humoral immunity].

    PubMed

    Protsenko, V V; Tolstop'iatov, B O; Zhmin'ko, P G; Diedkov, A G; Konovalenko, V F; Korovin, S I; Palivets', A Iu; Volkov, I B; Iurkovs'kyĭ, S D; Vasiliuk, O M

    2001-01-01

    It has been established in an experimental setting in laboratory animals through testing a number of reactions such as active skin anaphylaxis reaction, mast cell degranulation reaction, specific leucocyte lysis reaction, delayed hypersensitivity reaction, and graft-versus-host reaction that ceramic preparations hydroxilapatite M and osteogel-7 have no sensitizing effects; osteogel-7 is not endowed with immunomodulating activity, which fact suggests to us its immunological inertness.

  19. An experimental approach for synthesis of Fe-Al-O multiferroic fibrous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starbov, N.; Starbova, K.; Vanderbemden, Ph; Simeonova, P.; Lovchinov, V.

    2012-12-01

    Basic principles of the electro-hydrodynamics are applied for synthesis of solid state Fe-Al-O multi-ferroic fibrous material. For that purpose stable blend spinning solutions comprised of a high molecular assisting organic polymer and salts of iron and aluminum are developed. These solutions are tested under electrospinning conditions and synthesis of homogeneous as spun non-woven mats characterized by fibre mean diameters in the micro-and nano-size range is successfully demonstrated. Multi-step thermal procedure is applied for the consecutive solvent evaporation, polymer pyrolisis and final fibre calcination. Electron-optical imaging technique and XRD are applied for revealing the sample morphology and the phase composition correspondingly. The results obtained outline the wide possibilities for fabrication of multi-ferroics fibrous nano-materials on the basis of Fe-Al-O.

  20. An experimental technique to study impulse-wave propagation in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani-Ardakani, S.; Kesavan, S. K.; Chu, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of materials are studied with a technique which uses a mechanical shaker to subject vertically mounted specimens to impulsive forces. The mounting of the specimens over the mechanical shaker with a suspension system is examined. The components of the coupling assembly are described. The electric circuitries for the adjustment of shaker-platform height and suspending-wire tension, and for the acceleration-response measurement of impacted specimens are diagramatically presented. The procedures for studying impulse-wave propagation in materials are discussed; accelerometer response is utilized to determine the velocity of the impulse-wave propagation in the test specimens. The design and function of the suspension and coupling system are evaluated. The data reveal that the technique is applicable for analyzing the impulse-wave propagation in cylindrical specimens, biomechanical measurements, and modal analysis.

  1. Incorporating waste into an experimental school prototype: lessons regarding materials reclamation opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Kong Seng; Mohd Yaacob, Naziaty; Rao, Sreenivasaiah Purushothama; Hashim, Nor Rasidah

    2012-12-01

    This article presents lessons learned from a design project that explored the possibility of incorporating waste into the design of a school prototype. The authors worked with professional architects, a waste artist, environmental scientists and local waste operators to uncover new uses and applications for discarded items. As a result, bottles, aluminium cans, reclaimed doors, crushed concrete and second-hand bricks, etc. were identified, explored and integrated into the architectural design. This article serves as a catalyst that advocates the use of reclaimed materials in the field of design and planning. In particular, it highlights the challenges and issues that need to be addressed in carrying out design work with waste. Designers and practitioners interested in minimizing waste generation by proposing the use of reclaimed materials will find this article useful.

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigations of functionalized boron nitride as electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Nemeth, Karoly; Bareno, Javier; Dogan, Fulya; Bloom, Ira D.; Shaw, Leon L.

    2016-03-03

    The feasibility of synthesizing functionalized h-BN (FBN) via the reaction between molten LiOH and solid h-BN is studied for the first time and its first ever application as an electrode material in Li-ion batteries is evaluated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to provide mechanistic understanding of the possible electrochemical reactions derived from the FBN. Various materials characterizations reveal that the melt-solid reaction can lead to exfoliation and functionalization of h-BN simultaneously, while electrochemical analysis proves that the FBN can reversibly store charges through surface redox reactions with good cycle stability and coulombic efficiency. As a result, the DFT calculations have provided physical insights into the observed electrochemical properties derived from the FBN.

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigations of functionalized boron nitride as electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Fan; Nemeth, Karoly; Bareno, Javier; ...

    2016-03-03

    The feasibility of synthesizing functionalized h-BN (FBN) via the reaction between molten LiOH and solid h-BN is studied for the first time and its first ever application as an electrode material in Li-ion batteries is evaluated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to provide mechanistic understanding of the possible electrochemical reactions derived from the FBN. Various materials characterizations reveal that the melt-solid reaction can lead to exfoliation and functionalization of h-BN simultaneously, while electrochemical analysis proves that the FBN can reversibly store charges through surface redox reactions with good cycle stability and coulombic efficiency. As a result, the DFTmore » calculations have provided physical insights into the observed electrochemical properties derived from the FBN.« less

  4. Developing Experimental Approaches for the Evaluation of Toxicological Interactions of Nanoscale Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    toxicity models rather than use of in vitro assays. However, in addition to these established in vivo methods, expanded use of in vitro assays and... models that may be useful in helping predict the ADME and or biological interactions of nanoscale materials. " The organizers should consider disseminating...vitro/in vivo tests should be considered to provide additional information on model selection, but as yet cannot be a replacement for the in vivo tests

  5. An experimental study of ultrasonic vibration and the penetration of granular material

    PubMed Central

    Firstbrook, David; Worrall, Kevin; Timoney, Ryan; Suñol, Francesc; Gao, Yang

    2017-01-01

    This work investigates the potential use of direct ultrasonic vibration as an aid to penetration of granular material. Compared with non-ultrasonic penetration, required forces have been observed to reduce by an order of magnitude. Similarly, total consumed power can be reduced by up to 27%, depending on the substrate and ultrasonic amplitude used. Tests were also carried out in high-gravity conditions, displaying a trend that suggests these benefits could be leveraged in lower gravity regimes. PMID:28293134

  6. An experimental study on fatigue performance of cryogenic metallic materials for IMO type B tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Sung; You, Won-Hyo; Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Su; Kim, Yooil

    2013-12-01

    Three materials SUS304, 9% Ni steel and Al 5083-O alloy, which are considered possible candidate for International Maritime Organization (IMO) type B Cargo Containment System, were studied. Monotonic tensile, fatigue, fatigue crack growth rate and Crack Tip Opening Displacement tests were carried out at room, intermediate low (-100 °C) and cryogenic (-163 °C) temperatures. The initial yield and tensile strengths of all materials tended to increase with decreasing temperature, whereas the change in elastic modulus was not as remarkable. The largest and smallest improvement ratio of the initial yield strengths due to a temperature reduction were observed in the SUS304 and Al 5083- O alloy, respectively. The fatigue strengths of the three materials increased with decreasing temperature. The largest increase in fatigue strength was observed in the Al 5083-O alloy, whereas the 9% Ni steel sample showed the smallest increase. In the fatigue crack growth rate test, SUS304 and Al 5083-O alloy showed a decrease in the crack propagation rate, due to decrease in temperature, but no visible improvement in da/dN was observed in the case of 9% Ni steel. In the Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD) test, CTOD values were converted to critical crack length for the comparison with different thickness specimens. The critical crack length tended to decrease in the case of SUS304 and increase for the Al 5083-O alloy with decreasing temperature. In case of 9% Ni steel, change of critical crack length was not observed due to temperature decrease. In addition, the changing material properties according to the temperature of the LNG tank were analyzed according to the international code for the construction and equipment of ships carrying liquefied gases in bulk (IGC code) and the rules of classifications.

  7. Integrated Modeling and Experimental Studies at the Meso Scale for Advanced Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    atmosphere (atm) 1.013 250 × 10 5 pascal (Pa) pound force per square inch (psi) 6.984 757 × 10 3 pascal (Pa) Temperature degree Fahrenheit ( o F) [T...destroyed with an extremely high temperature deflagration, that is highly contained in localized area. There is a need to avoid wide-scale...nominally solid materials, that surely experience temperature rise through dissipative yield mechanisms. But immediately and subsequently the overall

  8. Experimental Investigation of Widespread Delamination Damage to Composite Materials Caused by Radiant Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-30

    epoxy laminate fiberglass stock material bonded with epoxy resin (Armstrong A-12). After manufacture, plates were stored at room temperature and...sell any patented invention that may relate to them. This report was cleared for public release by the...delamination damage caused by the thermal environment. Three classes of matrix resins were evaluated with IM7 carbon fibers; epoxy 977-3, modified

  9. Experimental and simulation study on bake-out with dilution ventilation technology for building materials.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang; Liu, Jing; Wei, Shanshan; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-11-01

    With recent improvements to living standards and renovations to many residential buildings, a large volume of new building materials have been utilized throughout China. Formaldehyde and other kinds of VOC pollutants, such as benzene, toluene and xylene found in new building materials, however, emit gases that may lead to some direct or potential health problems. Bake-out with dilution ventilation technology has the potential to shorten emission cycles of indoor air pollution, by which off-gassing from building materials can be reduced. In this paper, a test chamber was used to represent a newly renovated residential room in China. Experiments were conducted to study the applicability of the technology for removing of formaldehyde, benzene, toluene and xylene. A numerical method was used to simulate a 1 m3-chamber-TVOC removing amount under different operating conditions and the concentration change of TVOC during the bake-out exhaust dilution process. The effects of bake-out temperatures and times, ventilation times, and air change rates on removal are also discussed.

  10. [Experimental study on methane potentials of source-separated BMW and individual waste materials].

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Li, Run-dong; Li, Yan-ji; Ke, Xin; Wei, Li-hong; Luo, Xiao-song

    2008-08-01

    A laboratory procedure is described for measuring methane potentials of source-separated bio-organic municipal waste (BMW). Triplicate reactors with about 20 grams fresh material were incubated at 37 degrees C with 300 mL inoculum from Shenyang wastewater treatment plant and the methane production was followed over a 50 d period by regular measurement of methane on a gas chromatograph. At 37 degrees C, the methane production efficiency of source-separated BMW and individual waste materials was: starch > BMW > protein > food oil > fat > paper. For the source-separated BMW,starch,protein,food oil,fat and paper, the methane potential (CH4/VS) of 218.15, 209.11, 194.20, 238.86, 257.82 and 131.41 mL/g were found,and ultimate biodegradability of 6 difference materials were 67.73%, 72.88%, 65.84%, 78.38%, 74.11% and 47.98%, respectively.

  11. Experimental study of a vortex ring impacting a smart material-based cantilevered plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Sean; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2011-11-01

    Recent developments in lightweight smart materials have generated scientific and technological advancements in small scale energy harvesting for powering low-consumption electronic devices. Often, energy is harvested from base excitation of a cantilevered smart material strip. In this case, the encompassing fluid acts as a passive damper, reducing the vibration amplitude and frequency, which reduces the harvesting capacity. By comparison, relatively few research efforts to date have explored the feasibility of using smart materials for harvesting energy directly from fluid motion. In this paper we employ vortex rings as the source from which to extract energy and use an ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) strip in a cantilevered configuration as the harvesting device. Vortex rings, generated using a piston/cylinder arrangement submersed in water, are fired at the IPMC harvester and the resulting impact is recorded using a high speed video camera. The vortex ring propagation and circulation are estimated using flow visualization and particle image velocimetry. The plate deflection and electrical output are recorded as functions of time and correlated to the vortex strength and geometry.

  12. Experimental determination of ablation vapor species from carbon phenolic heat-shield materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The relative concentrations of vapors produced from carbon phenolic composites under thermal loadings approximating those expected at peak heating during vehicle entry into the atmospheres of the outer planets have been determined. The technique of vaporizing the surface of bulk samples by laser irradiation while measuring in situ the vapor species by mass spectrometry is described. Results show that vapor composition varies with irradiance level and with depth of heating (or extent of pyrolysis). Attempts are made to compare these experimental results with the theoretical predictions from computer codes.

  13. L-Histidinium thiocyanurate: Experimental and theoretical studies of a new nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira Gonçalves, Mauro A.; Silva, Pedro S. Pereira; Silva, Manuela Ramos; Paixão, José A.

    2017-02-01

    A new organic compound, L-histidinium thiocyanurate thiocyanuric acid dihydrate, has been synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and nonlinear optical measurements. The efficiency of the second-harmonic generation was evaluated with the Kurtz and Perry powder method at a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. By using the experimental structure, the molecular first hyperpolarizability tensor was determined with Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods. The second-order susceptibility tensor of the crystal was evaluated using the oriented gas model with the Lorenz-Lorentz and the Wortmann-Bishop local-field corrections.

  14. Experimental Techniques for Evaluating the Effects of Aging on Impact and High Strain Rate Properties of Triaxial Braided Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Gilat, Amos; Matrka, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to measure the impact and high strain rate properties of triaxial braided composite materials and to quantify any degradation in properties as a result of thermal and hygroscopic aging typically encountered during service. Impact tests are being conducted on flat panels using a projectile designed to induce high rate deformation similar to that experienced in a jet engine fan case during a fan blade-out event. The tests are being conducted on as-fabricated panels and panels subjected to various numbers of aging cycles. High strain rate properties are being measured using a unique Hopkinson bar apparatus that has a larger diameter than conventional Hopkinson bars. This larger diameter is needed to measure representative material properties because of the large unit cell size of the materials examined in this work. In this paper the experimental techniques used for impact and high strain rate testing are described and some preliminary results are presented for both as-fabricated and aged composites.

  15. Experimental studies of seal materials for potential use in a Los Medanos-type bedded salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Roy, D.M.; Grutzeck, M.W.

    1981-09-01

    This investigation is composed of the following three tasks: (1) materials selection and factors affecting longevity of seal materials; (2) experimental seal materials for shaft, tunnel, and room backfill incorporating rock from the Los Medanos area; and (3) effects of the curing environment on properties of seal materials. Cement-based materials have been studied as candidates for backfilling and sealing boreholes, shafts, tunnels, and rooms in potential repository environments, particularly in bedded salt. In these studies, potential seal materials were selected and subjected to preliminary tests. Then, geochemical factors which control longevity of repository-sealing materials were investigated. The subjects of investigations included: factors controlling the attainment of equilibrium, with time, of the plug components; and the rate of approach of the plug-component subsystem to a state of equilibrium within the total system. The effect of these factors upon changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radwaste species are being determined. High values were obtained for compressive strengths of some concretes (> 35 MPa); these samples also had very low permeabilities to brine (10/sup -7/ or 10/sup -8/ darcy). Highest strengths were obtained from samples cast with dolostone and anhydrite aggregate. Apparently, a strong bond generally was formed between the grout and the various rocks, evidenced by breakage through aggregate particles in tests of compressive strength. An expansive grout mixture containing salt was evaluated in five curing conditions, including: solutions saturated with CaSO/sub 4/, and Ca(OH)/sub 2/; deionized water; naturally occurring brine; and humid air, all at 38/sup 0/C. Expansion due to extensive growth of ettringite occurred in the first three of these five environments.

  16. Laser shocks: A tool for experimental simulation of damage into materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boustie, M.; Cuq Lelandais, J. P.; Berthe, L.; Ecault, R.

    2012-07-30

    High power laser irradiation of solids results in a strong shock wave propagation, driving very high amplitude pressure loadings with very short durations. These particular characteristics offer the possibility to study the behaviour of matter under extreme dynamic conditions in continuity with what is possible with the conventional generators of shock (launchers of projectiles, explosives). An advantage of laser shocks is a possible recovery of the shocked samples presenting the metallurgical effects of the shock in most cases. We introduce the principle of the laser shock generation, the characterization of these shocks, the principal mechanisms and effects associated with their propagation in the solids. We show how laser shocks can be a laboratory tool for simulating shock effects at ultra high strain rate, providing a high in information experimental layout for validation of damage modelling on an extended strain rate range compared to conventional shock generators. New data have been obtained with ultra short femtosecond range irradiation. Experimental data gathered through post mortem observation, time resolved velocity measurement are shown along with numerical associated simulations, showing the possibility to predict the damage behaviour of metallic targets under extreme strain rate up to 10{sup 8} s{sup -1}.

  17. Experimental evidence of a moisture clog effect in cement-based materials under temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiaoting; Rougelot, Th.; Davy, C.A.; Chen, Wei; Agostini, F.; Skoczylas, F.; Bourbon, X.

    2009-12-15

    This study is an original contribution to the understanding of the hydraulic behaviour of cement-based materials when subjected to temperature rises. Permeability is measured continuously during heating by injecting inert gas into a sample at homogeneous temperature. Using a confining cell especially designed in our laboratory, the sample is submitted to a constant heating rate, up to 200 deg. C, superimposed to hydrostatic pressure (at ca. 5 MPa). In parallel with a normalised CEM II mortar (water-to-cement ratio (W/C) of 0.5), a CEM V-cement-based concrete, used in nuclear waste storage applications, is studied. For normalised mortar, gas retention is evidenced, depending on the sample size (scale effect), water saturation level S{sub w}, and heating rate. For dry normalised mortar, permeability may be divided by two during heating. In conjunction with thermo-gravimetry analysis (TGA) results, such evolution is attributed to the dehydration of C-S-H around 150 deg. C. Indeed, mass loss after heat cycling is substantially higher than that due to free water release solely: mortar loses structural, bound water during the process. For partially-saturated and long mortar samples, a gas retention phenomenon is recorded when heating at a rate of ca. 4.9 deg. C/min. Our analysis is that free water inside the macropores, as well as bound water released from the C-S-H, dilates or vaporizes, and obstructs the interconnected porous network. Due to moisture clogging, no more gas is allowed through the material pore network: a so-called gas retention phenomenon occurs. Most interestingly, although loosing structural water like normalised mortar, yet over a wider temperature range, dry CEM V concrete displays good temperature resistance, as its permeability remains constant during heating. For highly partially-saturated concrete, a gas retention effect is recorded. As a conclusion, observed phenomena at the laboratory scale testify of potentially strong gas retention effects

  18. Cryogenic loading of large volume presses for high-pressure experimentation and synthesis of novel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

    2005-01-21

    We present an efficient easily implemented method for loading cryogenic fluids in a large volume press. We specifically apply this method to the high-pressure synthesis of an extended solid derived from CO using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. This method employs cryogenic cooling of Bridgman type WC anvils well insulated from other press components, condensation of the load gas within a brass annulus surrounding the gasket between the Bridgman anvils. We demonstrate the viability of the described approach by synthesizing macroscopic amounts (several milligrams) of polymeric CO-derived material, which were recovered to ambient conditions after compression of pure CO to 5 GPa or above.

  19. Experimental determination of the shipboard fire environment for simulated radioactive material packages

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Bobbe, J.G.; Arviso, M.

    1997-03-01

    A series of eight fire tests with simulated radioactive material shipping containers aboard the test ship Mayo Lykes, a break-bulk freighter, is described. The tests simulate three basic types of fires: engine room fires, cargo fires and open pool fires. Detailed results from the tests include temperatures, heat fluxes and air flows measured during the fires. The first examination of the results indicates that shipboard fires are not significantly different from fires encountered in land transport. 13 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Luz, Paul; Smith, Guy; Spivey, Reggie; Jeter, Linda; Gillies, Donald; Hua, Fay; Anikumar, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting "real-time" and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  1. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Luz, P.; Smith, G. A.; Spivey, R.; Jeter, L.; Gillies, D. C.; Hua, F.; Anilkumar, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting real-time and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  2. Computational Modeling and Experimental Characterization of Martensitic Transformations in Nicoal for Self-Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, T. A.; Yamakov, V. I.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Leser, W. P.; Warner, J. E.; Newman, J. A.; Purja Pun, G. P.; Mishin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental changes to aero-vehicle management require the utilization of automated health monitoring of vehicle structural components. A novel method is the use of self-sensing materials, which contain embedded sensory particles (SP). SPs are micron-sized pieces of shape-memory alloy that undergo transformation when the local strain reaches a prescribed threshold. The transformation is a result of a spontaneous rearrangement of the atoms in the crystal lattice under intensified stress near damaged locations, generating acoustic waves of a specific spectrum that can be detected by a suitably placed sensor. The sensitivity of the method depends on the strength of the emitted signal and its propagation through the material. To study the transition behavior of the sensory particle inside a metal matrix under load, a simulation approach based on a coupled atomistic-continuum model is used. The simulation results indicate a strong dependence of the particle's pseudoelastic response on its crystallographic orientation with respect to the loading direction and suggest possible ways of optimizing particle sensitivity. The technology of embedded sensory particles will serve as the key element in an autonomous structural health monitoring system that will constantly monitor for damage initiation in service, which will enable quick detection of unforeseen damage initiation in real-time and during onground inspections.

  3. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimassi, M. A.; Brauner, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence.

  4. Experimental study on cryogenic moisture uptake in polyurethane foam insulation material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Yao, L.; Qiu, L. M.; Gan, Z. H.; Yang, R. P.; Ma, X. J.; Liu, Z. H.

    2012-12-01

    Rigid foam is widely used to insulate cryogenic tanks, in particular for space launch vehicles due to its lightweight, mechanical strength and thermal-insulating performance. Up to now, little information is available on the intrusion of moisture into the material under cryogenic conditions, which will bring substantial additional weight for the space vehicles at lift-off. A cryogenic moisture uptake apparatus has been designed and fabricated to measure the amount of water uptake into the polyurethane foam. One side of the specimen is exposed to an environment with high humidity and ambient temperature, while the other with cryogenic temperature at approximately 78 K. A total of 16 specimens were tested for up to 24 h to explore the effects of the surface thermal protection layer, the foam thickness, exposed time, the butt joints, and the material density on water uptake of the foam. The results are constructive for the applications of the foam to the cryogenic insulation system in space launch vehicles.

  5. Experimental Evidence Supported by Simulations of a Very High H2 Diffusion in Metal Organic Framework Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salles, F.; Jobic, H.; Maurin, G.; Koza, M. M.; Llewellyn, P. L.; Devic, T.; Serre, C.; Ferey, G.

    2008-06-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to extract the self-diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the metal organic frameworks MIL-47(V) and MIL-53(Cr). We find that the diffusivity of hydrogen at low loading is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than in zeolites. Such a high mobility has never been experimentally observed before in any nanoporous materials, although it was predicted in carbon nanotubes. Either 1D or 3D diffusion mechanisms are elucidated depending on the chemical features of the MIL framework.

  6. Experimental Evidence Supported by Simulations of a Very High H{sub 2} Diffusion in Metal Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Salles, F.; Maurin, G.; Jobic, H.; Koza, M. M.; Llewellyn, P. L.; Devic, T.; Serre, C.; Ferey, G.

    2008-06-20

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to extract the self-diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the metal organic frameworks MIL-47(V) and MIL-53(Cr). We find that the diffusivity of hydrogen at low loading is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than in zeolites. Such a high mobility has never been experimentally observed before in any nanoporous materials, although it was predicted in carbon nanotubes. Either 1D or 3D diffusion mechanisms are elucidated depending on the chemical features of the MIL framework.

  7. Structure elucidation of alkaline earth impregnated MCM-41 type mesoporous materials obtained by direct synthesis: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Gizeuda L.; Silva, Francisco das Chagas M.; Araújo, Maciel M.; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A.; Luz, Geraldo E.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, MCM-41 were synthesized hydrothermally and functionalized with calcium and strontium salts by direct method, using the Si/M = 50 molar ratio, in order to elucidate the way as the alkaline earth is incorporated on MCM-41 molecular sieve. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption and theoretical calculations by DFT method. Experimental results and computer simulations showed that the alkaline earths were incorporated on MCM-41 through a complex structure, which negatively influences on basic sites formation.

  8. Experimental Validation of the Butyl-Rubber Finite Element (FE) Material Model for the Blast-Mitigating Floor Mat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the accuracy of each material model, several metrics, E0, ELoad, and Sss , are implemented as shown in Fig. 24. Each metric is defined...strain at the maximum stress point. Encircled area Sss represents the absorbed energy during the loading–unloading event and is defined as follows...rising edges of the experimental results (in Figs. 21 and 22). Stress, σ Strain, ε 0 Sss ε=0.5% ε=εMAX σ=σMAX E0 ELoad ε=εP σ=σQ σ=σ0 σ’ σ’’ 22

  9. Modeling of the charge-state separation at ITEP experimental facility for material science based on a Bernas ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Barminova, H. Y. Saratovskyh, M. S.

    2016-02-15

    The experiment automation system is supposed to be developed for experimental facility for material science at ITEP, based on a Bernas ion source. The program CAMFT is assumed to be involved into the program of the experiment automation. CAMFT is developed to simulate the intense charged particle bunch motion in the external magnetic fields with arbitrary geometry by means of the accurate solution of the particle motion equation. Program allows the consideration of the bunch intensity up to 10{sup 10} ppb. Preliminary calculations are performed at ITEP supercomputer. The results of the simulation of the beam pre-acceleration and following turn in magnetic field are presented for different initial conditions.

  10. Transport gap engineering by contact geometry in graphene nanoribbons: Experimental and theoretical studies on artificial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmann, Thomas; Franco-Villafañe, John A.; Kuhl, Ulrich; Mortessagne, Fabrice; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    Electron transport in small graphene nanoribbons is studied by microwave emulation experiments and tight-binding calculations. In particular, it is investigated under which conditions a transport gap can be observed. Our experiments provide evidence that armchair ribbons of width 3 m +2 with integer m are metallic and otherwise semiconducting, whereas zigzag ribbons are metallic independent of their width. The contact geometry, defining to which atoms at the ribbon edges the source and drain leads are attached, has strong effects on the transport. If leads are attached only to the inner atoms of zigzag edges, broad transport gaps can be observed in all armchair ribbons as well as in rhomboid-shaped zigzag ribbons. All experimental results agree qualitatively with tight-binding calculations using the nonequilibrium Green's function method.

  11. Experimental evidence of localized plasmon resonance in composite materials containing single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuba, M. V.; Paddubskaya, A. G.; Plyushch, A. O.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Slepyan, G. Ya.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Ksenevich, V. K.; Buka, P.; Seliuta, D.; Kasalynas, I.; Macutkevic, J.; Valusis, G.; Thomsen, C.; Lakhtakia, A.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental proof of localized plasmon resonance was found in thin films containing either single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) or SWNT bundles of different length. All samples were prepared by a simple technique that permitted the selection of different SWNT lengths in different samples without significant differences in electronic properties. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that an optical-density peak, the same as a terahertz conductivity peak, shifts to higher frequencies as the SWNT lengths are reduced—in agreement with a similar tendency predicted for the localized plasmon resonance in finite-length SWNTs [Slepyan , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.205423 81, 205423 (2010)].

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Journal Bearing Stability and New Gas Bearing Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2001-01-01

    It has been estimated that the noise levels in aircraft engine transmissions can be reduced by as much as 10 dB through the use of journal bearings. The potential benefits of lower noise levels include reduced wear, longer gear life and enhanced comfort for passengers and crew. Based on this concept the journal-thrust wave bearing was analyzed and its performance was evaluated. Numerical codes, developed over the past 30 years by Dr. Dimofte, were used to predict the performance of the bearing. The wave bearing is a fluid film bearing and therefore was analyzed using the Reynolds pressure equation. The formulation includes turbulent flow concepts and possesses a viscosity-temperature correction. The centrifugal growth of the bearing diameter and the deformation of the bearing under gear loads were also incorporated into the code. An experimental rig was developed to test the journal-thrust wave bearing.

  13. Determining the representative volume element size for three-dimensional microstructural material characterization. Part 2: Application to experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2015-05-01

    Improved microstructural imaging and characterization methods have recently opened the door for quantitative evaluation of microstructures of such functional materials as solid oxide fuel cell and battery electrodes and composite gas separation membranes. Accurate quantitative characterization of these structures relies on the concept of a representative volume element (RVE) to provide a sufficiently large sample to be statistically representative of the material. In Part 1 of this work, several models were described to determine the RVE size for several common microstructural properties: volume fraction, particle size, and network contiguity. In this work, extensive synchrotron X-ray nanotomography imaging of a multiphase composite gas separation membrane is used to provide an experimental comparison to the model predictions. Results suggest that the models provide a reasonable estimate of RVE size, and can serve as a starting point for researchers planning imaging and characterization experiments.

  14. Dynamicimagestoaddressconceptualnodes about mechanical waves: Example materials and preliminary results of the experimentation of the teacher training module IMAGONDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, I.; Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Sassi, E.

    2004-09-01

    In the framework of the 2002-03 project “Fisica per la Formazione Culturale - FORMazione Insegnanti" funded by Italy ministry of Education, a set of training materials, focused on mechanical waves, has been developed. The core of the materials is represented by animated images purposely designed in order to: 1) address intrinsically dynamic aspects of one-dimensional impulses/waves propagation on a string; 2) have the trainees reflect upon students' difficulties in reading/interpreting static images (as the ones which are featured in common textbooks) and animations. In this paper we discuss example materials concerning transversal impulses on strings to address conceptual nodes such as: 1) configuration of the string at a given time and its aaabstract representation; 2) displacement vs. time graph of a string element and its aaabstract representation; 3) relationships between the two aaabstract representations; 4) modelization of mechanical wave propagation in one dimension. Moreover the results of the experimentation of the training materials in the framework of the Post Graduate School to Became Physics Teacher in Secondary Schools are presented and commented.

  15. Experimental assessment of non-treated bentonite as the buffer material of a radioactive waste repository.

    PubMed

    Choi, J; Kang, C H; Whang, J

    2001-05-01

    The bentonite-based material being evaluated in several countries as potential barriers and seals for a nuclear waste disposal system is of mostly sodium type, whereas most bentonite available in Korea is known to be of calcium type. In order to investigate whether local Korean bentonite could be useful as a buffer or sealing material in an HLW repository system, raw bentonites sampled from the south-east area of Korea were examined in terms of their physicochemical properties such as surface area, CEC, swelling rate, and distribution coefficient. The diffusion behavior of some radionuclides of interest in compacted bentonite was also investigated. Considering that HLW generates decay heat over a long time, the thermal effect on the physicochemical properties of bentonite was also included. Four local samples were identified as Ca-bentonite through XRD and chemical analysis. Of the measured values of surface area, CEC and swelling rate of the local samples, Sample-A was found to have the greatest properties as the most likely candidate barrier material. The distribution coefficients of Cs-137, Sr-85, Co-60 and Am-241 for Sample-A sample were measured by the batch method. Sorption equilibrium was reached in around 8 to 10 days, but that of Sr was found to be reached earlier. Comparing the results of this study with the reference data, domestic bentonite was found to have a relatively high sorption ability. For the effect of varying concentration on sorption, the values of Kd peaked at 10(-9)-10(-7) mol/l of radionuclide concentration. In XRD analysis, the (001) peak of Sample-A was fully collapsed above 200 degrees C. The shoulder appearing at about 150 degrees C in the DSC curve was found to be evidence that Sample-A is predominated by Ca-montmorillonite. The loss of swelling capacity and CEC of Sample-A started at about 100 degrees C. The swelling data and the (001) peak intensity of the heat-treated sample showed that they were linearly interrelated. The measured

  16. Experimental investigation of various vegetable fibers as sorbent materials for oil spills.

    PubMed

    Annunciado, T R; Sydenstricker, T H D; Amico, S C

    2005-11-01

    Oil spills are a global concern due to their environmental and economical impact. Various commercial systems have been developed to control these spills, including the use of fibers as sorbents. This research investigates the use of various vegetable fibers, namely mixed leaves residues, mixed sawdust, sisal (Agave sisalana), coir fiber (Cocos nucifera), sponge-gourd (Luffa cylindrica) and silk-floss as sorbent materials of crude oil. Sorption tests with crude oil were conducted in deionized and marine water media, with and without agitation. Water uptake by the fibers was investigated by tests in dry conditions and distillation of the impregnated sorbent. The silk-floss fiber showed a very high degree of hydrophobicity and oil sorption capacity of approximately 85goil/g sorbent (in 24hours). Specific gravity measurements and buoyancy tests were also used to evaluate the suitability of these fibers for the intended application.

  17. Experimental performances of a battery thermal management system using a phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hémery, Charles-Victor; Pra, Franck; Robin, Jean-François; Marty, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Li-ion batteries are leading candidates for mobility because electric vehicles (EV) are an environmentally friendly mean of transport. With age, Li-ion cells show a more resistive behavior leading to extra heat generation. Another kind of problem called thermal runway arises when the cell is too hot, what happens in case of overcharge or short circuit. In order to evaluate the effect of these defects at the whole battery scale, an air-cooled battery module was built and tested, using electrical heaters instead of real cells for safety reasons. A battery thermal management system based on a phase change material is developed in that study. This passive system is coupled with an active liquid cooling system in order to initialize the battery temperature at the melting of the PCM. This initialization, or PCM solidification, can be performed during a charge for example, in other words when the energy from the network is available.

  18. Combustion aerosols formed during burning of radioactively contaminated materials: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, M.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Dennis, G.W.

    1987-03-01

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases. Radioactive aerosols generated by fires were investigated in experiments in which combustible solids and liquids were contaminated with radioactive materials and burned. Uranium in powder and liquid form was used to contaminate five fuel types: polychloroprene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, cellulose, and a mixture of 30% tributylphosphate (TBP) in kerosene. Heat flux, oxygen concentration, air flow, contaminant concentration, and type of ignition were varied in the experiments. The highest release (7.1 wt %) came from burning TBP/kerosene over contaminated nitric acid. Burning cellulose contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate liquid gave the lowest release (0.01 wt %). Rate of release and particle size distribution of airborne radioactive particles were highly dependent on the type of fuel burned.

  19. Experimental verification of dosimetry predictions of bremsstrahlung attenuation as a function of material and electron energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Beutler, D.E. ); Knott, D.P. )

    1993-12-01

    Dose attenuation with depth in an absorber of on-axis bremsstrahlung generated from an electron target is measured and shown to agree within [+-]9% with Monte Carlo predictions as a function of absorber material (Al,Fe,Pb) and incident electron beam energy (5.5-25.1 MeV). For this on-axis bremsstrahlung, 1 to 5 g/cm[sup 2] of upstream and 0.2 to 1 g/cm[sup 2] of downstream Al buffer is sufficient to provide electron equilibration for CaF[sub 2]:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters (TI-Ds) over the measured energy range of 5.5 to 25.1 MeV, respectively. Once effective'' equilibration has been established, an expression of the form DA/Q = C[sub 1]V[sup C[sub 2

  20. Experimental verification of dosimetry predictions of bremsstrahlung attenuation as a function of material and electron energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Beutler, D.E. ); Knott, D.P. )

    1993-01-01

    Dose attenuation with depth in an absorber of on-axis bremsstrahlung generated from an electron target is measured and shown to agree within [plus minus]9% with Monte Carlo predictions as a function of absorber material (Al, Fe, Pb) and incident electron-beam energy (5.5--25.1 MeV). For this on-axis bremsstrahlung, 1 to 5 g/cm[sup 2] of upstream and 0.2 to 1 g/cm[sup 2] of downs Al buffer is sufficient to provide electron equilibration for CaF[sub 2]:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLDs) over the measured energy range of 5.5 to 25.1 MeV, respectively. Once effective'' equilibration has been established, an expression of the form DA/Q = C[sub 1]V[sup c[sub 2

  1. Experimental measurements of thermal properties of high-temperature refractory materials used for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Jeter, Sheldon; Al-Ansary, Hany; Abdel-Khalik, Said; Golob, Matthew; Danish, Syed Noman; Saeed, Rageh; Djajadiwinata, Eldwin; Al-Suhaibani, Zeyad

    2016-05-01

    This paper builds on studies conducted on thermal energy storage (TES) systems that were built as a part of the work performed for a DOE-funded SunShot project titled "High Temperature Falling Particle Receiver". In previous studies, two small-scale TES systems were constructed for measuring heat loss at high temperatures that are compatible with the falling particle receiver concept, both of which had shown very limited heat loss. Through the course of those studies, it became evident that there was a lack of information about the thermal performance of some of the insulating refractory materials used in the experiments at high temperatures, especially insulating firebrick and perlite concrete. This work focuses on determining the thermal conductivities of those materials at high temperatures. The apparatus consists of a prototype cylindrical TES bin built with the same wall construction used in previous studies. An electric heater is placed along the centerline of the bin, and thermocouples are used to measure temperature at the interfaces between all layers. Heat loss is measured across one of the layers whose thermal conductivity had already been well established using laboratory experiments. This value is used to deduce the thermal conductivity of other layers. Three interior temperature levels were considered; namely, 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C. Results show that the thermal conductivity of insulating firebrick remains low (approximately 0.22 W/m.K) at an average layer temperature as high as 640°C, but it was evident that the addition of mortar had an impact on its effective thermal conductivity. Results also show that the thermal conductivity of perlite concrete is very low, approximately 0.15 W/m.K at an average layer temperature of 360°C. This is evident by the large temperature drop that occurs across the perlite concrete layer. These results should be useful for future studies, especially those that focus on numerical modeling of TES bins.

  2. Solid Silicone Elastomer Material(DC745U)-Historical Overview and New Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse

    2012-08-08

    DC745U is a silicone elastomer used in several weapon systems. DC745U is manufactured by Dow Corning and its formulation is proprietary. Risk changes without notification to the customer. {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si{l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} NMR have previously determined that DC745U contains {approx} 98.5% dimethyl siloxane, {approx}1.5% methyl-phenyl siloxane, and a small amount (<1%) of vinyl siloxane repeat units that are converted to crosslinking sites. The polymer is filled with {approx} 38 wt.% of a mixture of fumed silica and quartz. Some conclusions are: (1) DMA shows that crystallization does have an effect on the mechanical properties of DC745U; (2) DMA shows that the crystallization is time and temperature dependent; (3) Mechanical tests show that DC745U undergo a crystalline transition at temperatures below -50 C; (4) Rate and temperature does not have an effect above crystalline transition; (5) Crystalline transition occurs faster at colder temperatures; (6) The material remains responsive and recovers after warming it to temperature above -40 C; (7) We were able to review all previous historical data on DC745U; (8) Identified specific gaps in materials understanding; (9) Developed design of experiments and testing methods to address gaps associated with post-curing and low temperature mechanical behavior; (10) Resolved questions of post-cure and alleviated concerns associated with low temperature mechanical behavior with soak time and temperature; and (11) This work is relevant to mission-critical programs and for supporting programmatic work for weapon research.

  3. Computational and Experimental Study of Energetic Material in a Counterflow Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smooke, Mitchell D.; Yetter, R. A.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Tanoff, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Ground based (normal gravity) combustion studies can provide important information on the processes by which monopropellants and composite systems burn. The effects of gravitational forces, however, can often complicate the interpretation of the models and the implementation of experiments designed to help elucidate complex issues. We propose to utilize a combined computational/experimental approach in a microgravity environment to understand the interaction of oxidizer-binder diffusion flames in composite propellants. By operating under microgravity conditions we will be able to increase the length scales and suppress the gravitational forces on melting binders such that increased resolution of both major and minor species will be possible thus reducing the demands placed on both the computational and diagnostic tools. Results of a detailed transport/finite rate chemistry model will be compared with nonintrusive optical diagnostic measurements of the structure and extinction of diffusion flames in which oxidizers such as ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium dinitramide (ADN) are counterflowed against realistic binders such as hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and 3,3-bis(azidomethyl)oxetane (BAMO). The work proposed herein represents a collaborative effort among the research groups at Yale University, Princeton University and the Combustion Diagnostics Laboratory at the Naval Air Warfare Center in China Lake, CA.

  4. An experimental study of low velocity impacts into granular material in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, Naomi; Avila Martinez, Iris; Sunday, Cecily; Cherrier, Olivier; Zenou, Emanuel; Janin, Tristan; Cadu, Alexandre; Gourinat, Yves; Mimoun, David

    2016-04-01

    The granular nature of asteroid surfaces, in combination with the low surface gravity, makes it difficult to predict lander - surface interactions from existing theoretical models. Nonetheless, an understanding of such interactions is particularly important for the deployment of a lander package. This was demonstrated by the Philae lander, which bounced before coming to rest roughly 1 kilometer away from its intended landing site on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko before coming to rest (Biele et al., 2015). In addition to being important for planning the initial deployment, information about the acceleration profile upon impact is also important in the choice of scientific payloads that want to exploit the initial landing to study the asteroid surface mechanical properties (e.g., Murdoch et al., 2016). Using the ISAE-SUPAERO drop tower, we have performed a series of low-velocity collisions into granular material in low gravity. Reduced-gravity is simulated by releasing a free-falling projectile into a surface container with a downward acceleration less than that of Earth's gravity. The acceleration of the surface is controlled through the use an Atwood machine, or a system of pulleys and counterweights. In reducing the effective surface acceleration of the granular material, the confining pressure will be reduced, and the properties of the granular material will become more representative of those on an asteroid's surface. In addition, since both the surface and projectile are falling, the projectile requires a minimum amount of time to catch the surface before the collision begins. This extended free-fall increases the experiment duration, making it easier to use accelerometers and high-speed cameras for data collection. The experiment is built into an existing 5.5 m drop-tower frame and has required the custom design of all components, including the projectile, surface sample container, release mechanism and deceleration system (Sunday et al., 2016

  5. Experimental study of phase change materials for thermal storage in the temperature range of 300-400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinberg, R.; Zvegilsky, D.

    2014-12-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) based on inorganic salts having a temperature of fusion between 300 and 400°C, were investigated using a lab scale set-up dedicated for studying latent heat storage for concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) technology. This experimental system provides thermal measurements of PCM specimens of about 1000 g under the heating temperature up to 450°C and enables simultaneous investigation of calorimetric properties of the loaded materials and heat transfer effects developed in the thermal storage during the charge and discharge phases. The measurement technique comprised temperature and pressure sensors, a control and data acquisition system and a thermal analysis model used to evaluate the experimental data. Results of the thermochemical tests conducted with a thermal storage medium composed of the ternary eutectic mixture of carbonate salts (34.5% K2CO3-33.4% Na2CO3-32.1% Li2CO3) and Diphyl (synthetic thermal oil, max working temperature 400°C) used as the heat transfer fluid are presented and discussed in this paper.

  6. Experimental Comparison of Tantalum Material Strength between Single Crystal [100] and [111] Samples at High Pressure and Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechaty, Christopher; Park, Hye-Sook; Cavallo, Rob; Prisbrey, Shon; Rudd, Robert; Wehrenberg, Christopher; Huntington, Channing; Maddox, Brian; May, Mark; Remington, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    Experiments were performed using the OMEGA laser to investigate Ta material strength at high pressure (1 Mbar), and high strain rates (106-108 s-1) . To achieve these pressures and strain rates in experiment without melting the sample, a quasi-isentropic drive was employed to drive the growth of pre-imposed sinusoidal perturbations embedded on the surface of the Ta sample, via the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. By measuring the ripple amplitude using face-on high energy (~ 22 KeV) radiography, the strength of the Ta sample was inferred from the amount of RT growth observed. Under these experimental conditions, the Ta material strength can be modeled by the Multiscale (MS) model, developed at LLNL. In this study, we performed a side-by-side comparison of the ripple growth on [100] and [111] orientated single-crystal Ta samples for the same shot and drive conditions. The objective was to determine if a difference in the growth predicted by the MS model could be observed at the high pressure and strain rates present in our experiments, and within the error bars of the experimental technique. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Can local adaptation research in plants inform selection of native plant materials? An analysis of experimental methodologies.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Alexis L; Espeland, Erin K; Wagner, Viktoria; Nelson, Cara R

    2016-12-01

    Local adaptation is used as a criterion to select plant materials that will display high fitness in new environments. A large body of research has explored local adaptation in plants, however, to what extent findings can inform management decisions has not been formally evaluated. We assessed local adaptation literature for six key experimental methodologies that have the greatest effect on the application of research to selecting plant materials for natural resource management: experimental environment, response variables, maternal effects, intraspecific variation, selective agents, and spatial and temporal variability. We found that less than half of experiments used reciprocal transplants or natural field conditions, which are both informative for revegetation and restoration. Population growth rate was rarely (5%) assessed, and most studies measured only single generations (96%) and ran for less than a year. Emergence and establishment are limiting factors in successful revegetation and restoration, but the majority of studies measured later life-history stages (66%). Additionally, most studies included limited replication at the population and habitat levels and tested response to single abiotic selective factors (66%). Local adaptation research should be cautiously applied to management; future research could use alternative methodologies to allow managers to directly apply findings.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Studies on the Formability of Materials in Hot Stamping and Cold Die Quenching Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Mohamed, M. S.; Cai, J.; Lin, J.; Balint, D.; Dean, T. A.

    2011-05-04

    Formability of steel and aluminium alloys in hot stamping and cold die quenching processes is studied in this research. Viscoplastic-damage constitutive equations are developed and determined from experimental data for the prediction of viscoplastic flow and ductility of the materials. The determined unified constitutive equations are then implemented into the commercial Finite Element code Abaqus/Explicit via a user defined subroutine, VUMAT. An FE process simulation model and numerical procedures are established for the modeling of hot stamping processes for a spherical part with a central hole. Different failure modes (failure takes place either near the central hole or in the mid span of the part) are obtained. To validate the simulation results, a test programme is developed, a test die set has been designed and manufactured, and tests have been carried out for the materials with different forming rates. It has been found that very close agreements between experimental and numerical process simulation results are obtained for the ranges of temperatures and forming rates carried out.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Studies on the Formability of Materials in Hot Stamping and Cold Die Quenching Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Mohamed, M. S.; Cai, J.; Lin, J.; Balint, D.; Dean, T. A.

    2011-05-01

    Formability of steel and aluminium alloys in hot stamping and cold die quenching processes is studied in this research. Viscoplastic-damage constitutive equations are developed and determined from experimental data for the prediction of viscoplastic flow and ductility of the materials. The determined unified constitutive equations are then implemented into the commercial Finite Element code Abaqus/Explicit via a user defined subroutine, VUMAT. An FE process simulation model and numerical procedures are established for the modeling of hot stamping processes for a spherical part with a central hole. Different failure modes (failure takes place either near the central hole or in the mid span of the part) are obtained. To validate the simulation results, a test programme is developed, a test die set has been designed and manufactured, and tests have been carried out for the materials with different forming rates. It has been found that very close agreements between experimental and numerical process simulation results are obtained for the ranges of temperatures and forming rates carried out.

  10. Experimental Technique for Producing and Recording Precise Particle Impacts on Transparent Window Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry; Guven, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    A new facility for making small particle impacts is being developed at NASA. Current sand/particle impact facilities are an erosion test and do not precisely measure and document the size and velocity of each of the impacting particles. In addition, evidence of individual impacts is often obscured by subsequent impacts. This facility will allow the number, size, and velocity of each particle to be measured and adjusted. It will also be possible to determine which particle produced damage at a given location on the target. The particle size and velocity will be measured by high speed imaging techniques. Information as to the extent of damage and debris from impacts will also be recorded. It will be possible to track these secondary particles, measuring size and velocity. It is anticipated that this additional degree of detail will provide input for erosion models and also help determine the impact physics of the erosion process. Particle impacts will be recorded at 90 degrees to the particle flight path and also from the top looking through the target window material.

  11. Finite Element Modeling of the Ultrasound Stimulated Thermography for Viscoelastic Materials and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, Bernard; Bacon, Christophe; Biateau, Christine

    2009-03-01

    The ultrasound stimulated thermography method is usually used to detect the temperature rise at a defect position. The temperature rise can be due to the friction between the edges of the defect and/or the plastic deformation around the defect. This paper presents another aspect of the method when the ultrasounds are propagating in a viscoelastic anisotropic material, such as polymers or fibers reinforced polymers. The attenuation of the waves produces a distributed temperature field. Therefore, even a defect that does not produce some heat, can be detected, since the ultrasonic field is modified. A FE model is used for computing the temperature field and for predicting the possibility for an infrared camera of detecting the temperature rise and its modification due to a defect. The model computes the stress and displacement fields associated to the propagation and the loss of energy. Then the heat equation is solved with this loss as a source of heating. An experiment is done with a sonotrode that excites a PVC plate. The ultrasonic displacement at the top of the plate is measured with a laser velocimeter and introduced in the model. Finally, the model result is compared to the image produced by an infrared camera.

  12. Experimental verification of dosimetry predictions of bremsstrahlung attenuation as a function of material and electron energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Beutler, D.E.; Knott, D.P.

    1993-05-01

    Dose attenuation with depth in an absorber of on-axis bremsstrahlung generated from an electron target is measured and shown to agree within {plus_minus}9% with Monte Carlo predictions as a function of absorber material (Al, Fe, Pb) and incident electron-beam energy (5.5--25.1 MeV). For this on-axis bremsstrahlung, 1 to 5 g/cm{sup 2} of upstream and 0.2 to 1 g/cm{sup 2} of downs Al buffer is sufficient to provide electron equilibration for CaF{sub 2}:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLDs) over the measured energy range of 5.5 to 25.1 MeV, respectively. Once ``effective`` equilibration has been established, an expression of the form DA/Q = C{sub 1}V{sup c{sub 2}}e{sup {minus}C}{sub 3}V{sup c}{sub 4}{ell}, can be used to predict the dose-area (DA) product per absorbed beam charge (Q) at a given incident beam energy (V) in TLDs as a function of depth ({ell}) in absorbers, within a fixed solid angle centered about the beam axis. This expression is quantified for the measurements presented here.

  13. Experimental methods for the characterization of the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of soft materials

    PubMed Central

    Kazemirad, Siavash; K. Heris, Hossein; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A characterization method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was developed for the quantification of the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of soft materials at high frequencies; i.e., up to 4 kHz. Planar harmonic surface waves were produced on the surface of silicone rubber samples. The phase and amplitude of the propagating waves were measured at different locations along the propagation direction, which allowed the calculation of the complex Rayleigh wavenumbers at each excitation frequency using a transfer function method. An inverse wave propagation problem was then solved to obtain the complex shear/elastic moduli from the measured wavenumbers. In a separate, related investigation, dynamic indentation tests using atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed at frequencies up to 300 Hz. No systematic verification study is available for the AFM-based method, which can be used when the dimensions of the test samples are too small for other existing testing methods. The results obtained from the Rayleigh wave propagation and AFM-based indentation methods were compared with those from a well-established method, which involves the generation of standing longitudinal compression waves in rod-shaped test specimens. The results were cross validated and qualitatively confirmed theoretical expectations presented in the literature for the frequency-dependence of polymers. PMID:23654420

  14. An Experimental Evaluation of Material Properties and Fracture Simulation of Cryorolled 7075 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prosenjit; Singh, I. V.; Jayaganthan, R.

    2012-07-01

    This work presents an experimental evaluation of yield strength, tensile strength, and impact toughness of 7075 Al alloy. The extended finite element method (XFEM) has been chosen for quasi-static crack growth simulations using Charpy impact energy as the crack growth criterion for both Bulk and ultrafine-grained (UFG) 7075 Al alloy. The 7075 Al alloy is rolled for different thickness reductions (40 and 70%) at cryogenic (liquid nitrogen) temperature, and its mechanical properties are studied by performing the tensile and Charpy impact testing. The microstructural characterization of the alloy was carried out using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The rolling of the Al alloy at cryogenic temperature suppresses dynamic recovery, and dislocation cells formed during processing, transformed into fully formed ultrafine-grains (600 nm) at 70% thickness reduction. The impact energy used as the crack growth criterion under quasi-static loading condition based on the Griffith energy concept. The elastic-plastic ductile fracture simulations are performed by XFEM using ABAQUS Software (Version 6.9). For crack modeling, two different types of functions are used to model a crack based on partition of unity concept. A discontinuous function is used to model the portion behind the crack tip, whereas crack tip is modeled by near-tip asymptotic functions. This permits the crack is to be represented explicitly without meshing the crack surfaces, thus crack propagation simulations can be carried out without a need of re-meshing. Strain energy release and stress distribution ahead of the crack tip is found for some practical crack problems. The numerical examples indicate a significant improvement in crack growth properties of UFG 7075 Al alloy as compared to its bulk form due to an effective grain refinement.

  15. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, J. P.; Rokusek, D. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Nieto-Perez, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Kugel, H. W.; Heim, B.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2009-06-01

    Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, T-11 M, and NSTX. Lithium in the solid and liquid state has been studied extensively in laboratory experiments including its erosion and hydrogen-retaining properties. Reductions in physical sputtering up to 40-60% have been measured for deuterated solid and liquid lithium surfaces. Computational modeling indicates that up to a 1:1 deuterium volumetric retention in lithium is possible. This paper presents the results of systematic in situ laboratory experimental studies on the surface chemistry evolution of ATJ graphite under lithium deposition. Results are compared to post-mortem analysis of similar lithium surface coatings on graphite exposed to deuterium discharge plasmas in NSTX. Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components in NSTX have shown substantial reduction of hydrogenic recycling. Questions remain on the role lithium surface chemistry on a graphite substrate has on particle sputtering (physical and chemical) as well as hydrogen isotope recycling. This is particularly due to the lack of in situ measurements of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bonding state on ATJ graphite is lithium peroxide and with sufficient exposure to ambient air conditions, lithium carbonate is generated. Correlation between both results is used to assess the role of lithium chemistry on the state of lithium bonding and implications on hydrogen pumping and lithium sputtering. In addition, reduction of factors between 10 and 30 reduction in physical sputtering from lithiated graphite compared to pure lithium or carbon is also measured.

  16. An experimental investigation of the early dynamic impact behaviour of textile armour systems: Decoupling material from system response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepus, Elvis

    This work focuses on the early impact response of textile armour systems. A relatively new data acquisition system, the Enhanced Laser Velocity Sensor (ELVS), was refined and used to generate a large database of results for a 5.57 mm diameter, 3 gram, non-deforming projectile impacting single-ply configurations of Ballistic Nylon, two weaves of Kevlar 129, and Zylon (PBO) over a range of velocities from 61 m/s to 248 m/s. In addition, one Kevlar 129 material was tested in configurations of 2, 3, 4, 8 and 16 plies over a range of strike velocities from 90 m/s to 481 m/s. ELVS results consisted of high-resolution timehistories of displacement, velocity and energy for each system tested. The strain wave velocity and ballistic performance of each system was also determined. Results taken from during the impact event were analysed up to just prior to the strain-wave rebounding from the boundary and returning to the impact point---effectively removing boundary influences. Regardless of system type, a constant rate of energy absorption within the pre-rebound timeframe was found to exist, which scales with the strike velocity to approximately the 8/3-power. Well-established single fibre theory was modified and applied to woven materials. It was assumed that three primary energy absorption mechanisms exist; elastic strain, in-plane kinetic and out-of-plane kinetic. This simple model yields the experimentally observed 8/3 exponent and parametrically predicts the difference between the different single-ply material systems, but underpredicts the observed behaviour by a factor of 2 and cannot address the performance reduction with increasing ply count. This combined experimental and analytical work confirms the long-held assumption that single fibre wave physics is applicable to multi-ply woven systems. More significantly, for the first time, it decouples material response from overall system response and provides the experimental tools and methodology required to analyse

  17. Experimental investigations of material models for Ti-6A1-4V and 2024-T3

    SciTech Connect

    Leseur, D

    1999-05-03

    This report describes studies of the deformation and failure behavior of Ti-6Al-4V and 2024-T3 aluminum. Data was obtained at high strain rates and large strains using the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique. This information, plus additional data from the literature, was used to critically evaluate the ability of the Johnson Cook material model to represent the deformation and failure response of Ti-6AMV and 2024-T3 under conditions relevant to simulations of engine containment and the influence of uncontained engine debris on aircraft structures. This model is being used in the DYNA3D finite element code, which is being developed/validated for evaluating aircraft/engine designs relative to the federal airworthiness standards and for improving mitigation/containment technology. The results of the experimental work reported here were used to define a new set of material constants for the strength component of the Johnson Cook model for Ti-6Al-4V and 2024-T3. The capabilities and limitations of the model are reviewed. The model can accurately represent the stress-strain response of the materials. The major concern with the Johnson Cook material model is its ability to accurately represent the stress - strain rate response at strain rates greater than 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. Additional work is also needed to adequately account for failure via shear localization, which was the dominant failure mode at high strain rates in both materials. Failure modeling in both Ti-6Al-N and 2024-T3 will be considered further in future reports.

  18. Experimental test of a hot water storage system including a macro-encapsulated phase change material (PCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongibello, L.; Atrigna, M.; Bianco, N.; Di Somma, M.; Graditi, G.; Risi, N.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems (TESs) are of fundamental importance for many energetic systems, essentially because they permit a certain degree of decoupling between the heat or cold production and the use of the heat or cold produced. In the last years, many works have analysed the addition of a PCM inside a hot water storage tank, as it can allow a reduction of the size of the storage tank due to the possibility of storing thermal energy as latent heat, and as a consequence its cost and encumbrance. The present work focuses on experimental tests realized by means of an indoor facility in order to analyse the dynamic behaviour of a hot water storage tank including PCM modules during a charging phase. A commercial bio-based PCM has been used for the purpose, with a melting temperature of 58°C. The experimental results relative to the hot water tank including the PCM modules are presented in terms of temporal evolution of the axial temperature profile, heat transfer and stored energy, and are compared with the ones obtained by using only water as energy storage material. Interesting insights, relative to the estimation of the percentage of melted PCM at the end of the experimental test, are presented and discussed.

  19. Experimental determination of the yield stress curve of the scotch pine wood materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, Ezgi; Aygün, Cevdet; Kaya, Şükrü Tayfun

    2013-12-01

    Yield stress curve is determined for the pine wood specimens by conducting a series of tests. In this work, pinewood is modeled as a composite material with transversely isotropic fibers. Annual rings (wood grain) of the wood specimens are taken as the major fiber directions with which the strain gauge directions are aligned. For this purpose, three types of tests are arranged. These are tensile, compression and torsion loading tests. All of the tests are categorized with respect to fiber orientations and their corresponding loading conditions. Each test within these categories is conducted separately. Tensile and compression tests are conducted in accordance with standards of Turkish Standards Institution (TSE) whereas torsion tests are conducted in accordance with Standards Australia. Specimens are machined from woods of Scotch pine which is widely used in boat building industries and in other structural engineering applications. It is determined that this species behaves more flexibly than the others. Strain gauges are installed on the specimen surfaces in such a way that loading measurements are performed along directions either parallel or perpendicular to the fiber directions. During the test and analysis phase of yield stress curve, orientation of strain gauge directions with respect to fiber directions are taken into account. The diagrams of the normal stress vs. normal strain or the shear stress vs. shear strain are plotted for each test. In each plot, the yield stress is determined by selecting the point on the diagram, the tangent of which is having a slope of 5% less than the slope of the elastic portion of the diagram. The geometric locus of these selected points constitutes a single yield stress curve on σ1-σ2 principal plane. The resulting yield stress curve is plotted as an approximate ellipse which resembles Tsai-Hill failure criterion. The results attained in this work, compare well with the results which are readily available in the literature.

  20. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    PubMed

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  1. Experimental study and steady-state simulation of biogeochemical processes in laboratory columns with aquifer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirbahman, Aria; Schönenberger, René; Furrer, Gerhard; Zobrist, Jürg

    2003-07-01

    Packed bed laboratory column experiments were performed to simulate the biogeochemical processes resulting from microbially catalyzed oxidation of organic matter. These included aerobic respiration, denitrification, and Mn(IV), Fe(III) and SO 4 reduction processes. The effects of these reactions on the aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry of the aquifer material were closely examined. The data were used to model the development of alkalinity and pH along the column. To study the independent development of Fe(III)- and SO 4-reducing environments, two columns were used. One of the columns (column 1) contained small enough concentrations of SO 4 in the influent to render the reduction of this species unimportant to the geochemical processes in the column. The rate of microbially catalyzed reduction of Mn(IV) changed with time as evidenced by the variations in the initial rate of Mn(II) production at the head of the column. The concentration of Mn in both columns was controlled by the solubility of rhodochrosite (MnCO 3(S)). In the column where significant SO 4 reduction took place (column 2), the concentration of dissolved Fe(II) was controlled by the solubility of FeS. In column 1, where SO 4 reduction was not important, maximum dissolved Fe(II) concentrations were controlled by the solubility of siderite (FeCO 3(S)). Comparison of solid-phase and aqueous-phase data suggests that nearly 20% of the produced Fe(II) precipitates as siderite in column 1. The solid-phase analysis also indicates that during the course of experiment, approximately 20% of the total Fe(III) hydroxides and more than 70% of the amorphous Fe(III) hydroxides were reduced by dissimilatory iron reduction. The most important sink for dissolved S(-II) produced by the enzymatic reduction of SO 4 was its direct reaction with solid-phase Fe(III) hydroxides leading initially to the formation of FeS. Compared to this pathway, precipitation as FeS did not constitute an important sink for S(-II) in column

  2. Experimental study on the fabrication of advanced materials for energy applications using high energy mechanical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Swamy, Ashvin Kumar

    The reaction of aluminum (Al) powder with water has the potential for on demand hydrogen generation. Conventional Al powders, however, react with water slowly due to a highly protective oxide layer on the particle surface. Current methods for Al activation involve harmful and expensive materials. The nano-scale Al powders also remain very expensive and have problems such as a large amount of oxide on the surface. The use of aluminum in an energy generation cycle is also hindered by the fact that, although Al is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust, its recovery from ore consumes a lot of energy. Recycling aluminum hydroxide, formed as a result of Al reaction with water, would also require large amounts of energy. The energy consumption for production of Al powder and hence its cost could be significantly reduced by using recycled aluminum scrap and waste where aluminum is contained in metallic, non-oxidized form. The research work presented here investigates the preparation of an activated aluminum powder from aluminum foil that is widely available as scrap and waste. The obtained results demonstrate that a highly reactive, fine powder can be obtained from Al foil by high-energy ball milling with sodium chloride (NaCl). The obtained powder readily reacts with hot water, releasing hydrogen. Note that NaCl is an environment-friendly additive that can easily be removed after milling and recycled. After washing NaCl out, the powders retain a high reactivity with respect to hot water. As compared to previously studied activation of commercial Al powders, a major advantage of the investigated process is the feasibility of using secondary aluminum. Another area of research presented here is the synthesis of gallium oxide (Ga2O3) nanostructures for their use as high-temperature sensors. Quasi one-dimensional nanomaterials are of great interest due to increased focus on their importance in physics research and also their applications in the nanodevices industry

  3. Theoretical and Experimental Thermal Performance Analysis of Complex Thermal Storage Membrane Containing Bio-Based Phase Change Material (PCM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Stovall, Therese K; Shrestha, Som S; Yarbrough, David W

    2010-12-01

    Since 2000, an ORNL research team has been testing different configurations of PCM-enhanced building envelop components to be used in residential and commercial buildings. During 2009, a novel type of thermal storage membrane was evaluated for building envelope applications. Bio-based PCM was encapsulated between two layers of heavy-duty plastic film forming a complex array of small PCM cells. Today, a large group of PCM products are packaged in such complex PCM containers or foils containing arrays of PCM pouches of different shapes and sizes. The transient characteristics of PCM-enhanced building envelope materials depend on the quality and amount of PCM, which is very often difficult to estimate because of the complex geometry of many PCM heat sinks. The only widely used small-scale analysis method used to evaluate the dynamic characteristics of PCM-enhanced building products is the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Unfortunately, this method requires relatively uniform, and very small, specimens of the material. However, in numerous building thermal storage applications, PCM products are not uniformly distributed across the surface area, making the results of traditional DSC measurements unrealistic for these products. In addition, most of the PCM-enhanced building products contain blends of PCM with fire retardants and chemical stabilizers. This combination of non-uniform distribution and non-homogenous composition make it nearly impossible to select a representative small specimen suitable for DSC tests. Recognizing these DSC limitations, ORNL developed a new methodology for performing dynamic heat flow analysis of complex PCM-enhanced building materials. An experimental analytical protocol to analyze the dynamic characteristics of PCM thermal storage makes use of larger specimens in a conventional heat-flow meter apparatus, and combines these experimental measurements with three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference modeling and whole building energy

  4. Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy of planetary analog materials. Experimental facility at Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Brissaud, O.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.; Doute, S.

    2007-08-01

    We have developed an original experimental facility designed to measure the bidirectional reflectance spectra of planetary analog materials. These measurements are helpful to interpret the observations of the spectrometers on board space probes in orbit around various Solar System bodies. The central part of the facility is the LPG spectrogonio- radiometer (Brissaud et al., 2004). This instrument provides measurements of samples BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) with high photometric and spectrometric accuracy in the spectral range of visible and near-infrared (0.3 - 4.8 microns). Measurements can be made at any value of incidence and emergence angle up to 80°. Azimuth angle is allowed to vary between 0 and 180°. The instrument was recently installed in a cold room allowing ambient temperatures as low as -20°C. This makes possible the measurements on different kinds of water ice samples (slab ice, frost, snow...) and mixtures of minerals and water ice with unprecedented accuracy. We also have designed and built a simulation chamber to measure spectra of samples (water ice and/or minerals) under an atmosphere with perfectly controlled temperature, pressure and composition. The main objective of this last improvement is the study of water exchange between planetary regolith analogs and atmosphere (adsorption/ desorption, condensation/sublimation). Experimental results will mainly apply to Martian water cycle and hydrated mineralogy. This simulation chamber also provides an efficient way to obtain bidirectional reflectance spectra of dry materials (removal of adsorbed water) with implications for planetary bodies without atmospheric or surface water (Titan, asteroids...). The reflectance spectroscopy facility is part of a large panel of instruments and techniques available at Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble that provide complementary measurements on the same samples: infrared transmission spectroscopy of thin ice films, thick liquid and

  5. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. High-temperature thermo-mechanical behavior of functionally graded materials produced by plasma sprayed coating: Experimental and modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kang Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Su; Park, Chang Hyun; Kim, Gon-Ho; Baik, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are widely used in aerospace industries to protect exterior surfaces from harsh environments. In this study, functionally graded materials (FGMs) were investigated with the aim to optimize their high temperature resistance and strength characteristics. NiCrAlY bond coats were deposited on Inconel-617 superalloy substrate specimens by the low vacuum plasma spraying technique. Functionally graded Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings with gradually varying amounts of YSZ (20%-100%) were fabricated from composite powders by vacuum plasma spraying. Heat shield performance tests were conducted using a high- temperature plasma torch. The temperature distributions were measured using thermocouples at the interfaces of the FGM layers during the tests. A model for predicting the temperature at the bond coating-substrate interface was established. The temperature distributions simulated using the finite element method agreed well with the experimental results.

  7. An experimental/theoretical method for the study of the residual technological stresses in products made of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, G. V.; Reznichenko, A. I.

    1992-04-01

    A method for analyzing residual stresses in products made of composite materials by forced winding, pyrolytic precipitation, casting or extrusion is proposed. It is shown that each initial stressed state of a product may have an equivalent temperature field causing identical thermoelastic stresses in the product. This method is verified by means of analysis of the technological stresses in thick-walled conic shells made by pyrolytic carbon precipitation at temperatures above 2000 C. The method makes it possible to determine the stresses of the whole volume of the product with comparatively few data on the deformation relaxation provided by the attached strain gauges. Satisfactory agreement was found between the theoretical and experimental values of the stresses in places of the fixed strain gauges.

  8. Molecular concept and experimental evidence of H2O, CH4 and CO2 adsorption on organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Krooss, Bernhard; Busch, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Unconventional gas, such as shale gas or coalbed methane offers an attractive low-carbon solution and furthermore provides possibilities for CO2-storage and coevally for enhanced gas recovery. In order to better understand gas and water interaction with organic matter (coal) of different maturity we developed a molecular concept with experimental and literature support for sorption of these fluids on organic material over the entire range of thermal maturity. With increasing burial depth and temperature CO2 and CH4 are the main volatiles released when organic material matures (cf. coalification). While most CO2 is generally dissolved in formation water and transported away from the coal, most CH4 (coalbed methane, CBM) remains adsorbed to the coal pore structure and is produced as unconventional gas. We present here the experimental basis and a conceptual model and to explain CO2 and CH4 sorption in the presence of water on coal with varying coal maturity (from lignite to anthracite). Adsorption experiments have been performed on different maturity coals at various temperatures, pressures up to 20 MPa and under dry and moist conditions. With increasing coal maturity we find for both gases a linear sorption capacity trend for moisture-equilibrated and a more parabolic trend for dry coal samples. When investigating the difference in CH4 and CO2 sorption capacity on coal of different maturity as a function of moisture content we infer that oxygen containing functional groups account for the selective sorption properties of gases and water to coals. Additionally restrictions in translational and vibrational movements of the sorbed gas molecules induced by adsorbed water molecules cause differences in the presence of water.

  9. Combining Simulated and Experimental Data to Simulate Ultrasonic Array Data From Defects in Materials With High Structural Noise.

    PubMed

    Bloxham, Harry A; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul David

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive testing inspections using phased arrays are performed on a wide range of components and materials. All real inspections suffer, to varying extents, from coherent noise, including image artifacts and speckle caused by complex geometries and grain scatter, respectively. By its nature, this noise is not reduced by averaging; however, it degrades the signal-to-noise ratio of defects and ultimately limits their detectability. When evaluating the effectiveness of an inspection, a large pool of data from samples containing a range of different defects are important to estimate the probability of detection of defects and to help characterize them. For a given inspection, coherent noise is easy to measure experimentally but hard to model realistically. Conversely, the ultrasonic response of defects can be simulated relatively easily. This paper proposes a novel method of simulating realistic array data by combining noise-free simulations of defect responses with coherent noise taken from experimental data. This removes the need for costly physical samples with known defects to be made and allows for large data sets to be created easily.

  10. Experimental investigation of reduced volatile formation by high-temperature interactions among meteorite constituent materials, water, and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Samejima, Taro; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    Late heavy bombardment (LHB) of extraterrestrial objects supplied carbon with metals to the prebiotic Earth. The early oceans were the major target of these impacts, followed by interactions among the atmosphere, oceanic water, and meteorite constituent materials under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions. Post-impact reactions of these hypervelocity impacts have the potential to produce reduced volatiles and organic compounds, including amino acids. Therefore, understanding the reactions in post-impact plumes is of great importance for the investigation of prebiotic organic compounds. The composition of post-impact plumes has been investigated with thermochemical calculations. However, experimental evidence is still needed to understand the reactions in dynamic systems of post-impact plumes. The present study investigates the effects of reaction temperature and availability of water on products from iron, nickel, graphite, nitrogen, and water in a dynamic gas flow system to investigate reactions in post-impact plumes. Results of this study indicate the formation of CO, H2, NH3, and HCN by hypervelocity oceanic impacts of iron-rich extraterrestrial objects. The formation of methane was limited in the present experiments, suggesting that the quenching rate is an influential factor for methane formation in post-impact plumes. Availability of water vapor in the plume was also an influential factor for the formation of reduced volatiles that controlled the CO formation rate from graphite. These results provide experimental evidence for the formation of reduced volatiles in post-impact plumes, which influenced the formation of prebiotic organic compounds.

  11. Influence of humidity on the initial emittable concentration of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde in building materials: experimental observation and correlation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Cai, Chaorui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-01-01

    Humidity is one of the main environmental factors affecting the emission rate and key parameters of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials. Meanwhile, the initial emittable concentration (Cm,0) is proved to be the most sensitive key parameter to the emission behaviours. However, there is no report on the relationship between humidity and Cm,0. In this paper, Cm,0 of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde from a type of medium density fiberboard in absolute humidity (AH) range of 4.6–19.6 g/m3 at 25 °C were tested by virtue of a C-history method. Experimental results indicate that Cm,0 is dramatically dependent on AH, increased by 10 and 2 times for formaldehyde and hexaldehyde when AH rising from 4.6 g/m3 to 19.6 g/m3. A linear relationship between the logarithm of Cm,0 and AH is obtained based on the measured results. In addition, a correlation characterizing the association of emission rate and AH is derived. The effectiveness of the correlation is verified with our experimental results as well as data from literature. With the correlations, the Cm,0 or emission rate different from the test AH conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be useful for predicting the emission characteristics of humidity changing scenarios and for source control. PMID:27025353

  12. Test Methodology Development for Experimental Structural Assessment of ASC Planar Spring Material for Long-Term Durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Gunjin; Abdullah, A. B. M.; Binienda, Wieslaw; Krause, David L.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    2014-01-01

    A vibration-based testing methodology has been developed that will assess fatigue behavior of the metallic material of construction for the Advanced Stirling Convertor displacer (planar) spring component. To minimize the testing duration, the test setup is designed for base-excitation of a multiplespecimen arrangement, driven in a high-frequency resonant mode; this allows completion of fatigue testing in an accelerated period. A high performance electro-dynamic exciter (shaker) is used to generate harmonic oscillation of cantilever beam specimens, which are clasped on the shaker armature with specially-designed clamp fixtures. The shaker operates in closed-loop control with dynamic specimen response feedback provided by a scanning laser vibrometer. A test coordinator function synchronizes the shaker controller and the laser vibrometer to complete the closed-loop scheme. The test coordinator also monitors structural health of the test specimens throughout the test period, recognizing any change in specimen dynamic behavior. As this may be due to fatigue crack initiation, the test coordinator terminates test progression and then acquires test data in an orderly manner. Design of the specimen and fixture geometry was completed by finite element analysis such that peak stress does not occur at the clamping fixture attachment points. Experimental stress evaluation was conducted to verify the specimen stress predictions. A successful application of the experimental methodology was demonstrated by validation tests with carbon steel specimens subjected to fully-reversed bending stress; high-cycle fatigue failures were induced in such specimens using higher-than-prototypical stresses

  13. Influence of humidity on the initial emittable concentration of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde in building materials: experimental observation and correlation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Cai, Chaorui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-03-30

    Humidity is one of the main environmental factors affecting the emission rate and key parameters of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials. Meanwhile, the initial emittable concentration (Cm,0) is proved to be the most sensitive key parameter to the emission behaviours. However, there is no report on the relationship between humidity and Cm,0. In this paper, Cm,0 of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde from a type of medium density fiberboard in absolute humidity (AH) range of 4.6-19.6 g/m(3) at 25 °C were tested by virtue of a C-history method. Experimental results indicate that Cm,0 is dramatically dependent on AH, increased by 10 and 2 times for formaldehyde and hexaldehyde when AH rising from 4.6 g/m(3) to 19.6 g/m(3). A linear relationship between the logarithm of Cm,0 and AH is obtained based on the measured results. In addition, a correlation characterizing the association of emission rate and AH is derived. The effectiveness of the correlation is verified with our experimental results as well as data from literature. With the correlations, the Cm,0 or emission rate different from the test AH conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be useful for predicting the emission characteristics of humidity changing scenarios and for source control.

  14. Combined experimental and analytical study using cruciform specimen for testing advanced aeropropulsion materials under in-plane biaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Krause, David

    2006-03-01

    A new in-house test capability has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to conduct highly critical tests in support of major and significant components of the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). It is to aid the development of analytical life prediction methodology and to experimentally assist in verifying the flight-design component's life. Components within the SRG such as the heater head pressure vessel endure a very high temperature environment for a long period of time. Such conditions impose life-limiting failure by means of material creep, a slow gradual increase in strain which leads to an eventual failure of the pressure vessel. To properly evaluate the performance and assist in the design of this component, testing under multiaxial loading setting is essential, since the heater head is subjected to a biaxial state of stress. Thus, the current work undertakes conducting analytical studies under equibiaxial and non-equi-biaxial loadings situations at various temperatures emulating creep environment. These analytical activities will utilize the finite element method to analyze cruciform type specimens both, under linear elastic and creep conditions. And further to calibrate the in-plane biaxial-test system. The specimen finite element model is generated with MSC/Patran [1] and analytical calculations are conducted with MARC and ANSYS finite element codes [2-3]. Complementing these calculations will undertake conducting experimental tests. However, only results pertaining to the analytical studies are reported and their impact on estimating the life of the component is evaluated.

  15. Experimental investigation of thermal characteristics of lithium ion battery using phase change materials combined with metallic foams and fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y. C.; Zhang, H. Y.; Xia, X.

    2016-08-01

    Phase change materials are of great interest in energy storage and energy management applications due to their high latent heat and excellent cycling stability. In this paper, the thermal characteristics of phase change materials (PCM) for thermal management of cylindrical 18650 lithium-ion battery (LIB) were experimentally investigated. A commercial paraffin wax with a melting temperaturerange between 47 - 53.8oC was used in this study. A metal cylinder with a heater was used to emulate the heat generation from a battery, which was surrounded with the paraffin PCM and containted in a metal housing. The experiment was conducted in an environmental test chamber with controlled ambient temperatures and power inputs. Both the battery temperature and the housing wall temperature were measured during steady-state heating and cyclic heating conditions. Since PCM has low thermal conductivity, thermal enhancement techniques were investigated by adding metal foams (MFs) or combining metallic foam and fins into the PCM to enhance the thermal conductivity. The battery temperatures were measured for all the cases and the results were analyzed and discussed.

  16. A field experimental study of lignin sand stabilizing material (LSSM) extracted from spent-liquor of straw pulping paper mills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han-Jie; Li, Jing; Lu, Xiao-Zhen; Jin, Yong-Can

    2005-01-01

    A new technique was introduced for sand stabilization and re-vegetation by use of lignin sand stabilizing material (LSSM). LSSM is a reconstructed organic compound with lignin as the most dominant component from the extracts of black-liquor issued by straw pulp paper mills. Unlike the polyvinyl acetate or foamed asphalt commonly used for dune stabilization, the new material is plant-friendly and can be used with virescence actions simultaneously. The field experimental study was conducted since 2001 in China's Northwest Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region and has been proved that LSSM is effective in stabilizing the fugitive dunes, making the arenaceous plants survive and the bare dune vegetative. The advisable solution concentration is 2% and the optimal field spraying quantity is 2.5 L/m2. The soil nutrients of the stabilized and greened dune, such as organic matter, available phosphorous and total nitrogen are all increased compared with the control treatment, which is certainly helpful to the growth of arenaceous plants. The technique is worthwhile to be popularized because it is provided not only a new method for desertification control but also an outlet for cleaning contaminants issued from the straw paper mills.

  17. Simulation and Experimental Study on Effect of Phase Change Material Thickness to Reduce Temperature of Photovoltaic Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indartono, Y. S.; Prakoso, S. D.; Suwono, A.; Zaini, I. N.; Fernaldi, B.

    2015-09-01

    Solar energy is promising renewable energy which can be applied in Indonesia. Average solar radiation in the country is 4.8 kWh/day/m2. Weakness of silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) is efficiency reduction caused by temperature increase. Many attempts have been done to reduce PV temperature. In previous study, palm oil, which is widely available in Indonesia, is suitable to be used as phase change material (PCM) to reduce PV temperature. In this study, thickness of aluminium rectangular-tube containing phase change material oil is varied. The tube is placed at back part of PV. Numerical and experimental study was done to evaluate the effect of tube thickness to the temperature reduction of the PV. Variation of tube thickness used in the experiment is 50.8mm, 76.2 mm, 101.6 mm. Both studies show that increase of PCM thickness reduces PV temperature. Higher PCM thickness cause large reduction on PV temperature. Simulation result shows there is an optimum thickness of the PCM which is applied to the PV.

  18. Preventing thermal runaway propagation in lithium ion battery packs using a phase change composite material: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Stephen; Schweitzer, Ben; Khateeb, Siddique; Al-Hallaj, Said

    2017-02-01

    The safety issues of lithium ion batteries pose ongoing challenges as the market for Li-ion technology continues to grow in personal electronics, electric mobility, and stationary energy storage. The severe risks posed by battery thermal runaway necessitate safeguards at every design level - from materials, to cell construction, to module and pack assembly. One promising approach to pack thermal management is the use of phase change composite materials (PCC™), which offer passive protection at low weight and cost while minimizing system complexity. We present experimental nail penetration studies on a Li-ion pack for small electric vehicles, designed with and without PCC, to investigate the effectiveness of PCC thermal management for preventing propagation when a single cell enters thermal runaway. The results show that when parallel cells short-circuit through the penetrated cell, the packs without PCC propagate fully while those equipped with PCC show no propagation. In cases where no external short circuits occur, packs without PCC sometimes propagate, but not consistently. In all test conditions, the use of PCC lowers the maximum temperature experienced by neighboring cells by 60 °C or more. We also elucidate the propagation sequence and aspects of pack failure based on cell temperature, voltage, and post-mortem data.

  19. Experimental Study of Material Removal Rate in Electrical Discharge Turning of Titanium Alloy (Ti-6al-4v)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Y. M.; Gohil, Vikas

    2017-03-01

    Electrical discharge turning (EDT) is a new machining process in which an external axis is added to a conventional EDM machine in order to produce precise cylindrical forms on hard and difficult to machine materials. By feeding a pre shaped tool electrode against a rotating work piece, axially symmetrical pats can be produce. The machining performance of EDT process is influenced by its machining parameters, which directly affect the quality of the machined component. This paper presents an experimental study on the effects of EDM parameters namely pulse-on time, peak current, gap voltage, spindle speed and flushing pressure on material removal rate (MRR) in electrical discharge turning of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. This has been done by means of the Taguchi’s design of experiment technique. A mathematical model has been developed for MRR by regression analysis and factor effects were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Signal-to-noise ratio analysis is used to find the optimal condition.

  20. An experimental and analytical investigation into the effects of process vibrations on material removal rates during polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullany, B.; Mainuddin, M.; Williams, W.; Keanini, R.

    2013-06-01

    Experimental testing, using both commercially available polishing machines and a specially built test platform, demonstrates that material removal rates (MRRs) observed during polishing of fused silica are strongly affected by nanometer-scale vibration amplitudes. Specifically, a nanometer level increase in system vibrations can produce MRRs approximately 150% higher than on an inherently smoother running machine. Moreover the higher spatial frequency surface roughness values are little-effected by the spectral content of the polishing machine. Polishing under controlled conditions, using the test platform, shows that for vibration amplitudes, A ≲ 1.6 μm, and over a fairly wide range of vibration frequencies, MRR increases almost linearly with increasing input power. By contrast, for A ≳ 10 μm, MRR exhibits a rapid decay with increasing A. Order of magnitude analyses and physical arguments are presented in order to explain the qualitatively distinct MRR trends observed. In the small-amplitude limit, A ≲ 1.6 μm, two arguments are presented which suggest that the total observed removal rate, MRRtot, reflects the superposed action of chemical-mechanical removal, MRRcm, and vibration-driven, flow-induced removal, MRRflow, i.e., MRRtot=MRRcm+MRRflow. The analyses further indicate that MRRflow primarily reflects cyclic viscous shears and pressure gradients extant within the thin, non-Newtonian slurry film that exists between the polishing tool and workpiece. Shears and pressure gradients, and corresponding flow-induced MRRs, are, in turn, found to scale as √A /do ω, where A is the vibration amplitude, do is the characteristic gap thickness between the tool and workpiece, and ω is the vibration frequency. In the large-amplitude limit, A ≳ 5 μm, experimental measurements and a simple scaling argument show that the polishing slurry film becomes thick enough that the workpiece and polishing tool lose direct contact. In this limit, observed MRRs thus reflect

  1. Novel light-curable materials containing experimental bioactive micro-fillers remineralise mineral-depleted bonded-dentine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Watson, Timothy F; Toledano, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the therapeutic remineralising effects of innovative light-curable materials (LCMs) containing two experimental calcium silicate-based micro-fillers (TCS) modified with β-TCP only or β-TCP, zinc oxide (ZnO)/polyacrylic acid (PAA) on mineral-depleted bonded-dentine interfaces in simulated body fluids (SBFS). Three experimental LCMs were formulated: (1) resin A, containing a β-TCP-modified TCS (βTCS) micro-filler; (2) resin B, containing a polycarboxylated β-TCP/ZnO-modified TCS (βZn-TCS) micro-filler; and 3) resin C, containing no filler (control). Acid-etched (35% H3PO4) dentine specimens were bonded using the three LCMs and submitted to atomic force microscope (AFM)/nano-indentation analysis to evaluate the modulus of elasticity (Ei) and hardness (Hi) across the interface after SBFS storage (24 h/1 m/3 m). The ultramorphology and micropermeability of the resin-dentine interface were evaluated using confocal laser microscopy. Resin-dentine sticks were created and submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) test (SBFS: 24 h/3 m). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed after de-bonding. The LCMs containing the experimental bioactive micro-fillers reduced the micropermeability and induced a significant increase of the Ei and Hi along the bonding interface. The specimens created using the resin B (βZn-TCS) attained the highest μTBS values both after 24 h and 3 m of SBFS storage. In conclusion, the innovative bioactive light-curable materials tested in this study are able to induce a therapeutic remineralising effect on the nano-mechanical properties and on the sealing ability of mineral-depleted resin-dentine interfaces. The contemporary idea of minimally invasive operative treatment, where therapeutic restorations are performed to combat the carious process and remineralise the dental hard tissues, may be satisfied by using such resin-base systems, containing βTCS or βZn-TCS bioactive micro-fillers.

  2. Experimental constraints on the energy budget of dynamic gouge formation: effects of rock strength, material heterogeneity, and initial flaw characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Ashley; Barber, Troy; Borjas, Christopher; Ghaffari, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Fault core materials are characterized by substantial grain size reduction relative to host and damage zone rocks. The properties of these materials control fault strength and frictional behavior, and they record valuable information about rupture and slip processes. At high strain rates and large stress amplitudes characteristic of earthquake rupture tips, rock failure passes through a fragmentation transition from discrete fracture to pulverization; therefore much of the observed grain size reduction at the leading edge of propagating earthquake ruptures. Past examinations of particle size distributions in gouge formed in the cores of natural faults have led to contrasting conclusions that during a single event, the energy associated with creation of new surface area during this grain size reduction can be as large as 50%, or as little as <1% of the earthquake energy budget; however these estimates are difficult to confirm due to (A) challenges associated with accurate particle size measurement and (B) uncertainty regarding the variety of (not-necessarily coseismic) physico-chemical processes that may contribute to the observed grain size reduction. Here we study the micromechanics and energy budget of dynamic rock fragmentation under impulsive compressive loads using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. We present new experimental results on Arkansas Novaculite and Westerly Granite coupled with microstructural observations and BET surface area measurements of post-mortem specimens. We show that the energy partitioned into creation of new surface areas approaches a significant portion of the total dissipated energy during our experiments, but this partitioning can be buffered by the presence of flaws and/or significant material heterogeneity. The results of this work have important implications for lithologic controls on gouge formation and energy partitioning during earthquakes.

  3. Experimental study of temperature-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate embolic material in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile in swines.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xianbin; Zhao, Changfu; Pang, Jinfeng; Ding, Zhaoyi; Wang, Yubo; Xu, Kan; Chen, Hao; Li, Bingwei; Luo, Q I

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive liquid embolic material, chitosan/β-glycerophosphate (C/GP), in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile (REM) in a swine model of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cAVM). A total of 24 domestic swines were used as the experimental animals, among which 12 pigs underwent direct embolization of one side of the REM, while the other 12 pigs underwent embolization of the bilateral REM following anastomosis of the carotid artery and jugular vein. A super-selective microcatheter was introduced into the REM during the embolization procedure, and the C/GP hydrogel was injected until an image of the REM disappeared in the angiography examination. Further angiography examinations were performed after 2 and 6 weeks, and histological examination of the REM was performed after 6 weeks. Of the 24 domestic swines, 23 cases underwent successful thrombosis. Convulsions occurred in one case and that pig died during the embolization procedure. Following embolization, the angiography observations revealed that the embolized REM was no longer able to be developed, and adhesion of the microcatheter tip with the embolic agent did not occur. In addition, no apparent revascularization was observed in the angiography examinations performed at weeks 2 and 6. Therefore, the current preliminary study indicated that use of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive embolic material was feasible for the embolization of cAVM; thus, C/GP may be used as an ideal embolic material for the treatment of cAVM.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    In oil and gas industry, soil particles, crude oil, natural gas, particle-laden liquids, and seawater can carry various highly aggressive elements, which accelerate the material degradation of component surfaces by combination of slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear mechanisms. This material degradation results into the loss of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, and impact strength; leading to detachment, delamination, cracking, and ultimately premature failure of components. Since the failure of high valued equipment needs considerable cost and time to be repaired or replaced, minimizing the tribological failure of equipment under aggressive environment has been gaining increased interest. It is widely recognized that effective management of degradation mechanisms will contribute towards the optimization of maintenance, monitoring, and inspection costs. The hardfacing techniques have been widely used to enhance the resistance of surfaces against degradation mechanisms. Applying a surface coating improves wear and corrosion resistance and ensures reliability and long-term performance of coated parts. A protective layer or barrier on the components avoids the direct mechanical and chemical contacts of tool surfaces with process media and will reduce the material loss and ultimately its failure. Laser cladding as an advanced hardfacing technique has been widely used for industrial applications in order to develop a protective coating with desired material properties. During the laser cladding, coating material is fused into the base material by means of a laser beam in order to rebuild a damaged part's surface or to enhance its surface function. In the hardfacing techniques such as atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF), and laser cladding, mixing of coating materials with underneath surface has to be minimized in order to utilize the properties of the coating material most effectively. In this regard, laser cladding offers

  5. High pressure experimental constraints on the fate of water during subduction of oceanic crustal material into the deep mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Anja; Frost, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of the abundance and distribution of H2O in the Earth's deep mantle remains highly controversial. The chief means of replenishment of the Earth's interior with volatiles over much of geological time is subduction, but constraints are very poor as natural samples from the deep Earth's interior subduction zones are inaccessible. High pressure experimental investigations can overcome that problem by simulating deep mantle conditions and processes. We aim to experimentally determine the maximum storage capacity, substitution mechanism and behaviour of H2O in hydrous and nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) during subduction of hydrated oceanic crustal material into the deep upper mantle. A particular interest is to determine the H2O content of NAMs at the conditions where nominally hydrous phases (such as phengite) are breaking down to release H2O that would then leave the slab. By applying a novel experimental approach formerly used for peridotite mantle compositions [1, 2], small amounts of H2O in eclogitic NAMs such as garnet, clinopyroxene, coesite/stishovite etc. will be determined for the first time in high pressure experiments as a function of pressure, temperature and bulk composition by using interlayers of the NAMs and volatile-rich oceanic crustal material of MORB composition. Here we present the first results of experimentally determined melting and phase relations of an altered oceanic basalt composition GA1 [3] containing varying amounts of H2O (up to 7wt.%) at varying temperatures (sub-solidus to near solidus) and pressures (6-10 GPa; i.e. from ~200 to ~330 km depth) using multi anvil apparatuses at University of Bayreuth, Germany. Experiments yield well-crystallised assemblages of garnet ± clinopyroxene ± coesite/stishovite ± rutile ± phengite ± vapour. Similar to previous studies [e.g. 4-8], the stability of phengite varies as a function of pressure, temperature, buffering mineral paragenesis and bulk H2O concentration. In addition, K2O

  6. An experimentally verified model for thermal microactuators including nonlinear material properties, vacuum, and intra-device heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, Keegan; Naraghi, Mohammad; Boyd, James G.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a model and computational method to predict the steady-state performance of thermal flexure microactuators at high input powers and various levels of partial vacuum. The model accounts for nonlinear temperature dependence of material properties, heat loss due to radiation, and intra-device heat transfer by conduction across an air gap. The model is validated by comparing the model predictions with the experimentally measured voltage, current, and displacement at standard conditions, prior to adjusting for partial vacuum. In order to understand the effect of nonlinearities on model reliability, the predictions of six additional hypothetical models are considered where (1) intra-device heat transfer is neglected, (2) radiation is neglected, (3) the thermal conductivity of silicon is assumed to be temperature-independent, (4) the thermal conductivity of air is assumed to be temperature-independent, (5) the electrical resistivity of silicon is assumed to be linear in temperature, and (6) the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon is assumed to be temperature-independent. All factors except radiation were shown to have a significant influence on the device performance especially at high input powers. The experimentally validated full model is then employed to predict the effect of reduced air pressure on the displacement and heat transfer properties of the actuator. This aspect of the study targets applications of thermal actuators in controlled environments such as space applications, actuators used for in situ micropositioning and tensile testing inside electron microscopy chambers, or actuators incorporated into the design of MEMS resonators. It was demonstrated that the maximum actuator displacement is not a linear function of reduced pressure and that it reaches a maximum at a certain partial vacuum level.

  7. Experimental high strain-rate deformation products of carbonate-silicate rocks: Comparison with terrestrial impact materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bogert, C. H.; Schultz, P. H.; Spray, J. G.

    2008-09-01

    as an individual mineral species, no pure lime was observed to be present. In the quartzite sample, CaO is present only as a component of the Ca- and Ca,Mg-silicates. In the fine-grained shear zone materials, however, elemental mapping and EMP analyses reveal an overall segregation of MgO and CaO [6], suggesting that CaO is mostly present in Casilicates and Ca,Mg-silicates with low MgO contents. Dolomitic marble sample. The dolomitic marble section exhibited thinner, shorter fractures than the quartzite sample. Mechanical twinning was induced by the deformation. The adhered friction products were very fine-grained material with larger, untwinned calcite (Fig. 2), and dendritic carbonates with a composition similar to huntite. Most of the secondary calcite had rounded margins, which suggested that they were molten during the experiment. The dendritic huntite-like carbonate, with a CO2 content higher than of these secondary carbonate grains (Fig. 3). However, calcite was the dominant secondary mineral. The finegrained portion of the shear zone material contained pervasive vesicles. The vesicles immediately adjacent to the secondary calcite grains were smaller than those adjacent to the dolomitic marble. This suggests that incorporation of CO2 near the calcite grains facilitated their growth. Discussion. The textures and compositions of the experimental products indicate that the dolomitic marble decarbonated in response to the high temperatures generated during experimental deformation. Simultaneously, the liberated CaO recombined with CO2 to form molten calcite in the shear zone. This effect, in part, is due to the lower decarbonation temperature for dolomite versus calcite [c.f., 7], which allows calcite to survive at higher temperatures than dolomite. In addition, the confining pressure during the experiment was high enough to allow calcite to be present as a liquid [c.f., 8]. Both the calcite and dendritic carbonate are likely products of back-reaction of CaO and

  8. Numerical-experimental analyses by Hot-Wire method of an alumina cylinder for future studies on thermal conductivity of the fusion breeder materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Frano, R.; Moscardini, M.; Aquaro, D.

    2014-11-01

    The determination of the thermal conductivity of breeder materials is one of the main goal in order to find the best candidate material for the fusion reactor technology. Experimental tests have been and will be carried out with a dedicated experimental devices, built at the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering of the University of Pisa. The methodological approach used in doing that is characterized by two main phases strictly interrelated each other: the first one focused on the experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of a ceramic material, by means of hot wire method, to be subsequently used in the second phase, based on the test rig method, to determine the thermal conductivity of pebble bed material. To the purpose, two different experimental devices have been designed and built. This paper deals with the first phase of the methodology. In this framework, the equipment set up and built to perform Hot wire tests, the ceramic material (a cylinder of alumina), the experimental procedure and the measured results obtained varying the temperature, are presented and discussed. The experimental campaign has been lead from 50°C up to 400°C. The thermal conductivity of the ceramic material at different bulk temperatures has been obtained in stationary conditions (detected on the basis of the temperature values measured during the experiment). Numerical analyses have been also performed by means of FEM code Ansys©. The numerical results were in quite good agreement with the experimental one, confirming also the reliability of code in reproducing heat transfer phenomena.

  9. Modeling disturbance-driven transport of unconsolidated materials using a rate process framework: Experimental investigation of granular creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roering, J. J.

    2002-12-01

    The movement of unconsolidated materials near the earth's surface is often driven by disturbances that occur at a range of spatial and temporal scales. The nature of these disturbances varies from highly stochastic, such as tree turnover (which is influenced by tree physiology, soil properties, storm frequency, and topography), to periodic and predictable, such as frost heave or creep (which is influenced by seasonal changes in temperature and moisture). To explore the effect of probabilistic disturbances on surface processes, we formulated a granular creep model analogous to rate process theory (RPT) used for chemical reactions (Eyring, 1936, J. Chem. Phys., v. 4, p. 283-291). According to the theory, individual particles must be energized to a height greater than adjacent particles in order for grain dilation and transport to occur. The height of neighboring particles (which is akin to activation energy in chemical reactions) varies with slope angle such that energy barriers get smaller in the downslope direction as slopes steepen. When slopes approach the friction-limited angle of repose, the height of energy barriers approaches zero and grains flow in the absence of disturbance. An exponential function is used to describe the probability distribution of particle excitation height although alternative distributions are possible. The exponent that describes the probability distribution increases with depth due to additional overburden. We tested model predictions of granular dynamics in an experimental sandpile. In the sandpile, acoustic energy serves as the disturbance agent such that grains dilate and flow in response. Particle velocities are controlled by the frequency of energy pulses that result in grain displacement. Using tracers to track particle trajectories, we observed a convex-up velocity profile near the surface of the sandpile, consistent with predictions of our RPT-based velocity model. In addition, we depth-integrated the velocity model to predict

  10. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical and Thermal properties of sisal fibre reinforced composite and effect of sic filler material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surya Teja, Malla; Ramana, M. V.; Sriramulu, D.; Rao, C. J.

    2016-09-01

    With a view of exploring the potential use of natural recourses, we made an attempt to fabricate sisal fibre polymer composites by hand lay-up method. Natural fiber composites are renewable, cheap and biodegradable. Their easy availability, lower density, higher specific properties, lower cost, satisfactory mechanical and thermal properties, non-corrosive nature, makes them an attractive ecological alternative to glass, carbon or other man-made synthetic fibers. In this work, the effect of SiC on mechanical and thermal properties of natural sisal fiber composites are investigated. The composite has been made with and without SiC incorporating natural sisal fiber with polyester as bonding material. The experimental outcomes exhibited that the tensile strength of composite with 10%SiC 2.53 times greater than that of composite without SiC. The impact strength of composite with 10% SiC is 1.73 times greater than that of composite without SiC plain polyester. Thermal properties studied include thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal degradation and stability. Three different samples with 0%, 5%, 10% SiC powder are considered. With the addition of SiC filler powder, thermal conductivity increases, specific heat capacity gradually increases then decreases, thermal diffusivity increases and thermal stability improves with Sic powder.

  11. Correlation Between Material Properties of Ferroelectric Thin Films and Design Parameters for Microwave Device Applications: Modeling Examples and Experimental Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; VanKeuls, Fred W.; Subramanyam, Guru; Mueller, Carl H.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Rosado, Gerardo

    2000-01-01

    The application of thin ferroelectric films for frequency and phase agile components is the topic of interest of many research groups worldwide. Consequently, proof-of-concepts (POC) of different tunable microwave components using either (HTS, metal)/ferroelectric thin film/dielectric heterostructures or (thick, thin) film "flip-chip" technology have been reported. Either as ferroelectric thin film characterization tools or from the point of view of circuit implementation approach, both configurations have their respective advantages and limitations. However, we believe that because of the progress made so far using the heterostructure (i.e., multilayer) approach, and due to its intrinsic features such as planar configuration and monolithic integration, a study on the correlation of circuit geometry aspects and ferroelectric material properties could accelerate the insertion of this technology into working systems. In this paper, we will discuss our study performed on circuits based on microstrip lines at frequencies above 10 GHz, where the multilayer configuration offers greater ease of insertion due to circuit's size reduction. Modeled results of relevant circuit parameters such as the characteristic impedance, effective dielectric constant, and attenuation as a function of ferroelectric film's dielectric constant, tans, and thickness, will be presented for SrTiO3 and Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 ferroelectric films. A comparison between the modeled and experimental data for some of these parameters will be presented.

  12. Comparison of Model and Experimental Results for Material and Energy Flow in a Titanium Evaporation System with Deforming Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Westerberg, K W; Meier, T C; Braun, D G; Frischknecht, K D; Anklam, T M

    2003-05-12

    Finite element calculations and measurements are compared for material and energy flow in a system to evaporate pure titanium. A 40 kW electron beam is used to heat the end of a 7.62 cm diameter cylindrical rod which is fed vertically through a water-cooled crucible. Vapor emanates from a liquid pool in which flow is driven strongly by buoyancy and capillary forces. At high evaporation rates, the vapor exerts strong shear and normal forces on the liquid-vapor interface. The MELT finite element code is used to calculate steady-state, axisymmetric flow and temperature fields along with liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interface locations. The influence of the vapor on the liquid top surface is treated using boundary conditions with parameters derived from Monte Carlo simulations. The upper and lower interfaces of the liquid pool are tracked using a mesh structured with rotating spines. Experimental evaporation rates are obtained from measured feed rates, and heat flow rates are determined from measured temperature rises in the cooling water. The finite element model provides a good representation of the measured evaporation rates, heat flows, and lower pool boundary locations.

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Demonstration on the Transport Properties of Fused Ring Host Materials for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, S. C.; So, S. K.; Yeung, M. Y.; Lo, C. F.; Wen, S. W.; Chen, C. H.

    2006-01-01

    The charge transport properties of three tertiary-butyl (t-Bu) substituted anthracene derivatives (ADN), critical blue host materials for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), have been investigated experimentally and computationally. From time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, all ADN compounds exhibit ambipolar characters. The hole and electron mobilities are in the range (1--5)× 10-7 cm2 V-1 s-1 under an external applied field of about 1 MV cm-1. Un-substituted ADN has the highest carrier mobilities while heavily t-Bu substituted ADN has the least. The electron and hole conducting properties of are consistent with ab initio calculation, which indicates that the frontier orbitals are localized mainly on the anthracene moiety. t-Bu substitutions in ADN increase the hopping path lengths among the molecules and hence reduce the electron and hole mobilities. The results demonstrate that t-Bu substitution is an effective means of engineering the conductivity of organic charge transporter for OLED applications.

  14. Experimental Comparison of Tantalum Material Strength between Single Crystal [100] and [111] Samples at High Pressure and Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechaty, Christopher; Park, Hye-Sook; Cavallo, Rob; Rudd, Robert; Prisbrey, Shon; Maddox, Brian; Wehrenberg, Christopher; May, Mark; Remington, Bruce

    2013-06-01

    Experiments were performed using the OMEGA laser to investigate the strength difference between single crystal [100] and [111] Ta samples at high pressure (1 Mbar), and high strain rates (106- 108 s-1) . To achieve these pressures and strain rates in experiment without melting the sample, a quasi-isentropic drive was employed to drive the growth of pre-imposed sinusoidal perturbations on the surface of the Ta samples, via the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. By measuring the ripple amplitude using face-on high energy (~22 KeV) radiography, the strength of the Ta sample is inferred from the amount of RT growth observed. Under these experimental conditions, the Ta material strength can be modeled by the Multiscale (MS) model, developed at LLNL. The value of the ``Taylor Factor'' (a MS model parameter), is thought to vary for [100] and [111] crystal orientations. To investigate this difference under these conditions, a comparison of the ripple growth was performed on the two samples for the same shot and drive conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Passive neutralization of acid mine drainage using basic oxygen furnace slag as neutralization material: experimental and modelling.

    PubMed

    Zvimba, John N; Siyakatshana, Njabulo; Mathye, Matlhodi

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated passive neutralization of acid mine drainage using basic oxygen furnace slag as neutralization material over 90 days, with monitoring of the parameters' quality and assessment of their removal kinetics. The quality was observed to significantly improve over time with most parameters removed from the influent during the first 10 days. In this regard, removal of acidity, Fe(II), Mn, Co, Ni and Zn was characterized by fast kinetics while removal kinetics for Mg and SO4(2-) were observed to proceed slowly. The fast removal kinetics of acidity was attributed to fast release of alkalinity from slag minerals under mildly acidic conditions of the influent water. The removal of acidity through generation of alkalinity from the passive treatment system was also observed to generally govern the removal of metallic parameters through hydroxide formation, with overall percentage removals of 88-100% achieved. The removal kinetics for SO4(2-) was modelled using two approaches, yielding rate constant values of 1.56 and 1.53 L/(day mol) respectively, thereby confirming authenticity of SO4(2-) removal kinetics experimental data. The study findings provide insights into better understanding of the potential use of slags and their limitations, particularly in mine closure, as part of addressing this challenge in South Africa.

  16. Experimental Demonstration of the Molten Oxide Electrolysis Method for Oxygen and Iron Production from Simulated Lunar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Ethridge, E.; Hudson, S.; Sen, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a Marshall Space Flight Center funded effort to conduct an experimental demonstration of the processing of simulated lunar resources by the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process to produce oxygen and metal from lunar resources to support human exploration of space. Oxygen extracted from lunar materials can be used for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements produced can be used for in situ fabrication of thin-film solar cells for power production. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis, MOE, is chosen for extraction, since the electron is the most practical reducing agent. MOE was also chosen for following reasons. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. In the experiments reported here, melts containing iron oxide were electrolyzed in a low temperature supporting oxide electrolyte (developed by D. Sadoway, MIT).

  17. Experimental study of attenuation and dispersion over a broad frequency range: 2. The universal scaling of polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine; Takei, Yasuko; Hiraga, Takehiko

    2011-09-01

    In order to extend the range of conditions that can be obtained in experiments, we have measured the viscoelastic properties of polycrystalline organic borneol, as an analogue to mantle rock. Using a custom fabricated apparatus, the Young's modulus E and attenuation QE-1 were measured accurately over a broad frequency range (10-4 ≤ f (Hz) ≤ 2.15) and at low strain amplitude (10-5-10-6). Creep experiments were performed with the same apparatus to measure the steady state viscosity. Anelasticity and viscosity were measured at high homologous temperatures (T = 22-48°C; T/Tm = 0.61-0.67) and various grain sizes (3-22 μm), the growth of which was controlled by annealing. Using the measured viscosities η and the unrelaxed modulus EU determined from ultrasonic experiments, the frequency of the entire data set was normalized by the Maxwell frequency fM = EU/η, resulting in E and Q-1 master curves. The Q-1 data from previous studies on olivine-dominated samples also collapse onto the same curve when scaled by fM,, demonstrating the universality of anelasticity for polycrystalline materials. The similitude by the Maxwell frequency scaling indicates that the dominant mechanism for the anelasticity observed in this study and in previous studies is diffusionally accommodated grain boundary sliding. A generalized formulation for this similitude is provided to extrapolate the experimental data to velocity and attenuation of seismic shear waves.

  18. Ion exchange removal of cesium from simulated and actual supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carlson, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in conjunction with the Process Chemistry and Statistics Section of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), conducted this study as part of the Supernatant Treatment Development Task for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Applied Engineering Project. The study assesses the performance of the CS-100 ion exchange material for removing cesium from simulated and actual alkaline supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103. The objective of these experiments is to compare the cesium ion exchange loading and elution profiles of actual and simulated wastes. Specific experimental objectives include (1) demonstration of decontamination factors (DF) for cesium removal, 92) verification of simulant performance, (3) investigation of waste/exchanger chemistry, and (4) determination of the radionuclide content of the regenerated CS-100 resin prior to disposal.

  19. Is Physicality an Important Aspect of Learning through Science Experimentation among Kindergarten Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Loizou, Eleni; Papaevripidou, Marios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether physicality (actual and active touch of concrete material), as such, is a necessity for science experimentation learning at the kindergarten level. We compared the effects of student experimentation with Physical Manipulatives (PM) and Virtual Manipulatives (VM) on kindergarten students'…

  20. Ab initio and experimental pre-edge investigations of the Mn K -edge XANES in oxide-type materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, François

    2005-04-01

    Mn K edge ab initio FEFF8.2 calculations of the pre-edge features of the x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) region were undertaken for a series of Mn-bearing oxide-type compounds. The aim of the study is to provide a reliable method for determining quantitative and accurate redox and symmetry information for manganese. In agreement with multiplet calculations by Glatzel and co-workers, FEFF8.2 predicts a doublet and a triplet for Mn(II) and Mn(III) in octahedral symmetry, respectively, in agreement with high-resolution XANES experiments. Site distortion increases notably the contribution from dipolar transitions and, consequently, the pre-edge feature integrated area. An even more intense pre-edge feature is calculated and measured for the Td symmetry (singletlike). For Mn(IV), a triplet is predicted and measured for the Oh symmetry. However, additional transitions are found in Mn(IV)-rich compounds, that are related to metal-metal transitions. These transitions overlap strongly with the “true pre-edge,” making extraction of redox and symmetry information for Mn(IV) more challenging. However, a model of the pre-edge with pseudo-Voigt functions of fixed calculated width (based on core-hole lifetime and experimental resolution) helps to separate the contributions related to first-neighbor symmetry from those of the metal-metal pairs. Application to multivalent defective manganese oxide materials suggests that the pre-edge information varies linearly as a function of Mn redox state or symmetry but varies nonlinearly as a function of both parameters. Finally, the polymerization of the manganese networks can be estimated from the metal-metal transitions found in the pre-edge region.

  1. Ab initio and experimental pre-edge investigations of the Mn K-edge XANES in oxide-type materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farges, Francois

    2005-04-15

    Mn K edge ab initio FEFF8.2 calculations of the pre-edge features of the x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) region were undertaken for a series of Mn-bearing oxide-type compounds. The aim of the study is to provide a reliable method for determining quantitative and accurate redox and symmetry information for manganese. In agreement with multiplet calculations by Glatzel and co-workers, FEFF8.2 predicts a doublet and a triplet for Mn(II) and Mn(III) in octahedral symmetry, respectively, in agreement with high-resolution XANES experiments. Site distortion increases notably the contribution from dipolar transitions and, consequently, the pre-edge feature integrated area. An even more intense pre-edge feature is calculated and measured for the T{sub d} symmetry (singletlike). For Mn(IV), a triplet is predicted and measured for the O{sub h} symmetry. However, additional transitions are found in Mn(IV)-rich compounds, that are related to metal-metal transitions. These transitions overlap strongly with the 'true pre-edge', making extraction of redox and symmetry information for Mn(IV) more challenging. However, a model of the pre-edge with pseudo-Voigt functions of fixed calculated width (based on core-hole lifetime and experimental resolution) helps to separate the contributions related to first-neighbor symmetry from those of the metal-metal pairs. Application to multivalent defective manganese oxide materials suggests that the pre-edge information varies linearly as a function of Mn redox state or symmetry but varies nonlinearly as a function of both parameters. Finally, the polymerization of the manganese networks can be estimated from the metal-metal transitions found in the pre-edge region.

  2. A cold model experimental study on the flow characteristics of bed material in a fluidized bed bottom ash cooler in a CFB boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Li, Yourong

    2000-12-01

    A cold model experimental study on the flowing characteristics of bed material between a fluidized bed ash cooler and a furnace of CFB boiler were discussed in this paper. The research results showed that flowing status of the bed material in a bubbling bed, which was run with a circulating fluidized bed together in parallel operation, was influenced by the pressure difference between the CFB and the bubbling bed, the switch status of unlocking air, and the structure of the exit of the bubbling bed. There was a circulating flow of bed material between CFB and bubbling bed.

  3. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  4. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  5. Method and device for dynamic modelling of rubbery materials applied to human soft tissues. Part II: device and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaci, S.; Ciornei, M. C.; Ciornei, F. C.; Filote, C.; Romanu, I. C.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the experimental results obtained on an experimental device where a horizontal rubber wire is stretched by a transversal oscillating force - that is a body with an acceleration sensor attached, placed at the middle of it that oscillates freely. A nonlinear model was proposed for the experimental test rig, the differential equation of motion was offered and a series of curves were traced and compared to the experimental ones. One can conclude that the theoretical model certifies very well the behaviour of the real model. An open problem remains the manner of adopting the parameters characteristic to the dissipative element of the system.

  6. [Experimental-morphologic study of bone tissue reaction to carbon-containing material implantation with initiated X-ray contrast property].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, A S; Nabiev, F Kh; Golovin, R V

    2005-01-01

    In experimental study on 15 rabbits (chinchilla) influence of titanium plates implanted lapped on adjacent tissues in the region of the lower jaw body (comparison group) and carbon material with added boron in the concentrations of 8 and 15% (the study group) was studied. Results of the experimental-morphological investigation show that carbon-based materials with boron addition (with its content 8 and 15%) did not impede adaptive rebuilding of bone tissues and in particular bone structure regeneration in the process of reactive rebuilding of the "maternal" bone. Moreover, as the result of reactive processes developing in osseous tissues after implantation of the tested materials their successful integration in surrounding tissue structures was detected.

  7. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  8. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  9. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  10. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  11. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  12. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  13. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  14. Material and Social Incentives to Participation in Behavioral Interventions: A Meta-Analysis of Gender Disparities in Enrollment and Retention in Experimental Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Durantini, Marta R.; Albarracín, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Objective A meta-analysis was conducted to test theoretical hypotheses about the predictors of enrollment and completion of condom-use-promotion interventions among men and women. Design A meta-analysis summarized research reports of the efficacy of experimental interventions on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. Main Outcome Measures The outcome measure consisted of (a) a measure of participation, obtained by subtracting the actual number of participants from the number of the invited people, and (b) a measure of retention was obtained by subtracting the number of participants who completed the intervention from the number of commencers. Results Experimental interventions providing instrumental and financial resources (e.g., payments) increased initiation and retention more among predominantly male samples, whereas experimental interventions using group formats increased initiation and retention more among predominantly female samples. These patterns remained while controlling for past condom use, other HIV-risk behaviors, and demographics associated with gender composition. Conclusion People seek out HIV-prevention interventions to fulfill gender-specific needs, and these differences must be taken into account in the design of HIV-prevention interventions. PMID:19751090

  15. A self-instructional manual for installing low-cost/no-cost weatherization materials: Experimental validation with scouts.

    PubMed

    Pavlovich, M; Greene, B F

    1984-01-01

    In this study, we describe the development and evaluation of a self-instructional program for installing 10 low-cost/no-cost weatherization materials (e.g., weatherstripping, caulking). This program was a weatherization and retrofit manual (WARM) providing step-by-step instructions and illustrations. Boy and Girl Scouts participated and used either the WARM or existing product instructions (EPI) to apply the materials. Scouts installed the materials properly only when they used the WARM.

  16. A self-instructional manual for installing low-cost/no-cost weatherization materials: Experimental validation with scouts

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovich, Mark; Greene, Brandon F.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, we describe the development and evaluation of a self-instructional program for installing 10 low-cost/no-cost weatherization materials (e.g., weatherstripping, caulking). This program was a weatherization and retrofit manual (WARM) providing step-by-step instructions and illustrations. Boy and Girl Scouts participated and used either the WARM or existing product instructions (EPI) to apply the materials. Scouts installed the materials properly only when they used the WARM. PMID:16795671

  17. Ultrasonic field profile evaluation in acoustically inhomogeneous anisotropic materials using 2D ray tracing model: Numerical and experimental comparison.

    PubMed

    Kolkoori, S R; Rahman, M-U; Chinta, P K; Ktreutzbruck, M; Rethmeier, M; Prager, J

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials is difficult to examine because of the directional dependency of elastic properties. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic non destructive testing techniques for the inspection of anisotropic materials particularly austenitic cladded materials, austenitic welds and dissimilar welds. In this contribution we present an adapted 2D ray tracing model for evaluating ultrasonic wave fields quantitatively in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. Inhomogeneity in the anisotropic material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The presented algorithm evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase relations as well as transmission coefficients. The ray tracing model is able to calculate the ultrasonic wave fields generated by a point source as well as a finite dimension transducer. The ray tracing model results are validated quantitatively with the results obtained from 2D Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT) on several configurations generally occurring in the ultrasonic non destructive testing of anisotropic materials. Finally, the quantitative comparison of ray tracing model results with experiments on 32mm thick austenitic weld material and 62mm thick austenitic cladded material is discussed.

  18. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the liquefaction dynamics of a phase change material in a normal gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, R. L.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were undertaken to determine the role of gravity-induced free convection upon the liquefaction dynamics of a cylindrical paraffin slab under normal gravity conditions. The experimental equipment consisted of a test cell, a fluid-loop heating system, and a multipoint recorder. The test chamber was annular in shape with an effective radius of 1.585 cm and a length of 5.08 cm. The heating chamber was a 1.906 cm diameter tube going through the center of the test chamber, and connected to the fluid loop heating system. All experimental runs were made with the longitudinal axis of the test cell in the vertical direction to insure that convection was not a function of the angular axis of the cell. Ten melting runs were made at various hot wall temperatures. Also, two pure conduction solidification runs were made to determine an experimental latent heat of fusion.

  19. Experimental study of the effect of viscoelastic damping materials on noise and vibration reduction within railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rongping; Meng, Guang; Yang, Jun; He, Caichun

    2009-01-01

    Interior noise and vibration reduction has become one important concern of railway operating environments due to the influence of increased speeds and reduced vehicle weights for energy efficiency. Three types of viscoelastic damping materials, bitumen-based damping material, water-based damping coating and butyl rubber damping material, were developed to reduce the vibration and noise within railway vehicles. Two sleeper carriages were furnished with the new materials in different patterns of constrained-layer and free-layer damping treatment. The measurements of vibration and noise were carried out in three running carriages. It is found that the reduction effect of damping treatments depends on the running speed. The unweighted root-mean-square acceleration is reduced by 0.08-0.79 and 0.06-0.49 m/s 2 for the carriage treated by bitumen-based as well as water-based damping materials and water-based damping material, respectively. The first two materials reduce vibration in a wider frequency range of 63-1000 Hz than the last. It turns out that the damping treatments of the first two reduce the interior noise level by 5-8 dBA within the carriage, and the last damping material by 1-6 dBA. However, the specific loudness analysis of noises shows that the noise components between 125 and 250 Hz are dominant for the overall loudness, although the low-frequency noise is noticeably decreased by the damping materials. The measure of loudness is shown to be more accurate to assess reduction effect of the damping material on the acoustic comfort.

  20. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  1. Experimental investigation of the flow, oxidation, cooling, and thermal-fatigue characteristics of a laminated porous sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickel, R. O.; Warren, E. L.; Kaufman, A.

    1972-01-01

    The basic flow and oxidation characteristics of a laminated porous material (Lamilloy) are presented. The oxidation characteristics of Lamilloy are compared to a wireform-type porous material for the case when both materials are made from Hastelloy-X alloy. The cooling performance of an air cooled vane made from Lamilloy, as determined from cascade tests made at gas temperatures ranging from 1388 to 1741 C (2350 to 3165 F) is also discussed, as well as of a cascade-type thermal fatigue test of the Lamilloy vane.

  2. An integrated experimental and computational approach to material selection for sound proof thermally insulted enclosure of a power generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waheed, R.; Tarar, W.; Saeed, H. A.

    2016-08-01

    Sound proof canopies for diesel power generators are fabricated with a layer of sound absorbing material applied to all the inner walls. The physical properties of the majority of commercially available sound proofing materials reveal that a material with high sound absorption coefficient has very low thermal conductivity. Consequently a good sound absorbing material is also a good heat insulator. In this research it has been found through various experiments that ordinary sound proofing materials tend to rise the inside temperature of sound proof enclosure in certain turbo engines by capturing the heat produced by engine and not allowing it to be transferred to atmosphere. The same phenomenon is studied by creating a finite element model of the sound proof enclosure and performing a steady state and transient thermal analysis. The prospects of using aluminium foam as sound proofing material has been studied and it is found that inside temperature of sound proof enclosure can be cut down to safe working temperature of power generator engine without compromise on sound proofing.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Three-Dimensional (3-D) Material Flow Pattern in Thick Dissimilar 2050 Friction-Stir Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avettand-Fènoël, Marie-Noëlle; Taillard, Roland; Laye, Julien; Odièvre, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    The current microstructural investigation performed at various scales deals with the three-dimensional (3-D) material flow in thick dissimilar Airware™ 2050 friction-stir butt welds (Airware, Newport Beach, CA) because of the scarcity of the results obtained with thicker than 8 mm joints and the lack of detailed interpretation of features in the longitudinal direction. An additional originality consists in the study of material flow under the probe tip. In the current case of thick plates, the variation of local temperature along the weld depth is of key importance for the material flow. Indeed, it governs the slight difference of local mechanical behavior between both materials and therefore the shift of the interface, which was clearly put into evidence by means of a difference of Mn content as small as 0.3 pct between both alloys. This importance of temperature for the malleability also entails the pear shape of the nugget as well as a change of grains orientation along the depth in the thermomechanically affected zone. Due to the modification of tool-material adhesion with temperature, a new phenomenological model of material flow for thick friction-stir welds is proposed. In accordance with their difference of origin, the coexistence of onion rings and serrated interface is also highlighted.

  4. Me and My Environment, Unit IV: Transfer and Cycling of Materials in My Environment, Experimental Edition 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Boulder, CO.

    The experimental 1973-74 edition of Unit IV consists of 28 life science curriculum activities for 13- to 16-year-old educable mentally handicapped children. The role of the teacher in continuing field trials is noted and environmental themes and elements, inquiry skills, problem solving skills, and applicational behaviors and attitudes are…

  5. Explosive Percolation Transition is Actually Continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recently a discontinuous percolation transition was reported in a new “explosive percolation” problem for irreversible systems [D. Achlioptas, R. M. D’Souza, and J. Spencer, Science 323, 1453 (2009)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1167782] in striking contrast to ordinary percolation. We consider a representative model which shows that the explosive percolation transition is actually a continuous, second order phase transition though with a uniquely small critical exponent of the percolation cluster size. We describe the unusual scaling properties of this transition and find its critical exponents and dimensions.

  6. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  7. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  8. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation by Calorimetric Detection of Energetic Materials Using Thermal Bimorph Microcantilever Array: A Case Study on Sensing Vapors of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok-Won; Fragala, Joe; Banerjee, Debjyoti

    2015-01-01

    Bi-layer (Au-Si3N4) microcantilevers fabricated in an array were used to detect vapors of energetic materials such as explosives under ambient conditions. The changes in the bending response of each thermal bimorph (i.e., microcantilever) with changes in actuation currents were experimentally monitored by measuring the angle of the reflected ray from a laser source used to illuminate the gold nanocoating on the surface of silicon nitride microcantilevers in the absence and presence of a designated combustible species. Experiments were performed to determine the signature response of this nano-calorimeter platform for each explosive material considered for this study. Numerical modeling was performed to predict the bending response of the microcantilevers for various explosive materials, species concentrations, and actuation currents. The experimental validation of the numerical predictions demonstrated that in the presence of different explosive or combustible materials, the microcantilevers exhibited unique trends in their bending responses with increasing values of the actuation current. PMID:26334276

  9. Experimental Verification on Remote Detectability of Concealed Radioactive Material Based on the Plasma Discharge Delay Time using High-Power Millimeter-Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongsung; Yu, Dongho; Sawant, Ashwini; Choe, Mun Seok; Lee, Ingeun; Choi, Eunmi

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a remote detection method of a radioactive source by plasma breakdown using high-power millimeter-wave source, gyrotron. A number of free electrons near the radioactive source are much higher than those of without the radioactive source (roughly 10 particles/cm3) owing to the interaction of air molecules and strong gamma rays generated by radioactive material. The RF wave beam is focused in ambient air, and the plasmas discharge occurs involving random delay time which means a time interval between the RF wave and a fluorescent light caused by the plasma. We observed that the delay time decreased significantly due to the high density of free electrons in Ar plasma with an existence of Co60 radioactive material. This technique of delay time measurement shows 1000 times more sensitive than a method of detectable mass equation to identify the existence of radioactive source remotely. It is the first experimental verification of radioactive material detection using a high power gyrotron. This study shows that a remote detection of radioactive material based on analysis of precise delay time measurement could be feasible by using a high power millimeter/THz wave gyrotron. NRF-2013R1A1A2061062, NRF-2012-Global Ph.D. Fellowship Program.

  10. An experimental and numerical study on the effect of some properties of non-metallic materials on the ice adhesion level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piles Moncholi, Eduardo

    The rise of environmentalism in every sector of industry has led aircraft and engine manufacturing companies to develop new generations of more environmentally friendly engines. Companies are in a constant search for new manufacturing and production techniques in order to improve their products, from the environmental point of view, by gaining efficiency in manufacturing techniques and reduce the fuel consumption and emissions in-flight. Having this scenario in mind, the sponsor of this project is interested in understanding how changing the blade materials, currently titanium alloys, for other lighter materials, such as composites, is going to have an effect on overall gas turbine efficiency. In this Project the influence of the stiffness and coating thickness of those non-metallic materials suitable to be employed as coatings on gas turbine fan blades, from the icing point of view, are studied. The methodology is based on a study of linear elastic fracture mechanics of bi-material junctions and will extrapolate the general problem to the ice-coatings case, by obtaining experimental data from tests carried out in an icing tunnel. It was observed that the coating stiffness has an influence on the adhesion level of ice to less stiff materials, if compared with the adhesion level of ice to metals. We also describe how a 0.5 millimetre thin polymeric coating placed over a metallic substrate is enough to reduce the adhesion level of ice, hiding any effect that the underneath materials might have on the adhesion level..

  11. Prediction of heavy metal removal by different liner materials from landfill leachate: modeling of experimental results using artificial intelligence technique.

    PubMed

    Turan, Nurdan Gamze; Gümüşel, Emine Beril; Ozgonenel, Okan

    2013-01-01

    An intensive study has been made to see the performance of the different liner materials with bentonite on the removal efficiency of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from industrial leachate. An artificial neural network (ANN) was used to display the significant levels of the analyzed liner materials on the removal efficiency. The statistical analysis proves that the effect of natural zeolite was significant by a cubic spline model with a 99.93% removal efficiency. Optimization of liner materials was achieved by minimizing bentonite mixtures, which were costly, and maximizing Cu(II) and Zn(II) removal efficiency. The removal efficiencies were calculated as 45.07% and 48.19% for Cu(II) and Zn(II), respectively, when only bentonite was used as liner material. However, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Cu(II) removal (95%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (61.24% and 65.09%). Similarly, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (89.19%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (82.76% and 74.89%).

  12. Can local adaptation research in plants inform selection of native plant materials? An analysis of experimental methodologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Local adaptation research in plants: limitations to synthetic understanding Local adaptation is used as a criterion to select plant materials that will display high fitness in new environments. A large body of research has explored local adaptation in plants, however, to what extent findings can inf...

  13. Apollo-Soyuz pamphlet no. 9: General science. [experimental design in Astronomy, Biology, Geophysics, Aeronomy and Materials science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, L. W.; From, T. P.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives and planning activities for the Apollo-Soyuz mission are summarized. Aspects of the space flight considered include the docking module and launch configurations, spacecraft orbits, and weightlessness. The 28 NASA experiments conducted onboard the spacecraft are summarized. The contributions of the mission to the fields of astronomy, geoscience, biology, and materials sciences resulting from the experiments are explored.

  14. An Experimental Platform for Performing Measurements of the RF Magnetic Permeability and Electric Permittivity of Functional Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    research into a class of electronics based on modifying superconducting circuitry through the integration of complex functional materials with...governing the superconducting tunneling properties can assume frequency-dependent behavior. The interfacing of multi- ferroic and superconducting ...characteristic performance of various types of superconducting circuit structures. This could potentially enable high-precision dynamic control of

  15. Experimental evaluation of using stainless steel slag to produce mechanomutable asphalt mortars for their use in smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Navarro, F.; Iglesias, G. R.; Rubio-Gámez, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    Mechanomutable asphalt binders are a new generation of smart materials, which are able to change their mechanical response to the load conditions suffered during their service life. These binders are composed of a bituminous matrix and iron micro-particles that can be activated with an external magnetic field, which induces mechanical changes in the system. However, these particles are expensive and they considerably increase the cost of these materials, reducing their competiveness. Thus, the aim of this work is to study the viability to produce more sustainable and low-cost mechanomutable asphalt mortars using stainless steel slag (SSS). This by-product is obtained from the production of stainless steel and contains a significant quantity of iron that could be used to activate the response of these materials. Different sizes and concentrations of SSS were used to manufacture mechanomutable asphalt mortars, and their mechanical behavior was then examined using several rheological tests. The results show that it is possible to achieve changes in the rheological response of these smart asphalt materials, thereby obtaining mechanomutable mortars from the stainless steel by-products. The efficiency of the slag also appears to be more dependent on its iron content than on its concentration or particle size.

  16. Experimental demonstration of radiation effects on the performance of a stirling-alternator convertor and candidate materials evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireles, Omar R.

    Free-piston Stirling power convertors are under consideration by NASA for service in the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) and Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems to enable aggressive exploration missions by providing a reliable and constant power supply. The ASRG must withstand environmental radiation conditions, while the FSP system must tolerate a mixed neutron and gamma-ray environment resulting from self-irradiation. Stirling-alternators utilize rare earth magnets and a variety of organic materials whose radiation limits dominate service life estimates and shielding requirements. The project objective was to demonstrate the performance of the alternator, identify materials that exhibit excessive radiation sensitivity, identify radiation tolerant substitutes, establish empirical dose limits, and demonstrate the feasibility of cost effective nuclear and radiation tests by selection of the appropriate personnel and test facilities as a function of hardware maturity. The Stirling Alternator Radiation Test Article (SARTA) was constructed from linear alternator components of a Stirling convertor and underwent significant pre-exposure characterization. The SARTA was operated at the Sandia National Laboratories Gamma Irradiation Facility to a dose of over 40 Mrad. Operating performance was within nominal variation, although modestly decreasing trends occurred in later runs as well as the detection of an electrical fault after the final exposure. Post-irradiation disassembly and internal inspection revealed minimal degradation of the majority of the organic components. Radiation testing of organic material coupons was conducted since the majority of the literature was inconsistent. These inconsistencies can be attributed to testing at environmental conditions vastly different than those Stirling-alternator organics will experience during operation. Samples were irradiated at the Texas A&M TRIGA reactor to above expected FSP neutron fluence. A thorough

  17. JHR Project: a future Material Testing Reactor working as an International user Facility: The key-role of instrumentation in support to the development of modern experimental capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Bignan, G.; Gonnier, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Villard, J.F.; Destouches, C.; Chauvin, J.P.; Maugard, B.

    2015-07-01

    Research and development on fuel and material behaviour under irradiation is a key issue for sustainable nuclear energy in order to meet specific needs by keeping the best level of safety. These needs mainly deal with a constant improvement of performances and safety in order to optimize the fuel cycle and hence to reach nuclear energy sustainable objectives. A sustainable nuclear energy requires a high level of performances in order to meet specific needs such as: - Pursuing improvement of the performances and safety of present and coming water cooled reactor technologies. This will require a continuous R and D support following a long-term trend driven by the plant life management, safety demonstration, flexibility and economics improvement. Experimental irradiations of structure materials are necessary to anticipate these material behaviours and will contribute to their optimisation. - Upgrading continuously nuclear fuel technology in present and future nuclear power plants to achieve better performances and to optimise the fuel cycle keeping the best level of safety. Fuel evolution for generation II, III and III+ is a key stake requiring developments, qualification tests and safety experiments to ensure the competitiveness and safety: experimental tests exploring the full range of fuel behaviour determine fuel stability limits and safety margins, as a major input for the fuel reliability analysis. To perform such accurate and innovative progress and developments, specific and ad hoc instrumentation, irradiation devices, measurement methods are necessary to be set up inside or beside the material testing reactor (MTR) core. These experiments require beforehand in situ and on line sophisticated measurements to accurately determine different key parameters such as thermal and fast neutron fluxes and nuclear heating in order to precisely monitor and control the conducted assays. The new Material Testing Reactor JHR (Jules Horowitz Reactor) currently under

  18. Behavior of the different implant materials in acute infection and efficacy of antibiotherapy: experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Silistreli, Ozlem Karataş; Capar, Mustafa; Ulusal, Betul Gozel; Ekinci, Neşe; Aytug, Zeynep; Oztan, Yücel

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we propose a comparison of the behaviors of four different implant materials in case of acute infection: expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE), porous high density polyethylene (PHDPE), silicone, and autogenous cartilage tissue. The efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic antibiotic therapies was also investigated in a rat model as four groups: group A, acute infection and no antibiotic therapy (n = 24); group B, acute infection and prophylactic antibiotic therapy (n = 24); group C, acute infection and therapeutic antibiotic therapy (n = 24); and control, no infection and no antibiotic therapy (n = 24). All materials with dimensions of approximately 1 x 1 cm(2) diameter were implanted separately under the dorsal skin of rats. Staphylococcus aureus was used as the infectious agent and antibiotic therapy was done with seftriaxone (Desefin, I.M., 20 mg/kg/day). Tissue specimens were obtained on postoperative days 14 and 21. Semiquantitative and qualitative alterations existing in the connective tissue neighboring the implant material (reaction zone-capsule tissue), fixation to the host tissue, cellular ingrowth (interstice qualitatively), and infection signs were assessed either macroscopically or microscopically. In group A, all materials were affected negatively that led to continuous regression in the wound healing process. Fixation of the cartilage to the surrounding tissue was weak compared with other groups. Fibrovascular tissue ingrowth in porous implants was delayed, and no regular capsule formation was observed around silicone implants. In group B, outcomes were similar to control groups. Porous materials showed tissue ingrowth into the pores as good as the control group. Regular capsular tissue formed around the silicone implants and cartilage tissues. In group C, where silicone had been used, wound healing was not as good as in group B and the control group. In the e-PTFE group, the granulation tissue forming through the pores did not

  19. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  20. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  1. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  2. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  3. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of Samples for a Material Migration Experiment on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST).

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, William R.; Van Deusen, Stuart B.

    2015-12-01

    This report documents work done for the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization (Sponsor) under a Funds-In Agreement FI 011140916 with Sandia National Laboratories. The work consists of preparing and analyzing samples for an experiment to measure material erosion and deposition in the EAST Tokamak. Sample preparation consisted of depositing thin films of carbon and aluminum onto molybdenum tiles. Analysis consists of measuring the thickness of films before and after exposure to helium plasma in EAST. From these measurements the net erosion and deposition of material will be quantified. Film thickness measurements are made at the Sandia Ion Beam Laboratory using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis, as described in this report. This report describes the film deposition and pre-exposure analysis. Results from analysis after plasma exposure will be given in a subsequent report.

  5. Design and Analysis of an Experimental Setup for Determining the Burst Strength and Material Properties of Hollow Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    same test parameters would be useful. Additionally, future tests could be run with CFC cylinders fabricated with carbon nanotubes mixed in with the...finite element model. Glass and carbon fiber composite cylinders were fabricated and tested to failure with the device and the aforementioned properties...were found. Finally, carbon fiber composite tensile specimens of the dog-bone shape were tested to failure to compare material properties with those

  6. An Experimental and Finite Element Investigation into the Nonlinear Material Behavior of Pin-Loaded Composite Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    their midsurface counterparts due to the nature of the pin deflection and resulting load transfer. Linear elastic coupon radial stresses also followed... midsurface counterparts. The effects of the nonlinear elastic material behavior were quite evident when viewing the [(0/90)3,01, coupon intralaminar...to the midsurface of the coupon. The nonlinear elastic intralaminar shear stress-strain assumption acted to increase through thickness stresses

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Determination of the Thermomechanical Response of Inelastic Structural Materials to High Energy Thermal Inputs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3 . DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY OF REPORT __________________________________ A~PrOyed tOr publIc release, 2o. DECLASSIFICATION...DETERMINATION OF THE THERMOMECHANICAL RESPONSE OF INELASTIC STRUCTURAL MATERIALS TO HIGH ENERGY THERMAL INPUTS 3 Semi-Annual Technical Report Submitted by...D.H. Allen Aerospace Engineering Department and M.S. Pilant Mathematics Department 5Texas A&M University College Station, Texas 77843U 3 to the Air

  8. Dynamic Response and Damage Evolution in Composite Materials Subjected to Underwater Explosive Loading: An Experimental and Computational Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    testing , utilizing a water filled conical shock tube and computational sim- ulations, utilizing the commercially available LS - DYNA finite element code... composites have utilized LS - DYNA and the Mat_162 (Mat_Composite_OPTION) material model which simulates fiber breakage, matrix cracking and delamination damage...ARTICLE IN PRESS5. Finite element modeling Finite element modeling of the testing has been performed uti- lizing the LS - DYNA code available from the

  9. Experimental and Theoretical Determination of the Thermomechanical Response of Inelastic Structural Materials to High Energy Thermal Inputs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    Eshelby tensor corresponding to the case of a transversely isotropic matrix with its crystalline directions coincident with the principal directions...fabricate a total of 18 specimens (6 of each thickness). The material was received in an annealed condition specified by ASTM 5536 and used without further...to the case of a transversely isotropic matrix with its crystalline directions coincident with the principal directions of a spheroidal inhomogeneity

  10. Meso-Scale Experimental & Numerical Studies for Predicting Macro-scale Performance of Advanced Reactive Materials (ARMs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    goal is to delineate how processes of localized deformation and flow, or fracture and fragmentation, create the dispersion and mixing of reactants and...flow, or fracture and fragmentation, create the dispersion and mixing of reactants and provide the thermal and mass transport resulting in highly...of the meso-scale mechanisms of impact-initiated anaerobic chemical reactions in intermetallic-based reactive materials in the form of nano /micro

  11. Thermal Conductivity Measurements By Means of a New `Small Hot-Box' Apparatus: Manufacturing, Calibration and Preliminary Experimental Tests on Different Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, C.; Belloni, E.; Lunghi, L.; Barbanera, M.

    2016-05-01

    The evaluation of the thermal performance building components requires a high level of accuracy. Windows, doors and thermal bridges are not homogeneous, and their thermal transmittance can be evaluated by means of Hot-Box, used for full-scale elements. For homogeneous materials and one-dimensional heat flux, the thermal conductivity can be easily measured through other experimental apparatuses, such as the guarded hot plate and the heat flow meters. This study presents a new experimental apparatus named Small Hot-Box, built at the University of Perugia. No European standards are available for this innovative facility, but it takes into account some prescriptions of EN ISO 8990 and EN ISO 12567; it was built for the evaluation of the thermal properties of small specimens. The apparatus was designed, built, and calibrated by means of preliminary measurements. It is composed of a hot and a cold side, and the external walls are made of thick insulation. The thermal conductivity can be calculated by two different methodologies: the Hot-Box and the thermal flux meter method. Preliminary calibrations were carried out and different materials with known thermal transmittance were tested. The aim is the development of a new experimental apparatus; guidance documents could be defined for the measurements methodology requirements.

  12. Characterisation of CIME, an experimental chamber for simulating interactions between materials of the cultural heritage and the environment.

    PubMed

    Chabas, A; Fouqueau, A; Attoui, M; Alfaro, S C; Petitmangin, A; Bouilloux, A; Saheb, M; Coman, A; Lombardo, T; Grand, N; Zapf, P; Berardo, R; Duranton, M; Durand-Jolibois, R; Jerome, M; Pangui, E; Correia, J J; Guillot, I; Nowak, S

    2015-12-01

    An approach consisting in combining in situ and laboratory experiments is often favoured for investigating the mechanisms involved in the weathering of the materials of the cultural heritage. However, the realistic simulation in the laboratory of the environmental conditions ruling the interactions of atmospheric compounds with materials is a very complex task. The aim of this work is to characterise CIME, a new chamber specially built to simulate the interactions between materials of the cultural heritage and the environment. The originality of this instrument is that beside the usual climatic parameters (temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation) and gaseous pollutants, it also allows the controlled injection of different types of particulate matter such as terrigenous, marine and anthropogenic. Therefore, varied realistic atmospheric environments (marine or urban) can be easily simulated within CIME. In addition to the technical description of CIME, this paper shows the first results obtained by the impact of gaseous pollutants on non-durable glass, bronze and limestone. The first experiments for the deposition of different particles (calcite, clays, soot and halite) are also presented.

  13. Effects of Processing Residual Stresses on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Structural Materials: Experimental Approaches and Microstructural Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Christopher J.; Lados, Diana A.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth mechanisms of long cracks through fields with low and high residual stresses were investigated for a common structural aluminum alloy, 6061-T61. Bulk processing residual stresses were introduced in the material by quenching during heat treatment. Compact tension (CT) specimens were fatigue crack growth (FCG) tested at varying stress ratios to capture the closure and K max effects. The changes in fatigue crack growth mechanisms at the microstructural scale are correlated to closure, stress ratio, and plasticity, which are all dependent on residual stress. A dual-parameter Δ K- K max approach, which includes corrections for crack closure and residual stresses, is used uniquely to connect fatigue crack growth mechanisms at the microstructural scale with changes in crack growth rates at various stress ratios for low- and high-residual-stress conditions. The methods and tools proposed in this study can be used to optimize existing materials and processes as well as to develop new materials and processes for FCG limited structural applications.

  14. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a mesoporous K(x)WO3 material having superior mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sonal; Anderson, Sean T; Mayanovic, Robert A; Sakidja, Ridwan; Landskron, Kai; Kokoszka, Berenika; Mandal, Manik; Wang, Zhongwu

    2016-02-07

    Mesoporous materials with tailored properties hold great promise for energy harvesting and industrial applications. We have synthesized a novel tungsten bronze mesoporous material (K(x)WO3; x ∼ 0.07) having inverse FDU-12 type pore symmetry and a crystalline framework. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of the mesoporous K(0.07)WO3 show persistence of a highly ordered meso-scale pore structure to high pressure conditions (∼18.5 GPa) and a material with remarkable mechanical strength despite having ∼35% porosity. Pressure dependent in situ SAXS measurements reveal a bulk modulus κ = 44 ± 4 GPa for the mesoporous K(x)WO3 which is comparable to the corresponding value for the bulk monoclinic WO3 (γ-WO3). Evidence from middle angle (MAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy shows that the presence of potassium leads to the formation of a K-bearing orthorhombic tungsten bronze (OTB) phase within a monoclinic WO3 host structure. Our ab initio molecular dynamics calculations show that the formation of the OTB phase provides superior strength to the mesoporous K(0.07)WO3.

  15. Actual drawing of histological images improves knowledge retention.

    PubMed

    Balemans, Monique C M; Kooloos, Jan G M; Donders, A Rogier T; Van der Zee, Catharina E E M

    2016-01-01

    Medical students have to process a large amount of information during the first years of their study, which has to be retained over long periods of nonuse. Therefore, it would be beneficial when knowledge is gained in a way that promotes long-term retention. Paper-and-pencil drawings for the uptake of form-function relationships of basic tissues has been a teaching tool for a long time, but now seems to be redundant with virtual microscopy on computer-screens and printers everywhere. Several studies claimed that, apart from learning from pictures, actual drawing of images significantly improved knowledge retention. However, these studies applied only immediate post-tests. We investigated the effects of actual drawing of histological images, using randomized cross-over design and different retention periods. The first part of the study concerned esophageal and tracheal epithelium, with 384 medical and biomedical sciences students randomly assigned to either the drawing or the nondrawing group. For the second part of the study, concerning heart muscle cells, students from the previous drawing group were now assigned to the nondrawing group and vice versa. One, four, and six weeks after the experimental intervention, the students were given a free recall test and a questionnaire or drawing exercise, to determine the amount of knowledge retention. The data from this study showed that knowledge retention was significantly improved in the drawing groups compared with the nondrawing groups, even after four or six weeks. This suggests that actual drawing of histological images can be used as a tool to improve long-term knowledge retention.

  16. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  17. A new experimental method for measuring life time and crack growth of materials under multi-stage and random loadings.

    PubMed

    Stanzl, S

    1981-11-01

    The experimental equipment and method of operation of a special computer-controlled fatigue testing machine is described. This resonance testing machine, operating at ultrasonic frequencies (20 kHz), performs one-step, multistage, and random fatigue tests with the aid of a computerized control system in very short testing times. Differences between this method and testing procedure at conventional frequencies are pointed out. However, it is emphasized that the high frequency tests have practical merit aside from lower energy cost and testing times. Initial results of two-stage fatigue experiments are reported.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigation of effect of spacer arm and support matrix of synthetic affinity chromatographic materials for the purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zamolo, Laura; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo; Galarza, Benedict; Sadler, Chris; Williams, Sharon; Hofer, Stefan; Horak, Jeannie; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2010-07-29

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of each material component-the support, the spacer, and the surface chemistry-on the overall material performance of an affinity type purification media for the capture of immunoglobulin G (IgG). Material properties were investigated in terms of an experimental evaluation using affinity chromatography as well as computer modeling. The biomimetic triazine-based A2P affinity ligand was chosen as a fixed point, while spacer and support were varied. The investigated spacers were 1-2-diaminoethane (2LP), 1,3-propanedithiol (SS3), 3,6-dioxo-1,8-octanedithiol (DES), and a 1,4-substituted [1,2,3]-triazole spacer (TRZ). The support media considered were the agarose (AG) resins, PuraBead, the polyvinylether, Fractoprep, the polymethacrylate, Fractogel, and the porous silica, Fractosil. All materials were tested with pure IgG standard solution, with a mock feed solution as well as real cell culture supernatant. The interaction between IgG and A2P linked through the investigated spacers to AG was studied using molecular dynamics. The effect of a modification of the support chemical structure or of the protein-ligand binding site on the material performances was studied through target oriented simulations. Dynamic binding experiments (DBC) revealed that the performances of materials containing 2LP spacers were significantly decreased in the presence of Pluronic F68. The simulations indicated that this is probably determined by the establishment of intermolecular interactions between the 2LP charged amino group and the ether oxygen of Pluronic F68. The spacer giving the highest IgG dynamic binding capacity when Pluronic F68 was present in the feed was TRZ. The simulations showed that, among the investigated spacers, TRZ is the only one that prevents the adsorption of A2P on the support surface, thus suggesting that the mobility and lack of interaction of the ligand with the support is an important property for an affinity

  19. Physico-chemical studies of the experimental and theoretical properties of organic nonlinear optical material 4-chloro-4'methoxy benzylideneaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Merin; John, Nimmy L.; Saravana Kumar, M.; Subashini, A.; Sajan, D.

    2017-01-01

    The FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-visible spectral analysis of 4-chloro 4'-methoxy benzylidene aniline were done experimentally and interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) level of theory. Natural Bond orbital analysis was performed to understand the charge transfer interactions and reactive sites within the system. HOMO-LUMO analysis and first static and dynamic hyperpolarizability calculations were carried out in order to confirm the NLO activity of CMOBA. Photophysical characterization was done to understand the fluorescence emission and lifetime of CMOBA leading to application in blue OLEDs. The Molecular Electrostatic Potential Map was simulated to identify the active sites for electrophilic and nucleophilic attack or the active sites of the molecule which can bind to proteins. Molecular docking analysis revealed its potential as an inhibitor for different proteins which are responsible for cancer and many inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and psoriasis. Experimental studies of invitro antiproliferative effect by MTT assay verified the anticancer properties of CMOBA.

  20. The effects of rumination on mood and intrusive memories after exposure to traumatic material: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Zetsche, Ulrike; Ehring, Thomas; Ehlers, Anke

    2009-01-01

    Correlational studies have shown that trauma-related rumination predicts chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to experimentally test the hypothesis that rumination is causally involved in the development and maintenance of PTSD symptoms. A video depicting the aftermath of serious road traffic accidents was used as an analogue stressor. After having watched the video, N = 101 healthy participants were randomly assigned to a guided thinking task designed to induce (a) rumination, (b) memory integration and (c) distraction. In line with the hypotheses, rumination led to less recovery from sad mood triggered by the video than the other two conditions. In addition, self-reported state levels of rumination during the guided thinking task predicted subsequent intrusive memories in the session. However, no significant main effect of the experimental manipulation on intrusive memories of the video was found. Results of exploratory analyses suggested possible sex differences in the way the processing manipulations were effective. Taken together, the results partially support the hypothesis that rumination is involved in the maintenance of negative mood and post-traumatic stress symptoms. PMID:19665693

  1. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Tikalsky, Paul J.; Bahia, Hussain U.; Deng, An; Snyder, Thomas

    2004-10-15

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  2. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Pauul J. Tikalsky

    2004-10-31

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  3. Assessment of Cable Aging Equipment, Status of Acquired Materials, and Experimental Matrix at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zwoster, Andy; Schwenzer, Birgit

    2015-03-30

    The need for increased understanding of the aging and degradation behavior for polymer components of nuclear power plant electrical cables is described in this report. The highest priority materials for study and the resources available at PNNL for these studies are also described. The anticipated outcomes of the PNNL work described are : improved understanding of appropriate accelerated aging conditions, improved knowledge of correlation between observable aging indicators and cable condition in support of advanced non-destructive evaluation methods, and practical knowledge of condition-based cable lifetime prediction.

  4. Influence of material and microtopography on the development of local infection in vivo: experimental investigation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Thomas F; Debefve, Laurence; Boure, Ludovic; Campoccia, Davide; Schlegel, Urs; Richards, Robert G

    2009-09-01

    Polishing the surface of internal fracture fixation (IFF) implant materials can ease implant removal and reduce irritation to gliding tissues by reducing soft tissue adhesion and bony overgrowth. Thus, polishing the surface of these implants is expected to have significant clinical benefit in certain situations. The aim of the present study was to determine if polishing the surface of an IFF device influences susceptibility to infection. The local infection rate associated with 4-hole 2.0 mm Synthes locking compression plates (LCPs) composed of clinically available commercially pure titanium (cpTi) and titanium aluminium niobium (TAN) in their standard microrough form was compared with that of their test polished equivalents and also to clinically available electropolished stainless steel (EPSS). The LCPs were fixed in locking mode onto the tibia of mature, female New Zealand White rabbits and a clinical strain of Staphylococcus aureus was added to the implantation site. Twenty eight days after surgery the rabbits were euthanized and assessed for infection. The rank order based on descending ID50 was; polished TAN, standard TAN, standard cpTi, EPSS and finally polished cpTi, however, the ID50 values did not differ greatly between the groups with the same material. Using the LCP model in locking mode, polishing the surface of both cpTi and TAN was not found to influence the susceptibility to infection in our animal model.

  5. A New Porcine Sponge Material for Temporary Embolization: An Experimental Short-Term Pilot Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Louail, B.; Sapoval, M. Bonneau, M.; Wasseff, M.; Senechal, Q.; Gaux, J-C.

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a porcine-derived gelfoam, Curaspon, for the temporary occlusion of the visceral arteries. Methods. Curaspon was used for the selective embolization of segmentary hepatic, unilateral polar renal, and single lumbar arteries of 10 pigs under general anesthesia. Sequential angiographic checks were carried out and the pigs killed between 3 days and 2 weeks later. Macroscopic and microscopic studies using standard techniques were used to evaluate the immediate efficacy of embolization, duration of and completeness of recanalization on angiography, macroscopic appearance of target-organ ischemia, and microscopic analysis of inflammatory reaction. Results. Immediate arterial occlusion was obtained in all cases. Renal arteries showed a total recanalization in 63% of cases on day 7 and 100% on day 14. Total hepatic recanalization was obtained in 100% of animals on day 7. All lumbar arteries were recanalized on day 14. Microscopic analysis in the kidney revealed a mild inflammatory reaction and a progressive lysis of the Curaspon (87% of samples at day 3 showed a persistence of Curaspon and 5% at day 14). In some cases, localized and partial destruction of the arterial wall was visualized. In the liver the same patterns were observed but resolved more completely and more rapidly. Conclusions. Curaspon is an efficient material for the temporary occlusion of visceral and parietal arteries in pigs. However, arterial aneurysms were observed and a relationship of these with the material cannot be excluded.

  6. Hydroplus experimental study of dry, saturated, and frozen geological materials. Technical report, 15 July 1991-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, E.S.; Smith, E.A.

    1994-04-01

    The dynamic shock responses of eight (8) types of rock and grouts were determined from one-dimensional plate impact experiments to support the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) HYDROPLUS program. Hugoniot data and loading and release paths were measured using in-situ stress gauges or VISAR interferometry. Two NTS tuffs from the DISTANT ZENITH and HUNTERS TROPHY test beds, a grout, MJ-2, which was designed to match the DISTANT ZENITH tuff and three carbonate rocks, Danby marble, Fort Knox carbonates and Salem limestone were characterized. All of these materials were tested in a water saturated condition at ambient and frozen conditions. Additionally, the Salem limestone was characterized dry. Hugoniot data for ice was also measured. Experiments that simulated jointed rock formation were conducted using Danby marble to evaluate the effects of water- or ice-filled joints on the amplitude of a stress wave propagating through the formation. Hugoniot data, release adiabats, and propagated waveshapes are presented for the rocks, grout, and ice. The effects of freezing, porosity, and dolomitization of the limestones on the Hugoniot and wave propagation characteristics of these materials are detailed. Propagated wave profiles and measured attenuation rates are given for the simulated jointed rock experiments. Hugoniot, DISTANT ZENITH Tuff, HUNTERS TROPHY Tuff, Release Adiabat, MJ-2 Grout, Danby Marble, Ice, Jointed Rocks, Fort Knox Carbonates.

  7. Influence of shockwave profile on ejection of micron-scale material from shocked Sn surfaces: an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, Michael B; Byers, Mark E; Hammerberg, James E; Germann, Tim C; Dimonte, Guy; Rigg, Paulo A; Buttler, William T

    2009-01-01

    This effort experimentally investigates the relationship between shock-breakout pressure and the amount of micron-scale fragments ejected (ejecta) upon shock release at the metal/vacuum interface of Sn targets shocked with a supported shockwave. The results are compared with an analogous set derived from HE shocked Sn targets, Taylor shockwave loading. The supported shock-pulse was created by impacting a Sn target with a Ti64 (Ti-6Al-4V) impactor that was accelerated using a powder gun. Ejecta production at the free-surface or back-side of the Sn targets were characterized through use of piezoelectric pins and Asay foils, and heterodyne velocimetry verified the time of shock release and the breakout pressure.

  8. An experimental and analytical investigation of the rail shear-test method as applied to composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Mcwithey, R. R.; Weisshaar, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    This report presents the results from an experimental and analytical investigation of the stress distributions occurring in a rail shear test. The effects of non-uniform stresses induced by differential thermal expansion, rail flexibility and specimen aspect ratio on measured shear modulus and ultimate strength of composite laminates are shown. A two-dimensional linearly elastic finite element model was used to analytically determine how various geometric parameters influenced the magnitude and distribution of inplane normal and shear stresses in a tensile rail shear specimen. Rail shear tests were conducted at room temperature and 589 K (600 F) on selected graphite-polyimide composite laminates using two titanium rail configurations. The analysis and test methods are discussed, and the results of the effects of the various parameters on shear modulus and ultimate strength are presented.

  9. Dissolution of Oxygen Precipitate Nuclei in n-Type CZ-Si Wafers to Improve Their Material Quality: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Basnyat, Prakash; Devayajanam, Srinivas; Tan, Teh; Upadhyaya, Ajay; Tate, Keith; Rohatgi, Ajeet; Xu, Han

    2017-01-01

    We present experimental results which show that oxygen-related precipitate nuclei (OPN) present in p-doped, n-type, Czochralski wafers can be dissolved using a flash-annealing process, yielding very high quality wafers for high-efficiency solar cells. Flash annealing consists of heating a wafer in an optical furnace to temperature between 1150 and 1250 degrees C for a short time. This process produces a large increase in the minority carrier lifetime (MCLT) and homogenizes each wafer. We have tested wafers from different axial locations of two ingots. All wafers reach nearly the same high value of MCLT. The OPN dissolution is confirmed by oxygen analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectra and injection-level dependence of MCLT.

  10. Experimental Study on Enhancing the Productivity of Solar Still Using Locally Available Material as a Storage Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, Thottipalayam Vellingri; Aybar, Hikmet Şelli; Nedunchezhian, Natarajan

    2016-06-01

    This experimental study focuses on the effect of pebbles as an energy storage medium on the performance of a solar distillation system. Two single basin solar stills are fabricated with an effective area of 0.5 m2, the glass cover was tilted at 10° with respect to the horizontal. The experiments on the still were carried out under the same climatic conditions for two different modes of operations, (1) conventional still and (2) modified still (pebbles as storage medium). From the study, it could be concluded that (1) the productivity of solar still is increases 9.5 % when pebbles are used as storage medium (2) the maximum amount of heat losses occurs in the solar still is the combined effect of radiation and convection heat transfer from glass to ambient (3) pebbles have the potentiality to store the heat during high solar intensity period and to release the stored energy to water when the solar intensity is low.

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Hot Isostatically Pressed-Produced Stainless Steel/High Alloy Tool Steel Compound Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, Greta; Flyg, Jesper; Frisk, Karin; Sandberg, Odd

    2011-05-01

    Consolidation of tool steel powders and simultaneous joining to a stainless 316L steel are performed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Two tool steel grades are considered: a high vanadium alloyed carbon tool steel, and a high vanadium and chromium alloyed nitrogen tool steel. The boundary layer arising during diffusion bonding is in focus and, in particular, the diffusion of carbon and nitrogen over the joint. Measurements of the elemental concentration profiles and corrosion tests by the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) method are performed. Comparative calculations with the DICTRA software are performed and are found to be in agreement with the experimental results. It is found that the carbon tool steel grade has a more critical influence on the corrosion resistance of the stainless 316L steel in comparison to the nitrogen tool steel grade.

  12. Design of the Experimental Exposure Conditions to Simulate Ionizing Radiation Effects on Candidate Replacement Materials for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. Montgomery

    1998-01-01

    In this effort, experimental exposure times for monoenergetic electrons and protons were determined to simulate the space radiation environment effects on Teflon components of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although the energy range of the available laboratory particle accelerators was limited, optimal exposure times for 50 keV, 220 keV, 350 keV, and 500 KeV electrons were calculated that produced a dose-versus-depth profile that approximated the full spectrum profile, and were realizable with existing equipment. For the case of proton exposure, the limited energy range of the laboratory accelerator restricted simulation of the dose to a depth of .5 mil. Also, while optimal exposure times were found for 200 keV, 500 keV and 700 keV protons that simulated the full spectrum dose-versus-depth profile to this depth, they were of such short duration that the existing laboratory could not be controlled to within the required accuracy. In addition to the obvious experimental issues, other areas exist in which the analytical work could be advanced. Improved computer codes for the dose prediction- along with improved methodology for data input and output- would accelerate and make more accurate the calculational aspects. This is particularly true in the case of proton fluxes where a paucity of available predictive software appears to exist. The dated nature of many of the existing Monte Carlo particle/radiation transport codes raises the issue as to whether existing codes are sufficient for this type of analysis. Other areas that would result in greater fidelity of laboratory exposure effects to the space environment is the use of a larger number of monoenergetic particle fluxes and improved optimization algorithms to determine the weighting values.

  13. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  14. Experimental tests of irradiation-anneal-reirradiation effects on mechanical properties of RPV plate and weld materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C{sub V}) notch ductility and tension test properties of three reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel materials were determined for the 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated (I), 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated + 454{degree}C (850{degree}F)-168 h postirradiation annealed (IA), and 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) reirradiated (IAR) conditions. Total fluences of the I condition and the IAR condition were, respectively, 3.33 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} and 4.18 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The irradiation portion of the IAR condition represents an incremental fluence increase of 1. 05 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV, over the I-condition fluence. The materials (specimens) were supplied by the Yankee Atomic Electric Company and represented high and low nickel content plates and a high nickel, high copper content weld deposit prototypical of the Yankee-Rowe reactor vessel. The promise of the IAR method for extending the fluence tolerance of radiation-sensitive steels and welds is clearly shown by the results. The annealing treatment produced full C{sub V} upper shelf recovery and full or nearly full recovery in the C{sub V} 41 J (30 ft-lb) transition temperature. The C{sub V} transition temperature increases produced by the reirradiation exposure were 22% to 43% of the increase produced by the first cycle irradiation exposure. A somewhat greater radiation embrittlement sensitivity and a somewhat greater reirradiation embrittlement sensitivity was exhibited by the low nickel content plate than the high nickel content plate. Its high phosphorus content is believed to be responsible. The IAR-condition properties of the surface vs. interior regions of the low nickel content plate are also compared.

  15. Thermal Protection System Cavity Heating for Simplified and Actual Geometries Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations with Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) Cavity Heating is predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) on unstructured grids for both simplified cavities and actual cavity geometries. Validation was performed using comparisons to wind tunnel experimental results and CFD predictions using structured grids. Full-scale predictions were made for simplified and actual geometry configurations on the Space Shuttle Orbiter in a mission support timeframe.

  16. Tracking Actual Usage: The Attention Metadata Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolpers, Martin; Najjar, Jehad; Verbert, Katrien; Duval, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The information overload in learning and teaching scenarios is a main hindering factor for efficient and effective learning. New methods are needed to help teachers and students in dealing with the vast amount of available information and learning material. Our approach aims to utilize contextualized attention metadata to capture behavioural…

  17. What Writing Represents What Scientists Actually Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Often the writing that students in elementary school do in connection with science is their final report of a science fair project. They diligently file a report in the form of the scientific method--introduction, hypothesis, materials, procedure, results, and conclusion. This form of science writing persists through college courses in science,…

  18. Analytical and experimental investigation of the feasibility of accelerated lifetime testing of materials exposed to an atomic oxygen beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, Royal; Barnes, Alan; Tolk, Norman

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of atomic particles with surfaces is of both scientific and technological interest. Past work emphasizes the measurement of high-energy sputtering yields. Very little work utilized low-energy beams for which chemical and electronic effects can be important. Even less work has been carried out using well-defined low-energy projectiles. The use of low-energy, reactive projectiles permits one to investigate surface processes that have not been well characterized. As the energy of the projectile decreases, the collisional cascades and spikes, that are common for high-energy projectiles, become less important, and chemical and electronic effects can play a significant role. Aspects of particle-surface interactions are of concern in several areas of technology. For example, the erosion, desorption, and glow of surfaces of spacecraft in orbit are important in the arena of space technology. The materials studied under this contract are of possible use on the exterior portions of the power generation system of Space Station Freedom. Under the original designs, Space Station Freedom's power generation system would generate potential differences on the surface as high as 200 volts. Ions in the plasma that often surround orbiting vehicles would be accelerated by these potentials leading to bombardment and erosion of the exposed surfaces. The major constituent of the atmosphere, approximately 90 percent, in the low earth orbit region is atomic oxygen. Since atomic oxygen is extremely reactive with most materials, chemical effects can arise in addition to the physical sputtering caused by the acceleration of the oxygen ions. Furthermore, the incident oxygen ions can remain embedded in the exposed surfaces, altering the chemical composition of the surfaces. Since the effective binding energy of a chemically altered surface can be quite different from that of the pure substrate, the sputtering yield of a chemically altered surface is usually different also. The low

  19. Nutritional toxicology: basic principles and actual problems.

    PubMed

    Hathcock, J N

    1990-01-01

    Nutritional toxicology is a specialty that combines the backgrounds and research approaches of nutrition and toxicology. Many problems of substantial importance to health and food safety involve interactions of nutrition process and requirement with the effects of toxicological impact. Solution of these problems requires research that meets the procedural and design criteria of experimental nutrition and these of experimental toxicology. The relationships may be described in three basic categories: (1) influence of nutrition on toxicities; (2) influence of toxicants on nutrition; and (3) toxicities of nutrients. Trypsin inhibitor research, an example of diet impacting on toxicological response, illustrates the necessity of controlling nutritional composition aspects that can confound the results. Prolonged acetaminophen administration provides an example of the effects of toxicants on nutritional requirement and function which could be important for persons with marginal sulphur amino acid intake.

  20. Experimental results on the irradiation of nuclear fusion relevant materials at the dense plasma focus ‘Bora’ device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Gribkov, V. A.; Niemela, J.; Tuniz, C.; Zanolli, C.; Chernyshova, M.; Demina, E. V.; Latyshev, S. V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Talab, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    Samples of materials counted as perspective ones for use in the first-wall and construction elements in nuclear fusion reactors (FRs) with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement (W, Ti, Al, low-activated ferritic steel ‘Eurofer’ and some alloys) were irradiated in the dense plasma focus (DPF) device ‘Bora’ having a bank energy of ⩽5 kJ. The device generates hot dense (T ˜ 1 keV, n ˜ 1019 cm-3) deuterium plasma, powerful plasma streams (v ˜ 3 × 107 cm s-1) and fast (E ˜ 0.1 … 1.0 MeV) deuterons of power flux densities q up to 1010 and 1012 W cm-2 correspondingly. ‘Damage factor’ F = q × τ0.5 ensures an opportunity to simulate radiation loads (predictable for both reactors types) by the plasma/ion streams, which have the same nature and namely those parameters as expected in the FR modules. Before and after irradiation we provided investigations of our samples by means of a number of analytical techniques. Among them we used optical and scanning electron microscopy to understand character and parameters of damageability of the surface layers of the samples. Atomic force microscopy was applied to measure roughness of the surface after irradiation. These characteristics are quite important for understanding mechanisms and values of dust production in FR that may relate to tritium retention and emergency situations in FR facilities. We also applied two new techniques. For the surface we elaborated the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single photon detection with high spectroscopic and angular resolutions. For bulk damageability investigations we applied an x-ray microCT system where x-rays were produced by a Hamamatsu microfocus source (150 kV, 500 µA, 5 µm minimum focal spot size). The detector was a Hamamatsu CMOS flat panel coupled to a fibre optic plate under the GOS scintillator. The reconstruction of three-dimensional data was run with Cobra 7.4 and DIGIX CT software while VG Studio Max 2.1, and Amira 5.3 were used for

  1. Experimental Evaluation and Comparison of Thermal Conductivity of High-Voltage Insulation Materials for Vacuum Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, C.; Srikrishna, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum electronic devices operate with very high voltage differences between their sub-assemblies which are separated by very small distances. These devices also emit large amounts of heat that needs to be dissipated. Hence, there exists a requirement for high-voltage insulators with good thermal conductivity for voltage isolation and efficient heat dissipation. However, these voltage insulators are generally poor conductors of heat. In the present work, an effort has been made to obtain good high-voltage insulation materials with substantial improvement in their thermal conductivity. New mixtures of composites were formed by blending varying percentages (by volumes) of aluminum nitride powders with that of neat room-temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone elastomer compound. In this work, a thermal conductivity test setup has been devised for the quantification of the thermal conductivity of the insulators. The thermal conductivities and high-voltage isolation capabilities of various blended composites were quantified and were compared with that of neat RTV to evaluate the relative improvement.

  2. Experimental use of a cellulosic biopolymer as a new material for suburethral sling in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Roberto G.; Lima, Salvador V. C.; Aguiar, José L. de A.; Andrade, Rogerson T.; Pinto, Flávia C. M.; Vilar, Fabio O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the interaction between the cellulose exopolysaccharide (CEC) and urethral tissue when used as a pubovaginal sling. Materials and Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups. In groups A and B the cellulose exopolysaccharide (CEC) was implanted around the urethral tissue (bladder neck below the upper margin) and the rats were sacrificed at 30 and 90 days. Similar procedure was used in groups C and D using a polypropylene mesh. After sacrifice bladder and urethra were sent for histological analysis. The histological parameters (inflammatory reaction) by evaluated by quantitative analysis. For collagen deposition analysis it was used stereological method. Results: The cellulose exopolysaccharide (CEC) was inert and well preserved at the implanted region at the time of examination. Morphologic alterations were not found at the CEC implant but some reactions of foreign body type were observed at the adjacent structures. In some areas a process of neovascular formation was observed. Stereological analysis at the suburethral area showed a significant difference in collagen presence in favor of CEC. Conclusions: The CEC implant showed adequate results when used as a suburethral sling with good integration to the host tissue, preserving its architecture. PMID:26742973

  3. Quantification of material nonlinearity in relation to microdamage density using nonlinear reverberation spectroscopy: Experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Van Den Abeele, K; Le Bas, P Y; Van Damme, B; Katkowski, Tomasz

    2009-09-01

    High amplitude vibrations induce amplitude dependence of the characteristic resonance parameters (i.e., resonance frequency and damping factor) in materials with microscopic damage features as a result of the nonlinear constitutive relation at the damage location. This paper displays and quantifies results of the nonlinear resonance technique, both in time (signal reverberation) and in frequency (sweep) domains, as a function of sample crack density. The reverberation spectroscopy technique is applied to carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites exposed to increasing thermal loading. Considerable gain in sensitivity and consistent interpretation of the results for nonlinear signatures in comparison with the linear characteristics are obtained. The amount of induced damage is quantified by analyzing light optical microscopy images of several cross-sections of the CFRP samples using histogram equalization and grayscale thresholding. The obtained measure of crack density is compared to the global macroscopic nonlinearity of the sample and explicitly confirms that the increase in nonlinearity is linked to an increased network of cracks. A change from 1% to 3% in crack density corresponds to a tenfold increase in the signature of nonlinearity. Numerical simulations based on a uniform distribution of a hysteretic nonlinear constitutive relation within the sample support the results.

  4. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  5. Physical properties and biological/odontogenic effects of an experimentally developed fast-setting α-tricalcium phosphate-based pulp capping material

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, fast-setting α-tricalcium-phosphate (TCP) cement was developed for use in the pulp capping process. The aim of this study was to investigate the physical properties and biological effects of α-TCP cement in comparison with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods We measured the setting time, pH values, compressive strength, and solubility of the two materials. We evaluated biocompatibility on the basis of cell morphology and a viability test using human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Chemical composition of each material was analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic (EDS) analysis. The expression of odontogenic-related genes was evaluated by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The calcified nodule formation was measured by Alizarin red staining. We performed the pulp capping procedure on rat teeth for histological investigation. The data were analyzed by an independent t-test for physical properties, one-way ANOVA for biological effects, and the Mann-Whitney U test for tertiary dentin formation. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant for all tests. Results The setting time, pH values, and compressive strength of α-TCP was lower than that of MTA (P < 0.05); however, the solubility of α-TCP was higher than that of MTA (P < 0.05). The resultant cell viability observed with the two materials was similar (P > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that cells attached to both materials were flat and had cytoplasmic extensions. The expression of odontogenic-related markers and mineralized nodule formation were higher in the two experimental groups compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Continuous tertiary dentin was formed underneath the capping materials in all samples of the tested groups. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that the α-TCP exhibited biocompatibility and odontogenicity comparable to MTA, whereas it had a quicker setting time. PMID:25015173

  6. Experimental investigation of the effect of the material damage induced in sheet metal forming process on the service performance of 22MnB5 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Weimin; Xie, Dongxuan; Chen, Yanhong

    2016-07-01

    The use of ultra-high strength steels through sheet metal forming process offers a practical solution to the lightweight design of vehicles. However, sheet metal forming process not only produces desirable changes in material properties but also causes material damage that may adversely influence the service performance of the material formed. Thus, an investigation is conducted to experimentally quantify such influence for a commonly used steel (the 22MnB5 steel) based on the hot and cold forming processes. For each process, a number of samples are used to conduct a uniaxial tensile test to simulate the forming process. After that, some of the samples are trimmed into a standard shape and then uniaxially extended until fracture to simulate the service stage. Finally, a microstructure test is conducted to analyze the microdefects of the remaining samples. Based on the results of the first two tests, the effect of material damage on the service performance of 22MnB5 steel is analyzed. It is found that the material damages of both the hot and cold forming processes cause reductions in the service performance, such as the failure strain, the ultimate stress, the capacity of energy absorption and the ratio of residual strain. The reductions are generally lower and non-linear in the former process but higher and linear in the latter process. Additionally, it is found from the microstructure analysis that the difference in the reductions of the service performance of 22MnB5 by the two forming processes is driven by the difference in the micro damage mechanisms of the two processes. The findings of this research provide a useful reference in terms of the selection of sheet metal forming processes and the determination of forming parameters for 22MnB5.

  7. Times_New_RomanModeling, Simulation and Experimental Verification of Constitutive Models for Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberman, K. S.; Asay, B. W.; Henson, B. F.; Funk, D. J.

    1997-07-01

    Simulation of the complete response of components and systems composed of energetic materials, such as PBX9501 is important in the determination of the safety of various explosive systems. For example, predicting the correct state of stress, rate of deformation and temperature during penetration is essential in the prediction of ignition. Such simulation requires accurate constitutive models. These models must also be computationally efficient to enable analysis of large scale three dimensional problems using explicit lagrangian finite element codes such as DYNA3D. However, to be of maximum utility, these predictions must be validated against robust dynamic experiments. In this paper, we report comparisons between experimental and predicted displacement fields in PBX9501 during dynamic deformation, and describe the modeling approach. The predictions use Visco-SCRAM and the generalized method of cells which have been implemented into DYNA3D. The experimental data were obtained using laser-induced fluorescense speckle photography. Results from this study have lead to more accurate models and have also guided further experimental work.

  8. Design and construction of nanoscale material for ultrasonic assisted adsorption of dyes: Application of derivative spectrophotometry and experimental design methodology.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Ahmad Reza; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Asfaram, Arash; Jannesar, Ramin; Goudarzi, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) based on central rotatable experimental design was used to investigate the effect of ultrasound assisted simultaneous adsorption process variables on Cu: ZnS-NPs-AC from aqueous solution. Cu: ZnS-NPs-AC was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). To overcome the severe methylene blue (MB) and brilliant green (BG) dyes spectral overlapping, derivative spectrophotometric method were successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of dyes in their binary solutions. Simultaneous determination of the dyes can be carried out using the first-order and second order derivative signal at 664 and 663nm for BG and MB, respectively. The factors investigated were pH (2.5-8.5), adsorbent mass (0.006-0.030g), sonication time (1-5min) and initial MB and BG concentration (3-15mgL(-1)). Five levels, which were low level, center point, upper level and two axillar points, were considered for each of the factors. The desirability function (DF: 0.9853) on the STATISTICA version 10.0 software showed that the optimum removal (99.832 and 99.423% for MB and BG, respectively) was obtained at pH 8.0, adsorbent mass 0.024g, sonication time 4min and 9mgL(-1) initial concentration for each dye. Besides, the results show that obtained data were adequately fitted into the second-order polynomial model, since the calculated model F value (172.96 and 96.35 for MB and BG, respectively) is higher than the critical F value. The values of coefficient of determination (0.9968 and 0.9943 for MB and BG, respectively) and adjusted coefficient of determination (0.9911 and 0.9840 for MB and BG, respectively) are close to 1, indicating a high correlation between the observed and the predicted values. The ultrasonic amplitude and adsorbent mass were found to be the most effective variable influencing the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium was well

  9. Experimental study on the impact-induced seismic wave propagating through granular materials: Implications for a future asteroid mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, M.; Matsumoto, E.; Arakawa, M.; Matsue, K.; Kobayashi, N.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: A seismic wave survey is a direct method to investigate the sub-surface structures of solid bodies, so we measured and analyzed these seismic waves propagating through these interiors. Earthquake and Moonquake are the only two phenomena that have been observed to explore these interiors until now, while the future surveys on the other bodies, (solid planets and/or asteroids) are now planned. To complete a seismic wave survey during the mission period, an artificial method that activates the seismic wave is necessary and one candidate is a projectile collision on the target body. However, to utilize the artificial seismic wave generated on the target body, the relationship between the impact energy and the amplitude and the decay process of the seismic wave should be examined. If these relationships are clarified, we can estimate the required sensitivity of seismometers installed on the target body and the possible distance from the seismic origin measurable for the seismometer. Furthermore, if we can estimate the impact energy from the observed seismic wave, we expect to be able to estimate the impact flux of impactors that collided on the target body. McGarr et al. (1969) did impact experiments by using the lexan projectile and two targets, quartz sand and sand bonded by epoxy cement, at 0.8-7 km/s. They found a difference of seismic wave properties between the two targets, and calculated the conversion efficiency to discuss the capability of detection of seismic waves on the Moon. However, they did not examine the excitation and propagation properties of the seismic waves in detail. In this study, we carried out impact experiments in the laboratory to observe the seismic waves by accelerometers, and examined the effects of projectile properties on the excitation and propagation properties of the seismic waves. Experimental methods: We made impact experiments by using a one-stage gas gun at Kobe University. Projectiles were a polycarbonate cylinder

  10. Accessing ultra-high pressures and strain rates in the solid state: An experimental path to extreme materials science on the Omega and NIF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, K. Thomas

    2005-03-01

    A new approach to materials science at extreme pressures and strain rates has been developed on the Omega laser, using a ramped plasma piston drive. The laser drives a shock through a solid plastic reservoir that unloads at the rear free surface, expands across a vacuum gap, and stagnates on the metal sample under study. This produces a gently increasing ram pressure, compressing the sample nearly isentropically. The peak pressure on the sample, diagnosed with VISAR measurements, can be varied by adjusting the laser energy and pulse length, gap size, and reservoir density, and obeys a simple scaling relation.^1 This has been demonstrated at OMEGA at pressures to 200 GPa in Al foils. In an important application, using in-flight x-ray radiography, the material strength of solid-state samples at high pressure can be inferred by measuring the reductions in the growth rates (stabilization) of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable interfaces. RT instability measurements of solid Al-6061-T6 and vanadium, at pressures of 20-100 GPa and strain rates of 10^6 to 10^8 s-1, show clear material strength effects. High-pressure experimental designs based on this drive have been developed for the NIF laser, predicting that solid-state samples can be quasi-isentropically driven to pressures an order of magnitude higher than on Omega - accessing new regimes of dense, high-pressure matter. [1] J. Edwards et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 075002 (2004).

  11. An experimental investigation of using carbon foam-PCM-MWCNTs composite materials for thermal management of electronic devices under pulsed power modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshaer, W. G.; Rady, M. A.; Nada, S. A.; Palomo Del Barrio, Elena; Sommier, Alain

    2017-02-01

    The present article reports on a detailed experimental investigation of using carbon foam-PCM-MWCNTs composite materials for thermal management (TM) of electronic devices subjected to pulsed power. The TM module was fabricated by infiltrating paraffin wax (RT65) as a phase change material (PCM) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a thermal conductivity enhancer in a carbon foam as a base structure. Two carbon foam materials of low and high values of thermal conductivities, CF20 and KL1-250 (3.1 and 40 W/m K), were tested as a base structure for the TM modules. Tests were conducted at different power intensities and power cycling/loading modes. Results showed that for all power varying modes and all carbon foams, the infiltration of RT65 into carbon foam reduces the temperature of TM module and results in damping the temperature spikes height. Infiltration of MWCNTS into RT65 further improves the effectiveness of TM module. Temperature damping was more pronounced in stand-alone pulsed power cycles as compared to pulsed power spikes modes. The effectiveness of inclusion of RT65 and RT65/MWCNTs in damping the temperature spikes height is remarkable in TM modules based on KL1-250 as compared to CF-20.

  12. Experimental aspects and mechanical modeling paradigms for the prediction of degradation and failure in nanocomposite materials subjected to fatigue loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averett, Rodney D.

    2008-10-01

    The objective of the current research was to contribute to the area of mechanics of composite polymeric materials. This objective was reached by establishing a quantitative assessment of the fatigue strength and evolution of mechanical property changes during fatigue loading of nanocomposite fibers and films. Both experimental testing and mathematical modeling were used to gain a fundamental understanding of the fatigue behavior and material changes that occurred during fatigue loading. In addition, the objective of the study was to gain a qualitative and fundamental understanding of the failure mechanisms that occurred between the nanoagent and matrix in nanocomposite fibers. This objective was accomplished by examining scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fractographs. The results of this research can be used to better understand the behavior of nanocomposite materials in applications where degradation due to fatigue and instability of the composite under loading conditions may be a concern. These applications are typically encountered in automotive, aerospace, and civil engineering applications where fatigue and/or fracture are primary factors that contribute to failure.

  13. EFFECT OF CONVENTIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL GINGIVAL RETRACTION SOLUTIONS ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH AND INHIBITION OF POLYMERIZATION OF FOUR TYPES OF IMPRESSION MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Sábio, Sérgio; Franciscone, Paulo Afonso; Mondelli, José

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, two types of tests (tensile strength test and polymerization inhibition test) were performed to evaluate the physical and chemical properties of four impression materials [a polysulfide (Permlastic), a polyether (Impregum), a condensation silicone (Xantopren) and a polyvinylsiloxane (Aquasil)] when polymerized in contact with of one conventional (Hemostop) and two experimental (Vislin and Afrin) gingival retraction solutions. For the tensile strength test, the impression materials were mixed and packed into a steel plate with perforations that had residues of the gingival retraction solutions. After polymerization, the specimens were tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine. For the polymerization inhibition test, specimens were obtained after taking impressions from a matrix with perforations that contained 1 drop of the gingival retraction solutions. Two independent examiners decided on whether or not impression material remnants remained unpolymerized, indicating interference of the chemical solutions. Based on the analysis of the results of both tests, the following conclusions were reached: 1. The tensile strength of the polysulfide decreased after contact with Hemostop and Afrin. 2. None of the chemical solutions inhibited the polymerization of the polysulfide; 3. The polyether presented lower tensile strength after polymerization in contact with the three gingival retraction agents; 4. The polyether had its polymerization inhibited only by Hemostop; 5. None of the chemical solutions affected the tensile strength of the condensation silicone; 6. Only Hemostop inhibited the polymerization of the condensation silicone; 7. The polyvinylsiloxane specimens polymerized in contact with Hemostop had significantly lower tensile strength; 8. Neither of the chemical solutions (Afrin and Vislin) affected the tensile strength of the polyvinylsiloxane and the condensation silicone; 9. Results of the tensile strength and polymerization

  14. Effect of conventional and experimental gingival retraction solutions on the tensile strength and inhibition of polymerization of four types of impression materials.

    PubMed

    Sábio, Sérgio; Franciscone, Paulo Afonso; Mondelli, José

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, two types of tests (tensile strength test and polymerization inhibition test) were performed to evaluate the physical and chemical properties of four impression materials [a polysulfide (Permlastic), a polyether (Impregum), a condensation silicone (Xantopren) and a polyvinylsiloxane (Aquasil)] when polymerized in contact with of one conventional (Hemostop) and two experimental (Vislin and Afrin) gingival retraction solutions. For the tensile strength test, the impression materials were mixed and packed into a steel plate with perforations that had residues of the gingival retraction solutions. After polymerization, the specimens were tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine. For the polymerization inhibition test, specimens were obtained after taking impressions from a matrix with perforations that contained 1 drop of the gingival retraction solutions. Two independent examiners decided on whether or not impression material remnants remained unpolymerized, indicating interference of the chemical solutions. Based on the analysis of the results of both tests, the following conclusions were reached: 1. The tensile strength of the polysulfide decreased after contact with Hemostop and Afrin. 2. None of the chemical solutions inhibited the polymerization of the polysulfide; 3. The polyether presented lower tensile strength after polymerization in contact with the three gingival retraction agents; 4. The polyether had its polymerization inhibited only by Hemostop; 5. None of the chemical solutions affected the tensile strength of the condensation silicone; 6. Only Hemostop inhibited the polymerization of the condensation silicone; 7. The polyvinylsiloxane specimens polymerized in contact with Hemostop had significantly lower tensile strength; 8. Neither of the chemical solutions (Afrin and Vislin) affected the tensile strength of the polyvinylsiloxane and the condensation silicone; 9. Results of the tensile strength and polymerization

  15. External Validity of Contingent Valuation: Comparing Hypothetical and Actual Payments.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mandy; Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Jareinpituk, Suthi; Cairns, John

    2016-10-09

    Whilst contingent valuation is increasingly used in economics to value benefits, questions remain concerning its external validity that is do hypothetical responses match actual responses? We present results from the first within sample field test. Whilst Hypothetical No is always an Actual No, Hypothetical Yes exceed Actual Yes responses. A constant rate of response reversals across bids/prices could suggest theoretically consistent option value responses. Certainty calibrations (verbal and numerical response scales) minimise hypothetical-actual discrepancies offering a useful solution. Helping respondents resolve uncertainty may reduce the discrepancy between hypothetical and actual payments and thus lead to more accurate policy recommendations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Dynamic strength of armature materials under pulsed current conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Duane C.; Noel, Andrew P.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for generating tensile-strength-versus electrical-action curves for armature materials under pulsed current conditions is presented. This technique is capable of imposing high strain rates (above 1000/sec) under pulse current conditions by electromagnetically expanding a wire formed from a candidate armature material. The strain rate is derived by determining the change in mutual inductance between the expanding test wire and a fixed reference wire. The experimental technique and results obtained for aluminum and copper armature materials are described. The results indicate that aluminum and copper armature materials maintain a high percentage of room-temperature tensile strength under actual railgun conditions.

  17. Experimental Design for a Macrofoam-Swab Study Relating the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to Low Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates on Four Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2014-12-05

    This report describes the experimental design for a laboratory study to quantify the recovery efficiencies and false negative rates of a validated, macrofoam-swab sampling method for low concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) spores on four surface materials (stainless steel, glass, vinyl tile, plastic light cover panel). Two analytical methods (culture and polymerase chain reaction) will be used. Only one previous study has investigated how the false negative rate depends on test factors. The surrogates BAS and BG have not been tested together in the same study previously. Hence, this study will provide for completing gaps in the available information on the performance of macrofoam-swab sampling at low concentrations.

  18. Experimental Design for a Macrofoam Swab Study Relating the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to Low Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates on Four Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2014-04-16

    This report describes the experimental design for a laboratory study to quantify the recovery efficiencies and false negative rates of a validated, macrofoam swab sampling method for low concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) spores on four surface materials (stainless steel, glass, vinyl tile, plastic light cover panel). Two analytical methods (plating/counting and polymerase chain reaction) will be used. Only one previous study has investigated false negative as a function of affecting test factors. The surrogates BAS and BG have not been tested together in the same study previously. Hence, this study will provide for completing gaps in the available information on the performance of macrofoam swab sampling at low concentrations.

  19. MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoni, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

  20. Analytical, Numerical, and Experimental Investigation on a Non-Contact Method for the Measurements of Creep Properties of Ultra-High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Responsive access to space requires re-use of components such as rocket nozzles that operate at extremely high temperatures. For such applications, new ultra-hightemperature materials that can operate over 2,000 C are required. At the temperatures higher than the fifty percent of the melting temperature, the characterization of creep properties is indispensable. Since conventional methods for the measurement of creep is limited below 1,700 C, a new technique that can be applied at higher temperatures is strongly demanded. This research develops a non-contact method for the measurement of creep at the temperatures over 2,300 C. Using the electrostatic levitator in NASA MSFC, a spherical sample was rotated to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. The deforming sample was captured with a digital camera and analyzed to measure creep deformation. Numerical and analytical analyses have also been conducted to compare the experimental results. Analytical, numerical, and experimental results showed a good agreement with one another.

  1. Experimental investigation of synthetic gas composition in a two-stage fluidized bed gasification process: effect of activated carbon as bed material.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jia-Hong; Lin, Chiou-Liang; Chang, Tsung-Jen; Weng, Wang-Chang; Liu, JingYong

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a two-stage fluidized bed gasifier was used to investigate the effect of the equivalence ratio (ER) and steam/biomass ratio (S/B) on the synthetic gas distribution while activated carbon (AC) was added as the bed material in secondary gasifier (Stage II). The experimental results showed that when the empty bed (without the bed material) was used for the Stage II reaction, the hydrogen (H2) content in the synthetic gas emitted from the Stage II reactor was 2-3 mol% higher than that from the first-stage gasifier (Stage I). It was supposed that using the Stage II reactor prolongs the reaction time and thereby increases the H2 production. Besides, when the AC was added in the Stage II gasifier, the H2 concentration, the total gas yield, and gas heating value reached their maximum (30 mol%) when ER and S/B were 0.3 and 1.5, respectively.

  2. Experimental study of a passive thermal management system for high-powered lithium ion batteries using porous metal foam saturated with phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. Q.; Qu, Z. G.; He, Y. L.; Tao, Y. B.

    2014-06-01

    A highly efficient thermal strategy to manage a high-powered Li-ion battery package within the required safe temperature range is of great demand for electric vehicles (EVs) applications. A sandwiched cooling structure using copper metal foam saturated with phase change materials was designed. The thermal efficiency of the system was experimentally evaluated and compared with two control cases: a cooling mode with pure phase change materials and an air-cooling mode. The results showed that the thermal management with air natural convection cannot fulfill the safety demand of the Li-ion battery. The use of pure PCM can dramatically reduce the surface temperature and maintain the temperature within an allowable range due to the latent heat absorption and the natural convection of the melted PCM during the melting process. The foam-paraffin composite further reduced the battery's surface temperature and improved the uniformity of the temperature distribution caused by the improvement of the effective thermal conductivity. Additionally, the battery surface temperature increased with an increase in the porosity and the pore density of the metal foam.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Magnetic, Superconducting, and other Phase Transitions in novel F-Electron Materials at Ultra-high Pressures - Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maple, Brian; Jeffires, Jason

    2006-07-28

    This grant, entitled “Experimental investigation of magnetic, superconducting and other phase transitions in novel f-electron materials at ultrahigh pressures,” spanned the funding period from May 1st, 2003 until April 30th, 2006. The major goal of this grant was to develop and utilize an ultrahigh pressure facility—capable of achieving very low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and extreme pressures as well as providing electrical resistivity, ac susceptibility, and magnetization measurement capabilities under pressure—for the exploration of magnetic, electronic, and structural phases and any corresponding interactions between these states in novel f-electron materials. Realizing this goal required the acquisition, development, fabrication, and implementation of essential equipment, apparatuses, and techniques. The following sections of this report detail the establishment of an ultrahigh pressure facility (Section 1) and measurements performed during the funding period (Section 2), as well as summarize the research project (Section 3), project participants and their levels of support (Section 4), and publications and presentations (Section 5).

  4. Computational simulation of coupled material degradation processes for probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Bast, Callie C.

    1992-01-01

    The research included ongoing development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic material strength degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, is postulated for strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to a number of effects or primative variables. These primative variable may include high temperature, fatigue or creep. In most cases, strength is reduced as a result of the action of a variable. This multifactor interaction strength degradation equation has been randomized and is included in the computer program, PROMISS. Also included in the research is the development of methodology to calibrate the above described constitutive equation using actual experimental materials data together with linear regression of that data, thereby predicting values for the empirical material constraints for each effect or primative variable. This regression methodology is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Actual experimental materials data were obtained from the open literature for materials typically of interest to those studying aerospace propulsion system components. Material data for Inconel 718 was analyzed using the developed methodology.

  5. Beaked Whales Respond to Simulated and Actual Navy Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Tyack, Peter L.; Zimmer, Walter M. X.; Moretti, David; Southall, Brandon L.; Claridge, Diane E.; Durban, John W.; Clark, Christopher W.; D'Amico, Angela; DiMarzio, Nancy; Jarvis, Susan; McCarthy, Elena; Morrissey, Ronald; Ward, Jessica; Boyd, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where sonars are in regular use near Andros Island, Bahamas. An array of bottom-mounted hydrophones can detect beaked whales when they click anywhere within the range. We used two complementary methods to investigate behavioral responses of beaked whales to sonar: an opportunistic approach that monitored whale responses to multi-day naval exercises involving tactical mid-frequency sonars, and an experimental approach using playbacks of simulated sonar and control sounds to whales tagged with a device that records sound, movement, and orientation. Here we show that in both exposure conditions beaked whales stopped echolocating during deep foraging dives and moved away. During actual sonar exercises, beaked whales were primarily detected near the periphery of the range, on average 16 km away from the sonar transmissions. Once the exercise stopped, beaked whales gradually filled in the center of the range over 2–3 days. A satellite tagged whale moved outside the range during an exercise, returning over 2–3 days post-exercise. The experimental approach used tags to measure acoustic exposure and behavioral reactions of beaked whales to one controlled exposure each of simulated military sonar, killer whale calls, and band-limited noise. The beaked whales reacted to these three sound playbacks at sound pressure levels below 142 dB re 1 µPa by stopping echolocation followed by unusually long and slow ascents from their foraging dives. The combined results indicate similar disruption of foraging behavior and avoidance by beaked whales in the two different contexts, at exposures well below those used by regulators to define

  6. Beaked whales respond to simulated and actual navy sonar.

    PubMed

    Tyack, Peter L; Zimmer, Walter M X; Moretti, David; Southall, Brandon L; Claridge, Diane E; Durban, John W; Clark, Christopher W; D'Amico, Angela; DiMarzio, Nancy; Jarvis, Susan; McCarthy, Elena; Morrissey, Ronald; Ward, Jessica; Boyd, Ian L

    2011-03-14

    Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where sonars are in regular use near Andros Island, Bahamas. An array of bottom-mounted hydrophones can detect beaked whales when they click anywhere within the range. We used two complementary methods to investigate behavioral responses of beaked whales to sonar: an opportunistic approach that monitored whale responses to multi-day naval exercises involving tactical mid-frequency sonars, and an experimental approach using playbacks of simulated sonar and control sounds to whales tagged with a device that records sound, movement, and orientation. Here we show that in both exposure conditions beaked whales stopped echolocating during deep foraging dives and moved away. During actual sonar exercises, beaked whales were primarily detected near the periphery of the range, on average 16 km away from the sonar transmissions. Once the exercise stopped, beaked whales gradually filled in the center of the range over 2-3 days. A satellite tagged whale moved outside the range during an exercise, returning over 2-3 days post-exercise. The experimental approach used tags to measure acoustic exposure and behavioral reactions of beaked whales to one controlled exposure each of simulated military sonar, killer whale calls, and band-limited noise. The beaked whales reacted to these three sound playbacks at sound pressure levels below 142 dB re 1 µPa by stopping echolocation followed by unusually long and slow ascents from their foraging dives. The combined results indicate similar disruption of foraging behavior and avoidance by beaked whales in the two different contexts, at exposures well below those used by regulators to define

  7. Condensation heat transfer of actual flue gas on horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Osakabe, Masahiro; Itoh, Tugue; Yagi, Kiyoyuki

    1999-07-01

    In order to improve the boiler efficiency, latent heat recovery from an exhaust flue gas is a very important concept. Condensation heat transfer on horizontal stainless steel tubes was investigated experimentally using an actual flue gas from a natural gas boiler. The experiment was conducted at different air ratios and steam mass concentrations of the flue gas, and in a wide range of tube wall temperature. The condensation pattern was similar to the dropwise condensation near the dew point. As the wall temperature was decreased, the wall region covered with a thin liquid film increased. The heat and mass transfer behavior were well predicted with the simple analogy correlation in the high wall temperature region. But in the low wall temperature region, the total heat transfer rate was higher than that predicted by the simple analogy correlation. At a high steam mass concentration artificially generated with steam injection, the total heat transfer rate was higher than that predicted by the simple analogy correlation. The analogy correlation using the modified Sherwood number taking account of the mass absorption effect was proposed. The modified correlation gave a good prediction of the heat flux at the high steam mass concentration.

  8. Parameter-free determination of actual temperature at chemical freeze-out in nuclear interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, A. D.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Tzoulis, J.

    1995-07-01

    We propose a method to determine the actual temperature at chemical freeze-out in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions, using the experimental μq/T and μs/T values, obtained from strange particle ratios. We employ the Hadron Gas formalism, assuming only local thermal equilibration, to relate the quarkchemical potential and temperature. This relation constrains the allowed values of μq/T, μs/T and T, enabling the determination of the actual temperature. Comparison of the inverse slope parameter of the mT-distributions with the actual temperature determines the transverse flow velocity of the fireball matter. Knowledge of these quantities is essential in determining the EoS of nuclear matter and in evaluating interactions with regard to a possible phase transition to QGP.

  9. A Preisach approach to modeling partial phase transitions in the first order magnetocaloric material MnFe(P,As)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Moos, L.; Bahl, C. R. H.; Nielsen, K. K.; Engelbrecht, K.; Küpferling, M.; Basso, V.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging technology that could provide energy efficient and environmentally friendly cooling. Magnetocaloric materials in which a structural phase transition is found concurrently with the magnetic phase transition are often termed first order magnetocaloric materials. Such materials are potential candidates for application in magnetic refrigeration devices. However, the first order materials often have adverse properties such as hysteresis, making actual performance troublesome to quantify, a subject not thoroughly studied within this field. Here we investigate the behavior of MnFe(P,As) under partial phase transitions, which is similar to what materials experience in actual magnetic refrigeration devices. Partial phase transition curves, in the absence of a magnetic field, are measured using calorimetry and the experimental results are compared to simulations of a Preisach-type model. We show that this approach is applicable and discuss what experimental data is required to obtain a satisfactory material model.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Magnetic Superconducting, and other Phase Transitions in Novel f-Electron Materials at Ultra-high Pressures Using Designer Diamond Anvils

    SciTech Connect

    Maple, M. Brian

    2005-09-13

    Pressure is a powerful control parameter, owing to its ability to affect crystal and electronic structure without introducing defects, for the investigation of condensed matter systems. Some f-electron, heavy-fermion materials display interesting and novel behavior when exposed to pressures achievable with conventional experimental techniques; however, a growing number of condensed matter systems require extreme conditions such as ultrahigh pressures, high magnetic fields, and ultralow temperatures to sufficiently explore the important properties. To that end, we have been funded to develop an ultrahigh pressure facility at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) in order to investigate superconductivity, magnetism, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and other phenomena under extreme conditions. Our goals for the second year of this grant were as follows: (a) perform electrical resistivity measurements on novel samples at a myriad of pressures using conventional piston-cylinder techniques, Bridgman anvil techniques, and diamond anvil cell technology; (b) install, commission, and operate an Oxford Kelvinox MX-100 dilution refrigerator for access to ultralow temperatures and high magnetic fields. (c) continue the development of diamond anvil cell (DAC) technology. During the past year, we have successfully installed the Oxford Kelvinox MX-100 dilution refrigerator and verified its operability down to 12 mK. We have begun an experimental program to systematically investigate the f-electron compound URu2Si2 under pressure and in the presence of magnetic fields. We have also continued our collaborative work with Sam Weir at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on Au4V and implemented a new corollary study on Au1-xVx using ultrahigh pressures. We have continued developing our DAC facility by designing and constructing an apparatus for in situ pressure measurement as well as designing high pressure cells. This report serves to highlight the progress we have made

  11. Prediction of capillary hysteresis in a porous material using lattice-Boltzmann methods and comparison to experimental data and a morphological pore network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrenholz, B.; Tölke, J.; Lehmann, P.; Peters, A.; Kaestner, A.; Krafczyk, M.; Durner, W.

    2008-09-01

    In this work we use two numerical methods which rely only on the geometry and material parameters to predict capillary hysteresis in a porous material. The first numerical method is a morphological pore network (MPN) model, where structural elements are inserted into the imaged pore space to quantify the local capillary forces. Then, based on an invasion-percolation mechanism, the fluid distribution is computed. The second numerical method is a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) approach which solves the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for both fluid phases and describes the dynamics of the fluid/fluid interface. We have developed an optimized version of the model proposed in [Tölke J, Freudiger S, Krafczyk M. An adaptive scheme for LBE multiphase flow simulations on hierarchical grids, Comput. Fluids 2006;35:820-30] for the type of flow problems encountered in this work. A detailed description of the model and an extensive validation of different multiphase test cases have been carried out. We investigated pendular rings in a sphere packing, static and dynamic capillary bundle models and the residual saturation in a sphere packing. A sample of 15 mm in diameter filled with sand particles ranging from 100 to 500 μm was scanned using X-rays from a synchrotron source with a spatial resolution of 11 μm. Based on this geometry we computed the primary drainage, the first imbibition and the secondary drainage branch of the hysteresis loop using both approaches. For the LB approach, we investigated the dependence of the hysteresis loop on the speed of the drainage and the imbibition process. Furthermore we carried out a sensitivity analysis by simulating the hysteretic effect in several subcubes of the whole geometry with extremal characteristic properties. The predicted hysteretic water retention curves were compared to the results of laboratory experiments using inverse modeling based on the Richards equation. A good agreement for the hysteresis loop between the LB and MPN model

  12. Experimental characterization of the constitutive materials of MgB2 multi-filamentary wires for the development of 3D numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escamez, Guillaume; Sirois, Frédéric; Tousignant, Maxime; Badel, Arnaud; Granger, Capucine; Tixador, Pascal; Bruzek, Christian-Éric

    2017-03-01

    Today MgB2 superconducting wires can be manufactured in long lengths at low cost, which makes this material a good candidate for large scale applications. However, because of its relatively low critical temperature (less than 40 K), it is necessary to operate MgB2 devices in a liquid or gaseous helium environment. In this context, losses in the cryogenic environment must be rigorously minimized, otherwise the use of a superconductor is not worthy. An accurate estimation of the losses at the design stage is therefore mandatory in order to allow determining the device architecture that minimizes the losses. In this paper, we present a complete a 3D finite element model of a 36-filament MgB2 wire based on the architecture of the Italian manufacturer Colombus. In order for the model to be as accurate as possible, we made a substantial effort to characterize all constitutive materials of the wire, namely the E–J characteristics of the MgB2 filaments and the electric and magnetic properties (B‑H curves) of nickel and monel, which are the two major non-superconducting components of the wire. All properties were characterized as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Limitations of the characterization and of the model are discussed, in particular the difficulty to extract the maximum relative permeability of nickel and monel from the experimental data, as well as the lack of a thin conductive layer model in the 3D finite element method, which prevents us from taking into account the resistive barriers around the MgB2 filaments in the matrix. Two examples of numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the capabilities of the model in its current state.

  13. Self-Actualization and the Effective Social Studies Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rodney B.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a study undertaken to investigate the relationship between social studies teachers' degrees of self-actualization and their teacher effectiveness. Investigates validity of using Maslow's theory of self-actualization as a way of identifying the effective social studies teacher personality. (Author/DB)

  14. Self-Actualization Effects Of A Marathon Growth Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dorothy S.; Medvene, Arnold M.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a marathon group experience on university student's level of self-actualization two days and six weeks after the experience. Gains in self-actualization as a result of marathon group participation depended upon an individual's level of ego strength upon entering the group. (Author)

  15. Self-actualization: Its Use and Misuse in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Stanley D.

    1982-01-01

    The writings of Abraham Maslow are analyzed to determine the meaning of the psychological term "self-actualization." After pointing out that self-actualization is a rare quality and that it has little to do with formal education, the author concludes that the concept has little practical relevance for teacher education. (PP)

  16. The Self-Actualization of Polk Community College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearsall, Howard E.; Thompson, Paul V., Jr.

    This article investigates the concept of self-actualization introduced by Abraham Maslow (1954). A summary of Maslow's Needs Hierarchy, along with a description of the characteristics of the self-actualized person, is presented. An analysis of humanistic education reveals it has much to offer as a means of promoting the principles of…

  17. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means risks described...

  18. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means...

  19. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means...

  20. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means...

  1. 26 CFR 1.953-2 - Actual United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Actual United States risks. 1.953-2 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.953-2 Actual United States risks. (a) In general. For purposes of paragraph (a) of § 1.953-1, the term “United States risks” means...

  2. Facebook as a Library Tool: Perceived vs. Actual Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Terra B.

    2011-01-01

    As Facebook has come to dominate the social networking site arena, more libraries have created their own library pages on Facebook to create library awareness and to function as a marketing tool. This paper examines reported versus actual use of Facebook in libraries to identify discrepancies between intended goals and actual use. The results of a…

  3. School Guidance Counselors' Perceptions of Actual and Preferred Job Duties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, John Dexter

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide process data for school counselors, administrators, and the public, regarding school counselors' actual roles within the guidance counselor preferred job duties and actual job duties. In addition, factors including National Certification or no National Certification, years of counseling experience, and…

  4. Term Familiarity to indicate Perceived and Actual Difficulty of Text in Medical Digital Libraries.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Gondy; Endicott, James E

    2011-10-01

    With increasing text digitization, digital libraries can personalize materials for individuals with different education levels and language skills. To this end, documents need meta-information describing their difficulty level. Previous attempts at such labeling used readability formulas but the formulas have not been validated with modern texts and their outcome is seldom associated with actual difficulty. We focus on medical texts and are developing new, evidence-based meta-tags that are associated with perceived and actual text difficulty. This work describes a first tag, term familiarity , which is based on term frequency in the Google corpus. We evaluated its feasibility to serve as a tag by looking at a document corpus (N=1,073) and found that terms in blogs or journal articles displayed unexpected but significantly different scores. Term familiarity was then applied to texts and results from a previous user study (N=86) and could better explain differences for perceived and actual difficulty.

  5. Experimental Rate Study of Vitrinite Maturation as a Function of Temperature, Time, Starting Material, Aqueous Fluid Pressure, and Oxygen Fugacity: Corroboration of Prior Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, W. G.; Mählmann, R. F.

    2002-05-01

    Kinetic studies were performed on disaggregated samples of gymnosperm and angiosperm huminite at 2.0 kbar aqueous fluid pressure and oxygen fugacities defined by hematite-magnetite and magnetite + quartz-fayalite solid buffers. Individual experiments lasted from 5-204 days. The rate of vitrinite reflectance (VR) increase was evaluated at 200, 250, 300, and 400oC isotherms; experimentally determined, approximately steady-state values for the mean percentage Rmax are 0.54, 0.74, 1.10, and 2.25, respectively. The overall activation energy governing the kinetics of several devolatilization reactions responsible for increase in VR measured in our experiments is 21.8+/- 0.3 kJ/mol. Combined with earlier rate studies conducted by Dalla Torre et al. (1997), we conclude that the rate of vitrinite maturation is unaffected by oxidation state, "wet" versus "dry" conditions, and the nature of the starting lignitic material. To a small extent, elevated lithostatic pressure retards the rate of increase in VR. These new run data demonstrate that VR is chiefly a function of temperature and time. In support of most earlier field, theoretical, and laboratory studies, our research indicates that, for all but geologically insignificant times intervals, vitrinite reflectance is an appropriate proxy for host-rock burial temperature.

  6. Essential Experimental Methods for Identifying Bonghan Systems as a Basis for Korean Medicine: Focusing on Visual Materials from Original Papers and Modern Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoon-Gi; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Lee, Ki-Bog

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, through studies on Korean Medicine, Bonghan Kim proposed the Bonghan systems (BS) as the anatomical reality of the acupuncture meridians based on various experimental data. Since 2002, several groups, mainly led by a team at Seoul National University, who renamed the BS as the primo vascular system (PVS), have published around 70 papers showing biological structures corresponding to the BS. However, it is still difficult for other researchers to find them, especially under the skin, which Bonghan Kim first reported as acupuncture points, due to similar-looking biological tissues, for example, the lymphatic vessels, and such artifacts as blood clots or fascia debris. To solve these drawbacks, we examined the main methods for identifying the BS by comparing the original papers with the modern outcomes in terms of the common physical/chemical characteristics of the BS. In addition, effective methods of staining and microscopic observations discovered by modern teams are synthetically explained using visual materials such as diagrams and photos. Through the essentially organized methods in this review paper, we suggest that one can find the BS under the skin as putative acupuncture points by tracing the intraexternal BS, from which a new Korean Medicine will be born. PMID:26539230

  7. Essential Experimental Methods for Identifying Bonghan Systems as a Basis for Korean Medicine: Focusing on Visual Materials from Original Papers and Modern Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon-Gi; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Lee, Ki-Bog

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, through studies on Korean Medicine, Bonghan Kim proposed the Bonghan systems (BS) as the anatomical reality of the acupuncture meridians based on various experimental data. Since 2002, several groups, mainly led by a team at Seoul National University, who renamed the BS as the primo vascular system (PVS), have published around 70 papers showing biological structures corresponding to the BS. However, it is still difficult for other researchers to find them, especially under the skin, which Bonghan Kim first reported as acupuncture points, due to similar-looking biological tissues, for example, the lymphatic vessels, and such artifacts as blood clots or fascia debris. To solve these drawbacks, we examined the main methods for identifying the BS by comparing the original papers with the modern outcomes in terms of the common physical/chemical characteristics of the BS. In addition, effective methods of staining and microscopic observations discovered by modern teams are synthetically explained using visual materials such as diagrams and photos. Through the essentially organized methods in this review paper, we suggest that one can find the BS under the skin as putative acupuncture points by tracing the intraexternal BS, from which a new Korean Medicine will be born.

  8. The material mapping strategy influences the accuracy of CT-based finite element models of bones: an evaluation against experimental measurements.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Fulvia; Schileo, Enrico; Helgason, Benedikt; Cristofolini, Luca; Viceconti, Marco

    2007-11-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence on the global model's accuracy of the strategy adopted to define the average element Young's modulus in subject-specific finite element models of bones from computed tomography data. The classic strategy of calculating the Young's modulus from an average element density and the one that averages the Young's moduli directly derived from each voxel Hounsfield Unit were considered. These strategies were applied to the finite element model of a real human femur. The accuracy of the superficial stress and strain predictions was evaluated against experimentally measured values in 13 strain-gauge locations for five different loading conditions. The results obtained for the two material distributions were statistically different. Both models predicted very accurately the superficial stresses, with regression coefficients higher than 0.9 and slopes not significantly different from unity. The second strategy definitely improved the strains prediction accuracy: the regression coefficient raised from 0.69 to 0.79; the average and peak errors decreased from 45.1% to 31.3% and from 228% to 134% of the maximum measured strain, respectively. The stress fields predicted inside the bone were also significantly different. A new software implementing the second strategy was made available in the public domain.

  9. Predicting Stress vs. Strain Behaviors of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Cast Magnesium Alloy with Actual Pore Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Barker, Erin; Cheng, Guang; Sun, Xin; Forsmark, Joy; Li, Mei

    2016-01-06

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) microstructure-based finite element modeling method (i.e., extrinsic modeling method) is developed, which can be used in examining the effects of porosity on the ductility/fracture of Mg castings. For this purpose, AM60 Mg tensile samples were generated under high-pressure die-casting in a specially-designed mold. Before the tensile test, the samples were CT-scanned to obtain the pore distributions within the samples. 3D microstructure-based finite element models were then developed based on the obtained actual pore distributions of the gauge area. The input properties for the matrix material were determined by fitting the simulation result to the experimental result of a selected sample, and then used for all the other samples’ simulation. The results show that the ductility and fracture locations predicted from simulations agree well with the experimental results. This indicates that the developed 3D extrinsic modeling method may be used to examine the influence of various aspects of pore sizes/distributions as well as intrinsic properties (i.e., matrix properties) on the ductility/fracture of Mg castings.

  10. Actual 10-Year Survivors Following Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Prescott, Jason D.; Wang, Tracy S.; Glenn, Jason; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Poultsides, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with limited therapeutic options beyond surgical resection. The characteristics of actual long-term survivors following surgical resection for ACC have not been previously reported. Method Patients who underwent resection for ACC at one of 13 academic institutions participating in the US Adrenocortical Carcinoma Group from 1993 to 2014 were analyzed. Patients were stratified into four groups: early mortality (died within 2 years), late mortality (died within 2–5 years), actual 5-year survivor (survived at least 5 years), and actual 10-year survivor (survived at least 10 years). Patients with less than 5 years of follow-up were excluded. Results Among the 180 patients available for analysis, there were 49 actual 5-year survivors (27%) and 12 actual 10-year survivors (7%). Patients who experienced early mortality had higher rates of cortisol-secreting tumors, nodal metastasis, synchronous distant metastasis, and R1 or R2 resections (all P < 0.05). The need for multi-visceral resection, perioperative blood transfusion, and adjuvant therapy correlated with early mortality. However, nodal involvement, distant metastasis, and R1 resection did not preclude patients from becoming actual 10-year survivors. Ten of twelve actual 10-year survivors were women, and of the seven 10-year survivors who experienced disease recurrence, five had undergone repeat surgery to resect the recurrence. Conclusion Surgery for ACC can offer a 1 in 4 chance of actual 5-year survival and a 1 in 15 chance of actual 10-year survival. Long-term survival was often achieved with repeat resection for local or distant recurrence, further underscoring the important role of surgery in managing patients with ACC. PMID:27633419

  11. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  12. Laboratory-scale experimental burning of selected Palaeozoic limestones from the Barrandian area (Prague Basin, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic): re-evaluation of properties of historical raw material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Prikryl, Richard; Stastna, Aneta

    2013-04-01

    Palaeozoic limestones from the Barrandian area (Prague Basin, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic) have been quarried and utilized, among others, for manufacturing of inorganic binders. Certain beds, e.g. Devonian dvorecko-prokopské limestones were historically burnt for high quality hydraulic lime which is not produced recently. Aiming to evaluate potential of this specific raw material for small-scale production of restoration hydraulic lime, we have conducted some laboratory experimental burning tests in an electrical furnace up to 1200°C. Prior to the burning, all studied lithotypes (4 in total) have been examined for their mineralogy (optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence study, X-ray diffraction of insoluble residue) and geochemistry (wet chemical analyses). Studied biomicritic limestones can be classified as wackstones to packstones. Carbonate content varies from 80 to 90 %, the rest is due to dominant illite and silica, and subordinate kaolinite, feldspars, and/or chlorite. Specific composition of non-carbonate component (specifically high content of illite and silica) positively influences formation of CS, Ca, and/or CAS phases when burnt at calcination temperatures from 850 to 1200°C (in steps of 50°C). In the products formed during firing, mineral phases typical for hydraulic lime, such as larnite, brownmillerite, and gehlenite, along with free lime, quartz and silica phases, and portlandite were identified by X-ray diffraction. The amount of the dominant hydraulic phase, larnite, increased with higher firing temperature. On the other hand, content of free lime, quartz and silica decreased. The amount of portlandite was almost independent of the firing temperature. Higher amounts of larnite and other hydraulic phase were detected during the peak firing temperature of 1200°C in specimens containing higher amount of insoluble residue. From the study performed, it is evident that studied dvorecko-prokopské limestone, which included favourable amount of

  13. Electrodermal responses to implied versus actual violence on television.

    PubMed

    Kalamas, A D; Gruber, M L

    1998-01-01

    The electrodermal response (EDR) of children watching a violent show was measured. Particular attention was paid to the type of violence (actual or implied) that prompted an EDR. In addition, the impact of the auditory component (sounds associated with violence) of the show was evaluated. Implied violent stimuli, such as the villain's face, elicited the strongest EDR. The elements that elicited the weakest responses were the actual violent stimuli, such as stabbing. The background noise and voices of the sound track enhanced the total number of EDRs. The results suggest that implied violence may elicit more fear (as measured by EDRs) than actual violence does and that sounds alone contribute significantly to the emotional response to television violence. One should not, therefore, categorically assume that a show with mostly actual violence evokes less fear than one with mostly implied violence.

  14. 40. Photocopy of plan of the Castillo c. 1779 (Actual ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Photocopy of plan of the Castillo c. 1779 (Actual Negative 4'x5') STAR PLAN, COURTYARD FACADE PROFILE AND DEFENSIVE LINKS - Castillo de San Marcos, 1 Castillo Drive, Saint Augustine, St. Johns County, FL

  15. Multiscale modeling and experimental interpretation of perovskite oxide materials in thermochemical energy storage and conversion for application in concentrating solar power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Kevin J.

    Decarbonization of the electric grid is fundamentally limited by the intermittency of renewable resources such as wind and solar. Therefore, energy storage will play a significant role in the future of grid-scale energy generation to overcome the intermittency issues. For this reason, concentrating solar power (CSP) plants have been a renewable energy generation technology of interest due to their ability to participate in cost effective and efficient thermal energy storage. However, the ability to dynamically dispatch a CSP plant to meet energy demands is currently limited by the large quantities of sensible thermal energy storage material needed in a molten salt plant. Perovskite oxides have been suggested as a thermochemical energy storage material to enhance the energy storage capabilities of particle-based CSP plants, which combine sensible and chemical modes of energy storage. In this dissertation, computational models are used to establish the thermochemical energy storage potential of select perovskite compositions, identify system configurations that promote high values of energy storage and solar-to-electric efficiency, assess the kinetic and transport limitation of the chemical mode of energy storage, and create receiver and reoxidation reactor models capable of aiding in component design. A methodology for determining perovskite thermochemical energy storage potential is developed based on point defect models to represent perovskite non-stoichiometry as a function of temperature and gas phase oxygen partial pressure. The thermodynamic parameters necessary for the model are extracted from non-stoichiometry measurements by fitting the model using an optimization routine. The procedure is demonstrated for Ca0.9Sr0.1MnO 3-d which displayed combined energy storage values of 705.7 kJ/kg -1 by cycling between 773 K and 0.21 bar oxygen to 1173 K and 10 -4 bar oxygen. Thermodynamic system-level models capable of exploiting perovskite redox chemistry for energy

  16. Actuarial and actual analysis of surgical results: empirical validation.

    PubMed

    Grunkemeier, G L; Anderson, R P; Starr, A

    2001-06-01

    This report validates the use of the Kaplan-Meier (actuarial) method of computing survival curves by comparing 12-year estimates published in 1978 with current assessments. It also contrasts cumulative incidence curves, referred to as "actual" analysis in the cardiac-related literature with Kaplan-Meier curves for thromboembolism and demonstrates that with the former estimate the percentage of events that will actually occur.

  17. Experimental Studies of Selected Aqueous Electrochemical Systems Relevant for Materials Processing in the Fabrications of Microelectronic Components and Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingzhao

    A broad range of electrochemical techniques are employed in this dissertation to investigate a selected set of aqueous electrochemical systems that are relevant for materials processing in the fabrication of microelectronic devices and direct alcohol fuel cells. In terms of technical applications, this work covers three main experimental systems: (i) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), (ii) electro-less nickel deposition, and (iii) direct alkaline glycerol fuel cells. The first two areas are related to electronic device fabrications and the third topic is related to cost-effective energy conversion. The common electrochemical aspect of these different systems is that, in all these cases the active material characteristics are governed by complex (often multi-step) reactions occurring at metal-liquid (aqueous) interfaces. Electro-analytical techniques are ideally suited for studying the detailed mechanisms of such reactions, and the present investigation is largely focused on developing adequate analytical strategies for probing these reaction mechanisms. In the fabrication of integrated circuits, certain steps of materials processing involve CMP of Al deposited on thin layers of diffusion barrier materials like Ta/TaN, Co, or Ti/TiN. A specific example of this situation is found in the processing of replacement metal gates used for high-k/metal-gate transistors. Since the commonly used barrier materials are nobler than Al, the Al interface in contact with the barrier can become prone to galvanic corrosion in the wet CMP environment. Using model systems of coupon electrodes and two specific barrier metals, Ta and Co, the electrochemical factors responsible for these corrosion effects are investigated here in a moderately acidic (pH = 4.0) abrasive-free solution. The techniques of cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are combined with strategic measurements of galvanic currents and open circuit potentials (OCPs). L-ascorbic acid (AA) is employed as a

  18. Abrasive Particle Trajectories and Material Removal Non-Uniformity during CMP and Filtration Characteristics of CMP Slurries - A Simulation and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Vahid

    Nanoscale finishing and planarization are integral process steps in multilevel metallization designs for integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing since it is necessary to ensure local and global surface planarization at each metal layer before depositing the next layer. Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) has been widely recognized as the most promising technology to eliminate topographic variation and has allowed the construction of multilevel interconnection structures with a more regularly stacked sequence, resulting in better device performance [1]. Understanding fundamental of the CMP mechanisms can offer guidance to the control and optimization of the polishing processes. CMP kinematics based on slurry distribution and particle trajectories have a significant impact on MRR profiles. In this work a mathematical model to describe particle trajectories during chemical mechanical polishing was developed and extended to account for the effect of larger particles, particle location changes due to slurry dispensing and in-situ conditioning. Material removal rate (MRR) and within wafer non-uniformity (WIWNU) were determined based on the calculated particle trajectory densities. Rotary dynamics and reciprocating motion were optimized to obtain best MRR uniformity. Edge-fast MRR profile was discussed based on mechanical aspect of CMP. Using the model, we also investigated the effect of variable rotational speeds of wafer and pad, and of large particles on WIWNU and scratch growth. It was shown that the presence of even a small portion of large particles can deteriorate the WIWNU significantly and also lead to more scratches. Furthermore, it was shown that the in-situ conditioning improves the uniformity of the polished wafers. Furthermore, a combined experimental and computational study of fibrous filters for removal of larger abrasive particles from aqueous dispersions, essential to minimize defects during chemical mechanical polishing, was performed. Dilute aqueous

  19. The Methodology of Calculation of Cutting Forces When Machining Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, D. A.; Yanyushkin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    Cutting of composite materials has specific features and is different from the processing of metals. When this characteristic intense wear of the cutting tool. An important criterion in the selection process parameters composite processing is the value of the cutting forces, which depends on many factors and is determined experimentally, it is not always appropriate. The study developed a method of determining the cutting forces when machining composite materials and the comparative evaluation of the calculated and actual values of cutting forces. The methodology for calculating cutting forces into account specific features of the cutting tool and the extent of wear, the strength properties of the processed material and cutting conditions. Experimental studies conducted with fiberglass milling cutter equipped with elements of hard metal VK3M. The discrepancy between the estimated and the actual values of the cutting force is not more than 10%.

  20. Experimental simulation of the water cooling of corium spread over the floor of a BWR containment

    SciTech Connect

    Morage, F.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with an experimental investigation of the cooling effect of water collected on the surface of corium released onto the floor of a BWR drywell. In the present experiments, the actual reactor materials were replaced by simulant materials. Specifically, the results are shown for Freon-11 film boiling over liquid Wood`s metal spread above a solid porous surface through which argon gas was injected. An analysis of the obtained experimental data revealed that the actual film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and the water above the pool should be more efficient than predicted by using standard correlations for boiling over solid surfaces. This effect will be further augmented by the gas released due to the ablation of concrete floor beneath the corium and percolating towards its upper surface and into through the water layer above.

  1. Understanding and Predicting the Thermal Explosion Violence of HMX-Based and RDX-Based Explosives - Experimental Measurements of Material Properties and Reaction Violence

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; Weese, R K; Cunningham, B J; Tran, T D

    2002-07-03

    The violence of thermal explosions with energetic materials is affected by many material properties, including mechanical and thermal properties, thermal ignition kinetics, and deflagration behavior. These properties must be characterized for heated samples as well as pristine materials. We present available data for these properties for two HMX-based formulations--LX-04 and PBX-9501, and two RDX-based formulations--Composition B and PBXN-109. We draw upon separately published data on the thermal explosion violence with these materials to compare the material properties with the observed violence. We have the most extensive data on deflagration behavior of these four formulations, and we discuss the correlation of the deflagration data with the violence results. The data reported here may also be used to develop models for application in simulation codes such as ALE3D to calculate and Dredict thermal explosion violence.

  2. How Many Parameters Actually Affect the Mobility of Conjugated Polymers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, Rocco P.; Blom, Paul W. M.; Troisi, Alessandro

    2017-02-01

    We describe charge transport along a polymer chain with a generic theoretical model depending in principle on tens of parameters, reflecting the chemistry of the material. The charge carrier states are obtained from a model Hamiltonian that incorporates different types of disorder and electronic structure (e.g., the difference between homo- and copolymer). The hopping rate between these states is described with a general rate expression, which contains the rates most used in the literature as special cases. We demonstrate that the steady state charge mobility in the limit of low charge density and low field ultimately depends on only two parameters: an effective structural disorder and an effective electron-phonon coupling, weighted by the size of the monomer. The results support the experimental observation [N. I. Craciun, J. Wildeman, and P. W. M. Blom, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 056601 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.056601] that the mobility in a broad range of (polymeric) semiconductors follows a universal behavior, insensitive to the chemical detail.

  3. Progressive Digressions: Home Schooling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Maslow's (1971) theory of primary creativeness is used as the basis for a self-actualization model of education. Examples of how to use the model in creative homeschooling are provided. Key elements include digressive and immersion learning, self-directed learning, and the integration of work and play. Teaching suggestions are provided. (Contains…

  4. A Taxometric Analysis of Actual Internet Sports Gambling Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Julia; LaBrie, Richard A.; Shaffer, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents findings from the first taxometric study of actual gambling behavior to determine whether we can represent the characteristics of extreme gambling as qualitatively distinct (i.e., taxonic) or as a point along a dimension. We analyzed the bets made during a 24-month study period by the 4,595 most involved gamblers among a…

  5. William Brennan and the Failed "Theory" of Actual Malice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillmor, Donald M.

    This paper contains an analysis of Justice William Brennan's Supreme Court opinions concerning cases on freedom of expression and his interpretations of Alexander Meiklejohn's theory of actual malice in cases of libel. Particular attention is paid to Brennan's landmark contribution to the law of libel, his opinion in "New York Times v.…

  6. MLCMS Actual Use, Perceived Use, and Experiences of Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon; Grönlund, Åke

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning involves use of mobile devices to participate in learning activities. Most e-learning activities are available to participants through learning systems such as learning content management systems (LCMS). Due to certain challenges, LCMS are not equally accessible on all mobile devices. This study investigates actual use, perceived…

  7. Venture actualization in nursing. An analysis of innovation.

    PubMed

    Neidlinger, S H; Bartleson, B J; Drews, N; Hukari, D

    1992-01-01

    From innovations shared by nurse executives and nurse intrapreneurs in acute care hospitals, The Venture Actualization in Nursing Model emerged. Derived from a nursing perspective, this model captures the steps of the nurse innovation process, linking the nurse executive and nurse intrapreneur role components to the process that leads to venture success.

  8. Comparison of Actual Surgical Outcomes and 3D Surgical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Scott; Cevidanes, Lucia; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The advent of imaging software programs have proved to be useful for diagnosis, treatment planning, and outcome measurement, but precision of 3D surgical simulation still needs to be tested. This study was conducted to determine if the virtual surgery performed on 3D models constructed from Cone-beam CT (CBCT) can correctly simulate the actual surgical outcome and to validate the ability of this emerging technology to recreate the orthognathic surgery hard tissue movements in 3 translational and 3 rotational planes of space. Methods Construction of pre- and post-surgery 3D models from CBCTs of 14 patients who had combined maxillary advancement and mandibular setback surgery and 6 patients who had one-piece maxillary advancement surgery was performed. The post-surgery and virtually simulated surgery 3D models were registered at the cranial base to quantify differences between simulated and actual surgery models. Hotelling T-test were used to assess the differences between simulated and actual surgical outcomes. Results For all anatomic regions of interest, there was no statistically significant difference between the simulated and the actual surgical models. The right lateral ramus was the only region that showed a statistically significant, but small difference when comparing two- and one-jaw surgeries. Conclusions Virtual surgical methods were reliably reproduced, oral surgery residents could benefit from virtual surgical training, and computer simulation has the potential to increase predictability in the operating room. PMID:20591553

  9. 24 CFR 200.96 - Certificates of actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and... Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Cost Certification § 200.96 Certificates of actual... before final endorsement, except that in the case of an existing project that does not...

  10. 24 CFR 200.96 - Certificates of actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and... Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Cost Certification § 200.96 Certificates of actual... before final endorsement, except that in the case of an existing project that does not...

  11. Computer/PERT technique monitors actual versus allocated costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houry, E.; Walker, J. D.

    1967-01-01

    A computer method measures the users performance in cost-type contracts utilizing the existing nasa program evaluation review technique without imposing any additional reporting requirements. progress is measured by comparing actual costs with a value of work performed in a specific period.

  12. Student Exposure to Actual Patients in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Marie A.; McCall, Charles Y.; Francisco, George E., Jr.; Poirier, Sylvie

    1997-01-01

    Two clinical courses for first-year dental students were designed to develop students' interaction skills through actual patient case presentations and discussions and an interdisciplinary teaching approach. Results indicate students preferred the case presentations, with or without lecture, to the lecture-only approach and felt they learned more…

  13. Fair Equality of Opportunity in Our Actual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Fair equality of opportunity, a principle that governs the competition for desirable jobs, can seem irrelevant in our actual world, for two reasons. First, parents have broad liberty to raise their children as they see fit, which seems to undermine the fair equality of opportunity-based commitment to eliminating the effects of social circumstances…

  14. Actualizing Concepts in Home Management: Proceedings of a National Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Home Economics Association, Washington, DC.

    The booklet prints the following papers delivered at a national conference: Actualizing Concepts in Home Management: Decision Making, Dorothy Z. Price; Innovations in Teaching: Ergonomics, Fern E. Hunt; Relevant Concepts of Home Management: Innovations in Teaching, Kay P. Edwards; Standards in a Managerial Context, Florence S. Walker; Organizing:…

  15. Indentation of Transversely Isotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Talapady Srivatsa

    Instrumented indentation, as a tool for characterization of mechanical properties, has well been established in the past decades. Studies have been conducted to understand the behavior of isotropic materials under indentation and techniques to accurately predict isotropic material properties have also been reported. Further, within the isotropic regime, work has been done to predict the indentation hardness without having to investigate the area of contact during indentation. Studies have also reported the prospect of utilizing indentation to predict the fatigue behavior of isotropic materials. This dissertation is made with the intent of extending the use of indentation, as a characterization tool, to the anisotropic regime. The effect of transverse isotropy on the indentation response of materials is systematically studied here. Extensive computational analysis is performed to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanics of indentation of transversely isotropic materials. Owing to the anisotropy, indentation may be performed parallel or perpendicular to the plane of isotropy of the specimen. It is observed that the indentation response varies significantly for each of these cases. The two cases are treated as unique and an identical systematic analysis is carried for both. The indentation orientations shall henceforth be referred to as transverse and longitudinal indentation for indentation parallel and perpendicular to the plane of isotropy respectively. A technique is developed capable of extracting the elastic-plastic properties of transversely isotropic materials from interpretation of indentation response in either direction. The technique is rigorously tested for its robustness, accuracy and uniqueness of results. A sensitivity analysis is performed to determine how sensitive the technique is to errors in experimental results. Rigorous studies are performed to understand the variation in pile-up or sink-in during indentation with varying anisotropy in the

  16. Experimental attrition rates of bed-material sediment from geologic provinces of Western Oregon and their application to regional sediment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, J.; O'Connor, J. E.; Jones, K. L.; Wallick, R.

    2011-12-01

    Many topographic, hydrologic, and land use variables affect the supply and transport of bed-material in rivers, but the underlying geology is a key factor controlling both the volume of introduced material and the attrition of bed-material as it moves downstream. Recent and ongoing USGS river studies in Western Oregon document strong links between geologic province and bed-material transport. Rivers originating in the Mesozoic metamorphic and intrusive igneous rocks of the Klamath terranes of southwestern Oregon have the greatest gravel transport rates (and channel and valley-bottom morphologies reflecting high bed-material fluxes), whereas the generally lesser amounts of gravel in streams that drain Oregon's Coast Range and western Cascade Range owes in large part to Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units underlying most of these basins. Aspects of these differences are controlled by supply as well as clast attrition. Here we aim to quantify bed-material attrition rates associated with the five main geologic provinces of Western Oregon: the Klamath terranes, Western Cascades, High Cascades, Coast Range sedimentary rocks, and Coast Range volcanic rocks. Bed-material samples were collected throughout the region from streams that drain a single geologic province and tumbled with a lapidary tumbler to determine relative attrition rates. Two kilograms of each sample were sorted into an initial distribution of clast sizes (from 16 to 64mm) and tumbled, with periodic breaks to reweigh and sieve the sample. Results show marked differences in attrition rates, with the sedimentary rocks of the Coast Range having weight loss coefficients between 1.206 and 0.211/km, orders of magnitude greater than all of the other sampled provinces. For comparison, bed material from the Klamath terranes have weight loss coefficients ranging from 0.013 to 0.005/km, and a control sample of quartzite clasts (from the Klamath terranes) has a weight loss coefficient of 0.001/km. These results

  17. Effect of an Experimental Direct Pulp-capping Material on the Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fan; Dong, Yan; Yang, Yan-Wei; Lin, Ping-Ting; Yu, Hao-Han; Sun, Xiang; Sun, Xue-Fei; Zhou, Huan; Huang, Li; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2016-10-04

    Effective pulp-capping materials must have antibacterial properties and induce dentin bridge formation; however, many current materials do not satisfy clinical requirements. Accordingly, the effects of an experiment pulp-capping material (Exp) composed of an antibacterial resin monomer (MAE-DB) and Portland cement (PC) on the viability, adhesion, migration, and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined. Based on a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, hDPSCs exposed to Exp extracts showed limited viability at 24 and 48 h, but displayed comparable viability to the control at 72 h. hDPSC treatment with Exp extracts enhanced cellular adhesion and migration according to in vitro scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. Exp significantly upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. The hDPSCs cultured with Exp exhibited higher ALP activity and calcium deposition in vitro compared with the control group. The novel material showed comparable cytocompatibility to control cells and promoted the adhesion, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, indicating excellent biocompatibility. This new direct pulp-capping material containing MAE-DB and PC shows promise as a potential alternative to conventional materials for direct pulp capping.

  18. Effect of an Experimental Direct Pulp-capping Material on the Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fan; Dong, Yan; Yang, Yan-wei; Lin, Ping-ting; Yu, Hao-han; Sun, Xiang; Sun, Xue-fei; Zhou, Huan; Huang, Li; Chen, Ji-hua

    2016-01-01

    Effective pulp-capping materials must have antibacterial properties and induce dentin bridge formation; however, many current materials do not satisfy clinical requirements. Accordingly, the effects of an experiment pulp-capping material (Exp) composed of an antibacterial resin monomer (MAE-DB) and Portland cement (PC) on the viability, adhesion, migration, and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined. Based on a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, hDPSCs exposed to Exp extracts showed limited viability at 24 and 48 h, but displayed comparable viability to the control at 72 h. hDPSC treatment with Exp extracts enhanced cellular adhesion and migration according to in vitro scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. Exp significantly upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. The hDPSCs cultured with Exp exhibited higher ALP activity and calcium deposition in vitro compared with the control group. The novel material showed comparable cytocompatibility to control cells and promoted the adhesion, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, indicating excellent biocompatibility. This new direct pulp-capping material containing MAE-DB and PC shows promise as a potential alternative to conventional materials for direct pulp capping. PMID:27698421

  19. Effect of an Experimental Direct Pulp-capping Material on the Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fan; Dong, Yan; Yang, Yan-Wei; Lin, Ping-Ting; Yu, Hao-Han; Sun, Xiang; Sun, Xue-Fei; Zhou, Huan; Huang, Li; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Effective pulp-capping materials must have antibacterial properties and induce dentin bridge formation; however, many current materials do not satisfy clinical requirements. Accordingly, the effects of an experiment pulp-capping material (Exp) composed of an antibacterial resin monomer (MAE-DB) and Portland cement (PC) on the viability, adhesion, migration, and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined. Based on a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, hDPSCs exposed to Exp extracts showed limited viability at 24 and 48 h, but displayed comparable viability to the control at 72 h. hDPSC treatment with Exp extracts enhanced cellular adhesion and migration according to in vitro scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. Exp significantly upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. The hDPSCs cultured with Exp exhibited higher ALP activity and calcium deposition in vitro compared with the control group. The novel material showed comparable cytocompatibility to control cells and promoted the adhesion, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, indicating excellent biocompatibility. This new direct pulp-capping material containing MAE-DB and PC shows promise as a potential alternative to conventional materials for direct pulp capping.

  20. Coupled flexural-torsional vibrations of anisotropic bars from polymer composite materials. II - Comparisons of calculated and experimental data for carbon-fiber composite bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekel'Chik, V. S.; Perren, A. A.; Riabov, V. M.; Iartsev, B. A.

    1992-04-01

    A number of primary natural frequencies of flexural and torsional vibrations are determined experimentally for specimens cut from a unidirectional CFRP plate at the angles phi = 0, 90 deg to the reinforcement direction. The flexural and torsional vibration values yielded primary values of elasticity and shear moduli, which were then corrected on the basis of a comparison of the experimental data and theoretical calculations of the frequencies of coupled flexural-torsional vibrations of specimens cut at angles of 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 deg. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental data is obtained, and it is shown that the flexural-torsional interaction must be considered in studying the natural vibrations for specimens whose longitudinal axes do not coincide with the elasticity symmetry axis.

  1. Experimental analysis of the material degradation of PET on a co-rotating twin-screw extruder for varying vacuum pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herken, T.; Fecke, N.; Schöppner, V.

    2015-05-01

    Plastics, starting from inexpensive mass-produced articles to technical high-end applications, are being used in ever more areas of life. The main drivers are their flexible product properties and the resultant broad application possibilities. To be able to offer plastic products inexpensively and conserve the environment at the same time, more and more attention is being paid to plastics recycling. Polyethylene terephthalate - in short PET - is of particular significance here because of its frequent application in the film and packaging industry and its special material properties. The recycling of PET, however, can only be carried out a limited number of times because it's processing necessarily results in both thermal and mechanical stresses on the material. This is the basis for the reactions at molecular level, which result in a shortening of the molecule chains (material degradation) and exert a negative effect on the product properties. The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence the material degradation of PET in twin-screw extrusion. To do this, various screw configurations and different speed and throughput conditions are examined in a series of experiments. Furthermore, material specimens are removed along the length of the screw in order to evaluate the influence of individual screw sections. By determining the intrinsic viscosity of the specimens, it is possible to measure the mean molecular weight and thus the material damage. Based on the test results, guidelines are drawn up for the compounding of PET so as to ensure as little damage as possible to the material.

  2. Experimental analysis of the material degradation of PET on a co-rotating twin-screw extruder for varying vacuum pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Herken, T.; Fecke, N.; Schöppner, V. E-mail: Nikolas.Fecke@ktp.uni-paderborn.de

    2015-05-22

    Plastics, starting from inexpensive mass-produced articles to technical high-end applications, are being used in ever more areas of life. The main drivers are their flexible product properties and the resultant broad application possibilities. To be able to offer plastic products inexpensively and conserve the environment at the same time, more and more attention is being paid to plastics recycling. Polyethylene terephthalate – in short PET – is of particular significance here because of its frequent application in the film and packaging industry and its special material properties. The recycling of PET, however, can only be carried out a limited number of times because it’s processing necessarily results in both thermal and mechanical stresses on the material. This is the basis for the reactions at molecular level, which result in a shortening of the molecule chains (material degradation) and exert a negative effect on the product properties. The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence the material degradation of PET in twin-screw extrusion. To do this, various screw configurations and different speed and throughput conditions are examined in a series of experiments. Furthermore, material specimens are removed along the length of the screw in order to evaluate the influence of individual screw sections. By determining the intrinsic viscosity of the specimens, it is possible to measure the mean molecular weight and thus the material damage. Based on the test results, guidelines are drawn up for the compounding of PET so as to ensure as little damage as possible to the material.

  3. Physico-chemical investigation of clayey/cement-based materials interaction in the context of geological waste disposal: Experimental approach and results

    SciTech Connect

    Dauzeres, A.; Le Bescop, P.; Sardini, P.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.

    2010-08-15

    Within the concepts under study for the geological disposal of intermediate-level long-lived waste, cement-based materials are considered as candidate materials. The clayey surrounding rock and the cement-based material being considered differ greatly in their porewater composition. Experiments are conducted on the diffusion of solutes constituting those porewaters in a confined clay/cement composite system using cells. The test temperature was set at 25 {sup o}C and 2, 6 and 12 months. Results supply new information: carbonation is low and not clog the interface. Such absence of carbonation allows for the diffusion of aqueous species and, thus, for the degradation of the cement paste and the illitisation of illite/smectite interstratifications. The cement material is subjected to a decalcification: portlandite dissolution and a CaO/SiO{sub 2} reduction in the calcium silicate hydrate. The sulphate in diffusion induces non-destructive ettringite precipitation in the largest pores. After 12 months, about 800 {mu}m of cement material is concerned by decalcification.

  4. Apparent and Actual Dynamic Contact Angles in Confined Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Takeshi; Kajishima, Takeo

    2016-11-01

    To accurately predict the fluid flow with moving contact lines, it has a crucial importance to use a model for the dynamic contact angle which gives contact angles on the length scale corresponding to the spacial resolution of the fluid solver. The angle which a moving fluid interface forms to a solid surface deviates from an actual (microscopic) dynamic contact angle depending on the distance from the contact line and should be called an apparent (macroscopic) dynamic contact angle. They were, however, often undistinguished especially in the experimental works, on which a number of empirical correlations between a contact angle and a contact line velocity have been proposed. The present study is the first attempt to measure both apparent and actual contact angles from the identical data sets to discuss the difference and the relationship between these two contact angles of difference length scales. The study is conducted by means of numerical simulation, solving the Navier-Stokes equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation under the generalized Navier boundary condition for the immiscible two-phase flow in channels. The present study also illustrates how the system size and the physical properties of the adjoining fluid affect the apparent and the actual dynamic contact angles. JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 15K17974.

  5. Experimental determination of satellite bolted joints thermal resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantelli, Marcia Barbosa Henriques; Basto, Jose Edson

    1990-01-01

    The thermal resistance was experimentally determined of the bolted joints of the first Brazilian satellite (SCD 01). These joints, used to connect the satellite structural panels, are reproduced in an experimental apparatus, keeping, as much as possible, the actual dimensions and materials. A controlled amount of heat is forced to pass through the joint and the difference of temperature between the panels is measured. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber with liquid nitrogen cooled walls, that simulates the space environment. Experimental procedures are used to avoid much heat losses, which are carefully calculated. Important observations about the behavior of the joint thermal resistance with the variation of the mean temperature are made.

  6. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

  7. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING, D.L.

    2007-04-13

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 2224 Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cesium-137 sulfate and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  8. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING, D.L.

    2006-10-18

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 222-S Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cs-137 sulfate, and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  9. 63. VIEW OF AUTOTRANSFERS. THE ACTUAL AUTOTRANSFERS ARE ENCLOSED IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF AUTOTRANSFERS. THE ACTUAL AUTOTRANSFERS ARE ENCLOSED IN THE OIL FILLED CYLINDERS ON THE RIGHT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THESE ELECTRICAL DEVICES BOOSTED THE GENERATOR OUTPUT OF 11,000 VOLTS TO 22,000 VOLTS PRIOR TO TRANSMISSION OUT TO THE MAIN FEEDER LINES. A SPARE INNER UNIT IS CONTAINED IN THE METAL BOX AT THE LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  10. The actual citation impact of European oncological research.

    PubMed

    López-Illescas, Carmen; de Moya-Anegón, Félix; Moed, Henk F

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the research performance of major European countries in the field Oncology, the most important journals in which they published their research articles, and the most important academic institutions publishing them. The analysis was based on Thomson Scientific's Web of Science (WoS) and calculated bibliometric indicators of publication activity and actual citation impact. Studying the time period 2000-2006, it gives an update of earlier studies, but at the same time it expands their methodologies, using a broader definition of the field, calculating indicators of actual citation impact, and analysing new and policy relevant aspects. Findings suggest that the emergence of Asian countries in the field Oncology has displaced European articles more strongly than articles from the USA; that oncologists who have published their articles in important, more general journals or in journals covering other specialties, rather than in their own specialist journals, have generated a relatively high actual citation impact; and that universities from Germany, and--to a lesser extent--those from Italy, the Netherlands, UK, and Sweden, dominate a ranking of European universities based on number of articles in oncology. The outcomes illustrate that different bibliometric methodologies may lead to different outcomes, and that outcomes should be interpreted with care.

  11. Working memory and acquisition of implicit knowledge by imagery training, without actual task performance.

    PubMed

    Helene, A F; Xavier, G F

    2006-04-28

    This study investigated acquisition of a mirror-reading skill via imagery training, without the actual performance of a mirror-reading task. In experiment I, healthy volunteers simulated writing on an imaginary, transparent screen placed at eye level, which could be read by an experimenter facing the subject. Performance of this irrelevant motor task required the subject to imagine the letters inverted, as if seen in a mirror from their own point of view (imagery training). A second group performed the same imagery training interspersed with a complex, secondary spelling and counting task. A third, control, group simply wrote the words as they would normally appear from their own point of view. After training with 300 words, all subjects were tested in a mirror-reading task using 60 non-words, constructed according to acceptable letter combinations of the Portuguese language. Compared with control subjects, those exposed to imagery training, including those who switched between imagery and the complex task, exhibited shorter reading times in the mirror-reading task. Experiment II employed a 2 x 3 design, including two training conditions (imagery and actual mirror-reading) and three competing task conditions (a spelling and counting switching task, a visual working memory concurrent task, and no concurrent task). Training sessions were interspersed with mirror-reading testing sessions for non-words, allowing evaluation of the mirror-reading acquisition process during training. The subjects exposed to imagery training acquired the mirror-reading skill as quickly as those exposed to the actual mirror-reading task. Further, performance of concurrent tasks together with actual mirror-reading training severely disrupted mirror-reading skill acquisition; this interference effect was not seen in subjects exposed to imagery training and performance of the switching and the concurrent tasks. These results unequivocally show that acquisition of implicit skills by top

  12. Dynamic characterization and modeling of potting materials for electronics assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Lee, Gilbert F.; Santiago, Jaime R.

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling, which in turn needs both static and dynamic characterization of individual electronic components and encapsulation material to generate reliable material parameters for a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, difficulty arises in capturing one of the critical features characteristic of the loading environment in a high velocity impact: multiple loading events coupled with multi-axial stress states. Hence, potting materials need to be characterized well to understand its damping capacity at different frequencies and strain rates. An encapsulation scheme to protect electronic boards consists of multiple layers of filled as well as unfilled polymeric materials like Sylgard 184 and Trigger bond Epoxy # 20-3001. A combination of experiments conducted for characterization of materials used Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB), and dynamic material analyzer (DMA). For material which behaves in an ideal manner, a master curve can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. To verify the applicability of WLF model, a new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor with experimental incremental shift factor. Deviations can be readily observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine if model parameters reflect the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests can readily indicate deviations from experimental high strain rate data. Experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements are presented.

  13. Estimating actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation using standard meteorological data: a pragmatic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, T. A.; Peel, M. C.; Lowe, L.; Srikanthan, R.; McVicar, T. R.

    2012-10-01

    This guide to estimating daily and monthly actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation covers topics that are of interest to researchers, consulting hydrologists and practicing engineers. Topics include estimating actual evaporation from deep lakes and from farm dams and for catchment water balance studies, estimating potential evaporation as input to rainfall-runoff models, and reference crop evapotranspiration for small irrigation areas, and for irrigation within large irrigation districts. Inspiration for this guide arose in response to the authors' experiences in reviewing research papers and consulting reports where estimation of the actual evaporation component in catchment and water balance studies was often inadequately handled. Practical guides using consistent terminology that cover both theory and practice are not readily available. Here we provide such a guide, which is divided into three parts. The first part provides background theory and an outline of conceptual models of potential evaporation of Penman, Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor, and discussions of reference crop evaporation and then Class-A pan evaporation. The last two sub-sections in this first part include techniques to estimate actual evaporation from (i) open-surface water and (ii) landscapes and catchments (Morton and the advection-aridity models). The second part addresses topics confronting a practicing hydrologist, e.g. estimating actual evaporation for deep lakes, shallow lakes and farm dams, lakes covered with vegetation, catchments, irrigation areas and bare soil. The third part addresses six related issues (i) hard-wired evaporation estimates, (ii) evaporation estimates without wind data, (iii) at-site meteorological data, (iv) dealing with evaporation in a climate change environment, (v) 24-h versus day-light hour estimation of meteorological variables, and (vi) uncertainty in evaporation estimates. This paper is supported by supplementary material that includes

  14. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, I. S.; Pegg, I. L.; Rielley, Elizabeth; Carranza, Isidro; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan-Tao T.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Cecil, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  15. Experimental study of the rigidity and transparency to ionizing radiation of composite materials used in the enclosure under pressure of the Micromegas detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbaoui, Imen; Besbes, Hatem; Chafra, Moez

    Innovation in the field of nuclear imaging is necessarily followed by a radical change in the detection principle. The gas detector Micromegas (Mesh Micro Structure Gaseous) could be an interesting option, thanks to the stability and robustness of such a detector. Thus, it was necessary to study the implementation of the detector enclosure in composite materials. The focus of the present study was the robustness and gamma rays transparency of a set of composites. The studied composites were reinforced with vegetable fibers (alfa), and synthetic fibers. The mechanical properties of all composites specimen were evaluated by three-point bending test, whereas, gamma ray transparency was evaluated by the exposition of composites specimen to a mono-energetic gamma ray beam emitted by a Technetium 99-m source. Findings revealed that the biocomposite materials using alfa fiber and Polymethyl Methacrylate matrix are very promising as long as they present good robustness and high gamma ray transparency in diagnostic range.

  16. [Computed tomographic evaluation of the healing of experimental defect of a long bone of the skeleton after implantation into its cavity osteoplastic material "Cerabone®"].

    PubMed

    Korenkov, A V; Sikora, V Z

    2015-01-01

    Described in the literature properties of osteoplastic material "Cerabone®" have been obtained from studies in the maxilla and cancellous bone. The lack of data on the impact of «Cerabone®» on the dynamics of the healing of defects of compact substance of the long bones of the skeleton dictates the need for such studies. Implantation of osteoplastic material «Cerabone ®» was performed into the defect of rat femoral shaft followed by computer-tomographic analysis of its healing. Starting from the 30th day until the end of the experiment (120th day) there were found faint signs of rarefaction in the distal part adjacent to the defect of parent bone, with no signs of bone resorption in its proximal part. There was identified an extremely high density of the implantation site «Cerabone®», no visible radiographic evidence of resorption of osteoplastic material and ensuring by the latter the stability of volume of the defect in cortical bone at all stages of the experiment.

  17. Experimental study and neural network modeling of sugarcane bagasse pretreatment with H2SO4 and O3 for cellulosic material conversion to sugar.

    PubMed

    Gitifar, Vahid; Eslamloueyan, Reza; Sarshar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    In this study, pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis is investigated using two categories of pretreatment methods: dilute acid (DA) pretreatment and combined DA-ozonolysis (DAO) method. Both methods are accomplished at different solid ratios, sulfuric acid concentrations, autoclave residence times, bagasse moisture content, and ozonolysis time. The results show that the DAO pretreatment can significantly increase the production of glucose compared to DA method. Applying k-fold cross validation method, two optimal artificial neural networks (ANNs) are trained for estimations of glucose concentrations for DA and DAO pretreatment methods. Comparing the modeling results with experimental data indicates that the proposed ANNs have good estimation abilities.

  18. Evaluation of Barrier Cable Impact Pad Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    ACTUAL BATCH DATA CU MATERIAL SOLID VOLUME SAT. SURF DRY SAT. . O,- DRY WATER ACT’.AL CU FT/BATCH BATCH WT. LB FACTOR EATCl ,9 CORRECTION. LB 1ATC. -T...POZZDOTHER CEMENT PROPORTIONS CALCULATED BATCH DATA (I CU YO) ACTUAL BATCH CATA CU =T SOLID VOLUME SAT. SURF DRY SAT. 3, DRY WATER MATERIAL CU FT

  19. Flexible Material Systems Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John K.; Shook, Lauren S.; Ware, Joanne S.; Welch, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program has been undertaken to better characterize the stress-strain characteristics of flexible material systems to support a NASA ground test program for inflatable decelerator material technology. A goal of the current study is to investigate experimental methods for the characterization of coated woven material stiffness. This type of experimental mechanics data would eventually be used to define the material inputs of fluid-structure interaction simulation models. The test methodologies chosen for this stress-strain characterization are presented along with the experimental results.

  20. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.